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Sample records for intrinsic sphincter deficiency

  1. Can we, and do we need to, define bladder neck hypermobility and intrinsic sphincteric deficiency? ICI-RS 2011.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, P.P.; Leijsen, S.A.L. van; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Abrams, P.; Smith, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Bladder neck hypermobility (BNH, also called urethral hypermobility), and intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD) are terms frequently used in the clinical evaluation and management of stress urinary incontinence, and as subject qualifiers in clinical research. The terms also infer

  2. Considerations in the modern management of stress urinary incontinence resulting from intrinsic sphincter deficiency.

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    Hillary, Christopher James; Osman, Nadir; Chapple, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD) is a common cause of stress urinary incontinence and is associated with more severe symptoms, often being associated with failed previous surgery. Due to the impaired sphincteric function, alternative surgical approaches are often required. The purpose of this review is to appraise the contemporary literature on the diagnosis and management of ISD. A PubMed search was performed to identify articles published between 1990 and 2014 using the following terms: ISD, stress urinary incontinence and type III stress urinary incontinence. Publications were screened for relevance, and full manuscripts were retrieved. Most studies base the diagnosis of ISD upon urodynamic appearances using recognized criteria (Valsalva leak point pressure <60 cm H2O or a maximum urethral closure pressure <20 cm H2O) in addition to clinical features. A range of non-surgical and surgical treatment options are available for the patient. Pubovaginal slings are more effective than retropubic colposuspensions with outcomes comparable to those reported with midurethral slings. The artificial urinary sphincter provides long-term cure rates; however, it is associated with specific morbidity including device erosion, mechanical failure and revision. The benefits of bulking agents, however, are not sustained beyond 1 year. There are few randomized controlled trials that compare accepted treatments specifically for patients with ISD. The lack of standardization in the definition and diagnostic criteria used limits inter-study comparisons. An assessment of urethral pressure profile when combined with the clinical features may help predict outcomes of surgical intervention.

  3. Comparison of Effectiveness between Tension-Free Vaginal Tape (TVT) and Trans-Obturator Tape (TOT) in Patients with Stress Urinary Incontinence and Intrinsic Sphincter Deficiency.

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    Kim, Hyeong Gon; Park, Hyoung Keun; Paick, Sung Hyun; Choi, Woo Suk

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the two types of mid-urethral slings for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD). This retrospective study included patients who underwent tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure or transobturator tape (TOT) procedure by a single surgeon for SUI with ISD, defined as Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) TVT and 52 patients received TOT. Age, underlying diseases, Stamey grade, cystocele grade, and presence of urge incontinence were not significantly different between the two groups. Urodynamic parameters including maximal urethral closing pressure, detrusor overactivity, VLPP, urethral hypermobility (Q-tip ≥ 30°), were also comparable between the two groups. Success rate was significantly higher in the TVT group than in the TOT group (95.2% vs. 82.7%, p = 0.009). On multivariate analysis, only TOT surgery (OR = 3.922, 95%CI = 1.223-12.582, p = 0.022) was a risk factor for failure following surgical treatment. TVT is more effective than TOT in treatment of female SUI with ISD.

  4. Comparison of Effectiveness between Tension-Free Vaginal Tape (TVT and Trans-Obturator Tape (TOT in Patients with Stress Urinary Incontinence and Intrinsic Sphincter Deficiency.

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    Hyeong Gon Kim

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the two types of mid-urethral slings for stress urinary incontinence (SUI with intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD.This retrospective study included patients who underwent tension-free vaginal tape (TVT procedure or transobturator tape (TOT procedure by a single surgeon for SUI with ISD, defined as Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP < 60 cmH2O in a urodynamic study. Cases of neurogenic bladder, previous SUI surgery, and concomitant cystocele repair were excluded. The primary outcome was treatment success at 12 months, defined by self-reported absence of symptoms, no leakage episodes recorded, and no retreatment.Among the 157 women who were included in the final analysis, 105 patients received TVT and 52 patients received TOT. Age, underlying diseases, Stamey grade, cystocele grade, and presence of urge incontinence were not significantly different between the two groups. Urodynamic parameters including maximal urethral closing pressure, detrusor overactivity, VLPP, urethral hypermobility (Q-tip ≥ 30°, were also comparable between the two groups. Success rate was significantly higher in the TVT group than in the TOT group (95.2% vs. 82.7%, p = 0.009. On multivariate analysis, only TOT surgery (OR = 3.922, 95%CI = 1.223-12.582, p = 0.022 was a risk factor for failure following surgical treatment.TVT is more effective than TOT in treatment of female SUI with ISD.

  5. [Initial results of adjustable periurethral balloons (ACT™ and pro ACT™) in the treatment of adult stress urinary incontinence with intrinsic sphincter deficiency].

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    Kaboré, F-A; Gaillet, S; Blanc, J; Boissier, R; Aurier, K Lenne; Delaporte, V; Coulange, C; Lechevallier, E; Karsenty, G

    2014-12-01

    To report efficacy and morbidity of periurethral adjustable balloons (PUAB) in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD). Retrospective descriptive and analytic patients cohort study was performed from July 2010 to June 2012. We reviewed data from 43 patients (19 women and 24 men). The patients were categorized into 3 groups: i) women, ii) men after prostatectomy, iii) men with neurogenic SUI (prostate in position). Sandvick score and the average of 3 days 24 h Pad test evaluated the efficacy of the device. The patients impression of improvement was assessed in three degrees: completely improved, partially improved, not improved. After a median follow-up of 67 weeks (min. 40, max. 91) a significant improvement of the score of Sandvik was observed (8 to 4, P<0.005). The proportion of dry patients or with one security protection in the three groups was 57.9%, 64.3% and 50% respectively for women, men after prostatectomy, and men with neurological SUI. About 27.9% (12/43) of the patients had post-operative complications. These complications required an explantation of the PUAB in 11/12 patients among whom 7/11 (63.6%) had a delayed re-implantation of the device. In this series, the overall efficacy observed was 67.4% with a post-operative complication rate of 27.9%. The device adjustment was done in consultation as well as the complications management and the explantation when necessary. 4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Surgery for stress urinary incontinence due to presumed sphincter deficiency after prostate surgery.

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    Silva, Laercio A; Andriolo, Régis B; Atallah, Álvaro N; da Silva, Edina M K

    2014-09-27

    Incontinence after prostatectomy for benign or malignant disease is a well-known and often a feared outcome. Although small degrees of incidental incontinence may go virtually unnoticed, larger degrees of incontinence can have a major impact on a man's quality of life.Conceptually, post-prostatectomy incontinence may be caused by sphincter malfunction or bladder dysfunction, or both. Most men with post-prostatectomy incontinence (60% to 100%) have stress urinary incontinence, which is involuntary urinary leakage on effort or exertion, or on sneezing or coughing. This may be due to intrinsic sphincter deficiency and may be treated with surgery for optimal management of incontinence. Detrusor dysfunction is more common after surgery for benign prostatic disease. To determine the effects of surgical treatment for urinary incontinence related to presumed sphincter deficiency after prostate surgery for:- men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) - transurethral resection of prostate (TURP), photo vaporisation of the prostate, laser enucleation of the prostate or open prostatectomy - and- men with prostate cancer - radical prostatectomy (retropubic, perineal, laparoscopic, or robotic). We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register, which contains trials identified from Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, MEDLINE in process, ClinicalTrials.gov, and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings (searched 31 March 2014); MEDLINE (January 1966 to April 2014); EMBASE (January 1988 to April 2014); and LILACS (January 1982 to April 2014). We handsearched the reference lists of relevant articles and conference proceedings. We contacted investigators to locate studies. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials that include surgical treatments of urinary incontinence after prostate surgery. Two authors independently screened the trials identified, appraised quality of papers

  7. Development of a rabbit's urethral sphincter deficiency animal model for anatomical-functional evaluation

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    M. Skaff

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to develop a new durable animal model (using rabbits for anatomical-functional evaluation of urethral sphincter deficiency. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 40 New Zealand male rabbits, weighting 2.500 kg to 3.100 kg, were evaluated to develop an incontinent animal model. Thirty-two animals underwent urethrolysis and 8 animals received sham operation. Before and at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after urethrolysis or sham operation, it was performed cystometry and leak point pressure (LPP evaluation with different bladder distension volumes (10, 20, 30 mL. In each time point, 10 animals (8 from the study group and 2 from the sham group were sacrificed to harvest the bladder and urethra. The samples were evaluated by H&E and Masson's Trichrome to determine urethral morphology and collagen/smooth muscle density. RESULTS: Twelve weeks after urethrolysis, it was observed a significant decrease in LPP regardless the bladder volume (from 33.7 ± 6.6 to 12.8 ± 2.2 cmH2O. The histological analysis evidenced a decrease of 22% in smooth muscle density with a proportional increase in the collagen, vessels and elastin density (p < 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Transabdominal urethrolysis develops urethral sphincter insufficiency in rabbits, with significant decrease in LPP associated with decrease of smooth muscle fibers and increase of collagen density. This animal model can be used to test autologous cell therapy for stress urinary incontinence treatment.

  8. Usefulness of Latent Iron Deficiency Correction in the Management of Schoolchildren with Gallbladder and Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction

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    YU.V. MARUSHKO

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rates of iron deficiency (ID remain high among children in Ukraine. ID contributes to burdened gastrointestinal pathology in children and adolescents, but evaluation of the impact of ID correction on the biliary tract dysfunction course is currently lacking. The objective was to determine the impact of latent ID correction on the clinical course of gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (GSOD and iron status in schoolchildren. Materials and methods. A case-control study was conducted in 60 children aged 9–17 years, who had been undergoing the in-patient treatment for GSOD exacerbation and had latent ID. Children were divided into 2 groups: I — 30 patients treated with iron supplementation (50 mg elemental iron daily for 125 days; II — 30 children having no iron supplementation. The study of anamnesis, clinical examination, complete blood count, determination of serum iron, transferrin saturation calculation, hair microelement profile evaluation, follow-up for 12 month were performed. Results. The study found that the use of iron supplement in children with GSOD and latent ID not only compensates ID in them, but also facilitates the GSOD course lowering the incidence of GSOD exacerbations by 30.7 %. Conclusions. Latent ID correction with combined iron, copper and manganese gluconate supplement facilitates the clinical course of GSOD and improves iron status in schoolchildren.

  9. Inflatable artificial sphincter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... procedures to treat urine leakage and incontinence include: Anterior vaginal wall repair Urethral bulking with artificial material ... urinary incontinence Images Inflatable artificial sphincter Anal sphincter anatomy Inflatable artificial sphincter - series References Adams MC, Joseph ...

  10. Dust-deficient Palomar-Green Quasars and the Diversity of AGN Intrinsic IR Emission

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    Lyu, Jianwei; Rieke, G. H. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Shi, Yong, E-mail: jianwei@email.arizona.edu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2017-02-01

    To elucidate the intrinsic broadband infrared (IR) emission properties of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we analyze the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 87 z ≲ 0.5 Palomar-Green (PG) quasars. While the Elvis AGN template with a moderate far-IR correction can reasonably match the SEDs of the AGN components in ∼60% of the sample (and is superior to alternatives such as that by Assef), it fails on two quasar populations: (1) hot-dust-deficient (HDD) quasars that show very weak emission thoroughly from the near-IR to the far-IR, and (2) warm-dust-deficient (WDD) quasars that have similar hot dust emission as normal quasars but are relatively faint in the mid- and far-IR. After building composite AGN templates for these dust-deficient quasars, we successfully fit the 0.3–500 μm SEDs of the PG sample with the appropriate AGN template, an infrared template of a star-forming galaxy, and a host galaxy stellar template. 20 HDD and 12 WDD quasars are identified from the SED decomposition, including seven ambiguous cases. Compared with normal quasars, the HDD quasars have AGNs with relatively low Eddington ratios and the fraction of WDD quasars increases with AGN luminosity. Moreover, both the HDD and WDD quasar populations show relatively stronger mid-IR silicate emission. Virtually identical SED properties are also found in some quasars from z = 0.5 to 6. We propose a conceptual model to demonstrate that the observed dust deficiency of quasars can result from a change of structures of the circumnuclear tori that can occur at any cosmic epoch.

  11. [Sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia].

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    Allescher, H-D

    2015-06-01

    Sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia is a functional disorder of the papillary region which can lead to clinical symptoms due to functional obstruction of biliary and pancreatic outflow. Based on the severity of the clinical symptoms the disorder can be graded into three types (biliary and pancreatic types I-III). The manometric diagnosis of this disorder using sphincter of Oddi manometry is hampered by the relatively high risk of pancreatitis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Although papillary manometry is often carried out in North America, in Europe this is the exception rather than the rule. Manometrically, sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia is characterized by an increased pressure in the biliary and/or the pancreatic sphincter segments and can be treated by endoscopic papillotomy. This overview counterbalances the arguments for primary invasive diagnostics and a pragmatic clinical approach, i.e. papillotomy should be directly carried out when a sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia is clinically suspected. For patients with biliary or pancreatic type I, endoscopic papillotomy is the treatment of choice. In biliary type II sphincter of Oddi manometry could be helpful for clinical decision-making; however, the exact risk-benefit ratio is still difficult to assess. In type III patient selection and the low predictive value of manometry for treatment success questions the clinical usefulness of sphincter of Oddi manometry.

  12. Obstetric anal sphincter injuries

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    Remon Keriakos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Obstetric anal sphincter injuries can be associated with significant short and long term consequences causing devastating impacts on the quality of lives of young, otherwise healthy women. The major consequence is anal incontinence which may be short or long term and vary in severity. The other consequences include pain, infection, dyspareunia and sexual dysfunction. This may in turn result in considerable economic burden to health care providers and patients. It also has an implication on future deliveries. Although it can never be eliminated, it can be reduced by improving practice, training and provision of high quality multidisciplinary care in order to reduce long-term morbidity. Obstetric anal sphincter injuries are also a source of litigation which can be distressing to both patients and clinicians. The aim of this review article is to explore the available evidence on epidemiology, strategies for preventions, prognosis and also how to deal with governance issues.

  13. Effect of Dystrophin Deficiency on Selected Intrinsic Laryngeal Muscles of the "mdx" Mouse

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    Fry, Lisa T.; Stemple, Joseph C.; Andreatta, Richard D.; Harrison, Anne L.; Andrade, Francisco H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Intrinsic laryngeal muscles (ILM) show biological differences from the broader class of skeletal muscles. Yet most research regarding ILM specialization has been completed on a few muscles, most notably the thyroarytenoid and posterior cricoarytenoid. Little information exists regarding the biology of other ILM. Early evidence suggests…

  14. C6 deficiency does not alter intrinsic regeneration speed after peripheral nerve crush injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sta, M.; Cappaert, N. L. M.; Ramekers, D.; Ramaglia, V.; Wadman, W. J.; Baas, F.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury leads to Wallerian degeneration, followed by regeneration, in which functionality and morphology of the nerve are restored. We previously described that deficiency for complement component C6, which prevents formation of the membrane attack complex, slows down degeneration

  15. Mice deficient of glutamatergic signaling from intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells exhibit abnormal circadian photoentrainment.

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    Nicole Purrier

    Full Text Available Several aspects of behavior and physiology, such as sleep and wakefulness, blood pressure, body temperature, and hormone secretion exhibit daily oscillations known as circadian rhythms. These circadian rhythms are orchestrated by an intrinsic biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN of the hypothalamus which is adjusted to the daily environmental cycles of day and night by the process of photoentrainment. In mammals, the neuronal signal for photoentrainment arises from a small subset of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs that send a direct projection to the SCN. ipRGCs also mediate other non-image-forming (NIF visual responses such as negative masking of locomotor activity by light, and the pupillary light reflex (PLR via co-release of neurotransmitters glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP from their synaptic terminals. The relative contribution of each neurotransmitter system for the circadian photoentrainment and other NIF visual responses is still unresolved. We investigated the role of glutamatergic neurotransmission for circadian photoentrainment and NIF behaviors by selective ablation of ipRGC glutamatergic synaptic transmission in mice. Mutant mice displayed delayed re-entrainment to a 6 h phase shift (advance or delay in the light cycle and incomplete photoentrainment in a symmetrical skeleton photoperiod regimen (1 h light pulses between 11 h dark periods. Circadian rhythmicity in constant darkness also was reduced in some mutant mice. Other NIF responses such as the PLR and negative masking responses to light were also partially attenuated. Overall, these results suggest that glutamate from ipRGCs drives circadian photoentrainment and negative masking responses to light.

  16. Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction

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    ... Volvulus Rare Diseases Abdominal Adhesions Anal Fistulas Celiac Disease Clostridium Difficile Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID) Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis Diverticula, Diverticulosis, Diverticulitis: What's the Difference? Nuts, Seeds, ...

  17. Laparoscopic implantation of artificial urinary sphincter: An option for treating recurrent female urinary incontinence.

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    Baldissera-Aradas, J V; Rodríguez-Villamil, L; González-Rodríguez, I; Gil-Ugarteburu, R; Fernández-Pello-Montes, S; Mosquera-Madera, J

    2016-01-01

    The failure rate for anti-incontinence surgery ranges from 5% to 80%. There is not actual consensus on the use of artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) as treatment for recurrent urinary incontinence in women. Several authors have shown that AUS can be useful, if the intrinsic sphincteric deficiency is checked. We present the first case in Spain, to our knowledge, of laparoscopic implantation of AUS as treatment for female recurrent urinary incontinence. Under general anaesthesia, patient was placed in supine decubitus with slight Trendelenburg, access to the vagina was verified. Through a transperitoneal pelvic laparoscopic approach, Retzius space was opened and then the laterovaginal spaces up to the endopelvic fascia. To facilitate the dissection of the bladder neck, we inserted a swab into the vagina, performing simultaneous traction and countertraction manoeuvres. As an access port for the AUS, we widened the incision of the lower trocar. We adjusted the periurethral cuff and then placed the reservoir and the pump in the laterovesical space and the labia majora of the vulva, respectively. Lastly, we connected the 3 AUS elements and peritoneum was closed to isolate AUS from the intestine. The surgical time was 92min, the estimated blood loss was <100cc(3) and the hospital stay was 48h. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The AUS was activated at 6 weeks. At 24 months, patient managed the AUS adequately and total continence was achieved. Laparoscopic implantation of AUS is a feasible technique. Transvaginal traction and countertraction manoeuvres can prevent intraoperative lesions. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Early discharge after external anal sphincter repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to describe an accelerated-stay program for repair of the external anal sphincter. METHODS: Twenty consecutive patients undergoing overlapping repair of the external anal sphincter were included in the study. Effect parameters were length of hospitalization....... CONCLUSION: We have described a safe accelerated-stay program (24 to 48 hours) for overlapping repair of external anal sphincter....

  19. Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction produces acute pancreatitis in the possum

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, J; Thomas, A; Woods, C; Schloithe, A; Toouli, J; Saccone, G

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction has been implicated as a cause of various forms of acute pancreatitis. However, there is no direct evidence to show that sphincter of Oddi dysfunction can cause obstruction of trans-sphincteric flow resulting in acute pancreatitis.
AIMS—To determine if induced sphincter of Oddi spasm can produce trans-sphincteric obstruction and, in combination with stimulated pancreatic secretion, induce acute pancreatitis.
METHODS—In anaesthetised possums, the pancre...

  20. ANAL SPHINCTER INJURIES (OASIS AT DELIVERY

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    Katja Jakopič

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anal incontinence severely impairs quality of life. It affects 4 to 19 % of women and is statistically related to number of vaginal deliveries. It is grossly underreported and most patients that do seek help are referred to gastroenterologists or colorectal surgeons. Incidence of recognized sphincter injuries at time of delivery is 1 to 2 %. However studies with anal ultrasound showed incidence of anal sphincter injuries at 28 to 41 %. Depending on the degree of injury symptoms range from partial to complete inability to control passing of winds, liquid or solid stools. About three thirds of patients are asymp- tomatic in puerperium, however half of them are at risk of developing anal incontinence in later life. Hypoestrogenisem, additional perineal trauma during consequent deliveries and sphincter atrophy can unmask anal sphincter damage years later. Timely recognition and treatment are vital for good long term results and quality of life, if possible immediately after delivery. Good knowledge of perineal anatomy, recognition of risk factors, intense search and appropriate treatment and follow-up are essential to management of anal sphincter injuries. All secondary sphincter repair is less effective. Content: Updated overview of current opinion and guidelines on anal sphincter injuries are pre- sented. Anal sphincter is composed of external anal sphincter (EAS and internal anal sphincter (IAS. Striated EAS is divided into three parts – subcutaneous, superficial, deep, and con- nected to puborectalis muscle posteriorly. Smooth-muscled IAS is a continuation of a cir- cular smooth-muscle layer of rectum. In between there is a thin longitudinal muscle layer. IAS constitutes 70 % of resting tone and is under constant contraction. EAS contributes to 30 % of resting tone and almost all pressure during active contraction. EAS injury leads to insufficient contraction after rectal sampling and filling which causes urgency – patient can

  1. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  2. Simultaneous penile prosthesis and male sling/artificial urinary sphincter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dominic; Romero, Claudio; Alba, Frances; Westney, O Lenaine; Wang, Run

    2013-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) from urethral sphincteric deficiency is not an uncommon problem. The commonest etiology is intervention for localized prostate cancer and/or radical cystoprostatectomy for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Despite advances in surgical technology with robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy and nerve sparing techniques, the rates of ED and SUI remain relatively unchanged. They both impact greatly on quality of life domains and have been associated with poor performance outcomes. Both the artificial urinary sphincter and penile prosthesis are gold standard treatments with proven efficacy, satisfaction and durability for end-stage SUI and ED respectively. Simultaneous prosthesis implantation for concurrent conditions has been well described, mostly in small retrospective series. The uptake of combination surgery has been slow due in part to technical demands of the surgery and to an extent, a heightened anxiety over potential complications. This paper aims to discuss the technical aspect of concurrent surgery for both disease entity and the current published outcomes of the various surgical techniques with this approach. PMID:23202702

  3. Evaluation of the anorectal sphincter using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohda, Ehiichi

    1994-01-01

    Until now the evaluation of how to function on the sphincter muscle complex on the imaging study has been done by defecography. The purpose of this paper is to show the normal and abnormal functions of sphincter muscle complex at rest and squeeze using MRI. The subjects were 15 volunteers with informed consent and 13 post operative patients with a history anorectal anomalies. MR images were obtained with a 1.5 T unit. Sagittal and axial planes were evaluated both at rest and squeeze. Squeeze was simulated by insufflating a rectal balloon or enema on the volunteers. Only light stimulation was stressed on the post operative patients by means of balloon insufflation with 50 ml air. Under balloon stimulation, 71% of normal sphincter muscle complexes contracted only transverse dimention. The rest was as is. None revealed significant distension. All patients with continence demonstrated the same transverse contraction. Patients with incontinence showed no significant contraction. Under enema stimulation for normal subjects, sphincter muscle complex distended on both dimensions. Gluteal muscle contracted 50% of volunteers under enema stimulation. All post operative patients with continence demonstrated gluteal muscles contractions. Normal sphincter muscle complex contracts only in transverse dimension under balloon stimulation, which is caused by the muscle. Under enema stimulation, it distends on both dimensions. Gluteal muscle contract only under enema stimulation. In post operative patients, MRI shows different functions of anal sphincter muscle complex between continent and incontinent groups. It may explain causes of incontinence. The gluteal muscle and puborectal muscle seem to have one of the essentials for continence. (author)

  4. Fiber types in the striated urethral and anal sphincters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D; Reske-Nielsen, E

    1983-01-01

    Seven normal human striated urethral and anal sphincters obtained by autopsy were examined using histochemical techniques. In both the urethral sphincter and the subcutaneous (s.c.) and superficial part of the anal sphincter a characteristic pattern with two populations of muscle fibers, abundant...

  5. Regional and genotypic differences in intrinsic electrophysiological properties of cerebellar Purkinje neurons from wild-type and dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Wanda M; Anderson, Judy E; Fry, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar subregions are recognized as having specialized roles, with lateral cerebellum considered crucial for cognitive processing, whereas vermal cerebellum is more strongly associated with motor control. In human Duchenne muscular dystrophy, loss of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin is thought to cause impairments in cognition, including learning and memory. Previous studies demonstrate that loss of dystrophin causes dysfunctional signaling at γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synapses on Purkinje neurons, presumably by destabilization of GABAA receptors. However, potential differences in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of Purkinje neurons, including membrane potential and action potential firing rates, have not been investigated. Here, using a 2×2 analysis of variance (ANOVA) experimental design, we employed patch clamp analysis to compare membrane properties and action potentials generated by acutely dissociated Purkinje neurons from vermal and lateral cerebellum in wild-type (WT) mice and mdx dystrophin-deficient mice. Compared to Purkinje neurons from WT mice, neurons from mdx mice exhibited more irregular action potential firing and a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential. Firing frequency was also lower in Purkinje neurons from the lateral cerebellum of mdx mice relative to those from WT mice. Several action potential waveform parameters differed between vermal and lateral Purkinje neurons, irrespective of dystrophin status, including action potential amplitude, slope (both larger in the vermal region), and duration (shorter in the vermal region). Moreover, the membrane potential of Purkinje neurons from the vermal region of WT mice exhibited a significant hyperpolarization and concurrent reduction in the frequency of spontaneous action potentials compared to Purkinje neurons from the lateral region. This regional hyperpolarization and reduction in spontaneous action potential frequency was abolished in mdx mice. These results from mice

  6. Incontinence after primary repair of obstetric anal sphincter tears is related to relative length of reconstructed external sphincter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norderval, S; Røssaak, K.; Markskog, A

    2012-01-01

    To determine if anatomic primary repair with end-to-end reconstruction of the external anal sphincter (EAS) in its full length combined with separate repair of coexisting internal anal sphincter (IAS) tear, when present, results in less incontinence and better anal sphincter integrity compared wi...

  7. Clinical role of a modified seton technique for the treatment of trans-sphincteric and supra-sphincteric anal fistulas.

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    Tokunaga, Yukihiko; Sasaki, Hirokazu; Saito, Tohru

    2013-03-01

    We have devised a modified seton technique that resects the external fistula tract while preserving the anal sphincter muscle. This study assessed the technique when used for the management of complex anal fistulas. Between January 2006 and December 2007, 239 patients (208 males and 31 females, median age: 41 years) underwent surgery for complex anal fistulas using the technique. Of the 239 patients, 198 patients had trans-sphincteric fistula and 41 patients had supra-sphincteric fistula. The durations of the surgeries were 17 min (47, 13) [median (range, interquartile range)] for trans-sphincteric fistulas and 38 (44, 16) for supra-sphincteric fistulas. The durations of the surgeries were significantly (P supra-sphincteric fistula than trans-sphincteric fistula. The hospital stays were 4 (13, 2) days and 5 (14, 3) days, respectively, for trans- and supra-sphincteric fistulas. The durations of seton placement until the spontaneous dropping of the seton were 42 (121, 48) and 141 (171, 55) days respectively. The recurrence rate was 0 % in patients with trans-sphincteric fistulas and 4.9 % (2 of 41) in patients with supra-sphincteric fistulas (P < 0.01). Serious incontinence was not observed. The technique provided favorable results for the treatment of complex anal fistulas and could be safely applied while preserving the sphincter function and conserving fecal continence.

  8. Risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter ruptures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jangö, Hanna; Langhoff-Roos, J; Rosthøj, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Jangö H, Langhoff-Roos J, Rosthøj S, Sakse A. Risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter ruptures: a population-based cohort study. BJOG 2012;00:000-000 DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2012.03486.x. Objective  To determine the incidence and risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter...... rupture (ASR). Design  Population-based retrospective cohort study. Setting  Data were taken from the National Medical Birth Registry, Denmark. Population  Patients with a first and a second vaginal delivery in the time period 1997-2010. Methods  Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression...... were used to determine risk factors of recurrent ASR. Main outcome measures  The incidence of recurrent ASR and odds ratios for possible risk factors of recurrent ASR: age, body mass index, grade of ASR, birthweight, head circumference, gestational age, presentation, induction of labour, oxytocin...

  9. Anal sphincter responses after perianal electrical stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ejnar; Klemar, B; Schrøder, H D

    1982-01-01

    not fatigued by repeated stimulation, were most dependent on placement of stimulating and recording electrodes, and always had a higher threshold than the third response. The third response was constantly present in normal subjects. It had the longest EMG response and the latency decreased with increasing......By perianal electrical stimulation and EMG recording from the external anal sphincter three responses were found with latencies of 2-8, 13-18 and 30-60 ms, respectively. The two first responses were recorded in most cases. They were characterised by constant latency and uniform pattern, were...

  10. Sphincter Saving Surgery in Low Rectal Carcinoma in a Resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgery is the principal modality of treatment of rectal carcinoma in order to achieve cure. Sphincter saving surgery improves the quality of life of patients with low rectal carcinoma. Aim: To report a case of sphincter saving low anterior resection for low rectal cancer with hand sown colorectal anastomosis

  11. Anal sphincter complex: endoanal MR imaging of normal anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussain, S. M.; Stoker, J.; Laméris, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    To determine the normal anatomy of the anal sphincter complex on magnetic resonance (MR) images. Ten healthy volunteers (four men, six women; age range, 21-26 years) underwent MR imaging with an endoanal coil. The lower part of the anal canal contained the internal sphincter, the longitudinal muscle

  12. Effect of endorectal pullthrough on external anal sphincter integrity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tissue during dissection. Anal sphincter electromyography. (EMG) is an indispensable parameter for the diagnosis of patients with any anorectal dysfunction. The aim of our study was to assess the integrity of the anorectal sphincter after transanal endorectal pullthrough using anal EMG. Methods This prospective study was ...

  13. Intrinsic Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    the activity. There has been very little research and theorizing which considers the topic of intrinsic motivation , yet there is a substantial amount...reported within the framework of intrinsic motivation , yet the paper reinterprets the work within that framework. It considers several approaches of

  14. Optimization of the artificial urinary sphincter: modelling and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marti, Florian; Leippold, Thomas; John, Hubert; Blunschi, Nadine; Mueller, Bert

    2006-01-01

    The artificial urinary sphincter should be long enough to prevent strangulation effects of the urethral tissue and short enough to avoid the improper dissection of the surrounding tissue. To optimize the sphincter length, the empirical three-parameter urethra compression model is proposed based on the mechanical properties of the urethra: wall pressure, tissue response rim force and sphincter periphery length. In vitro studies using explanted animal or human urethras and different artificial sphincters demonstrate its applicability. The pressure of the sphincter to close the urethra is shown to be a linear function of the bladder pressure. The force to close the urethra depends on the sphincter length linearly. Human urethras display the same dependences as the urethras of pig, dog, sheep and calf. Quantitatively, however, sow urethras resemble best the human ones. For the human urethras, the mean wall pressure corresponds to (-12.6 ± 0.9) cmH 2 O and (-8.7 ± 1.1) cmH 2 O, the rim length to (3.0 ± 0.3) mm and (5.1 ± 0.3) mm and the rim force to (60 ± 20) mN and (100 ± 20) mN for urethra opening and closing, respectively. Assuming an intravesical pressure of 40 cmH 2 O, and an external pressure on the urethra of 60 cmH 2 O, the model leads to the optimized sphincter length of (17.3 ± 3.8) mm

  15. Anal sphincter injury in vaginal deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehir, Mark P; Rubeo, Zachary; Flood, Karen; Mardy, Anne H; O'Herlihy, Colm; Boylan, Peter C; D'Alton, Mary E

    2018-03-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency that occurs in 0.2-3% of all cephalic vaginal deliveries. We hypothesized that because of the difficult nature of deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia, the condition may be associated with anal sphincter injury. We sought to identify risk factors for obstetric anal sphincter injury in women with shoulder dystocia. This retrospective analysis included all cases of shoulder dystocia from 2007 to 2011 at two large tertiary referral centers, in the USA and Ireland. Details of maternal demographics, intrapartum characteristics, and delivery outcomes in cases of shoulder dystocia were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to describe the association between shoulder dystocia and anal sphincter injury. There were 685 cases of shoulder dystocia, and the rate of shoulder dystocia was similar at both institutions. The incidence of anal sphincter injury was 8.8% (60 out of 685). The rate was 14% (45 out of 324) in nulliparas and 4.2% (15 out of 361) in multiparas. Women with sphincter injury were more likely to be nulliparous (75% [45 out of 60] vs 45% [279 out of 625]; p shoulder dystocia, the risk of anal sphincter injury is 9%. Risk factors include nulliparity, operative vaginal delivery, and use of internal maneuvers, whereas episiotomy was found to have a protective effect against anal sphincter injury during cases of shoulder dystocia.

  16. ANAL INCONTINENCE AFTER UNRECOGNISED ANAL SPHINCTER TEAR AT VAGINAL DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mija Blaganje

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anal sphincter tears during vaginal delivery may result in serious sequel. Anal sphincter tears occur in approximately 2–19 % of all vaginal deliveries and are the most common precursor for faecal incontinence,1 however »occult« anal sphincter injury has been defined in 33 % of primiparous women following vaginal delivery.2 Methods: 31-year old primiparous woman received transfusion due to atony after delivery. Episiotomy, second degree perineal tear and vaginal tear were surgically corrected immediately after delivery. In the following days inability to control passing of liquid stools and flatulence together with stress urinary incontinence appeared. The complaint persisted. Ultrasound and EMG examination confirmed rupture of the external anal sphincter, which had been missed at delivery. Over a year after delivery the patient had a posterior colporraphy with surgical correction of external anal sphincter, which did not result in any clinical improve- ment. On follow-up ultrasound examination a hypoechoegenic area between the external sphincter and vaginal wall was detected. The patient was referred to The University Hos- pital in Graz, where the tear will be treated with autologous myoblast transplantation in a clinical trial. Conclusions: Treatment of a missed anal sphincter tear is complicated, expensive and unpleasant for the patient. Early detection with immediate appropriate surgical correction after delivery is most efficient, but it takes experience.

  17. Early discharge after external anal sphincter repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    and complications within 30 days after the operation. Surgery was performed during the period of March 1993 to May 1997. The accelerated-stay program included preoperative information, no premedication, a surgical procedure without colostomy, single-dose prophylactic antibiotics, paracetamol for analgesia, free...... oral fluid and food immediately after the operation supplemented by laxatives, and enforced mobilization. Follow-up by questionnaire was performed at a median of 14 (range, 4-52) months after the operation. RESULTS: Median hospital stay was one day. Fifteen patients were discharged the day after...... surgery and 5 patients stayed for 48 hours after the operation. There was no 30-day morbidity, and no patient received a colostomy in conjunction with the sphincter repair. Fourteen of 19 patients available for follow-up reported a significantly improved functional result compared with preoperative state...

  18. Long-term anal incontinence after obstetric anal sphincter injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jangö, Hanna; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anal incontinence is a major concern following delivery with obstetric anal sphincter injury and has been related to the degree of sphincter tear. OBJECTIVES: To 1) evaluate whether women with a fourth degree obstetric anal sphincter injury in the first delivery have an increased risk...... of long-term anal- and fecal incontinence after a second delivery and 2) assess the impact of mode of second delivery on anal incontinence and related symptoms in these patients. STUDY DESIGN: We performed secondary analyses of a national questionnaire study in all Danish women with an obstetric anal...... performed uni- and multivariable logistic regression analyses to evaluate the outcomes. RESULTS: In total, 2,008 patients had an obstetric anal sphincter injury of which 12.2% (n=245) had a fourth degree tear in the first delivery. The median follow-up time since the first delivery with OASIS was 11.6 years...

  19. Anal sphincter EMG in the diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, K; Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Løkkegaard, Annemette

    2010-01-01

    The role of electromyography (EMG) recorded from the external anal sphincter (EAS) in the diagnosis of atypical parkinsonian syndromes is a matter for continuous debate. Most studies addressing this issue are retrospective.......The role of electromyography (EMG) recorded from the external anal sphincter (EAS) in the diagnosis of atypical parkinsonian syndromes is a matter for continuous debate. Most studies addressing this issue are retrospective....

  20. Radiology of the AS 800 artificial urinary sphincter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, S.; Shetty, M.K.; Flood, H.D.; Grainger, R.

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen adult male patients who had an AS 800 artificial urinary sphincter inserted are reviewed. Five have had malfunction, and in four the causes were diagnosed radiologically. These included: fistula formation, leakage of hydraulic fluid, air in the system, and inadequate deflation of the cuff. Since the sphincter is filled with contrast medium, it is ideally suited to radiological assessment. (author). 5 refs.; 6 figs

  1. Artificial urinary sphincter for post-prostatectomy incontinence: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Mary H; McCammon, Kurt A

    2014-06-01

    The artificial urinary sphincter remains the gold standard for treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. The AMS 800 (American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, MN, USA) is the most commonly implanted artificial urinary sphincter. Having been on the market for almost 40 years, there is an abundance of literature regarding its use, but no recent review has been published. We reviewed the current literature regarding the indications, surgical principles, outcomes and complications of artificial urinary sphincter implantation for stress urinary incontinence after prostatectomy. A PubMed search was carried out for articles on the artificial urinary sphincter from 1995 to present. The review was centered on articles related to the use of the AMS 800 for stress urinary incontinence in males after prostatectomy. Relevant articles were reviewed. The majority of patients will achieve social continence (1 pad per day) after artificial urinary sphincter implantation; however, rates of total continence (no pad usage) are significantly lower. Patient satisfaction outcomes average greater than 80% in most series. Potential complications requiring reoperation include infection (0.5-10.6%) and urethral erosion (2.9-12%). Revision surgeries are most commonly as a result of urethral atrophy, which ranges from 1.6 to 11.4%. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier freedom from reoperation ranges from 50 to 79%, while the 10-year Kaplan-Meier freedom from mechanical failure is 64%. The artificial urinary sphincter is a reliable device with good outcomes. As expected with any prosthetic device, complications including mechanical failure, infection, erosion and recurrent incontinence remain significant concerns. Despite known complications, the patient satisfaction rates after artificial urinary sphincter implantation remain high. Appropriate patient counseling and adherence to surgical principles are imperative. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  2. Designing micro- and nanostructures for artificial urinary sphincters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Florian M.; Deyhle, Hans; Kovacs, Gabor; Müller, Bert

    2012-04-01

    The dielectric elastomers are functional materials that have promising potential as actuators with muscle-like mechanical properties due to their inherent compliancy and overall performance: the combination of large deformations, high energy densities and unique sensory capabilities. Consequently, such actuators should be realized to replace the currently available artificial urinary sphincters building dielectric thin film structures that work with several 10 V. The present communication describes the determination of the forces (1 - 10 N) and deformation levels (~10%) necessary for the appropriate operation of the artificial sphincter as well as the response time to master stress incontinence (reaction time less than 0.1 s). Knowing the dimensions of the presently used artificial urinary sphincters, these macroscopic parameters form the basis of the actuator design. Here, we follow the strategy to start from organic thin films maybe even monolayers, which should work with low voltages but only provide small deformations. Actuators out of 10,000 or 100,000 layers will finally provide the necessary force. The suitable choice of elastomer and electrode materials is vital for the success. As the number of incontinent patients is steadily increasing worldwide, it becomes more and more important to reveal the sphincter's function under static and stress conditions to realize artificial urinary sphincters, based on sophisticated, biologically inspired concepts to become nature analogue.

  3. Sphincter-saving procedure for radiation-injuried rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Yoshihiro; Koyama, Yasuo; Hojo, Keiichi

    1982-01-01

    Up to this time the sigmoid colostomy has been widely accepted and conventional treatment for radiation-injured rectum, but patients without residual malignancy strongly desire to live without colostomy. We have tried to remove the involved rectal segments by sphincter-saving procedures. Four patients underwent these procedures, pull-through procedure in three and low anterior resection in one. Among sphincter-saving procedures, pull-through procedure was most adequate. Provided the following five conditions are fulfilled, pull-through procedure should be considered for severe radiation-injured rectum. (1) No recurrence of initial malignancy in the pelvis. (2) More than 2 cm intact rectal segment above dentate line may be preserved. (3) No radiation-injured segment in upper sigmoid. (4) No severe radiation damage in small intestine. (5) Patients under 70 year-old, with normal tonus of anal sphincter. (author)

  4. Modifiable risk factors of obstetric anal sphincter injury in primiparous women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jango, Hanna; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    To determine modifiable risk factors and incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS) in primiparous women.......To determine modifiable risk factors and incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS) in primiparous women....

  5. External urethral sphincter pressure measurement: an accurate method for the diagnosis of detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H Suzuki Bellucci

    Full Text Available Combined pelvic floor electromyography (EMG and videocystourethrography (VCUG during urodynamic investigation are the most acceptable and widely agreed methods for diagnosing detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia (DESD. Theoretically, external urethral sphincter pressure (EUSP measurement would provide enough information for the diagnosis of DESD and could simplify the urodynamic investigation replacing combined pelvic floor EMG and VCUG. Thus, we evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of EUSP measurement for DESD. PATIENTS #ENTITYSTARTX00026;A consecutive series of 72 patients (36 women, 36 men with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction able to void spontaneously was prospectively evaluated at a single university spinal cord injury center. Diagnosis of DESD using EUSP measurement (index test versus combined pelvic floor EMG and VCUG (reference standard was assessed according to the recommendations of the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy Initiative.Using EUSP measurement (index test and combined pelvic floor EMG and VCUR (reference standard, DESD was diagnosed in 10 (14% and in 41 (57% patients, respectively. More than half of the patients presented discordant diagnosis between the index test and the reference standard. Among 41 patients with DESD diagnosed by combined pelvic floor EMG and VCUR, EUSP measurement identified only 6 patients. EUSP measurement had a sensitivity of 15% (95% CI 5%-25%, specificity of 87% (95% CI 76%-98%, positive predictive value of 60% (95% CI 30%-90%, and negative predictive value of 56% (95% CI 44%-68% for the diagnosis of DESD.For diagnosis of DESD, EUSP measurement is inaccurate and cannot replace combined pelvic floor EMG and VCUR.

  6. Long-term outcome of internal sphincter myectomy in patients with internal anal sphincter achalasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doodnath, Reshma

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Internal anal sphincter achalasia (IASA) is a condition with presentation similar to Hirschsprung\\'s disease (HD), but with the presence of ganglion cells on rectal suction biopsy (RSB). The diagnosis is made on anorectal manometry (ARM) by the absence of the rectosphincteric reflex on rectal balloon inflation. Internal sphincter myectomy (ISM) is the treatment of choice for patients with IASA. Recently, botulinum toxin has been used to treat IASA patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term bowel function in patients with IASA following ISM. METHODS: The medical records of 24 patients with IASA managed by ISM during 1993-2005 were examined. There were 18 boys and 6 girls, aged 2-12 years. All patients presented with intractable constipation with or without soiling. The diagnosis was made by the demonstration of the absence of the rectosphincteric reflex on ARM. HD was excluded by the presence of ganglion cells and normal acetylcholinesterase activity in RSB. Patients were followed 4-14 years later. RESULTS: Fifteen (62.5%) patients at the time of follow-up had regular bowel motions without the use of laxatives. Six (25%) patients had regular bowel motions, but remained on small doses of laxatives. Two (8.3%) patients who suffered from constipation and soiling required twice weekly enemas to remain clean. One (4.2%) patient required resection of dilated rectosigmoid colon 3 years after myectomy, remains on laxatives, but has normal bowel control. No patients had faecal incontinence following ISM. CONCLUSION: This long-term follow-up study shows that the vast majority of IASA patients have normal bowel control following ISM.

  7. Influence of hiatal hernia on lower esophageal sphincter function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, G B; Bombeck, C T; Nyhus, L M

    1981-01-01

    Sliding hiatal hernia has long term been implicated as a cause of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) incompetence and gastroesophageal reflux. The physics of LES function in hiatal hernia were investigated in in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro models of sliding hernias were constructed from excised canine gastroesophageal specimens. A "sphincter" was simulated with a rubber band around the gastroesophageal junction. It was found that placement of a ligature "hernia ring" on the stomach increased the opening pressure of the model sphincter. Addition of a tissue "hernia sac" sutured to the esophagus above the sphincter further increased the opening pressure, the protective effect being related to the pressure transmitted from the stomach to the hernia sac. There was no fluid leakage from the hernia sac between the hernia ring and the stomach. In anesthetized dogs (in vivo model) gastric and esophageal pressures were measured during gastric infusion while the LES gas way to reflux. A ligature tied loosely around the stomach to simulate a "hernia ring" and a sliding hernia without a hernia sac increased both the opening and the closing pressures of the LES by 36 +/- 18% and 35 +/- 20% (mean +/- SD), respectively. The opening pressure was increased by a decrease in gastric wall tension at the gastroesophageal junction, which was caused by the decreased radius of the herniated portion of the stomach. Pressure transmitted from the stomach to the hernia sac added to the LES pressure, and thereby further increased the opening pressure of the sphincter. The results explain how gastroesophageal reflux may be prevented in patients with hiatal hernia. It was recognized that the hernia sac may protect the sphincter, provided that it inserts into the esophagus above the LES. PMID:7469555

  8. Obstetric anal sphincter injury: incidence, risk factors, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudding, Thomas C; Vaizey, Carolynne J; Kamm, Michael A

    2008-02-01

    Obstetric sphincter damage is the most common cause of fecal incontinence in women. This review aimed to survey the literature, and reach a consensus, on its incidence, risk factors, and management. This systematic review identified relevant studies from the following sources: Medline, Cochrane database, cross referencing from identified articles, conference abstracts and proceedings, and guidelines published by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (United Kingdom), Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (United Kingdom), and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. A total of 451 articles and abstracts were reviewed. There was a wide variation in the reported incidence of anal sphincter muscle injury from childbirth, with the true incidence likely to be approximately 11% of postpartum women. Risk factors for injury included instrumental delivery, prolonged second stage of labor, birth weight greater than 4 kg, fetal occipitoposterior presentation, and episiotomy. First vaginal delivery, induction of labor, epidural anesthesia, early pushing, and active restraint of the fetal head during delivery may be associated with an increased risk of sphincter trauma. The majority of sphincter tears can be identified clinically by a suitably trained clinician. In those with recognized tears at the time of delivery repair should be performed using long-term absorbable sutures. Patients presenting later with fecal incontinence may be managed successfully using antidiarrheal drugs and biofeedback. In those who fail conservative treatment, and who have a substantial sphincter disruption, elective repair may be attempted. The results of primary and elective repair may deteriorate with time. Sacral nerve stimulation may be an appropriate alternative treatment modality. Obstetric anal sphincter damage, and related fecal incontinence, are common. Risk factors for such trauma are well recognized, and should allow for reduction of injury by proactive

  9. Mode of delivery after obstetric anal sphincter injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmarkar, Roopali; Bhide, Alka; Digesu, Alex; Khullar, Vik; Fernando, Ruwan

    2015-11-01

    To assess the effect of vaginal delivery and caesarean section on faecal symptoms and structure and function of anal sphincter in women who sustained obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) in their previous pregnancy and were advised about the mode of delivery based on faecal incontinence symptoms, anal manometry and endoanal ultrasound. It is a descriptive study on a cohort of women who had OASIS from 2006 to 2013. They were assessed after OASIS and during subsequent pregnancy with a questionnaire, endoanal ultrasound and anal manometry. Vaginal delivery was recommended to asymptomatic women with normal investigations. Elective caesarean section was recommended to women with faecal symptoms, anal sphincter defects of more than 30° or low resting or incremental anal pressures. All women were reassessed after subsequent delivery. Fifty women who had pregnancies after OASIS, were seen after OASIS, during subsequent pregnancy and after the second delivery. 15 women had faecal symptoms after OASIS. The external, internal and combined anal sphincter defects were seen in 13, 11 and 9 women respectively. Low resting and incremental pressure were seen in 15 and 11 women respectively. Caesarean section was done in 22 women and 28 women delivered vaginally. Worsening of faecal symptoms and reduction in anal pressures were not observed in planned vaginal delivery or elective caesarean section groups. Faecal symptoms were worse with reduced anal pressures in three women from the planned caesarean section group. One of the women had a vaginal delivery and two women had emergency caesarean section at 7cm and 10cm dilatation. There were no new sphincter defects or recurrent OASIS in any of the women in the study group. Decision about the mode of delivery of pregnancy after OASIS based on symptoms, anal manometry and endoanal ultrasound helps in preserving the anal sphincter function and avoiding unnecessary caesarean sections. Further follow-up of these patients is essential

  10. The Influence of Antral Ulcers on Intramural Gastric Nerve Projections Supplying the Pyloric Sphincter in the Pig (Sus scrofa domestica-Neuronal Tracing Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Zalecki

    Full Text Available Gastric ulcerations in the region of antrum pylori represent a serious medical problem in humans and animals. Such localization of ulcers can influence the intrinsic descending nerve supply to the pyloric sphincter. The pyloric function is precisely regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic nerves. Impaired neural regulation could result in pyloric sphincter dysfunction and gastric emptying malfunction. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of gastric antral ulcerations on the density and distribution of intramural gastric descending neurons supplying the pyloric sphincter in pigs.The experiment was performed on 2 groups of pigs: healthy gilts (n=6 and gilts with experimentally induced peptic ulcers in the region of antrum pylori (n=6. Gastric neurons supplying pyloric sphincter were labeled using the retrograde neuronal tracing technique (20μl of Fast Blue tracer injected into the pyloric sphincter muscle. After a week survival period the animals were sacrificed and the stomachs were collected. Then, the stomach wall was cross-cut into 0.5cm thick sections taken in specified intervals (section I - 1.5cm; section II - 3.5cm; section III - 5.5cm; section IV - 7.5cm starting from the sphincter. Consecutive microscopic slices prepared from each section were analyzed under fluorescent microscope to count traced neurons. Obtained data were statistically analyzed. The total number of FB-positive perikarya observed within all studied sections significantly decreased from 903.3 ± 130.7 in control to 243.8 ± 67.3 in experimental animals. In healthy pigs 76.1 ± 6.7% of labeled neurons were observed within the section I, 23.53 ± 6.5% in section II and only occasional cells in section III. In experimental animals, as many as 93.8 ± 2.1% of labeled cells were observed within the section I and only 6.2 ± 2.2% in section II, while section III was devoid of such neurons. There were no traced perikarya in section IV observed in both groups of pigs

  11. Rectocele and anal sphincter defect – surgical anatomy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    carefully directed translabial ultrasound scan of the rectum and anal sphincters. The ultrasound examination was performed by a radi- ologist with specific understanding of the pathology. Conventional two-dimensional ultrasound imaging was performed using a 4 - 8. MHz curved array probe. The patient was in the left ...

  12. Thermal responses of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yun; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Kenichi

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys (SMAs) proposed by the authors. The SMA artificial anal sphincter has the function of occlusion at body temperature and can be opened with a thermal transformation induced deformation of SMAs to solve the problem of severe fecal incontinence. The investigation of its thermal behavior is of great importance in terms of practical use in living bodies as a prosthesis. In this work, a previously proposed phenomenological model was applied to simulate the thermal responses of SMA plates that had undergone thermally induced transformation. The numerical approach for considering the thermal interaction between the prosthesis and surrounding tissues was discussed based on the classical bio-heat equation. Numerical predictions on both in vitro and in vivo cases were verified by experiments with acceptable agreements. The thermal responses of the SMA artificial anal sphincter were discussed based on the simulation results, with the values of the applied power and the geometric configuration of thermal insulation as parameters. The results obtained in the present work provided a framework for the further design of SMA artificial sphincters to meet demands from the viewpoint of thermal compatibility as prostheses.

  13. Anal sphincter electromyography in patients with Anorectal Dysfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinchet Soler, Rafael; Hidalgo Marrero, Yanet; Espichicoque Megret, Arianne; Manzano Suarez, Jianeya; Perez Gonzales, Ruth Maite

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the electromyography value of anal sphincter in patients with anorectal dysfunctions. Anorectal dysfunctions are frequent reason of pediatric consultation in children, especially with anal incontinence. A study of series of cases in patient with anorectal dysfunctions was carried out from January 2002 to January of 2006. 65 patients were studied. Anorectal malformations (ARM) represented the predominant affection with 38 patients (58.5%), prevailing the male sex in 25 patients (65.8%). Encopresis and intestinal agagliosis dicrease was observed. Sphincter was found before surgical treatment through electromyography in patients with anorectal malformations and colostomy; in those with definitive operation and open colostomy, it avoided the operation in a patient that did not have muscular activity of the external sphincter. In children already operated and with closed colostomy several electromyography changes were observed in correspondence with different incontinence grades. In encopresis cases the study was useful to rule out sphincter functional alterations. Electromyography was pathological in all the operated patients of intestinal aganglionosis. This procedure was very useful for anal incontinence study that helped to determine and establish the prognosis. (author)

  14. Sonographic assessment of the anal sphincter after obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI) using transperineal ultrasound (TPUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Vered H; Valsky, Dan V; Yagel, Simcha

    2018-03-24

    Obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI) is the most common cause of anal incontinence and ano-rectal symptoms in women 1 . Reported rates of anal incontinence following primary repair of OASI range between 15-61%, with a mean of 39% 2, 3 . Other possible complications of OASI include perineal pain, dyspareunia, and less commonly, abscess formation, wound breakdown, and rectovaginal fistulae. Symptom onset may occur immediately, several years postpartum, or only late in life when aging of tissues adds to the delivery insult. Having sustained an OASI may impact significantly on women's physical and emotional health. Missed OASI, inadequate repair or lack of follow up are potential sources of litigation 4 . The reported incidence of OASI may be as high as 4-6.6% 4 , averaging 2.9% in the UK 3 . The incidence is higher in primiparae (6.1%) than in multiparae (1.7%) 3 . Recent years are seeing an increased awareness and structured training programs, which appear to have resulted in an increase in the detection rate of OASI 3 . The following risk factors have been identified with varying risk rates reported 3 : Asian ethnicity (OR 2.27, 95% CI 2.14-2.41), nulliparity (relative risk [RR] 6.97, 95% CI 5.40-8.99), birth weight greater than 4 kg (OR 2.27, 95% CI 2.18-2.36), shoulder dystocia (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.72-2.08), occipito-posterior position (RR 2.44, 95% CI 2.07-2.89), prolonged second stage of labor (up to RR 2.02, 95% CI 1.62-2.51 after four hours duration). Instrumental deliveries and episiotomy use have been extensively studied resulting in the following evidence: Vacuum delivery without episiotomy (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.74-2.05); vacuum delivery with episiotomy is protective (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.51-0.63); forceps delivery without episiotomy carries the highest potential risk (OR 6.53, 95% CI 5.57-7.64); and forceps delivery with episiotomy (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21-1.49). Other potential risk factors have been suggested with varying evidence such as advanced maternal age at

  15. The Danish anal sphincter rupture questionnaire: Validity and reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Ulla; Ottesen, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To revise, validate and test for reliability an anal sphincter rupture questionnaire in relation to construct, content and face validity. Setting and background. Since 1996 women with anal sphincter rupture (ASR) at one of the public university hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark have been...... among health care personnel, followed by an expert panel discussion. Ten women were interviewed about their understanding and attitude toward answering the questionnaire and it was pre-tested on 52 women with ASR. The questionnaire was revised five times during the validation process. The final version...... was test-retested among 20 women with ASR. Results. The questionnaire revealed typical problems after ASR. The length, use of language, and the way the questionnaire was constructed, was deemed appropriate. The reliability test showed good to very good correlation (Kappa values from 0.733 to 0.923) in all...

  16. Velopharyngeal sphincter pathophysiologic aspects in the in cleft palat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collares, Marcus Vinicius Martins

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cleft lip and palate are common congenital abnormalities with typical functional disorders on speech, deglutition and middle ear function. Objective: This article reviews functional labiopalatine disorders through a pathophysiological view. Method: We performed a literature search on line, as well as books and periodicals related to velopharyngeal sphincter. Our sources were LILACS, MEDLINE and SciELO databases, and we applied to the research Keywords of interest on the velopharyngeal pathophysiology, for articles published between 1965 and 2007. Conclusion: Velopharyngeal sphincter plays a central role in speech, swallowing and middle ear physiology in patients with labiopalatine cleft. At the end of our bibliographic review, pursuant to the velopharyngeal physiology in individuals with this disorder in the functional speech, deglutition and otologic function, we observed that although there is a great number of published data discussing this issue, further studies are necessary to completely understand the pathophysiology, due to the fact they have been exploited superficially.

  17. Gastrointestinal and Urologic Sphincter Dysfunction in Stiff Person Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrascu, Oana M; Tsimerinov, Evgeny I; Lewis, Richard A

    2016-12-01

    Stiff person syndrome is a neurologic disorder characterized by axial rigidity leading to progressive disability, with broad clinical spectrum. We report 2 cases with unique clinical presentation. Two young men suffered progressive urinary retention requiring bladder catheterization, anorectal spasms and constipation, complicated subsequently with lower extremity trigger-induced spasms, and gait instability. Associated symptoms revealed brainstem involvement (vertigo, diplopia, and cranial neuropathies) and dysautonomia (abnormal sweating and orthostatic hypotension). Anal manometry demonstrated incomplete relaxation of the anal sphincter. The first case was associated with diabetes mellitus type I, did not respond to classical therapies, but was responsive to rituximab. The second case responded to intravenous immunoglobulin infusions. Paraneoplastic profiles were negative, and anti-GAD65 antibody titers remained elevated despite successful therapeutic responses. We want to raise awareness that stiff person syndrome can present with esophageal, anorectal, and urethral sphincter disturbance. Rituximab is a good therapeutic option in intractable cases.

  18. The Danish anal sphincter rupture questionnaire: Validity and reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Ulla; Ottesen, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To revise, validate and test for reliability an anal sphincter rupture questionnaire in relation to construct, content and face validity. Setting and background. Since 1996 women with anal sphincter rupture (ASR) at one of the public university hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark have been...... among health care personnel, followed by an expert panel discussion. Ten women were interviewed about their understanding and attitude toward answering the questionnaire and it was pre-tested on 52 women with ASR. The questionnaire was revised five times during the validation process. The final version...... offered pelvic floor muscle examination and instruction by a specialist physiotherapist. In relation to that, a non-validated questionnaire about anal and urinary incontinence was to be answered six months after childbirth. Method. The original questionnaire was revised and a pilot test was performed...

  19. Second Kidney Transplant in a Patient with Artificial Urinary Sphincter

    OpenAIRE

    Gavin Tansley; Sertaç Çimen; Sanem Güler Çimen; Mark Walsh

    2015-01-01

    Artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) is regarded as the gold standard treatment for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. Kidney transplantation is gold standard treatment for end stage renal disease. Since both AUS implantation and renal transplant surgeries are relatively common, a co-occurrence is likely and a patient with AUS may need a kidney transplant. Herein, we report a patient with an AUS who underwent second kidney transplantation. Since the iliac fossa ipsilateral to the AUS part...

  20. Internal anal sphincter atrophy in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoua, Nora M; Schizas, Alexis; Forbes, Alastair; Denton, Christopher P; Emmanuel, Anton V

    2011-09-01

    SSc is a connective tissue, multisystem disorder of unknown aetiology. The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is affected in up to 90% of patients. The exact pathophysiology of GIT involvement is not known, but it is related to both neurogenic and myogenic abnormalities as well as possible vascular and ischaemic changes. Thinning of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) has been demonstrated in SSc with faecal incontinence. We aimed to investigate anal sphincter structure in patients with SSc. Forty-four SSc patients [24 symptomatic (Sx) and 20 asymptomatic (ASx)] and 20 incontinent controls (ICs) were studied. Patients underwent anorectal manometry and endoanal US. In the ICs, external anal sphincter defects were more common, but the IAS was less atrophic, evident by both atrophy scores and IAS thickness. There was no significant difference in atrophy scores [Sx: 2 (1.5-3) vs ASx: 2 (1-2)] or IAS thickness [Sx: 1.85 (1.5-2.3) vs ASx: 1.8 (1.7-2.25)] between the Sx and ASx SSc patients. Patients with SSc (both Sx and ASx) have thin and atrophic IAS, suggesting that IAS atrophy develops even in ASx patients and this may be amenable to treatment with sacral neuromodulation.

  1. Relationship between external anal sphincter atrophy at endoanal magnetic resonance imaging and clinical, functional, and anatomic characteristics in patients with fecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terra, Maaike P.; Deutekom, Marije; Beets-Tan, Regina G. H.; Engel, Alexander F.; Janssen, Lucas W. M.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E. E.; Dobben, Annette C.; Baeten, Cor G. M. I.; de Priester, Jacobus A.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Stoker, Jaap

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: External anal sphincter atrophy at endoanal magnetic resonance imaging has been associated with poor outcome of anal sphincter repair. We studied the relationship between external anal sphincter atrophy on endoanal magnetic resonance imaging and clinical, functional, and anatomic

  2. The impact of anal sphincter injury on perceived body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, David; Khan, Rabia; Naidoo, Kristina; Kearney, Rohna; Myers, Jenny; Reid, Fiona

    2017-05-01

    Obstetric anal sphincter injury is common but the effect on body image is unreported. The aim of this study was to explore patient perceived changes in body image and other psychological aspects in women attending a perineal follow-up clinic. This retrospective study analysed women's responses to a self-reported questionnaire. Consecutive women with anal sphincter injury who attended a United Kingdom Maternity Hospital perineal follow-up clinic between January 1999 and January 2012 were identified and the records obtained and reviewed. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine variables influencing self-reported change in body image. Questionnaires and operation notes were analysed from 422 women who attended at a median of four months after delivery. 222 (53%) reported a change in body image with 80 (19%) reporting lower self-esteem and 75 (18%) a change in their personality due to the change in body image. 248 (59%) perceived an anatomical change due to the delivery. Factors associated with increased likelihood of reporting a change in body image were reporting a perceived change in anatomy due to the delivery, adjusted OR 6.11 (3.56-10.49), anal incontinence, OR 1.97 (1.16-3.36), and delivery by forceps, OR 2.59 (1.23-5.43). This is the first study to quantify body image changes in women after anal sphincter injury sustained in childbirth. These were found to be very common, affecting up to 50% of women. The study has several limitations but it does highlight the significant psychosocial problems of negative self-esteem and personality changes associated with a perceived change in body image that has not previously been reported. It also outlines the further research questions that need to be addressed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Endosonographic appearance of the anal sphincters in patients following colostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudol-Szopinska, I.; Jakubowski, W.; Szczepkowski, M.; Panorska, A.

    2002-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to visualize, by anal ultrasound (AUS), the suspected defects of the anal sphincters in the patients after colostomy and to analyze possible factors that could have led to such defects. Patients and methods. AUS, using a 7.0 MHz endorectal probe, was performed in a group of 25 patients with colostomy. The internal anal sphincter (IAS), external anal sphincter (EAS) and puborectalis muscle (PR) were visualized and the defects within them were qualified and quantified. For statistical analysis, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used. Results. The IAS was thin in all but three patients (22 patients; 88 %) with the mean thickness of 1.62 mm. A circular reduction of the thickness along the entire length of the IAS was seen in 20 patients (90.9 %). The echogenicity of the IAS was increased in 15 patients (60 %), and in 10 of them (66.6%), this defect embraced the whole length and circumference of the IAS. The margins of the IAS were not well-defined in 10 patients (40%). A significant correlation was found between the length of the patient's life with the stoma and the IAS echogenicity defect (p-value = 0.0001). No significant correlation was found between the dynamic examination, the IAS thickness and the IAS borders definition. Conclusion. The reduced thickness, increased echogenicity and borders definition defect of the IAS are seen in the patients after colostomy. The only significant correlation was confirmed between the length of the patient's life with the stoma and the IAS echogenicity defect. (author)

  4. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the anal sphincter using a dedicated endoanal receiver coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSouza, N.M.; Williams, A.D.; Gilderdale, D.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Imperial College School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-04-01

    The use of a surface coil in MR imaging improves signal-to-noise ratio of adjacent tissues of interest. We therefore devised an endoanal receiver coil for imaging the anal sphincter. The probe is solid and re-usable: it comprises a saddle geometry receiver with integral tuning, matching and decoupling. It is placed in the anal canal and immobilised externally. Both in vitro and in vivo normal anatomy is identified. The mucosa is high signal intensity, the submucosa low signal intensity, the internal sphincter uniformly high signal intensity and the external sphincter low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images. In females, the transverse perineal muscle bridges the inferior part of the external sphincter anteriorly. In perianal sepsis, collections and the site of the endoanal opening are identified. In early-onset fecal incontinence following obstetric trauma/surgery, focal sphincter defects are demonstrated; in late-onset fecal incontinence external sphincter atrophy is seen. In fecally incontinent patients with scleroderma, forward deviation of the anterior sphincter musculature with descent of rectal air and feces into the anal canal is noted. The extent of sphincter invasion is assessed in low rectal tumours. In children with congenital anorectal anomalies, abnormalities of the muscle components are defined using smaller-diameter coils. Such information is invaluable in the assessment and surgical planning of patients with a variety of anorectal pathologies. (orig.) With 15 figs., 26 refs.

  5. Impact of bowel dysfunction on quality of life after sphincter-preserving resection for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmertsen, Katrine; Laurberg, Solveig; Jess, Per

    2013-01-01

    Bowel dysfunction after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer is a common complication, with the potential to affect quality of life (QoL) strongly. The aim of this study was to examine the extent of bowel dysfunction and impact on health-related QoL after curative sphincter......-preserving resection for rectal cancer....

  6. [Design of an artificial sphincter system with bio-feedback function based on MSP430].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-kan; Yan, De-tian

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we advance a new treating method for rectectomy postoperative anus incontinence, which is called "artificial sphincter system with biofeedback-function". The system simulates the function of human's sphincter and has entered into a stage of simulation experiments on animals.

  7. Artificial Urinary Sphincter: Long-Term Results and Patient Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drogo K. Montague

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The published evidence concerning the safety, efficacy, and patient satisfaction for implantation of the current model of the artificial urinary sphincter (AS 800 in men with post prostatectomy urinary incontinence was the objective of this review. A Pub Med English language literature search from 1995 to 2011 was performed. A majority of men who undergo AUS implantation for post prostatectomy urinary incontinence achieve satisfactory results (0 to 1 pad per day. Infection rates range from 0.46 to 7%, cuff erosion rates range from 3.8 to 10%, and urethral atrophy ranges from 9.6 to 11.4%. Kaplan-Meier 5 year projections for freedom from any reoperation were 50% for a small series and 79.4% for a larger series. Kaplan-Meier projections for freedom from mechanical failure were 79% at 5 years and 72% at 10 years. In another series 10 year projections for freedom from mechanical failure were 64%. Although the artificial urinary sphincter (AUS is the gold standard for the treatment of this disorder, most men will continue to need at least one pad per day for protection, and they are subject to a significant chance of future AUS revision or replacement.

  8. Recurrent obstetric anal sphincter injury and the risk of long term anal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jangö, Hanna; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Women with an obstetric anal sphincter injury are concerned about the risk of recurrent obstetric anal sphincter injury in their second pregnancy. Existing studies have failed to clarify whether recurrence of obstetric anal sphincter injury affects the risk of anal- and fecal...... incontinence at long term follow up. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether recurrent obstetric anal sphincter injury influenced the risk of anal- and fecal incontinence more than 5 years after the second vaginal delivery. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a secondary analysis of data from a postal questionnaire study...... in women with obstetric anal sphincter injury in the first delivery and one subsequent vaginal delivery. The questionnaire was sent to all Danish women who fulfilled inclusion criteria and had two vaginal deliveries 1997 -2005. We performed uni- and multivariable analyses to assess how recurrent obstetric...

  9. Morphological characteristics of sphincter zone glands of urinary bladder in different stages of postnatal ontogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamedov N.M.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Methods of macromicroscopy and morphometry have been used to study sphincter zone glands by 54 total preparations of a urinary bladder received from corpses of people of different ages without any pathology of organs of urine-genital apparatus. The glands were painted by 0, 05% methylene blue solution and were investigated with the application of stereomicroscopic-binocular microscope MBS-9. Microscopic sections of sphincter zone glands in the thickness 5-7 microns were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, azure-2-eosin and with hematoxylin-picrofucsin by Van-Gizon technique. Sphincter zone glands are arranged firmly without dependence on age, length and width of initial department of glands of these zones. In postnatal ontogenesis size indices of sphincter zone glands have been essentially changed. These indices are equal for left and right ureter sphincter zone glands

  10. [Home training as a treatment of faecal incontinence and sphincter dyssynergia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas Colmenares, G V; Moya Jiménez, M J; Roldán Pérez, S; Granero Cendón, R; Vinuesa Salgueiro, J; López Alonso, M

    2017-01-25

    The defecation disorders represents the 3% of consultations in pediatrics patients. Our goal was to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the reeducation of the defecation maneuver through home training in patients with encopresis and sphincter dyssynergia. Study of patients with fecal incontinence treated with home training at our center between 2014-2015. Anorectal manometry was performed and was valued defecation maneuver by expulsion of rectal probe with or without the ball. Daily sessions were performed using a Foley catheter (18-20Fr.) with progressive filling of the balloon, maximum 20cc. The response to the treatment was assessed in terms of episodes of soiling. Seven patients (6 males and 1 female) with a mean age of 9.7 years (range, 5-15) were included; two patients with anorectal malformation history, 1 Hirschsprung disease, 1 sacrococcygeal teratoma and 3 functional encopresis. Three patients had soiling episodes daily and 4 patients frequently. The mean basal pressure of anal channel was 32.34mmHg (range, 11.74-50.75) with negative defecation maneuver in 2 cases, deficient in 3 and dyssynergic in 2 patients. The mean time of biofeedback therapy to be asymptomatic was 5.14 months (range, 2-11), with a mean of 16.14 months (range, 3-24), with the 7 patients currently maintained clean. The present study suggests that re-education of defecation maneuver through home training, seems to be an effective and efficient therapy, achieving excellent results in medium term.

  11. Anal incontinence in women with recurrent obstetric anal sphincter rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgeskov, Reneé; Nickelsen, Carsten Nahne Amtoft; Secher, Niels Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    : Women with recurrent ASR between January 2000 and June 2011 were identified at two delivery wards in Copenhagen. The women answered a questionnaire with a validated scoring system for AI (St. Mark`s score), and the results were compared with those obtained in two control groups: women with subsequent......UNLABELLED: Abstract Objectives: To determine the risk of recurrent anal sphincter rupture (ASR), and compare the risk of anal incontinence (AI) after recurrent ASR, with that seen in women with previous ASR who deliver by caesarean section or vaginally without sustaining a recurrent ASR. METHODS...... uncomplicated vaginal delivery or caesarean section. RESULTS: There were 93 437 vaginal deliveries. ASR occurred in 5.5% (n = 2851) of the nulliparous and 1.5% (n = 608) of the multiparous women. Recurrent ASR occurred in 8% (n = 49) of whom 50% reported symptoms of AI. We found no difference in the occurrence...

  12. Sphincter preservation with preoperative radiation therapy and coloanal anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, Bruce D.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Enker, Warren E.; Paty, Philip

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if preoperative radiation therapy allows sphincter preservation in the treatment of rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with the diagnosis of invasive, resectable, primary adenocarcinoma of the rectum limited to the pelvis were enrolled on a Phase I/II trial of preoperative radiation therapy plus low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. By preoperative assessment, all patients had invasive tumors (2: T2, 28: T3) involving the distal half of the rectum and required an abdominoperineal resection. The median tumor size was 4 cm (range: 1.5-6 cm) and the median distance from the anal verge was 4 cm (range: 3-7 cm). The whole pelvis received 46.8 Gy followed by a 3.60 Gy boost to the primary tumor bed. The median follow-up was 43 months (range: 6-82 months). Results: Of the 29 patients who underwent resection, 3 (10%) had a complete pathologic response and 24 (83%) were able to successfully undergo a low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. The incidence of local failure was crude: 17% and 4-year actuarial: 23%. The 4-year actuarial survival was 75%. One patient developed a partial disruption of the anastomosis and two developed rectal stenosis. Analysis of sphincter function using a previously published scale was performed at the time of last follow-up in 22 of the 24 patients who underwent a low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. Function was good or excellent in 77%. The median number of bowel movements/day was two (range: 1-6). Conclusions: This technique may be an alternative to an abdominoperineal resection in selected patients. Continued follow-up is needed to determine if this approach ultimately has similar local control and survival rates as an abdominoperineal resection

  13. Incontinence, bladder neck mobility, and sphincter ruptures in primiparous women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jundt K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To compare the function of the pelvic floor in primiparae before and during pregnancy with the status post partum concerning symptoms of incontinence, sphincter ruptures, bladder-neck mobility and the influence of the different modes of deliveries. Methods Questionnaire evaluating symptoms of urinary and anal incontinence in nulliparous women before and after delivery and correlating these symptoms with functional changes of the pelvic floor based on a careful gynaecologic examination as well as perineal and endoanal ultrasound. Results 112 women were included in our study and came for the first visit, 99 women returned for follow-up 6 months after childbirth. Stress and flatus incontinence significantly increased from before pregnancy (3 and 12% to after childbirth (21 and 28% in women with spontaneous delivery or vacuum extraction. No new symptoms occurred after c-section. There was no significant difference between the bladder neck position before and after delivery. The mobility of the bladder neck was significantly higher after vaginal delivery using a vacuum extraction compared to spontaneous delivery or c-section. The bladder neck in women with post partum urinary stress incontinence was significantly more mobile than in continent controls. The endoanal ultrasound detected seven occult sphincter defects without any correlation to symptoms of anal incontinence. Conclusion Several statistically significant changes of the pelvic floor after delivery were demonstrated. Spontaneous vaginal delivery or vacuum extraction increases the risk for stress or anal incontinence, delivery with vacuum extraction leads to higher bladder neck mobility and stress incontinent women have more mobile bladder necks than continent women.

  14. Worldwide Experience with Erosion of the Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicuben, Evan T; Bell, Reginald C W; Jobe, Blair A; Buckley, F P; Daniel Smith, C; Graybeal, Casey J; Lipham, John C

    2018-04-17

    The magnetic sphincter augmentation device continues to become a more common antireflux surgical option with low complication rates. Erosion into the esophagus is an important complication to recognize and is reported to occur at very low incidences (0.1-0.15%). Characterization of this complication remains limited. We aim to describe the worldwide experience with erosion of the magnetic sphincter augmentation device including presentation, techniques for removal, and possible risk factors. We reviewed data obtained from the device manufacturer Torax Medical, Inc., as well as the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database. The study period was from February 2007 through July 2017 and included all devices placed worldwide. In total, 9453 devices were placed and there were 29 reported cases of erosions. The median time to presentation of an erosion was 26 months with most occurring between 1 and 4 years after placement. The risk of erosion was 0.3% at 4 years after device implantation. Most patients experienced new-onset dysphagia prompting evaluation. Devices were successfully removed in all patients most commonly via an endoscopic removal of the eroded portion followed by a delayed laparoscopic removal of the remaining beads. At a median follow-up of 58 days post-removal, there were no complications and 24 patients have returned to baseline. Four patients reported ongoing mild dysphagia. Erosion of the LINX device is an important but rare complication to recognize that has been safely managed via minimally invasive approaches without long-term consequences.

  15. Postpartum two- and three-dimensional ultrasound evaluation of anal sphincter complex in women with obstetric anal sphincter injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, C; Martínez-Franco, E; Wozniak, M M; Cassado, J; Santoro, G A; Elías, N; López, M; Palacio, M; Wieczorek, A P; Espuña-Pons, M

    2017-04-01

    To compare the sensitivity and specificity of two- (2D) and three- (3D) dimensional transperineal ultrasound (TPUS) and 3D endovaginal ultrasound (EVUS) with the gold standard 3D endoanal ultrasound (EAUS) in detecting residual defects after primary repair of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS). External (EAS) and internal (IAS) anal sphincters were evaluated by the four ultrasound modalities in women with repaired OASIS. 2D-TPUS was evaluated in real-time, whereas 3D-TPUS, 3D-EVUS and 3D-EAUS volumes were evaluated offline by six blinded readers. The presence/absence of any tear in EAS or IAS was recorded and defects were scored according to the Starck system. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values were calculated, using 3D-EAUS as reference standard. Inter- and intraobserver analyses were performed for all 3D imaging modalities. Association between patients' symptoms (Wexner score) and ultrasound findings (Starck score) was calculated. Images from 55 patients were analyzed. Compared with findings on 3D-EAUS, the agreement for EAS evaluation was poor for 3D-EVUS (κ = 0.01), fair for 2D-TPUS (κ = 0.30) and good for 3D-TPUS (κ = 0.73). The agreement for IAS evaluation was moderate for both 3D-EVUS (κ = 0.41) and 2D-TPUS (κ = 0.52) and good for 3D-TPUS (κ = 0.66). Good intraobserver (3D-EAUS, κ = 0.73; 3D-TPUS, κ = 0.78) and interobserver (3D-EAUS, κ = 0.68; 3D-TPUS, κ = 0.60) agreement was reported. Significant association between Starck and Wexner scores was found only for 3D-EAUS (Spearman's rho = 0.277, P = 0.04). 2D-TPUS and 3D-EVUS are not accurate modalities for the assessment of anal sphincters after repair of OASIS. 3D-TPUS shows good agreement with the gold standard 3D-EAUS and a high sensitivity in detecting residual defects. It, thus, has potential as a screening tool after primary repair of OASIS. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG

  16. Sphincter of Oddi manometry using guide-wire-type manometer is feasible for examination of sphincter of Oddi motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuyama, Saori; Nobutani, Kentaro; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Shiomi, Hideyuki; Sanuki, Tsuyoshi; Sugimoto, Maki; Yoshida, Masaru; Arisaka, Yoshifumi; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Hayakumo, Takanobu; Azuma, Takeshi; Kutsumi, Hiromu

    2013-10-01

    Sphincter of Oddi manometry (SOM) is recognized as the standard diagnostic modality for sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD). However, SOM is not commonly performed because of its technical difficulty and the high incidence of post-procedural pancreatitis. To diminish post-procedural pancreatitis, we tried to develop a new method of SOM. This study examined the feasibility of SOM with a guide-wire-type manometer, which is commonly used to measure the arterial pressure for coronary angiography, for the assessment of SO motility. A total of 35 procedures were performed in 8 patients with biliary type III SOD and 14 patients with other disease. We performed SOM using the guide-wire-type manometer on SOD cases and other cases [amplitude, duration, frequency and the area under the curve (AUC) of SO contractions]. The mean time required for the measurement was 7.5 ± 4.1 min. The amplitude, frequency and AUC of SO contractions were significantly larger in the SOD cases than in other diseases (147.2 vs. 92.8 mmHg, p = 0.042; 10 vs. 5/min, p = 0.007; 2,837 vs. 1,122 mmHg s, p = 0.003, respectively). In 6 patients who underwent endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST), the SO amplitude decreased dramatically after EST. In this study, mild pancreatitis was observed in only one patient. SOM using a guide-wire-type manometer is safe, reliable and easy to apply for the clinical assessment of SO motility. The guide-wire-type manometer may become a new method to measure SO function for the diagnosis of SOD.

  17. Involvement of nitric oxide in human transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations and esophageal primary peristalsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, D. P.; Holloway, R. H.; Tytgat, G. N.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Nitric oxide (NO) is well accepted as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the gastrointestinal tract; however, its role in the triggering of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) in humans remains to be determined. Therefore, the effect of

  18. Significance of the thickness of the anal sphincters with age and its relevance in faecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachrysostomou, M; Pye, S D; Wild, S R; Smith, A N

    1994-08-01

    Ultrasonographic studies in healthy volunteers showed that the external anal sphincter (EAS) and internal anal sphincter (IAS) thicknesses were inversely related at rest. The functional importance of the two sphincters in continence control was demonstrated in the relationship between the sum of the thicknesses of the two sphincters and the anal canal resting pressure. The aims of the present study were to assess the morphometric appearance of the anal sphincters by endosonography in faecally incontinent patients and to contrast this with that of older healthy subjects. Twenty-eight female patients with neurogenic faecal incontinence (FI) were studied. An older group of 7 healthy women, aged 41-75 years, and a young group of 11 nulliparous healthy women, aged 20-23 years, served as control groups. Anal endosonography was performed with a radial rotating endoprobe, with the subject in the left lateral position. Conventional anal manometry was performed in all subjects. The EAS in the FI group was thicker than the EAS in the old (p IAS thickness in the FI group did not differ from that in the older group. In both these groups the IAS was thicker than in the young women (p IAS in the FI group does not seem to compensate for function and results in a failure of the sphincter mechanism to maintain continence, whereas in healthy elderly subjects the increased IAS thickness appears to be compensatory and important for continence control.

  19. The diagnostic accuracy of endovaginal and transperineal ultrasound for detecting anal sphincter defects: The PREDICT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, A.-M.; Abdool, Z.; Sultan, A.H.; Thakar, R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the accuracy and predictive value of transperineal (TPU) and endovaginal ultrasound (EVU) in the detection of anal sphincter defects in women with obstetric anal sphincter injuries and/or postpartum symptoms of faecal incontinence. Materials and methods: One hundred and sixty-five women were recruited, four women were excluded as they were seen years after their last delivery. TPU and EVU, followed by endonanal ultrasound (EAU), were performed using the B and K Viking 2400 scanner. Sensitivity and specificity, as well as predictive values with 95% confidence intervals, for detecting anal sphincter defects were calculated for EVU and TPU, using EAU as the reference standard. Results: On EAU a defect was found in 42 (26%) women: 39 (93%) had an external (EAS) and 23 (55%) an internal anal sphincter (IAS) defect. Analysable images of one level of the EAS combined with an analysable IAS were available in 140 (87%) women for EVU and in 131 (81%) for TPU. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of any defect was 48% (30-67%) and 85% (77-91%) for EVU and 64% (44-81%) and 85% (77-91%) for TPU, respectively. Conclusion: Although EAU using a rotating endoprobe is the validated reference standard in the identification of anal sphincter defects, it is not universally available. However while TPU and/or EVU with conventional ultrasound probes can be useful in identifying normality, for clinical purposes they are not sensitive enough to identify an underlying sphincter defect.

  20. Coexistence of elastic fibers with hyaluronic acid in the human urethral sphincter complex: a histological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinata, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shin-ichi; Shibata, Shunichi; Morizane, Shuichi; Honda, Masashi; Isoyama, Tadahiro; Sejima, Takehiro; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2013-10-01

    To promote the prevention and treatment of urethral sphincteric dysfunction, we examined the distribution of elastic fibers around the urethral sphincter complex and the histological localization of hyaluronic acid in relation to elastic fiber architecture. Using elastica-Masson staining as well as biotinated hyaluronic acid binding protein, we examined specimens of the urethral sphincter complex obtained from 14 elderly Japanese cadavers, including 10 men and 4 women. As a control, we also observed other striated muscles in male cadavers. Elastic fibers were densely distributed throughout the submucosal and smooth muscle layers along the entire length of the male urethra, including the prostatic urethra. The levator ani fascia and rhabdosphincter also contained abundant elastic fibers. An intramuscular elastic net was seen in the rhabdosphincter but not in other striated muscles. Strong staining for hyaluronic acid was evident in the submucosa and smooth muscle sphincter of the urethra but not in the levator ani fascia or rhabdosphincter, suggesting that elastic fibers and hyaluronic acid might interact at the former sites. Gender related differences in the distribution of elastic fibers and hyaluronic acid were noted with a much lower density of elastic fibers and hyaluronic acid staining in women than in men. Urethral sites where elastic fibers and hyaluronic acid coexist could be targeted for the prevention and treatment of urethral sphincteric insufficiency. These findings should improve our understanding of the human urethral sphincter complex. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sphincter saving anorectoplasty (SSARP for the reconstruction of Anorectal malformations

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    Paudel Bishnu

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This report describes a new technique of sphincter saving anorectoplasty (SSARP for the repair of anorectal malformations (ARM. Methods Twenty six males with high ARM were treated with SSARP. Preoperative localization of the center of the muscle complex is facilitated using real time sonography and computed tomography. A soft guide wire is inserted under image control which serves as the route for final pull through of bowel. The operative technique consists of a subcoccygeal approach to dissect the blind rectal pouch. The separation of the rectum from the fistulous communication followed by pull through of the bowel is performed through the same incision. The skin or the levators in the midline posteriorly are not divided. Postoperative anorectal function as assessed by clinical Wingspread scoring was judged as excellent, good, fair and poor. Older patients were examined for sensations of touch, pain, heat and cold in the circumanal skin and the perineum. Electromyography (EMG was done to assess preoperative and postoperative integrity of external anal sphincter (EAS. Results The patients were separated in 2 groups. The first group, Group I (n = 10, were newborns in whom SSARP was performed as a primary procedure. The second group, Group II (n = 16, were children who underwent an initial colostomy followed by delayed SSARP. There were no operative complications. The follow up ranged from 4 months to 18 months. Group I patients have symmetric anal contraction to stimulation and strong squeeze on digital rectal examination with an average number of bowel movements per day was 3–5. In group II the rate of excellent and good scores was 81% (13/16. All patients have an appropriate size anus and regular bowel actions. There has been no rectal prolapse, or anal stricture. EAS activity and perineal proprioception were preserved postoperatively. Follow up computed tomogram showed central placement the pull through bowel in between

  2. Artificial urinary sphincters for male stress urinary incontinence: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordon BH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Billy H Cordon,1 Nirmish Singla,1 Ajay K Singla2 1Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, 2Department of Urology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, OH, USA Abstract: The artificial urinary sphincter (AUS, which has evolved over many years, has become a safe and reliable treatment for stress urinary incontinence and is currently the gold standard. After 4 decades of existence, there is substantial experience with the AUS. Today AUS is most commonly placed for postprostatectomy stress urinary incontinence. Only a small proportion of urologists routinely place AUS. In a survey in 2005, only 4% of urologists were considered high-volume AUS implanters, performing >20 per year. Globally, ~11,500 AUSs are placed annually. Over 400 articles have been published regarding the outcomes of AUS, with a wide variance in success rates ranging from 61% to 100%. Generally speaking, the AUS has good long-term outcomes, with social continence rates of ~79% and high patient satisfaction usually between 80% and 90%. Despite good outcomes, a substantial proportion of patients, generally ~25%, will require revision surgery, with the rate of revision increasing with time. Complications requiring revision include infection, urethral atrophy, erosion, and mechanical failure. Most infections are gram-positive skin flora. Urethral atrophy and erosion lie on a spectrum resulting from the same problem, constant urethral compression. However, these two complications are managed differently. Mechanical failure is usually a late complication occurring on average later than infection, atrophy, or erosions. Various techniques may be used during revisions, including cuff relocation, downsizing, transcorporal cuff placement, or tandem cuff placement. Patient satisfaction does not appear to be affected by the need for revision as long as continence is restored. Additionally, AUS following prior sling surgery has comparable

  3. Sacral neuromodulation effects on periurethral sensation and urethral sphincter activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Jonathan L; Kenton, Kimberly; Greer, W Jerod; Ramm, Olga; Szychowski, Jeff M; Wilson, Tracey; Richter, Holly E

    2013-06-01

    To characterize the effect of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) on urethral neuromuscular function. Following IRB approval, women with refractory overactive bladder (OAB) underwent standardized urethral testing prior to and after Stage 1 SNM implantation. Periurethral sensation was measured using current perception thresholds (CPT). Striated urethral sphincter activity was quantified using concentric needle electromyography (CNE) and Multi-Motor Unit Action Potential (MUP) analysis software. Nonparametric analyses were used to characterize pre/post changes with intervention. Baseline CPT and CNE findings were compared between SNM responders and non-responders. Twenty-seven women were enrolled in this pilot study with a mean age of 61 ± 13 years. Twenty of 26 women (76.9%) responded to SNM and went to Stage 2 permanent implantation. Four (14.8%) withdrew after Stage 1 implantation; three of the four withdrawals had not had therapeutic responses to SNM. CPT and CNE parameters did not significantly differ from baseline 2 weeks after SNM. Pre-SNM urethral sensation was not significantly different between responders and non-responders. However, responders had larger amplitude, longer duration and more turns and phases at baseline approaching significance, reflecting more successful urethral reinnervation, than non-responders. SNM does not alter urethral neuromuscular function 2 weeks post Stage 1 implantation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The vagal control of the feline pyloric sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edin, R; Ahlman, H; Kewenter, J

    1979-10-01

    In acute experiments on cats in chloralose anesthesia the effects of efferent and afferent electrical stimulation of the cervical vagi on an applied constant flow of saline through the feline pylorus was studied. The motor activity of the stomach was recorded simultaneously with a volume recording technique. Efferent cervical vagal stimulation caused a decrease in the transpyloric flow and an increased gastric motor activity. In a few animals the decreased transsphincteric flow was preceded by a short period of increased flow. When the transpyloric flow was reduced by splanchnic nerve stimulation or a noradrenaline infusion, vagal nerve stimulation induced an increased flow through the pylorus indicating the presence of relaxatory fibres to the pylorus within the vagi. Electrical stimulation of the central end of the ipsilateral vagal nerve in the neck, with the contralateral vagal verve left intact, resulted in a decreased transpyloric flow and relaxation of the stomach. This response could be induced with or without intact splanchnic nerves, and disappeared when the intact contralateral vagus was cut. It is concluded that the vagi mediate both excitatory and inhibitory fibres to the pyloric sphincter in the cat. A vago-vagal excitatory reflex to the pylorus can be elicited by afferent vagal nerve stimulation together with a vago-vagal relaxatory response of the stomach.

  5. Age and Dyssynergia Subtypes Associated With Normal Sphincter Pressures in Women With Fecal Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James-Stevenson, Toyia; Xu, Huiping; Heit, Michael; Shin, Andrea

    2017-06-27

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is frequently associated with low sphincter pressures, sensory abnormalities, and advanced age. Twenty-three percent of patients with FI and 22% of healthy patients demonstrate dyssynergic defecation (DD) on high-resolution anorectal manometry. Overflow incontinence occurs in some DD patients with normal resting and squeeze anal sphincter pressures. Our aim was to identify factors associated with normal sphincter pressures in women with FI. We reviewed medical records of 134 women with FI. Patients with normal resting and squeeze anal pressures were compared with those with abnormal pressures using Wilcoxon rank sum test and Fisher exact. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with normal resting and squeeze anal pressures. Among 134 women, abnormal resting and/or squeeze pressures were identified in 113 and normal pressures were identified in 21. Women with normal sphincter pressures were younger (mean age 52.7 ± 10.8 years vs 59.0 ± 14.0 years, P = 0.036), more often had abnormal defecation indices (100% vs 83.2%, P = 0.043) and higher rectal defecation pressures (30.8 ± 18.8 mm Hg vs 50.8 ± 22.6 mm Hg, P normal and abnormal sphincter pressure groups (P = 0.021). Dyssynergia subtypes I or III (odds ratio, 7.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-28.8) and age younger than 67 years (odds ratio, 8.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-48.6) were associated with greater odds of having normal sphincter pressures. Female FI patients with normal anal sphincter pressures are younger, have higher rectal defecation pressures, and more often have type I or type III DD.

  6. Leg raise increases pressure in lower and upper esophageal sphincter among patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitnar, P; Stovicek, J; Andel, R; Arlt, J; Arltova, M; Smejkal, M; Kolar, P; Kobesova, A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relation between posturally increased intra-abdominal pressure and lower/upper esophageal sphincter pressure changes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. We used high resolution manometry to measure pressure changes in lower and upper esophageal sphincter during bilateral leg rise. We also examined whether the rate of lower and upper esophageal sphincter pressure would increase during leg raise differentially in individuals with versus without normal resting pressure. Fifty eight patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease participated in the study. High resolution manometry was performed in relaxed supine position, then lower and upper esophageal sphincter pressure was measured. Finally, the subjects were instructed to keep their legs lifted while performing 90-degree flexion at the hips and knees and the pressure was measured again. Paired t-test and independent samples t-test were used. There was a significant increase in both lower (P leg raise compared to the initial resting position. Individuals with initially higher pressure in lower esophageal sphincter (>10 mmHg) exhibited a greater pressure increase during leg raise than those with initially lower pressure (pressure ≤10 mmHg; P = 0.002). Similarly individuals with higher resting upper esophageal sphincter pressure (>44 mmHg) showed a greater pressure increase during leg raise than those with lower resting pressure (≤44 mmHg; P leg activities on intraesophageal pressure in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, indicating by means of high resolution manometry that diaphragmatic postural and sphincter function are likely interrelated in this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavioli, Margherita; Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible

  8. The impact of incontinence etiology on artificial urinary sphincter outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R. Miller

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the impact of incontinence etiology on artificial urinary sphincter (AUS device outcomes. Materials and Methods: We identified 925 patients who underwent primary AUS placement from 1983 to 2011. The etiology of incontinence was categorized as radical prostatectomy alone, radical prostatectomy with radiation, benign prostate resection, and those with cryotherapy as a salvage prostate cancer treatment. Hazard regression and competing risk analyses were used to determine the association of the etiology of incontinence with device outcomes. Results: The distribution of the 4 etiologies of incontinence included: 598 patients (64.6% treated with prostatectomy alone, 206 (22.2% with prostatectomy and pelvic radiation therapy, 104 (11.2% with benign prostate resection, and 17 (1.8% with prior cryotherapy. With a median follow-up of 4.9 years (interquartile range, 1.2–8.8 years, there was significant difference in the cumulative incidence of device infection/urethral erosion events between the four etiologies (p=0.003. On multivariable analysis, prior cryotherapy (reference prostatectomy alone; hazard ratio [HR], 3.44; p=0.01, older age (HR, 1.07; p=0.0009 and history of a transient ischemic attack (HR, 2.57; p=0.04 were associated with an increased risk of device infection or erosion. Notably, pelvic radiation therapy with prostatectomy was not associated with an increased risk of device infection or erosion (reference prostatectomy alone, p=0.30. Conclusions: Compared to prostatectomy alone, prior treatment with salvage cryotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer was associated with an increased risk of AUS infection/erosion, whereas radiation (in addition to prostatectomy was not.

  9. Artificial urinary sphincters for male stress urinary incontinence: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordon, Billy H; Singla, Nirmish; Singla, Ajay K

    2016-01-01

    The artificial urinary sphincter (AUS), which has evolved over many years, has become a safe and reliable treatment for stress urinary incontinence and is currently the gold standard. After 4 decades of existence, there is substantial experience with the AUS. Today AUS is most commonly placed for postprostatectomy stress urinary incontinence. Only a small proportion of urologists routinely place AUS. In a survey in 2005, only 4% of urologists were considered high-volume AUS implanters, performing >20 per year. Globally, ~11,500 AUSs are placed annually. Over 400 articles have been published regarding the outcomes of AUS, with a wide variance in success rates ranging from 61% to 100%. Generally speaking, the AUS has good long-term outcomes, with social continence rates of ~79% and high patient satisfaction usually between 80% and 90%. Despite good outcomes, a substantial proportion of patients, generally ~25%, will require revision surgery, with the rate of revision increasing with time. Complications requiring revision include infection, urethral atrophy, erosion, and mechanical failure. Most infections are gram-positive skin flora. Urethral atrophy and erosion lie on a spectrum resulting from the same problem, constant urethral compression. However, these two complications are managed differently. Mechanical failure is usually a late complication occurring on average later than infection, atrophy, or erosions. Various techniques may be used during revisions, including cuff relocation, downsizing, transcorporal cuff placement, or tandem cuff placement. Patient satisfaction does not appear to be affected by the need for revision as long as continence is restored. Additionally, AUS following prior sling surgery has comparable outcomes to primary AUS placement. Several new inventions are on the horizon, although none have been approved for use in the US at this point.

  10. Teaching the pharyngeal flap and sphincter pharyngoplasty: The sticky note method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jake J; Jabbour, Noel

    2015-11-01

    To demonstrate a cost-effective, quick, and easily reproducible three-dimensional sticky note model to enhance the understanding and conceptualization of the geometry and steps of the pharyngeal flap and sphincter pharyngoplasty. The method involves making specified incisions and rearrangements of readily available components, including disposable clear plastic cups, yellow and pink sticky notes, and white paper. Once assembly is complete, further incisions and remodeling are performed to simulate a pharyngeal flap or sphincter pharyngoplasty. The cost of the materials to make one model was $0.94. Average construction time was less than 10 min. This three-dimensional model is an efficient, interactive, and simple visual aid to teach surgical trainees the geometry and steps of the pharyngeal flap and sphincter pharyngoplasty. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro and in vivo assessment of an intelligent artificial anal sphincter in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zong-Hai; Shi, Fu-Jun; Chen, Fei; Liang, Fei-Xue; Li, Qiang; Yu, Jin-Long; Li, Zhou; Han, Xin-Jun

    2011-10-01

    Artificial sphincters have been developed for patients with fecal incontinence, but finding a way to make such sphincters more "intelligent" remains a problem. We assessed the function of a novel intelligent artificial anal sphincter (IAAS) in vitro and in vivo in rabbits. After the prosthesis was activated, rabbits were continent of feces during 81.4% of the activation time. The fecal detection unit provided 100% correct signals on stool in vitro and 65.7% in vivo. The results indicated that the IAAS could efficiently maintain continence and detect stool; however, the IAAS is still in the preliminary experimental stage and more work is needed to improve the system. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Disorders of the pelvic floor and anal sphincters; a gastroenterologist’s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamonn M.M. Quigley, MD FRCP FACP FACG FRCPI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The integration and coordination of the musculature of the pelvic floor and the anal sphincters is critical to two important physiological functions: defecation and continence. Consequently, disorders affecting the pelvic floor muscles, the anal sphincters, their innervation or their precise coordination will, depending on their nature, result either in obstructed defecation or fecal incontinence. Both of these disorders are much more common in females and the latter, in particular, is linked with parity. While the symptomatology, presentation and optimal mode of investigation of fecal incontinence are well standardized, considerable debate and controversy continues to surround the contributions of pelvic floor and anal sphincter dysfunction to chronic constipation and the optimal clinical approach to their investigation remains to be defined. In appropriately chosen cases surgical intervention may provide the best outcome for sufferers from incontinence; biofeedback approaches may be of value in both incontinence and obstructed defecation and surgery has little role to play in the latter.

  13. Health Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all health deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  14. Smooth muscle enfoldment internal sphincter construction after intersphincteric resection for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Heiying; Zhang, Bei; Yao, Hang; Du, Yonghong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Leng, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    To assess smooth muscle enfoldment and internal sphincter construction (SMESC) for improvement of continence after intersphincteric resection (ISR) for rectal cancer. Twenty-four Bama miniature pigs were randomly divided into a conventional ISR group and experimental SMESC group, with 12 pigs in each group. The proximal sigmoid colon was anastomosed directly to the anus in the ISR group. In the SMESC group, internal sphincter construction was performed. At 12 weeks before and after surgery, rectal resting pressure and anal canal length were assessed. Three-dimensional ultrasound was used to determine the thickness of the internal sphincter. After the animals were sacrificed, the rectum and anus were resected and pathological examinations were performed to evaluate the differences in sphincter thickness and muscle fibers. All 24 animals in the SMESC group and the ISR group survived the surgery. Twelve weeks post-surgery, the rectal resting pressure, length of the anal high-pressure zone and the postoperative internal sphincter thickness for the ISR group were significantly lower than for the SMESC group. There was a thickened area (about 2 cm) above the anastomotic stoma among animals from the SMESC group; in addition, the smooth muscles were significantly enlarged and enfolded when compared to the ISR group. This animal model study shows that the SMESC procedure achieved acceptable reconstruction of the internal anal neo-sphincter (IAN/S), without increasing surgical risk. However, the findings in this experimental animal model must be confirmed by clinical trials to determine the safety and efficacy of this procedure in clinical practice.

  15. Phasic or terminal detrusor overactivity in women: age, urodynamic findings and sphincter behavior relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise A. Valentini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To search for relationships between phasic (P and terminal (T DO with age, urodynamic findings and sphincter behavior during involuntary detrusor contraction in woman. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Urodynamic studies (triple lumen catheter 7F, seated position of 164 successive women referred for LUTS with diagnosis of DO were reviewed. Patients were stratified in 4 sub-groups: pre- (18-44y, peri- (45-54 y, post-menopause (55-74 y and oldest old (≥ 75 y. The urethral sensor was positioned at the level of the maximum urethral closure pressure for sphincter behavior analysis. A variation of at least 5 cmH2O in pressure (detrusor or urethra was chosen to assert DO or sphincter response. Sphincter response was classified as relaxation (re before or during DO, or steady (st. RESULTS: Occurrence of P and TDO was similar: 77 P and 87 T. The PDO group was significantly younger (p = 0.0003. TDO was more frequent in patients with a history of neurological disease. The percentage of PDO remained almost constant in age groups, while that of TDO increased with age from 6.7% to 23.2% (p = 0.0013. Uninhibited contraction occurred at a smaller bladder volume in the P group: 149 ± 95 vs. 221 ± 113 mL (p < 0.0001. Steady sphincter predominated in the TDO subgroup: 45.9% vs. 32.1% and increased significantly in each DO sub-group of ³ 75y. CONCLUSION: Steady sphincter during both P and TDO, and occurrence of TDO appear as specific of aging. The last result could be related to structural changes in the detrusor muscle with aging.

  16. Influence of preoperative (hyperthermic) radiochemotherapy on manometric anal sphincter function in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzmann, J.; Huenerbein, M.; Slisow, W.; Rau, B.; Gellermann, J.; Wust, P.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) followed by curative surgery is a well-accepted therapeutic option in the treatment of advanced rectal cancer. Usually, the anal sphincter is located in the irradiation area of a preoperative RCT regime. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of preoperative RCT on anal sphincter function. Patients and methods: between 1994 and 2000, 102 patients with rectal cancer stage uT3/uT4 were analyzed. All patients underwent radiotherapy with 45 Gy (5 x 1.8 Gy) including two cycles of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin (folinic acid) chemotherapy. 46 patients were treated additionally with up to five sessions of locoregional hyperthermia. The sphincter function was analyzed by perfusion manometry before preoperative therapy and 4 weeks after pretreatment had been finished. For statistics, the Wilcoxon signed rank test and mann-whitney U-test were used (SPSS 9.0 for Windows trademark). Results: the mean value of all 102 patients showed a significant reduction of the mean maximum resting pressure from 97 to 89 mmHg (p = 0.02). For the mean maximal squeeze pressure no significant difference could be shown (178 vs. 176 mmHg). For patients with distal (≤ 7.5 cm from anal verge) tumors the difference was highly significant (92 vs. 79 mmHg). Locoregional hyperthermia had no additional influence on sphincter function. Conclusion: preoperative RCT impairs sphincter function especially in patients with distal tumors. In addition, RCT could have a negative influence on the continence of patients who received sphincter-preserving surgery. (orig.) [de

  17. Smooth muscle enfoldment internal sphincter construction after intersphincteric resection for rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiying Jin

    Full Text Available To assess smooth muscle enfoldment and internal sphincter construction (SMESC for improvement of continence after intersphincteric resection (ISR for rectal cancer.Twenty-four Bama miniature pigs were randomly divided into a conventional ISR group and experimental SMESC group, with 12 pigs in each group. The proximal sigmoid colon was anastomosed directly to the anus in the ISR group. In the SMESC group, internal sphincter construction was performed. At 12 weeks before and after surgery, rectal resting pressure and anal canal length were assessed. Three-dimensional ultrasound was used to determine the thickness of the internal sphincter. After the animals were sacrificed, the rectum and anus were resected and pathological examinations were performed to evaluate the differences in sphincter thickness and muscle fibers.All 24 animals in the SMESC group and the ISR group survived the surgery. Twelve weeks post-surgery, the rectal resting pressure, length of the anal high-pressure zone and the postoperative internal sphincter thickness for the ISR group were significantly lower than for the SMESC group. There was a thickened area (about 2 cm above the anastomotic stoma among animals from the SMESC group; in addition, the smooth muscles were significantly enlarged and enfolded when compared to the ISR group.This animal model study shows that the SMESC procedure achieved acceptable reconstruction of the internal anal neo-sphincter (IAN/S, without increasing surgical risk. However, the findings in this experimental animal model must be confirmed by clinical trials to determine the safety and efficacy of this procedure in clinical practice.

  18. Faecal incontinence in patients with a sphincter defect: comparison of sphincteroplasty and sacral nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, F G; Chadi, S A; Cracco, A J; Sands, D R; Zutshi, M; Gurland, B; Da Silva, G; Wexner, S D

    2017-05-01

    Sphincteroplasty (SP) is used to treat faecal incontinence (FI) in patients with a sphincter defect. Although sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is used in patients, its outcome in patients with a sphincter defect has not been definitively evaluated. We compared the results of SP and SNS for FI associated with a sphincter defect. Patients treated by SNS or SP for FI with an associated sphincter defect were retrospectively identified from an Institutional Review Board approved prospective database. Patients with ultrasound evidence of a sphincter defect were matched by age, gender and body mass index. The main outcome measure was change in the Cleveland Clinic Florida Faecal Incontinence Score (CCF-FIS). Twenty-six female patients with a sphincter defect were included in the study. The 13 patients in each group were similar for age, body mass index, initial CCF-FIS and the duration of follow-up. No differences were observed in parity (P = 1.00), the rate of concomitant urinary incontinence (P = 0.62) or early postoperative complications. Within-group analysis showed a significant reduction of the CCF-FIS among patients having SNS (15.9-8.4; P = 0.003) but not SP (16.9-12.9; P = 0.078). There was a trend towards a more significant improvement in CCF-FIS in the SNS than in the SP group (post-treatment CCF-FIS 8.4 vs 12.9, P = 0.06). Net improvement in CCF-FIS was not significantly different between the groups (P = 0.06). Significant improvement in CCF-FIS was observed in patients treated with SNS but not SP patients. A trend towards better results was seen with SNS. Colorectal Disease © 2016 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Disposition of the striated urethral sphincter and its relation to the prostate in human fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano A. Favorito

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the arrangement of the muscle fibers of the striated urethral sphincter and its relationship with the prostate during the fetal period in humans. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed 17 prostates from well preserved fresh human fetuses ranging in age from 10 to 31 weeks postconception (WPC. Transversal sections were obtained and stained with Gomori's trichrome and immunolabeled with anti alpha-actin antibody. RESULTS: We found that the urethral striated sphincter (rabdosphincter is located on the periphery of the smooth muscle and there was no merge between striated and smooth muscle fibers in any fetal period. In the prostate apex, the striated sphincter shows a circular arrangement and covers completely the urethra externally, whereas adjacent to verumontanum, it looks like a "horseshoe" and covers only the anterior and lateral surfaces of the urethra. Near the bladder neck, in fetuses younger than 20 WPC, we have found striated muscle fibers only at the anterior surface of the prostate, while in fetuses older than 20 WPC, the striated muscle covers the anterior and lateral surfaces of the prostate. CONCLUSIONS: The urethral sphincter muscle covers the anterior and lateral surfaces of the urethra in all fetuses older than 20 WPC, close to the bladder neck and at the distal prostate. In the region of the prostate apex, the urethral sphincter covers completely the urethra circularly. The knowledge of the normal anatomy of the urethral sphincter in fetuses could be important to understand its alterations in congenital anomalies involving the base of the bladder, the bladder neck and the proximal urethra.

  20. Do changes in anal sphincter anatomy correlate with anal function in women with a history of vaginal delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, Sthela Maria; Dealcanfreitas, Iris Daiana; Regadas, Francisco Sergio Pinheiro; Rodrigues, Lusmar Veras; Fernandes, Graziela Olivia da Silva; Pereira, Jacyara de Jesus Rosa

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate anal sphincter anatomy using three-dimensional ultrasonography (3-DAUS) in incontinent women with vaginal delivery, correlate anatomical findings with symptoms of fecal incontinence and determine the effect of vaginal delivery on anal canal anatomy and function. Female with fecal incontinence and vaginal delivery were assessed with Wexner's score, manometry, and 3DAUS. A control group comprising asymptomatic nulliparous was included. Anal pressure, the angle of the defect and length of the external anal sphincter (EAS), the anterior and posterior internal anal sphincter (IAS), the EAS + puborectal and the gap were measured and correlated with score. Of the 62, 49 had fecal incontinence and 13 were asymptomatic. Twenty five had EAS defects, 8 had combined EAS+IAS defects, 16 had intact sphincters and continence scores were similar. Subjects with sphincter defects had a shorter anterior EAS, IAS and longer gap than women without defects. Those with a vaginal delivery and intact sphincters had a shorter anterior EAS and longer gap than nulliparous. We found correlations between resting pressure and anterior EAS and IAS length in patients with defects. Fecal incontinence symptoms did not correlate with anal pressures and anal sphincter anatomy changes, but women with sphincter defects have shorter anterior EAS and IAS and a longer gap.

  1. Artificial urethral sphincters: Value of plain film radiography in evaluation of prosthesis malfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, S.C.; Hansen, M.E.; Webster, G.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    Case records were reviewed to determine the diagnostic efficacy of plain radiographs in the evaluation of inflatable artificial urethral sphincters. Of 84 patients with prostheses, 21 (25%) developed complications. Fluid leaks were found in 16 patients who presented with recurrent incontinence; plain radiographs demonstrated an interval decrease in balloon reservoir diameter. Kinked tubing, which was evident on plain films, caused acute urinary retention in three patients. However, plain radiographs failed to detect evidence of prosthesis erosion into the urethra in either of two patients with this complication. Although urethroscopy is needed to detect urethral erosion, plain radiographs are inexpensive and reliable in the initial evaluation of artifical sphincter malfunction

  2. Video manometry of the sphincter of Oddi: a new aid for interpreting manometric tracings and excluding manometric artefacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madácsy, L; Middelfart, H V; Matzen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    was to develop a new method sphincter of Oddi video manometry-based on simultaneous ESOM and real-time endoscopic image analysis, and to investigate the usefulness of video manometry for detecting manometric artefacts during ESOM. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Seven consecutive patients who had undergone cholecystectomy...... and were referred with a suspicion of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction were investigated. Sphincter of Oddi pressure and endoscopic images (20 frames/s) were recorded simultaneously on a Synectics PC Polygraf computer system with a time-correlated basis, and then compared. RESULTS: On ESOM, 69 sphincter......, or retching, were also easily recognized using simultaneous ESOM and real-time endoscopic image analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Video manometry of the sphincter of Oddi is a promising new method for improving the analysis and documentation of ESOM tracings. It has several advantages over the conventional technique...

  3. Intrinsic contractures of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksima, Nader; Besh, Basil R

    2012-02-01

    Contractures of the intrinsic muscles of the fingers disrupt the delicate and complex balance of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles, which allows the hand to be so versatile and functional. The loss of muscle function primarily affects the interphalangeal joints but also may affect etacarpophalangeal joints. The resulting clinical picture is often termed, intrinsic contracture or intrinsic-plus hand. Disruption of the balance between intrinsic and extrinsic muscles has many causes and may be secondary to changes within the intrinsic musculature or the tendon unit. This article reviews diagnosis, etiology, and treatment algorithms in the management of intrinsic contractures of the fingers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Predicting Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Rob; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Intrinsic motivation can be predicted from participants' perceptions of the social environment and the task environment (Ryan & Deci, 2000)in terms of control, relatedness and competence. To determine the degree of independence of these factors 251 students in higher vocational education (physiotherapy and hotel management) indicated the…

  5. OCCULT ANAL SPHINCTER INJURIES (OASIS IN DEPARTMENT OF PERINATOLOGY IN LJUBLJANA – INCIDENCE AND RISK FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Jakopič

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vaginal delivery is the most important risk factors for development of faecal incontinence, which significantly affects quality of life. Foreign studies show OASIS occur at 20 to 40 % of vaginal deliveries. In Slovenia we recognize sphincter injuries at 1.7 % of deliveries, while true incidence of OASIS in our population remains unknown. Caesarean section prevents anal sphincter injuries. Known risk factors in foreign studies include prolonged second stage of labour, fetal weight > 3500 g, malpresentation, forceps delivery, maternal age more than 35 years at the time of first delivery, first delivery. Few women complain about defecatory problems in puerperium unless they are directly asked about them, so true incidence of such injuries is grossly underestimated. Previously compensated anal sphincter dysfunction can clinically manifest as late as in menopause. The most probable cause is atrophy of muscle and fibrous tissue of pelvic floor and anal sphincter due to lack of estrogen support in this period. With anal ultrasound we tried to determine the incidence of occult damage to anal sphincter in primiparas after vaginal delivery and the relation of injury to symptoms 6 weeks after delivery and identify possible risk factors in our population. We also tried to find out how many patients with anal sphincter injury become symptomatic immediately after deliv- ery. Methods: From January to June 2009 we examined 26 primiparas after vaginal delivery in the Ljubljana Maternity Hospital with anal ultrasound and compared various data about the delivery from our national delivery form. We excluded all patients with caesarean section, recognized anal sphincter injury at the time of the delivery or previous anorectal surgery, history of irritable bowel syndrome or pre-existing inflammatory bowel disease. All patients completed a bowel-function questionnaire, which included questions about faecal urgency and involuntary passing of gas, liquid or

  6. Endoanal MRI of the anal sphincter complex: correlation with cross-sectional anatomy and histology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Hussain (Shahid); J. Stoker (Jacob); A.W. Zwamborn; J.C. den Hollander (Jan); J.-W. Kuiper (Jan-Willem); C.A. Entius; J.S. Lameris

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study was to correlate the in vivo endoanal MRI findings of the anal sphincter with the cross-sectional anatomy and histology. Fourteen patients with rectal tumours were examined with a rigid endoanal MR coil before undergoing

  7. Endoanal MRI of the anal sphincter complex: correlation with cross-sectional anatomy and histology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussain, S. M.; Stoker, J.; Zwamborn, A. W.; den Hollander, J. C.; Kuiper, J. W.; Entius, C. A.; Laméris, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate the in vivo endoanal MRI findings of the anal sphincter with the cross-sectional anatomy and histology. Fourteen patients with rectal tumours were examined with a rigid endoanal MR coil before undergoing abdominoperineal resection. In addition, 12 cadavers

  8. Subtle lower esophageal sphincter relaxation abnormalities in patients with unexplained esophageal dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herregods, T. V. K.; van Hoeij, F. B.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2018-01-01

    Esophageal dysphagia is a relatively common symptom. We aimed to evaluate whether subtle, presently not acknowledged forms of dysfunction of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could explain dysphagia in a subset of patients with normal findings at high-resolution manometry (HRM) according to the

  9. Prolonged-Release Oxycodone/Naloxone Improves Anal Sphincter Relaxation Compared to Oxycodone Plus Macrogol 3350

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Brock, Christina; Grønlund, Debbie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioid analgesics inhibit anal sphincter function and contribute to opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD). However, it is unknown whether the inhibition can be reduced by opioid antagonism with prolonged-release (PR) naloxone and how this compares to laxative treatment. AIMS: To com...

  10. Current Evaluation of Upper Oesophageal Sphincter Opening in Dysphagia Practice: An International SLT Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Julie; Walshe, Margaret; McMahon, Barry P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assessment of adequate upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) opening during swallowing is an integral component of dysphagia evaluation. Aims: To ascertain speech and language therapists' (SLTs) satisfaction with current methods for assessing UOS function in people with dysphagia and to identify challenges encountered by SLTs with UOS…

  11. Long-Term Results of External Upper Esophageal Sphincter Myotomy for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kos, M.P.; David, E.F.; Knol, E.C.; Mahieu, H.F.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the efficacy of external myotomy of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) for oropharyngeal dysphagia. In the period 1991-2006, 28 patients with longstanding dysphagia and/or aspiration problems of different etiologies underwent UES myotomy as a single surgical

  12. Sphincter-Preserving Surgery for Low Rectal Cancers: Incidence and Risk Factors for Permanent Stoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Joanna Chung Kiu; Foo, Dominic Chi Chung; Wei, Rockson; Law, Wai Lun

    2017-11-01

    Advances in surgical techniques and paradigm changes in rectal cancer treatment have led to a drastic decline in the abdominoperineal resection rate, and sphincter-preserving operation is possible in distal rectal cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the long-term incidence of permanent stoma after sphincter-preserving surgery for low rectal cancer and its corresponding risk factors. From 2000 to 2014, patients who underwent sphincter-preserving low anterior resection for low rectal cancer (within 5 cm from the anal verge) were included. The occurrence of permanent stoma over time and its risk factors were investigated by using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. This study included 194 patients who underwent ultra-low anterior resection for distal rectal cancer, and the median follow-up period was 77 months for the surviving patients. Forty-six (23.7%) patients required a permanent stoma eventfully. Anastomotic-related complications and disease progression were the main reasons for permanent stoma. Clinical anastomotic leakage (HR 5.72; 95% CI 2.31-14.12; p consideration when contemplating sphincter-preserving surgery.

  13. Premature closure of the upper esophageal sphincter as a cause of severe deglutition disorder in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Husby, Steffen; Kruse-Andersen, Søren

    2005-01-01

    of these causes. An 8-week-old infant was referred because of suspicion of cricopharyngeal achalasia causing persistent swallowing problems and failure to thrive. Manometry results showed normal resting tone and relaxation but premature closure of the upper esophageal sphincter. The infant was treated...

  14. Le sphincter artificiel urinaire chez l'homme a propos de 23 cas The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Routine investigations included urine analysis, assessment of a possible concomitant inflammation or infection, urethroscopy and a urodynamic work-up. Pelvic floor training was done in all cases, while macroplastique was administered in 15 cases only. Finally, an artificial sphincter was placed in periurethral position in all ...

  15. Effect of L-NMMA on postprandial transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, D. P.; Tiel-van Buul, M. M.; Tytgat, G. N.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2000-01-01

    In a previous study we showed that nitric oxide (NO) synthesis inhibition by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) reduced the number of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) triggered by gastric balloon distention. The role of NO in postprandial TLESRs and gastroesophageal reflux,

  16. Location of bladder and urethral sphincter motoneurons in the male guinea pig (Cavia porcellus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, R; Izhar, Z; Gerrits, PO; Miner, W; Holstege, G; Gerrits, Peter O.

    2004-01-01

    Although the guinea pig is used widely in experimental medical research, including in studies on micturition control, the spinal origin of preganglionic parasympathetic bladder and somatic external urethral sphincter motoneurons is not known. In the male, guinea pig using wheat germ

  17. Three-Dimensional Endoanal Ultrasound Features of the Anal Sphincter in Asian Primigravidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Dakshitha Praneeth; Senaratne, Supun; Senanayake, Hemantha; Samarasekera, Dharmabandu Nandadeva

    2018-04-17

    The normal parameters of 3-dimensional endoanal ultrasound (3DEAUS) of the anal sphincter have not been reported for primigravidae or pregnant women at present. 3DEAUS parameters in Asian primigravidae were assessed in this study. We analyzed 3DEAUS data of 101 consecutives Asian primigravidae, assessed in the early third trimester. The assessment was performed with a rigid ultrasonic probe (Olympus ® RU 12M-R1 probe and EU-ME1 ultrasound system (Olympus Corp., Shinjuku, Japan). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to detect the differences in pressure in different quadrants. The participants had a mean age of 24.7 (standard deviation [SD], 5.1) years. The Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score was normal in all participants. The anal sphincter complex had 3 characteristic segments that were identifiable: upper, middle and lower. The puborectalis muscle was identified as a striated "V"-shaped sling, and its mean thickness was 7.44 (SD, 1.41) mm. The mean thickness of internal (IAS) and external (EAS) sphincters at the mid-sphincter level were 1.78 (SD, 0.59) and 5.49 (SD, 1.21) mm, respectively. The EAS measured 6.02 (SD, 1.07) mm at the lower sphincter level. The statistically significant differences seen in the in quadrants were: the IAS was thicker anteriorly (Z = -2.642; P = .008), the EAS at both midsphincter level (Z = -3.70; P IAS was thicker at the 9 o'clock position (Z = -2.081; P = .037). Good symmetry at all 3 levels was seen in the EAS (including the puborectalis muscle). Normal values of 3DEAUS for primigravidae have been identified and may serve as reference values for other laboratories. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  18. Morphologic changes of the anal sphincter musculature during and after temporary stool deviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, M; Fein, M; Fuchs, K H; Bussen, D; Grun, C; Thiede, A

    2001-04-01

    Temporary stool deviation, using a stoma, is a well-known surgical principle to protect low colorectal or coloanal anastomoses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate any morphologic changes with regard to the anal sphincter muscles during and after temporary ileostomy. Forty-four patients with rectal carcinomas were studied prospectively. All patients underwent low anterior resection. Reconstruction was performed using either a coloanal pouch or a straight end-to-end anastomosis. A protective stoma was fashioned in all 44 patients (ileostomy n=41; colostomy n=3). Stoma closure was carried out after a median of 85 days (41-330 days). Using a standard protocol, anal-sphincter thickness [m. puborectalis, external anal sphincter (EAS) and internal anal (IAS) sphincter] was assessed by means of endoanal ultrasonography preoperatively, at the time of stoma closure, and every 3 months thereafter for 1 year. The diameter of the puborectal muscle decreased from a median preoperative value of 6.3 mm to 5.7 mm at the time of stoma closure (P=0.03). After 3 months, 6.2 mm was measured. This value remained stable for the complete follow-up period. Similar results were recorded for the EAS. The IAS thickness remained stable throughout the study period, measuring between 2.1 mm and 2.4 mm. Temporary stool deviation does lead to morphologic changes of the anal sphincter. While the smooth muscle remains unchanged, the striated counterpart undergoes atrophic transformation. However, after passage reconstruction, i.e., stoma closure, a rapid regeneration of the voluntary muscles is observed.

  19. Sacral neuromodulation for faecal incontinence following obstetric sphincter injury - outcome of percutaneous nerve evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydningen, M B; Dehli, T; Wilsgaard, T; Lindsetmo, R O; Kumle, M; Stedenfeldt, M; Norderval, S

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE) in women with faecal incontinence (FI) following obstetric anal sphincter injury and to relate the outcomes to baseline factors, with special emphasis on the extent of the sphincter defect. This was a prospective study at a tertiary colorectal referral unit at the University Hospital of North Norway conducted from 2012 to 2014. Sixty-three women underwent a 3-week PNE using a tined lead and the Verify ® external neurostimulator. The primary outcome was efficacy, defined as the percentage reduction in weekly FI episodes, and patients with a reduction of 50% or more were defined as responders. Baseline factors affecting the primary outcome were explored. Sphincter defects were classified with a validated three-dimensional endoanal ultrasound defect score. Fifty-six (89%) of the 63 women were responders with a reduction in weekly FI episodes of 94.5%, from a median (interquartile range) of 4.8 (2.0-11.0) to 0.5 (0-2.0) (P < 0.001). Twenty-nine (52%) reported no weekly FI episodes, and urgency episodes disappeared in 18 (32%). In the multivariable linear regression model, efficacy was related to concomitant urinary incontinence (P = 0.04), body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.03) and pain during PNE (P = 0.046) but not to the extent of the sphincter defect (P = 0.1). Responders had a higher St Mark's score than nonresponders (P = 0.046). The vast majority of women had successful PNE tests. Responders had higher baseline St Mark's scores than nonresponders. Efficacy was related to concomitant urinary incontinence, BMI and pain, not to the extent of the sphincter defect. Colorectal Disease © 2016 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Roland Bénabou; Jean Tirole

    2003-01-01

    A central tenet of economics is that individuals respond to incentives. For psychologists and sociologists, in contrast, rewards and punishments are often counterproductive, because they undermine "intrinsic motivation". We reconcile these two views, showing how performance incentives offered by an informed principal (manager, teacher, parent) can adversely impact an agent's (worker, child) perception of the task, or of his own abilities. Incentives are then only weak reinforcers in the short...

  1. Intrinsic and extrinsic mortality reunited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, Jacob J E; Wensink, Maarten J; Rozing, Maarten P

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic and extrinsic mortality are often separated in order to understand and measure aging. Intrinsic mortality is assumed to be a result of aging and to increase over age, whereas extrinsic mortality is assumed to be a result of environmental hazards and be constant over age. However......, allegedly intrinsic and extrinsic mortality have an exponentially increasing age pattern in common. Theories of aging assert that a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic stressors underlies the increasing risk of death. Epidemiological and biological data support that the control of intrinsic as well...... as extrinsic stressors can alleviate the aging process. We argue that aging and death can be better explained by the interaction of intrinsic and extrinsic stressors than by classifying mortality itself as being either intrinsic or extrinsic. Recognition of the tight interaction between intrinsic and extrinsic...

  2. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected.

  3. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage decreases lower esophageal sphincter pressure and increases frequency of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Akash; Meshram, Megha; Gopan, Amrit; Ganjewar, Vaibhav; Kumar, Praveen; Bhatia, Shobna J

    2012-06-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (tLESR) and decreased basal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure are postulated mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux (GER). There is conflicting evidence on the effect of carbonated drinks on lower esophageal sphincter function. This study was conducted to assess the effect of a carbonated beverage on tLESR and LES pressure. High resolution manometry tracings (16 channel water-perfused, Trace 1.2, Hebbard, Australia) were obtained in 18 healthy volunteers (6 men) for 30 min each at baseline, and after 200 mL of chilled potable water and 200 mL of chilled carbonated cola drink (Pepsi [Pepsico India Ltd]). The sequence of administration of the drinks was determined by random number method generated by a computer. The analysis of tracings was done using TRACE 1.2 software by a physician who was unaware of the sequence of administration of fluids. The mean (SD) age of the participant was 37.3 (12.9) years. The median (range) frequency of tLESr was higher after the carbonated beverage (10.5 [0-26]) as compared to baseline (0 [0-3], p = 0.005) as well as after water (1 [0-14], p = 0.010). The LES pressure decreased after ingestion of the carbonated beverage (18.5 [11-37] mmHg) compared to baseline (40.5 [25-66] mmHg, p = 0.0001) and after water (34 [15-67] mmHg, p = 0.003). Gastric pressure was not different in the three groups. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage increases tLESr and lowers LES pressure in healthy subjects.

  4. The Impact of Urethral Risk Factors on Transcorporeal Artificial Urinary Sphincter Erosion Rates and Device Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Stephen; Dmochowski, Roger R; Brown, Elizabeth T; Reynolds, W Stuart; Kaufman, Melissa R; Milam, Douglas F

    2015-12-01

    We report the impact of urethral risk factors on erosion rates and device survival outcomes after transcorporeal artificial urinary sphincter placement. We performed a retrospective analysis of all transcorporeal artificial urinary sphincters placed at a single institution between January 2000 and May 2014. We assessed patient demographic, comorbid diseases and surgical characteristics for risk factors considered poor for device survival. Risk factors were compared to postoperative complications requiring explantation, including cuff erosion, infection and device revision. A total of 37 transcorporeal artificial urinary sphincters were placed in 35 men. Placement was performed as a primary procedure in 21 of 37 cases (56.8%) and as salvage in the remainder. In this transcorporeal population there were 7 explantations (18.9%) due to erosion in 4 cases, cuff downsizing in 2 and infection in 1. Median followup from implantation to last followup was 8.5 months (range 0.9 to 63). Median time from artificial urinary sphincter placement to explantation was 17.3 months (range 0.9 to 63) and time specifically to transcorporeal erosion was 7.4 months (range 0.9 to 26). On univariate analysis no parameters were associated with sphincter cuff erosion but a history of an inflatable penile prosthesis was associated with a higher device explantation rate (60% vs 12.5%, p=0.04). No associations were revealed on multivariate logistic analysis. All 4 cuff erosion cases demonstrated greater than 2 urethral risk factors, including prior radiation therapy in all. The probability of cuff erosion in patients with 2 or more urethral risk factors was 1.65 times the probability of erosion in those with 0 or 1 urethral risk factor (95% CI 1.3, 2.2). The proportion of patients free of erosion at 35 months was 100% in those with 0 or 1 urethral risk factor and 64% in those with 2 or more risk factors (log rank test p=0.00). Similarly the proportion of patients free of explantation at 35 months

  5. Describing a new syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezih Akca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Little seems to be known about the sexual dysfunction (SD in lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Aims: Investigation of sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patient with lumbar disc hernitions. Settings and Design: A retrospective analysis. Materials and Methods: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patients admitted with lumbar disc herniations between September 2012-March 2014. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the Predictive Analytics SoftWare (PASW Statistics 18.0 for Windows (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois. The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to evaluate the difference between patients. Results: Four patients with sexual and sphincter dysfunction were found, including two women and two men, aged between 20 and 52 years. All of them admitted without low back pain. In addition, on neurological examination, reflex and motor deficit were not found. However, almost all patients had perianal sensory deficit and sexual and sphincter dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of three patients displayed a large extruded disc fragment at L5-S1 level on the left side. In fourth patient, there were not prominent disc herniations. There was not statistically significant difference between pre-operative and post-operative sexual function, anal-urethral sphincter function, and perianal sensation score. A syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation with sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness was noted. We think that it is crucial for neurosurgeons to early realise that paralysis of the sphincter and sexual dysfunction are possible in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. Conclusion: A syndrome with perianal sensory deficit, paralysis of the sphincter, and sexual dysfunction may occur in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. The improvement of perianal sensory deficit after surgery was

  6. Electromagnetic effects on the biological tissue surrounding a transcutaneous transformer for an artificial anal sphincter system*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Peng; Yang, Bang-hua; Shao, Yong; Yan, Guo-zheng; Liu, Hua

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the electromagnetic effects on the biological tissue surrounding a transcutaneous transformer for an artificial anal sphincter. The coupling coils and human tissues, including the skin, fat, muscle, liver, and blood, were considered. Specific absorption rate (SAR) and current density were analyzed by a finite-length solenoid model. First, SAR and current density as a function of frequency (10–107 Hz) for an emission current of 1.5 A were calculated under different tissue thickness. Then relations between SAR, current density, and five types of tissues under each frequency were deduced. As a result, both the SAR and current density were below the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The results show that the analysis of these data is very important for developing the artificial anal sphincter system. PMID:21121071

  7. Artificial urinary sphincter implantation: an important component of complex surgery for urinary tract reconstruction in patients with refractory urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Liao, Limin

    2018-01-08

    We review our outcomes and experience of artificial urinary sphincter implantation for patients with refractory urinary incontinence from different causes. Between April 2002 and May 2017, a total of 32 patients (median age, 40.8 years) with urinary incontinence had undergone artificial urinary sphincter placement during urinary tract reconstruction. Eighteen patients (56.3%) were urethral injuries associated urinary incontinence, 9 (28.1%) had neurogenic urinary incontinence and 5 (15.6%) were post-prostatectomy incontinence. Necessary surgeries were conducted before artificial urinary sphincter placement as staged procedures, including urethral strictures incision, sphincterotomy, and augmentation cystoplasty. The mean follow-up time was 39 months. At the latest visit, 25 patients (78.1%) maintained the original artificial urinary sphincter. Four patients (12.5%) had artificial urinary sphincter revisions. Explantations were performed in three patients. Twenty-four patients were socially continent, leading to the overall success rate as 75%. The complication rate was 28.1%; including infections (n = 4), erosions (n = 4), and mechanical failure (n = 1). The impact of urinary incontinence on the quality of life measured by the visual analogue scale dropped from 7.0 ± 1.2 to 2.2 ± 1.5 (P urinary sphincter implantation in our center are unique, and the procedure is an effective treatment as a part of urinary tract reconstruction in complicated urinary incontinence cases with complex etiology.

  8. Sphincter (ring muscle) gymnastics for spinal cord injured and spinal cord transected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yom-Tov, S

    2000-07-01

    Sphincter gymnastics seem to be able to recruit central pattern generators--networks of neurons that generate motor patterns--through peripheral rhythmic stimuli and to activate them without supraspinal signals. This physical therapy method is thus suitable for treating spinal cord injured and spinal cord transected patients, for it can reach below the injured segment and feed signals into the central nervous system, thus activating vital organs. This article presents some observations and discusses a possible mechanism.

  9. Endoanal MRI of the anal sphincter complex: correlation with cross-sectional anatomy and histology.

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, S M; Stoker, J; Zwamborn, A W; Den Hollander, J C; Kuiper, J W; Entius, C A; Laméris, J S

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study was to correlate the in vivo endoanal MRI findings of the anal sphincter with the cross-sectional anatomy and histology. Fourteen patients with rectal tumours were examined with a rigid endoanal MR coil before undergoing abdominoperineal resection. In addition, 12 cadavers were used to obtain cross-sectional anatomical sections. The images were correlated with the histology and anatomy of the resected rectal specimens as well as with the cross-sectional a...

  10. The expression of tachykinin receptors in the human lower esophageal sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Chen, Que T; Li, Jing H; Geng, Xian; Liu, Jun F; Li, He F; Feng, Yong; Li, Jia L; Drew, Paul A

    2016-03-05

    Mammalian tachykinins are a family of neuropeptides which are potent modulators of smooth muscle function with a significant contractile effect on human smooth muscle preparations. Tachykinins act via three distinct G protein-coupled neurokinin (NK) receptors, NK1, NK2 and NK3, coded by the genes TACR1, TACR2 and TACR3 respectively. The purpose of this paper was to measure the mRNA and protein expression of these receptors and their isoforms in the clasp and sling fibers of the human lower esophageal sphincter complex and circular muscle from the adjacent distal esophagus and proximal stomach. We found differences in expression between the different receptors within these muscle types, but the rank order of the receptor expression did not differ between the different muscle types. The rank order of the mRNA expression was TACR2 (α isoform)>TACR2 (β isoform)>TACR1 (short isoform)>TACR1 (long isoform)>TACR3. The rank order of the protein expression was NK2>NK1>NK3. This is the first report of the measurement of the transcript and protein expression of the tachykinin receptors and their isoforms in the muscles of the human lower esophageal sphincter complex. The results provide evidence that the tachykinin receptors could contribute to the regulation of the human lower esophageal sphincter, particularly the TACR2 α isoform which encodes the functional isoform of the tachykinin NK2 receptor was the most highly expressed of the tachykinin receptors in the muscles associated with the lower esophageal sphincter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional Morphology of Anal Sphincter Complex Unveiled by High Definition Manometery & 3-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizada, Varuna; Bhargava, Valmik; Karsten, Anna; Mittal, Ravinder K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Anal sphincter complex consists of anatomically overlapping internal anal sphincter (IAS), external anal sphincter (EAS) & puborectalis muscle (PRM). We determined the functional morphology of anal sphincter muscles using high definition manometery (HDAM), 3D-ultrasound (US) and Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Patients We studied 15 nulliparous women. Interventions HDAM probe equipped with 256 pressure transducers was used to measure the anal canal pressures at rest and squeeze. Lengths of IAS, PRM and EAS were determined from the 3D-US images and superimposed on the HDAM plots. Movements of anorectal angle with squeeze were determined from the dynamic MR images. Results HDAM plots reveal that anal canal pressures are highly asymmetric in the axial and circumferential direction. Anal canal length determined by the 3D-US images is slightly smaller than measured by HDAM. The EAS (1.9 ± 0.5 cm long) and PRM (1.7 ± 0.4 cm long) surround distal and proximal parts of the anal canal respectively. With voluntary contraction, anal canal pressures increase in the proximal (PRM) and distal (EAS zone) parts of anal canal. Posterior peak pressure in the anal canal moves cranially in relationship to the anterior peak pressure, with squeeze. Similar to the movement of peak posterior pressure, MR images show cranial movement of anorectal angle with squeeze. Conclusion Our study proves that the PRM is responsible for the closure of the cranial part of anal canal. HDAM, in addition to measuring constrictor function can also record the elevator function of levator ani/pelvic floor muscles. PMID:21951657

  12. Impact of castration with or without alpha-tocopherol supplementation on the urethral sphincter of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Kracochansky

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the impact of low levels of testosterone induced by orchiectomy and the effect of alpha-tocopherol supplementation on oxidative stress in the urethral sphincter. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty male Wistar rats weighing 250-300g were divided into four groups with 10 each: Sham group; Orchiectomy group: bilateral orchiectomy; Orchiectomy-pre-Tocopherol group: bilateral orchiectomy preceded by alpha-tocopherol supplementation for four weeks; Orchiectomy-full-Tocopherol group: bilateral orchiectomy with alpha-tocopherol supplementation for four weeks preceding the procedure and for eight weeks afterwards. At the protocol end, animals were euthanized and had the sphincter analyzed stereologically focusing on collagen and muscle fibers percentage. Oxidative stress levels were determined using 8-epi-PGF2. RESULTS: The 8-epi-PGF2 levels were statistically higher (p < 0.0003 in the Orchiectomy group compared to others groups while Sham and Orchiectomy-full-Tocopherol groups presented statistically similar values (p = 0.52. Collagen volumetric densities were significantly lower in Sham and Orchiectomy-full-Tocopherol groups (p < 0.022. Sham group presented statistically greater muscle fiber percent. CONCLUSION: Castration caused oxidative stress in the urethral sphincter complex, with increased collagen deposition. Alpha-tocopherol had a protective effect and its supplementation for twelve weeks provided the greatest protection.

  13. Functional mapping of the pelvic floor and sphincter muscles from high-density surface EMG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun; He, Jinbao; Khavari, Rose; Boone, Timothy B; Zhang, Yingchun

    2016-11-01

    Knowledge of the innervation of pelvic floor and sphincter muscles is of great importance to understanding the pathophysiology of female pelvic floor dysfunctions. This report presents our high-density intravaginal and intrarectal electromyography (EMG) probes and a comprehensive innervation zone (IZ) imaging technique based on high-density EMG readings to characterize the IZ distribution. Both intravaginal and intrarectal probes are covered with a high-density surface electromyography electrode grid (8 × 8). Surface EMG signals were acquired in ten healthy women performing maximum voluntary contractions of their pelvic floor. EMG decomposition was performed to separate motor-unit action potentials (MUAPs) and then localize their IZs. High-density surface EMG signals were successfully acquired over the vaginal and rectal surfaces. The propagation patterns of muscle activity were clearly visualized for multiple muscle groups of the pelvic floor and anal sphincter. During each contraction, up to 218 and 456 repetitions of motor units were detected by the vaginal and rectal probes, respectively. MUAPs were separated with their IZs identified at various orientations and depths. The proposed probes are capable of providing a comprehensive mapping of IZs of the pelvic floor and sphincter muscles. They can be employed as diagnostic and preventative tools in clinical practices.

  14. Sphincter preservation for distal rectal cancer--a goal worth achieving at all costs?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulsow, Jürgen

    2011-02-21

    To assess the merits of currently available treatment options in the management of patients with low rectal cancer, a review of the medical literature pertaining to the operative and non-operative management of low rectal cancer was performed, with particular emphasis on sphincter preservation, oncological outcome, functional outcome, morbidity, quality of life, and patient preference. Low anterior resection (AR) is technically feasible in an increasing proportion of patients with low rectal cancer. The cost of sphincter preservation is the risk of morbidity and poor functional outcome in a significant proportion of patients. Transanal and endoscopic surgery are attractive options in selected patients that can provide satisfactory oncological outcomes while avoiding the morbidity and functional sequelae of open total mesorectal excision. In complete responders to neo-adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, a non-operative approach may prove to be an option. Abdominoperineal excision (APE) imposes a permanent stoma and is associated with significant incidence of perineal morbidity but avoids the risk of poor functional outcome following AR. Quality of life following AR and APE is comparable. Given the choice, most patients will choose AR over APE, however patients following APE positively appraise this option. In striving toward sphincter preservation the challenge is not only to achieve the best possible oncological outcome, but also to ensure that patients with low rectal cancer have realistic and accurate expectations of their treatment choice so that the best possible overall outcome can be obtained by each individual.

  15. Sphincter preservation for distal rectal cancer--a goal worth achieving at all costs?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulsow, Jurgen

    2012-02-01

    To assess the merits of currently available treatment options in the management of patients with low rectal cancer, a review of the medical literature pertaining to the operative and non-operative management of low rectal cancer was performed, with particular emphasis on sphincter preservation, oncological outcome, functional outcome, morbidity, quality of life, and patient preference. Low anterior resection (AR) is technically feasible in an increasing proportion of patients with low rectal cancer. The cost of sphincter preservation is the risk of morbidity and poor functional outcome in a significant proportion of patients. Transanal and endoscopic surgery are attractive options in selected patients that can provide satisfactory oncological outcomes while avoiding the morbidity and functional sequelae of open total mesorectal excision. In complete responders to neo-adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, a non-operative approach may prove to be an option. Abdominoperineal excision (APE) imposes a permanent stoma and is associated with significant incidence of perineal morbidity but avoids the risk of poor functional outcome following AR. Quality of life following AR and APE is comparable. Given the choice, most patients will choose AR over APE, however patients following APE positively appraise this option. In striving toward sphincter preservation the challenge is not only to achieve the best possible oncological outcome, but also to ensure that patients with low rectal cancer have realistic and accurate expectations of their treatment choice so that the best possible overall outcome can be obtained by each individual.

  16. The current role of the artificial urinary sphincter in male and female urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islah, Mar; Cho, Sung Yong; Son, Hwancheol

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of the artificial urinary sphincter has affected the current surgical options for urinary incontinence. With its unique features, the artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) has been an attractive option for the treatment of urinary incontinence regardless of gender. The current paper discusses the indications, contraindications, types of devices, surgical approaches, outcomes, and complications of the AUS in the treatment of both male and female urinary incontinence. A PubMed review of the available literature was performed and articles reporting implantation of artificial urinary sphincters for urinary incontinence in both male and female patients were evaluated. There was a comparable satisfactory continence rate after the implantation of an AUS (59~97% in males vs. 60~92% in females). In comparison, there were some differences in the indications, contraindications, surgical approaches, outcomes, and complications of the AUS implanted for urinary incontinence in male and female patients. AUS implantation is a safe and effective surgical option for the treatment of urinary incontinence of various etiologies. Continuous evolution of the device has made it an attractive option for the treatment of both male and female urinary incontinence.

  17. A novel artificial anal sphincter system in an in vitro and in vivo experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guo-Zheng; Liu, Hua; Jiang, Ping-Ping; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Yong-Bing; Ding, Zai-Xian

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents some of the latest progress in the development of a novel artificial anal sphincter system (AASS) to treat severe fecal incontinence. We have redesigned and integrated an intelligent, remote-controlled artificial anal sphincter based on biological signal feedback mechanisms. The device consists of an external telemetry unit, an internal artificial anal sphincter (IAAS), and a transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS). The mechanical medical micropump of the IAAS can realize bidirectional flow with a maximum flow rate of 8.5 ml/min and can build backpressure up to 170 kPa. The design of the prosthesis reduces occlusion pressure and allows for low inflation volumes (9 mL-10.5 mL); operating pressures between 4.05 kPa and 7.16 kPa indicate that the risk of ischemic injury to the bowel is minimal. Furthermore, the rechargeable battery based on TETS puts the operation time at an estimated 2 days. The performance characteristics of the AASS and its efficiency in achieving continence and sensing the stool inside the anorectum were evaluated in vitro and in vivo in a pig model. Experimental results confirm that the system can maintain continence and build the sense of defecation successfully. Moreover, this innovation can be integrated into not only severe fecal incontinence, erectile dysfunction, and therapy-resistant reflux disease, but also morbid adiposity therapeutic AASS applications.

  18. Intrinsic Chevrolets at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.; Collins, J.C.; Ellis, S.D.; Gunion, J.F.; Mueller, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of the production at high energy of heavy quarks, supersymmetric particles and other large mass colored systems via the intrinsic twist-six components in the proton wave function is discussed. While the existing data do not rule out the possible relevance of intrinsic charm production at present energies, the extrapolation of such intrinsic contributions to very high masses and energies suggests that they will not play an important role at the SSC

  19. Intrinsically dynamic population models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Schoen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsically dynamic models (IDMs depict populations whose cumulative growth rate over a number of intervals equals the product of the long term growth rates (that is the dominant roots or dominant eigenvalues associated with each of those intervals. Here the focus is on the birth trajectory produced by a sequence of population projection (Leslie matrices. The elements of a Leslie matrix are represented as straightforward functions of the roots of the matrix, and new relationships are presented linking the roots of a matrix to its Net Reproduction Rate and stable mean age of childbearing. Incorporating mortality changes in the rates of reproduction yields an IDM when the subordinate roots are held constant over time. In IDMs, the birth trajectory generated by any specified sequence of Leslie matrices can be found analytically. In the Leslie model with 15 year age groups, the constant subordinate root assumption leads to reasonable changes in the age pattern of fertility, and equations (27 and (30 provide the population size and structure that result from changing levels of net reproduction. IDMs generalize the fixed rate stable population model. They can characterize any observed population, and can provide new insights into dynamic demographic behavior, including the momentum associated with gradual or irregular paths to zero growth.

  20. Can three-dimensional high-resolution anorectal manometry detect anal sphincter defects in patients with faecal incontinence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie, A; Iriana, S; Pimentel, M; Murrell, Z; Fleshner, P; Zaghiyan, K

    2017-05-01

    Endoanal ultrasound (EAUS) is the gold standard for detecting anal sphincter defects in patients with faecal incontinence (FI), while anorectal manometry evaluates sphincter function. Three-dimensional high-resolution anorectal manometry (3D HRAM) is a newer modality with the potential to assess both sphincter function and anatomy. The purpose of the present study was to compare 3D HRAM with 3D EAUS for the detection of anal sphincter defects in patients with FI. A linkage analysis was performed between the 3D HRAM and 3D EAUS databases of a tertiary referral centre to identify patients with FI who underwent both 3D EAUS and 3D HRAM. With 3D HRAM, a defect was defined as any pressure measurement below 25 mmHg at rest with at least 18° of continuous expansion. The 3D HRAM findings were compared with those of 3D EAUS. The study cohort included 39 patients with a mean age of 64.7 ± 15.2 years (SD); and 31 (79%) were female. Eight (21%) patients had an anal sphincter defect on EAUS with a median size of 93° (range 40°-136°). Fourteen (36%) had a defect shown by 3D HRAM with a median size of 144° (36°-180°). The sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of 3D HRAM in detecting a sphincter defect were 75%, 74%, 43% and 92%, respectively. With a negative predictive value of 92%, 3D HRAM may be a useful screening method for ruling out a sphincter defect in patients with FI, thereby avoiding both EAUS and manometry in selected patients. Colorectal Disease © 2016 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. Defects on endoanal ultrasound and anal incontinence after primary repair of fourth-degree anal sphincter rupture: a study of the anal sphincter complex and puborectal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakse, A; Secher, N J; Ottesen, M

    2009-01-01

    as the length of the anal canal, and then correlate these measures with AI; and to assess the interobserver measurement agreement between an inexperienced and an experienced sonologist. METHODS: EAUS was offered to 84 consecutive women, who were asked to answer a validated questionnaire after fourth-degree ASR......OBJECTIVES: To perform three-dimensional endoanal ultrasound (EAUS) after primary repair of fourth-degree anal sphincter rupture (ASR) and correlate the sonographic defects with anal incontinence (AI); to measure the axial and sagittal thickness and angle of the puborectal muscle (PRM) as well...... with Starck score. No clear association between the measurements of the PRM and AI was shown. The experienced observer detected more of the small defects than did the inexperienced observer. CONCLUSION: In a 1-9-year follow-up period after primary suture of fourth-degree ASR, the frequency of AI was high...

  2. VLCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boneh, A; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N

    2006-01-01

    We diagnosed six newborn babies with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) through newborn screening in three years in Victoria (prevalence rate: 1:31,500). We identified seven known and two new mutations in our patients (2/6 homozygotes; 4/6 compound heterozygotes). Blood sa...

  3. Defecation into clothing without forewarning and mean radiation dose to bowel and anal-sphincter among gynecological cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Helena; Alevronta, Eleftheria; Steineck, Gunnar; Waldenström, Ann-Charlotte; Nyberg, Tommy; Olsson, Caroline; Wilderäng, Ulrica; Dunberger, Gail; Al-Abany, Massoud; Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    To analyze the relationship between mean radiation dose to the bowels and the anal-sphincter and occurrence of 'defecation into clothing without forewarning', a specific and serious fecal incontinence symptom after gynecological radiotherapy. Additional potential risk factors associated with the symptom are explored. Data were collected for 519 eligible gynecological cancer survivors, treated with pelvic radiotherapy, with a median follow-up of 5.8 years, using a study-specific questionnaire and medical records. Correlations between defecation into clothing without forewarning and mean dose to organs at risk; the anal-sphincter region, the rectum, the sigmoid and the small intestines were investigated, also taking other risk factors into account. Twelve percent reported having had the symptom at least once in the preceding six months. Mean doses >50 Gy to the anal-sphincter region, the rectum, the sigmoid and the small intestines were related to the occurrence of the symptom. Significantly associated risk factors were deliveries with high birth weight, heart failure and lactose and/or gluten intolerance. After adjusting for these factors, mean doses >50 Gy to the anal-sphincter region, the sigmoid and the small intestines remained related to the occurrence of the symptom. Mean doses to the bowels and anal-sphincter region are related to the risk of defecation into clothing without forewarning in long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic radiotherapy. Further radiobiological modeling may distinguish which organ(s) contribute most to development of the symptom.

  4. Sphincter of Oddi botulinum toxin injection to prevent pancreatic fistula after distal pancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackert, Thilo; Klaiber, Ulla; Hinz, Ulf; Kehayova, Tzveta; Probst, Pascal; Knebel, Phillip; Diener, Markus K; Schneider, Lutz; Strobel, Oliver; Michalski, Christoph W; Ulrich, Alexis; Sauer, Peter; Büchler, Markus W

    2017-05-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula represents the most important complication after distal pancreatectomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a preoperative endoscopic injection of botulinum toxin into the sphincter of Oddi to prevent postoperative pancreatic fistula (German Clinical Trials Register number: DRKS00007885). This was an investigator-initiated, prospective clinical phase I/II trial with an exploratory study design. We included patients who underwent preoperative endoscopic sphincter botulinum toxin injection (100 units of Botox). End points were the feasibility, safety, and postoperative outcomes, including postoperative pancreatic fistula within 30 days after distal pancreatectomy. Botulinum toxin patients were compared with a control collective of patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy without botulinum toxin injection by case-control matching in a 1:1 ratio. Between February 2015 and February 2016, 29 patients were included. All patients underwent successful sphincter of Oddi botulinum toxin injection within a median of 6 (range 0-10) days before operation. One patient had an asymptomatic, self-limiting (48 hours) increase in serum amylase and lipase after injection. Distal pancreatectomy was performed in 24/29 patients; 5 patients were not resectable. Of the patients receiving botulinum toxin, 7 (29%) had increased amylase levels in drainage fluid on postoperative day 3 (the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery definition of postoperative pancreatic fistula grade A) without symptoms or need for reintervention. Importantly, no clinically relevant fistulas (International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery grades B/C) were observed in botulinum toxin patients compared to 33% postoperative pancreatic fistula grade B/C in case-control patients (P pancreatectomy. The results of the present trial suggest its efficacy in the prevention of clinically relevant postoperative pancreatic fistula and are validated currently in the

  5. The experience of artificial urinary sphincter implantation by a single surgeon in 15 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Chi Shen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Artificial urinary sphincter (AUS is the gold standard treatment for urinary incontinence owing to sphincter incompetence. We reviewed our experience in AUS implantation. From 1995 to 2009, 19 patients underwent 25 AUS implantations performed by a single surgeon. The cause of incontinence was sphincter incompetence, which was secondary to prostate surgery, neurogenic bladder, radiation, and post-traumatic urethral lesion. Twenty-three prostheses were placed in the bulbar urethra for male patients: 11 AUS cuffs were placed through the perineal approach and 12 through the penoscrotal approach. Two procedures were applied over the bladder neck for the female patients. Through a retrospective review of charts, continence and complications were analyzed. The mean follow-up time was 50.0 ± 42.9 months (range: 2–146 months. There were 16 successful surgeries (64%, and these patients were free from the need for a pad. In eight surgeries (32%, the devices were removed due to infection, while one implantation (4% was unsuccessful due to perforation into the bulbar urethra. There was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.024 in failure rates between patients who received radiotherapy (100% and other patients (22.7%. There was no statistically significant difference in dry and revision rates (p > 0.05 between the perineal and penoscrotal approach. Accordingly, over half of the patients with total incontinence benefitted from AUS implantation. In consideration of the high failure rate for patients receiving radiotherapy, caution should be exercised in the use of implantation. Secondary implantation has a satisfactory success rate in selected patients. The same success rate was noted for both perineal and penoscrotal approaches.

  6. Subclinical Anal Sphincter Injuries Following Instrumental Delivery–A Physiological Analysis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girisha Balaraju

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injuries (OASIS has been reported in up to 25% patients and occult OASIS has been reported in up to 1.2%. Instrumental delivery has been considered a risk factor for OASIS. Aim: To compare the anal sphincter functions as assessed by Anorectal Manometry (ARM in asymptomatic patients following instrument delivery with those of patients who underwent Lower Segment Caesarian Section (LSCS after six months of delivery. Materials and Methods: Seventeen women who had instrumental delivery and thirteen who underwent elective cesarean section were recruited. Evaluation included a detailed history and physical examination, administration of the Cleveland Clinic Questionnaire and ARM to record the basal pressure, squeeze pressure, anorectal sensation and balloon expulsion time. Categorical variables were compared using the Chi-square test. All calculations were done using the software SPSS 21.0. Results: We found statistically significant lower basal (34 ± 3.4 vs 60±2.3 mm hg, p<0.05 and squeeze pressures (56±4.1 vs 76±5.2 mm hg, p<0.05, and higher balloon expulsion time (58±2.9 s vs 19±1.8 seconds, p<0.05 in women with instrument delivery compared to LSCS. The rectal sensation was comparable in both the groups. Conclusion: Persistent subtle anal sphincter dysfunctions are common following instrument delivery compared to LSCS. The role of identifying these and preventing future incontinence in such women needs to be assessed in future studies.

  7. Anatomy and mechanical properties of the anal sphincter muscles in healthy senior volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusa, T; Abler, D; Tutuian, R; Gingert, C; Heverhagen, J T; Adamina, M; Brügger, L E; Büchler, P

    2018-03-15

    A large proportion of age-related fecal incontinence is attributed to weakness or degeneration of the muscles composing the anal continence organ. However, the individual role of these muscles and their functional interplay remain poorly understood. This study employs a novel technique based on the combination of MR imaging and FLIP measurements (MR-FLIP) to obtain anatomical and mechanical information simultaneously. Unlike previous methods used to assess the mechanics of the continence organ, MR-FLIP allows inter-individual comparisons and statistical analysis of the sphincter morpho-mechanical parameters. The anatomy as well as voluntary and involuntary mechanical properties of the anal continence organ were characterized in 20 healthy senior volunteers. Results showed that the external anal sphincter (EAS) forms a funnel-like shape with wall thickness increasing by a factor of 2.5 from distal (6 ± 0 mm) to proximal (15 ± 3 mm). Both voluntary and involuntary mechanical properties in this region correlate strongly with the thickness of the muscle. The positions of least compliance and maximal orifice closing were both located toward the proximal EAS end. In addition, maximal contraction during squeeze maneuvers was reached after 2 s, but high muscle fatigue was measured during a 7 s holding phase, corresponding to about 60% loss of the energy produced by the muscles during the contraction phase. This work reports baseline parameters describing the morpho-mechanical condition of the sphincter muscle of healthy elderly volunteers. New parameters were also proposed to quantify the active properties of the muscles based on the mechanical energy associated with muscle contraction and fatigue. This information could be used to assess patients suffering from AI or for the design of novel implants. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Paraganglioma of the Cauda Equina Presenting with Erectile and Sphincter Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesław Marcol

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Paragangliomas of the cauda equina are rare neuroepithelial tumors, usually manifesting clinically as sciatica. Here, we report a case of cauda equina paraganglioma with an unusual course in a 43-year-old man. His main complaints were erectile and sphincter dysfunction. The low back pain was initially ascribed to accidental injury. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed intradural tumor at the L2/L3 level. The patient underwent gross tumor resection, and the diagnosis of paraganglioma was based on neuropathologic examination. The symptoms completely resolved after tumor resection.

  9. Intrinsically Passive Handling and Grasping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stramigioli, Stefano; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Khodabandehloo, Koorosh

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents a control philosophy called Intrinsically Passive Control, which has the feature to properly behave during interaction with any passive objects. The controlled robot will never become unstable due to the physical structure of the controller.

  10. A comparative study of various electrodes in electromyography of the striated urethral and anal sphincter in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K K; Kristensen, E S; Qvist, N

    1985-01-01

    The series comprised 41 children aged 6 to 14 years consecutively referred with recurrent urinary tract infection and/or enuresis. Carbon dioxide cystometry was carried out in the supine and the erect position and combined with simultaneous electromyography (EMG). The external urethral sphincter...... was examined with a ring electrode mounted on a urethral catheter, while recordings from the striated anal sphincter were based on an anal plug electrode and perianal electrocardiographic (ECG) skin electrodes: 211 EMG and cystometric examinations were performed and all three methods gave satisfactory results...

  11. Injection of Botulinum Toxin a to Upper Esophageal Sphincter for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Two Patients with Inclusion Body Myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis WC Liu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion body myositis (IBM is a progressive degenerative skeletal muscle disease leading to weakening and atrophy of both proximal and distal muscles. Dysphagia is reported in up to 86% of IBM patients. Surgical cricopharyngeal myotomy may be effective for cricopharyngeal dysphagia and there is one published report that botulinum toxin A, injected into the cricopharyngeus muscle using a hypopharyngoscope under general anesthesia, relieved IBM-associated dysphagia. This report presents the first documentation of botulinum toxin A injection into the upper esophageal sphincter using a flexible esophagogastroduodenoscope under conscious sedation, to reduce upper esophageal sphincter pressure and successfully alleviate oropharyngeal dysphagia in two IBM patients.

  12. Restoration of continence following rectopexy for rectal prolapse and recovery of the internal anal sphincter electromyogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farouk, R; Duthie, G S; Bartolo, D C; MacGregor, A B

    1992-05-01

    Twenty-two patients with full-thickness rectal prolapse underwent ambulatory fine wire electromyography of the internal and sphincter (IAS), external and sphincter and puborectalis, together with anorectal manometry, using a computerized system. Examinations were performed both before and 3 to 4 months after rectopexy. The median (interquartile range (i.q.r.)) preoperative IAS electromyogram (EMG) frequency was 0.18 (0.05-0.31) Hz and the median (i.q.r.) preoperative resting anal pressure was 28 (15-64) cmH2O. An improvement in the IAS EMG frequency, median (i.q.r.) 0.29 (0.19-0.38) Hz (P less than 0.03), and resting anal pressure, median (i.q.r.) 41 (20-72) cmH2O (P less than 0.05), was recorded after operation, but these variables remained significantly lower than those found in normal controls: median (i.q.r.) IAS EMG frequency 0.44 (0.36-0.48) Hz and median (i.q.r.) resting anal pressure 92 (74-98) cmH2O. We suggest that repair of the prolapse allows the IAS to recover by removing the cause of persistent rectoanal inhibition.

  13. Urodynamic assessment of bladder and urethral sphincter function before and after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnoiu, O S; Vozmediano-Chicharro, R; García-Galisteo, E; Soler-Martinez, J; del Rosa-Samaniego, J M; Machuca-Santacruz, J; Baena-Gonzalez, V

    2014-03-01

    Affectation of the bladder after open prostatectomy is demonstrated. Decrease in bladder capacity and bladder compliance, detrusor hyper-or hypo-activity and voiding dysfunction are observed. We propose to investigate the effects of robotic surgery on bladder and sphincter function through the comparative study of preoperative and postoperative urodynamic values 3 months after prostatectomy. Prospective study of 32 consecutive patients undergoing robotic prostatectomy. They all underwent urodynamic study one month before the intervention and 3 months after the radical prostatectomy. Twenty five percent of patients undergoing robotic prostatectomy showed detrusor hyperactivity accompanied by a decrease in bladder compliance of 30.2 to 21.8 ml/cmH2O. Urethral profile showed diminished functional length of 67 to 44 mm and decreased maximum urethral pressure of 48.5 to 29.3 cmH2O. After robotic prostatectomy 21.8% of patients had detrusor hypoactivity, obstruction decreased between 28.1% to 12.5%. Decreased bladder compliance, detrusor hypo- or hyperactivity and obstruction improvement observed in the study of the flow pressure have been associated with sphincter involvement. It is part of the complex of lower urinary tract dysfunction that occurs after robotic prostatectomy. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Cutting Whole Length or Partial Length of Internal Anal Sphincter in Managementof Fissure in Ano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furat Shani Aoda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A chronic anal fissure is a common painful perianal condition.The main operative procedure to treat this painful condition is a lateral internal sphincteretomy (LIS.The aim of study is to compare the outcome and complications of closed LIS up to the dentate line (whole length of internal sphincter or up to the fissure apex (partial length of internal sphincter in the treatment of anal fissure.It is a prospective comparativestudy including 100 patients with chronic fissure in ano. All patients assigned to undergo closed LIS. Those patients were randomly divided into two groups: 50 patients underwent LIS to the level of dentate line (whole length and other 50 patients underwent LIS to the level of fissure apex (partial length. Patients were followed up weekly in the 1st month, twice monthly in the second month then monthly   for next 2 months and finally after 1 year. There was satisfactory relief of pain in all patients in both groups & complete healing of the fissure occurred. Regarding post operative incontinence no major degree of incontinence occur in both group but minor degree of incontinence persists In 7 patients after whole length LIS after one year. In conclusion, both whole length & partial length LIS associated with improvement of pain, good chance of healing but whole length LIS associated with more chance of long term  flatus incontinence. Hence,we recommend partial length LIS as treatment forchronic anal fissure.

  15. Impact of liberal use of mediolateral episiotomy on the incidence of obstetric anal sphincter tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafran, Noah; Salim, Raed

    2012-09-01

    To assess the impact of liberal compared with restrictive use of mediolateral episiotomy on the incidence of obstetric anal sphincter tear (OAST). Data between the years 1999-2001 (era 1) when liberal mediolateral episiotomy was applied were compared with the years 2004-2008 (era 2) when restricted mediolateral episiotomy was implemented. Liberal mediolateral episiotomy was done for fetal or maternal indications, while restrictive mediolateral episiotomy was done when a tear was imminent. Primary outcome was the incidence of OAST. A total of 25,170 women who delivered vaginally were included. After adjusting for potential confounders, the incidence of OAST was found to be significantly higher in era 2 (0.4 %) compared to era 1 (0.1 %), (p = 0.02; adjusted OR 2.23; 95 % CI, 1.16-4.29). Among primiparous women, the incidence of mediolateral episiotomy was 71.8 and 27.1 % in eras 1 and 2, respectively (p liberal policy among primiparous women only, 124 deliveries are needed to prevent one OAST. Liberal compared to restrictive use of mediolateral episiotomy may be a sphincter-saving procedure among primiparous women.

  16. Modified technique of bilateral gluteus maximus transposition for reconstruction of sphincter for pediatric traumatic fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Feiteng; Wu, Yang; Chen, Yongmei; Liu, Juxian; Li, Fuyu; Xiang, Bo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to report our 13-year experience of 14 children with gluteus maximus muscular transposition to treat post-trauma fecal incontinence and discuss our technical modifications to this surgical procedure. Fourteen children (median age: 9.9years) with complete fecal incontinence after traumas received this procedure from December 1998 to February 2011. The major modification of the surgery was that we transposed two thick muscular bundles about 2cm in diameter bilaterally. They surrounded the middle portion of rectum to act as sphincters. We used dynamic defecography and anorectal endosonography to observe the functions of the transposed muscles. Wexner scores, fecal incontinence quality of life questionnaire and self-rated health measurement scale scores had been used to evaluate their life quality. The median follow-up time was 6.3years. Twelve children reported prominently improved fecal controls with reduced stool frequency. Postoperative dynamic defecography and anorectal endosongraphy vividly demonstrated the satisfactory voluntary contractile and relaxed states of the reconstructed muscle. Wexner scores were significantly improved both 1year and 2years after the procedure (Pgluteus maximus transposition for reconstruction of sphincter efficiently improved fecal control and life quality for pediatric patients with traumatic fecal incontinence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  18. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  19. Effects of cimetidine and ranitidine on interdigestive and postprandial lower esophageal sphincter pressures and plasma gastrin levels in normal subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, A. J.; Bogaard, J. W.; van Hattum, J.; Akkermans, L. M.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cimetidine and ranitidine on human lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) and plasma levels of gastrin in all phases of the interdigestive motor complex and after a test meal. In a random, double-blind manner, placebo, cimetidine (1.0

  20. Effect of feeding on myoelectric activity of the sphincter of Oddi and the gastrointestinal tract in the opossum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coelho, J. C.; Gouma, D. J.; Moody, F. G.; Schlegel, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of different foods on the myoelectric activity of the sphincter of Oddi and gastrointestinal tract was evaluated in the opossum. Gallbladder pressure was also recorded. Feeding fat and mixed food resulted in the greatest incidence of spike activity in the duodenum and jejunum, followed by

  1. Anterior anal sphincter repair can be of long term benefit: a 12-year case cohort from a single surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telford Karen J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early surgical results of anterior sphincter repair for faecal incontinence can be good, but in the longer term are often disappointing. This study aimed to determine the short and long term outcomes from anterior sphincter repair and identify factors predictive of long term success. Methods Patients who underwent anterior sphincter repair between 1989 and 2001 in one institution were identified. Postal questionnaires were sent to patients, which included validated scoring systems for symptom severity and quality of life assessments for faecal incontinence. Patient demographics and risk factors were recorded as were the results of anorectal physiology studies and endoanal ultrasound. Results Eighty-five patients underwent repair by one consultant. The length of follow up ranged from 1 to 12 years. Most patients (96% had early symptom improvement postoperatively. Of the 47 patients assessed long term (≥ 5 years, 28 (60% maintained this success. Significant improvements in quality of life were observed (P Conclusion There were no predictive factors of outcome success and no changes in anal manometry identified, however anterior sphincter repair remains worthwhile. Changes in compliance of the anorectum may be responsible for symptom improvement.

  2. The impact of naloxegol on anal sphincter function - Using a human experimental model of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Debbie; Poulsen, Jakob L; Krogh, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    of the anal canal. Gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed with the Patient Assessment of Constipation Symptom (PAC-SYM) questionnaire and the Bristol Stool Form Scale. RESULTS: During oxycodone treatment, naloxegol improved RAIR-induced sphincter relaxation by 15% (-45.9 vs -38.8 mm Hg; P 

  3. Early effect of external beam radiation therapy on the anal sphincter: A study using anal manometry and transrectal ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnbaum, E.H.; Dreznik, Z.; Myerson, R.J.; Lacey, D.L.; Fry, R.D.; Kodner, I.J.; Fleshman, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The early of pelvic irradiation on the anal sphincter has not been previously investigated. This study prospectively evaluated the acute effect of preoperative radiation on anal function. Twenty patients with rectal carcinoma received 4,500 cGy of preoperative external beam radiation. The field of radiation included the sphincter in 10 patients and was delivered above the anorectal ring in 10 patients. Anal manometry and transrectal ultrasound were performed before and four weeks after radiotherapy. No significant difference in mean maximal squeeze or resting pressure was found after radiation therapy. An increase in mean minimal sensory threshold was significant. Histologic examination revealed minimal radiation changes at the distal margin in 8 of 10 patients who underwent low anterior resection and in 1 of 3 patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection. The authors conclude that preoperative radiation therapy has minimal immediate effect on the anal sphincter and is not a major contributing factor to postoperative incontinence in patients after sphincter-saving operations for rectal cancer

  4. Efficacy of duodenoscopic treatment of biliary ascariasis while preserving function of duodenal sphincter: a report of 69 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Kai

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo observe the efficacy of duodenoscopic treatment of biliary ascariasis while preserving the function of the duodenal sphincter and to explore the feasibility of this technique as the preferred method for treatment of biliary ascariasis. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 69 patients with biliary ascariasis who received duodenoscopic treatment while preserving the function of the duodenal sphincter in our department from 2007 to 2013. ResultsAll the 69 patients with biliary ascariasis not only preserved the function of the duodenal sphincter, but also had the biliary ascarids successfully removed. The patients were discharged 2-3 days later and then received conventional helminthic treatment. No patients developed complications such as acute pancreatitis, bleeding, and perforation. ConclusionDuodenoscopic treatment of biliary ascariasis while preserving the function of the duodenal sphincter is safe and effective and causes fewer surgical complications, so it should be considered as the preferred method for treatment of biliary ascariasis.

  5. Obstetric anal sphincter injury, risk factors and method of delivery - an 8-year analysis across two tertiary referral centers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hehir, Mark P

    2013-10-01

    Obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS) represents a major cause of maternal morbidity and is a risk factor for the development of fecal incontinence. We set out to analyze the incidence of OASIS and its association with mode of delivery in two large obstetric hospitals across an 8-year study period.

  6. Low current electrical stimulation upregulates cytokine expression in the anal sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo, Levilester; Lian, Lei; Jiang, Hai-Hong; Sopko, Nikolai; Penn, Marc; Damaser, Margot; Zutshi, Massarat

    2012-02-01

    Stem cells are an emerging treatment for regeneration of damaged anal sphincter tissues. Homing to the site of injury can be potentiated by stromal derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and monocyte chemotactic protein 3 (MCP-3) expression. The effects of electrical stimulation (ES) on upregulation of these cytokines were investigated. The anal sphincter complex of Sprague Dawley rats was stimulated with current of 0.25 mA, pulse duration of 40 pulses/s, pulse width of 100 μs, and frequency of 100 Hz for 1 or 4 h. Sham was created using the same needle which was inserted into the anal sphincter without electrical stimulation in different groups of animals. The rats were euthanized immediately or 24 h after stimulation. Cytokine analysis was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Statistical analysis was performed. Results are presented as a fold increase compared to sham that was normalized to 1. SDF-1 and MCP-3 immediately after 1 h were 2.5 ± 0.77 and 3.1± 0.93 vs. sham, respectively, showing significant increase. After 1-h stimulation and euthanasia 24 h after, SDF-1 and MCP-3 were 1.49 ± 0.16 and 1.51± 0.14 vs. sham, respectively, showing significant increase. Immediately and 24 h after 4-h stimulation, SDF-1 was 1.21 ± 0.16 and 0.54 ± 0.16 vs. sham, respectively, and was not significantly different. Immediately and 24 h after 4-h stimulation, MCP-3 was 1.29 ± 0.41 and 0.35 ±1.0 vs. sham, respectively, and was not significantly different. SDF-1 and MCP-3 after 1 h were significantly higher than after 4 h of stimulation at both time points. Electrical stimulation for 1 h significantly upregulates SDF-1 and MCP-3 expression that persists for 24 h. Prolonged stimulation reduced chemokine expression, suggesting electrolysis of cells.

  7. Upper esophageal sphincter pressure in patients with Chagas' disease and primary achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dantas R.O.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important component of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES is the cricopharyngeal muscle. During the measurement of sphincter pressure the catheter passed through the sphincter affects the pressure value. In Chagas' disease and primary achalasia there is an esophageal myenteric plexus denervation which may affect UES pressure. We measured the UES pressure of 115 patients with Chagas' disease, 28 patients with primary achalasia and 40 healthy volunteers. We used a round manometric catheter with continuous perfusion and the rapid pull-through method, performed in triplicate during apnea. Pressures were measured in four directions, and the direction with the highest pressure (anterior/posterior and the average of the four directions were measured. The highest UES pressure in Chagas' disease patients without abnormalities upon radiologic esophageal examination (N = 63 was higher than in normal volunteers (142.8 ± 47.4 mmHg vs 113.0 ± 46.0 mmHg, mean ± SD, P<0.05. There was no difference in UES pressure between patients with primary achalasia and patients with Chagas' disease and similar esophageal involvement and normal volunteers (P>0.05. There was no difference between patients with or without esophageal dilation. In the group of subjects less than 50 years of age the UES pressure of primary achalasia (N = 21 was lower than that of Chagas' disease patients with normal radiologic esophageal examination (N = 41, measured at the site with the highest pressure (109.3 ± 31.5 mmHg vs 149.6 ± 45.3 mmHg, P<0.01 and as the average of the four directions (64.2 ± 17.1 mmHg vs 83.5 ± 28.6 mmHg, P<0.05. We conclude that there is no difference in UES pressure between patients with Chagas' disease, primary achalasia and normal volunteers, except for patients with minor involvement by Chagas' disease, for whom the UES pressure at the site with the highest pressure was higher than the pressure of normal volunteers and patients with primary

  8. Human amniotic fluid stem cell injection therapy for urethral sphincter regeneration in an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Bum

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem cell injection therapies have been proposed to overcome the limited efficacy and adverse reactions of bulking agents. However, most have significant limitations, including painful procurement, requirement for anesthesia, donor site infection and a frequently low cell yield. Recently, human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFSCs have been proposed as an ideal cell therapy source. In this study, we investigated whether periurethral injection of hAFSCs can restore urethral sphincter competency in a mouse model. Methods Amniotic fluids were collected and harvested cells were analyzed for stem cell characteristics and in vitro myogenic differentiation potency. Mice underwent bilateral pudendal nerve transection to generate a stress urinary incontinence (SUI model and received either periurethral injection of hAFSCs, periurethral injection of Plasma-Lyte (control group, or underwent a sham (normal control group. For in vivo cell tracking, cells were labeled with silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles containing rhodamine B isothiocyanate (MNPs@SiO2 (RITC and were injected into the urethral sphincter region (n = 9. Signals were detected by optical imaging. Leak point pressure and closing pressure were recorded serially after injection. Tumorigenicity of hAFSCs was evaluated by implanting hAFSCs into the subcapsular space of the kidney, followed two weeks later by retrieval and histologic analysis. Results Flow activated cell sorting showed that hAFSCs expressed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC markers, but no hematopoietic stem cell markers. Induction of myogenic differentiation in the hAFSCs resulted in expression of PAX7 and MYOD at Day 3, and DYSTROPHIN at Day 7. The nanoparticle-labeled hAFSCs could be tracked in vivo with optical imaging for up to 10 days after injection. Four weeks after injection, the mean LPP and CP were significantly increased in the hAFSC-injected group compared with the control group. Nerve regeneration and

  9. Patients' bowel symptom experiences and self-care strategies following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, Margaret; McCarthy, Geraldine; Livingstone, Vicki; Savage, Eileen

    2014-08-01

    To investigate patients' bowel symptom experiences and self-care strategies following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer and the relationship between bowel symptom experiences and the self-care strategies used. Earlier diagnosis of rectal cancer allows for less invasive surgical treatments such as sphincter-saving procedures to be performed. Although a permanent stoma is generally not required, patients experience changes in bowel function following this surgery. However, limited research exists on patients' bowel symptom experiences and the self-care strategies used to manage symptoms following sphincter-saving surgery of rectal cancer. Quantitative descriptive correlational. A convenience sample of 143 patients aged 30 to over 70 years was used. Data were collected (April 2010-December 2010) using the Illness Perception Questionnaires, the Difficulties of Life Scale and a researcher developed Self-care Strategy Measure. The research was underpinned by the Symptom Management Theory. Relating to the four most effective self-care strategies used respondents reporting more bowel symptom were more likely to use the self-care strategy proximity/knowing the location of a toilet at all times. Females, respondents with high timeline cyclical scores and respondents with high physiological responses scores were more likely to use protective clothing. Respondents reporting more bowel symptom and with high social responses scores were more likely to use bowel medication. Females were more likely to wear incontinence pads. This research provides insights into the daily bowel symptom experiences of patients following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. It demonstrates the range of self-care strategies that individuals use to manage their bowel symptoms and the self-care-strategies that were most effective for them. Patients should be encouraged to report on-going bowel problems following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. Supportive care for patients

  10. Prior Radiation Therapy Decreases Time to Idiopathic Erosion of Artificial Urinary Sphincter: A Multi-Institutional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Melissa R; Milam, Douglas F; Johnsen, Niels V; Cleves, Mario A; Broghammer, Joshua A; Brant, William O; Jones, LeRoy A; Brady, Jeffrey D; Gross, Martin S; Henry, Gerard D

    2018-04-01

    Substantial controversy and conflicting data exist regarding the survival of the artificial urinary sphincter in patients with prior radiation therapy. We present data from a multi-institutional analysis examining the effect of prior radiation for prostate cancer on device survival. A database was compiled of patients with artificial urinary sphincter cuff erosion, which included demographic and comorbid patient characteristics, functional analyses and interventions. We identified 80 patients with iatrogenic or idiopathic artificial urinary sphincter erosion. Idiopathic erosion cases were further analyzed to determine factors influencing device survival with specific stratification for radiation therapy. A total of 56 patients were identified with idiopathic artificial urinary sphincter erosion. Of those men 33 (58.9%) had not undergone radiation treatment while 23 (41.1%) had a history of brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy. In patients without radiation erosion-free median device survival was 3.15 years (95% CI 1.95-5.80), in contrast to the median device survival of only 1.00 year (95% CI 0.36-3.00) in irradiated patients. The erosion-free survival experience of patients with vs without radiation differed significantly (Wilcoxon-Breslow test for equality of survivor functions p = 0.03). Radiation therapy in patients with known idiopathic cuff erosion in this contemporary analysis correlated with significantly increased time to erosion. Mean time to idiopathic cuff erosion was accelerated by approximately 2 years in irradiated cases. To our knowledge these data represent the first demonstration of substantial outcome differences associated with radiation in patients with an artificial urinary sphincter who present specifically with cuff erosion. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pelvic floor and anal sphincter trauma should be key performance indicators of maternity services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, H P; Pardey, J; Murray, H

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness of maternal somatic birth trauma, which affects many more women than previously thought, primarily in the form of anal sphincter and levator ani tears. Given that such trauma occurs in about one-third of all women giving birth vaginally for the first time, and given that it has serious long-term consequences, it should be audited by all maternity services with a view to providing remedial therapy to delay or prevent subsequent morbidity, and to facilitate practice improvement. The increasing availability of modern imaging equipment and the skills of using it for pelvic floor assessment means that it is now becoming possible to provide such services postnatally.

  12. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastwood, G.L.; Braverman, L.E.; White, E.M.; Vander Salm, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with 131 I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism

  13. Radiographic and manometric correlation in achalasia with apparent lower esophageal sphincter relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Richter, J.E.; Chen, Y.M.; Wu, W.C.; Gelfand, D.W.; Castell, D.O.

    1987-01-01

    The authors compared the clinical, radiographic, and manometric findings in ten patients with atypical achalasia showing complete but short-duration lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation with findings in 39 patients with classic achalasia. Patients with atypical achalasia were younger, had dysphagia and weight loss of shorter duration, and had less esophageal dilation than patients with classic achalesia. LES pressure and esophagogastric junction caliber, however, were similar in the two groups. The majority of patients in both groups responded well to pneumatic dilation. They conclude that achalasia with apparent LES relaxation may represent an early form of this motor disorder and that the radiographic findings remain characteristic except for less dilation of the esophagus

  14. Episiotomy in vacuum-assisted delivery affects the risk of obstetric anal sphincter injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ninna S; Persson, Lisa K G; Jangö, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    The risk of obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS) is increased in vacuum-assisted delivery. However, it remains unclear whether episiotomy may protect against OASIS in this type of delivery. The objective of this study was to assess whether mediolateral or lateral episiotomy affects the risk...... of OASIS in vacuum-assisted delivery among primiparous women. Data were found searching The PubMed, Cochrane library and Embase databases electronically. Studies investigating the risk of OASIS in vacuum-assisted delivery with and without the use of mediolateral or lateral episiotomy were considered...... for inclusion. Of the 452 studies found, 15 observational studies were included in this meta-analysis. All authors assessed risk of bias of the included studies using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network (SIGN) quality score. According to this meta-analysis, mediolateral or lateral episiotomy...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  17. Relationship of Sphincter of Oddi Spike Bursts to Gastrointestinal Myoelectric Activity in Conscious Opossums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ryuichi; Toouli, James; Dodds, Wylie J.; Sarna, Sushil; Hogan, Walter J.; Itoh, Zen

    1982-01-01

    The oppossum sphincter of Oddi (SO) exhibits peristaltic spike bursts with accompanying contraction waves that originate proximally in the sphincter of Oddi and propagate toward the duodenum. In this study we recorded myoelectrical activity of the opossum SO and upper gastrointestinal tract in six conscious animals using chronically implanted electrodes. Biopolar electrodes were implanted in the gastric antrum, duodenum, SO segment, jejunum, and ileum. During fasting the frequency of SO spike bursts, scored as number per minute, showed a cyclic pattern consisting of four phases (A to D). Phase A had a low spike burst frequency of ∼2/min that lasted ∼20 min. In phase B, the spike burst frequency increased progressively during a 40-45 min interval culminating in a short interval of phase C activity characterized by a maximal spike burst frequency of ∼5/min. During phase D, the spike bursts decreased over 15 min to merge with the low frequency of phase A and the cycle repeated. Cycle length of the interdigestive SO cycle, 87±11 SD min, was virtually identical with that of the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The onset of phase C activity in the SO began 1-2 min before phase III of the MMC activity in the duodenum. Feeding abolished the cyclic pattern of spike burst activity in the SO as well as in the upper gastrointestinal tract. After feeding the SO spike bursts occurred at a frequency of 5-6/min for at least 3 h. We conclude that: (a) During fasting, the oppossum SO exhibits cyclic changes in its spike burst frequency; (b) Maximal spike burst frequency of the SO occurs virtually concurrent with passage of phase III MMC activity through the duodenum and; (c) Feeding abolishes the interdigestive cyclic spike burst pattern of the SO as well as that of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:7076847

  18. [Temporary urethral stents ALLIUM BUS "BULBAR URETHRAL STENT" for the treatment of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matillon, X; Terrier, J-E; Arnouil, N; Lalloue, F; Pic, G; Ruffion, A

    2016-09-01

    The temporary prosthetic sphincterotomy is a possible treatment for neurologic detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD). The purpose of the study was to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the urethral stent (US) Temporary ALLIUM BUS "BULBAR URETHRAL STENT". A prospective, non-comparative, single-center starting in 2015 was conducted. Were included patients over 18 years, with a neurologic DSD proved urodynamically for which medical treatment was not indicated or failed. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients who had a voiding method considered as improved or much improved at 1 month and the feasibility of the procedure. From January to June 2015, 7 patients, (mean age 47.9 years [24-76 years]) were prospectively enrolled. One patient was lost to sight at one month and therefore excluded. The median follow-up was 8.1 months (1-10 months). All procedures were technically successful. At 1 month, there were 57% of grade 2 complications (Clavien-Dindo), 1 of 6 patients had a migration of the US. At one month, quality of life and the urologic situation was considered good in 3 patients, unchanged in 2 patients and decreased in 1 patient. The study was stopped after the inclusion of seven patients. At the date of the latest news, 5 of 6 patients had a migrated or an explanted US. The temporary urethral stent ALLIUM BUS does not seem to be a possible surgical alternative for the treatment of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The caecocolonic junction in humans has a sphincteric anatomy and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussone Pellegrini, M S; Manneschi, L I; Manneschi, L

    1995-01-01

    Sphincteric anatomy and function are present at the caecocolonic junction in several mammals. In humans, radiologists and endoscopists have respectively reported a circumferential contraction and a prominent ileocaecal fold at the border area between the caecum and the ascending colon. Anatomical findings on necropsy material failed to confirm its presence. Microscopic studies on surgical specimens showed the existence of muscular and innervational patterns different from those of adjacent areas. The aim of this work was to confirm the existence of a specialised fold at the caecocolonic junction in humans and to ascertain its role by carrying out a study of functional anatomy. Pancolonoscopies were performed on 100 patients and ileocaecal fold behaviour was observed before and after mechanical stimulation. Isolated ileocaecocolonic regions, surgically obtained, were filled with a fixative solution to study their macro and microscopic morphology after stimulation. Endoscopically, the ileocaecal fold was semilunar or circular in shape and spontaneous or evoked spasms occurred in 52 patients. A prominent circular fold could be seen in surgical specimens after stimulation. The entire muscle coat deeply penetrated this fold, showing the features characteristic of the ileocaecal junction. In particular, the inner portion of the circular muscle showed a peculiar arrangement and was thicker than elsewhere. These results show that in humans the caecocolonic junction is provided with a sphincter morphology and function. Little is known about its physiological relevance in ileal flow accommodation and caecal filling and emptying but it should not be underestimated with regard to some colonic motility disorders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7489934

  20. Characterization of Partial Intrinsic Symmetries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shehu, Aurela; Brunton, Alan; Wuhrer, Stefanie; Wand, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We present a mathematical framework and algorithm for characterizing and extracting partial intrinsic symmetries of surfaces, which is a fundamental building block for many modern geometry processing algorithms. Our goal is to compute all “significant” symmetry information of the shape, which we

  1. Reading: Intrinsic versus Extrinsic Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    Much debate centers on motivating student in reading achievement. Should students feel motivated from within (intrinsic motivation), or is it better to have extrinsic motivation whereby external stimuli are used to help learners achieve optimally in reading? This paper aims to analyze the two points of view about motivating students in reading…

  2. Intrinsic volumes of symmetric cones

    OpenAIRE

    Amelunxen, Dennis; Bürgisser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We compute the intrinsic volumes of the cone of positive semidefinite matrices over the real numbers, over the complex numbers, and over the quaternions, in terms of integrals related to Mehta's integral. Several applications for the probabilistic analysis of semidefinite programming are given.

  3. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy intrinsic seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinger, C.T.; Burr, T.; Vnuk, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    We have begun to quantify the ability of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to detect the removal and replacement of the lid of a simulated special nuclear materials drum. Conceptually, the acoustic spectrum of a container establishcs a baseline fingerprint, which we refer to as an intrinsic seal, for the container. Simply removing and replacing the lid changes some of the resonant frequencies because it is impossible to exactly duplicate all of the stress patterns between the lid and container. Preliminary qualitative results suggested that the ARS intrinsic seal could discriminate between cases where a lid has or has not been removed. The present work is directed at quantifying the utility of the ARS intrinsic seal technique, including the technique's sensitivity to ''nuisance'' effects, such as temperature swings, movement of the container, and placement of the transducers. These early quantitative tests support the potential of the ARS intrinsic seal application, but also reveal a possible sensitivity to nuisance effects that could limit environments or conditions under which the technique is effective

  4. Intrinsic Motivation in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Benjamin; Nambiar, Nathan; Hemphill, Caroline; Devietti, Elizabeth; Massengale, Alexandra; McCredie, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    This article describes ways in which educators can use Harter's perceived competence motivation theory, the achievement goal theory, and self-determination theory to develop students' intrinsic motivation to maintain physical fitness, as demonstrated by the Sound Body Sound Mind curriculum and proven effective by the 2013 University of…

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  8. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer can interfere with the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack ... vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia called pernicious anemia. Vitamin C deficiency anemia risk factors include: Smoking. Smoking ...

  9. Effect of Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, on the triggering of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations in dogs and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, H.; Jensen, J.; Carlsson, A.; Ruth, M.; Lehmann, A.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are the main mechanism underlying gastro-oesophageal reflux and are a potential pharmacological treatment target. We evaluated the effect of the CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol

  10. Comparison of posterior internal anal sphincter myectomy and intrasphincteric botulinum toxin injection for treatment of internal anal sphincter achalasia: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmacher, Florian; Puri, Prem

    2012-08-01

    Internal anal sphincter (IAS) achalasia is a clinical condition with presentation similar to Hirschsprung's disease, but with the presence of ganglion cells on rectal suction biopsy (RSB). The diagnosis is made by anorectal manometry (ARM), which demonstrates the absence of the rectosphincteric reflex on rectal balloon inflation. The recommended treatment of choice is posterior IAS myectomy. Recently, intrasphincteric botulinum toxin (Botox) injection has been effectively used for treatment of IAS achalasia. The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy of posterior IAS myectomy with intrasphincteric Botox injection for treatment of IAS achalasia. A systematic literature search for relevant articles was conducted using the following databases: MEDLINE( ® ), EMBASE(®), ISI Web of Science(SM) and the Cochrane Library. A meta-analysis was performed with the studies where IAS achalasia was diagnosed based on the results of ARM and RSB. Odds ratio (OR) with 95 % confidence intervals were calculated. Sixteen prospective and retrospective studies, published from 1973 to 2009, were identified. A total of 395 patients with IAS achalasia were included in this meta-analysis. Fifty-eight percent of patients underwent IAS myectomy and 42 % Botox injection. Regular bowel movements were significantly more frequent after IAS myectomy (OR 0.53, [95 % CI 0.29-0.99]; p = 0.04). There was no significant difference in continued use of laxatives or rectal enemas (OR 0.92, [95 % CI 0.34-2.53], p = 0.89) and in overall complication rates between both procedures (OR 0.68, [95 % CI 0.38-1.21]; p = 0.19). Looking at specific complications, the rate of transient faecal incontinence was significantly higher after Botox injection (OR 0.07, [95 % CI 0.01-0.54]; p IAS myectomy (OR 0.56, [95 % CI 0.32-0.97]; p = 0.04 and OR 0.25, [95 % CI 0.15-0.41]; p IAS achalasia, posterior IAS myectomy appears to be a more effective treatment option compared to intrasphincteric

  11. Calculation of upper esophageal sphincter restitution time from high resolution manometry data using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungheim, Michael; Busche, Andre; Miller, Simone; Schilling, Nicolas; Schmidt-Thieme, Lars; Ptok, Martin

    2016-10-15

    After swallowing, the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) needs a certain amount of time to return from maximum pressure to the resting condition. Disturbances of sphincter function not only during the swallowing process but also in this phase of pressure restitution may lead to globus sensation or dysphagia. Since UES pressures do not decrease in a linear or asymptotic manner, it is difficult to determine the exact time when the resting pressure is reached, even when using high resolution manometry (HRM). To overcome this problem a Machine Learning model was established to objectively determine the UES restitution time (RT) and moreover to collect physiological data on sphincter function after swallowing. HRM-data of 15 healthy participants performing 10 swallows each were included. After manual annotation of the RT interval by two swallowing experts, data were transferred to the Machine Learning model, which applied a sequence labeling modeling approach based on logistic regression to learn and objectivize the characteristics of all swallows. Individually computed RT values were then compared with the annotated values. Estimates of the RT were generated by the Machine Learning model for all 150 swallows. When annotated by swallowing experts mean RT of 11.16s±5.7 (SD) and 10.04s±5.74 were determined respectively, compared to model-generated values from 8.91s±3.71 to 10.87s±4.68 depending on model selection. The correlation score for the annotated RT of both examiners was 0.76 and 0.63 to 0.68 for comparison of model predicted values. Restitution time represents an important physiologic swallowing parameter not previously considered in HRM-studies of the UES, especially since disturbances of UES restitution may increase the risk of aspiration. The data presented here show that it takes approximately 9 to 11s for the UES to come to rest after swallowing. Based on maximal RT values, we demonstrate that an interval of 25-30s in between swallows is necessary until the

  12. Sphincter preservation with pre-operative radiation therapy (RT) and coloanal anastomosis: long term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagman, Raquel; Minsky, Bruce D.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Guillem, Jose G.; Paty, Philip B.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the long term follow-up of sphincter preservation with pre-operative RT and coloanal anastomosis for rectal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 36 pts (M:25, F:11) with invasive, clinically resectable, primary adenocarcinoma of the rectum were enrolled from 1/87 through 4/96 on a prospective Phase I/II trial. All patients were examined in the office by their operating surgeon prior to the start of RT and were judged clinically to require an abdominoperineal resection (APR) due to the proximity (but not invasion of) the tumor to the anal sphincter. By transrectal ultrasound, clinical T stage was T2:5, and T3:31. The median age was 55 years (range: 33-76 years), and the median distance from the anal verge was 4 cm (range: 3-7 cm). The median tumor size was 3.8 cm (range: 1.5-7 cm). Pts received 4680 cGy (180 cGy/day) to the whole pelvis followed by a boost to 5040 cGy followed by surgery 4-5 weeks later. Although no chemotherapy was delivered concurrently with RT, patients with pathologically positive pelvic nodes (13) or metastatic disease (6) received post-operative 5-FU based chemotherapy. All underwent fecal diversion which was closed 2-4 months post-op. Sphincter function was performed using a telephone survey according to the MSKCC sphincter function scale (Excellent: 1-2 bowel movements/day, no soilage, Good: 3-4 bowel movements/day, and/or mild soilage, fair: Episodic > 4 bowel movements/day, and/or moderate soilage, and Poor: incontinence). Actuarial calculations were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The median follow-up was 56 months (range: 4-121 months). RESULTS: Of the 35 patients who underwent surgery (1 pt with unresectable liver mets did not undergo surgery) (27(35)) (77%) were able to undergo a coloanal anastomosis and the pathological complete response rate was 14%. Post-operative complications included 1 (3%) partial anastamotic disruption, 2 (6%) rectal stenosis, and 1 (3%) pelvic abscess. For the total group of

  13. Sphincter-sparing surgery after preoperative radiotherapy for low rectal cancers: feasibility, oncological results, and quality of life outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, A.S.; Soravia, C.; Gertsch, P.; Bieri, S.; Sprangers, M.A.G.

    1999-01-01

    In cancers of the distal rectum, preoperative radiotherapy is often associated with low anterior resection. This study assesses the choice of surgical procedure, oncological results, and quality of life outcomes in a retrospective cohort of patients with low-lying rectal cancers. The results obtained reinforce the notion of the feasibility, in routine practice, of sphincter-sparing surgery after preoperative radiotherapy in a significant proportion of low rectal cancers. The oncological results seem to be unaffected by the choice of surgical procedure. However, with the possible exception of body image and sexual aspects in males, quality of life parameters were not necessarily better in the restorative surgery group. Prospective studies are mandatory to clarify the putative quality of life advantages of sphincter-conserving procedures in this context. (author)

  14. Causes of Artificial Urinary Sphincter Failure and Strategies for Surgical Revision: Implications of Device Component Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Arnav; Joice, Gregory A; Patel, Hiten D; Manka, Madeleine G; Sopko, Nikolai A; Wright, E James

    2018-03-12

    Up to 50% of patients receiving an artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) require surgical revision after initial placement. However, the literature is heterogeneous regarding the leading causes of AUS failure and appropriate surgical management. To inform a revision approach by tabulating the causes of AUS failure, assessing AUS component survival, and examining the single-component revision efficacy. We retrospectively reviewed 168 patients receiving AUS placements carried out by a single surgeon from 2008 to 2016 at a high-volume academic institution. The median follow-up from initial placement was 2.7 yr, with 37.5% experiencing recurrent incontinence. The cuff size ranged from 4.0 to 5.5cm, with median size of 4.5cm. Patients without infection or erosion underwent systematic device interrogation and revision, starting with the pressure-regulating balloon (PRB) and then, if necessary, the urethral cuff. Device revision involved either PRB-only correction or cuff and PRB revision. We used bootstrapped intervals to estimate the mean time to failure for individual AUS components. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used to compare survival for individual components and for revised devices by revision technique. PRB malfunction most commonly caused device failure, while cuff or pump malfunction was rare. Among patients undergoing surgical revision, those with PRB-only correction had similar outcomes to those with more extensive device correction (cuff and PRB exchange; p=0.46). This study, while systematic and detailed, is limited by sample size, follow-up length, and its retrospective nature. PRB malfunction most commonly caused AUS failure in our cohort. PRB-only correction may satisfactorily restore AUS function in select patients. Consequently, initial interrogation of the PRB may avoid a second incision and urethral exposure for many patients requiring AUS revision. Artificial urinary sphincters remain prone to failure over time. In many instances, correcting only the

  15. Sphincter preservation in rectal cancer with preoperative radiation therapy and coloanal anastomosis: long term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagman, Raquel; Minsky, Bruce D.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Guillem, Jose G.; Paty, Philip P.

    1998-01-01

    Background: To determine if preoperative radiation therapy allows sphincter preservation in the treatment of rectal cancer. Methods: Thirty six patients with the diagnosis of invasive, resectable, primary adenocarcinoma of the rectum limited to the pelvis were enrolled on a Phase I/II trial of preoperative radiation therapy plus low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. By preoperative assessment, all patients had invasive tumors (5,T 2; 31,T 3 ) involving the distal half of the rectum and clinically required an abdominoperineal resection. The median tumor size was 3.8 cm [range: 1.5-7 cm] and the median distance from the anal verge was 4 cm [range: 3-7 cm]. The whole pelvis received 46.80 Gy followed by a 3.60 Gy boost to the primary tumor bed. The median follow-up was 56 months [range: 4-121 months]. Results: Of the 35 patients who underwent resection, 5 (14%) had a complete pathologic response and 27 (77%) were able to successfully undergo a low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. The incidence of local failure was crude: 17% and 5-year actuarial: 21%. The 5-year actuarial survival was 64%. Analysis of sphincter function using a previously published scale was performed at the time of last follow-up in the 27 patients who underwent a low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. Function was good or excellent in 85%. The median number of bowel movements/day was 2 (range: 0-8). Conclusions: Our data suggest that preoperative radiation therapy allows sphincter preservation in 77% of selected patients who would otherwise require an abdominoperineal resection, and 85% have good to excellent sphincter function. Given the moderate local failure rate, we now routinely use preoperative combined modality therapy plus postoperative chemotherapy for patients with clinical T 3 disease

  16. Anastomotic leakage after sphincter-sparing surgery in a young woman diagnosed with low rectal cancer - case report

    OpenAIRE

    Denis Aslan; Adrian Bordea; Traean Burcoș

    2017-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the third most common site for cancer in the world, with a high morbidity and mortality. The new techniques for the treatment of low rectal cancer have been improved recently, allowing sphincter-sparing surgery to be available for more patients, with an optimal oncological and functional outcome. The most fundamental advance in rectal cancer surgery was the concept of total mesorectal resection (TME) introduced by Heald in 1982. Association with neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy...

  17. Does preserved sphincter of Oddi function prevent common bile duct stones recurrence in patients after endoscopic papillary balloon dilation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzung-Jiun Tsai

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whether preserving sphincter of Oddi (SO function by endoscopic papillary balloon dilation (EPBD is beneficial for preventing recurrent common bile duct stone disease (CBDS is controversial. The aim of this study was to measure sphincter of Oddi (SO function by using SO manometry, and to evaluate the association with recurrent CBDS. Methods: Patients with suspected CBDS who underwent successful EPBD were included. These patients underwent SO manometry at two months after EPBD with bile duct clearance. They were regularly followed for recurrent CBDS. Results: From January 2000 to December 2009, 185 patients received EPBD and SO manometry was included. There were 64% male with mean age of 65 ± 15.6 years. Mean ballooning inflation size was 1.1 ± 0.19 cm and mean ballooning time was 4.5 ± 0.85 min 55.7% had a sphincter of Oddi basal pressure (SOBP of 0 mmHg, 16.2%  40 mmHg. In multivariate analysis, EPBD with balloon ≥1.2 cm was the only factor for loss of SO function. Moreover, patients with preserved SO function had higher stone recurrence rate (15% vs. 5%, p = 0.034. Conclusion: EPBD using balloon ≥1.2 cm is a major factor for loss of SO function, which seems to reduce the risk of recurrent CBD stones. Keywords: Common bile duct stone, Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation, Sphincter of Oddi manometry

  18. Assessment and in vitro experiment of artificial anal sphincter system based on rebuilding the rectal sensation function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Peng; Liu, Jinding; Jiang, Enyu; Wang, Hua

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a novel artificial anal sphincter (AAS) system based on rebuilding the rectal sensation function is proposed to treat human fecal incontinence. The executive mechanism of the traditional AAS system was redesigned and integrated for a simpler structure and better durability. The novel executive mechanism uses a sandwich structure to simulate the basic function of the natural human anal sphincter. To rebuild the lost rectal sensation function caused by fecal incontinence, we propose a novel method for rebuilding the rectal sensation function based on an Optimal Wavelet Packet Basis (OWPB) using the Davies-Bouldin (DB) index and a support vector machine (SVM). OWPB using a DB index is used for feature vector extraction, while a SVM is adopted for pattern recognition.Furthermore, an in vitro experiment with the AAS system based on rectal sensation function rebuilding was carried out. Experimental results indicate that the novel executive mechanism can simulate the basic function of the natural human anal sphincter, and the proposed method is quite effective for rebuilding rectal sensation in patients.

  19. Detecting Nosocomial Intrinsic Infections through Relating Bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research ... Surgical procedures often lead to both intrinsic and extrinsic infections. ... This study demonstrated surgical procedures as precursory to intrinsic infections and that bacterial pathogens found on wounds and endogenous indicators of surgery are links to intrinsic infection.

  20. Feedback control of TET system with variable coupling coefficients for a novel artificial anal sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, L; Yan, G; Yan, S; Wang, Z; Liu, Z

    2014-03-01

    For treating severe faecal incontinence, the authors developed an intelligent artificial anal sphincter system (AASS) equipped with a feedback sensor that utilized a transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS). To deliver the correct amount of power (i.e. to match the load demand under variable coupling conditions caused by changes in positioning between the coils due to fitting and changes in posture), a regulating method to stabilize output voltage with a closed loop variable-frequency controller was developed in this paper. The method via which the voltage gain characteristics of a voltage-fed series-tuned TETS were derived is also described. The theoretical analysis was verified by the results of the experiment. A numerical analysis method was used as a control rule with respect to the relationship between operating frequency and output voltage. To validate the feedback control rules, a prototype of the TET charging system was constructed, and its performance was validated with the coupling variation between 0.12-0.42. The results show that the output voltage of the secondary side can be maintained at a constant 7 V across the whole coupling coefficient range, with a switching frequency regulation range of 271.4-320.5 kHz, and the proposed controller has reached a maximal end-to-end power efficiency of 67.5% at 1 W.

  1. COX-1 vs. COX-2 as a determinant of basal tone in the internal anal sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Godoy, Márcio A F; Rattan, Neeru; Rattan, Satish

    2009-02-01

    Prostanoids, produced endogenously via cyclooxygenases (COXs), have been implicated in the sustained contraction of different smooth muscles. The two major types of COXs are COX-1 and COX-2. The COX subtype involved in the basal state of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle tone is not known. To identify the COX subtype, we examined the effect of COX-1- and COX-2-selective inhibitors, SC-560 and rofecoxib, respectively, on basal tone in the rat IAS. We also determined the effect of selective deletion of COX-1 and COX-2 genes (COX-1(-/-) and COX-2(-/-) mice) on basal tone in murine IAS. Our data show that SC-560 causes significantly more efficacious and potent concentration-dependent decreases in IAS tone than rofecoxib. In support of these data, significantly higher levels of COX-1 than COX-2 mRNA were found in the IAS. In addition, higher levels of COX-1 mRNA and protein were expressed in rat IAS than rectal smooth muscle. In wild-type mice, IAS tone was decreased 41.4 +/- 3.4% (mean +/- SE) by SC-560 (1 x 10(-5) M) and 5.4 +/- 2.2% by rofecoxib (P IAS from wild-type mice and significantly less (0.080 +/- 0.015 mN/mg) in the IAS from COX-1(-/-) mice (P IAS tone.

  2. A novel puborectalis muscle artificial anal sphincter system with the module of sensory perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Zhiwu; Yan, Guozheng; Jin, Wentian; Lu, Shan; Zhou, Zerun

    2017-02-01

    This article presents a novel puborectalis muscle artificial anal sphincter system (PM-AASS) with the module of sensory perception for treating severe faecal incontinence (FI). Due to the implantable feature of PM-AASS, this system applied low-power design and the total energy consumption could drop to 48.8 Ah/d. To reduce the injury of intestine and the pressure exerted on intestine, the actuator, including the structure of tings and the robot mechanism, of PM-AASS was presented and the middle ring was optimised. To realise the sensory perception, the intestinal flexible pressure sensors, comprising the radial sensors and the axial sensors, were designed. The sensors calibration showed the R-square of each fitting line were above 0.998, which presented a high goodness of fit and indicated we could figure out the pressure value with the analogue voltage captured by MCU. Through the in-vitro experiment, the results that the radial sensors were more relevant to the occlusion threshold while the axial sensors had more effect on the alarm threshold could be concluded. The practicability of the PM-AASS was verified by the results of the in-vivo experiment, which showed that the PM-AASS had the effect of improvement to the anorectal internal pressure.

  3. Circular and longitudinal muscles shortening indicates sliding patterns during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nirali; Jiang, Yanfen; Mittal, Ravinder K.; Kim, Tae Ho; Ledgerwood, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal axial shortening is caused by longitudinal muscle (LM) contraction, but circular muscle (CM) may also contribute to axial shortening because of its spiral morphology. The goal of our study was to show patterns of contraction of CM and LM layers during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (TLESR). In rats, esophageal and LES morphology was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry, and function with the use of piezo-electric crystals and manometry. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve was used to induce esophageal contractions. In 18 healthy subjects, manometry and high frequency intraluminal ultrasound imaging during swallow-induced esophageal contractions and TLESR were evaluated. CM and LM thicknesses were measured (40 swallows and 30 TLESRs) as markers of axial shortening, before and at peak contraction, as well as during TLESRs. Animal studies revealed muscular connections between the LM and CM layers of the LES but not in the esophagus. During vagal stimulated esophageal contraction there was relative movement between the LM and CM. Human studies show that LM-to-CM (LM/CM) thickness ratio at baseline was 1. At the peak of swallow-induced contraction LM/CM ratio decreased significantly (2). The pattern of contraction of CM and LM suggests sliding of the two muscles. Furthermore, the sliding patterns are in the opposite direction during peristalsis and TLESR. PMID:26045610

  4. Pressure morphology of the relaxed lower esophageal sphincter: the formation and collapse of the phrenic ampulla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, Monika A.; Nicodème, Frédéric; Pandolfino, John E.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to apply novel high-resolution manometry with eight-sector radial pressure resolution (3D-HRM technology) to resolve the deglutitive pressure morphology at the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) before, during, and after bolus transit. A hybrid HRM assembly, including a 9-cm-long 3D-HRM array, was used to record EGJ pressure morphology in 15 normal subjects. Concurrent videofluoroscopy was used to relate bolus movement to pressure morphology and EGJ anatomy, aided by an endoclip marking the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ). The contractile deceleration point (CDP) marked the time at which luminal clearance slowed to 1.1 cm/s and the location (4 cm proximal to the elevated SCJ) at which peristalsis terminated. The phrenic ampulla spanned from the CDP to the SCJ. The subsequent radial and axial collapse of the ampulla coincided with the reconstitution of the effaced and elongated lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Following ampullary emptying, the stretched LES (maximum length 4.0 cm) progressively collapsed to its baseline length of 1.9 cm (P stomach. During ampullary emptying, the LES circular muscle contracts, and longitudinal muscle shortens while that of the adjacent esophagus reelongates. The likely LES elongation with the formation of the ampulla and shortening to its native length after ampullary emptying suggest that reduction in the resting tone of the longitudinal muscle within the LES segment is a previously unrecognized component of LES relaxation. PMID:22114118

  5. Opium addiction as a new risk factor of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Shahrokh; Toussy, Jafar; Zahmatkesh, Mehrdad

    2007-11-01

    Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) refers to an abnormality of SO contractility. It is a benign, non-calculus obstruction to the flow of bile or pancreatic juice through the pancreaticobiliary junction. Although morphine can cause an excitatory effect on SO motility, there are no comprehensive data about opium as a risk factor in inducing SOD in chronic opium abusers. The aim of the study was to assess potential risk factors, especially opium addiction (OA), in patients with SOD. In a case-control study, opium addiction, cigarette smoking, cholecystectomy, and periampullary diverticulum in patients with SOD were recorded and compared with healthy subjects. SOD was diagnosed by the Geenen-Hogan classification (type I). OA (p=0.001) and cholecystectomy (p<0.001) were two independent risk factors in patients with SOD. Chronic use of opiates by the oral or inhalational route may induce SOD, but whether chronic use of other morphine derivatives or i.v. drug abuse induce this disorder is not clear and needs further evaluation.

  6. Subtle lower esophageal sphincter relaxation abnormalities in patients with unexplained esophageal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herregods, T V K; van Hoeij, F B; Bredenoord, A J; Smout, A J P M

    2018-02-01

    Esophageal dysphagia is a relatively common symptom. We aimed to evaluate whether subtle, presently not acknowledged forms of dysfunction of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could explain dysphagia in a subset of patients with normal findings at high-resolution manometry (HRM) according to the Chicago classification v3.0. We used HRM to compare LES relaxation characteristics in 97 patients with unexplained dysphagia with those in 44 healthy subjects. In addition, normative values for time to LES relaxation and completeness of LES relaxation were calculated. Patients with delayed or incomplete LES relaxation were compared with patients with normal relaxation. Dysphagia patients had a higher nadir LES pressure (P=.001) and a longer time to LES relaxation (P=.012) than healthy subjects. Based on the findings in healthy subjects, normal values of LES relaxation were defined as: ≥50% of swallows with normal LES relaxation time (relaxation (not reaching a value below 10 mm Hg). Dysphagia patients had significantly more often >50% swallows with delayed and/or incomplete LES relaxation than healthy controls (25% vs 4.5%; P=.004). Dysphagia patients with >50% delayed and/or incomplete LES relaxation had a significantly higher LES resting pressure (Prelaxation abnormalities, such as a delayed relaxation of the LES and/or incomplete LES relaxation, could be a cause of dysphagia in approximately one quarter of the patients with otherwise unexplained esophageal dysphagia. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Obstetric anal sphincter injury rates among primiparous women with different modes of vaginal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampt, Amanda J; Patterson, Jillian A; Roberts, Christine L; Ford, Jane B

    2015-12-01

    To determine whether rates of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) are continuing to increase and whether risk of OASIS according to mode of delivery is constant over time. In a retrospective population-based study, data were obtained for vaginal singleton vertex deliveries at 37-41 weeks of pregnancy among primiparous women in New South Wales, Australia, between January 2001 and December 2011. Annual OASIS rates were determined among non-instrumental, forceps, and vacuum deliveries with and without episiotomy. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine adjusted odds ratios for each delivery mode category by year. Trends in adjusted odds ratios over time for each delivery category were compared. OASIS occurred in 955 (4.1%) of 23 081 deliveries in 2001 and 1487 (5.9%) of 25 081 deliveries in 2011. After adjustment for known risk factors, the only delivery categories to show statistically significant increases in OASIS over the study period were non-instrumental deliveries without episiotomy (linear trend Pdeliveries with episiotomy (linear trend P=0.004). Overall, OASIS rates have continued to increase. Known risk factors do not fully explain the increase in OASIS rates in non-instrumental deliveries without an episiotomy and in forceps deliveries with an episiotomy. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Preoperative chemoradiation with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil for extraperitoneal T3 rectal cancer: acute toxicity, tumor response, sphincter preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Coco, Claudio; Cellini, Numa; Picciocchi, Aurelio; Rosetto, Maria Elena; Mantini, Giovanna; Marmiroli, Luca; Barbaro, Brunella; Cogliandolo, Santa; Nuzzo, Gennaro; Tedesco, Manfredo; Ambesi-Impiombato, Fabrizio; Cosimelli, Maurizio; Rotman, Marvin

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of preoperative external radiation therapy intensified by systemic chemotherapy including bolus cisplatin (c-DDP) and 4-day infusional 5-fluorouracil (PLAFUR-4) on tumor response and sphincter preservation in patients with extraperitoneal T3 rectal cancer with acceptable toxicity, and to compare the results to our previous experience with bolus mitomycin c (MMC) and 4-day infusion 5-FU (FUMIR). Methods and Materials: Between October 1995 and March 1998, 40 consecutive patients with resectable extraperitoneal adenocarcinoma of the rectum were treated with preoperative chemoradiation: slow infusion iv c-DDP, 60 mg/m 2 , day 1 and 29 plus 24-h continuous infusion iv 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 1000 mg/m 2 , days 1-4 and 29-32, and concurrent external beam radiotherapy (45 Gy whole pelvis followed by 5.4 Gy boost). All but 3 patients had T3 disease. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after the end of chemoradiation. Results: No patient had Grade 4 acute toxicity. Grade 3 hematological toxicity was observed only in 2 (5%) patients. No patient had major gastrointestinal, skin, or urological acute toxicity. All patients had radical surgery. There was no perioperative mortality; perioperative morbidity rate was 12%. Overall, 23% (9 of 40) of patients had a complete pathological response and 10% (4 of 40) of patients had rare isolated residual cancer cells (Tmic). Comparing the stage at the diagnostic workup with the pathological stage, tumor downstaging was observed in 27 (68%) patients; nodal status downstaging was detected in 24 (60%) patients. Thirty-four (85%) patients had a sphincter-saving surgical procedure. In 4 of 10 (40%) patients who were definitive candidates for an abdominoperineal resection (APR), the sphincter was preserved, as it was in 13 of 13 (100%) probable candidates. Lengthening of the distance between the anorectal ring and the lower pole of the tumor ≥ 20 mm was observed in 9 (23%) patients. None of the patients had soilage

  9. Anal sphincter defects and faecal incontinence 15-24 years after first delivery: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán Rojas, Rodrigo A; Salvesen, Kjell Å; Volløyhaug, Ingrid

    2017-08-06

    To establish the prevalence of external (EAS) and internal anal sphincter (IAS) defects 15-24 years after childbirth in association to mode of delivery and faecal incontinence (FI), and compare the proportion of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) reported at delivery with defects on ultrasound. This was a cross-sectional study including 563 women, who delivered their first child from 1990-97. Women responded to a validated questionnaire (PFDI) in 2013-14. The proportion of women with FI was recorded. Information about OASIS was obtained from the National Birth Registry. Study participants underwent 4D transperineal ultrasound examination. A defect of the EAS and IAS of ≥30° in ≥4/6 planes on tomographic ultrasound was registered. Multiple logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) for comparison of prevalence of EAS defects between different modes of delivery and in association to FI. Fisher's exact test was used for IAS defects. Defects of EAS and IAS were found after normal delivery (n = 201): 10% and 1%; forceps (n = 144): 32% and 7%; vacuum (n = 120): 15% and 4%, and no defects after caesarean section (n = 98). Forceps was associated with increased risk of EAS defects compared to normal delivery (aOR 4.1, 95% CI 2.3-7.2) and vacuum (aOR 3.0, 95% CI 1.6-5.6) and increased risk of IAS defects compared to normal delivery (cOR 7.4, 95% CI 1.5-70.5). The difference between vacuum and normal delivery was not significant. FI was indicated by 18% of women with EAS defects, 29% with IAS defects and 8% without sphincter defects. EAS and IAS defects were associated with increased risk of FI (aOR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3-4.9; cOR 4.2, 95% CI 1.1-13.5). 80% of ultrasonographical sphincter defects were not reported as OASIS at first or subsequent deliveries. Anal sphincter defects visualized by transperineal ultrasound 15-24 years after delivery were associated with forceps and FI. Undetected OASIS was frequent. This article is

  10. Intrinsic cylindrical and spherical waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlow, I K

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic waveforms associated with cylindrical and spherical Bessel functions are obtained by eliminating the factors responsible for the inverse radius and inverse square radius laws of wave power per unit area of wavefront. The resulting expressions are Riccati-Bessel functions for both cases and these can be written in terms of amplitude and phase functions of order v and wave variable z. When z is real, it is shown that a spatial phase angle of the intrinsic wave can be defined and this, together with its amplitude function, is systematically investigated for a range of fixed orders and varying z. The derivatives of Riccati-Bessel functions are also examined. All the component functions exhibit different behaviour in the near field depending on the order being less than, equal to or greater than 1/2. Plots of the phase angle can be used to display the locations of the zeros of the general Riccati-Bessel functions and lead to new relations concerning the ordering of the real zeros of Bessel functions and the occurrence of multiple zeros when the argument of the Bessel function is fixed

  11. Gynaecological and obstetrical bleeding in women with factor XI deficiency - a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiewel-Verschueren, S.; Arendz, I. J.; Knol, H. M.; Meijer, Karina

    Menstrual bleeding, pregnancy and delivery present an intrinsic haemostatic challenge to women with bleeding disorders such as factor XI (FXI) deficiency. Aim: To provide a systematic overview of studies on gynaecological and obstetrical bleeding problems in women with FXI deficiency. Methods: We

  12. Laryngeal Muscles Are Spared in the Dystrophin Deficient "mdx" Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lisa B.; Joseph, Gayle L.; Adkins, Tracey D.; Andrade, Francisco H.; Stemple, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: "Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)" is caused by the loss of the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. The disease leads to severe and progressive skeletal muscle wasting. Interestingly, the disease spares some muscles. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of dystrophin deficiency on 2 intrinsic laryngeal muscles, the…

  13. Inhibition of Intrinsic Thrombin Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Stief MD

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The contact phase of coagulation is of physiologic/pathophysiologic importance, whenever unphysiologic polynegative substances such as cell fragments (microparticles get in contact with blood. There are several clinically used inhibitors of intrinsic thrombin generation. Here the inhibitory concentrations 50% (IC50 of these anticoagulants are measured by the highly specific thrombin generation assay INCA. Methods Unfrozen pooled normal citrated plasma in polystyrole tubes was supplemented at 23°C in duplicate with 0–2 IU/ml low molecular weight heparin (dalteparin, 0–2 IU/ml unfractionated heparin, 0–500 KIU/ml aprotinin, or 0–40 mM arginine. 50 μl plasma or 1 IU/ml thrombin standard were pipetted into a polystyrole microtiter plate with flat bottom. 5 μl SiO 2 /CaCl 2 - reagent (INCA activator were added and after 0–30 min incubation at 37°C 100 μl 2.5 M arginine, pH 8.6, were added; arginine inhibits hemostasis activation and depolymerizes generated fibrin within 20 min at 23°C. The in the physiologic 37°C incubation phase generated thrombin was then chromogenically detected. The intra-assay CV values were < 5%. Results and Discussion The approximate IC50 were 0.01 IU/ml dalteparin, 0.02 IU/ml heparin, 25 KIU/ml aprotinin, and 12 mM arginine. The efficiency of any anticoagulant on intrinsic thrombin generation should be measured for each individual patient. Abbreviations IIa, thrombin; δA, increase in absorbance; APTT, activated partial thromboplastin time; CRT, coagulation reaction time (at 37°C in water-bath; F-wells, polystyrole microtiter plates with flat bottom; IC50, inhibitory concentration 50%; INCA, intrinsic coagulation activity assay; IU, international units; KIU, kallikrein inhibiting unis; LMWH, low molecular weight heparin; mA, milli-absorbance units; PSL, pathromtin SL®; RT, room temperature (23°C; U-wells, polystyrole microtiter plates with round bottom.

  14. Intrinsic rotation with gyrokinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Felix I.; Barnes, Michael; Catto, Peter J.; Calvo, Iván

    2012-01-01

    The generation of intrinsic rotation by turbulence and neoclassical effects in tokamaks is considered. To obtain the complex dependences observed in experiments, it is necessary to have a model of the radial flux of momentum that redistributes the momentum within the tokamak in the absence of a preexisting velocity. When the lowest order gyrokinetic formulation is used, a symmetry of the model precludes this possibility, making small effects in the gyroradius over scale length expansion necessary. These effects that are usually small become important for momentum transport because the symmetry of the lowest order gyrokinetic formulation leads to the cancellation of the lowest order momentum flux. The accuracy to which the gyrokinetic equation needs to be obtained to retain all the physically relevant effects is discussed.

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, ... can help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for iron-deficiency anemia, especially if they have: A history of iron-deficiency anemia Heavy blood loss during ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of blood ... iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition because they need twice ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you lose iron. ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... and is recruiting by invitation only. View more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat the ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science ... deficiency anemia. Endurance activities and athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... risk for the condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia ... periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and ... of the mouth, an enlarged spleen, and frequent infections. People who have iron-deficiency anemia may have ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... have iron-deficiency anemia, you'll have a high level of transferrin that has no iron. Other ... may include dietary changes and supplements, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require a blood ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and paler than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency ... if you have iron-deficiency anemia or another type of anemia. You may be diagnosed with iron- ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and ... Internal bleeding (bleeding inside the body) also may lead to iron-deficiency anemia. This type of blood ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and ... much of the transferrin in your blood isn't carrying iron. If you have iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ... Treatment may need to be done in a hospital. The goals of treating iron-deficiency anemia are ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more information about diet and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young ... who should be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ... iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you may get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is ...

  18. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  19. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven F Werder

    2010-04-01

    : 200 picograms per milliliter or less is low, and 201 to 350 picograms per milliliter is borderline low. Other tests may be indicated, including plasma homocysteine, serum methylmalonic acid, antiparietal cell and anti-intrinsic factor antibodies, and serum gastrin level. In B12 deficiency dementia with versus without pernicious anemia, there appear to be different manifestations, need for further workup, and responses to treatment. Dementia of the Alzheimer’s type is a compatible diagnosis when B12 deficiency is found, unless it is caused by pernicious anemia. Patients with pernicious anemia generally respond favorably to supplemental B12 treatment, especially if pernicious anemia is diagnosed early in the course of the disease. Some patients without pernicious anemia, but with B12 deficiency and either mild cognitive impairment or mild to moderate dementia, might show some degree of cognitive improvement with supplemental B12 treatment. Evidence that supplemental B12 treatment is beneficial for patients without pernicious anemia, but with B12 deficiency and moderately-severe to severe dementia is scarce. Oral cyanocobalamin is generally favored over intramuscular cyanocobalamin.Keywords: Alzheimer, dementia, cognitive impairment, cognitive dysfunction, cobalamin, cyanocobalamin, B12, homocysteine, hyperhomocysteinemia, homocystinuria

  20. Pneumatic Dilation of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter Can Now Be Successfully Performed Without Morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yi; Bustamante, Marco; Moraveji, Sharareh; McCallum, Richard W

    2016-11-01

    Patients with dysphagia may be diagnosed with impaired lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation and treated with pneumatic dilation (PD), stretching and tearing LES muscle fibers. Esophageal perforation has been reported to be as high as 10%. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the perforation rate of PD when used for impaired relaxation of the LES using current techniques. A chart review was conducted to identify patients referred for esophageal manometry by high-resolution manometry and later received PD from January 2013 to April 2016. The diagnoses of achalasia, gastroesophageal junction outlet obstruction or hypertensive LES with accompanying impaired LES relaxation were based on the Chicago Classification III. Demographic data, clinical findings, treatment approaches and outcomes were explored. A total of 187 patients were referred for dysphagia and had esophageal manometry during this time frame. In all, 62 patients (34 female), mean age of 52 years, met the criteria for incomplete relaxation of the LES and underwent a total of 88 PD procedures. All initial PD procedures used the 30-mm diameter balloon, 18 subsequently required a 35-mm balloon and 8 went on to 40-mm balloon size. No perforations or other complications were documented by esophagogastroduodenoscopy, gastrografin testing immediately postdilation or by subsequent clinical outcome. PD by an experienced gastroenterologist using general anesthesia, fluoroscopic guidance, Rigiflex balloon equipment and a specific repetitive technique can be successfully performed without perforation. Hence, the already known therapeutic efficacy of PD can now be combined with the knowledge that there is essentially no accompanying perforation rate. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Subtypes of muscarinic receptors in vagal inhibitory pathway to the lower esophageal sphincter of the opossum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, R J; Dodds, W J

    1987-10-01

    We assessed the characteristics of muscarinic neural transmission in the vagal inhibitory pathway to the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) of anesthetized opossums. LES relaxation was induced by electrical stimulation of the cervical vagus. Measurements were made of LES relaxation before and after intravenous administration of nicotinic (hexamethonium), serotonergic (5-Meo-DMT), nonselective muscarinic (atropine), and selective muscarinic (pirenzepine-M1 and 4-DAMP-M2) antagonists. The latency of LES relaxation was increased substantially by pirenzepine and atropine, increased slightly by hexamethonium, but was not affected by 4-DAMP or 5-Meo-DMT. Given as concurrent intravenous infusions, hexamethonium, 5-Meo-DMT and 4-DAMP added to pirenzepine or atropine did not significantly increase LES relaxation latency above that caused by pirenzepine or atropine alone. None of the antagonists alone had a significant effect on percent LES relaxation. The combination of pirenzepine or 4-DAMP with hexamethonium and 5-Meo-DMT did not affect percent LES relaxation. The combination of atropine with hexamethonium and 5-Meo-DMT reduced LES relaxation to 18%. The combination of pirenzepine and 4-DAMP with hexamethonium and 5-Meo-DMT, however, had no effect on percent LES relaxation. We conclude that muscarinic participation in vagally induced LES relaxation exhibits two functional receptor subtypes: (1) M1 receptors that determine LES relaxation latency and are antagonized by pirenzepine or atropine, and (2) non-M1, non-M2 receptors (Mx receptors) that contribute to the magnitude of LES relaxation and are antagonized by atropine, but not by pirenzepine or 4-DAMP.

  2. Sacral neuromodulation for combined faecal and urinary incontinence following obstetric anal sphincter injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydningen, M B; Riise, S; Wilsgaard, T; Lindsetmo, R O; Norderval, S

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) in the treatment of faecal incontinence and concomitant urinary incontinence in women with a history of obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS). In this prospective study, consecutive women with faecal incontinence following OASIS accepted for SNM were screened for concomitant urinary incontinence. The primary outcome was the change in urinary incontinence score on the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire for Urinary Incontinence, Short Form (ICIQ-UI-SF), between baseline and 12 months. Secondary outcomes included the change in St Mark's score, sexual function and quality of life, change in grade of urinary incontinence and disappearance of urgency. From March 2012 to September 2014, 39 women with combined faecal incontinence and urinary incontinence received SNM. Thirty-seven women were available for analysis after 12 months. The mean reduction in the ICIQ-UI-SF score between the baseline and 12 months was 5.8 (95% CI 3.7-8.0, P < 0.001). ICIQ-UI-SF was reduced in 29 (78%) women, urinary incontinence resolved in 13/37 (35%, 95% CI 20%-50%) patients, and urgency disappeared in 14/33 (42%, 95% CI 26%-59%). The mean reduction in the St Mark's score was 10.6 (95% CI 8.6-12.7, P < 0.001). Disease-specific quality of life, Euroqual 5-dimension visual analogue scale (EQ-5D VAS) and several areas of sexual function changed significantly for the better. More than three-quarters of the women with combined faecal and urinary incontinence following OASIS reported a successful outcome with reduction in ICIQ-UI-SF at 12 months after SNM. Colorectal Disease © 2017 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  3. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Cesar Soares dos Santos Junior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5. The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years, was 44% (n=40. The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years. Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7% resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3% additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1% underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%. Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%. In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices.

  4. Is Removal of the Pressure-regulating Balloon Necessary After Artificial Urinary Sphincter Cuff Erosion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Alexander T; Viers, Boyd R; Shakir, Nabeel A; Pagliara, Travis J; Scott, Jeremy M; Morey, Allen F

    2018-03-01

    To characterize the risk of delayed infectious complications from retained pressure-regulating balloons (PRBs) after artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) cuff erosion. From our database of 530 AUS cases between 2007 and 2016, we identified 40 total AUS cuff erosions. Twenty-four (60%) presented without evidence of gross device infection and underwent explant of cuff and pump without removal of the PRB. Space of Retzius (SoR) and high submuscular (HSM) balloon locations were analyzed to assess for ease of removal. Presenting clinical features and retained balloon-related outcomes are reported. Of the 24 AUS cuff erosions with retained balloons, 6 (25%) men subsequently required PRB removal for infection during the median follow-up of 36 months (interquartile range 29-53). The median time to balloon infection after AUS erosion surgery was 4 months (interquartile range 4-16). Infection risk was reduced in those without concurrent inflatable penile prosthesis (20%) and in those who underwent "drain and retain" of the PRB (13%). The most common presenting clinical symptoms with retained PRB infection were pain and erythema near the site of the PRB (83%). No patient developed sepsis-related complications. The location of the PRB in this subcohort included 2 SoR and 4 HSM placements. The median operative time for balloon removal in the SoR was 3.5 times greater than that for HSM PRBs (133 minutes vs 38 minutes). With extended follow-up, three-quarters of the men with retained PRBs after AUS cuff erosion experienced no infectious complications. Removal of infected SoR PRBs was associated with greater operative times and surgical complexity relative to HSM PRBs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. System design and experimental research of lower esophageal sphincter stimulator for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin-Chen Sun; Wan-Jun Tao; Chuan-Qing Zhu; Li-Li Zhao; Min Wang; Xiao-Ying Lu; Zhi-Gong Wang; Zhi-Ning Fan

    2017-07-01

    Electrical stimulation therapy (EST) of lower esophageal sphincters (LES) is a new technique for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In this paper, an implantable LES stimulator with wireless power transmission is proposed for the treatment of GERD. The LES stimulator is composed of an implantable pulse generator (IPG), an external controller, and a wireless power transmission module. The IPG, whose area is 31×21 mm 2 , is designed to generate voltage-regulated constant-current stimulation pulses. The external controller allows for wireless programming of the IPG via a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) module. The wireless power transmission module provides power for the IPG. According to the measurement of output stimulus waveforms, the proposed LES stimulator is capable of delivering electrical stimulations with a current ranging between 0 and 8 mA. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the proposed LES stimulator, experiments were performed on 12 male New Zealand white rabbits. Esophageal manometry was performed before and after the procedure and the LES pressure (LESP) has been recorded. The mean LESP is increased significantly in the stimulation group than the sham group (stimulation group: 9.25±1.24 mmHg vs 13.99 ±1.28 mmHg, p<;0.05; sham group: 9.00±1.22 mmHg vs 9.23±1.27 mmHg, p=0.267). The results show that the electrical stimulation delivered by the LES stimulator can safely and effectively increase resting LES pressure in acute animal models, suggesting that the implantable LES stimulator is a perspective approach for treating GERD in clinics.

  6. High-resolution manometry: reliability of automated analysis of upper esophageal sphincter relaxation parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Hee; Lee, Joon Seong; Hong, Su Jin; Lee, Ji Sung; Jeon, Seong Ran; Kim, Wan Jung; Kim, Hyun Gun; Cho, Joo Young; Kim, Jin Oh; Cho, Jun Hyung; Park, Won Young; Park, Ji Woong; Lee, Yang Gyun

    2014-10-01

    At present, automated analysis of high-resolution manometry (HRM) provides details of upper esophageal sphincter (UES) relaxation parameters. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of automatic analysis of UES relaxation parameters. One hundred and fifty three subjects (78 males, mean age 68.6 years, range 26-97) underwent HRM. UES relaxation parameters were interpreted twice, once visually (V) by two experts and once automatically (AS) using the ManoView ESO analysis software. Agreement between the two analysis methods was assessed using Bland-Altman plots and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). The agreement between V and AS analyses of basal UES pressure (CCC 0.996; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.994-0.997) and residual UES pressure (CCC 0.918; 95% CI 0.895-0.936) was good to excellent. Agreement for time to UES relaxation nadir (CCC 0.208; 95% CI 0.068-0.339) and UES relaxation duration (CCC 0.286; 95% CI 0.148-0.413) between V and AS analyses was poor. There was moderate agreement for recovery time of UES relaxation (CCC 0.522; 95% CI 0.397-0.627) and peak pharyngeal pressure (CCC 0.695; 95% CI 0.605-0.767) between V and AS analysis. AS analysis was unreliable, especially regarding the time variables of UES relaxation. Due to the difference in the clinical interpretation of pharyngoesophageal dysfunction between V and AS analysis, the use of visual analysis is justified.

  7. Urethral Stricture Outcomes After Artificial Urinary Sphincter Cuff Erosion: Results From a Multicenter Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Martin S; Broghammer, Joshua A; Kaufman, Melissa R; Milam, Douglas F; Brant, William O; Cleves, Mario A; Dum, Travis W; McClung, Christopher; Jones, LeRoy A; Brady, Jeffrey D; Pryor, Michael B; Henry, Gerard D

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the influence of both repair type and degree of cuff erosion on postoperative urethral stricture rate. Sparse literature exists regarding patient outcomes after artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) cuff erosion. Surgeons from 6 high-volume male continence centers compiled a comprehensive database of post-erosion patients to examine outcomes. This retrospective multi-institution study included 80 patients treated for AUS cuff erosions. Seventy-eight patients had specific information regarding post-cuff erosion urethral strictures. Erosion patients were categorized into 1 of 3 repair types at the time of explant surgery: catheter only, single-layer capsule-to-capsule repair (urethrorrhaphy), and formal urethroplasty. Operative notes and available medical records were extensively reviewed to collect study data. Twenty-five of 78 patients manifested a urethral stricture after AUS cuff erosion (32%). More strictures occurred among patients who underwent urethrorrhaphy (40% vs 29% for catheter only and 14% for urethroplasty). Stricture rates did not vary significantly by repair type (P = .2). Strictures occurred significantly more frequently in patients with complete cuff erosions (58%) as compared to partial erosions (25%, P = .037). A trend was detected regarding increased percentage of erosion correlating with increased stricture rate, but this did not reach statistical significance (P = .057). Partially eroded patients were more likely to undergo urethrorrhaphy repair (60%, P = .002). Urethral stricture was more likely to occur after complete cuff erosion as opposed to partial erosion in this multicenter retrospective population. Repair type, whether catheter only, urethrorrhaphy, or formal urethroplasty, did not appear to influence postoperative stricture rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The MRI study of the sphincter muscle complex in congenital anorectal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Shaotao; Mao Yongzhong; Wang Yong; Dong Ning; Ruan Qinglan; Peng Zhenjun; Kong Xiangquan; Liu Dingxi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the development of the sphincter muscle complex (SMC) and defecation function in pediatric patients with congenital anorectal malformations (ARM). Methods: A total of 64 children underwent MRI, among whom 39 were patients with ARM, and the others were patients without ARM undergoing MRI because of other dieases. The dimensions of the SMC in different planes were evaluated with different sequences and coils. The relationship between the SMC development and the defecation function was investigated. Results: In control group, the absolute value of SMC width was (3.63 ± 0.22)mm, which had a high correlation with age (r=0.998, P 0.05). The SMCs in intermediate ARM patients [muscle index (MI)=0.47 ± 0.05] and low ARM patients (MI=0.49 ± 0.05) were well developed. The SMCs in a portion of patients with high ARM (MI=0.28 ± 0.06) were poorly developed, when MI≤0.18, anorectal contraction pressure was significantly lower (t=3.55, P 0.18[(0.85 ± 0.20) vs (2.24 ± 1.02) kPa]. The length of anal canal with high-pressure[(10.88 ± 3.64) vs (20.26 ± 4.34)mm] was shorter (t= 5.18, P 0.18, the anorectal angle was less than 90 degrees, and normal continent function was found in 21 of 23 cases (91%). Conclusion: MRI can be employed to evaluate the development of SMC in patients with ARM, MI was an objective criteria to evaluate the development of SMC. When MI≤0.18, maldevelopment of SMC will be highly suspected. (authors)

  9. [Impact of anastomotic strictures on treatment of post-prostatectomy stress incontinence by artificial urinary sphincter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pic, G; Terrier, J E; Ozenne, B; Morel-Journel, N; Paparel, P; Ruffion, A

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a degradation of the quality of life factor in the consequences of radical prostatectomy. Artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) is the standard treatment. Screening and preoperative treatment of anastomotic strictures (AS) is an essential step for the success of the intervention. The objective of the study was to assess the impact of AS on the results of AUA. We retrospectively studied 147 AUS settlements from 2005 to 2013 in the urology department of the Centre Hospitalier Lyon by three operators. The demographic characteristics, the irradiation history, the severity of incontinence, the complications of AUS, the continence rate and the postoperative satisfaction were collected. Wilcoxon statistical tests and Fischer and a Kaplan-Meier curve were used to compare the two control groups and AS. Logistic regression analysis looked for predictors of surgical reintervention. Of the 147 patients included, 24 (16.3%) had a history of AS. Of these, 21 (87.5%) were treated with endoscopic urethrotomy. Patients in the AS group had more severe incontinence (P<0.05) than in the control group. Explantation rates, recurrence of incontinence and reoperation was 12.5%, 8.3% and 33.3% in the AS group against 4.9%, 15.4% and 27.6% in the control group. In logistic regression, history of AS has not been found as reoperation risk factor. Continents and satisfied patients rate were 77.8% and 76.5%, respectively in the AS group against 91.1% and 81.1% in the control group. The history of AS does not appear to be predictive of poor outcome after implementation of a AUS. Larger cohort studies are needed to confirm these results. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  15. Effects of electroacupuncture combined with stem cell transplantation on anal sphincter injury-induced faecal incontinence in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojia; Guo, Xiutian; Jin, Weiqi; Lu, Jingen

    2018-03-08

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and acupuncture are known to mitigate tissue damage. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects of combined electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation and BMSC injection in a rat model of anal sphincter injury-induced faecal incontinence (FI). 60 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: sham-operated control, FI, FI+EA, FI+BMSC, and FI+BMSC+EA. The anorectal tissues were collected on days 1, 3, 7 and 14. Repair of the injured anal sphincter was compared using haematoxylin and eosin (HE) and immunocytochemiscal analyses with sarcomeric α actinin. The expression of stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-3 (MCP-3) was detected by quantitative reverse transcription PCR to evaluate the effects of EA on the homing of BMSCs. The therapeutic effect of combined EA+BMSCs on damaged tissue was the strongest among all the groups as indicated by HE and immunohistochemical staining. The expression of SDF-1 and MCP-3 was significantly increased by combined EA and BMSC treatment when compared with the other groups (P=0.01 to P<0.05), suggesting promotive effects of EA on the homing of BMSCs. The combination of EA and BMSC transplantation effectively repaired the impaired anal sphincters. The underlying mechanism might be associated with apparent promotive effects of EA on the homing of BMSCs. Our study provides a theoretical basis for the development of a non-surgical treatment method for FI secondary to muscle impairment. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Incentives and intrinsic motivation in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Berdud

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: The conclusions could act as a guide to support the optimal design of incentive policies and schemes within health organisations when healthcare professionals are intrinsically motivated.

  17. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intrinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. (author).

  18. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    1990-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intrinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. (author)

  19. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk de Bruyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations.

  20. Case report of deep vein thrombosis caused by artificial urinary sphincter reservoir compressing right external iliac vein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus J Yip

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial urinary sphincters (AUSs are commonly used after radical prostatectomy for those who are incontinent of urine. However, they are associated with complications, the most common being reservoir uprising or migration. We present a unique case of occlusive external iliac and femoral vein obstruction by the AUS reservoir causing thrombosis. Deflation of the reservoir and anticoagulation has, thus far, not been successful at decreasing thrombus burden. We present this case as a rare, but significant surgical complication; explore the risk factors that may have contributed, and other potential endovascular therapies to address this previously unreported AUS complication.

  1. Geochemical indicators of intrinsic bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borden, R.C.; Gomez, C.A.; Becker, M.T.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed field investigation has been completed at a gasoline-contaminated aquifer near Rocky Point, NC, to examine possible indicators of intrinsic bioremediation and identify factors that may significantly influence the rae and extent of bioremediation. The dissolved plume of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) in ground water is naturally degrading. Toluene and o-xylene are most rapidly degraded followed by m-, p-xylene, and benzene. Ethylbenzene appears to degrade very slowly under anaerobic conditions present in the center of the plume. The rate and extent of biodegradation appears to be strongly influenced by the type and quantity of electron acceptors present in the aquifer. At the upgradient edge of the plume, nitrate, ferric iron, and oxygen are used as terminal electron acceptors during hydrocarbon biodegradation. The equivalent of 40 to 50 mg/l of hydrocarbon is degraded based on the increase in dissolved CO 2 relative to background ground water. Immediately downgradient of the source area, sulfate and iron are the dominant electron acceptors. Toluene and o-xylene are rapidly removed in this region. Once the available oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate are consumed, biodegradation is limited and appears to be controlled by mixing and aerobic biodegradation at the plume fringes

  2. Protein intrinsic disorder in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Florencio; Pietrosemoli, Natalia; García-Martín, Juan A; Solano, Roberto

    2013-09-12

    To some extent contradicting the classical paradigm of the relationship between protein 3D structure and function, now it is clear that large portions of the proteomes, especially in higher organisms, lack a fixed structure and still perform very important functions. Proteins completely or partially unstructured in their native (functional) form are involved in key cellular processes underlain by complex networks of protein interactions. The intrinsic conformational flexibility of these disordered proteins allows them to bind multiple partners in transient interactions of high specificity and low affinity. In concordance, in plants this type of proteins has been found in processes requiring these complex and versatile interaction networks. These include transcription factor networks, where disordered proteins act as integrators of different signals or link different transcription factor subnetworks due to their ability to interact (in many cases simultaneously) with different partners. Similarly, they also serve as signal integrators in signaling cascades, such as those related to response to external stimuli. Disordered proteins have also been found in plants in many stress-response processes, acting as protein chaperones or protecting other cellular components and structures. In plants, it is especially important to have complex and versatile networks able to quickly and efficiently respond to changing environmental conditions since these organisms cannot escape and have no other choice than adapting to them. Consequently, protein disorder can play an especially important role in plants, providing them with a fast mechanism to obtain complex, interconnected and versatile molecular networks.

  3. Protein intrinsic disorder in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencio ePazos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To some extent contradicting the classical paradigm of the relationship between protein 3D structure and function, now it is clear that large portions of the proteomes, especially in higher organisms, lack a fixed structure and still perform very important functions. Proteins completely or partially unstructured in their native (functional form are involved in key cellular processes underlain by complex networks of protein interactions. The intrinsic conformational flexibility of these disordered proteins allows them to bind multiple partners in transient interactions of high specificity and low affinity. In concordance, in plants this type of proteins has been found in processes requiring these complex and versatile interaction networks. These include transcription factor networks, where disordered proteins act as integrators of different signals or link different transcription factor subnetworks due to their ability to interact (in many cases simultaneously with different partners. Similarly, they also serve as signal integrators in signalling cascades, such as those related to response to external stimuli. Disordered proteins have also been found in plants in many stress-response processes, acting as protein chaperones or protecting other cellular components and structures. In plants, it is especially important to have complex and versatile networks able to quickly and efficiently respond to changing environmental conditions since these organisms can not escape and have no other choice than adapting to them. Consequently, protein disorder can play an especially important role in plants, providing them with a fast mechanism to obtain complex, interconnected and versatile molecular networks.

  4. Early pelvic floor muscle training after obstetrical anal sphincter injuries for the reduction of anal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathé, Mélodie; Valancogne, Guy; Atallah, Anthony; Sciard, Clémentine; Doret, Muriel; Gaucherand, Pascal; Beaufils, Etienne

    2016-04-01

    Between 0.5 and 5% of vaginal deliveries involve obstetrical anal sphincter injuries (OASIS). Thirty to forty percent of patients with OASIS will suffer from anal incontinence in the subacute postpartum period. The aim of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of early pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) combined with standard rehabilitation on anal incontinence after vaginal deliveries complicated by OASIS. The present work was a retrospective quantitative study performed in a tertiary-level maternity hospital. Women with 3rd or 4th degree obstetric tears were included. Women who gave birth between January 1st, 2011 and December 31st, 2012 underwent standard pelvic-perineal rehabilitation within 6-8 weeks postpartum. Women who gave birth between January 1st, 2013 and July 1st, 2014 had early rehabilitation (within 30 days after delivery) followed by the same standard rehabilitation received by the other group. Rehabilitation was performed by physiotherapists specialized in perineology. No electrostimulation was done in early rehabilitation. An in-house-validated modification of the Jorge and Wexner questionnaire was sent by mail to the patients to assess symptoms. The main judgment criterion was anal incontinence to gas, loose stools and/or solid stool. Two hundred and thirty patients were diagnosed with OASIS. Nineteen women (8.3%) were lost to follow-up. The intention-to-treat analysis included 211 patients, 109 of whom underwent standard rehabilitation and 102 early rehabilitation plus standard rehabilitation. The two groups were comparable in terms of parity, birth weight, assisted delivery, epidural anesthesia and rates of mediolateral episiotomy. Multivariate analyses adjusted for type of perineal lesion were performed. Early rehabilitation significantly reduced gas leakage: OR 0.51 [0.29-0.90] (p=0.02), liquid stool leakage: OR 0.22 [0.08-0.58] (p=0.02) and urinary stress incontinence: OR 0.43 [0.24-0.77] (p=0.004). We recommend early (during the

  5. Risk of recurrence and subsequent delivery after obstetric anal sphincter injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghestan, E; Irgens, L M; Børdahl, P E; Rasmussen, S

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the recurrence risk, the likelihood of having further deliveries and mode of delivery after third to fourth degree obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS). Population-based cohort study. The Medical Birth Registry of Norway. A cohort of 828,864 mothers with singleton, vertex-presenting infants, weighing 500 g or more, during the period 1967-2004. Comparison of women with and without a history of OASIS with respect to the occurrence of OASIS, subsequent delivery rate and planned caesarean rate. OASIS in second and third deliveries, subsequent delivery rate and mode of delivery. Adjusted odds ratios of the recurrence of OASIS in women with a history of OASIS in the first, and in both the first and second deliveries, were 4.2 (95% CI 3.9-4.5; 5.6%) and 10.6 (95% CI 6.2-18.1; 9.5%), respectively, relative to women without a history of OASIS. Instrumental deliveries, in particular forceps deliveries, birthweights of 3500 g or more and large maternity units were associated with a recurrence of OASIS. Instrumental delivery did not further increase the excess recurrence risk associated with high birthweight. A man who fathered a child whose delivery was complicated by OASIS was more likely to father another child whose delivery was complicated by OASIS in another woman who gave birth in the same maternity unit (adjusted OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.2-3.7; 5.6%). However, if the deliveries took place in different maternity units, the recurrence risk was not significantly increased (OR 1.3; 95% CI 0.8-2.1; 4.4%). The subsequent delivery rate was not different in women with and without previous OASIS, whereas women with a previous OASIS were more often scheduled to caesarean delivery. Recurrence risks in second and third deliveries were high. A history of OASIS had little or no impact on the rates of subsequent deliveries. Women with previous OASIS were delivered more frequently by planned caesarean delivery. © 2011 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of

  6. LEADERSHIP STYLE AND EMPLOYEES' INTRINSIC JOB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This study investigates the impact of leadership style on employees' intrinsic job satisfaction in the Cross River State Newspaper Corporation, Calabar,. Nigeria. The study examined the problem of dissatisfaction in the work place as far as intrinsic factors of job satisfaction are concerned. Structured questionnaire ...

  7. Intrinsic bioremediation of landfills interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigmon, R.L.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    Intrinsic bioremediation is a risk management option that relies on natural biological and physical processes to contain the spread of contamination from a source. Evidence is presented in this report that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the Sanitary Landfill is fundamental to support incorportion into a Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

  8. Differential scanning microcalorimetry of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permyakov, Sergei E

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasensitive differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is an indispensable thermophysical technique enabling to get direct information on enthalpies accompanying heating/cooling of dilute biopolymer solutions. The thermal dependence of protein heat capacity extracted from DSC data is a valuable source of information on intrinsic disorder level of a protein. Application details and limitations of DSC technique in exploration of protein intrinsic disorder are described.

  9. Intrinsic bioremediation of landfills interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Fliermans, C.B.

    1997-07-14

    Intrinsic bioremediation is a risk management option that relies on natural biological and physical processes to contain the spread of contamination from a source. Evidence is presented in this report that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the Sanitary Landfill is fundamental to support incorportion into a Corrective Action Plan (CAP).

  10. An Intrinsic Coordinate System for Fingerprint Matching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazen, A.M.; Gerez, Sabih H.; Bigun, J.; Smeraldi, F.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, an intrinsic coordinate system is proposed for fingerprints. First the fingerprint is partitioned in regular regions, which are regions that contain no singular points. In each regular region, the intrinsic coordinate system is defined by the directional field. When using the

  11. AUTONOMY AND OBJECTIFIED BODIES IN LARGE INSTITUTIONS: DEVICES FOR THE INTERNALIZATION OF SPHINCTER CONTROL IN CHILDHOOD AND ITS EXTERNALIZATION DURING OLD AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Magadelna, Santiago

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the key criteria for the designation and management of the socially immature (Children and the relegated (Elderly is inadequate "personal autonomy". This is based, among other mechanisms on "physiological functional autonomy" which is put under question both during infant immaturity and senile cognitive impairment. At both ends (Children and Elderly guardianship is delegated, as "not-social birth" or "social death". We compare the need for sphincter control in Childhood socialization in institutionalized subjects with the arisen need of sphincter control in institutionalized Elderly.

  12. A theoretical framework to guide a study of patients' bowel symptoms and self-care strategies following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, Margaret; McCarthy, Geraldine; Savage, Eileen

    2013-08-01

    A paucity of research is available on patients' bowel symptom experiences and self-care strategies following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. Most research undertaken to date on patients' bowel symptoms following surgery for rectal cancer has been largely atheoretical. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of choosing a theoretical framework to guide a study of patients' bowel symptoms and self-care strategies following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. As a result of a thorough literature review, we determined that the Symptom Management Theory provided the most comprehensive framework to guide our research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Periarticular Morphine-Induced Sphincter of Oddi Spasm Causing Severe Pain and Bradycardia in an Awake Patient Under Spinal Anesthesia: An Important Diagnostic Consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumpan, Yuri; Engen, Dale; Tanzola, Robert; Saha, Tarit

    2016-10-01

    Sphincter of Oddi spasm from opioids has been documented, presenting as severe epigastric pain and potentially overlooked in a differential diagnosis. We present a case of sphincter of Oddi spasm from periarticular morphine in a patient under spinal anesthesia, causing severe distress and treated effectively with glucagon. It is important for anesthesiologists using opioids to consider it as a cause of perioperative pain and be familiar with treatment as it may be refractory by conventional use of opioids for pain relief. It is also important to consider the systemic effects of periarticular absorption, as evident by our case.

  14. Anastomotic leakage after sphincter-sparing surgery in a young woman diagnosed with low rectal cancer - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Aslan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rectal cancer is the third most common site for cancer in the world, with a high morbidity and mortality. The new techniques for the treatment of low rectal cancer have been improved recently, allowing sphincter-sparing surgery to be available for more patients, with an optimal oncological and functional outcome. The most fundamental advance in rectal cancer surgery was the concept of total mesorectal resection (TME introduced by Heald in 1982. Association with neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy determines regression of the disease by “down staging” the tumors and allows for sphincter-sparing surgery to be performed, with low recurrence rate and increased overall survival. We present the case of 48-year old woman who had low rectal resection with colorectal anastomosis for middle rectal cancer. The patient had a BMI of 29, was hypertensive, had uterine fibroids and underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy. During the 4th postoperative day the patient developed an anastomotic leakage grade B which was spontaneously closed on the 15th postoperative day. The patient did not manifest fever or any other symptoms. Normal bowel function resumed on the 5th postoperative day. No recurrence was detected at the one-year follow-up.

  15. Impaired contractility of the circular striated urethral sphincter muscle may contribute to stress urinary incontinence in female zucker fatty rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yung-Chin; Lin, Guiting; Wang, Guifang; Reed-Maldonado, Amanda; Lu, Zhihua; Wang, Lin; Banie, Lia; Lue, Tom F

    2017-08-01

    Obesity has been an independent risk factor for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI), the mechanism of this association remains unknown. The aim of this study is to validate the hypothesis that urethral dysfunction is a possible contributor to SUI in obese women. Ten Zucker Fatty (ZF) (ZUC-Lepr fa 185) and 10 Zucker Lean (ZL) (ZUC-Lepr fa 186) female rats at 12-week-old were used in this experiment. The urethral sphincter rings were harvested from the bladder neck through to the most proximal 2/3 regions. In the organ bath study, single pulses of electrical field stimulation (EFS) were applied. For the fatiguing stimulation, repeated multi-pulse EFS with 70 mA were applied at frequency of 5 Hz for 5 min. Caffeine-containing Krebs' solution was administrated to contract the urethra until the contraction began to reach a plateau for 10 min. We performed immunofluorescence staining of the urethra after the experiment was finished. Compared to ZL controls, ZF rats had significantly impaired muscle contractile activity (MCA) (P female rats had significantly impaired contractile properties of striated urethral sphincter, suggesting urethral dysfunction could be an important contributor to SUI in obesity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Design and evaluation of an intelligent artificial anal sphincter system powered by an adaptive transcutaneous energy transfer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guozheng; Wang, Yongbing; Wang, Zhiwu; Liu, Dasheng

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize an intelligent artificial anal sphincter system (AASS) II for patients with severe fecal incontinence. Redesigning and integrating a pressure sensor into the sphincter prosthesis allows us to reduce the sensor volume and makes it suitable for a chronic, ambulatory application. Furthermore, a close-loop frequency control method was designed for the transcutaneous energy transfer system. Finally, a longer working time of the implanted device was obtained by the low-power design of the hardware and software. The new model was implanted in 2 dogs and studied for periods of up to 5 weeks. The output voltage induced on the load of 30 Ω, for a variation range in k of 0.12 ~ 0.42, was maintained at approximately 6.8 V with a frequency control range of the 270 ~ 320 kHz. The minimum and maximum output voltages of the pressure sensor were found to be 1.7 V and 2.34 V, respectively, which corresponded to a pressure range of 90 ~ 120 kPa with maximum change rate of approximately 3.7% caused by the temperature variations. Moreover, compared with AASS I, the low-power design resulting in 94% reduction in power consumption. The efficacy of the device in achieving continence and sensing the need to defecate was assessed in an animal model. The technical concept and the design of the AASS II turned out to be capable of fulfilling the medical requirements.

  17. Radiological diagnosis in constipation and anal incontinence due to changes in the pelvic floor and sphincter apparatus of the anus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bistolfi, F.; Grillo Ruggeri, F.; Siragusa, A.

    1987-01-01

    Rectal constipation, anal incontinence and constipation combined with incontinence, are often caused by organic or simply functional changes in the pelvic floor and sphincterial apparatus. Therefore morphological as well as manometric and electromyographic studies of these anatomical parts are required. This is possible by combining two techniques: Intestinal Transit Time (ITT) and Defecatory Proctogram with Balloon (DPB). Personal experience of 38 patients with constipation with or without incontinence is reported. The results lead to the following conclusion: 1) ITT is a simple and non-invasive radiological technique that provides us with objective evidence of an impairment, i.e. constipation, whose symptoms are often only subjective; especially is allows us to identify rectal constipation, that can be caused by impairment of the anal sphincteral apparatus. 2) Using an uroprophylactic with a collar that adapts to the size of the anal duct, DPB always permits visualization of the duct with good representation of the recto-anal angle, whose changes may be the expression of organic or only functional impairments of the anal sphincterial apparatus. Increasing use of the two radiological techniques is therefore recommended in the diagnosis of alterations of the pelvic floor or anal sphincter

  18. Colour vision deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, M P

    2010-05-01

    Colour vision deficiency is one of the commonest disorders of vision and can be divided into congenital and acquired forms. Congenital colour vision deficiency affects as many as 8% of males and 0.5% of females--the difference in prevalence reflects the fact that the commonest forms of congenital colour vision deficiency are inherited in an X-linked recessive manner. Until relatively recently, our understanding of the pathophysiological basis of colour vision deficiency largely rested on behavioural data; however, modern molecular genetic techniques have helped to elucidate its mechanisms. The current management of congenital colour vision deficiency lies chiefly in appropriate counselling (including career counselling). Although visual aids may be of benefit to those with colour vision deficiency when performing certain tasks, the evidence suggests that they do not enable wearers to obtain normal colour discrimination. In the future, gene therapy remains a possibility, with animal models demonstrating amelioration following treatment.

  19. Do high job demands increase intrinsic motivation or fatigue or both? The role of job control and job social support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Yperen, N.W.; Hagedoorn, M.

    2003-01-01

    Examined whether job control and job social support reduce signs of fatigue and enhance intrinsic motivation among employees facing high job demands. 555 nurses (mean age 35.5 yrs) working at specialized units for patients with different levels of mental deficiency completed surveys regarding: (1)

  20. LACTASE DEFICIENCY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Shcherbak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic of the article is the lactase deficiency in children. The most frequent clinical manifestations — diarrhea and flatulence —are not specific to this pathology. Symptoms, typical for the majority of the diseases nosologies of the digestive system, lack of timely laboratory diagnosis, and, often, lack of pediatricians awareness about the specifics of this disease are the cause of lactase deficiency under-diagnostics. The article describes in detail the physiopathological mechanisms, clinical picture, diagnosis and dietary correction of lactase deficiency, the data concerning the prevalence of this disease are cited.Key words: lactose, lactase deficiency, children, health food.

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  2. Iodine deficiency disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Iodine deficiency (IDD) is one of the common problem in the diet. Iodine deficiency as prevalence of goiter in population occurs in the mountainous areas. There is consensus that 800 million people are at risk of IDD from living in iodine deficient area and 190 million from goiter. Very high prevalence of IDD in different parts of the world are striking. It has generally observed that in iodine-deficient areas about 50% are affected with goiter, 1-5% from cretinsim and 20% from impaired mental and/or mortor function. (A.B.)

  3. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ralph; Allen, Lindsay H; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2017-01-01

    , subclinical deficiency affects between 2.5% and 26% of the general population depending on the definition used, although the clinical relevance is unclear. B12 deficiency can affect individuals at all ages, but most particularly elderly individuals. Infants, children, adolescents and women of reproductive age...... are also at high risk of deficiency in populations where dietary intake of B12-containing animal-derived foods is restricted. Deficiency is caused by either inadequate intake, inadequate bioavailability or malabsorption. Disruption of B12 transport in the blood, or impaired cellular uptake or metabolism...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our ... more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  5. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. 28 refs., 1 fig

  6. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Motoneuronal location of the external urethral and anal sphincters : A single and double labeling study in the male and female golden hamster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, Peter O.; Sie, Judith A.M.L.; Holstege, Gerrit

    1997-01-01

    The location of external urethral (EUS) and anal sphincter (EAS) motoneurons was investigated in the golden hamster using the retrograde tracers horseradish peroxidase and cholera toxin B-subunit. Single and double labeling studies revealed that the motoneurons of the EUS and EAS were present in the

  8. Fundamentals and clinical perspective of urethral sphincter instability as a contributing factor in patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction--ICI-RS 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner-Hermanns, Ruth; Anding, Ralf; Rosier, Peter; Birder, Lori; Andersson, Karl Erik; Djurhuus, Jens Christian

    AIMS: Urethral pathophysiology is often neglected in discussions of bladder dysfunction. It has been debated whether "urethral sphincter instability," referred to based on observed "urethral pressure variations," is an important aspect of overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). The purpose of this report

  9. Laparoscopic Sphincter Augmentation Device Eliminates Reflux Symptoms and Normalizes Esophageal Acid Exposure One- and 2-Year Results of a Feasibility Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonavina, Luigi; Demeester, Tom; Fockens, Paul; Dunn, Daniel; Saino, Greta; Bona, Davide; Lipham, John; Bemelman, Willem; Ganz, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: One- and 2-year evaluation of a feasibility trial (clinicaltrials.gov registration numbers NCT01057992, NCT01058070, and 01058564) to assess the safety and efficacy of a laparoscopically implanted sphincter augmentation device for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

  10. The effectiveness of mediolateral episiotomy in preventing obstetric anal sphincter injuries during operative vaginal delivery: a ten-year analysis of a national registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bavel, Jeroen; Hukkelhoven, Chantal W. P. M.; de Vries, Charlotte; Papatsonis, Dimitri N. M.; de Vogel, Joey; Roovers, Jan-Paul W. R.; Mol, Ben Willem; de Leeuw, Jan Willem

    2017-01-01

    Obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) are associated with an increased risk of faecal incontinence after vaginal delivery. The aim of this retrospective population-based cohort study was to assess whether mediolateral episiotomy is associated with a reduction in the rate of OASIS during

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... when used properly, can help prevent iron-deficiency anemia in infants and young children. Talk with your child's doctor ... and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young children and women are the two ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... term but can't take iron supplements by mouth. This therapy also is given to people who need immediate treatment for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With If you have iron-deficiency anemia, get ongoing care to make sure your iron levels are improving. ...

  13. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  14. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  15. MENTAL DEFICIENCY. SECOND EDITION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HILLIARD, L.T.; KIRMAN, BRIAN H.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NEW IN BRITAIN SINCE THE 1957 EDITION, THE TEXT INCLUDES RECENT ADVANCES IN ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND TREATMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY. CONSIDERATION OF THE BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY INCLUDES HISTORICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS, THE SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFECT, PRENATAL CAUSES OF…

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough Iron Even if you have enough iron in your ...

  18. G6PD Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic disorder that is most common in males. About 1 in 10 African American males in the United States has it. G6PD deficiency mainly affects red blood cells, which carry oxygen ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other conditions to prevent you from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried ... patterns. Increase your daily intake of iron-rich foods to help treat your iron-deficiency anemia. See Prevention strategies to learn about foods ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español What Is ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  2. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart- ... infections Motor or cognitive development delays in ... with chronic conditions, iron-deficiency anemia can make their condition worse or result ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition ... for the fetus' growth. About half of all pregnant women develop iron-deficiency anemia. The condition can increase ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to a condition ... symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common ...

  10. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you ... get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is a safe, common procedure in which blood ...

  12. LINX®magnetic esophageal sphincter augmentation versus Nissen fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skubleny, Daniel; Switzer, Noah J; Dang, Jerry; Gill, Richdeep S; Shi, Xinzhe; de Gara, Christopher; Birch, Daniel W; Wong, Clarence; Hutter, Matthew M; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2017-08-01

    The LINX ® magnetic sphincter augmentation system (MSA) is a surgical technique with short-term evidence demonstrating efficacy in the treatment of medically refractory or chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Currently, the Nissen fundoplication is the gold-standard surgical treatment for GERD. We are the first to systematically review the literature and perform a meta-analysis comparing MSA to the Nissen fundoplication. A comprehensive search of electronic databases (e.g., MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library) using search terms "Gastroesophageal reflux or heartburn" and "LINX or endoluminal or magnetic" and "fundoplication or Nissen" was completed. All randomized controlled trials, non-randomized comparison study and case series with greater than 5 patients were included. Five hundred and forty-seven titles were identified through primary search, and 197 titles or abstracts were screened after removing duplicates. Meta-analysis was performed on postoperative quality of life outcomes, procedural efficacy and patient procedural satisfaction. Three primary studies identified a total of 688 patients, of whom 273 and 415 underwent Nissen fundoplication and MSA, respectively. MSA was statistically superior to LNF in preserving patient's ability to belch (95.2 vs 65.9%, p < 0.00001) and ability to emesis (93.5 vs 49.5%, p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference between MSA and LNF in gas/bloating (26.7 vs 53.4%, p = 0.06), postoperative dysphagia (33.9 vs 47.1%, p = 0.43) and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) elimination (81.4 vs 81.5%, p = 0.68). Magnetic sphincter augmentation appears to be an effective treatment for GERD with short-term outcomes comparable to the more technically challenging and time-consuming Nissen fundoplication. Long-term comparative outcome data past 1 year are needed in order to further understand the efficacy of magnetic sphincter augmentation.

  13. Clinical study of columnar balloon dilatation therapy for severe dysphagia caused by upper esophageal sphincter achalasia after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-bo SHAO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the mechanism and effect of columnar balloon dilatation therapy on treating patients with severe dysphagia caused by upper esophageal sphincter (UES achalasia after stroke. Methods Sixty -four patients with severe dysphagia caused by UES achalasia after stroke were diagnosed through Video Fluoroscopic Swallowing Study (VFSS and esophageal dynamics testing. The patients were randomly divided into control group (N = 32 and treatment group (N = 32. Patients in control group were treated with routine drug treatment and routine rehabilitation training, while patients in treatment group were treated with columnar balloon dilatation therapy on the basis of routine treatment. The treatment end point was either the patient resuming an oral diet or after 4-weeks treatment. All cases were evaluated by swallowing function of VFSS, high resolution manometry (HRM and scores of the severity of dysphagia before treatment and at treatment end point. Results Compared with before treatment, UES resting pressure (P = 0.000 and residual pressure (P = 0.000 were significantly decreased, peak pressure was significantly increased (P = 0.000, duration of relaxation was prolonged (P = 0.000, and scores of the severity of dysphagia were significantly increased (P = 0.000, 0.000 in both groups after treatment. Compared with control group, UES resting pressure (P = 0.001 and residual pressure (P = 0.000 were significantly decreased, peak pressure was significantly increased (P = 0.002, duration of relaxation was prolonged (P = 0.000, and scores of the severity of dysphagia were significantly increased (P = 0.000 in treatment group after treatment. Until the treatment end point or after 4-week treatment, the total effective rate in treatment group was significantly higher than that in control group [93.75% (30/32 vs. 81.25% (26/32; χ2 = 4.010, P = 0.000]. Conclusions Columnar balloon dilatation therapy is effective for reducing the tension of upper

  14. Intrinsic endometriosis of ureter: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Myung Sun; Kim, Ho Chul; Yun, Ku Sup; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon; Kim, Sung Yong; Shin, Hyung Sik

    1995-01-01

    Endometriosis is a rare cause of an ureteral obstruction. We report a case of intrinsic ureteral endometriosis resulting in severe hydroureteronephrosis. The diagnosis of ureteral endometriosis may be considered in women with flank pain and ureteric obstruction within true pelvis

  15. The Intrinsic Dynamics of Psychological Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallacher, Robin R.; van Geert, Paul; Nowak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Psychological processes unfold on various timescales in accord with internally generated patterns. The intrinsic dynamism of psychological process is difficult to investigate using traditional methods emphasizing cause–effect relations, however, and therefore is rarely incorporated into social

  16. Deuterium NMR, induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were studied. Induced cholesteric lyomesophases based on potassium laurate (KL) system, with small amounts of cholesterol added, were studied by deuterium NMR and by polarizing microscopy. Order profiles obtained from deuterium NMR of KL perdenderated chains in both induced cholesteric and normal mesophases were compared. The intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were based on the amphiphile potassium N-lauroyl serinate (KLNS) in the resolved levo form. The study of the type I intrinsic cholesteric mesophase was made by optical microscopy under polarized light and the type II intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophase was characterized by deuterium NMR. The new texture was explained by the use of the theory of disclinations developed for thermotropic liquid crystals, specially for cholesteric type. (M.J.C.) [pt

  17. Risk factors for bowel dysfunction after sphincter-preserving rectal cancer surgery: a prospective study using the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center bowel function instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihn, Myong Hoon; Kang, Sung-Bum; Kim, Duck-Woo; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Lee, Soo Young; Hong, Sa Min

    2014-08-01

    Until recently, no studies have prospectively evaluated bowel function after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer with the use of a validated bowel function scoring system. The aim of this study was to investigate possible risk factors for altered bowel function after sphincter-preserving surgery. This was a prospective study. The study was conducted between January 2006 and May 2012 at the authors' institution. Patients who underwent sphincter-preserving rectal cancer surgery were recruited. Bowel function was assessed 1 day before (baseline) and at 1 year after sphincter-preserving surgery or temporary ileostomy takedown with the use of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center questionnaire. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify the factors associated with altered bowel function after surgery. Overall, 266 patients were eligible for the analysis. The tumor was located in the upper, middle, and lower rectum in 68 (25.5%), 113 (42.5%), and 85 (32.0%) patients. Intersphincteric resection and temporary ileostomy were performed in 18 (6.8%) and 129 (48.5%) patients. The mean Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center score was 64.5 ± 7.6 at 1 year after sphincter-preserving surgery or temporary ileostomy takedown. The Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center score decreased in 163/266 patients (61.3%) between baseline and 1 year after surgery. Tumor location (p = 0.01), operative method (p = 0.03), anastomotic type (p = 0.01), and temporary ileostomy (p = 0.01) were associated with altered bowel function after sphincter-preserving surgery in univariate analyses. In multivariable analysis, only tumor location was independently associated with impaired bowel function after sphincter-preserving rectal cancer surgery. This study was limited by its nonrandomized design and the lack of measurement before preoperative chemoradiotherapy. We suggest that preoperative counseling should be implemented to inform patients of the risk of bowel dysfunction

  18. Intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms in enterococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, Brian L.; Rice, Louis B.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococci have the potential for resistance to virtually all clinically useful antibiotics. Their emergence as important nosocomial pathogens has coincided with increased expression of antimicrobial resistance by members of the genus. The mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci may be intrinsic to the species or acquired through mutation of intrinsic genes or horizontal exchange of genetic material encoding resistance determinants. This paper reviews the antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis and discusses treatment options. PMID:23076243

  19. The intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Andrés Olivares Pacheco

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsically resistant bacteria have emerged as a relevant health problem in the last years. Those bacterial species, several of them with an environmental origin, present naturally a low-level susceptibility to several drugs. It has been proposed that intrinsic resistance is mainly the consequence of the impermeability of cellular envelopes, the activity of multidrug efflux pumps or the lack of appropriate targets for a given family of drugs. However, recently published articles indicate that the characteristic phenotype of susceptibility to antibiotics of a given bacterial species depends on the concerted activity of several elements, what has been named as intrinsic resistome. These determinants comprise not just classical resistance genes. Other elements, several of them involved in basic bacterial metabolic processes, are of relevance for the intrinsic resistance of bacterial pathogens. In the present review we analyse recent publications on the intrinsic resistomes of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present as well information on the role that global regulators of bacterial metabolism, as Crc from P. aeruginosa, may have on modulating bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics. Finally, we discuss the possibility of searching inhibitors of the intrinsic resistome in the aim of improving the activity of drugs currently in use for clinical practice.

  20. Incentives and intrinsic motivation in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdud, Mikel; Cabasés, Juan M; Nieto, Jorge

    It has been established in the literature that workers within public organisations are intrinsically motivated. This paper is an empirical study of the healthcare sector using methods of qualitative analysis research, which aims to answer the following hypotheses: 1) doctors are intrinsically motivated; 2) economic incentives and control policies may undermine doctors' intrinsic motivation; and 3) well-designed incentives may encourage doctors' intrinsic motivation. We conducted semi-structured interviews à-la-Bewley with 16 doctors from Navarre's Healthcare Service (Servicio Navarro de Salud-Osasunbidea), Spain. The questions were based on current theories of intrinsic motivation and incentives to test the hypotheses. Interviewees were allowed to respond openly without time constraints. Relevant information was selected, quantified and analysed by using the qualitative concepts of saturation and codification. The results seem to confirm the hypotheses. Evidence supporting hypotheses 1 and 2 was gathered from all interviewees, as well as indications of the validity of hypothesis 3 based on interviewees' proposals of incentives. The conclusions could act as a guide to support the optimal design of incentive policies and schemes within health organisations when healthcare professionals are intrinsically motivated. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined inflatable penile prosthesis-artificial urinary sphincter implantation: no increased risk of adverse events compared to single or staged device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Robert L; Cabrini, Mercelo R; Harris, Elaine D; Mostwin, Jacek L; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Burnett, Arthur L

    2013-12-01

    Little data exist on the outcome of combined inflatable penile prosthesis and artificial urinary sphincter insertion for erectile dysfunction and stress urinary incontinence. We assessed patient outcomes for combined vs single device implantation at a single institution. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients who underwent inflatable penile prosthesis and artificial urinary sphincter insertion at our hospital from January 2000 to December 2011. A total of 55 combined procedures were performed compared to the single insertion of 336 inflatable penile prostheses and 279 artificial urinary sphincters. The surgical approach consisted of penoscrotal incisions for inflatable penile prostheses and transperineal incisions for artificial urinary sphincter cuff placement with a secondary lower abdominal incision for reservoir placement. Men treated with combined implantation had greater mean age and were at greater risk for prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment, and at lesser risk for Peyronie disease than men who received an inflatable penile prosthesis alone (each pprosthesis alone and the AUS alone (mean 218.1 vs 145.9 and 114.7 minutes, respectively, p0.05). Combined inflatable penile prosthesis-artificial urinary sphincter implantation and staged prosthesis implantation are feasible without an increased risk of adverse outcomes compared to implantation of a single prosthesis. Patients with concomitant erectile dysfunction and stress urinary incontinence should be counseled about the possible advantages of this surgical option, which include a single anesthesia event and faster resumption of sexual activity and urinary control. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [The importance of x-ray cinematography of deglutition for indicating the need for myotomy of the pharyngoesophageal sphincter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustiny, N; Schmid, H; Brühlmann, W F

    1987-05-01

    Fourteen patients were examined one to four years after cricopharyngeal myotomy that had been carried out because of dysfunction of the pharyngo-esophageal sphincter. Twelve patients were examined radiologically. Eleven of the 14 patients were clinically improved or cured. In two patients who were not improved, the underlying condition was a polymyositis. The other patients suffered from an idiopathic dysfunction. Because of the small numbers involved, no detailed statistical analysis was carried out. Nevertheless, our results indicate that: Cricopharyngeus myotomy produces marked improvement or cure in patients with idiopathic dysfunction. Weak propulsive peristalsis of the pharyngeal constrictors is a prognostic factor indicating a poor clinical result of surgery. There is little chance of clinical improvement in patients with polymyositis.

  3. Local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma: Value of various diagnostic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabbe, E.; Winkler, R.

    1985-05-01

    The authors reviewed 51 cases of local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma to assess the sensitivity of current diagnostic procedures. A combination of followup serum CEA levels and rectoscopy was found to be most efficient during the first two years after surgery in terms of the time frequency, and location of the recurrence as well as the cost-benefit ratio. On the other hand, almost all recurrent lesions developed extraluminally, infiltrating the suture line secondarily; moreover, one fourth extended outside the bowel wall. Thus in addition to endoscopy, CT is useful as a means of defining the entire mass at the anastomosis as well as detecting pericolic recurrence and is essential if repeat resection is contemplated.

  4. Local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma: Value of various diagnostic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabbe, E.; Winkler, R.

    1985-01-01

    The authors reviewed 51 cases of local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma to assess the sensitivity of current diagnostic procedures. A combination of followup serum CEA levels and rectoscopy was found to be most efficient during the first two years after surgery in terms of the time frequency, and location of the recurrence as well as the cost-benefit ratio. On the other hand, almost all recurrent lesions developed extraluminally, infiltrating the suture line secondarily; moreover, one fourth extended outside the bowel wall. Thus in addition to endoscopy, CT is useful as a means of defining the entire mass at the anastomosis as well as detecting pericolic recurrence and is essential if repeat resection is contemplated

  5. Stress urinary incontinence animal models as a tool to study cell-based regenerative therapies targeting the urethral sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Imbroda, Bernardo; Lara, María F; Izeta, Ander; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Hart, Melanie L

    2015-03-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a major health problem causing a significant social and economic impact affecting more than 200million people (women and men) worldwide. Over the past few years researchers have been investigating cell therapy as a promising approach for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) since such an approach may improve the function of a weakened sphincter. Currently, a diverse collection of SUI animal models is available. We describe the features of the different models of SUI/urethral dysfunction and the pros and cons of these animal models in regard to cell therapy applications. We also discuss different cell therapy approaches and cell types tested in preclinical animal models. Finally, we propose new research approaches and perspectives to ensure the use of cellular therapy becomes a real treatment option for SUI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Complications After Sphincter-Saving Resection in Rectal Cancer Patients According to Whether Chemoradiotherapy Is Performed Before or After Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Wook; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Shin, Ui Sup; Park, Jin Seok; Jung, Kwang Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to compare the influence of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with postoperative CRT on the incidence and types of postoperative complications in rectal cancer patients who underwent sphincter-saving resection. Patients and Methods: We reviewed 285 patients who received preoperative CRT and 418 patients who received postoperative CRT between January 2000 and December 2006. Results: There was no between-group difference in age, gender, or cancer stage. In the pre-CRT group, the mean level of anastomosis from the anal verge was lower (3.5 ± 1.4 cm vs. 4.3 ± 1.7 cm, p < 0.001) and the rate of T4 lesion and temporary diverting ileostomy was higher than in the post-CRT group. Delayed anastomotic leakage and rectovaginal fistulae developed more frequently in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (3.9% vs. 1.2%, p = 0.020, 6.5% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.027, respectively). Small bowel obstruction (arising from radiation enteritis) requiring surgical intervention was more frequent in the post-CRT group (0% in the pre-CRT group vs. 1.4% in the post-CRT group, p = 0.042). Multivariate analysis identified preoperative CRT as an independent risk factor for fistulous complications (delayed anastomotic leakage, rectovaginal fistula, rectovesical fistula), and postoperative CRT as a risk factor for obstructive complications (anastomotic stricture, small bowel obstruction). The stoma-free rates were significantly lower in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (5-year stoma-free rates: 92.8% vs. 97.0%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: The overall postoperative complication rates were similar between the pre-CRT and the Post-CRT groups. However, the pattern of postoperative complications seen after sphincter- saving resection differed with reference to the timing of CRT.

  7. Tachykinin receptors mediating responses to sensory nerve stimulation and exogenous tachykinins and analogues in the rabbit isolated iris sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J. M.; Mitchell, D.; Morton, I. K.

    1993-01-01

    1. We have used selective tachykinin receptor agonists and antagonists to investigate the nature of the receptors mediating responses to endogenous and exogenous tachykinins in the rabbit iris sphincter preparation in vitro. 2. The NK1-selective agonist, substance P methyl ester, induced contraction with a pD2 of 9.16 indicating the presence of NK1 receptors. In confirmation, the NK1-selective antagonist, GR82334, competitively antagonized responses to substance P methyl ester with high affinity (pKB 7.46). 3. NK3 receptors also mediate contraction since NK3-selective agonists exhibited high potency, e.g. the pD2 of [Me-Phe7]-neurokinin B was 9.67, and their responses were not inhibited by GR82334 (10 microM). 4. NK2 receptor activation does not seem to contribute to contraction since the NK2-selective agonist [beta-Ala8]-neurokinin A(4-10) had relatively low potency (pD2 6.43), and the NK2-selective antagonists MEN10207 (1 microM) and L-659,877 (10 microM) were inactive or had low affinity, respectively. 5. GR82334 (1 microM) significantly inhibited responses to electrical field-stimulation of non-adrenergic non-cholinergic sensory nerves (3, 10 and 30 Hz), and caused a rightward shift of the log concentration-response curve to bradykinin (lateral shift ca. 1000 fold). Higher concentrations of GR82334 (10 microM) significantly attenuated responses to capsaicin (1-60 microM) whilst completely abolishing responses to field-stimulation (3, 10 and 30 Hz) and bradykinin (1 nM- 3 microM). 6. In conclusion, NK1 and NK3 receptor activation results in contraction of the rabbit iris sphincter. The contractile response following sensory nerve stimulation by bradykinin, capsaicin and electrical field stimulation results from NK1 receptor activation. PMID:8401912

  8. Studies on the regulation of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) by acid in the esophagus and stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banovcin, P; Halicka, J; Halickova, M; Duricek, M; Hyrdel, R; Tatar, M; Kollarik, M

    2016-07-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR) is the major mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux, but the regulation of TLESR by stimuli in the esophagus is incompletely understood. We have recently reported that acid infusion in the esophagus substantially (by 75%) increased the number of meal-induced TLESR in healthy subjects. We concluded that the TLESR reflex triggered by gastric distention with meal was enhanced by the stimulation of esophageal nerves by acid. However, the possibilities that the acid infused into the esophagus acts after passing though lower esophageal sphincter in stomach to enhance TLESR, or that the acid directly initiates TLESR from the esophagus were not addressed. Here, we evaluated the effect of acid infusion into the proximal stomach on meal-induced TLESR (study 1) and the ability of acid infusion into the esophagus to initiate TLESR without prior meal (study 2). We analyzed TLESRs by using high-resolution manometry in healthy subjects in paired randomized studies. In study 1, we found that acid infusion into the proximal stomach did not affect TLESRs induced by standard meal. The number of meal-induced TLESRs following the acid infusion into the proximal stomach was similar to the number of meal-induced TLESRs following the control infusion. In study 2, we found that acid infusion into the esophagus without prior meal did not initiate TLESRs. We conclude that the increase in the meal-induced TLESRs by acid in the esophagus demonstrated in our previous study is not attributable to the action of acid in the stomach or to direct initiation of TLESR from the esophagus by acid. Our studies are consistent with the concept that the stimuli in the esophagus can influence TLESRs. The enhancement of TLESR by acid in the esophagus may contribute to pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux in some patients. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  9. SaFaRI: sacral nerve stimulation versus the FENIX magnetic sphincter augmentation for adult faecal incontinence: a randomised investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Annabelle E; Croft, Julie; Napp, Vicky; Corrigan, Neil; Brown, Julia M; Hulme, Claire; Brown, Steven R; Lodge, Jen; Protheroe, David; Jayne, David G

    2016-02-01

    Faecal incontinence is a physically, psychologically and socially disabling condition. NICE guidance (2007) recommends surgical intervention, including sacral nerve stimulation (SNS), after failed conservative therapies. The FENIX magnetic sphincter augmentation (MSA) device is a novel continence device consisting of a flexible band of interlinked titanium beads with magnetic cores that is placed around the anal canal to augment anal sphincter tone through passive attraction of the beads. Preliminary studies suggest the FENIX MSA is safe, but efficacy data is limited. Rigorous evaluation is required prior to widespread adoption. The SaFaRI trial is a National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment (HTA)-funded UK multi-site, parallel group, randomised controlled, unblinded trial that will investigate the use of the FENIX MSA, as compared to SNS, for adult faecal incontinence resistant to conservative management. Twenty sites across the UK, experienced in the treatment of faecal incontinence, will recruit 350 patients randomised equally to receive either SNS or FENIX MSA. Participants will be followed-up at 2 weeks post-surgery and at 6, 12 and 18 months post-randomisation. The primary endpoint is success, as defined by device in use and ≥50 % improvement in the Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score (CCIS) at 18 months post-randomisation. Secondary endpoints include complications, quality of life and cost effectiveness. SaFaRI will rigorously evaluate a new technology for faecal incontinence, the FENIX™ MSA, allowing its safe and controlled introduction into current clinical practice. These results will inform the future surgical management of adult faecal incontinence.

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Blood Loss When you lose blood, you lose ...

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    Full Text Available ... and naproxen Certain rare genetic conditions such as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which causes bleeding in the bowels ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ...

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

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    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also can cause internal bleeding. Other At-Risk Groups People who get kidney dialysis treatment may develop ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Special ...

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    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order a blood test called a complete blood count ( ... your risk factors , do a physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the first prenatal visit. For pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, ... while checking for other problems. Specialists Involved Primary care doctors often diagnose and treat iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Heavy blood loss during their monthly periods Other risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... in which your blood has a lower than normal number of red blood cells. Red blood cells ... cells it does make have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness ...

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    Full Text Available ... to improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially ...

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    Full Text Available ... apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all ... growth and development, and behavioral problems. Signs and Symptoms of Iron Deficiency Signs and symptoms of iron ...

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    Full Text Available ... For this treatment, iron is injected into a muscle or an IV line in one of your ... body can damage your organs. You may have fatigue (tiredness) and other symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia ...

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    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... because your need for iron increases during these times of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming ... iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to select: the entire site, the Health ... who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a ...

  8. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...... restricting crop productivity in many places of the world. Hence, timely alleviation of latent Mn deficiency is a challenge in promoting plant growth and quality. We describe here the key mechanisms of Mn deficiency in plants by focusing on the impact of Mn on PSII stability and functionality. We also address...... the mechanisms underlying the differential tolerance towards Mn deficiency observed among plant genotypes, which enable Mn-efficient plants to grow on marginal land with poor Mn availability....

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more. Read less Reminders Return to Causes to review how blood loss, not consuming the recommended amount ... iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency ... National Institute of Health Department of Health and Human Services OIG USA.gov

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    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... explain tests and procedures that your doctor may use to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. Living With will ...

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    Full Text Available ... need for iron increases during these periods of growth and development, and it may be hard to get the ... iron-deficiency anemia, red blood cells will be small in size with an MCV of less than ...

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  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Learn more about participating in a clinical ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting less than the recommended daily ...

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    Full Text Available ... especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less ... deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic ...

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    Full Text Available ... leafy green vegetables like turnip greens and spinach. Treatment To Stop Bleeding If blood loss is causing ... flow. In some cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If ...

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  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

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  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... recommended amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen ... mean corpuscular volume (MCV) that would suggest anemia. Different tests help your doctor screen for iron-deficiency ...

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    Full Text Available ... can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron- ... deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for who should be ...

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  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... improved health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood donors . NHLBI’s Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program , which began in ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... mouth Pale skin Swelling or soreness of the tongue Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest ... Check for bleeding. Look to see whether your tongue, nails, or inner lining of your eyelids are ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... specialists also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs ... information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, your ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk ... upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended ...

  6. Vitamin D Deficiency

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    ... inflammation) • Some lymphomas, a type of cancer Other risk factors for vitamin D deficiency ... medications • Frequent falls in older adults, or a non-traumatic fracture (bone break without ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 mg for children ... deficiency at certain ages: Infants between 6 and 12 months, especially if they are fed only breast ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through research and ... blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors of future health problems in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored ...

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  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for ... be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women of childbearing ...

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    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who ... other dark green leafy vegetables Prune juice The Nutrition Facts labels on packaged foods will show how ...

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  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... All News NHLBI News NHLBI in the Press Research Features All Events Past Events Upcoming Events About ... NHLBI Entire Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia ...

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    Full Text Available ... the likelihood of bleeding in the GI tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Are you ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that ...

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    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

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    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ...

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    Full Text Available ... as ice, dirt, paint, or starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

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    Full Text Available ... a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency ... frequently. This study is located in New York City, and is recruiting by invitation only. View more ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Older adults, especially those over age 65. Unhealthy environments Children who have lead in their blood from ... a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

  5. Functions of intrinsic disorder in transmembrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    2017-01-01

    mechanisms. (3) Trafficking of membrane proteins. (4) Transient membrane associations. (5) Post-translational modifications most notably phosphorylation and (6) disorder-linked isoform dependent function. We finish the review by discussing the future challenges facing the membrane protein community regarding......Intrinsic disorder is common in integral membrane proteins, particularly in the intracellular domains. Despite this observation, these domains are not always recognized as being disordered. In this review, we will discuss the biological functions of intrinsically disordered regions of membrane...... proteins, and address why the flexibility afforded by disorder is mechanistically important. Intrinsically disordered regions are present in many common classes of membrane proteins including ion channels and transporters; G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases and cytokine...

  6. Management Control, Intrinsic Motivation and Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godt Gregersen, Mikkel

    of the conclusion is that intrinsic motivation and management control can coexist under the conditions that all three basic needs, i.e. autonomy, competence and relatedness, are supported. This can happen when control takes point of departure in the individual employee. The second part of the conclusion......This thesis consists of a cape and three papers. The overall research question is: How can intrinsic motivation and management control coexist in a creative environment and how can coordination be possible in such a context? The cape ties together the research done in the three papers....... It is divided into six sections. The first section introduces the concepts of intrinsic motivation, creativity and management control. This is followed by a section on management control in a creative context. These two sections frame the thesis and introduce the setting in which the research has been done...

  7. Cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Fernando M; Bonni, Azad; Sousa, Mónica M

    2014-01-01

    Although neurons execute a cell intrinsic program of axonal growth during development, following the establishment of connections, the developmental growth capacity declines. Besides environmental challenges, this switch largely accounts for the failure of adult central nervous system (CNS) axons to regenerate. Here, we discuss the cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration, including not only the regulation of transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms, but also the modulation of local protein translation, retrograde and anterograde axonal transport, and microtubule dynamics. We further explore the causes underlying the failure of CNS neurons to mount a vigorous regenerative response, and the paradigms demonstrating the activation of cell intrinsic axon growth programs. Finally, we present potential mechanisms to support axon regeneration, as these may represent future therapeutic approaches to promote recovery following CNS injury and disease. PMID:24531721

  8. Insulin aggregation tracked by its intrinsic TRES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Li Hung C.; Birch, David J. S.; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav; Ryadnov, Maxim G.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2017-12-01

    Time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) have been used to detect conformational changes of intrinsic tyrosines within bovine insulin at a physiological pH. The approach offers the ability to detect the initial stages of insulin aggregation at the molecular level. The data analysis has revealed the existence of at least three fluorescent species undergoing dielectric relaxation and significant spectral changes due to insulin aggregation. The results indicate the suitability of the intrinsic TRES approach for insulin studies and for monitoring its stability during storage and aggregation in insulin delivery devices.

  9. Intrinsic viscosity of a suspension of cubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mallavajula, Rajesh K.

    2013-11-06

    We report on the viscosity of a dilute suspension of cube-shaped particles. Irrespective of the particle size, size distribution, and surface chemistry, we find empirically that cubes manifest an intrinsic viscosity [η]=3.1±0.2, which is substantially higher than the well-known value for spheres, [η]=2.5. The orientation-dependent intrinsic viscosity of cubic particles is determined theoretically using a finite-element solution of the Stokes equations. For isotropically oriented cubes, these calculations show [η]=3.1, in excellent agreement with our experimental observations. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  10. Intrinsic entropy perturbations from the dark sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celoria, Marco; Comelli, Denis; Pilo, Luigi

    2018-03-01

    Perfect fluids are modeled by using an effective field theory approach which naturally gives a self-consistent and unambiguous description of the intrinsic non-adiabatic contribution to pressure variations. We study the impact of intrinsic entropy perturbation on the superhorizon dynamics of the curvature perturbation Script R in the dark sector. The dark sector, made of dark matter and dark energy is described as a single perfect fluid. The non-perturbative vorticity's dynamics and the Weinberg theorem violation for perfect fluids are also studied.

  11. A model of intrinsic symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Li; Li, Sheng; George, Thomas F.; Sun, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Different from the symmetry breaking associated with a phase transition, which occurs when the controlling parameter is manipulated across a critical point, the symmetry breaking presented in this Letter does not need parameter manipulation. Instead, the system itself suddenly undergoes symmetry breaking at a certain time during its evolution, which is intrinsic symmetry breaking. Through a polymer model, it is revealed that the origin of the intrinsic symmetry breaking is nonlinearity, which produces instability at the instance when the evolution crosses an inflexion point, where this instability breaks the original symmetry

  12. Intrinsic Contribution of Perforin to NK-Cell Homeostasis during Mouse Cytomegalovirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja eArapovic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their role as effector cells in virus control, natural killer (NK cells have an immunoregulatory function in shaping the antiviral T-cell response. This function is further pronounced in perforin-deficient mice that show the enhanced NK-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion upon mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection. Here we confirmed that stronger activation and maturation of NK cells in perforin-deficient mice correlates with higher MCMV load. To further characterize the immunoregulatory potential of perforin, we compared the response of NK cells that express or do not express perforin using bone-marrow chimeras. Our results demonstrated that the enhanced proliferation and maturation of NK cells in MCMV-infected bone-marrow chimeras is an intrinsic property of perforin-deficient NK cells. Thus, in addition to confirming that NK-cell proliferation is virus load dependent, our data extend this notion demonstrating that perforin plays an intrinsic role as a feedback mechanism in regulation of NK-cell proliferation during viral infections.

  13. Frustration-induced protein intrinsic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Katsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2013-03-14

    Spontaneous folding into a specific native structure is the most important property of protein to perform their biological functions within organisms. Spontaneous folding is understood on the basis of an energy landscape picture based on the minimum frustration principle. Therefore, frustration seemingly only leads to protein functional disorder. However, frustration has recently been suggested to have a function in allosteric regulation. Functional frustration has the possibility to be a key to our deeper understanding of protein function. To explore another functional frustration, we theoretically examined structural frustration, which is designed to induce intrinsic disorder of a protein and its function through the coupled folding and binding. We extended the Wako-Saitô-Muñoz-Eaton model to take into account a frustration effect. With the model, we analyzed the binding part of neuron-restrictive silencer factor and showed that designed structural frustration in it induces intrinsic disorder. Furthermore, we showed that the folding and the binding are cooperative in interacting with a target protein. The cooperativity enables an intrinsically disordered protein to exhibit a sharp switch-like folding response to binding chemical potential change. Through this switch-like response, the structural frustration may contribute to the regulation function of interprotein interaction of the intrinsically disordered protein.

  14. Simple intrinsic defects in InAs :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2013-03-01

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in indium arsenide, InAs, as computed by density functional theory using semi-local density functionals, intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models.

  15. INTRINSIC AND EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION IN THE SELECTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A psychological perspective is considered that applies intrinsic and extrinsic motivational concepts to communication phenomena. The paper also tries to develop an analytical understanding of human communication-related behavior with respect to the two types of motives. Proposals are also put forward to communication ...

  16. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation among Collegiate Instrumentalists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather and compare information on measures of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation among instrumentalists enrolled in collegiate ensembles. A survey instrument was developed to gather information concerning demographic data and responses to questions on motivational preference. Participants were undergraduate and…

  17. A rotational integral formula for intrinsic volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Eva Bjørn Vedel; Rataj, J.

    2008-01-01

    A rotational version of the famous Crofton formula is derived. The motivation for deriving the formula comes from local stereology, a new branch of stereology based on sections through fixed reference points. The formula shows how rotational averages of intrinsic volumes measured on sections...

  18. Original Paper Detecting Nosocomial Intrinsic Infections through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-20

    Apr 20, 2011 ... Key Words: Bacterial pathogens, Endogenous indicators, NosocomiaI infection, Surgery. Received 30 October 2010/ Accepted 30 March 2011. INTRODUCTION. Micro-organisms from intrinsic and extrinsic sources have been known to cause nosocomial infections (CDC, 1991). The human body enables.

  19. Organisational Learning and Employees' Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedios, Richard; Boreham, Nick

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effects of organisational learning initiatives on employee motivation. Four initiatives consistent with theories of organisational learning were a priori ranked in terms of concepts that underpin intrinsic-motivation theory. Eighteen employees in a UK petrochemical company were interviewed to ascertain their experiences of…

  20. Intrinsic Motivation, Organizational Justice, and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, Kalli; Narayan, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    For employees to generate creative ideas that are not only original, but also useful to their company, they must interact with their workplace environment to determine organizational needs. Therefore, it is important to consider aspects of the individual as well as their environment when studying creativity. Intrinsic motivation, a predictor of…

  1. Discovery of Intrinsic Primitives on Triangle Meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Solomon, Justin

    2011-04-01

    The discovery of meaningful parts of a shape is required for many geometry processing applications, such as parameterization, shape correspondence, and animation. It is natural to consider primitives such as spheres, cylinders and cones as the building blocks of shapes, and thus to discover parts by fitting such primitives to a given surface. This approach, however, will break down if primitive parts have undergone almost-isometric deformations, as is the case, for example, for articulated human models. We suggest that parts can be discovered instead by finding intrinsic primitives, which we define as parts that posses an approximate intrinsic symmetry. We employ the recently-developed method of computing discrete approximate Killing vector fields (AKVFs) to discover intrinsic primitives by investigating the relationship between the AKVFs of a composite object and the AKVFs of its parts. We show how to leverage this relationship with a standard clustering method to extract k intrinsic primitives and remaining asymmetric parts of a shape for a given k. We demonstrate the value of this approach for identifying the prominent symmetry generators of the parts of a given shape. Additionally, we show how our method can be modified slightly to segment an entire surface without marking asymmetric connecting regions and compare this approach to state-of-the-art methods using the Princeton Segmentation Benchmark. © 2011 The Author(s).

  2. Relationship between intrinsic radiation sensitivity and metastatic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Anne M.; Mei, Su; Doty, Jay; Chen Yi; Pardo, Francisco S.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Prior studies emphasized genetic modulation of tumorigenicity, and experimental metastatic potential in cells transfected with oncogenes. Whether the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of cells might correlate with parallel changes in metastatic potential is unknown. Methods and Materials: Rat embryo cells (REC) were transfected with the following oncogenes, and where appropriate, with corresponding selection markers: pCMV neopEJ6.6ras, pEJ6.6ras/v-myc, pE1a, and pEJ6-.6ras/E1a. Individual transfectant clones and corresponding pooled cellular populations were propagated in selective medium. In vitro cellular radiation sensitivity was determined via clonogenic assays, a minimum of three, by standard techniques and individual SF 2 and MID parameters determined. Tumorigenicity was defined as the number of tumors forming following the injection of 1 x 10 5 - 1 x 10 6 cells into the axillary pouch of three different strains of immune-deficient mice. Animals were killed once resultant tumors reached a maximum size of 1.5-2.0 cm in maximum diameter. For determination of experimental metastatic potential, between 1 x 10 5 -1 x 10 6 cells were injected into the tail veins of litter-matched sibling mice in parallel to the tumorigenicity studies. Results: Radiobiologic studies indicate similar levels of radiation sensitivity among REC, mock-transfected REC, E1a, and combined E1a/ras transfectants. pEJ6.6ras, and combined ras/myc transfected pooled cellular populations demonstrated increases in radiation resistance when compared to the pooled radiobiologic data from untransfected and mock-transfected corresponding pooled cellular populations (p 2 , MID). Rat embryo cells, E1a, and mock-transfectants were relatively radiation sensitive and nontumorigenic. pE1a/ras was tumorigenic but demonstrated relatively low experimental metastatic potential. Ras, and ras/myc transfectants, demonstrated similar levels of experimental metastatic potential on lung colonization assays

  3. TACTICS SPHINCTER SPARING SURGERY IN LOCALLY-ADVANCED RECTAL ULTRA-LOW LOCALISATION WITH A LESION OF THE LATERAL GROUP LYMPH NODES: CLINICAL CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Tamrazov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the possibility of sphincter sparing surgery in patients with negative risk factors, such as localization in low third and lesion of lateral lymph nodes. Combined treatment and improved surgical approach allowed to achieve positive oncological and functional results. The discussion provides an analysis of the publications devoted to various approaches to the treatment of low rectal cancer with extended pelvic lymph node dissection and neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. 

  4. Metabolic changes in the lower esophageal sphincter influencing the result of anti-reflux surgical interventions in chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease

    OpenAIRE

    Altorjay, Aron; Juhasz, Arpad; Kellner, Viola; Sohar, Gellert; Fekete, Matyas; Sohar, Istvan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: With the availability of a minimally invasive approach, anti-reflux surgery has recently experienced a renaissance as a cost-effective alternative to life-long medical treatment in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We are not aware of the fact whether reflux episodes causing complaints for a long time i.e., at least for one year are associated with metabolic changes in the lower esophageal sphincter, and if so, whether these may influence functional results achieved a...

  5. Online signal processing of internal anal sphincter activity during pelvic autonomic nerve stimulation: a new method to improve the reliability of intra-operative neuromonitoring signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauff, D W; Koch, K P; Somerlik, K H; Heimann, A; Hoffmann, K P; Lang, H; Kneist, W

    2011-12-01

    Intra-operative neuromonitoring is increasingly applied in several surgical disciplines and has been introduced to facilitate pelvic autonomic nerve preservation. Nevertheless, it has been considered a questionable tool for the minimization of risk, as the results are variable and might be misleading. The aim of the present experimental study was to develop an intra-operative neuromonitoring system with improved reliability for monitoring pelvic autonomic nerve function. Fifteen pigs underwent low anterior rectal resection with pelvic autonomic nerve preservation. Intra-operative neuromonitoring was performed under autonomic nerve stimulation with observation of electromyographic signals of the internal anal sphincter and bladder manometry. As the internal anal sphincter frequency spectrum during stimulation was found to be mainly in the range of 5-20 Hz, intra-operative neuromonitoring signals were postoperatively processed by implementation of matching band pass filters. In 10 preliminary experiments, signal processing was performed offline in the postoperative analysis. Of 163 stimulations intra-operatively assessed by the surgeon as positive responses, 135 (83%) were confirmed after signal processing. In the following five consecutive experiments intra-operative online signal processing was realized and demonstrated reliable intra-operative neuromonitoring signals of internal anal sphincter activity with significant increase during pelvic autonomic nerve stimulation [0.5 μV (interquartile range = 0.3-0.7) vs 4.8 μV (interquartile range = 2.5-7.5); P signal processing of internal anal sphincter activity aids reliable identification of pelvic autonomic nerves with potential for improvement of intra-operative neuromonitoring in pelvic surgery. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  6. Three Gaseous Neurotransmitters, Nitric oxide, Carbon Monoxide, and Hydrogen Sulfide, Are Involved in the Neurogenic Relaxation Responses of the Porcine Internal Anal Sphincter

    OpenAIRE

    Folasire, Oladayo; Mills, Kylie A; Sellers, Donna J; Chess-Williams, Russ

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The internal anal sphincter (IAS) plays an important role in maintaining continence and a number of neurotransmitters are known to regulate IAS tone. The aim of this study was to determine the relative importance of the neurotransmitters involved in the relaxant and contractile responses of the porcine IAS. Methods Responses of isolated strips of IAS to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were obtained in the absence and presence of inhibitors of neurotransmitter systems. Resul...

  7. Effects of Age, Gender, Bolus Condition, Viscosity, and Volume on Pharyngeal and Upper Esophageal Sphincter Pressure and Temporal Measurements during Swallowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Susan G.; Stuart, Andrew; Castell, Donald; Russell, Gregory B.; Koch, Kenneth; Kemp, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of trial (i.e., Trial 1 vs. Trial 2); viscosity (i.e., saliva, thin, nectar-thick, honey-thick, and pudding-thick water); volume (i.e., 5 mL vs. 10 mL); age (i.e., young vs. older adults); and gender on pharyngeal (i.e., upper and lower) and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) pressures,…

  8. THE PARTICIPATION OF THE NITRERGIC PATHWAY IN INCREASED RATE OF TRANSITORY RELAXATION OF LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER INDUCED BY RECTAL DISTENSION IN DOGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Santos PALHETA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context The rectal distension in dogs increases the rate of transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation considered the main factor causing gastroesophageal reflux. Objectives The aim of this study was evaluate the participation of the nitrergic pathway in the increased transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation rate induced by rectal distension in anesthetized dogs. Methods Male mongrel dogs (n = 21, weighing 10-15 kg, were fasted for 12 hours, with water ad libitum. Thereafter, they were anesthetized (ketamine 10 mg.Kg-1 + xylazine 20 mg.Kg-1, so as to carry out the esophageal motility evaluation protocol during 120 min. After a 30-minute basal period, the animals were randomly intravenous treated whith: saline solution 0.15M (1ml.Kg-1, L-NAME (3 mg.Kg-1, L-NAME (3 mg.Kg-1 + L-Arginine (200 mg.Kg-1, glibenclamide (1 mg.Kg-1 or methylene blue (3 mg.Kg-1. Forty-five min after these pre-treatments, the rectum was distended (rectal distension, 5 mL.Kg-1 or not (control with a latex balloon, with changes in the esophageal motility recorded over 45 min. Data were analyzed using ANOVA followed by Student Newman-Keuls test. Results In comparison to the respective control group, rectal distension induces an increase in transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Pre-treatment with L-NAME or methylene blue prevents (P<0.05 this phenomenon, which is reversible by L-Arginine plus L-NAME. However, pretreating with glibenclamide failed to abolish this process. Conclusions Therefore, these experiments suggested, that rectal distension increases transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in dogs via through nitrergic pathways.

  9. The fragmented self: imbalance between intrinsic and extrinsic self-networks in psychotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisch, Sjoerd J H; Aleman, André

    2016-08-01

    Self-disturbances are among the core features of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders. The basic structure of the self could depend on the balance between intrinsic and extrinsic self-processing. We discuss studies on self-related processing in psychotic disorders that provide converging evidence for disrupted communication between neural networks subserving the so-called intrinsic self and extrinsic self. This disruption might be mainly caused by impaired integrity of key brain hubs. The intrinsic self has been associated with cortical midline structures involved in self-referential processing, autobiographical memory, and emotional evaluation. Additionally, we highlight central aspects of the extrinsic self in its interaction with the environment using sensorimotor networks, including self-experience in sensation and actions. A deficient relationship between these self-aspects because of disrupted between-network interactions offers a framework to explain core clinical features of psychotic disorders. In particular, we show how relative isolation and reduced modularity of networks subserving intrinsic and extrinsic self-processing might trigger the emergence of hallucinations and delusions, and why patients with psychosis typically have difficulties with self-other relationships and do not recognise mental problems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Factor XI deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme Diamant

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with a prolonged aPTT who was diagnosedas having factor XI deficiency after a rather large hematoma wasformed after angiography. Factor XI deficiency affects 1 in 1 millionpeople, but it is more common in Ashkenazim with a gene frequencyof 5% to 11%, being 0.3% homozygotes. These individuals usuallydo not present hemorrhagic events, except in cases of trauma orsurgery. These patients should be identified by routine coagulationscreening; bleeding could be prevented by use of fresh humanplasma or plasma concentrates.

  11. Vitamin Excess and Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Liliane; Krebs, Nancy F

    2018-04-01

    The published literature supports the high prevalence of supplement use in children and adolescents in the United States. Pediatricians today are faced with questions from parents and patients about the benefits, safety, efficacy, and correct dose of vitamins and minerals. In this article, we review 7 vitamins with the most clinical relevance as judged by abundance in food, risks and symptoms of deficiency, and potential for toxicity. Specifically, we focus on possible clinical scenarios that can be indicative of nutritional deficiency. We synthesize and summarize guidelines from nutrition experts, various medical societies, the World Health Organization, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. © American Academy of Pediatrics, 2018. All rights reserved.

  12. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-18

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  13. Laparoscopic and conventional resections for low rectal cancers: a retrospective analysis on perioperative outcomes, sphincter preservation, and oncological results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezen, Cem; Altuntas, Yunus E; Kement, Metin; Aksakal, Nihat; Okkabaz, Nuri; Vural, Selahattin; Oncel, Mustafa

    2012-09-01

    This study aims to compare the results of laparoscopic and conventional techniques in patients with low rectal cancers. A retrospective data analysis was initiated in patients underwent laparoscopic or conventional surgery for cancers located in the low (groups. Among 142 patietns (91 men [64.1%]; mean±standard deviation age, 57.7±14.6 years) who had tumors located group who received neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (92.4% versus 80.0%; P=.03), since there were significantly fewer cases with stage I tumors in this group (3.3% versus 14%; P=.33). The conversion rate was 14.1% (n=13). The amount of bleeding and the requirement for transfusion decreased (Pgroup. Other parameters were identical. In the laparoscopy group, the number of harvested lymph nodes (10.2±5.4 versus 12.4±6.0; P=.025) and the rate of vascular invasion (27.5% versus 47.8%; P=.021) were less, and Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed an improved survival (P=.042), although the follow-up period was significantly shorter in this group (P<.001). Laparoscopic surgery for low rectal cancers may be technically feasible and oncologically safe. Laparoscopy may increase the possibility of sphincter preservation.

  14. Comparison of urethral pressure profilometry and contrast radiography in the diagnosis of incompetence of the urethral sphincter mechanism in bitches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, S.P.; Cripps, P.J.; Holt, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    Three diagnostic indicators of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence were compared in 25 continent and 25 incontinent anaesthetised bitches: the resting urethral pressure profile, the stressed urethral pressure profile and the radiographic position of the bladder neck. Logistic regression indicated that the best predictor of continence status was the stressed urethral pressure profile as assessed by the percentage of negative peaks extending below the resting intravesical pressure; it classified 43 of the 50 dogs correctly. The radiographic position of the bladder neck was a better predictor of continence than either the measurement of functional profile length or the maximum urethral closure pressure from the resting urethral pressure profile, whether alone or in combination. By combining the percentage of negative peaks on the stressed profile with the position of the bladder neck, 46 of the 50 dogs were classified correctly. Cut-off values for the percentage of negative peaks on the stressed urethral pressure profile, and for the radiographic position of the bladder neck are suggested for use in evaluating incontinent bitches in clinical practice

  15. Increase of lower esophageal sphincter pressure after osteopathic intervention on the diaphragm in patients with gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, R C V; de Sá, C C; Pascual-Vaca, Á O; de Souza Fontes, L H; Herbella Fernandes, F A M; Dib, R A; Blanco, C R; Queiroz, R A; Navarro-Rodriguez, T

    2013-07-01

    The treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease may be clinical or surgical. The clinical consists basically of the use of drugs; however, there are new techniques to complement this treatment, osteopathic intervention in the diaphragmatic muscle is one these. The objective of the study is to compare pressure values in the examination of esophageal manometry of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) before and immediately after osteopathic intervention in the diaphragm muscle. Thirty-eight patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease - 16 submitted to sham technique and 22 submitted osteopathic technique - were randomly selected. The average respiratory pressure (ARP) and the maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) of the LES were measured by manometry before and after osteopathic technique at the point of highest pressure. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney, and magnitude of the technique proposed was measured using the Cohen's index. Statistically significant difference in the osteopathic technique was found in three out of four in relation to the group of patients who performed the sham technique for the following measures of LES pressure: ARP with P= 0.027. The MEP had no statistical difference (P= 0.146). The values of Cohen d for the same measures were: ARP with d= 0.80 and MEP d= 0.52. Osteopathic manipulative technique produces a positive increment in the LES region soon after its performance. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  16. Salvia miltiorrhiza Induces Tonic Contraction of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter in Rats via Activation of Extracellular Ca2+ Influx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chung Tsai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Up to 40% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD suffer from proton pump inhibitor refractory GERD but clinically the medications to strengthen the lower esophageal sphincter (LES to avoid irritating reflux are few in number. This study aimed to examine whether Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM extracts induce tonic contraction of rat LES ex vivo and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. To investigate the mechanism underlying the SM extract-induced contractile effects, rats were pretreated with atropine (a muscarinic receptor antagonist, tetrodotoxin (a sodium channel blocker, nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker, and Ca2+-free Krebs-Henseleit solution with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA, followed by administration of cumulative dosages of SM extracts. SM extracts induced dose-related tonic contraction of the LES, which was unaffected by tetrodotoxin, atropine, or nifedipine. However, the SM extract-induced LES contraction was significantly inhibited by Ca2+-free Krebs-Henseleit solution with EGTA. Next, SM extracts significantly induce extracellular Ca2+ entry into primary LES cells in addition to intracellular Ca2+ release and in a dose-response manner. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the SM extracts consistently induced significant extracellular Ca2+ influx into primary LES cells in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, SM extracts could induce tonic contraction of LES mainly through the extracellular Ca2+ influx pathway.

  17. Effects of omeprazole or anti-reflux surgery on lower oesophageal sphincter characteristics and oesophageal acid exposure over 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emken, Birgitte-Elise G; Lundell, Lars R; Wallin, Lene; Myrvold, Helge E; Engström, Cecilia; Montgomery, Madeleine; Malm, Anders R; Lind, Tore; Hatlebakk, Jan G

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effect of anti-reflux surgery (ARS) versus proton pump inhibitor therapy on lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) function and oesophageal acid exposure in patients with chronic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) over a decade of follow-up. In this randomised, prospective, multicentre study we compared LOS pressure profiles, as well as oesophageal exposure to acid, at baseline and at 1 and 10 years after randomisation to either open ARS (n = 137) or long-term treatment with omeprazole (OME) 20-60 mg daily (n = 108). Median LOS resting pressure and abdominal length increased significantly and remained elevated in patients operated on with ARS, as opposed to those on OME. The proportion of total time (%) with oesophageal pH <4.0 decreased significantly in both the surgical and medical groups, and was significantly lower after 1 year in patients treated with ARS versus OME. After 10 years, oesophageal acid exposure was normalised in both groups, with no significant differences, and bilirubin exposure was within normal limits. After 10 years, patients with or without Barrett's oesophagus did not differ in acid reflux control between the two treatment options. Open ARS and OME were both effective in normalising acid reflux into the oesophagus even when studied over a period of 10 years. Anatomically and functionally the LOS was repaired durably by surgery, with increased resting pressure and abdominal length.

  18. Identifying the neural substrates of intrinsic motivation during task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woogul; Reeve, Johnmarshall

    2017-10-01

    Intrinsic motivation is the inherent tendency to seek out novelty and challenge, to explore and investigate, and to stretch and extend one's capacities. When people imagine performing intrinsically motivating tasks, they show heightened anterior insular cortex (AIC) activity. To fully explain the neural system of intrinsic motivation, however, requires assessing neural activity while people actually perform intrinsically motivating tasks (i.e., while answering curiosity-inducing questions or solving competence-enabling anagrams). Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that the neural system of intrinsic motivation involves not only AIC activity, but also striatum activity and, further, AIC-striatum functional interactions. These findings suggest that subjective feelings of intrinsic satisfaction (associated with AIC activations), reward processing (associated with striatum activations), and their interactions underlie the actual experience of intrinsic motivation. These neural findings are consistent with the conceptualization of intrinsic motivation as the pursuit and satisfaction of subjective feelings (interest and enjoyment) as intrinsic rewards.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who have heavy periods ... because blood is lost during dialysis. Also, the kidneys are no longer able to make ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for ...

  20. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, sub...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program now includes participants with anemia, which may help us understand how genes contribute to differences in disease severity and how patients respond to treatment. The ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... woman's risk for a premature or low-birth-weight baby. Adults Who Have Internal Bleeding Adults who have internal bleeding, such as intestinal bleeding, can develop iron-deficiency anemia due to blood loss. Certain conditions, such as colon cancer and bleeding ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Follow a high-fiber diet. Large amounts of fiber can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron-rich foods may help you prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Taking ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially harmful donations and protect individuals from needing iron supplementation. Advancing research for improved health In support of our mission , we are committed ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... proof packages for supplements can help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency ... within months. Supplements come in pill form or in drops for children. Large amounts of iron can be harmful, so ...

  6. Iron deficiency in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaemia is a worldwide health problem affecting developed and developing countries. Children <5 years of age and women of child-bearing age are the most vulnerable. Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) ranked 15th and 14th in the global disability-adjusted life-years in. 1990 and 2010, respectively.[1] Globally, the ...

  7. Diagnosing oceanic nutrient deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C. Mark

    2016-11-01

    The supply of a range of nutrient elements to surface waters is an important driver of oceanic production and the subsequent linked cycling of the nutrients and carbon. Relative deficiencies of different nutrients with respect to biological requirements, within both surface and internal water masses, can be both a key indicator and driver of the potential for these nutrients to become limiting for the production of new organic material in the upper ocean. The availability of high-quality, full-depth and global-scale datasets on the concentrations of a wide range of both macro- and micro-nutrients produced through the international GEOTRACES programme provides the potential for estimation of multi-element deficiencies at unprecedented scales. Resultant coherent large-scale patterns in diagnosed deficiency can be linked to the interacting physical-chemical-biological processes which drive upper ocean nutrient biogeochemistry. Calculations of ranked deficiencies across multiple elements further highlight important remaining uncertainties in the stoichiometric plasticity of nutrient ratios within oceanic microbial systems and caveats with regards to linkages to upper ocean nutrient limitation. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ages of 14 and 50 years need more iron than boys and men of the same age. Women are at higher ... anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a strong urge to move the legs. This ... may be a sign of infection, a blood disorder, or another ... may be a clue as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, for ...

  10. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as if you are following a ... unhealthy environments, or other factors that increase your risk of developing iron-deficiency ... to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for and strategies ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Frequent blood tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia ... iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research ... Is Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, ...

  17. Anemia - B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lack (deficiency) of vitamin B12 . Causes Your body needs vitamin B12 to make red blood cells. In order ... rest of your life. Some people may also need to take vitamin B12 supplements by mouth. Treatment may no longer ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease ( ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ways that NHLBI continues to translate ... Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that NHLBI is funding on iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z ... usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be a sign of infection, a blood disorder, or another condition. Finally, the CBC looks at mean corpuscular (kor-PUS-kyu-lar) volume (MCV). MCV is a measure of the average size of your red blood cells. The results may be a clue as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, for ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... infection. A history of gastrointestinal surgery, such as weight-loss surgery—especially gastric bypass—or gastrectomy. Certain rare ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or advise you to eat more iron-rich foods. This not only will help you avoid iron-deficiency anemia, but also may lower your risk of having a low-birth-weight baby. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications The signs and ...

  4. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha One International Registry (AIR), a multinational research program focused on alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, was formed in response to a World Health Organization recommendation. Each of the nearly 20 participating countries maintains a national registry of patients with AAT defic...... epidemiology, inflammatory and signalling processes, therapeutic advances, and lung imaging techniques....

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may ask whether you might be pregnant. Physical Exam Your doctor will do a physical exam to look for signs of iron-deficiency anemia. ... liver and spleen Do a pelvic and rectal exam to check for internal bleeding Diagnostic Tests and ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron added). If you don't eat these foods regularly, or if you don't take an iron supplement, you're more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... where there is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... body. People with severe iron-deficiency anemia or who have chronic conditions such as kidney disease or celiac disease may be more likely to ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor about delayed clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a ... Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and low-birth-weight babies (weighing less than 5.5 pounds) are at even greater risk for iron- ... loss during their monthly periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other ... poorly because of money, social, health, or other problems. Follow a very low-fat diet over a ...

  20. MCAD deficiency in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Brage Storstein; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Hougaard, David Michael

    2012-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the most common defect of fatty acid oxidation. Many countries have introduced newborn screening for MCADD, because characteristic acylcarnitines can easily be identified in filter paper blood spot samples by tandem mass spectrometry (MS...