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Sample records for intrinsic pontine glioma

  1. Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma: poised for progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Katherine E.

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) are amongst the most challenging tumors to treat. Surgery is not an option, the effects of radiation therapy are temporary, and no chemotherapeutic agent has demonstrated significant efficacy. Numerous clinical trials of new agents and novel therapeutic approaches have been performed over the course of several decades in efforts to improve the outcome of children with DIPG, yet without success. The diagnosis of DIPG is based on radiographic findings in the setting of a typical clinical presentation, and tissue is not routinely obtained as the standard of care. The paradigm for treating children with these tumors has been based on that for supratentorial high-grade gliomas in adults as the biology of these lesions were presumed to be similar. However, recent pivotal studies demonstrate that DIPGs appear to be their own entity. Simply identifying this fact releases a number of constraints and opens opportunities for biologic investigation of these lesions, setting the stage to move forward in identifying DIPG-specific treatments. This review will summarize the current state of knowledge of DIPG, discuss obstacles to therapy, and summarize results of recent biologic studies.

  2. Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas: A systematic update on clinical trials and biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M. H. A.; van Vuurden, D. G.; Vandertop, W. P.; Kaspers, G. J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG) have a poor prognosis. Although DIPG constitute only 10-15% of all pediatric brain tumors, they are the main cause of death in this group. Despite 26 clinical trials in newly diagnosed DIPG in the past 5 years (including several targeted

  3. Culture methods of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma cells determine response to targeted therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meel, Michaël H.; Sewing, A. Charlotte P.; Waranecki, Piotr; Metselaar, Dennis S.; Wedekind, Laurine E.; Koster, Jan; van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Hulleman, Esther

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is an aggressive type of brainstem cancer occurring mainly in children, for which there currently is no effective therapy. Current efforts to develop novel therapeutics for this tumor make use of primary cultures of DIPG cells, maintained either as adherent

  4. Effective Drug Delivery in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma : A Theoretical Model to Identify Potential Candidates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Khouly, Fatma E; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Stroink, Thom; Hulleman, Esther; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Hendrikse, N Harry; Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Sophie E M

    2017-01-01

    Despite decades of clinical trials for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), patient survival does not exceed 10% at two years post-diagnosis. Lack of benefit from systemic chemotherapy may be attributed to an intact bloodbrain barrier (BBB). We aim to develop a theoretical model including

  5. Preclinical evaluation of convection-enhanced delivery of liposomal doxorubicin to treat pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma and thalamic high-grade glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sewing, A.C.; Lagerweij, T.; Vuurden, D.G. van; Meel, M.H.; Veringa, S.J.; Carcaboso, A.M.; Gaillard, P.J.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Wesseling, P.; Noske, D.; Kaspers, G.J.; Hulleman, E.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Pediatric high-grade gliomas (pHGGs) including diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) are primary brain tumors with high mortality and morbidity. Because of their poor brain penetrance, systemic chemotherapy regimens have failed to deliver satisfactory results; however,

  6. Bevacizumab targeting diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma : Results of 89Zr-bevacizumab PET imaging in brain tumor models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Marc H A; Lagerweij, Tonny; Sewing, A. Charlotte P; Vugts, Danielle J.; Van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Molthoff, Carla F M; Caretti, Viola; Veringa, Susanna J E; Petersen, Naomi; Carcaboso, Angel M.; Noske, David P.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Wesseling, Pieter; Van Dongen, Guus A M S; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Hulleman, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The role of the VEGF inhibitor bevacizumab in the treatment of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is unclear. We aim to study the biodistribution and uptake of zirconium-89 (89Zr)-labeled bevacizumab in DIPG mouse models. Human E98-FM, U251-FM glioma cells, and HSJD-DIPG-007-FLUC primary DIPG

  7. Monitoring of tumor growth and post-irradiation recurrence in a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caretti, V.; Zondervan, I.; Meijer, D.H.; Idema, S.; Vos, W. De; Hamans, B.C.; Bugiani, M.; Hulleman, E.; Wesseling, P.; Vandertop, W.P.; Noske, D.P.; Kaspers, G.; Molthoff, C.F.M.; Wurdinger, T.

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a fatal malignancy because of its diffuse infiltrative growth pattern. Translational research suffers from the lack of a representative DIPG animal model. Hence, human E98 glioma cells were stereotactically injected into the pons of nude mice. The E98 DIPG

  8. Bevacizumab Targeting Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: Results of 89Zr-Bevacizumab PET Imaging in Brain Tumor Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Marc H. A.; Lagerweij, Tonny; Sewing, A. Charlotte P.; Vugts, Danielle J.; van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Molthoff, Carla F. M.; Caretti, Viola; Veringa, Susanna J. E.; Petersen, Naomi; Carcaboso, Angel M.; Noske, David P.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Wesseling, Pieter; van Dongen, Guus A. M. S.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Hulleman, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The role of the VEGF inhibitor bevacizumab in the treatment of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is unclear. We aim to study the biodistribution and uptake of zirconium-89 ((89)Zr)-labeled bevacizumab in DIPG mouse models. Human E98-FM, U251-FM glioma cells, and HSJD-DIPG-007-FLUC primary DIPG

  9. In vitro drug response and efflux transporters associated with drug resistance in pediatric high grade glioma and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veringa, S.J.; Biesmans, D.; Vuurden, D.G. van; Jansen, M.H.; Wedekind, L.E.; Horsman, I.; Wesseling, P.; Vandertop, W.P.; Noske, D.P.; Kaspers, G.J.L.; Hulleman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric high-grade gliomas (pHGG), including diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG), are the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. While it is clear that surgery (if possible), and radiotherapy are beneficial for treatment, the role of chemotherapy for these tumors is still unclear.

  10. Hypofractionation vs Conventional Radiation Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: A Matched-Cohort Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, G.O.R.J.; Jansen, M.H.; Lauwers, S.J.; Nowak, P.J.; Oldenburger, F.R.; Bouffet, E.; Saran, F.; Kamphuis-van Ulzen, K.; Lindert, E.J. van; Schieving, J.H.; Boterberg, T.; Kaspers, G.J.L.; Span, P.N.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Gidding, C.E.M.; Hargrave, D.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite conventional radiation therapy, 54 Gy in single doses of 1.8 Gy (54/1.8 Gy) over 6 weeks, most children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) will die within 1 year after diagnosis. To reduce patient burden, we investigated the role of hypofractionation radiation therapy

  11. Hypofractionation vs conventional radiation therapy for newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma: a matched-cohort analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Geert O.; Jansen, Marc H.; Lauwers, Selmer J.; Nowak, Peter J.; Oldenburger, Foppe R.; Bouffet, Eric; Saran, Frank; Kamphuis-van Ulzen, Karin; van Lindert, Erik J.; Schieving, Jolanda H.; Boterberg, Tom; Kaspers, Gertjan J.; Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H.; Gidding, Corrie E.; Hargrave, Darren

    2013-01-01

    Despite conventional radiation therapy, 54 Gy in single doses of 1.8 Gy (54/1.8 Gy) over 6 weeks, most children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) will die within 1 year after diagnosis. To reduce patient burden, we investigated the role of hypofractionation radiation therapy given over 3

  12. Polo-like Kinase 1 as a potential therapeutic target in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amani, Vladimir; Prince, Eric W; Alimova, Irina; Balakrishnan, Ilango; Birks, Diane; Donson, Andrew M.; Harris, Peter; Levy, Jean M. Mulcahy; Handler, Michael; Foreman, Nicholas K.; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Vibhakar, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) are highly aggressive, fatal, childhood tumors that arise in the brainstem. DIPGs have no effective treatment, and their location and diffuse nature render them inoperable. Radiation therapy remains the only standard of care for this devastating disease. New therapeutic targets are needed to develop novel therapy for DIPG. We examined the expression of PLK1 mRNA in DIPG tumor samples through microarray analysis and found it to be up regulated versus normal pons. Using the DIPG tumor cells, we inhibited PLK1 using a clinically relevant specific inhibitor BI 6727 and evaluated the effects on, proliferation, apoptosis, induction of DNA damage and radio sensitization of the DIPG tumor cells. Treatment of DIPG cell lines with BI 6727, a new generation, highly selective inhibitor of PLK1, resulted in decreased cell proliferation and a marked increase in cellular apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis showed a significant arrest in G2-M phase and a substantial increase in cell death. Treatment also resulted in an increased γH2AX expression, indicating induction of DNA damage. PLK1 inhibition resulted in radiosensitization of DIPG cells. These findings suggest that targeting PLK1 with small-molecule inhibitors, in combination with radiation therapy, will hold a novel strategy in the treatment of DIPG that warrants further investigation

  13. A Novel Methodology for Applying Multivoxel MR Spectroscopy to Evaluate Convection-Enhanced Drug Delivery in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado, D I; Singh, R; Minkowitz, S; Zhou, Z; Haque, S; Peck, K K; Young, R J; Tsiouris, A J; Souweidane, M M; Thakur, S B

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas are inoperable high-grade gliomas with a median survival of less than 1 year. Convection-enhanced delivery is a promising local drug-delivery technique that can bypass the BBB in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma treatment. Evaluating tumor response is critical in the assessment of convection-enhanced delivery of treatment. We proposed to determine the potential of 3D multivoxel (1)H-MR spectroscopy to evaluate convection-enhanced delivery treatment effect in these tumors. We prospectively analyzed 3D multivoxel (1)H-MR spectroscopy data for 6 patients with nonprogressive diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas who received convection-enhanced delivery treatment of a therapeutic antibody (Phase I clinical trial NCT01502917). To compare changes in the metabolite ratios with time, we tracked the metabolite ratios Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA at several ROIs: normal white matter, tumor within the convection-enhanced delivery infusion site, tumor outside of the infused area, and the tumor average. There was a comparative decrease in both Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA metabolite ratios at the tumor convection-enhanced delivery site versus tumor outside the infused area. We used MR spectroscopy voxels with dominant white matter as a reference. The difference between changes in metabolite ratios became more prominent with increasing time after convection-enhanced delivery treatment. The comparative change in metabolite ratios between the convection-enhanced delivery site and the tumor site outside the infused area suggests that multivoxel (1)H-MR spectroscopy, in combination with other imaging modalities, may provide a clinical tool to accurately evaluate local tumor response after convection-enhanced delivery treatment. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  14. Single- and Multivoxel Proton Spectroscopy in Pediatric Patients With Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen-Smith, Emilie A. [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Venzon, David J. [Biostatistics and Data Management Section, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bent, Robyn S. [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Hipp, Sean J. [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Warren, Katherine E., E-mail: warrenk@mail.nih.gov [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of two magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques for treating pediatric patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) and to evaluate the relationship of metabolic profiles determined by each technique. Utility of each technique for improving patient management is also discussed. Methods and Materials: Children with DIPG (n = 36) were evaluated using single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) during the same imaging session. Patients were followed longitudinally (n = 150 total studies). Technical feasibility was defined by sufficient water and lipid suppression for detection of metabolites. Correlation of metabolic data obtained by SVS and MRSI was determined using the Spearman rank method. Metabolite ratios, including choline:N-acetyl-aspartate (Cho:NAA) and Cho:creatine (Cho:Cr), were obtained from SVS and MRSI. Results: SVS and MRSI acquisitions were feasible in >90% of studies. Maximum Cho:NAA and Cho:Cr from MRSI analysis were strongly associated with Cho:NAA and Cho:Cr obtained by SVS (r = 0.67 and 0.76, respectively). MRSI Cho:NAA values were more heterogeneous than Cho:Cr values within the same lesion, and a strong linear relationship between the range and maximum Cho:NAA values was observed. Conclusions: SVS and MRSI acquisitions were feasible, with a strong correlation in metabolic data. Both techniques may improve diagnostic evaluation and management of DIPG. SVS is recommended for global assessment of tumor metabolism before and after therapy. MRSI showed heterogeneous patterns of metabolic activity within these tumors and is recommended for planning and monitoring targeted therapies and evaluating nearby tissue for tumor invasion.

  15. Effective Drug Delivery in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: A Theoretical Model to Identify Potential Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma E. El-Khouly

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of clinical trials for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG, patient survival does not exceed 10% at two years post-diagnosis. Lack of benefit from systemic chemotherapy may be attributed to an intact bloodbrain barrier (BBB. We aim to develop a theoretical model including relevant physicochemical properties in order to review whether applied chemotherapeutics are suitable for passive diffusion through an intact BBB or whether local administration via convection-enhanced delivery (CED may increase their therapeutic potential. Physicochemical properties (lipophilicity, molecular weight, and charge in physiological environment of anticancer drugs historically and currently administered to DIPG patients, that affect passive diffusion over the BBB, were included in the model. Subsequently, the likelihood of BBB passage of these drugs was ascertained, as well as their potential for intratumoral administration via CED. As only non-molecularly charged, lipophilic, and relatively small sized drugs are likely to passively diffuse through the BBB, out of 51 drugs modeled, only 8 (15%—carmustine, lomustine, erlotinib, vismodegib, lenalomide, thalidomide, vorinostat, and mebendazole—are theoretically qualified for systemic administration in DIPG. Local administration via CED might create more therapeutic options, excluding only positively charged drugs and drugs that are either prodrugs and/or only available as oral formulation. A wide variety of drugs have been administered systemically to DIPG patients. Our model shows that only few are likely to penetrate the BBB via passive diffusion, which may partly explain the lack of efficacy. Drug distribution via CED is less dependent on physicochemical properties and may increase the therapeutic options for DIPG.

  16. Molecular Drug Imaging: 89Zr-Bevacizumab PET in Children with Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Marc H; Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Sophie E M; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Huisman, Marc C; Vugts, Danielle J; Hoekstra, Otto S; van Dongen, Guus A; Kaspers, Gert-Jan L

    2017-05-01

    Predictive tools for guiding therapy in children with brain tumors are urgently needed. In this first molecular drug imaging study in children, we investigated whether bevacizumab can reach tumors in children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) by measuring the tumor uptake of 89 Zr-labeled bevacizumab by PET. In addition, we evaluated the safety of the procedure in children and determined the optimal time for imaging. Methods: Patients received 89 Zr-bevacizumab (0.1 mg/kg; 0.9 MBq/kg) at least 2 wk after completing radiotherapy. Whole-body PET/CT scans were obtained 1, 72, and 144 h after injection. All patients underwent contrast (gadolinium)-enhanced MRI. The biodistribution of 89 Zr-bevacizumab was quantified as SUVs. Results: Seven DIPG patients (4 boys; 6-17 y old) were scanned without anesthesia. No adverse events occurred. Five of 7 primary tumors showed focal 89 Zr-bevacizumab uptake (SUVs at 144 h after injection were 1.0-6.7), whereas no significant uptake was seen in the healthy brain. In 1 patient, multiple metastases all showed positive PET results. We observed inter- and intratumoral heterogeneity of uptake, and 89 Zr-bevacizumab uptake was present predominantly (in 4/5 patients) within MRI contrast-enhanced areas, although 89 Zr-bevacizumab uptake in these areas was variable. Tumor targeting results were quantitatively similar at 72 and 144 h after injection, but tumor-to-blood-pool SUV ratios increased with time after injection ( P = 0.045). The mean effective dose per patient was 0.9 mSv/MBq (SD, 0.3 mSv/MBq). Conclusion: 89 Zr-bevacizumab PET studies are feasible in children with DIPG. The data suggest considerable heterogeneity in drug delivery among patients and within DIPG tumors and a positive, but not 1:1, correlation between MRI contrast enhancement and 89 Zr-bevacizumab uptake. The optimal time for scanning is 144 h after injection. Tumor 89 Zr-bevacizumab accumulation assessed by PET scanning may help in the selection of

  17. Role of Early Postradiation Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scans in Children With Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

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    Ko, Christine [Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kaushal, Aradhana, E-mail: kaushala@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Hammoud, Dima A. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Steffen-Smith, Emilie A.; Bent, Robyn [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Citrin, Deborah; Camphausen, Kevin [Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Warren, Katherine E. [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine optimal timing of assessing postradiation radiographic response on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in pediatric patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated on a prospective study at the National Cancer Institute (Protocol no. 06-C-0219) evaluating the effects of radiotherapy (RT). Standard RT was administered in standard fractionation over 6 weeks. Postradiation MRI scans were performed at 2 and 6-8 weeks. Results: Eleven patients with DIPG were evaluated. Median age was 6 years (range, 4-13 years). Patients were treated with external-beam RT to 55.8 Gy (n = 10) or 54 Gy (n = 1), with a gross tumor volume to planning target volume expansion of 1.8-2.0 cm. All patients received prescribed dose and underwent posttreatment MRI scans at 2 and 6-8 weeks. Pretreatment imaging revealed compression of fourth ventricle (n = 11); basilar artery encasement (n = 9); tumor extension outside the pons (n = 11); and tumor hemorrhage (n = 2). At the 2-week scan, basilar artery encasement improved in 7 of 9 patients, and extent of tumor was reduced in 5 of 11 patients. Fourth ventricle compression improved in 6 of 11 patients but worsened in 3 of 11 patients. Presumed necrosis was observed in 5 of 11 patients at 2 weeks and in 1 additional patient at 6-8 weeks. There was no significant difference in mean anteroposterior and transverse diameters of tumor between the 2- and 6-8-week time points. Six of 11 patients had increasing ventricular size, with no evidence of obstruction. Conclusions: There is no significant difference in tumor size of DIPG patients who have received standard RT when measured at 2 weeks vs. 6-8 weeks after RT. The majority of patients had the largest change in tumor size at the 2-week post-RT scan, with evolving changes documented on the 6-8-week scan. Six of 11 patients had progressive ventriculomegaly without obstruction, suggestive of communicating hydrocephalus. To the best

  18. In vitro drug response and efflux transporters associated with drug resistance in pediatric high grade glioma and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna J E Veringa

    Full Text Available Pediatric high-grade gliomas (pHGG, including diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG, are the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. While it is clear that surgery (if possible, and radiotherapy are beneficial for treatment, the role of chemotherapy for these tumors is still unclear. Therefore, we performed an in vitro drug screen on primary glioma cells, including three DIPG cultures, to determine drug sensitivity of these tumours, without the possible confounding effect of insufficient drug delivery. This screen revealed a high in vitro cytotoxicity for melphalan, doxorubicine, mitoxantrone, and BCNU, and for the novel, targeted agents vandetanib and bortezomib in pHGG and DIPG cells. We subsequently determined the expression of the drug efflux transporters P-gp, BCRP1, and MRP1 in glioma cultures and their corresponding tumor tissues. Results indicate the presence of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP1 in the tumor vasculature, and expression of MRP1 in the glioma cells themselves. Our results show that pediatric glioma and DIPG tumors per se are not resistant to chemotherapy. Treatment failure observed in clinical trials, may rather be contributed to the presence of drug efflux transporters that constitute a first line of drug resistance located at the blood-brain barrier or other resistance mechanism. As such, we suggest that alternative ways of drug delivery may offer new possibilities for the treatment of pediatric high-grade glioma patients, and DIPG in particular.

  19. Spatial genomic heterogeneity in diffuse intrinsic pontine and midline high-grade glioma: implications for diagnostic biopsy and targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Lindsey M; DeWire, Mariko; Ryall, Scott; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Leach, James; Miles, Lili; Ramani, Arun; Brudno, Michael; Kumar, Shiva Senthil; Drissi, Rachid; Dexheimer, Phillip; Salloum, Ralph; Chow, Lionel; Hummel, Trent; Stevenson, Charles; Lu, Q Richard; Jones, Blaise; Witte, David; Aronow, Bruce; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Fouladi, Maryam

    2016-01-04

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) and midline high-grade glioma (mHGG) are lethal childhood brain tumors. Spatial genomic heterogeneity has been well-described in adult HGG but has not been comprehensively characterized in pediatric HGG. We performed whole exome sequencing on 38-matched primary, contiguous, and metastatic tumor sites from eight children with DIPG (n = 7) or mHGG (n = 1) collected using a unique MRI-guided autopsy protocol. Validation was performed using Sanger sequencing, Droplet Digital polymerase-chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and fluorescent in-situ hybridization. Median age at diagnosis was 6.1 years (range: 2.9-23.3 years). Median overall survival was 13.2 months (range: 11.2-32.2 months). Contiguous tumor infiltration and distant metastases were observed in seven and six patients, respectively, including leptomeningeal dissemination in three DIPGs. Histopathological heterogeneity was evident in seven patients, including intra-pontine heterogeneity in two DIPGs, ranging from World Health Organization grade II to IV astrocytoma. We found conservation of heterozygous K27M mutations in H3F3A (n = 4) or HIST1H3B (n = 3) across all primary, contiguous, and metastatic tumor sites in all DIPGs. ACVR1 (n = 2), PIK3CA (n = 2), FGFR1 (n = 2), and MET (n = 1) were also intra-tumorally conserved. ACVR1 was co-mutated with HIST1H3B (n = 2). In contrast, PDGFRA amplification and mutation were spatially heterogeneous, as were mutations in BCOR (n = 1), ATRX (n = 2), and MYC (n = 1). TP53 aberrations (n = 3 patients) varied by type and location between primary and metastatic tumors sites but were intra-tumorally conserved. Spatial conservation of prognostically-relevant and therapeutically-targetable somatic mutations in DIPG and mHGG contrasts the significant heterogeneity of driver mutations seen in adult HGG and supports uniform implementation of diagnostic biopsy in DIPG and mHGG to

  20. The international diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma registry: an infrastructure to accelerate collaborative research for an orphan disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Joshua; Bartels, Ute; Leach, James; Jones, Blaise; Chaney, Brooklyn; Warren, Katherine E; Kirkendall, Jenavieve; Doughman, Renee; Hawkins, Cynthia; Miles, Lili; Fuller, Christine; Hassall, Tim; Bouffet, Eric; Lane, Adam; Hargrave, Darren; Grill, Jacques; Hoffman, Lindsey M; Jones, Chris; Towbin, Alex; Savage, Sharon A; Monje, Michelle; Li, Xiao-Nan; Ziegler, David S; Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Sophie; Kramm, Christof M; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Fouladi, Maryam

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), a rare, often fatal childhood brain tumor, remains a major therapeutic challenge. In 2012, investigators, funded by the DIPG Collaborative (a philanthropic partnership among 29 private foundations), launched the International DIPG Registry (IDIPGR) to advance understanding of DIPG. Comprised of comprehensive deidentified but linked clinical, imaging, histopathological, and genomic repositories, the IDIPGR uses standardized case report forms for uniform data collection; serial imaging and histopathology are centrally reviewed by IDIPGR neuro-radiologists and neuro-pathologists, respectively. Tissue and genomic data, and cell cultures derived from autopsies coordinated by the IDIPGR are available to investigators for studies approved by the Scientific Advisory Committee. From April 2012 to December 2016, 670 patients diagnosed with DIPG have been enrolled from 55 participating institutions in the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. The radiology repository contains 3558 studies from 448 patients. The pathology repository contains tissue on 81 patients with another 98 samples available for submission. Fresh DIPG tissue from seven autopsies has been sent to investigators to develop primary cell cultures. The bioinformatics repository contains next-generation sequencing data on 66 tumors. Nine projects using data/tissue from the IDIPGR by 13 principle investigators from around the world are now underway. The IDIPGR, a successful alliance among philanthropic agencies and investigators, has developed and maintained a highly collaborative, hypothesis-driven research infrastructure for interdisciplinary and translational projects in DIPG to improve diagnosis, response assessment, treatment and outcome for patients.

  1. Repurposing the anti-epileptic drug sodium valproate as an adjuvant treatment for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma

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    Killick-Cole, Clare L.; Singleton, William G. B.; Bienemann, Alison S.; Asby, Daniel J.; Wyatt, Marcella J.; Boulter, Lisa J.; Barua, Neil U.

    2017-01-01

    Targeting epigenetic changes in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) may provide a novel treatment option for patients. This report demonstrates that sodium valproate, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), can increase the cytotoxicity of carboplatin in an additive and synergistic manner in DIPG cells in vitro. Sodium valproate causes a dose-dependent decrease in DIPG cell viability in three independent ex vivo cell lines. Furthermore, sodium valproate caused an increase in acetylation of histone H3. Changes in cell viability were consistent with an induction of apoptosis in DIPG cells in vitro, determined by flow cytometric analysis of Annexin V staining and assessment of apoptotic markers by western blotting. Subsequently, immunofluorescent staining of neuronal and glial markers was used to determine toxicity in normal rat hippocampal cells. Pre-treatment of cells with sodium valproate enhanced the cytotoxic effects of carboplatin, in three DIPG cell lines tested. These results demonstrate that sodium valproate causes increased histone H3 acetylation indicative of HDAC inhibition, which is inversely correlated with a reduction in cell viability. Cell viability is reduced through an induction of apoptosis in DIPG cells. Sodium valproate potentiates carboplatin cytotoxicity and prompts further work to define the mechanism responsible for the synergy between these two drugs and determine in vivo efficacy. These findings support the use of sodium valproate as an adjuvant treatment for DIPG. PMID:28542253

  2. Pre-Clinical Study of Panobinostat in Xenograft and Genetically Engineered Murine Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Models.

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    Tammy Hennika

    Full Text Available Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG, or high-grade brainstem glioma (BSG, is one of the major causes of brain tumor-related deaths in children. Its prognosis has remained poor despite numerous efforts to improve survival. Panobinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, is a targeted agent that has recently shown pre-clinical efficacy and entered a phase I clinical trial for the treatment of children with recurrent or progressive DIPG.A collaborative pre-clinical study was conducted using both a genetic BSG mouse model driven by PDGF-B signaling, p53 loss, and ectopic H3.3-K27M or H3.3-WT expression and an H3.3-K27M orthotopic DIPG xenograft model to confirm and extend previously published findings regarding the efficacy of panobinostat in vitro and in vivo.In vitro, panobinostat potently inhibited cell proliferation, viability, and clonogenicity and induced apoptosis of human and murine DIPG cells. In vivo analyses of tissue after short-term systemic administration of panobinostat to genetically engineered tumor-bearing mice indicated that the drug reached brainstem tumor tissue to a greater extent than normal brain tissue, reduced proliferation of tumor cells and increased levels of H3 acetylation, demonstrating target inhibition. Extended consecutive daily treatment of both genetic and orthotopic xenograft models with 10 or 20 mg/kg panobinostat consistently led to significant toxicity. Reduced, well-tolerated doses of panobinostat, however, did not prolong overall survival compared to vehicle-treated mice.Our collaborative pre-clinical study confirms that panobinostat is an effective targeted agent against DIPG human and murine tumor cells in vitro and in short-term in vivo efficacy studies in mice but does not significantly impact survival of mice bearing H3.3-K27M-mutant tumors. We suggest this may be due to toxicity associated with systemic administration of panobinostat that necessitated dose de-escalation.

  3. Discrepant longitudinal volumetric and metabolic evolution of diffuse intrinsic Pontine gliomas during treatment: implications for current response assessment strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loebel, U. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States); Hwang, S.; Edwards, A.; Patay, Z. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States); Li, Y.; Li, X. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Memphis, TN (United States); Broniscer, A. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Pediatrics, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Based on clinical observations, we hypothesized that in infiltrative high-grade brainstem neoplasms, such as diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), longitudinal metabolic evaluation of the tumor by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may be more accurate than volumetric data for monitoring the tumor's biological evolution during standard treatment. We evaluated longitudinal MRS data and corresponding tumor volumes of 31 children with DIPG. We statistically analyzed correlations between tumor volume and ratios of Cho/NAA, Cho/Cr, and NAA/Cr at key time points during the course of the disease through the end of the progression-free survival period. By the end of RT, tumor volume had significantly decreased from the baseline (P <.0001) and remained decreased through the last available follow-up magnetic resonance imaging study (P =.007632). However, the metabolic profile of the tumor tissue (Cho/Cr, NAA/Cr, and Cho/NAA ratios) did not change significantly over time. Our data show that longitudinal tumor volume and metabolic profile changes are dissociated in patients with DIPG during progression-free survival. Volume changes, therefore, may not accurately reflect treatment-related changes in tumor burden. This study adds to the existing body of evidence that the value of conventional MRI metrics, including volumetric data, needs to be reevaluated critically and, in infiltrative tumors in particular, may not be useful as study end-points in clinical trials. We submit that advanced quantitative MRI data, including robust, MRS-based metabolic ratios and diffusion and perfusion metrics, may be better surrogate markers of key end-points in clinical trials. (orig.)

  4. Hypofractionation vs Conventional Radiation Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: A Matched-Cohort Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssens, Geert O., E-mail: g.janssens@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jansen, Marc H. [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lauwers, Selmer J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nowak, Peter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Oldenburger, Foppe R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bouffet, Eric [Department of Hematology/Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Saran, Frank [Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Kamphuis-van Ulzen, Karin [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lindert, Erik J. van [Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schieving, Jolanda H. [Department of Neurology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Boterberg, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Kaspers, Gertjan J. [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Gidding, Corrie E. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hargrave, Darren [Department of Oncology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Despite conventional radiation therapy, 54 Gy in single doses of 1.8 Gy (54/1.8 Gy) over 6 weeks, most children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) will die within 1 year after diagnosis. To reduce patient burden, we investigated the role of hypofractionation radiation therapy given over 3 to 4 weeks. A 1:1 matched-cohort analysis with conventional radiation therapy was performed to assess response and survival. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven children, aged 3 to 14, were treated according to 1 of 2 hypofractionation regimens over 3 to 4 weeks (39/3 Gy, n=16 or 44.8/2.8 Gy, n=11). All patients had symptoms for {<=}3 months, {>=}2 signs of the neurologic triad (cranial nerve deficit, ataxia, long tract signs), and characteristic features of DIPG on magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-seven patients fulfilling the same diagnostic criteria and receiving at least 50/1.8 to 2.0 Gy were eligible for the matched-cohort analysis. Results: With hypofractionation radiation therapy, the overall survival at 6, 9, and 12 months was 74%, 44%, and 22%, respectively. Progression-free survival at 3, 6, and 9 months was 77%, 43%, and 12%, respectively. Temporary discontinuation of steroids was observed in 21 of 27 (78%) patients. No significant difference in median overall survival (9.0 vs 9.4 months; P=.84) and time to progression (5.0 vs 7.6 months; P=.24) was observed between hypofractionation vs conventional radiation therapy, respectively. Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed DIPG, a hypofractionation regimen, given over 3 to 4 weeks, offers equal overall survival with less treatment burden compared with a conventional regimen of 6 weeks.

  5. Prospective Evaluation of Radiotherapy With Concurrent and Adjuvant Temozolomide in Children With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalali, Rakesh; Raut, Nirmal; Arora, Brijesh; Gupta, Tejpal; Dutta, Debnarayan; Munshi, Anusheel; Sarin, Rajiv; Kurkure, Purna

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To present outcome data in a prospective study of radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) in children with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs). Methods and Materials: Pediatric patients with newly diagnosed DIPGs were prospectively treated with focal RT to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions along with concurrent daily TMZ (75 mg/m 2 , Days 1-42). Four weeks after completing the initial RT-TMZ schedule, adjuvant TMZ (200 mg/m 2 , Days 1-5) was given every 28 days to a maximum of 12 cycles. Response was evaluated clinically and radiologically with magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography scans. Results: Between March 2005 and November 2006, 20 children (mean age, 8.3 years) were accrued. Eighteen patients have died from disease progression, one patient is alive with progressive disease, and one patient is alive with stable disease. Median overall survival and progression-free survival were 9.15 months and 6.9 months, respectively. Grade III/IV toxicity during the concurrent RT-TMZ phase included thrombocytopenia in 3 patients, leucopenia in 2, and vomiting in 7. Transient Grade II skin toxicity developed in the irradiated fields in 18 patients. During the adjuvant TMZ phase, Grade III/IV leucopenia developed in 2 patients and Grade IV thrombocytopenia in 1 patient. Patients with magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of a high-grade tumor had worse survival than those with a low-grade tumor (p = 0.001). Patients with neurologic improvement after RT-TMZ had significantly better survival than those who did not (p = 0.048). Conclusions: TMZ with RT has not yielded any improvement in the outcome of DIPG compared with RT alone. Further clinical trials should explore novel treatment modalities.

  6. Hypofractionation vs Conventional Radiation Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: A Matched-Cohort Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, Geert O.; Jansen, Marc H.; Lauwers, Selmer J.; Nowak, Peter J.; Oldenburger, Foppe R.; Bouffet, Eric; Saran, Frank; Kamphuis-van Ulzen, Karin; Lindert, Erik J. van; Schieving, Jolanda H.; Boterberg, Tom; Kaspers, Gertjan J.; Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H.; Gidding, Corrie E.; Hargrave, Darren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Despite conventional radiation therapy, 54 Gy in single doses of 1.8 Gy (54/1.8 Gy) over 6 weeks, most children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) will die within 1 year after diagnosis. To reduce patient burden, we investigated the role of hypofractionation radiation therapy given over 3 to 4 weeks. A 1:1 matched-cohort analysis with conventional radiation therapy was performed to assess response and survival. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven children, aged 3 to 14, were treated according to 1 of 2 hypofractionation regimens over 3 to 4 weeks (39/3 Gy, n=16 or 44.8/2.8 Gy, n=11). All patients had symptoms for ≤3 months, ≥2 signs of the neurologic triad (cranial nerve deficit, ataxia, long tract signs), and characteristic features of DIPG on magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-seven patients fulfilling the same diagnostic criteria and receiving at least 50/1.8 to 2.0 Gy were eligible for the matched-cohort analysis. Results: With hypofractionation radiation therapy, the overall survival at 6, 9, and 12 months was 74%, 44%, and 22%, respectively. Progression-free survival at 3, 6, and 9 months was 77%, 43%, and 12%, respectively. Temporary discontinuation of steroids was observed in 21 of 27 (78%) patients. No significant difference in median overall survival (9.0 vs 9.4 months; P=.84) and time to progression (5.0 vs 7.6 months; P=.24) was observed between hypofractionation vs conventional radiation therapy, respectively. Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed DIPG, a hypofractionation regimen, given over 3 to 4 weeks, offers equal overall survival with less treatment burden compared with a conventional regimen of 6 weeks.

  7. Human pontine glioma cells can induce murine tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caretti, Viola; Sewing, A. Charlotte P.; Lagerweij, Tonny; Schellen, Pepijn; Bugiani, Marianna; Jansen, Marc H. A.; van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Navis, Anna C.; Horsman, Ilona; Vandertop, W. Peter; Noske, David P.; Wesseling, Pieter; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Nazarian, Javad; Vogel, Hannes; Hulleman, Esther; Monje, Michelle; Wurdinger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), with a median survival of only 9 months, is the leading cause of pediatric brain cancer mortality. Dearth of tumor tissue for research has limited progress in this disease until recently. New experimental models for DIPG research are now emerging. To develop

  8. Three-dimensional susceptibility-weighted imaging and two-dimensional T2*-weighted gradient-echo imaging of intratumoral hemorrhages in pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loebel, Ulrike; Sedlacik, Jan; Sabin, Noah D.; Hillenbrand, Claudia M.; Patay, Zoltan; Kocak, Mehmet; Broniscer, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity and specificity of T2*-weighted gradient-echo imaging (T2*-GRE) and susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) in determining prevalence and cumulative incidence of intratumoral hemorrhages in children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) undergoing antiangiogenic and radiation therapy. Patients were recruited from an institutional review board-approved prospective phase I trial of vandetanib administered in combination with radiation therapy. Patient consent was obtained before enrollment. Consecutive T2*-GRE and SWI exams of 17 patients (F/M: 9/8; age 3-17 years) were evaluated. Two reviewers (R1 and R2) determined the number and size of hemorrhages at baseline and multiple follow-ups (92 scans, mean 5.4/patient). Statistical analyses were performed using descriptive statistics, graphical tools, and mixed-effects Poisson regression models. Prevalence of hemorrhages at diagnosis was 41% and 47%; the cumulative incidences of hemorrhages at 6 months by T2*-GRE and SWI were 82% and 88%, respectively. Hemorrhages were mostly petechial; 9.7% of lesions on T2*-GRE and 5.2% on SWI were hematomas (>5 mm). SWI identified significantly more hemorrhages than T2*-GRE did. Lesions were missed or misinterpreted in 36/39 (R1/R2) scans by T2*-GRE and 9/3 scans (R1/R2) by SWI. Hemorrhages had no clinically significant neurological correlates in patients. SWI is more sensitive than T2*-GRE in detecting hemorrhages and differentiating them from calcification, necrosis, and artifacts. Also, petechial hemorrhages are more common in DIPG at diagnosis than previously believed and their number increases during the course of treatment; hematomas are rare. (orig.)

  9. Craniospinal irradiation with concurrent temozolomide for primary metastatic pediatric high-grade or diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas. A first report from the GPOH-HIT-HGG Study Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, K.; Schlamann, A.; Pietschmann, S.; Kortmann, R.D. [University Medical Center Leipzig, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leipzig (Germany); Guckenberger, M. [University Medical Center Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Warmuth-Metz, M. [University Medical Center Wuerzburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Glueck, A. [Clinic for Radiation Oncology Schwabing, Muenchen (Germany); Wawer, A. [University Medical Center Muenchen Schwabing, Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Muenchen (Germany); Kramm, C.; Bueren, A.O. von [University Medical Center Goettingen, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Goettingen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    High-grade (HGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG) with primary metastatic spread are extremely rare and have a dismal prognosis. Analogous to simultaneous radiochemotherapy in non-metastatic HGG and DIPG, concurrent craniospinal irradiation (CSI) and metronomic temozolomide (metroTMZ) may represent a reasonable therapeutic approach. However, the antitumor efficacy and toxicity of this treatment still have to be investigated. Between March 2007 and December 2012, six children with primary metastatic HGG (n=4) or DIPG (n=2) received CSI and concurrent metroTMZ based on individual treatment recommendations and, in some cases, within the HIT-HGG 2007 multicenter trial. Outcome and treatment-related toxicities were evaluated. All patients received irradiation to the entire craniospinal axis (35.2 Gy, n=5; 36 Gy, n=1:) and 5 received a local boost to macroscopic tumor deposits. Simultaneously, metroTMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}/day, n=5; 60 mg/m{sup 2}/day, n=1) was administered. Additionally, 1 patient received nimotuzumab once per week. Within a median follow-up of 10.0 months (range 6.5-18.7 months), all patients experienced disease progression and 5 patients died. Median progression-free survival was 4.0±0.8 months (range 2.4-10.7 months) and median overall survival was 7.6±3.5 months (range 4.0-17.6 months). Acute myelosuppression most severely limited application of this aggressive treatment strategy. Severe hematotoxicities (= grade 3) occurred in all patients and metroTMZ had to be interrupted or discontinued in 4 out of 6 cases. Concurrent CSI and metroTMZ might represent a feasible treatment approach for primary metastatic HGG and DIPG. On the basis of our experience, severe but manageable acute hematotoxicity has to be expected. An international effort is warranted to reassess the efficacy and toxicity of this approach within a prospective study. (orig.)

  10. Parametric Response Mapping of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient as an Imaging Biomarker to Distinguish Pseudoprogression from True Tumor Progression in Peptide-Based Vaccine Therapy for Pediatric Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceschin, R; Kurland, B F; Abberbock, S R; Ellingson, B M; Okada, H; Jakacki, R I; Pollack, I F; Panigrahy, A

    2015-11-01

    Immune response to cancer therapy may result in pseudoprogression, which can only be identified retrospectively and may disrupt an effective therapy. This study assesses whether serial parametric response mapping (a voxel-by-voxel method of image analysis also known as functional diffusion mapping) analysis of ADC measurements following peptide-based vaccination may help prospectively distinguish progression from pseudoprogression in pediatric patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas. From 2009 to 2012, 21 children, 4-18 years of age, with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas were enrolled in a serial peptide-based vaccination protocol following radiation therapy. DWI was acquired before immunotherapy and at 6-week intervals during vaccine treatment. Pseudoprogression was identified retrospectively on the basis of clinical and radiographic findings, excluding DWI. Parametric response mapping was used to analyze 96 scans, comparing ADC measures at multiple time points (from the first vaccine to up to 12 weeks after the vaccine was halted) with prevaccine baseline values. Log-transformed fractional increased ADC, fractional decreased ADC, and parametric response mapping ratio (fractional increased ADC/fractional decreased ADC) were compared between patients with and without pseudoprogression, by using generalized estimating equations with inverse weighting by cluster size. Median survival was 13.1 months from diagnosis (range, 6.4-24.9 months). Four of 21 children (19%) were assessed as experiencing pseudoprogression. Patients with pseudoprogression had higher fitted average log-transformed parametric response mapping ratios (P = .01) and fractional decreased ADCs (P = .0004), compared with patients without pseudoprogression. Serial parametric response mapping of ADC, performed at multiple time points of therapy, may distinguish pseudoprogression from true progression in patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas treated with peptide-based vaccination.

  11. T2-weighted images are superior to other MR image types for the determination of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma intratumoral heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harward, Stephen; Harrison Farber, S; Malinzak, Michael; Becher, Oren; Thompson, Eric M

    2018-03-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) remains the main cause of death in children with brain tumors. Given the inefficacy of numerous peripherally delivered agents to treat DIPG, convection enhanced delivery (CED) of therapeutic agents is a promising treatment modality. The purpose of this study was to determine which MR imaging type provides the best discrimination of intratumoral heterogeneity to guide future stereotactic implantation of CED catheters into the most cellular tumor regions. Patients ages 18 years or younger with a diagnosis of DIPG from 2000 to 2015 were included. Radiographic heterogeneity index (HI) of the tumor was calculated by measuring the standard deviation of signal intensity of the tumor (SD Tumor ) normalized to the genu of the corpus callosum (SD Corpus Callosum ). Four MR image types (T2-weighted, contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, FLAIR, and ADC) were analyzed at several time points both before and after radiotherapy and chemotherapy. HI values across these MR image types were compared and correlated with patient survival. MR images from 18 patients with DIPG were evaluated. The mean survival ± standard deviation was 13.8 ± 13.7 months. T2-weighted images had the highest HI (mean ± SD, 5.1 ± 2.5) followed by contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images (3.7 ± 1.5), FLAIR images (3.0 ± 1.1), and ADC maps (1.6 ± 0.4). ANOVA demonstrated that HI values were significantly higher for T2-weighted images than FLAIR (p values increased, while FLAIR and ADC HI values decreased. Univariate and multivariate analyses did not reveal a relationship between HI values and patient survival (p > 0.05). For children with DIPG, T2-weighted MRI demonstrates the greatest signal intensity variance suggesting tumor heterogeneity. Within this heterogeneity, T2-weighted signal hypointensity is known to correlate with increased cellularity and thus may represent a putative target for CED catheter placement in future clinical trials.

  12. A multi-disciplinary consensus statement concerning surgical approaches to low-grade, high-grade astrocytomas and diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas in childhood (CPN Paris 2011) using the Delphi method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David A.; Liu, JoFen; Kieran, Mark; Jabado, Nada; Picton, Susan; Packer, Roger; St. Rose, Christian; Van Meeteren, Antoinette Schouten; Carvalho, Alice; Van Damme, An; Depreitere, Bart; Gustavsson, Bengt; Due Tonnessen, Bernt J; Bertozzi-Salamon, Anne Isabelle; Brentrup, Angela; Raybaud, Charles; Jones, Chris; Dufour, Christelle; Dorfer, Christian; Sainte-Rose, Christian; Malluci, Conor; Hargrave, Darren; Walker, David; Van Vuurden, Dannis; De Carli, Emilie; Bouffet, Eric; Van Calenbergh, Frank; Frappaz, Didier; Frassanito, Paolo; Goodrich, James; Baechli, Heidi; Grill, Jacques; Ternier, Jessica; Cappelen, Johan; Caird, John; Pereira, Josué; Riffaud, Laurent; Baroncini, Marc; Walker, Marion; Kieran, Mark; Ozek, Memet; Jabado, Nada; Nysom, Karsten; Varlet, Pascale; Goodden, John; Bertolini, Patricia; Perilongo, Giorgio; Mercier, Philippe; Grundy, Richard; Kortmann, Rolf Dieter; Packer, Roger; Pfister, Stefan; Constantini, Shlomi; Sgouros, Spyros; Holm, Stefan; Czech, Thomas; Merchant, Thomas; Stokland, Tore; Ridola, Vita; Vandertop, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytic tumors account for 42% of childhood brain tumors, arising in all anatomical regions and associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in 15%. Anatomical site determines the degree and risk of resectability; the more complete resection, the better the survival rates. New biological markers and modern radiotherapy techniques are altering the risk assessments of clinical decisions for tumor resection and biopsy. The increasingly distinct pediatric neuro-oncology multidisciplinary team (PNMDT) is developing a distinct evidence base. A multidisciplinary consensus conference on pediatric neurosurgery was held in February 2011, where 92 invited participants reviewed evidence for clinical management of hypothalamic chiasmatic glioma (HCLGG), diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), and high-grade glioma (HGG). Twenty-seven statements were drafted and subjected to online Delphi consensus voting by participants, seeking >70% agreement from >60% of respondents; where <70% consensus occurred, the statement was modified and resubmitted for voting. Twenty-seven statements meeting consensus criteria are reported. For HCLGG, statements describing overall therapeutic purpose and indications for biopsy, observation, or treatment aimed at limiting the risk of visual damage and the need for on-going clinical trials were made. Primary surgical resection was not recommended. For DIPG, biopsy was recommended to ascertain biological characteristics to enhance understanding and targeting of treatments, especially in clinical trials. For HGG, biopsy is essential, the World Health Organization classification was recommended; selection of surgical strategy to achieve gross total resection in a single or multistep process should be discussed with the PNMDT and integrated with trials based drug strategies for adjuvant therapies. PMID:23502427

  13. Endoscopic Endonasal Transclival Approach for Resection of a Pontine Glioma: Surgical Planning, Surgical Anatomy, and Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes Cabral, David T; Zenonos, Georgios A; Nuñez, Maximiliano; Celtikci, Pinar; Snyderman, Carl; Wang, Eric; Gardner, Paul A; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C

    2018-03-12

    The endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) has been proposed as a potential alternative for ventral brainstem lesions. The surgical anatomy, feasibility, and limitations of the EEA for intrinsic brainstem lesions are still poorly understood. To describe the surgical planning, anatomy, and technique of an intrinsic pontine glioma operated via EEA. Six-human brainstems were prepared for white matter microdissection. Ten healthy subjects were studied with high-definition fiber tractography (HDFT). A 56-yr-old female with right-hemiparesis underwent EEA for an exophytic pontine glioma. Pre- and postoperative HDFTs were implemented. The corticospinal tracts (CSTs) are the most eloquent fibers in the ventral brainstem. At the pons, CSTs run between the pontine nuclei and the middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP). At the lower medulla, the pyramidal decussation leaves no room for safe ventral access. In our illustrative case, preoperative HDFT showed left-CST displaced posteromedially and partially disrupted, right-CST posteriorly displaced, and MCP severely disrupted. A transclival exposure was performed achieving a complete resection of the exophytic component with residual intra-axial tumor. Immediately postop, patient developed new left-side abducens nerve palsy and worse right-hemiparesis. Ten days postop, her strength returned to baseline. HDFT showed preservation and trajectory restoration of the CSTs. The EEA provides direct access to the ventral brainstem, overcoming the limitations of lateral approaches. For intrinsic pathology, HDFT helps choosing the most appropriate surgical route/boundaries for safer resection. Further experience is needed to determine the indications and limitations of this approach that should be performed by neurosurgeons with high-level expertise in EEA.

  14. Bevacizumab as Therapy for Radiation Necrosis in Four Children With Pontine Gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Arthur K.; Macy, Margaret E.; Foreman, Nicholas K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Diffuse pontine gliomas are a pediatric brain tumor that is fatal in nearly all patients. Given the poor prognosis for patients with this tumor, their quality of life is very important. Radiation therapy provides some palliation, but can result in radiation necrosis and associated neurologic decline. The typical treatment for this necrosis is steroid therapy. Although the steroids are effective, they have numerous side effects that can often significantly compromise quality of life. Bevacizumab, an antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor, has been suggested as a treatment for radiation necrosis. We report on our initial experience with bevacizumab therapy for radiation necrosis in pediatric pontine gliomas. Materials and Methods: Four children with pontine gliomas treated at the Children's Hospital in Denver and the University of Colorado Denver developed evidence of radiation necrosis both clinically and on imaging. Those 4 children then received bevacizumab as a treatment for the radiation necrosis. We reviewed the clinical outcome and imaging findings. Results: After bevacizumab therapy, 3 children had significant clinical improvement and were able to discontinue steroid use. One child continued to decline, and, in retrospect, had disease progression, not radiation necrosis. In all cases, bevacizumab was well tolerated. Conclusions: In children with pontine gliomas, bevacizumab may provide both therapeutic benefit and diagnostic information. More formal evaluation of bevacizumab in these children is needed.

  15. Results of nimotuzumab and vinorelbine, radiation and re-irradiation for diffuse pontine glioma in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimino, Maura; Biassoni, Veronica; Miceli, Rosalba; Schiavello, Elisabetta; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Modena, Piergiorgio; Casanova, Michela; Pecori, Emilia; Giangaspero, Felice; Antonelli, Manila; Buttarelli, Francesca Romana; Potepan, Paolo; Pollo, Bianca; Nunziata, Raffaele; Spreafico, Filippo; Podda, Marta; Anichini, Andrea; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Sardi, Iacopo; De Cecco, Loris; Bode, Udo; Bach, Ferdinand; Gandola, Lorenza

    2014-06-01

    Radiotherapy is the only treatment definitely indicated for diffuse pontine gliomas (DIPG). Findings on the role of EGFR signaling in the onset of childhood DIPG prompted the use of nimotuzumab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody. Assuming a potential synergy with both radiotherapy and vinorelbine, a pilot phase 2 protocol was launched that combined nimotuzumab with concomitant radiation and vinorelbine. An amendment in July 2011 introduced re-irradiation at relapse. The primary endpoint for first-line treatment was objective response rate (CR + PR + SD) according to the RECIST. This report concerns the outcome of this strategy as a whole. Vinorelbine 20 mg/m(2) was administered weekly, with nimotuzumab 150 mg/m(2) in the first 12 weeks of treatment; radiotherapy was delivered from weeks 3 to 9, for a total dose of 54 Gy. Vinorelbine 25 mg/m(2) and nimotuzumab were given every other week thereafter until the tumor progressed or for up to 2 years. Re-irradiation consisted of 19.8 Gy, fractionated over 11 days. Baseline and latest MRIs were assessed blindly by an outside neuroradiologist. Twenty five children (mean age 7.4 years) were enrolled as of August 2009 (median follow-up 29 months). A response was observed in 24/25 patients (96 %). The nimotuzumab/vinorelbine combination was very well tolerated, with no acute side-effects. Eleven of 16 locally-relapsing patients were re-irradiated. One-year PFS and OS rates were 30 ± 10 % and 76 ± 9 %, respectively; 2-year OS was 27 ± 9 %; the median PFS and OS were 8.5 and 15 months, respectively. This strategy generated interesting results and warrants further investigation.

  16. Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood brain stem glioma presents as a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG; a fast-growing tumor that is difficult to treat and has a poor prognosis) or a focal glioma (grows more slowly, is easier to treat, and has a better prognosis). Learn about the diagnosis, cellular classification, staging, treatment, and clinical trials for pediatric brain stem glioma in this expert-reviewed summary.

  17. Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma as a Preclinical Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    studying this rare incurable tumor. Our approach is unique as we are using genetic engineered mouse modeling techniques to dissect the contribution of...Kambhampati M, Snyder K, Yadavilli S, Devaney JM, Harmon B, Hall J, Raabe EH, An P, Weingart M, Rood BR, Magge SN, MacDonald TJ, Packer RJ, Nazarian J

  18. The role of hypofractionation radiotherapy for diffuse intrinsic brainstem glioma in children: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, G.O.; Gidding, C.E.M.; Lindert, E.J. van; Oldenburger, F.R.; Erasmus, C.E.; Schouten-Meeteren, A.Y.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Most children with a diffuse intrinsic brainstem glioma will die within 1 year after diagnosis. To reduce patient burden, we investigated the feasibility of a radical hypofractionation radiotherapy schedule, given over 3 weeks, as an alternative to the standard regimen (30 fractions over 6

  19. The role of hypofractionation radiotherapy for diffuse intrinsic brainstem glioma in children: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Geert O. R. J.; Gidding, Corrie E. M.; van Lindert, Erik J.; Oldenburger, Foppe R.; Erasmus, Corrie E.; Schouten-Meeteren, Antoinette Y. N.; Kaanders, Johannes H. A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Most children with a diffuse intrinsic brainstem glioma will die within 1 year after diagnosis. To reduce patient burden, we investigated the feasibility of a radical hypofractionation radiotherapy schedule, given over 3 weeks, as an alternative to the standard regimen (30 fractions over 6 weeks).

  20. Central pontine myelinolysis CASE REPORT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Differential diagnosis of central pontine myelinolysis includes infarct, metastasis, glioma, multiple sclerosis, encephalitis, radiotherapy and chemotherapy.3 However concomitant involvement of the pons and basal ganglia is specific for osmotic myelinolysis.7 In such cases the imaging differential diagnosis includes hypoxia, ...

  1. EZH2 is a potential therapeutic target for H3K27M-mutant pediatric gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammad, Faizaan; Weissmann, Simon; Leblanc, Benjamin Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is an aggressive brain tumor that is located in the pons and primarily affects children. Nearly 80% of DIPGs harbor mutations in histone H3 genes, wherein lysine 27 is substituted with methionine (H3K27M). H3K27M has been shown to inhibit polycomb repressiv...

  2. Gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, M; Weller, M

    2016-01-01

    Key Features •Synthesizes widely dispersed information on the management of gliomas into one comprehensive resource •Chapters written by international authors who are preeminent researchers in the field •Fully explores the therapeutic options for patient care, from chemotherapy to radiotherapy to personalized approaches Description Researchers’ knowledge of gliomas continues to advance rapidly at both the basic and translational levels, and Gliomas provides a thorough overview ...

  3. The Role of Hypofractionation Radiotherapy for Diffuse Intrinsic Brainstem Glioma in Children: A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, Geert O.R.J.; Gidding, Corrie E.M.; Lindert, Erik J. van; Oldenburger, Foppe R.; Erasmus, Corrie E.; Schouten-Meeteren, Antoinette Y.N.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Most children with a diffuse intrinsic brainstem glioma will die within 1 year after diagnosis. To reduce patient burden, we investigated the feasibility of a radical hypofractionation radiotherapy schedule, given over 3 weeks, as an alternative to the standard regimen (30 fractions over 6 weeks). Methods and Materials: Nine children, ages 3-13, were treated by 13 fractions of 3 Gy (n = 8) or 6 fractions of 5.5 Gy (n = 1) given over 3 weeks. All patients had symptoms for ≤3 months and ≥2 signs of the neurologic triad (long tract signs, ataxia, cranial nerve deficit). Bilateral involvement of the pons (n = 8), encasement of the basilar artery (n = 7) and extension into the cerebellar peduncle (n = 6) was visible on magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Symptom improvement occurred in all patients within 2 weeks after start of radiotherapy. At a mean follow-up time of 15 months, 7 patients have died. Median time to progression and overall survival was 4.9 and 8.6 months, respectively. Median time to death after progression was 3.6 months. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed. In a recently published review of clinical trials, median time to progression, overall survival, and time between progression and death ranged from 5.0-8.8, 7.0-16, and 1.0-4.5 months, respectively, with more aggressive regimens. Conclusion: This radical hypofractionation radiotherapy regimen for children with diffuse intrinsic brainstem glioma is feasible and associated with no Grade 3 or 4 toxicities. With a minimal overall treatment time, it offers quick symptom relief and outcome results within the range of published data

  4. CT in pontine hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Yasuo; Kinoshita, Masao; Ikeda, Ken; Sasaki, Atsushi.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical and CT findings in 10 patients with primary pontine hemorrhage were reviewed. All patients were hypertensive. Pontine hemorrhage can be divided into 3 groups from the viewpoint of location of hematomas. These are the tegmentobasilar type, tegmental type and basilar type. The tegmentobasilar type produces characteristic clinical features for pontine hemorrhage and poor prognosis, otherwise, another two types produce atypical clinical features for pontine hemorrhage and good prognosis. (author)

  5. Glioma cell death induced by irradiation or alkylating agent chemotherapy is independent of the intrinsic ceramide pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee Gramatzki

    Full Text Available Resistance to genotoxic therapy is a characteristic feature of glioma cells. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide and glucosylceramide synthase (GCS catalyzes ceramide metabolism. Increased ceramide levels have been suggested to enhance chemotherapy-induced death of cancer cells.Microarray and clinical data for ASM and GCS in astrocytomas WHO grade II-IV were acquired from the Rembrandt database. Moreover, the glioblastoma database of the Cancer Genome Atlas network (TCGA was used for survival data of glioblastoma patients. For in vitro studies, increases in ceramide levels were achieved either by ASM overexpression or by the GCS inhibitor DL-threo-1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PPMP in human glioma cell lines. Combinations of alkylating chemotherapy or irradiation and ASM overexpression, PPMP or exogenous ceramide were applied in parental cells. The anti-glioma effects were investigated by assessing proliferation, metabolic activity, viability and clonogenicity. Finally, viability and clonogenicity were assessed in temozolomide (TMZ-resistant cells upon treatment with PPMP, exogenous ceramide, alkylating chemotherapy, irradiation or their combinations.Interrogations from the Rembrandt and TCGA database showed a better survival of glioblastoma patients with low expression of ASM or GCS. ASM overexpression or PPMP treatment alone led to ceramide accumulation but did not enhance the anti-glioma activity of alkylating chemotherapy or irradiation. PPMP or exogenous ceramide induced acute cytotoxicity in glioblastoma cells. Combined treatments with chemotherapy or irradiation led to additive, but not synergistic effects. Finally, no synergy was found when TMZ-resistant cells were treated with exogenous ceramide or PPMP alone or in combination with TMZ or irradiation.Modulation of intrinsic glioma cell ceramide levels by ASM overexpression or GCS inhibition does not enhance the anti-glioma activity of

  6. Hypertensive Encephalopathy: Isolated Pons Involvement Mimicking Central Pontine Myelinolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamanagatti, S.; Subramanian, S. [India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2006-09-15

    MRI of the brain was performed, and it demonstrated an isolated high signal on the T2 weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences that involved only the central pons with sparing the periphery. There was no restricted diffusion on diffusion weighted imaging. The differential diagnosis included posterior reversible syndrome and central pontine myelinolysis; however, the blood sodium on admission was normal. The pathogenesis of HE is that the auto-regulatory mechanisms that control the cerebral blood flow are exceeded, resulting in hyper-perfusion. The consequent over-distension of the cerebral vessels, the breakdown of the blood brain barrier and ultimately, the extravasation of fluid into the interstitium all cause vasogenic edema. In most cases, the changes of hypertensive encephalopathy represent reversible vasogenic edema, which can be seen on T2-weighted images, and restricted diffusion is not seen on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Hypertensive encephalopathy that manifests as a reversible increased signal isolated to the pons on T2-weighted images is extremely uncommon. The differential diagnosis for such pontine T2 hyperintensity includes pontine glioma, ischemic and radiation changes (generally irreversible conditions), as well as central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) and demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and rhomb-encephalitis. In CPM electrolyte imbalances provide a clue for the diagnosis, where as for glioma, there will be an expansion and mass effect. In conclusion, clinical recognition of brainstem HE may be difficult. The features of a lack of correlation between the severity of the radiological abnormality and the clinical status, combined with the rapid resolution following antihypertensive treatment, should suggest the diagnosis. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with the imaging abnormalities of this life

  7. Central pontine myelinolysis CASE REPORT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Central pontine myelinolysis is a demyelinating disease of the pons characterised by loss of myelin and oligodendroglia with relative neuron sparing. This condition classically occurs in alcoholics, malnourished or chronically debilitated adults1 and usually occurs in the hospital setting, a few days following rapid correction ...

  8. PD-0332991, a CDK4/6 Inhibitor, Significantly Prolongs Survival in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Brainstem Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Kelly L.; Misuraca, Katherine; Cordero, Francisco; Dobrikova, Elena; Min, Hooney D.; Gromeier, Matthias; Kirsch, David G.; Becher, Oren J.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is an incurable tumor that arises in the brainstem of children. To date there is not a single approved drug to effectively treat these tumors and thus novel therapies are desperately needed. Recent studies suggest that a significant fraction of these tumors contain alterations in cell cycle regulatory genes including amplification of the D-type cyclins and CDK4/6, and less commonly, loss of Ink4a-ARF leading to aberrant cell proliferation. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic approach of targeting the cyclin-CDK-Retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway in a genetically engineered PDGF-B-driven brainstem glioma (BSG) mouse model. We found that PD-0332991 (PD), a CDK4/6 inhibitor, induces cell-cycle arrest in our PDGF-B; Ink4a-ARF deficient model both in vitro and in vivo. By contrast, the PDGF-B; p53 deficient model was mostly resistant to treatment with PD. We noted that a 7-day treatment course with PD significantly prolonged survival by 12% in the PDGF-B; Ink4a-ARF deficient BSG model. Furthermore, a single dose of 10 Gy radiation therapy (RT) followed by 7 days of treatment with PD increased the survival by 19% in comparison to RT alone. These findings provide the rationale for evaluating PD in children with Ink4a-ARF deficient gliomas. PMID:24098593

  9. PD-0332991, a CDK4/6 inhibitor, significantly prolongs survival in a genetically engineered mouse model of brainstem glioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L Barton

    Full Text Available Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG is an incurable tumor that arises in the brainstem of children. To date there is not a single approved drug to effectively treat these tumors and thus novel therapies are desperately needed. Recent studies suggest that a significant fraction of these tumors contain alterations in cell cycle regulatory genes including amplification of the D-type cyclins and CDK4/6, and less commonly, loss of Ink4a-ARF leading to aberrant cell proliferation. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic approach of targeting the cyclin-CDK-Retinoblastoma (Rb pathway in a genetically engineered PDGF-B-driven brainstem glioma (BSG mouse model. We found that PD-0332991 (PD, a CDK4/6 inhibitor, induces cell-cycle arrest in our PDGF-B; Ink4a-ARF deficient model both in vitro and in vivo. By contrast, the PDGF-B; p53 deficient model was mostly resistant to treatment with PD. We noted that a 7-day treatment course with PD significantly prolonged survival by 12% in the PDGF-B; Ink4a-ARF deficient BSG model. Furthermore, a single dose of 10 Gy radiation therapy (RT followed by 7 days of treatment with PD increased the survival by 19% in comparison to RT alone. These findings provide the rationale for evaluating PD in children with Ink4a-ARF deficient gliomas.

  10. Pontine haemorrhage disguised as Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadan, Ummer; Manappallil, Robin George; Jayakrishnan, Chellenton; Supreeth, Ramesh Naga

    2018-02-05

    Isolated facial nerve palsy is a common presentation of Bell's palsy, but rarely seen in pontine lesions. The patient being reported is a middle-aged man who developed isolated facial nerve palsy and was initially treated as Bell's palsy. However, on MRI of the brain, he was found to have pontine haemorrhage. He was managed conservatively and improved. Pontine haemorrhage as an aetiology for isolated facial nerve palsy is a rare scenario, which often goes misdiagnosed and treated as Bell's palsy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Pax3 expression enhances PDGF-B-induced brainstem gliomagenesis and characterizes a subset of brainstem glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misuraca, Katherine L; Barton, Kelly L; Chung, Alexander; Diaz, Alexander K; Conway, Simon J; Corcoran, David L; Baker, Suzanne J; Becher, Oren J

    2014-10-21

    High-grade Brainstem Glioma (BSG), also known as Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG), is an incurable pediatric brain cancer. Increasing evidence supports the existence of regional differences in gliomagenesis such that BSG is considered a distinct disease from glioma of the cerebral cortex (CG). In an effort to elucidate unique characteristics of BSG, we conducted expression analysis of mouse PDGF-B-driven BSG and CG initiated in Nestin progenitor cells and identified a short list of expression changes specific to the brainstem gliomagenesis process, including abnormal upregulation of paired box 3 (Pax3). In the neonatal mouse brain, Pax3 expression marks a subset of brainstem progenitor cells, while it is absent from the cerebral cortex, mirroring its regional expression in glioma. Ectopic expression of Pax3 in normal brainstem progenitors in vitro shows that Pax3 inhibits apoptosis. Pax3-induced inhibition of apoptosis is p53-dependent, however, and in the absence of p53, Pax3 promotes proliferation of brainstem progenitors. In vivo, Pax3 enhances PDGF-B-driven gliomagenesis by shortening tumor latency and increasing tumor penetrance and grade, in a region-specific manner, while loss of Pax3 function extends survival of PDGF-B-driven;p53-deficient BSG-bearing mice by 33%. Importantly, Pax3 is regionally expressed in human glioma as well, with high PAX3 mRNA characterizing 40% of human BSG, revealing a subset of tumors that significantly associates with PDGFRA alterations, amplifications of cell cycle regulatory genes, and is exclusive of ACVR1 mutations. Collectively, these data suggest that regional Pax3 expression not only marks a novel subset of BSG but also contributes to PDGF-B-induced brainstem gliomagenesis.

  12. Intraoperative Pontine Infarction: A Hidden Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Marcanthony

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Apneusis, or apneustic respirations, is characterized by an abnormal breathing pattern involving gasping and the inability to fully expire. A loss of gag reflex and other cranial nerve deficits are also often accompanied with these respiratory changes. In neurological intensive care units (NICUs, these respiratory and airway changes are not uncommon and have been well documented (Lee et al. 1976. These clinical changes are often associated with pontine trauma as it is the core pneumotaxic center in the brain stem. We describe the airway management of a patient with an acute, occult pontine infarct status post craniectomy and cervical laminectomy for decompression of known Chiari malformation in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU.

  13. Signaling pathways and mesenchymal transition in pediatric high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meel, Michaël H; Schaper, Sophie A; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Hulleman, Esther

    2018-03-01

    Pediatric high-grade gliomas (pHGG), including diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG), are the most lethal types of cancer in children. In recent years, it has become evident that these tumors are driven by epigenetic events, mainly mutations involving genes encoding Histone 3, setting them apart from their adult counterparts. These tumors are exceptionally resistant to chemotherapy and respond only temporarily to radiotherapy. Moreover, their delicate location and diffuse growth pattern make complete surgical resection impossible. In many other forms of cancer, chemo- and radioresistance, in combination with a diffuse, invasive phenotype, are associated with a transcriptional program termed the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Activation of this program allows cancer cells to survive individually, invade surrounding tissues and metastasize. It also enables them to survive exposure to cytotoxic therapy, including chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation. We here suggest that EMT plays an important, yet poorly understood role in the biology and therapy resistance of pHGG and DIPG. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the major signal transduction pathways and transcription factors involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in cancer in general and in pediatric HGG and DIPG in particular. Despite the fact that the mesenchymal transition has not yet been specifically studied in pHGG and DIPG, activation of pathways and high levels of transcription factors involved in EMT have been described. We conclude that the mesenchymal transition is likely to be an important element of the biology of pHGG and DIPG and warrants further investigation for the development of novel therapeutics.

  14. Imaging of adult brainstem gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, Bela, E-mail: purohitbela@yahoo.co.in; Kamli, Ali A.; Kollias, Spyros S.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •BSG are classified on MRI into diffuse low-grade, malignant, focal tectal and exophytic subtypes. •Their prognosis and treatment is variable and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. •This article illustrates the imaging of adult BSGs on MRI and FET-PET. •We also describe prognostic factors and the treatment options of these tumours. -- Abstract: Brainstem gliomas (BSGs) are uncommon in adults accounting for about 2% of all intracranial neoplasms. They are often phenotypically low-grade as compared to their more common paediatric counterparts. Since brainstem biopsies are rarely performed, these tumours are commonly classified according to their MR imaging characteristics into 4 subgroups: (a) diffuse intrinsic low-grade gliomas, (b) enhancing malignant gliomas, (c) focal tectal gliomas and (d) exophytic gliomas/other subtypes. The prognosis and treatment is variable for the different types and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. Radiotherapy (RT) with adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment of diffuse low-grade and malignant BSGs, whereas, surgical resection is limited to the exophytic subtypes. Review of previous literature shows that the detailed imaging of adult BSGs has not received significant attention. This review illustrates in detail the imaging features of adult BSGs using conventional and advanced MR techniques like diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR perfusion weighted imaging (PWI), MR spectroscopy (MRS), as well as {sup 18}F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FET/PET). We have discussed the pertinent differences between childhood and adult BSGs, imaging mimics, prognostic factors and briefly reviewed the treatment options of these tumours.

  15. Pontin is localized in nucleolar fibrillar centers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvačková, Zuzana; Albring, K.F.; Koberna, Karel; Ligasová, Anna; Huber, O.; Raška, Ivan; Staněk, David

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 5 (2008), s. 487-497 ISSN 0009-5915 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA301/05/0601; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/0374; GA ČR(CZ) GD303/03/H065; GA ČR GA204/07/0133 Grant - others:Wellcome trust(XE) 075834/04/Z; GA MŠk(CZ) 1K05009; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Pontin * rRNA synthesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.111, year: 2008

  16. Serial magnetic resonance imaging of central pontine myelinolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buis, CI; Wijdicks, EFM

    Central Pontine Myelinolysis (CPM) is a rare neurologic complication after liver transplantation. The true incidence of CPM after orthotopic liver tranplantation remains an estimate. However, with the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging, early recognition became feasible. In this report, we

  17. Histologic classification of gliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perry, Arie; Wesseling, Pieter|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/157872866

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas form a heterogeneous group of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and are traditionally classified based on histologic type and malignancy grade. Most gliomas, the diffuse gliomas, show extensive infiltration in the CNS parenchyma. Diffuse gliomas can be further typed as astrocytic,

  18. Primary pontine hemorrhage. A clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Jun; Kagimoto, Hiroshi; Maeda, Masanobu; Soda, Takao [Shimane Prefectural Central Hospital, Izumo (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    We studied the relationship between outcome and clinical symptoms or CT findings of 34 cases with primary pontine hemorrhage diagnosed by CT scan from April 1994 to March 1999. This series comprised 19 males and 15 females ranging in age from 45 to 89 years with a mean of 67.1 years. According to their outcome at discharge, the cases were divided into 6 groups. Sixteen cases died within 2 weeks after onset (group AD), 4 cases died with complication in the chronic phase (group D), 3 cases were severely disabled to bed-ridden state (group C), 2 cases recovered to a daily life with wheelchair (group B), 4 cases recovered to a daily life with partial assistance (group A), and 5 cases showed a full recovery (group J). The factors significantly correlated with bed outcome are as follows: young age, consciousness disturbance, respiratory disturbance, tachycardia over 90 beats per minute, hyperthermia over 39 deg C, abnormal pupils, loss of oculocephalic reflex, tetraplegia, decerebrate rigidity, bilateral extension or over 30 mm transverse diameter of the hematoma. (author)

  19. Central pontine myelinolysis: clinical presentation and radiologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laubenberger, J.; Schneider, B.; Ansorge, O.; Goetz, F.; Haeussinger, D.; Volk, B.; Langer, M.

    1996-01-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is a neurologic disorder once thought to be uniformly fatal. With the introduction of CT and MRI there was an increasing number of reports on nonfatal cases of CPM. Nearly all reports on nonfata cases describe severe clinical syndromes with tetraparesis, bulbar palsy, and coma. We reviewed nine patients with CPM and compared the size of the pontine lesion on MRI and CT with the severity of clinical presentation. Clinical presentation of CPM was highly variable: The symptoms ranged from severe neurologic disorders to mild neurologic disturbances only. Two of nine patients died from CPM. The size of the pontine lesion did not correlate with the severity of the neurologic illness or the final outcome. Mild forms of CPM might be difficult to diagnose clinically. This applies even more for patients with underlying diseases such as Wernicke's encephalopathy, which in itself might cause a clinical picture similar to that of CPM. Central Pontine Myelinolysis is a major differential diagnosis in acute neurologic deterioration indicating pontine damage. Magnetic resonance imaging is the decisive diagnostic tool for CPM. (orig.)

  20. Rare association of central pontine myelinolysis with infantile tremor syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Datta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM is an acute demyelination within the central basis pontis. Though exact mechanism is not known it is seen commonly with rapid correction of hyponatremia and also with pontine ischemia or infarction, demyelinating diseases, pontine neoplasm and different metabolic diseases. We report a rare association of CPM in a patient of Infantile Tremor Syndrom (ITS. ITS is a syndrome of tremor, mental and physical retardation, pigmentary changes of hair and skin and anemia in malnourished children. Though first reported in Indian subcontinent many identical cases were reported from around the world. Our case is a 15 month old child with generalized tremor, mild hepatosplenomegaly with features of grade II malnutrition including skin and hair changes. All the signs and symtoms of tremor improved after treatment with the World Health Organization (WHO protocol for protein energy malnutrition (PEM and administration of propranolol without any side effects.

  1. Pontine tegmentum hematoma: report of a case with pure hemiplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILAGRES ANTONIO CARLOS DE PÁDUA

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the case of a 50 year-old hypertensive male patient with a pontine hematoma. The clinical presentation was characterized by pure pyramidal deficit signs (no other signs or symptoms were present. A pure hemiplegia syndrome, although common in supratentorial lesions, is considered to be a rare event in pontine vascular lesions. The pathophysiologic mechanisms of these neurological findings are unclear. The exclusive involvement of the pyramidal tract in this case is likely due to a variation in the vascular anatomy of the pons but, in some cases, a vascular malformation may be the cause.

  2. Clinical imaging of the cerebello-pontine angle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valavanis, A.; Schubiger, O.; Naidich, T.P.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes the diagnostic problems encountered in cerebello-pontine angle lesions. It includes the differential diagnostic criteria for each specific lesion. The former radiological methods of examination are briefly reviewed, but the main stress is on computer tomography. A chapter is devoted to magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. Clinical study of 48 cases of primary pontine hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Ushio; Murakami, Yoshikazu; Hatayama, Takashi; Hirohata, Taizou; Matsui, Seishi; Ohta, Masahiro

    1987-01-01

    We examined 48 cases of primary pontine hemorrhage by CT. Twenty-five cases were localized in the pons, 16 cases extended to the mid-brain, 5 cases to the thalamus and 2 cases to the cerebellum. The extension of the hemorrhage correlated to the grade and prognosis, though the over-all outcome was poor. (author)

  4. Early Colonization in the Pontine Region (Central Italy)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema, Peter; de Haas, Tymon; Termeer, Marleen; Stek, T.D.; Pelgrom, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study of changes in the urban and rural settlement of the Pontine region in southern Lazio from the Archaic (6th c. B.C.) to the Mid-Republican period (circa 200 B.C.). Its aim is to increase understanding of the colonization of this key area in the context of the political,

  5. Wernicke's encephalopathy and central pontine myelinolysis in hyperemesis gravidarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutamnartpong, Panee; Muengtaweepongsa, Sombat; Kulkantrakorn, Kongkiat

    2013-01-01

    A pregnant woman, who had been suffering from hyperemesis gravidarum, presented with alteration of consciousness, ocular nystagmus and ataxia. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the brain showed typical findings of Wernicke's encephalopathy and central pontine myelinolysis. The clinical features responded dramatically to thiamine supplementation. PMID:23546346

  6. PET for gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinoura, Nobusada; Momose, Toshimitsu

    1999-01-01

    CT and MRI imaging, which essentially provide the physical status of tissue, give important information on the histopathology and extent of gliomas. On the contrary, PET is a biochemical and physiologic technology and is beginning to give more precise information about gliomas, which allows the distinction between gliomas and normal brains, the supply of histopathologic and prognostic information, and the assessment of the response to the therapy. To date, fluorine-18fluorodeoxy-glucose (FDG) and 11C-methionine (MET) are widely used PET tracers for gliomas. Recent studies have demonstrated that the degree of the increase in the glycolytic rate in gliomas, as measured with FDG, is correlated with the histologic grade and prognosis. However, MET is superior to FDG in delineation of the boundaries of gliomas, because MET sometimes shows the lesion invaded by gliomas, which is usually wider than that detected by CT or MRI imaging. Finally, we discussed about 11C-Choline PET, in which T/N ratio of gliomas was remarkably high, and residual tumors were easily distinguished from surrounding normal tissues after surgery. In conclusion, it is important to know the advantage of individual PET tracers and combine a couple of tracers to obtain accurate information about gliomas. (author)

  7. Pontine Infarct Presenting with Atypical Dental Pain: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Rajat; Kumar, Sanjeev; Panwar, Ajay; Singh, Abhishek B

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial pain' most commonly occurs due to dental causes like caries, gingivitis or periodontitis. Other common causes of 'orofacial pain' are sinusitis, temporomandibular joint(TMJ) dysfunction, otitis externa, tension headache and migraine. In some patients, the etiology of 'orofacial pain' remains undetected despite optimal evaluation. A few patients in the practice of clinical dentistry presents with dental pain without any identifiable dental etiology. Such patients are classified under the category of 'atypical odontalgia'. 'Atypical odontalgia' is reported to be prevalent in 2.1% of the individuals. 'Atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia' can result from the neurological diseases like multiple sclerosis, trigeminal neuralgia and herpes infection. Trigeminal neuralgia has been frequently documented as a cause of 'atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia'. There are a few isolated case reports of acute pontine stroke resulting in 'atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia'. However, pontine stroke as a cause of atypical odontalgia is limited to only a few cases, hence prevalence is not established. This case is one, where a patient presented with acute onset atypical dental pain with no identifiable dental etiology, further diagnosed as an acute pontine infarct on neuroimaging. A 40 years old male presented with acute onset, diffuse teeth pain on right side. Dental examination was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) of the brain had an acute infarct in right pons near the trigeminal root entry zone(REZ). Pontine infarct presenting with dental pain as a manifestation of trigeminal neuropathy, has rarely been reported previously. This stresses on the importance of neuroradiology in evaluation of atypical cases of dental pain.

  8. What drives progressive motor deficits in patients with acute pontine infarction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue-bao Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive motor deficits are relatively common in acute pontine infarction and frequently associated with increased functional disability. However, the factors that affect the progression of clinical motor weakness are largely unknown. Previous studies have suggested that pontine infarctions are caused mainly by basilar artery stenosis and penetrating artery disease. Recently, lower pons lesions in patients with acute pontine infarctions have been reported to be related to progressive motor deficits, and ensuing that damage to the corticospinal tracts may be responsible for the worsening of neurological symptoms. Here, we review studies on motor weakness progression in pontine infarction and discuss the mechanisms that may underlie the neurologic worsening.

  9. MR imaging of pontine infarction within 2 weeks after ictus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, Akira; Hata, Hirofumi; Ohno, Masato (Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1991-08-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 10 patients with pontine infarction were reviewed. A total of 17 examinations were performed on a 1.5 Tesla high-field scanner (GE) within two weeks after ictus. The infarcted area was detected by MR as early as 20 hours after stroke in one case. However, MR images obtained in two cases three and nine hours after onset were unremarkable. It is therefore suggested that follow-up study should be performed when initial MR images within 20 hours postictus are normal. T{sub 1}-weighted images at four, nine and twelve days after ictus were interpreted as normal. In two of these three examinations, the infarcted areas were clearly demonstrated as hyperintense lesions on T{sub 2}-weighted images. In the other examination, however, an area of mildly increased signal intensity was seen on T{sub 2}-weighted images. This case suggests that the fogging effect is also observed on MR imaging and that a small pontine infarction may be overlooked during the subacute stage. Basilar artery occlusion was detected as an absence-of-flow void in three of the ten patients. In conclusion, MR imaging proved to be a relatively useful diagnostic modality for evaluating acute and subacute pontine infarction. (author).

  10. Chemotherapy in Glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Taal (Walter)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractGliomas are primary brain tumors and include astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, and mixed oligo-astrocytomas. Currently, treatment of newly diagnosed diffuse adult gliomas exists of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We were the first to show a high incidence of progressive MRI

  11. The value of 201thallium-SPECT imaging in childhood brainstem gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadvi, S S; Ebrahim, F S; Corr, P

    1998-08-01

    To compare 201thallium (T1) uptake and SPECT with MRI in children with brainstem gliomas. Ten children with brainstem gliomas were prospectively evaluated by 201Tl-SPECT and MRI. Histological verification was obtained in eight children - two died prior to surgery. Quantitative thallium uptake index (UI) was obtainable in five cases and was compared to tumour grade. In addition, two patients with known benign brainstem lesions (neurofibromatosis and tuberculoma) were similarly prospectively evaluated. All children with brainstem glioma accumulated thallium. (Mean U1 3.23, 100% sensitivity). The single patient with brainstem tuberculoma also accumulated thallium (UI 2.80, 91.7% specificity). There was no correlation between thallium uptake and tumour grade. Uptake could not be conclusively correlated with the following MR features: gadolinium enhancement, exophytic or intrinsic gliomas, necrosis and location of glioma within the brainstem. 201T1-SPECT is a promising imaging adjunct in the assessment of childhood brainstem gliomas.

  12. Central pontine myelinolysis secondary to cytomegalovirus hepatitis in a 10-month-old child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarhan, Cagla N.; Firat, Ali; Agildere, Muhtesem A. [Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. Sok. No:45, 06490 Bahcelievler, Ankara (Turkey); Otken, Arzu; Demirceken, Fulya [Sami Ulus Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Ankara (Turkey)

    2003-01-01

    We present a 10-month-old child with central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) secondary to chronic active hepatitis due to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. A total of 35 paediatric cases of pontine and/or extrapontine myelinolysis are reported and, to our knowledge, CPM secondary to CMV hepatitis in an infant has not been previously reported. The MRI findings are highlighted. (orig.)

  13. Ectopic peripontine arcuate fibres, a novel finding in pontine tegmental cap dysplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caan, Matthan W. A.; Barth, Peter G.; Niermeijer, Jikke-Mien; Majoie, Charles B.; Poll-The, Bwee Tien

    2014-01-01

    Pontine Tegmental Cap Dysplasia (PTCD) is a recently described hindbrain malformation presenting hypoplasia of the ventral pons, and a "pontine tegmental cap". Previous DTI studies identified ectopic transversely oriented nerve fibres in the cap, and absence of transverse fibre bundles in the

  14. Image findings in central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) and extrapontine myelinolysis (EPM); Bildgebung bei zentraler pontiner Myelinolyse (CPM) und extrapontiner Myelinolyse (EPM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oergel, Anja; Hauser, Till-Karsten; Naegele, T.; Horger, Marius [Univ. Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2017-02-15

    CT and NMR Image findings in central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) and extrapontine myelinolysis were compared with histological results. The clinical appearance and diagnosis using CT and NMR imaging are related to therapy decisions and outcome.

  15. Non-fatal hemorrhage from pontine vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Junkoh; Aoyama, Ikuhiro; Gi, Hidefuku; Handa, Hajime

    1982-01-01

    Pontine vascular malformations have usually been found at autopsy as an incidental finding or as a cause of a fatal hemorrhage. In recent years, however, computerized tomography (CT) has made it possible to visualize these lesions while the patinents are still alive. In this paper, we report 2 cases with non-fatal hemorrhages from pontine vascular malformation. The first case was a 31-year-old housewife with cheif complaints of a sensory disturbance of the left half of the body, double vision, nausea, and vomiting of 2 weeks' duration. CT revealed a small high-density mass, which was partially slightly contrast-enhanced, in the right lower pontine tegmentum, affecting the medial and lateral lemnisci, abducens, facial and acoustic nerves, brachium pontis, medial longitudinal fasciculus, corticospinal and corticobulbar fibers, and parepontine reticular formation. The second case was a 52-year-old female clerk with chief complaints of a sensory disturbance of the right half of the body and gait disturbance of 7 months' duration. CT revealed a small high-density mass, which was partially contrast-enhanced, in the left midpontine tegmentum, affecting the medial and lateral lemnisci, lateral spinothalamic tract, ventral ascending tract of V, and brachium pontis. Although there was no evidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage, both cases were deterirating progressively, probably due to tepeated small intraparenchymal hemorrhages. They were treated by radiation therapy in order to prevent further rebleeding. Fortunately, their symptoms gradually subsided, and both of them were doing well 2 years and one and a half years respectively after radiation therapy. The value of radiation therapy for this disease entity has not yet been established, but it may be worthwhile when the symptoms are worsening and there is no other suitable treatment. (J.P.N.)

  16. Intrinsic Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    the activity. There has been very little research and theorizing which considers the topic of intrinsic motivation , yet there is a substantial amount...reported within the framework of intrinsic motivation , yet the paper reinterprets the work within that framework. It considers several approaches of

  17. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy for hydrocephalus in brainstem glioma: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Natsuki; Ogiwara, Hideki

    2016-07-01

    A brainstem glioma is an incurable brain tumor that can be complicated by hydrocephalus. A ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is generally performed for the control of hydrocephalus. This study aimed to reveal the safety and efficacy of an endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) for hydrocephalus in brainstem gliomas. Six patients who had pontine glioma with hydrocephalus underwent an ETV between May 2010 and November 2015. In all the cases, there were one or more symptoms of hydrocephalus (headache, nausea, vomiting, or lethargy). Retrospective review of these patients was performed using the medical records and neuroimagings. The ETV was performed safely and there were no intraoperative complications in all patients. The mean follow-up period was 12.3 months. An immediate symptomatic relief of hydrocephalus and an adequate control of symptoms were achieved without a VP shunt in all patients. The ETV is considered to be an effective and safe procedure for the treatment of hydrocephalus in brainstem gliomas. Determining the ventriculostomy site according to the preoperative MRI in each case is considered to be important for the safe procedure.

  18. Molecular Neuropathology of Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Reifenberger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary human brain tumors. They comprise a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms that are histologically classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO classification of tumors of the nervous system. Over the past 20 years the cytogenetic and molecular genetic alterations associated with glioma formation and progression have been intensely studied and genetic profiles as additional aids to the definition of brain tumors have been incorporated in the WHO classification. In fact, first steps have been undertaken in supplementing classical histopathological diagnosis by the use of molecular tests, such as MGMT promoter hypermethylation in glioblastomas or detection of losses of chromosome arms 1p and 19q in oligodendroglial tumors. The tremendous progress that has been made in the use of array-based profiling techniques will likely contribute to a further molecular refinement of glioma classification and lead to the identification of glioma core pathways that can be specifically targeted by more individualized glioma therapies.

  19. Temozolomide in malignant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, W K

    2000-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme and anaplastic astrocytoma are the most common primary central nervous system malignancies and are the major cause of morbidity/ mortality despite combined modality approaches. Temozolomide (TMZ), a novel, oral, second-generation alkylating agent, has demonstrated antitumor activity against a broad range of solid tumors and highly resistant malignancies, including high-grade glioma Temozolomide does not require hepatic metabolism for activation, rapidly penetrates the cerebrospinal fluid, and consistently demonstrates reproducible linear pharmacokinetics with approximately 100% oral bioavailability. In preliminary clinical studies, TMZ has demonstrated meaningful efficacy and an acceptable safety profile in the treatment of patients with malignant glioma. These results have been recently confirmed in three open-label, multi-institutional studies that evaluated the use of TMZ in 525 malignant glioma patients. These studies represent the largest evaluation of a single agent in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas and were rigorously controlled with strict, prospectively defined criteria for assessment of tumor response, central review of histology, and validated instruments to assess health-related quality of life. Temozolomide was effective in delaying disease progression and maintaining health-related quality of life. Temozolomide represents a promising new agent in the treatment of malignant glioma.

  20. Human gliomas contain morphine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Peter; Rasmussen, Mads; Zhu, Wei

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Morphine has been found in cancer cell lines originating from human and animal cells. Thus, it became important to demonstrate whether or not actual tumours contain this opiate alkaloid. MATERIAL/METHODS: Human glioma tissues were biochemically treated to isolate and separate endogeno...... of the solutions used in the study nor was it present as a residual material in blank HPLC runs. CONCLUSIONS: Morphine is present in human gliomas, suggesting that it may exert an action that effects tumour physiology/pathology.......BACKGROUND: Morphine has been found in cancer cell lines originating from human and animal cells. Thus, it became important to demonstrate whether or not actual tumours contain this opiate alkaloid. MATERIAL/METHODS: Human glioma tissues were biochemically treated to isolate and separate endogenous...

  1. Angiogenesis in gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Czykier

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Brain gliomas are characterized by invasive growth and neovascularisation potential. Angiogenesis plays a major role in the progression of gliomas and its determination has a great prognostic value. The aim of the study was to assess the vascularisation of chosen brain gliomas and to estimate how it is correlated with tumour histological type, malignancy grade, location and size, and with age and sex of patients. Tumour vascularisation analysis was based on the determination of microvascular proliferation (MVP and microvessel density (MVD. Microvascular proliferation was measured with immunohistochemical methods using mouse monoclonal antibodies to detect cell proliferation antigens. The following antibodies were used Ki-67 and PCNA (DAKO. Identification of vessels was performed by CD31 antibody and anti-human von Willebrand factor (DAKO. The highest microvascular proliferation and microvascular density were observed in multiform glioblastomas and the lowest in oligodendrogliomas. Significant correlation was observed between the vascularisation and malignancy grade.

  2. The far lateral transpontomedullary sulcus approach to pontine cavernous malformations: technical report and surgical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abla, Adib A; Benet, Arnau; Lawton, Michael T

    2014-09-01

    Pontine cavernous malformations (CMs) located on a peripheral pontine surface or the fourth ventricular floor are resectable lesions, but those deep within the pons away from a pial surface are typically observed. However, the anterior bulge of the pons formed by the brachium pontis creates a unique entry point for access to deep pontine lesions from below, working upward through the pontomedullary sulcus. We developed a transpontomedullary sulcus (TPMS) approach to these lesions. The TPMS approach used the far lateral craniotomy and upper vagoaccessory triangle to define the surgical corridor. The entry point was above the olive, lateral to the pyramidal tracts and cranial nerve (CN) VI, above the preolivary sulcus and CN XII, and medial to CNs VII and VIII and CNs IX through XI. Four patients underwent this approach. All presented with hemorrhage and CN VI palsies. All pontine CMs were resected completely. Three patients were improved or unchanged, with good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale score ≤2) in all patients. The central pons remains difficult territory to access, and new surgical corridors are needed. The bulging underbelly of the pons allows access to pontine lesions deep to the pial surface from below. The far lateral TPMS approach is a novel and more direct alternative to the retrosigmoid transmiddle cerebellar peduncle approach. Unlike the retrosigmoid approach, the TPMS approach requires minimal parenchymal transgression and uses a brainstem entry point medial to most lower CNs. Favorable results demonstrate the feasibility of resecting pontine CMs that might have been previously deemed unresectable.

  3. Epidemiology of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birthe Krogh; Hansen, Steinbjorn; Laursen, Rene J.

    2017-01-01

    predominated in all grades. Focal deficits were the most frequent presenting symptom, but among patients with glioma, grade II epileptic seizures were the most frequent symptom. Headache was a rare mono-symptomatic onset symptom. At presentation, higher age, focal deficits and cognitive change for ... duration, and headache

  4. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Gliomas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Anni, H.; Dráber, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2013), s. 216-227 ISSN 1071-9091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12050 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : gliomas * mitochondrial dysfunction * microtubule proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.883, year: 2013

  5. Metabolic Reprogramming in Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Stoll

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Many cancers have long been thought to primarily metabolize glucose for energy production—a phenomenon known as the Warburg Effect, after the classic studies of Otto Warburg in the early twentieth century. Yet cancer cells also utilize other substrates, such as amino acids and fatty acids, to produce raw materials for cellular maintenance and energetic currency to accomplish cellular tasks. The contribution of these substrates is increasingly appreciated in the context of glioma, the most common form of malignant brain tumor. Multiple catabolic pathways are used for energy production within glioma cells, and are linked in many ways to anabolic pathways supporting cellular function. For example: glycolysis both supports energy production and provides carbon skeletons for the synthesis of nucleic acids; meanwhile fatty acids are used both as energetic substrates and as raw materials for lipid membranes. Furthermore, bio-energetic pathways are connected to pro-oncogenic signaling within glioma cells. For example: AMPK signaling links catabolism with cell cycle progression; mTOR signaling contributes to metabolic flexibility and cancer cell survival; the electron transport chain produces ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS which act as signaling molecules; Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs mediate interactions with cells and vasculature within the tumor environment. Mutations in the tumor suppressor p53, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 and 2 have been implicated in oncogenic signaling as well as establishing metabolic phenotypes in genetically-defined subsets of malignant glioma. These pathways critically contribute to tumor biology. The aim of this review is two-fold. Firstly, we present the current state of knowledge regarding the metabolic strategies employed by malignant glioma cells, including aerobic glycolysis; the pentose phosphate pathway; one-carbon metabolism; the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which is

  6. Metabolic Reprogramming in Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Marie; Stoll, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    Many cancers have long been thought to primarily metabolize glucose for energy production-a phenomenon known as the Warburg Effect, after the classic studies of Otto Warburg in the early twentieth century. Yet cancer cells also utilize other substrates, such as amino acids and fatty acids, to produce raw materials for cellular maintenance and energetic currency to accomplish cellular tasks. The contribution of these substrates is increasingly appreciated in the context of glioma, the most common form of malignant brain tumor. Multiple catabolic pathways are used for energy production within glioma cells, and are linked in many ways to anabolic pathways supporting cellular function. For example: glycolysis both supports energy production and provides carbon skeletons for the synthesis of nucleic acids; meanwhile fatty acids are used both as energetic substrates and as raw materials for lipid membranes. Furthermore, bio-energetic pathways are connected to pro-oncogenic signaling within glioma cells. For example: AMPK signaling links catabolism with cell cycle progression; mTOR signaling contributes to metabolic flexibility and cancer cell survival; the electron transport chain produces ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS) which act as signaling molecules; Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs) mediate interactions with cells and vasculature within the tumor environment. Mutations in the tumor suppressor p53, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 and 2 have been implicated in oncogenic signaling as well as establishing metabolic phenotypes in genetically-defined subsets of malignant glioma. These pathways critically contribute to tumor biology. The aim of this review is two-fold. Firstly, we present the current state of knowledge regarding the metabolic strategies employed by malignant glioma cells, including aerobic glycolysis; the pentose phosphate pathway; one-carbon metabolism; the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which is central to amino acid

  7. Microglia immunophenotyping in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annovazzi, Laura; Mellai, Marta; Bovio, Enrica; Mazzetti, Samanta; Pollo, Bianca; Schiffer, Davide

    2018-01-01

    Microglia, once assimilated to peripheral macrophages, in gliomas has long been discussed and currently it is hypothesized to play a pro-tumor role in tumor progression. Uncertain between M1 and M2 polarization, it exchanges signals with glioma cells to create an immunosuppressive microenvironment and stimulates cell proliferation and migration. Four antibodies are currently used for microglia/macrophage identification in tissues that exhibit different cell forms and cell localization. The aim of the present work was to describe the distribution of the different cell forms and to deduce their significance on the basis of what is known on their function from the literature. Normal resting microglia, reactive microglia, intermediate and bumpy forms and macrophage-like cells can be distinguished by Iba1, CD68, CD16 and CD163 and further categorized by CD11b, CD45, c-MAF and CD98. The number of microglia/macrophages strongly increased from normal cortex and white matter to infiltrating and solid tumors. The ramified microglia accumulated in infiltration areas of both high- and low-grade gliomas, when hypertrophy and hyperplasia occur. In solid tumors, intermediate and bumpy forms prevailed and there is a large increase of macrophage-like cells in glioblastoma. The total number of microglia cells did not vary among the three grades of malignancy, but macrophage-like cells definitely prevailed in high-grade gliomas and frequently expressed CD45 and c-MAF. CD98 + cells were present. Microglia favors tumor progression, but many aspects suggest that the phagocytosing function is maintained. CD98 + cells can be the product of fusion, but also of phagocytosis. Microglia correlated with poorer survival in glioblastoma, when considering CD163 + cells, whereas it did not change prognosis in isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutant low grade gliomas.

  8. Incontinência do choro e infarto protuberancial unilateral Incontinence of crying and unilateral pontine infarct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo de Oliveira-Souza

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo trata do caso de um paciente que apresentou incontinência do choro e hemiplegia direita por infarto ventroprotuberancial paramediano detectado pela RNM. O caráter circunscrito da lesão foi endossado pela normalidade dos potenciais evocados sômato-sensitivos e auditivos de curta-latência. Os episódios de choro desapareceram poucos dias depois do início do tratamento com doses baixas de imipramina. Discutimos o choro e riso patológicos como forma de incontinência da mímica resultante de desconexão límbico-motora, enfatizando a impropriedade de incluí-los na síndrome pseudobulbar, uma vez que dependem de correlatos anatômicos e funcionais distintos.A 64-year-old man presented with pathologic crying and right hemiplegia due to a unilateral pontine infarct from probable branch disease of the basilar artery. The circumscribed nature of the lesion was supported by MRI and short-latency evoked potentials. The weeping spells ceased after a few days of imipramine in low doses. Pathologic laughing and crying can be viewed as a limbic-motor disconnection syndrome, in which the faciovocal motor system is released from forebrain afferents carrying information of emotional content. The inclusion of pathologic laughing and crying in the syndrome pseudobulbar palsy is inaccurate and misleading, since each is related to distinct functional and anatomic systems intrinsic to the human brainstem.

  9. Molecular Imaging of Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Jacobs

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common types of brain tumors. Although sophisticated regimens of conventional therapies are being carried out to treat patients with gliomas, the disease invariably leads to death over months or years. Before new and potentially more effective treatment strategies, such as gene- and cell-based therapies, can be effectively implemented in the clinical application, certain prerequisites have to be established. First of all, the exact localization, extent, and metabolic activity of the glioma must be determined to identify the biologically active target tissue for a biological treatment regimen; this is usually performed by imaging the expression of up-regulated endogenous genes coding for glucose or amino acid transporters and cellular hexokinase and thymidine kinase genes, respectively. Second, neuronal function and functional changes within the surrounding brain tissue have to be assessed in order to save this tissue from therapy-induced damage. Third, pathognomonic genetic changes leading to disease have to be explored on the molecular level to serve as specific targets for patient-tailored therapies. Last, a concerted noninvasive analysis of both endogenous and exogenous gene expression in animal models as well as the clinical setting is desirable to effectively translate new treatment strategies from experimental into clinical application. All of these issues can be addressed by multimodal radionuclide and magnetic resonance imaging techniques and fall into the exciting and fast growing field of molecular and functional imaging. Noninvasive imaging of endogenous gene expression by means of positron emission tomography (PET may reveal insight into the molecular basis of pathogenesis and metabolic activity of the glioma and the extent of treatment response. When exogenous genes are introduced to serve for a therapeutic function, PET imaging may reveal the assessment of the “location,” “magnitude,” and

  10. Reduced thalamic and pontine connectivity in Kleine-Levin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eEngström

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Kleine-Levin syndrome is a rare sleep disorder, characterized by exceptionally long sleep episodes. The neuropathology of the syndrome is unknown and treatment is often inadequate. The aim of the study was to improve understanding of the underlying neuropathology, related to cerebral networks, in Kleine-Levin syndrome during sleep episodes. One patient with Kleine-Levin syndrome and congenital nystagmus, was investigated by resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging during both asymptomatic and hypersomnic periods. Fourteen healthy subjects were also investigated as control samples. Functional connectivity was assessed from seed regions of interest in the thalamus and the dorsal pons. Thalamic connectivity was normal in the asymptomatic patient whereas the connectivity between the brain stem, including dorsal pons, and the thalamus was diminished during hypersomnia. These results suggest that the patient’s nystagmus and hypersomnia might have their pathological origin in adjacent dorsal pontine regions. This finding provides additional knowledge of the cerebral networks involved in the neuropathology of this disabling disorder. Furthermore, these findings regarding a rare syndrome have broad implications and results could be of interest to researchers and clinicians in the whole field of sleep medicine.

  11. Central pontine myelinolysis secondary to hypokalaemic nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, C

    2010-01-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) has been described in alcoholic patients and in the aftermath of rapid correction of chronic hyponatraemia. We describe a case of CPM occurring secondary to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (DI), which developed as a consequence of severe hypokalaemia. A 63-year-old man with alcohol dependence was admitted to hospital with severe pulmonary sepsis and type 1 respiratory failure. On admission, he had euvolaemic hyponatraemia of 127 mmol\\/L, consistent with a syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secondary to his pneumonia. Following admission, his plasma potassium dropped from 3.2 to a nadir of 2.3 mmol\\/L. Mineralocorticoid excess, ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone production and other causes of hypokalaemia were excluded. The hypokalaemia provoked significant hypotonic polyuria and a slow rise in plasma sodium to 161 mmol\\/L over several days. Plasma glucose, calcium and creatinine were normal. The polyuria did not respond to desmopressin, and subsequent correction of his polyuria and hypernatraemia after normalization of plasma potassium confirmed the diagnosis of nephrogenic DI due to hypokalaemia. The patient remained obtunded, and the clinical suspicion of osmotic demyelination was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging. The patient remained comatose and passed away 10 days later. This is the first reported case of nephrogenic DI resulting in the development of CPM, despite a relatively slow rise in plasma sodium of less than 12 mmol\\/L\\/24 h. Coexisting alcohol abuse, hypoxaemia and hypokalaemia may have contributed significantly to the development of CPM in this patient.

  12. Basilar Artery Plaque and Pontine Infarction Location and Vascular Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Joon; Lee, Kyung Mi; Kim, Hyun Young; Kim, Young Seo; Koh, Seong-Ho; Heo, Sung Hyuk; Chang, Dae-Il

    2018-01-01

    Subclinical atherosclerotic plaques are common in patients with pontine infarctions (PIs) but without basilar artery (BA) stenosis. We hypothesized that BA plaque locations may differ by PI type and vertical location as well as vertebrobasilar artery geometry. Ninety-six patients with PI but without BA stenosis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography were enrolled. PIs were classified by type (paramedian, deep, or lateral) and vertical location (rostral, middle, or caudal). Patients underwent high-resolution MRI to evaluate BA plaque location (anterior, posterior, or lateral). The mid-BA angle on anteroposterior view and angle between the BA and dominant vertebral artery (BA-VA angle) on lateral view were measured. The PIs were paramedian (72.9%), deep (17.7%), and lateral (9.4%) type with a rostral (32.3%), middle (42.7%), and caudal (25.0%) vertical location. The BA plaque locations differed by PI type ( P =0.03) and vertical location ( P location; the greatest BA-VA angle was observed in patients with posterior plaques ( P <0.001) and caudal PIs ( P <0.001). Greatest mid-BA angles were observed with lateral BA plaques ( P =0.03) and middlelocated PIs ( P =0.03). Greater mid-BA angulation may enhance lateral plaque formation, causing lateral and middle PIs, whereas greater BA-VA angulation may enhance posterior plaque formation, causing paramedian or caudal PIs.

  13. Acute Psychosis as Main Manifestation of Central Pontine Myelinolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangala Gopal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM is an acute demyelinating neurological disorder affecting primarily the central pons and is frequently associated with rapid correction of hyponatremia. Common clinical manifestations of CPM include spastic quadriparesis, dysarthria, pseudobulbar palsy, and encephalopathy of various degrees; however, coma, “locked-in” syndrome, or death can occur in most severe cases. Rarely, CPM presents with neuropsychiatric manifestations, such as personality changes, acute psychosis, paranoia, hallucinations, or catatonia, typically associated with additional injury to the brain, described as extrapontine myelinolysis (EPM. We present a patient with primarily neuropsychiatric manifestations of CPM, in the absence of focal neurologic deficits or radiographic extrapontine involvement. A 51-year-old female without significant medical history presented with dizziness, frequent falls, diarrhea, generalized weakness, and weight loss. Physical examination showed no focal neurological deficits. Laboratory data showed severe hyponatremia, which was corrected rather rapidly. Subsequently, the patient developed symptoms of an acute psychotic illness. Initial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was unremarkable, although a repeat MRI two weeks later revealed changes compatible with CPM. This case demonstrates that acute psychosis might represent the main manifestation of CPM, especially in early stages of the disease, which should be taken into consideration when assessing patients with acute abnormalities of sodium metabolism.

  14. Patient with pontine warning syndrome and bilateral posterior internuclear ophthalmoplegia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Li

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Capsular warning syndrome was first described in 1993, featured with repetitive episodes of motor and/or sensory dysfunction without cortical signs. Recently, it has been demonstrated that clinically typical capsular warning syndrome can be associated with pontine infarct and the term “pontine warning syndrome� was coined. Case Presentation A 54-year-old woman with a history of hypertension was seen with profound left-sided hemiplegia. She had had 3 episodes of left-sided weakness before complete hemiplegia. Her speech was slurred. Left central facial palsy and hemiglossoplegia were presented. Her left plantar response was extensor and bilateral posterior internuclear ophthalmoplegia was seen on neurologic examination. Biochemical tests revealed hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia on the next day. MRI demonstrated an acute right paramedian pontine infarct. The patient was commenced on oral clopidogrel, atorvastatin and acarbose. After 23 days of hospitalization, she was discharged with severe left hemiplegia. Conclusions 1 Pontine warning syndrome may be underestimated and understudied. 2 Posterior internuclear ophthalmoplegia is a rare clinical sign in cerebrovascular diseases, while it can help to locate a brainstem lesion rather than an internal capsular one. 3 Blood pressure lowing administration may be improper for patients with pontine warning syndrome.

  15. Progressive deficit in isolated pontine infarction: the association with etiological subtype, lesion topography and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçal, Elif; Niftaliyev, Elvin; Baran, Gözde; Deniz, Çiğdem; Asil, Talip

    2017-09-01

    It is important to predict progressive deficit (PD) in isolated pontine infarction, a relatively common problem of clinical stroke practice. Traditionally, lacunar infarctions are known with their progressive course. However, few studies have analyzed the branch atheromatous disease subtype as a subtype of lacunar infarction, separately. There are also conflicting results regarding the relationship with the topography of lesion and PD. In this study, we classified etiological subtypes and lesion topography in isolated pontine infarction and aimed to investigate the association of etiological subtypes, lesion topography and clinical outcome with PD. We analyzed demographics, laboratory parameters, and risk factors of 120 patients having isolated pontine infarction and admitted within 24 h retrospectively. PD was defined as an increase in the National Institutes of Health Stroke scale ≥2 units in 5 days after onset. Patients were classified as following: large artery disease (LAA), basilar artery branch disease (BABD) and small vessel disease (SVD). Upper, middle and lower pontine infarcts were identified longitudinally. Functional outcome at 3 months was determined according to modified Rankin scores. Of 120 patients, 41.7% of the patients were classified as BABD, 30.8% as SVD and 27.5% as LAA. 23 patients (19.2%) exhibited PD. PD was significantly more frequent in patient with BABD (p 0.006). PD was numerically higher in patients with lower pontine infarction. PD was associated with BABD and poor functional outcome. It is important to discriminate the BABD neuroradiologically from other stroke subtypes to predict PD which is associated with poor functional outcome in patients with isolated pontine infarctions.

  16. Cerebellar and pontine tegmental hypermetabolism in miller-fisher syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Kyrong; Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) has been considered as a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a type of acute immune neuropathies involving peripheral nerve system. Unlike GBS, presence of cerebellar type ataxia and supranuclear ophthalmioplesia in MFS suggests additional involvement of the central nervous system. To determine involvement of the central nervous system in MFS, we investigated the cerebral metabolic abnormalities in patients with MFS using FDG PET. Nine patients who were diagnosed as MFS based on acute ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia without other identifiable causes participated in this study. In six patients, serum antibodies possibly related with symptom of MFS (anti- GQ1b or anti-GM1) were detected at the time of the study. With the interval of 25 26 days (range: 3-83 days) from the symptom on set, brain FDG PET were underwent in patients and compared with those from healthy controls. In group analysis comparing with healthy controls, FDG PET of patients revealed increased metabolism in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, and the thalamus. In contrast, the occipital cortex showed decreased metabolism. Individual analyses disclosed hypermetabolism in the cerebellar vermis or hemispheres in 5, and in the pontine tegmentum in 2 of the 9 patients. We also found that the cerebellar vermian hypermetabolism was inversely correlated with the interval between from the symptom on set to PET study. Moreover, follow-up PET of a patient demonstrated that cerebellar hypermetabolism decreased markedly with an improvement of the ophthalmoplegia and ataxia. These findings indicate an involvement of the central nervous system in MFS and suggest an antibody-associated acute inflammatory process as a mechanism of this disorder.

  17. Cerebellar and pontine tegmental hypermetabolism in miller-fisher syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yu Kyrong; Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) has been considered as a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a type of acute immune neuropathies involving peripheral nerve system. Unlike GBS, presence of cerebellar type ataxia and supranuclear ophthalmioplesia in MFS suggests additional involvement of the central nervous system. To determine involvement of the central nervous system in MFS, we investigated the cerebral metabolic abnormalities in patients with MFS using FDG PET. Nine patients who were diagnosed as MFS based on acute ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia without other identifiable causes participated in this study. In six patients, serum antibodies possibly related with symptom of MFS (anti- GQ1b or anti-GM1) were detected at the time of the study. With the interval of 25 26 days (range: 3-83 days) from the symptom on set, brain FDG PET were underwent in patients and compared with those from healthy controls. In group analysis comparing with healthy controls, FDG PET of patients revealed increased metabolism in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, and the thalamus. In contrast, the occipital cortex showed decreased metabolism. Individual analyses disclosed hypermetabolism in the cerebellar vermis or hemispheres in 5, and in the pontine tegmentum in 2 of the 9 patients. We also found that the cerebellar vermian hypermetabolism was inversely correlated with the interval between from the symptom on set to PET study. Moreover, follow-up PET of a patient demonstrated that cerebellar hypermetabolism decreased markedly with an improvement of the ophthalmoplegia and ataxia. These findings indicate an involvement of the central nervous system in MFS and suggest an antibody-associated acute inflammatory process as a mechanism of this disorder

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of sequelae of central pontine myelinolysis in chronic alcohol abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, Akira; Kudo, Sho [Department of Radiology, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, 849-8501, Saga (Japan); Yuzuriha, Takefumi; Murakami, Masaru; Endoh, Koichi; Hiejima, Shigeto; Koga, Hiroshi [Center for Emotional and Behavional Disorders, Hizen National Hospital, 160 Mitsu, Higashisefuri, Kanzaki, 842-0192, Saga (Japan)

    2003-12-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is one of the serious neurological complications of alcoholism. This study evaluated magnetic resonance images of sequelae of CPM. Approximately 600 alcoholic patients were examined by a 1.0-T magnetic resonance imaging device, and 11 patients were retrospectively found to have a central pontine lesion, a presumed sequela of CPM. The lesions had various shapes and most were cavitary. In 3 of the 11 patients bilateral symmetrical oval lesions were faintly visible in the middle cerebellar peduncles. These middle cerebellar peduncular lesions were diagnosed as having Wallerian degeneration of the pontocerebellar tract secondary to CPM. (orig.)

  19. Isolated sixth nerve palsy from hemorrhage of a pontine cavernous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallery, Robert M; Klein, Joshua P; Pless, Misha L

    2012-12-01

    A 32-year-old woman who developed binocular horizontal diplopia was found to have an isolated fascicular sixth nerve palsy secondary to hemorrhage of a cavernous malformation within the left pontine tegmentum. There was sparing of the paramedian pontine reticular formation and absence of a horizontal gaze palsy. The natural history of cavernous malformations and a mechanism by which hemorrhage of these vascular lesions may produce minimal neurologic signs, including isolated ocular motor cranial nerve palsies, is discussed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that includes susceptibility-weighted sequences leads to their accurate diagnosis.

  20. Central pontine myelinolysis in advanced HIV infection with tuberculosis and multicentric Castleman's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchanov, J; Branding, G; Stocker, H

    2013-07-01

    We present a case of central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) in a patient with advanced HIV infection and miliary tuberculosis. While hospitalized the patient developed an unusual ataxic variant of CPM with full clinical recovery. Follow-up imaging revealed resolution of pontine lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a clinical and radiological recovery from CPM in advanced HIV disease. Our report extends our knowledge of neurological presentations in patients with advanced HIV infection. It highlights the importance of considering CPM in patients with advanced HIV disease presenting with an ataxic syndrome, even in the absence of an electrolyte derangement.

  1. A neurotological study of patients with pontine hyperintense lesions on T2 weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Toru; Tominaga, Satoru; Yukimasa, Akiko; Oku, Masaya; Sakagami, Masafumi [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    Pontine hyperintense lesions seen on T2-weighted MRI were thought to be related to disequilibrium. Some of these lesions have a low signal on T1-weighted imaging, while others have an iso-signal. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between neurological findings and pontine lesions detected by MRI. The subjects were 11 patients (6 males, 5 females; age range: 30 to 83 years [mean: 64.1 years]) with pontine hyperintense lesions identified on T2-weighted MRI. We compared the clinical signs and the MRI findings. Six of the patients had low-intensity areas on T1-weighted images, and the other 5 had iso-intensity areas. Six patients complained of vertigo, and 5 complained of dizziness. Eight complained of positionaly evoked disequilibrium. Positional nystagmus was seen in 4 patients. In 9 patients, abnormalities were found on the ENG test, including the saccadic eye movement test, ETT, and OKP. Numbness on the lips occurred in 2 patients, and cerebellar signs were present in 4. None of the patients had facial paralysis. Disequilibrium originating in the central nervous system was suggested in 10 patients. Clinical examinations revealed similar findings in patients with a low signal on T1-weighted MRI and those with an iso-signal. Our results indicate that pontine lesions identified by T2-weighted MRI cause vertigo or dizziness, and, in most cases, these lesions cause abnormal neurological or neurological abnormalities. (author)

  2. A neurotological study of patients with pontine hyperintense lesions on T2 weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Toru; Tominaga, Satoru; Yukimasa, Akiko; Oku, Masaya; Sakagami, Masafumi

    2002-01-01

    Pontine hyperintense lesions seen on T2-weighted MRI were thought to be related to disequilibrium. Some of these lesions have a low signal on T1-weighted imaging, while others have an iso-signal. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between neurological findings and pontine lesions detected by MRI. The subjects were 11 patients (6 males, 5 females; age range: 30 to 83 years [mean: 64.1 years]) with pontine hyperintense lesions identified on T2-weighted MRI. We compared the clinical signs and the MRI findings. Six of the patients had low-intensity areas on T1-weighted images, and the other 5 had iso-intensity areas. Six patients complained of vertigo, and 5 complained of dizziness. Eight complained of positionaly evoked disequilibrium. Positional nystagmus was seen in 4 patients. In 9 patients, abnormalities were found on the ENG test, including the saccadic eye movement test, ETT, and OKP. Numbness on the lips occurred in 2 patients, and cerebellar signs were present in 4. None of the patients had facial paralysis. Disequilibrium originating in the central nervous system was suggested in 10 patients. Clinical examinations revealed similar findings in patients with a low signal on T1-weighted MRI and those with an iso-signal. Our results indicate that pontine lesions identified by T2-weighted MRI cause vertigo or dizziness, and, in most cases, these lesions cause abnormal neurological or neurological abnormalities. (author)

  3. The impact of infrastructural works on regional settlement systems : the Via Appia and the Pontine marshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, Tymon; Tol, Gijs; Armstrong, Kate; Attema, Peter; Martinez, José; Nogales Basarrate, Trinidad; Rodà de Llanza, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a project that investigates developments in settlement and infrastructure in the Pontine Plain (Lazio, Central Italy) through geographic models and new fieldwork. The preliminary results of this fieldwork on two sites along the Via Appia, Forum Appii and Ad Medias, show that

  4. Wernicke′s encephalopathy and central pontine myelinolysis in hyperemesis gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panee Sutamnartpong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A pregnant woman, who had been suffering from hyperemesis gravidarum, presented with alteration of consciousness, ocular nystagmus and ataxia. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the brain showed typical findings of Wernicke′s encephalopathy and central pontine myelinolysis. The clinical features responded dramatically to thiamine supplementation.

  5. Clinical and Radiological Features of Wallerian Degeneration of the Middle Cerebellar Peduncles Secondary to Pontine Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yong Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Despite the rarity of bilateral and symmetrical lesions of MCPs, secondary WD should be highly suspected if these lesions occur within 6 months after pontine infarction, particularly paramedian pons. Conventional MRI appears to be a relatively sensitive method for detecting WD of MCPs, which might affect the short-term prognosis.

  6. Pontine encephalocele and abnormalities of the posterior fossa following transclival endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutourousiou, Maria; Filho, Francisco Vaz Guimaraes; Costacou, Tina; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Wang, Eric W; Snyderman, Carl H; Rothfus, William E; Gardner, Paul A

    2014-08-01

    Transclival endoscopic endonasal surgery (EES) has recently been used for the treatment of posterior fossa tumors. The optimal method of reconstruction of large clival defects following EES has not been established. A morphometric analysis of the posterior fossa was performed in patients who underwent transclival EES to compare those with observed postoperative anatomical changes (study group) to 50 normal individuals (anatomical control group) and 41 matched transclival cases with preserved posterior fossa anatomy (case-control group) using the same parameters. Given the absence of clival bone following transclival EES, the authors used the line between the anterior commissure and the basion as an equivalent to the clival plane to evaluate the location of the pons. Four parameters were studied and compared in the two populations: the pontine location/displacement, the maximum anteroposterior (AP) diameter of the pons, the maximum AP diameter of the fourth ventricle, and the cervicomedullary angle (CMA). All measurements were performed on midsagittal 3-month postoperative MR images in the study group. Among 103 posterior fossa tumors treated with transclival EES, 14 cases (13.6%) with postoperative posterior fossa anatomy changes were identified. The most significant change was anterior displacement of the pons (transclival pontine encephalocele) compared with the normal location in the anatomical control group (p 50% of the clivus) and dura. Nine (64.3%) of the 14 patients were overweight (body mass index [BMI] > 25 kg/m(2)). An association between BMI and the degree of pontine encephalocele was observed, but did not reach statistical significance. The use of a fat graft as part of the reconstruction technique following transclival EES with dural opening was the single significant factor that prevented pontine displacement (p = 0.02), associated with 91% lower odds of pontine encephalocele (OR = 0.09, 95% CI 0.01-0.77). The effect of fat graft reconstruction was

  7. Use of statins and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Andersen, L; Hallas, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory studies and a single case-control study have suggested a protective effect of statins on the risk of glioma. We wished to investigate the influence of statin use on the risk of glioma in a population-based setting.......Laboratory studies and a single case-control study have suggested a protective effect of statins on the risk of glioma. We wished to investigate the influence of statin use on the risk of glioma in a population-based setting....

  8. Glutamate/glutamine metabolism coupling between astrocytes and glioma cells: neuroprotection and inhibition of glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Pei-Sen; Kang, De-Zhi; Lin, Ru-Ying; Ye, Bing; Wang, Wei; Ye, Zu-Cheng

    2014-07-18

    Glioma glutamate release has been shown to promote the growth of glioma cells and induce neuronal injuries from epilepsy to neuronal death. However, potential counteractions from normal astrocytes against glioma glutamate release have not been fully evaluated. In this study, we investigated the glutamate/glutamine cycling between glioma cells and astrocytes and their impact on neuronal function. Co-cultures of glioma cells with astrocytes (CGA) in direct contact were established under different mix ratio of astrocyte/glioma. Culture medium conditioned in these CGAs were sampled for HPLC measurement, for neuronal ratiometric calcium imaging, and for neuronal survival assay. We found: (1) High levels of glutaminase expression in glioma cells, but not in astrocytes, glutaminase enables glioma cells to release large amount of glutamate in the presence of glutamine. (2) Glutamate levels in CGAs were directly determined by the astrocyte/glioma ratios, indicating a balance between glioma glutamate release and astrocyte glutamate uptake. (3) Culture media from CGAs of higher glioma/astrocyte ratios induced stronger neuronal Ca(2+) response and more severe neuronal death. (4) Co-culturing with astrocytes significantly reduced the growth rate of glioma cells. These results indicate that normal astrocytes in the brain play pivotal roles in glioma growth inhibition and in reducing neuronal injuries from glioma glutamate release. However, as tumor growth, the protective role of astrocytes gradually succumb to glioma cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitkus, Matthew S.; Diplas, Bill H.; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg132 of IDH1 and Arg172 of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy. PMID:26188014

  10. Paediatric and adult malignant glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Chris; Perryman, Lara; Hargrave, Darren

    2012-01-01

    Gliomas in children differ from their adult counterparts by their distribution of histological grade, site of presentation and rate of malignant transformation. Although rare in the paediatric population, patients with high-grade gliomas have, for the most part, a comparably dismal clinical outcome...... to older patients with morphologically similar lesions. Molecular profiling data have begun to reveal the major genetic alterations underpinning these malignant tumours in children. Indeed, the accumulation of large datasets on adult high-grade glioma has revealed key biological differences between...... the adult and paediatric disease. Furthermore, subclassifications within the childhood age group can be made depending on age at diagnosis and tumour site. However, challenges remain on how to reconcile clinical data from adult patients to tailor novel treatment strategies specifically for paediatric...

  11. Visual hallucinations and pontine demyelination in a child: possible REM dissociation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Maria Gabriella; Batocchi, Anna Paola; Dittoni, Serena; Losurdo, Anna; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Stefanini, Maria Chiara; Vollono, Catello; Della Marca, Giacomo; Mariotti, Paolo

    2008-12-15

    An 11 year-old-boy acutely developed complex visual and acoustic hallucinations. Hallucinations, consisting of visions of a threatening, evil character of the Harry Potter saga, persisted for 3 days. Neurological and psychiatric examinations were normal. Ictal EEG was negative. MRI documented 3 small areas of hyperintense signal in the brainstem, along the paramedian and lateral portions of pontine tegmentum, one of which showed post-contrast enhancement. These lesions were likely of inflammatory origin, and treatment with immunoglobulins was started. Polysomnography was normal, multiple sleep latency test showed a mean sleep latency of 8 minutes, with one sleep-onset REM period. The pontine tegmentum is responsible for REM sleep regulation, and contains definite "REM-on" and "REM-off" regions. The anatomical distribution of the lesions permits us to hypothesize that hallucinations in this boy were consequent to a transient impairment of REM sleep inhibitory mechanisms, with the appearance of dream-like hallucinations during wake.

  12. A case of pontine tegmental cap dysplasia with comorbidity of oculoauriculovertebral spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Pin Fee; Haraguchi, Kohei; Torio, Michiko; Kirino, Makiko; Ogata, Reina; Matsukura, Masaru; Sakai, Yasunari; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Kira, Ryutaro

    2015-01-01

    Pontine tegmental cap dysplasia (PTCD) is a newly described brainstem malformation with distinct neuroimaging findings, characterized by a flattened ventral pons, cerebellar vermal hypoplasia and vaulted pontine tegmentum that forms a "caplike" or "beaklike" bulge projecting into the fourth ventricle. We describe a 3-month-old infant male who presented with typical neuroradiological findings as well as clinical features of PTCD. Notably, he manifested multiple anomalies with left ocular and facial hypoplasia, bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and rib and vertebral anomalies. Oculoauriculovertebral spectrum (OAVS) was thus considered to be an accompanying phenotype of this patient. The unique comorbidity seen in this patient suggests that PTCD and OAVS may partly share a common mechanism in their pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Progressive dysarthria and bilateral sensory disturbance in a case of bilateral ventrolateral pontine infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Soichiro; Okazaki, Shuhei; Tonomura, Shuichi; Miyashita, Kotaro; Ihara, Masafumi

    2017-12-27

    A rare case of bilateral ventrolateral pontine infarction in a 70-year-old man who developed progressive dysarthria and bilateral sensory disturbance is reported with literature review. He had been diagnosed with hypertension, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance 10 years earlier. Ten days before admission, he was aware of the difficulty in walking and speaking, which gradually worsened. On admission he showed bilateral thermal hypoalgesia of face and lower extremities, dysarthria, dysphagia, and ataxic gait. High resolution three-dimensional MRI revealed bilateral ventrolateral pontine infarction with a large atherosclerotic plaque in the ventral side of the basilar artery, which led to a diagnosis of atherothrombotic brain infarction. The atherosclerotic plaque in the basilar artery was thought to be responsible for simultaneous occlusion of the bilateral short circumflex arteries of the pons.

  14. Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jun [School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Cai, Yu, E-mail: aihaozuqiu22@163.com [School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Liu, Pin [Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Zhao, Weiguo [Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2016-08-05

    Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase 1 (Nek1) regulates cell cycle progression to mitosis. Its expression and potential functions in human gliomas have not been studied. Here, our immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay and Western blot assay results showed that Nek1 expression was significantly upregulated in fresh and paraffin-embedded human glioma tissues. Its level in normal brain tissues was low. Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas was correlated with the proliferation marker (Ki-67), tumor grade, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) and more importantly, patients’ poor survival. Further studies showed that Nek1 expression level was also increased in multiple human glioma cell lines (U251-MG, U87-MG, U118, H4 and U373). Significantly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nek1 inhibited glioma cell (U87-MG/U251-MG) growth. Nek1 siRNA also sensitized U87-MG/U251-MG cells to temozolomide (TMZ), causing a profound apoptosis induction and growth inhibition. The current study indicates Nek1 might be a novel and valuable oncotarget of glioma, it is important for glioma cell growth and TMZ-resistance. - Highlights: • Nek1 is upregulated in multiple human glioma tissues and cell lines. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with glioma grades and patients’ KPS score. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with patients’ poor overall survival. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 inhibits glioma cell growth. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 sensitizes human glioma cells to temozolomide.

  15. The Role of Pontin and Reptin in Cellular Physiology and Cancer Etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Qian Mao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pontin (RUVBL1, TIP49, TIP49a, Rvb1 and Reptin (RUVBL2, TIP48, TIP49b, Rvb2 are highly conserved ATPases of the AAA+ (ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities superfamily and are involved in various cellular processes that are important for oncogenesis. First identified as being upregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma and colorectal cancer, their overexpression has since been shown in multiple cancer types such as breast, lung, gastric, esophageal, pancreatic, kidney, bladder as well as lymphatic, and leukemic cancers. However, their exact functions are still quite unknown as they interact with many molecular complexes with vastly different downstream effectors. Within the nucleus, Pontin and Reptin participate in the TIP60 and INO80 complexes important for chromatin remodeling. Although not transcription factors themselves, Pontin and Reptin modulate the transcriptional activities of bona fide proto-oncogenes such as MYC and β-catenin. They associate with proteins involved in DNA damage repair such as PIKK complexes as well as with the core complex of Fanconi anemia pathway. They have also been shown to be important for cell cycle progression, being involved in assembly of telomerase, mitotic spindle, RNA polymerase II, and snoRNPs. When the two ATPases localize to the cytoplasm, they were reported to promote cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Due to their various roles in carcinogenesis, it is not surprising that Pontin and Reptin are proving to be important biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of various cancers. They are also current targets for the development of new therapeutic anticancer drugs.

  16. Hox paralog group 2 genes control the migration of mouse pontine neurons through slit-robo signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J Geisen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The pontine neurons (PN represent a major source of mossy fiber projections to the cerebellum. During mouse hindbrain development, PN migrate tangentially and sequentially along both the anteroposterior (AP and dorsoventral (DV axes. Unlike DV migration, which is controlled by the Netrin-1/Dcc attractive pathway, little is known about the molecular mechanisms guiding PN migration along the AP axis. Here, we show that Hoxa2 and Hoxb2 are required both intrinsically and extrinsically to maintain normal AP migration of subsets of PN, by preventing their premature ventral attraction towards the midline. Moreover, the migration defects observed in Hoxa2 and Hoxb2 mutant mice were phenocopied in compound Robo1;Robo2, Slit1;Slit2, and Robo2;Slit2 knockout animals, indicating that these guidance molecules act downstream of Hox genes to control PN migration. Indeed, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we further demonstrated that Robo2 is a direct target of Hoxa2 in vivo and that maintenance of high Robo and Slit expression levels was impaired in Hoxa2 mutant mice. Lastly, the analysis of Phox2b-deficient mice indicated that the facial motor nucleus is a major Slit signaling source required to prevent premature ventral migration of PN. These findings provide novel insights into the molecular control of neuronal migration from transcription factor to regulation of guidance receptor and ligand expression. Specifically, they address the question of how exposure to multiple guidance cues along the AP and DV axes is regulated at the transcriptional level and in turn translated into stereotyped migratory responses during tangential migration of neurons in the developing mammalian brain.

  17. Evaluating the evidence surrounding pontine cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin P Grace

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement (REM sleep - characterized by vivid dreaming, motor paralysis, and heightened neural activity - is one of the fundamental states of the mammalian central nervous system. Initial theories of rapid eye movement (REM sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the ‘pontine REM sleep generator’ by cholinergic inputs. Here we review and evaluate the evidence surrounding cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation. We submit that: (i the capacity of pontine cholinergic neurotransmission to generate REM sleep has been firmly established by gain-of-function experiments, (ii the function of endogenous cholinergic input to REM sleep generating sites cannot be determined by gain-of-function experiments; rather, loss-of-function studies are required, (iii loss-of-function studies show that endogenous cholinergic input to the PFT is not required for REM sleep generation, and (iv Cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generating sites serve an accessory role in REM sleep generation: reinforcing non-REM-to-REM sleep transitions making them quicker and less likely to fail.

  18. One-and-a-half syndrome in pontine infarcts: MRI correlates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seze, J. de; Lucas, C.; Vermersch, P.; Leys, D.; Leclerc, X.; Sahli, A.

    1999-01-01

    The one-and-a-half syndrome is characterised by a lateral gaze palsy in one direction and internuclear ophthalmoplegia in the other. It is due to a unilateral lesion of the dorsal pontine tegmentum, involving the ipsilateral paramedian pontine reticular formation, internuclear fibres of the ipsilateral medical longitudinal fasciculus and, usually, the abducens nucleus. The main causes of this rare syndrome are stroke and multiple sclerosis. Few cases have been reported since the introduction of MRI. Our aim was to examine clinicoradiological correlations in six patients with a one-and-a-half syndrome due to a stroke. Ophthalmological symptoms were diplopia, oscillopsia or blurred vision. Four patients had an associated facial nerve palsy, three a hemiparesis and one a unilateral hemihypoaesthesia. MRI revealed an infarct in the pons in all patients. The cause of the infarct was a basilar artery dissection in one patient, bilateral vertebral artery dissection in a second and unknown in the other four. All patients recovered within 2 days to 8 weeks. This study showed a good correlation between the site of the lesion (superior, inferior or extensive pontine ischaemia) and clinical deficits. (orig.)

  19. Pontine atrophy precedes cerebellar degeneration in spinocerebellar ataxia 7: MRI-based volumetric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, O; Lee, P; Kim, S; Kim, H; Huh, K

    2004-01-01

    Background and objective: Spinocerebellar ataxia 7 (SCA7) is characterised by cerebellar ataxia and visual loss. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings characteristic of patients with SCA7. Methods: Twenty patients with SCA (eight SCA3, three SCA6, and nine SCA7) and 20 control subjects underwent an MRI-based volumetric analysis. Results: The pontine volume in patients with SCA7 was decreased by a greater amount than in patients with other types of SCA (p0.05). Pontine atrophy was a consistent finding in all patients with SCA7 regardless of the degree of cerebellar atrophy or the severity or duration of illness. In contrast, cerebellar atrophy was not found in those with a short duration of illness or mild ataxia, but became prominent as the severity and duration of illness progressed. Conclusions: Our study suggests that neurodegeneration is ongoing during the life of individuals with SCA7, and that the primary pathology in these individuals involves the brainstem rather than the cerebellum. In addition, pontine atrophy is a prominent, consistent finding in SCA7, and may help in establishing the clinical diagnosis of SCA7. PMID:15377695

  20. Case of primary pontine hemorrhage of the young adult followed by CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashiyama, Shoji; Higuchi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Akira

    1985-01-01

    A case of primary pontine hemorrhage of the young was reported. He was 22 years of age, who did not have the history of hypertension. He suddenly noticed disturbance of skilled act of his right hand and speech disturbance. He was admitted to our clinic two days after the onset. Neurological examination revealed right facial palsy, disturbance of delicate movement of his right hand and slight dysarthria. Lumbar puncture, after six days from the onset, yielded watery clear cerebrospinal fluid containing 6/3 cells/mm/sup 3/, 27mg/dl of protein and 65.1 mg/dl of sugar. An opening pressure was 75 mmH/sub 2/O. The vertebral angiography revealed no evidence of mass lesion and vascular anomalies. CT scan demonstrated a pontine hematoma, the size of this hematoma sequentially enlarged in follow-up CT scan. His clinical symptoms were gradually aggravated, i.e. cerebellar sign, urinary disturbance and involuntary movement. Conservative therapy was performed and his symptoms gradually improved. The size of hematoma was reduced in follow-up CT scan. The genesis, diagnosis and treatment of primary pontine hemorrhage of the young were discussed. (author).

  1. Tricyclic Neovibsanin Scaffold Inhibits Glioma by Targeting Glioma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of tricyclic neovibsanin scaffold (TCNS) on cell viability, colony formation capacity and induction of apoptosis in glioma cells. Methods: 3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2, 5-diphe¬nyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to analyze the effect of TCNS on cell proliferation. Light microscopic ...

  2. Varicella zoster virus infection of malignant glioma cell cultures: a new candidate for oncolytic virotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leske, Henning; Haase, Rudolf; Restle, Florian; Schichor, Christian; Albrecht, Valerie; Vizoso Pinto, Maria G; Tonn, Joerg C; Baiker, Armin; Thon, Niklas

    2012-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is a highly aggressive tumor with a median survival of 14 months despite all standard therapies. Focusing on alternative treatment strategies, we evaluated the oncolytic potential of varicella zoster virus (VZV) in malignant glioma cell cultures. Replication of wildtype and mutant VZV was comparatively analyzed in glioma cell lines (U87, U251 and U373) and in primary malignant glioma cells (n=10) in vitro by infectious foci assay, immunofluorescence microscopy and western blot analysis. Additionally, the tumor-targeting potential of VZV-infected human mesenchymal stem cells was evaluated. VZV replicated efficiently in all the glioma cells studied here followed by rapid oncolysis in vitro. The attenuated vaccine VZV mutant rOKA/ORF63rev[T171] exhibited most efficient replication. Human mesenchymal stem cells were found suitable for targeting VZV to sites of tumor growth. VZV exhibits an intrinsic oncolytic potential in malignant glioma cell cultures and might be a novel candidate for virotherapy in glioblastoma multiforme.

  3. Malignant glioma after bombshell injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troost, D; Tulleken, C A

    1984-01-01

    A case of post-traumatic glioma is presented. The patient, wounded in the head in World War II by a bombshell, developed symptoms of an intracranial tumor in 1982. Histopathologically the tumor was an astrocytoma grade III. The tumor was in direct continuity with an old abscess membrane.

  4. Contemporary management of low--grade glioma: a paradigm shift in neuro-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayhurst, Caroline

    2017-06-01

    Supratentorial diffuse intrinsic low-grade gliomas represent a distinct but heterogenous group of tumours, with the propensity to grow and to differentiate into malignant tumours. They have been historically viewed in the 'benign' spectrum of intrinsic brain tumours, so a watch-and-wait policy was often adopted. With recent advances in our understanding of the natural history of these tumours, combined with advances in surgical technique, an aggressive approach is now recommended. Increasing quality evidence of the impact of tumour resection and multicentre trials of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy have led to a new algorithm for low-grade glioma management. This review aims to outline the emerging evidence that has shifted neuro-oncology practice. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Improving vaccine efficacy against malignant glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Ladomersky, Erik; Genet, Matthew; Zhai, Lijie; Gritsina, Galina; Lauing, Kristen L.; Lulla, Rishi R.; Fangusaro, Jason; Lenzen, Alicia; Kumthekar, Priya; Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Binder, David C.; James, C. David; Wainwright, Derek A.

    2016-01-01

    The effective treatment of adult and pediatric malignant glioma is a significant clinical challenge. In adults, glioblastoma (GBM) accounts for the majority of malignant glioma diagnoses with a median survival of 14.6��mo. In children, malignant glioma accounts for 20% of primary CNS tumors with a median survival of less than 1��y. Here, we discuss vaccine treatment for children diagnosed with malignant glioma, through targeting EphA2, IL-13R��2 and/or histone H3 K27M, while in adults, treatm...

  6. TLR9 expression in glioma tissues correlated to glioma progression and the prognosis of GBM patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chao; Cao, Shouqiang; Yan, Ying; Ying, Qiao; Jiang, Tao; Xu, Ke; Wu, Anhua

    2010-01-01

    Our study aims to evaluate the expression of TLR9 in glioma tissues, examine the association between TLR9 expression, clinicopathological variables, and glioma patient outcome, we further characterized the direct effects of TLR9 agonist CpG ODN upon the proliferation and invasion of glioma cells in vitro. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence were used to determine the expression of TLR9 in glioma cell lines and clinical glioma samples. Tissue microarry and immunohistochemistry were applied to evaluated TLR9 expression in 292 newly diagnosed glioma and 13 non-neoplastic brain tissues. We further investigated the effect of CpG ODN on the proliferation and invasion of glioma cells in vitro with MTT assays and matrigel transwell assay respectively. RT-PCR showed that TLR9 expressed in all the glioma samples and glioma cell lines we examined. The tissue array analysis indicated that TLR9 expression is correlated with malignancy of glioma (p < 0.01). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that TLR9 expression is an independent prognostic factor for PFS of GBM patients(P = 0.026). TLR9 agonist CpG ODN has no significant effect on glioma proliferation, but matrigel transwell analysis showed that TLR9 agonist CpG ODN can significantly enhance glioma invasion in vitro. Our data indicated that TLR9 expression increases according to the histopathological grade of glioma, and the TLR9 expression level is related to the PFS of GBM patients. In addition, our findings warrant caution in the directly injection of TLR9 agonist CpG ODN into glioma tissues for the glioma immunotherapy

  7. LncRNA TUG1 acts as a tumor suppressor in human glioma by promoting cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Meng; An, Gang; Ma, Qingfang

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have revealed multiple functional roles of long non-coding RNA taurine upregulated gene 1 in different types of malignant tumors, except for human glioma. Here, it was designed to study the potential function of taurine upregulated gene 1 in glioma pathogenesis focusing on its regulation on cell apoptosis. The expression of taurine upregulated gene 1 in glioma tissues was detected by quantitative RT-PCR and compared with that in adjacent normal tissues. Further correlation analysis was conducted to show the relationship between taurine upregulated gene 1 expression and different clinicopathologic parameters. Functional studies were performed to investigate the influence of taurine upregulated gene 1 on apoptosis and cell proliferation by using Annexin V/PI staining and cell counting kit-8 assays, respectively. And, caspase activation and Bcl-2 expression were analyzed to explore taurine upregulated gene 1-induced mechanism. taurine upregulated gene 1 expression was significantly inhibited in glioma and showed significant correlation with WHO Grade, tumor size and overall survival. Further experiments revealed that the dysregulation of taurine upregulated gene 1 affected the apoptosis and cell proliferation of glioma cells. Moreover, taurine upregulated gene 1 could induce the activation of caspase-3 and-9, with inhibited expression of Bcl-2, implying the mechanism in taurine upregulated gene 1-induced apoptosis. taurine upregulated gene 1 promoted cell apoptosis of glioma cells by activating caspase-3 and -9-mediated intrinsic pathways and inhibiting Bcl-2-mediated anti-apoptotic pathways, acting as a tumor suppressor in human glioma. This study provided new insights for the function of taurine upregulated gene 1 in cancer biology, and suggested a potent application of taurine upregulated gene 1 overexpression for glioma therapy. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  8. Restless legs syndrome secondary to pontine infarction: Clinical analysis of five cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou-Zhen Tuo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pontine infarction is a common type of stroke in the cerebral deep structures, resulting from occlusion of small penetrating arteries, may manifest as hemi-paralysis, hemi-sensory deficit, ataxia, vertigo, and bulbar dysfunction, but patients presenting with restless legs syndrome (RLS are extremely rare. Herein, we reported five cases with RLS as a major manifestation of pontine infarction. Methods: Five cases of pontine infarction related RLS were collected from July 2013 to February 2016. The diagnosis of RLS was made according to criteria established by the International RLS Study Group (IRLSSG in 2003. Neurological functions were assessed according to the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS and modified Rankin Scale (mRS. Severity of RLS was based on the International RLS Rating Scale (IRLS-RS. Sleep quality was assessed by Epworth Rating Scale (ERS, and individual emotional and psychological states were assessed by Hamilton Depression Scale (HDS and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS. Results: The laboratory data at the onset including hemoglobin, serum concentration of homocysteine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, creatinine, electrolytes, and thyroid hormones were normal. The electroencephalogram (EEG, lower-extremity somatosensory evoked potential (SEP, and nerve conduction velocity (NCV in four limbs were normal. The average period of follow-up was 34.60 ± 12.76 months. The MRI examination showed acute or subacute pontine infarction lesions, 3 cases in the rostral inner side, 1 case in the rostral lateral and inner side, and 1 case in rostral lateral side. The neurological deficits included weakness in 4 cases, contralateral sensory deficit in 1 case, and ataxia in 2 cases. All 5 patients presented with symptom of RLS at or soon after the onset of infarction and 4 patients experienced uncomfortable sensations in the paralyzed limbs contralateral to the ischemic lesion. Their neurological deficits improved significantly 2

  9. Pontine stroke presenting as isolated facial nerve palsy mimicking Bell's palsy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saluja Paramveer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated facial nerve palsy usually manifests as Bell's palsy. Lacunar infarct involving the lower pons is a rare cause of solitary infranuclear facial paralysis. The present unusual case is one in which the patient appeared to have Bell's palsy but turned out to have a pontine infarct. Case presentation A 47-year-old Asian Indian man with a medical history of hypertension presented to our institution with nausea, vomiting, generalized weakness, facial droop, and slurred speech of 14 hours' duration. His physical examination revealed that he was conscious, lethargic, and had mildly slurred speech. His blood pressure was 216/142 mmHg. His neurologic examination showed that he had loss of left-sided forehead creases, inability to close his left eye, left facial muscle weakness, rightward deviation of the angle of the mouth on smiling, and loss of the left nasolabial fold. Afferent corneal reflexes were present bilaterally. MRI of the head was initially read as negative for acute stroke. Bell's palsy appeared less likely because of the acuity of his presentation, encephalopathy-like imaging, and hypertension. The MRI was re-evaluated with a neurologist's assistance, which revealed a tiny 4 mm infarct involving the left dorsal aspect of the pons. The final diagnosis was isolated facial nerve palsy due to lacunar infarct of dorsal pons and hypertensive encephalopathy. Conclusion The facial nerve has a predominant motor component which supplies all muscles concerned with unilateral facial expression. Anatomic knowledge is crucial for clinical localization. Bell's palsy accounts for around 72% of facial palsies. Other causes such as tumors and pontine infarcts can also present as facial palsy. Isolated dorsal infarct presenting as isolated facial palsy is very rare. Our case emphasizes that isolated facial palsy should not always be attributed to Bell's palsy. It can be a presentation of a rare dorsal pontine infarct as observed

  10. Decreased orexin (hypocretin) immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus and pontine nuclei in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Nicholas J; Waters, Karen A; Rodriguez, Michael L; Machaalani, Rita

    2015-08-01

    Infants at risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) have been shown to have dysfunctional sleep and poor arousal thresholds. In animal studies, both these attributes have been linked to impaired signalling of the neuropeptide orexin. This study examined the immunoreactivity of orexin (OxA and OxB) in the tuberal hypothalamus (n = 27) and the pons (n = 15) of infants (1-10 months) who died from SIDS compared to age-matched non-SIDS infants. The percentage of orexin immunoreactive neurons and the total number of neurons were quantified in the dorsomedial, perifornical and lateral hypothalamus at three levels of the tuberal hypothalamus. In the pons, the area of orexin immunoreactive fibres were quantified in the locus coeruleus (LC), dorsal raphe (DR), laterodorsal tegmental (LDT), medial parabrachial, dorsal tegmental (DTg) and pontine nuclei (Pn) using automated methods. OxA and OxB were co-expressed in all hypothalamic and pontine nuclei examined. In SIDS infants, orexin immunoreactivity was decreased by up to 21 % within each of the three levels of the hypothalamus compared to non-SIDS (p ≤ 0.050). In the pons, a 40-50 % decrease in OxA occurred in the all pontine nuclei, while a similar decrease in OxB immunoreactivity was observed in the LC, LDT, DTg and Pn (p ≤ 0.025). No correlations were found between the decreased orexin immunoreactivity and previously identified risk factors for SIDS, including prone sleeping position and cigarette smoke exposure. This finding of reduced orexin immunoreactivity in SIDS infants may be associated with sleep dysfunction and impaired arousal.

  11. Tumor Metabolism of Malignant Gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, Peng; Williams, Terence M.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Guo, Deliang, E-mail: deliang.guo@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center & Arthur G James Cancer Hospital, Columbus, OH 43012 (United States)

    2013-11-08

    Constitutively activated oncogenic signaling via genetic mutations such as in the EGFR/PI3K/Akt and Ras/RAF/MEK pathways has been recognized as a major driver for tumorigenesis in most cancers. Recent insights into tumor metabolism have further revealed that oncogenic signaling pathways directly promote metabolic reprogramming to upregulate biosynthesis of lipids, carbohydrates, protein, DNA and RNA, leading to enhanced growth of human tumors. Therefore, targeting cell metabolism has become a novel direction for drug development in oncology. In malignant gliomas, metabolism pathways of glucose, glutamine and lipid are significantly reprogrammed. Moreover, molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes are just starting to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent studies revealing critical gene alterations that lead to metabolic changes in malignant gliomas, and also discuss promising therapeutic strategies via targeting the key players in metabolic regulation.

  12. Central pontine myelinolysis presenting as isolated sixth nerve palsy in third trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosavi, Tushar Divakar; See, Siew Ju

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old primigravida presented with isolated left sixth nerve palsy at 38 weeks gestation. Her MRI showed a lesion consistent with central pontine myelinolysis (CPM). Extensive investigations did not reveal any secondary cause for the CPM. She recovered spontaneously in 2 weeks with complete resolution of her MRI changes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CPM occurring in third trimester in the absence of identifiable secondary causes and of CPM presenting as an isolated sixth nerve palsy. We discuss the reported causes of CPM in pregnancy, possible pathophysiologic mechanisms involved and the anatomic basis of the unique clinical presentation of sixth nerve palsy in our case.

  13. Primary pontine gliobastoma multiforme: A case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Ji Yeon; Baek, Hye Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University College of Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Jin Il; Cho, Soo Buem; Choi, Bo Hwa; Bae, Kyung Soo; Jeon, Kyung Nyeo [Dept. of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University Changwon Hospital, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dae Seob; Shin, Hwa Seon [Dept. of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) most commonly occurs in the pons while it is rare in the brainstem. However, diagnosis of brainstem GBM can be difficult due to its rarity and nonspecific clinical manifestations. Herein, we presented a case of a 47-year-old female patient confirmed as primary pontine GBM by histopathological examination. This case highlights that GBM should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with a space-occupying lesion in the brainstem as well as the importance of a meticulous radiological review with clinical suspicion.

  14. Mechanisms Regulating Glioma Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paw, Ivy; Carpenter, Richard C.; Watabe, Kounosuke; Debinski, Waldemar; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive, deadliest, and most common brain malignancy in adults. Despite the advances made in surgical techniques, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the median survival for GBM patients has remained at a mere 14 months. GBM poses several unique challenges to currently available treatments for the disease. For example, GBM cells have the propensity to aggressively infiltrate/invade into the normal brain tissues and along the vascular tracks, which prevents complete resection of all malignant cells and limits the effect of localized radiotherapy while sparing normal tissue. Although anti-angiogenic treatment exerts anti-edematic effect in GBM, unfortunately, tumors progress with acquired increased invasiveness. Therefore, it is an important task to gain a deeper understanding of the intrinsic and post-treatment invasive phenotypes of GBM in hopes that the gained knowledge would lead to novel GBM treatments that are more effective and less toxic. This review will give an overview of some of the signaling pathways that have been shown to positively and negatively regulate GBM invasion, including, the PI3K/Akt, Wnt, sonic hedgehog-GLI1, and microRNAs. The review will also discuss several approaches to cancer therapies potentially altering GBM invasiveness. PMID:25796440

  15. The Glioma International Case-Control Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, E. Susan; Armstrong, Georgina N; Zhou, Renke

    2016-01-01

    describe the Glioma International Case-Control (GICC) Study (recruitment, 2010-2013), a study being conducted by the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium that integrates data from multiple data collection sites, uses a common protocol and questionnaire, and includes biospecimen......Decades of research have established only a few etiological factors for glioma, which is a rare and highly fatal brain cancer. Common methodological challenges among glioma studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity of tumor subtypes, and retrospective exposure assessment. Here, we briefly...... collection. To our knowledge, the GICC Study is the largest glioma study to date that includes collection of blood samples, which will allow for genetic analysis and interrogation of gene-environment interactions....

  16. Prenatal Imaging Findings of Pontine Tegmental Cap Dysplasia: Report of Four Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondiaux, Eléonore; Valence, Stéphanie; Friszer, Stéphanie; Rodriguez, Diana; Burglen, Lydie; Ducou le Pointe, Hubert; Blouet, Marie; Garel, Catherine

    2017-07-05

    To describe the prenatal imaging findings in pontine tegmental cap dysplasia (PTCD), a rare congenital malformation of the hindbrain so far reported postnatally only and characterized by a typical appearance of the pons with malformations of the vermis and the cerebellar peduncles. This retrospective multicenter study retrieved 4 cases of PTCD over a 10-year period. Prenatal ultrasonography and fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were reviewed and compared to postnatal or postmortem data. In all cases, the parents were referred between 22 and 27 weeks of gestation for characterization of a small cerebellar diameter prenatal diagnosis of PTCD was suspected in 1/4 cases, while in 3/4 cases the suggested prenatal diagnosis was pontocerebellar hypoplasia. In all cases, PTCD was characterized by ventral pontine hypoplasia with absence of bulging of the pons and by the tegmental cap protruding into the fourth ventricle on prenatal MRI. Parents opted for termination of pregnancy in 1 case. In the 3 other cases, the children presented with global developmental delay and multiple cranial nerve impairment. PTCD is a differential diagnosis of pontocerebellar hypoplasia and should be discussed on prenatal MRI in the presence of the tegmental cap protruding into the fourth ventricle. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. A Rare Pontine Neuro-ophthalmic Syndrome: Eight-and-a-Half Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Eruyar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One-and-a half syndrome is seen in paramedian pontine lesions, and may also co-exist with cranial nerve paralysis. This clinical situation is called eight-and-a-half syndrome when facial nerve paralysis also accompanies this manifestation. A man aged 38 years was admitted with symptoms of sudden-onset binocular diplopia and dizziness. The patient had no known co-morbidities. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed a small-sized infarct in the left paramedian pontine tegmentum posterior area. In his neuro-ophthalmologic examination, total paresis of left eye horizontal movements, mild lateral deviation, and monocular nystagmus during abduction of the right eye were observed. The patient also had peripheral facial paralysis on the left side; therefore, no signs of motor deficit of his extremities were examined. Eight-and-a-half syndrome is a rare disorder that is seen in localized-small pons lesions, mostly accompanied by infarcts. This clinical manifestation is called eight-and-a-half syndrome and arises within lesions in both the parapontine reticular formation and the medial longitudinal fasciculus in the inferior pons tegmentum where horizontal eye movements are controlled, and facial axons adjacent to the nucleus of the sixth nerve. We wanted to present this case to emphasize this rare situation

  18. Pontine tegmental cap dysplasia: developmental and cognitive outcome in three adolescent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tortorella Gaetano

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pontine Tegmental Cap Dysplasia (PTCD is a recently described, rare disorder characterized by a peculiar cerebellar and brainstem malformation. Nineteen patients have been reported to date, of which only one in the adolescent age, and data on the clinical, cognitive and behavioural outcome of this syndrome are scarce. Here we describe three adolescent patients with PTCD. All presented bilateral deafness and multiple cranial neuropathies, variably associated with skeletal, cardiac and gastro-intestinal malformations. Feeding and swallowing difficulties, that are often causative of recurrent aspiration pneumonias and death in the first years of life, completely resolved with age in all three patients. Neuropsychological assessment showed borderline to moderate cognitive impairment, with delay in adaptive functioning, visual-spatial and language deficits. Two of three patients also showed mild behavioural problems, although their overall socialization abilities were well preserved. Cochlear implantation in two patients significantly improved their relational and learning abilities. Fibre tractography confirmed the abnormal bundle of transversely oriented fibres forming the typical pontine "tegmental cap" and absence of decussation of the superior cerebellar peduncles, supporting the hypothesis that PTCD results from abnormal axonal guidance and/or migration. These data indicate that PTCD may have a favourable long-term outcome, with borderline cognitive deficit or even normal cognition and partially preserved speech.

  19. PP2A Inhibitor PME-1 Drives Kinase Inhibitor Resistance in Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amanpreet; Denisova, Oxana V; Qiao, Xi; Jumppanen, Mikael; Peuhu, Emilia; Ahmed, Shafiq U; Raheem, Olayinka; Haapasalo, Hannu; Eriksson, John; Chalmers, Anthony J; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme lacks effective therapy options. Although deregulated kinase pathways are drivers of malignant progression in glioblastoma multiforme, glioma cells exhibit intrinsic resistance toward many kinase inhibitors, and the molecular basis of this resistance remains poorly understood. Here, we show that overexpression of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibitor protein PME-1 drives resistance of glioma cells to various multikinase inhibitors. The PME-1-elicited resistance was dependent on specific PP2A complexes and was mediated by a decrease in cytoplasmic HDAC4 activity. Importantly, both PME-1 and HDAC4 associated with human glioma progression, supporting clinical relevance of the identified mechanism. Synthetic lethality induced by both PME-1 and HDAC4 inhibition was dependent on the coexpression of proapoptotic protein BAD. Thus, PME-1-mediated PP2A inhibition is a novel mechanistic explanation for multikinase inhibitor resistance in glioma cells. Clinically, these results may inform patient stratification strategies for future clinical trials with selected kinase inhibitors in glioblastoma multiforme. Cancer Res; 76(23); 7001-11. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Functional topography of respiratory, cardiovascular and pontine-wave responses to glutamate microstimulation of the pedunculopontine tegmentum of the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Topchiy, Irina; Waxman, Jonathan; Radulovacki, Miodrag; Carley, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Functionally distinct areas were mapped within the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) of 42 ketamine/xylazine anesthetized rats using local stimulation by glutamate microinjection (10 mM, 5–12 nl). Functional responses were classified as: 1) apnea; 2) tachypnea; 3) hypertension (HTN); 4) sinus tachycardia; 5) genioglossus electromyogram activation or 6) pontine-waves (p-waves) activation.

  1. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide excites medial pontine reticular formation neurons in the brainstem rapid eye movement sleep-induction zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne; Reiner, P B

    1999-01-01

    Although it has long been known that microinjection of the cholinergic agonist carbachol into the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF) induces a state that resembles rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, it is likely that other transmitters contribute to mPRF regulation of behavioral states. A key...

  2. A report on radiation-induced gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvati, M.; Artico, M.; Caruso, R.; Rocchi, G.; Orlando, E.R.; Nucci, F. (Univ. of Rome La Sapienza (Italy))

    1991-01-15

    Radiation-induced gliomas are uncommon, with only 73 cases on record to date. The disease that most frequently occasioned radiation therapy has been acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three more cases are added here, two after irradiation for ALL and one after irradiation for tinea capitis. In a review of the relevant literature, the authors stress the possibility that the ALL-glioma and the retinoblastoma-glioma links point to syndromes in their own right that may occur without radiation therapy.56 references.

  3. Combined chemotherapy of malignant gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jellinger, K.; Volc, D.; Grisold, W.; Flament, H.; Vollmer, R.; Weiss, R. (Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien-Lainz (Austria). Ludwig Boltzmann Inst. fuer Neurobiologie)

    1983-01-01

    A controlled study of 226 age-matched patients with histologically proven grade 3 and 4 supratentorial gliomas with maximum feasible tumour resection, postoperative Karnofsky performance over 50 and minimum survival of 8 weeks compares the results of supportive care (45 cases), high-dose irradiation of 40 to 66 Gy (59 cases), COMP protocol (CCNU, procarbazine, vincristine, methotrexate, prednisone in 15 day cycles-42 cases) and simultaneous irradiation and COMP chemotherapy (80 cases including 30 survivors). Median recurrent-free intervals in the treatment groups (7 to 11.7 months) were significantly longer than after supportive care (4.4 months). Median survival with supportive care (6.7 months) was significantly shorter than after radiation or COMP treatment (11.7 and 12.3 months) and 14.9 to over 19.9 months with combined treatment, where the two-year survival rates were 33 and 67% (for survivors), and the 3-year survival rates 13 to 30%. Toxic side effects of multimodality treatment were more frequent than after chemotherapy. In addition to space-occupying intracranial cysts often simulating tumour recurrence (12%) and rare radiation necrosis, about 15% of long-term survivors developed progressive intellectual dysfunction with brain atrophy, in the absence of tumour regrowth. Despite some promising results of multimodality approaches towards the management of malignant supratentorial gliomas, the overall results are unsatisfactory and need further optimization.

  4. Central pontine myelinolysis presenting as isolated sixth nerve palsy in third trimester of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Divakar Gosavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old primigravida presented with isolated left sixth nerve palsy at 38 weeks gestation. Her MRI showed a lesion consistent with central pontine myelinolysis (CPM. Extensive investigations did not reveal any secondary cause for the CPM. She recovered spontaneously in 2 weeks with complete resolution of her MRI changes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CPM occurring in third trimester in the absence of identifiable secondary causes and of CPM presenting as an isolated sixth nerve palsy. We discuss the reported causes of CPM in pregnancy, possible pathophysiologic mechanisms involved and the anatomic basis of the unique clinical presentation of sixth nerve palsy in our case.

  5. Central Pontine Myelinolysis and Localized Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake Seen on 18F-FDG PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Frederik; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer Carsten; Rørdam, Lene

    2017-01-01

    Case report describing the finding of central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) using combined fluorine-18 ( 18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). The patient was a known alcoholic who, during admission was under treatment for hyponatremia, showed...... a significant decline in both motor and cognitive function. Combined 18F-FDG PET/CT showed localized FDG uptake in the pons, consistent with the finding of CPM observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CPM is a demyelinating lesion of the pons, resulting in several neurological symptoms. The exact cause...... of CPM is not clear, but a strong relations between loss of myelin and osmotic stress exists, especially during rapid correction of hyponatremia. The osmotic stress is thought to induce disruption of the blood-brain barrier, allowing access for inflammatory mediators in extravascular brain tissue, which...

  6. Clinical Evolution of Central Pontine Myelinolysis in a Patient with Alcohol Withdrawal: A Blurred Clinical Horizon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul S. Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM, a potentially fatal and debilitating neurological condition, was first described in 1959 in a study on alcoholic and malnourished patients. It is a condition most frequently related to rapid correction of hyponatremia. Chronic alcoholism associated CPM tends to be benign with a favorable prognosis compared to CPM secondary to rapid correction of hyponatremia. We describe a normonatremic, alcoholic patient who presented with CPM after a rapid rise in his sodium levels. Our case illustrates the fact that CPM can manifest even in patients who are normonatremic at baseline. Rapid rises in sodium levels should be promptly reversed before clinical symptoms manifest in patient with risk factors for CPM irrespective of their baseline sodium levels. Furthermore, clinical evolution of CPM can be difficult to discern from the natural course of alcohol withdrawal delirium, requiring astuteness and maintenance of a high degree of clinical suspicion on the part of the physician.

  7. PROJECTIONS FROM THE ROSTRAL PARVOCELLULAR RETICULAR-FORMATION TO PONTINE AND MEDULLARY NUCLEI IN THE RAT - INVOLVEMENT IN AUTONOMIC REGULATION AND OROFACIAL MOTOR CONTROL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TERHORST, GJ; COPRAY, JCVM; LIEM, RSB; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    1991-01-01

    The efferent connections of the rostral parvocellular reticular formation to pontine and medullary nuclei in the rat were studied with anterogradely transported Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin. Dense innervations from the rostral parvocellular reticular formation were found in the mesencephalic

  8. A clinico-radiological study on 254 cases of pontine high signals on magnetic resonance imaging in relation to brain stem semiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masaki; Takahashi, Akira (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Arahata, Yutaka; Motegi, Yoshimasa; Furuse, Masahiro

    1993-11-01

    A total of 254 patients who were proved to have pontine high intensity areas on T[sub 2]-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were analyzed in relation to brain stem semiology. A comparative study on MRI and MR angiography was made between 254 patients with pontine high signals and 276 control cases showing no abnormality either on T[sub 1] or T[sub 2]-weighted images. Of the 254 patients, 62 had transient subjective complaints such as vertigo-dizziness. Supratentorial high signals, basilar artery tortuousness and vertebral artery asymmetry on MR angiography were seen more frequently in patients with pontine high signals than in the controls. In conclusion, pontine high signals may result from diffuse arteriosclerosis and MR angiography is considered to be a useful screening method. (author).

  9. A case of mistaken identity: alcohol withdrawal, schizophrenia, or central pontine myelinolysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider P

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Paul Schneider1, Vicki A Nejtek2,3, Cheryl Hurd2,31Green Oaks Behavioral Health Care Services, Dallas, 2University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, 3John Peter Smith Health Network, Fort Worth, Texas, USAAbstract: Demyelination is a hallmark of central pontine myelinolysis (CPM. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of this condition include weakness, quadriplegia, pseudobulbar palsy, mood changes, psychosis, and cognitive disturbances. These psychiatric symptoms are also associated with schizophrenia and alcohol withdrawal. Thus, it is clinically relevant to differentiate between CPM, schizophrenia, and alcohol withdrawal as the treatment and prognostic outcomes for each diagnosis are distinct. We present a series of events that led to a misdiagnosis of a patient admitted to the medical emergency center presenting with confusion, psychomotor agitation, and delirium who was first diagnosed with schizophrenia and alcohol withdrawal by emergency medical physicians and later discovered by the psychiatric consult team to have CPM. With a thorough psychiatric evaluation, a review of the laboratory results first showing mild hyponatremia (127 mmol/L, subsequent hypernatremia (154 mmol/L, and magnetic resonance brain imaging, psychiatrists concluded that CPM was the primary diagnosis underlying the observed neuropsychopathology. This patient has mild impairments in mood, cognition, and motor skills that remain 12 months after her emergency-center admission. This case report reminds emergency clinicians that abnormal sodium metabolism can have long-term and devastating psychopathological and neurological consequences. Differentiating between CPM, schizophrenia, and alcohol withdrawal using neuroimaging techniques and preventing the risks for CPM using slow sodium correction are paramount.Keywords: MRI, alcohol, schizophrenia, central pontine myelinolysis, hyponatremia

  10. Central Pontine Myelinolysis After Living-Donor Liver Transplant: A Report of 2 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ya-Lan; Hsieh, Chia-En; Lin, Kuo-Hua; Chou, Chen-Te; Lin, Ping-Yi; Wang, Su-Han; Chen, Yao-Li

    2017-11-15

    Here, we present 2 patients who developed central pontine myelinolysis after living-donor liver transplant. Both patients had abnormal sodium level before living-donor liver transplant. Patient 1 presented with severe hyponatremia on admission. After administration of 3% saline, her sodium level during the first 24 hours was kept at 100 mEq/L and then increased to 116 mEq/L during the next 24 hours. The level increased 5.8 mEq/L during the 4- to 5-hour transplant procedure. Patient 2 was admitted to the hospital with an unprovoked seizure. The serum sodium concentration was 111 mEq/L, which was treated with 3% saline infusion. Serum sodium concentration escalated to 118 mEq/L over an 8-hour period. Intraoperatively, both patients received large amounts of replacement fluids (0.9% normal saline and albumin), blood transfusion, and sodium bicarbonate during the anhepatic phase, all of which carry high sodium load. Variations in sodium levels changed rapidly in patient 1 during transplant surgery. After they underwent liver transplant, patient 1 had clear mental status and patient 2 demonstrated worsened mental status. On approximately day 14 and day 4 after liver transplant, magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse abnormalities of the pons, resulting in diagnosis of central pontine myelinolysis. Although both patients survived, 1 remains in a vegetative state and the other continues to present with mild balance and swallowing abnormalities. To reduce the chance of inadvertent overcorrection in patients with hyponatremia, it is therefore important that sodium concentrations should be monitored frequently and fluids and electrolytes titrated carefully.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in olivary pseudohypertrophy with pontine and midbrain hemorrhages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo; Nakajima, Masashi; Kijima, Masanori (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-02-01

    We investigated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes suggestive of olivary pseudohypertrophy in 8 patients with brainstem hemorrhage; 7 had pontine hemorrhage and 1 had midbrain hemorrhage. In 7 of 8 patients, MRI revealed olivary pseudohypertrophy, which consisted of prolongation of the T{sub 1}- and T{sub 2}-relaxation times in the inferior olives. Olivary pseudohypertrophy was demonstrated 5 to 24 months after damage to the central tegmental tracts due to hemorrhage, and unilaterally in 6 patients with pontine hemorrhage and bilaterally in the remaining one patient with midbrain hemorrhage. One patient who had no MRI evidence of olivary pseudohypertrophy was in the acute stage one month after onset. Of 6 patients with unilateral olivary pseudohypertrophy demonstrated by MRI, olivary pseudohypertrophy occurred on the same side as the damaged central tegmental tract in 2 patients and on the more affected side of the damaged tracts in 4 patients. Such anatomical associations were similar to those previously, pathologically reported. Clinically, 5 of 7 patients with images suggestive of olivary pseudohypertrophy had palatal or ocular myoclonus bilaterally, but these 5 patients olivary pseudohypertrophy was unilateral. In 2 of these 5 patients, palatal or ocular myoclonus showed a predominance on one side. The predominant side of palatal or ocular myoclonus was on the same side as the affected olive in one patient, though the side was on the opposite to the affected olive in the other. In the former, clinicoanatomical associations presented the problems. It is suggested that in patients with brainstem hemorrhage, MRI can depict olivary pseudohypertrophy with great sensitivity, particularly if there is a well-demarcated lesion in the central tegmental tract and when the lesion is not in the acute stage. MRI is useful in studying the clinicoanatomical correlation between olivary pseudohypertrophy and palatal or ocular myoclonus. (author).

  12. Adult high-grade malignant gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fable Zustovich

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS malignant gliomas are relatively rare diseases. Prognosis is poor but has improved over recent years due to the improvement in the multi-disciplinary treatment: surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy...

  13. Improving vaccine efficacy against malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladomersky, Erik; Genet, Matthew; Zhai, Lijie; Gritsina, Galina; Lauing, Kristen L; Lulla, Rishi R; Fangusaro, Jason; Lenzen, Alicia; Kumthekar, Priya; Raizer, Jeffrey J; Binder, David C; James, C David; Wainwright, Derek A

    2016-08-01

    The effective treatment of adult and pediatric malignant glioma is a significant clinical challenge. In adults, glioblastoma (GBM) accounts for the majority of malignant glioma diagnoses with a median survival of 14.6 mo. In children, malignant glioma accounts for 20% of primary CNS tumors with a median survival of less than 1 y. Here, we discuss vaccine treatment for children diagnosed with malignant glioma, through targeting EphA2, IL-13Rα2 and/or histone H3 K27M, while in adults, treatments with RINTEGA, Prophage Series G-100 and dendritic cells are explored. We conclude by proposing new strategies that are built on current vaccine technologies and improved upon with novel combinatorial approaches.

  14. Dialysis delivery of an adenosine A2A agonist into the pontine reticular formation of C57BL/6J mouse increases pontine acetylcholine release and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Christal G; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Lydic, Ralph

    2006-03-01

    In vivo microdialysis in C57BL/6J (B6) mouse was used to test the hypothesis that activating adenosine A(2A) receptors in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) increases acetylcholine (ACh) release and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Eight concentrations of the adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine hydrochloride (CGS 21680; CGS) were delivered to the PRF and ACh in the PRF was quantified. ACh release was significantly increased by dialysis with 3 mum CGS and significantly decreased by dialysis with 10 and 100 microm CGS. Co-administration of the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol (ZM 241385; 30 nM) blocked the CGS-induced increase in ACh release. In a second series of experiments, CGS (3 microm) was delivered by dialysis to the PRF for 2 h while recording sleep and wakefulness. CGS significantly decreased time in wakefulness (-51% in h 1; -54% in h 2), increased time in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep (90% in h 1; 151% in h 2), and increased both time in REM sleep (331% in h 2) and the number of REM sleep episodes (488% in h 2). The enhancement of REM sleep is consistent with the interpretation that adenosine A(2A) receptors in the PRF of the B6 mouse contribute to REM sleep regulation, in part, by increasing ACh release in the PRF. A(2A) receptor activation may promote NREM sleep via GABAergic inhibition of arousal promoting neurons in the PRF.

  15. Long-term culture of organotypic multicellular glioma spheroids: a good culture model for studying gliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, P.; Troost, D.; Das, P. K.; Leenstra, S.; Bosch, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Gliomas, as well as other solid tumours, contain tumour stroma composed of connective tissue, macrophages, capillaries and other non-cellular constituents. Therefore, a homogeneous culture of tumour cells alone, as is often used as a culture model for gliomas, is not ideal to study all aspects of

  16. Aberrant Signaling Pathways in Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Kita, Daisuke; Watanabe, Takuya; Hayashi, Yutaka; Teng, Lei; Pyko, Ilya V.; Hamada, Jun-Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a WHO grade IV malignant glioma, is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor in adults; few treatments are available. Median survival rates range from 12–15 months. The biological characteristics of this tumor are exemplified by prominent proliferation, active invasiveness, and rich angiogenesis. This is mainly due to highly deregulated signaling pathways in the tumor. Studies of these signaling pathways have greatly increased our understanding of the biology and clinical behavior of GBM. An integrated view of signal transduction will provide a more useful approach in designing novel therapies for this devastating disease. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of GBM signaling pathways with a focus on potential molecular targets for anti-signaling molecular therapies

  17. Molecular Diagnostics of Gliomas Using Next Generation Sequencing of a Glioma-Tailored Gene Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Angela; Kaulich, Kerstin; Stepanow, Stefanie; Wolter, Marietta; Köhrer, Karl; Felsberg, Jörg; Malzkorn, Bastian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2017-03-01

    Current classification of gliomas is based on histological criteria according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. Over the past years, characteristic genetic profiles have been identified in various glioma types. These can refine tumor diagnostics and provide important prognostic and predictive information. We report on the establishment and validation of gene panel next generation sequencing (NGS) for the molecular diagnostics of gliomas. We designed a glioma-tailored gene panel covering 660 amplicons derived from 20 genes frequently aberrant in different glioma types. Sensitivity and specificity of glioma gene panel NGS for detection of DNA sequence variants and copy number changes were validated by single gene analyses. NGS-based mutation detection was optimized for application on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens including small stereotactic biopsy samples. NGS data obtained in a retrospective analysis of 121 gliomas allowed for their molecular classification into distinct biological groups, including (i) isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (IDH) 1 or 2 mutant astrocytic gliomas with frequent α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) and tumor protein p53 (TP53) gene mutations, (ii) IDH mutant oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q codeletion, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation and frequent Drosophila homolog of capicua (CIC) gene mutation, as well as (iii) IDH wildtype glioblastomas with frequent TERT promoter mutation, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation and/or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification. Oligoastrocytic gliomas were genetically assigned to either of these groups. Our findings implicate gene panel NGS as a promising diagnostic technique that may facilitate integrated histological and molecular glioma classification. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  18. Difusion weighted imaging characteristics differentiate acute symptomatic cerebral microbleeds from silent microbleeds: An acute pontine microhemorrhage case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arda Yılmaz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs on susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI have generally been considered to be silent. Recent reports indicated that, albeit it is a rarity, CMBs can cause acute focal neurological symptoms. Herein we present a patient who was admitted with cheiro-oral syndrome due to an acute izolated pontine microbleed. Combination of diffusion weighted imaging and SWI can be useful in the differentiation of acute symptomatic cerebral microbleeds from chronic ones.

  19. Characteristics of gliomas in patients with somatic IDH mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Charlotte; Thomas, Laure; Psimaras, Dimitri; Bielle, Franck; Vauléon, Elodie; Loiseau, Hugues; Cartalat-Carel, Stéphanie; Meyronet, David; Dehais, Caroline; Honnorat, Jérôme; Sanson, Marc; Ducray, François

    2016-03-31

    IDH mutations are found in the majority of adult, diffuse, low-grade and anaplastic gliomas and are also frequently found in cartilaginous tumors. Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome are two enchondromatosis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple benign cartilaginous tumors due to post-zygotic acquisition of IDH mutations. In addition to skeletal tumors, enchondromatosis patients sometimes develop gliomas. The aim of the present study was to determine whether gliomas in enchondromatosis patients might also result from somatic IDH mosaicism and whether their characteristics are similar to those of sporadic IDH-mutated gliomas. For this purpose, we analyzed the characteristics of 6 newly diagnosed and 32 previously reported cases of enchondromatosis patients who developed gliomas and compared them to those of a consecutive series of 159 patients with sporadic IDH-mutated gliomas. As was the case with sporadic IDH mutated gliomas, enchondromatosis gliomas were frequently located in the frontal lobe (54 %) and consisted of diffuse low-grade (73 %) or anaplastic gliomas (21 %). However, they were diagnosed at an earlier age (25.6 years versus 44 years, p IDH mutated gliomas (21 % versus 1 %, p IDH mutations and loss of ATRX expression. In two patients, the same IDH mutation was demonstrated in the glioma and in a cartilaginous tumor. In contrast to sporadic IDH mutated gliomas, no enchondromatosis glioma harbored a 1p/19q co-deletion (0/6 versus 59/123, p = 0.03). The characteristics of gliomas in patients with enchondromatosis suggest that these tumors, as cartilaginous tumors, result from somatic IDH mosaicism and that the timing of IDH mutation acquisition might affect the location and molecular characteristics of gliomas. Early acquisition of IDH mutations could shift gliomagenesis towards the brainstem thereby mimicking the regional preference of histone mutated gliomas.

  20. The progress of radiosensitive genes of human brain glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xi; Liu Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Human gliomas are one of the most aggressive tumors in brain which grow infiltrativly. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment. But as the tumor could not be entirely cut off, it is easy to relapse. Radiotherapy plays an important role for patients with gliomas after surgery. The efficacy of radiotherapy is associated with radio sensitivity of human gliomas. This paper makes a summary of current situation and progress for radiosensitive genes of human brain gliomas. (authors)

  1. Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... functioning well. There are three types of normal glial cells that can produce tumors. An astrocyte will produce ... which it originates. Description Three types of normal glial cells can produce tumors—astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and ependymal cells. ...

  2. Central pontine myelinolysis in a chronic alcoholic: A clinical and brain magnetic resonance imaging follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dujmović Irena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM is a noninflammatory, demyelinating lesion usually localised in the basis pontis. Chronic alcoholism is frequently associated with this condition which may have a variable clinical outcome. Until now, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI follow-up in alcoholic CPM cases after alcohol withdrawal has been rarely described. Case report. We reported a 30- year-old male with a 12-year history of alcohol abuse, who presented with inability to stand and walk, nausea, vomiting and somnolence. Neurological examination revealed: impared fixation on lateral gaze, dysarthria, mild spastic quadriparesis, truncal and extremity ataxia, sock-like hypesthesia and moderate decrease in vibration sense in legs. Brain MRI showed a trident-shaped non-enhancing pontine lesion highly suggestive of CPM. After an eight-month alcoholfree follow-up period, the patient’s clinical status significantly improved, while the extent of MRI pontine lesion was merely slightly reduced. Conclusion. The presented case demonstrates that CPM in chronic alcoholics may have a benign clinical course after alcohol withdrawal, which is not necessarily associated with the reduction of lesions on brain MRI. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175031

  3. New similarity search based glioma grading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haegler, Katrin; Brueckmann, Hartmut; Linn, Jennifer [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Wiesmann, Martin; Freiherr, Jessica [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Boehm, Christian [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Computer Science, Munich (Germany); Schnell, Oliver; Tonn, Joerg-Christian [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    MR-based differentiation between low- and high-grade gliomas is predominately based on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images (CE-T1w). However, functional MR sequences as perfusion- and diffusion-weighted sequences can provide additional information on tumor grade. Here, we tested the potential of a recently developed similarity search based method that integrates information of CE-T1w and perfusion maps for non-invasive MR-based glioma grading. We prospectively included 37 untreated glioma patients (23 grade I/II, 14 grade III gliomas), in whom 3T MRI with FLAIR, pre- and post-contrast T1-weighted, and perfusion sequences was performed. Cerebral blood volume, cerebral blood flow, and mean transit time maps as well as CE-T1w images were used as input for the similarity search. Data sets were preprocessed and converted to four-dimensional Gaussian Mixture Models that considered correlations between the different MR sequences. For each patient, a so-called tumor feature vector (= probability-based classifier) was defined and used for grading. Biopsy was used as gold standard, and similarity based grading was compared to grading solely based on CE-T1w. Accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of pure CE-T1w based glioma grading were 64.9%, 78.6%, and 56.5%, respectively. Similarity search based tumor grading allowed differentiation between low-grade (I or II) and high-grade (III) gliomas with an accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 83.8%, 78.6%, and 87.0%. Our findings indicate that integration of perfusion parameters and CE-T1w information in a semi-automatic similarity search based analysis improves the potential of MR-based glioma grading compared to CE-T1w data alone. (orig.)

  4. New similarity search based glioma grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegler, Katrin; Wiesmann, Martin; Böhm, Christian; Freiherr, Jessica; Schnell, Oliver; Brückmann, Hartmut; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Linn, Jennifer

    2012-08-01

    MR-based differentiation between low- and high-grade gliomas is predominately based on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images (CE-T1w). However, functional MR sequences as perfusion- and diffusion-weighted sequences can provide additional information on tumor grade. Here, we tested the potential of a recently developed similarity search based method that integrates information of CE-T1w and perfusion maps for non-invasive MR-based glioma grading. We prospectively included 37 untreated glioma patients (23 grade I/II, 14 grade III gliomas), in whom 3T MRI with FLAIR, pre- and post-contrast T1-weighted, and perfusion sequences was performed. Cerebral blood volume, cerebral blood flow, and mean transit time maps as well as CE-T1w images were used as input for the similarity search. Data sets were preprocessed and converted to four-dimensional Gaussian Mixture Models that considered correlations between the different MR sequences. For each patient, a so-called tumor feature vector (= probability-based classifier) was defined and used for grading. Biopsy was used as gold standard, and similarity based grading was compared to grading solely based on CE-T1w. Accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of pure CE-T1w based glioma grading were 64.9%, 78.6%, and 56.5%, respectively. Similarity search based tumor grading allowed differentiation between low-grade (I or II) and high-grade (III) gliomas with an accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 83.8%, 78.6%, and 87.0%. Our findings indicate that integration of perfusion parameters and CE-T1w information in a semi-automatic similarity search based analysis improves the potential of MR-based glioma grading compared to CE-T1w data alone.

  5. Intrinsic contractures of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksima, Nader; Besh, Basil R

    2012-02-01

    Contractures of the intrinsic muscles of the fingers disrupt the delicate and complex balance of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles, which allows the hand to be so versatile and functional. The loss of muscle function primarily affects the interphalangeal joints but also may affect etacarpophalangeal joints. The resulting clinical picture is often termed, intrinsic contracture or intrinsic-plus hand. Disruption of the balance between intrinsic and extrinsic muscles has many causes and may be secondary to changes within the intrinsic musculature or the tendon unit. This article reviews diagnosis, etiology, and treatment algorithms in the management of intrinsic contractures of the fingers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Olaparib in Treating Patients With Advanced Glioma, Cholangiocarcinoma, or Solid Tumors With IDH1 or IDH2 Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-05

    Advanced Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Glioblastoma; Grade II Glioma; IDH1 Gene Mutation; IDH2 Gene Mutation; Recurrent Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Glioma; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; WHO Grade III Glioma

  7. Predicting Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Rob; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Intrinsic motivation can be predicted from participants' perceptions of the social environment and the task environment (Ryan & Deci, 2000)in terms of control, relatedness and competence. To determine the degree of independence of these factors 251 students in higher vocational education (physiotherapy and hotel management) indicated the…

  8. Intravenous or local injections of flavoxate in the rostral pontine reticular formation inhibit urinary frequency induced by activation of medial frontal lobe neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Kimio; Nishijima, Saori; Kadekawa, Katsumi; Ashitomi, Katsuhiro; Ueda, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Hideyuki

    2014-10-01

    The rostral pontine reticular formation has a strong inhibitory effect on micturition by facilitating lumbosacral glycinergic neurons. We assessed the influence of the rostral pontine reticular formation on the micturition reflex after noradrenaline injection in the medial frontal lobe. We also examined the relation between the medial frontal lobe and the rostral pontine reticular formation. Continuous cystometry was performed in 28 female rats. After the interval between bladder contractions was shortened by noradrenaline injection in the medial frontal lobe we injected glutamate or flavoxate hydrochloride in the rostral pontine reticular formation or intravenously injected flavoxate or propiverine. The change in bladder activity was examined. Noradrenaline injection in the medial frontal lobe shortened the interval between bladder contractions. In contrast to the bladder contraction interval before and after noradrenaline injection in the medial frontal lobe, the interval was prolonged after noradrenaline injection when glutamate or flavoxate was injected in the rostral pontine reticular formation, or flavoxate was injected intravenously. Noradrenaline injection in the medial frontal lobe plus intravenous propiverine injection also prolonged the interval compared to that after noradrenaline injection alone. However, the interval after noradrenaline injection in the medial frontal lobe plus intravenous injection of propiverine was shorter than that before noradrenaline injection only. Medial frontal lobe neurons excited by noradrenaline may facilitate the micturition reflex via activation of inhibitory interneurons, which inhibit descending rostral pontine reticular formation neurons that innervate the lumbosacral glycinergic inhibitory neurons. Therefore, the mechanism of micturition reflex facilitation by the activation of medial frontal lobe neurons involves the rostral pontine reticular formation. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education

  9. Molecular Therapeutic Targets for Glioma Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Takano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the prominent angiogenesis that occurs in malignant glioma, antiangiogenic therapy has been attempted. There have been several molecular targets that are specific to malignant gliomas, as well as more broadly in systemic cancers. In this review, I will focus on some topics related to molecular therapeutic targets for glioma angiogenesis. First, important angiogenic factors that could be considered molecular targets are VEGF, VEGF-induced proteins on endothelial cells, tissue factor, osteopontin, v3 integrin, and thymidine phosphorylase as well as endogenous inhibitors, soluble Flt1, and thrombospondin 1. Second, hypoxic areas are also decreased by metronomic CPT11 treatment as well as temozolomide. Third, glioma-derived endothelial cells that are genetically and functionally distinct from normal endothelial cells should be targeted, for example, with SDF-1 and CXCR7 chemokine. Fourth, endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs likely contribute towards glioma angiogenesis in the brain and could be useful as a drug delivery tool. Finally, blockade of delta-like 4 (Dll4 results in a nonfunctioning vasculature and could be another important target distinct from VEGF.

  10. Convection enhanced delivery of carmustine to the murine brainstem: a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sewing, A. Charlotte P.; Caretti, Viola; Lagerweij, Tonny; Schellen, Pepijn; Jansen, Marc H. A.; van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Idema, Sander; Molthoff, Carla F. M.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Noske, David P.; Hulleman, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Systemic delivery of therapeutic agents remains ineffective against diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), possibly due to an intact blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and to dose-limiting toxicity of systemic chemotherapeutic agents. Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) into the brainstem may provide an

  11. Development of the SIOPE DIPG network, registry and imaging repository: a collaborative effort to optimize research into a rare and lethal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Sophie E. M.; Baugh, Joshua; Chaney, Brooklyn; de Jongh, Dennis; Sanchez Aliaga, Esther; Barkhof, Frederik; Noltes, Johan; de Wolf, Ruben; van Dijk, Jet; Cannarozzo, Antonio; Damen-Korbijn, Carin M.; Lieverst, Jan A.; Colditz, Niclas; Hoffmann, Marion; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Bison, Brigitte; Jones, David T. W.; Sturm, Dominik; Gielen, Gerrit H.; Jones, Chris; Hulleman, Esther; Calmon, Raphael; Castel, David; Varlet, Pascale; Giraud, Géraldine; Slavc, Irene; van Gool, Stefaan; Jacobs, Sandra; Jadrijevic-Cvrlje, Filip; Sumerauer, David; Nysom, Karsten; Pentikainen, Virve; Kivivuori, Sanna-Maria; Leblond, Pierre; Entz-Werle, Natasha; von Bueren, Andre O.; Kattamis, Antonis; Hargrave, Darren R.; Hauser, Péter; Garami, Miklos; Thorarinsdottir, Halldora K.; Pears, Jane; Gandola, Lorenza; Rutkauskiene, Giedre; Janssens, Geert O.; Torsvik, Ingrid K.; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Gil-da-Costa, Maria J.; Zheludkova, Olga; Shats, Liudmila; Deak, Ladislav; Kitanovski, Lidija; Cruz, Ofelia; Morales La Madrid, Andres; Holm, Stefan; Gerber, Nicolas; Kebudi, Rejin; Grundy, Richard; Lopez-Aguilar, Enrique; Zapata-Tarres, Marta; Emmerik, John; Hayden, Tim; Bailey, Simon; Biassoni, Veronica; Massimino, Maura; Grill, Jacques; Vandertop, William P.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Fouladi, Maryam; Kramm, Christof M.; van Vuurden, Dannis G.

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a rare and deadly childhood malignancy. After 40 years of mostly single-center, often non-randomized trials with variable patient inclusions, there has been no improvement in survival. It is therefore time for international collaboration in DIPG research,

  12. Development of the SIOPE DIPG network, registry and imaging repository : a collaborative effort to optimize research into a rare and lethal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zanten, Sophie E M Veldhuijzen; Baugh, Joshua; Chaney, Brooklyn; De Jongh, Dennis; Aliaga, Esther Sanchez; Barkhof, Frederik; Noltes, Johan; De Wolf, Ruben; Van Dijk, Jet; Cannarozzo, Antonio; Damen-Korbijn, Carin M; Lieverst, Jan A; Colditz, Niclas; Hoffmann, Marion; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Bison, Brigitte; Jones, David T W; Sturm, Dominik; Gielen, Gerrit H; Jones, Chris; Hulleman, Esther; Calmon, Raphael; Castel, David; Varlet, Pascale; Giraud, Géraldine; Slavc, Irene; Van Gool, Stefaan; Jacobs, Sandra; Jadrijevic-Cvrlje, Filip; Sumerauer, David; Nysom, Karsten; Pentikainen, Virve; Kivivuori, Sanna-Maria; Leblond, Pierre; Entz-Werle, Natasha; von Bueren, Andre O; Kattamis, Antonis; Hargrave, Darren R; Hauser, Péter; Garami, Miklos; Thorarinsdottir, Halldora K; Pears, Jane; Gandola, Lorenza; Rutkauskiene, Giedre; Janssens, Geert O; Torsvik, Ingrid K; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Gil-da-Costa, Maria J; Zheludkova, Olga; Shats, Liudmila; Deak, Ladislav; Kitanovski, Lidija; Cruz, Ofelia; La Madrid, Andres Morales; Holm, Stefan; Gerber, Nicolas; Kebudi, Rejin; Grundy, Richard; Lopez-Aguilar, Enrique; Zapata-Tarres, Marta; Emmerik, John; Hayden, Tim; Bailey, Simon; Biassoni, Veronica; Massimino, Maura; Grill, Jacques; Vandertop, William P; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Fouladi, Maryam; Kramm, Christof M; van Vuurden, Dannis G

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a rare and deadly childhood malignancy. After 40 years of mostly single-center, often non-randomized trials with variable patient inclusions, there has been no improvement in survival. It is therefore time for international collaboration in DIPG research,

  13. The role of the pontine respiratory complex in the response to intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Joyce A; Milsom, William K

    2010-04-30

    These experiments were designed to determine the effects of EEG state on the response of rats to intermittent hypoxia and to test the hypotheses that short-term potentiation (STP) and ventilatory long term facilitation (vLTF) are state dependent; and that neurons with NMDA receptors in the dorso-ventral pontine respiratory group (dvPRG) modulate the development of STP and vLTF in rats. Low-doses of urethane anaesthesia (hypoxia result in cycling between EEG states that superficially resemble wake and slow wave sleep in rats and are accompanied by changes in breathing pattern that closely resemble those seen when unanaesthetized rats cycle between wake and SWS. When changes between these states were accounted for, intermittent, poikilocapnic hypoxia did not produce a significant vLTF. However, there was a persistent STP of tidal volume and vLTF did develop after blockade of NMDAr in the region of the PBrKF complex by microinjection of MK-801. Blockade of NMDA-type glutamate receptor-mediated processes in the dorsal pons also caused animals to cycle into State III, but did not alter the response to either continuous or intermittent hypoxia indicating that the response to hypoxia was not state dependent. This shows that neurons in the region of the PRG inhibit STP and vLTF, but no longer do so if PRG NMDA receptor activation is blocked. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Ascending Reticular Activating System from Pontine Reticular Formation to the Thalamus in the Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Seok eYeo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Action of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS on the cerebral cortex is responsible for achievement of consciousness. In this study, we attempted to reconstruct the lower single component of the ARAS from the reticular formation (RF to the thalamus in the normal human brain using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI.Methods: Twenty six normal healthy subjects were recruited for this study. A 1.5-T scanner was used for scanning of diffusion tensor images, and the lower single component of the ARAS was reconstructed using FMRIB software. We utilized two ROIs for reconstruction of the lower single component of the ARAS: the seed ROI - the RF of the pons at the level of the trigeminal nerve entry zone, the target ROI - the intralaminar nuclei of the thalamus at the level of the commissural plane.Results: The reconstructed ARAS originated from the pontine RF, ascended through the mesencephalic tegmentum just posterior to the red nucleus, and then terminated on the intralaminar nuclei of the thalamus. No significant differences in fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tract number were observed between hemispheres (P>0.05Conclusion: We reconstructed the lower single component of the ARAS from the RF to the thalamus in the human brain using DTI. The results of this study might be of value for the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with impaired consciousness

  15. Hypocretin and GABA interact in the pontine reticular formation to increase wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevig, Holly N; Watson, Christopher J; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2010-10-01

    Hypocretin-1/orexin A administered directly into the oral part of rat pontine reticular formation (PnO) causes an increase in wakefulness and extracellular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels. The receptors in the PnO that mediate these effects have not been identified. Therefore, this study tested the hypothesis that the increase in wakefulness caused by administration of hypocretin-1 into the PnO occurs via activation of GABAA receptors and hypocretin receptors. Within/between subjects. University of Michigan. Twenty-three adult male Crl:CD*(SD) (Sprague Dawley) rats. Microinjection of hypocretin-1, bicuculline (GABAA receptor antagonist), SB-334867 (hypocretin receptor-1 antagonist), and Ringer solution (vehicle control) into the PnO. Hypocretin-1 caused a significant concentration-dependent increase in wakefulness and decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep. Coadministration of SB-334867 and hypocretin-1 blocked the hypocretin-1-induced increase in wakefulness and decrease in both the NREM and REM phases of sleep. Coadministration of bicuculline and hypocretin-1 blocked the hypocretin-1-induced increase in wakefulness and decrease in NREM sleep caused by hypocretin-1. The increase in wakefulness caused by administering hypocretin-1 to the PnO is mediated by hypocretin receptors and GABAA receptors in the PnO. These results show for the first time that hypocretinergic and GABAergic transmission in the PnO can interact to promote wakefulness.

  16. Molecular Alterations of KIT Oncogene in Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L. Gomes

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common and devastating primary brain tumours. Despite therapeutic advances, the majority of gliomas do not respond either to chemo or radiotherapy. KIT, a class III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK, is frequently involved in tumourigenic processes. Currently, KIT constitutes an attractive therapeutic target. In the present study we assessed the frequency of KIT overexpression in gliomas and investigated the genetic mechanisms underlying KIT overexpression. KIT (CD117 immunohistochemistry was performed in a series of 179 gliomas of various grades. KIT activating gene mutations (exons 9, 11, 13 and 17 and gene amplification analysis, as defined by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR were performed in CD117 positive cases. Tumour cell immunopositivity was detected in 15.6% (28/179 of cases, namely in 25% (1/4 of pilocytic astrocytomas, 25% (5/20 of diffuse astrocytomas, 20% (1/5 of anaplastic astrocytomas, 19.5% (15/77 of glioblastomas and one third (3/9 of anaplastic oligoastrocytomas. Only 5.7% (2/35 of anaplastic oligodendrogliomas showed CD117 immunoreactivity. No association was found between tumour CD117 overexpression and patient survival. In addition, we also observed CD117 overexpression in endothelial cells, which varied from 0–22.2% of cases, being more frequent in high-grade lesions. No KIT activating mutations were identified. Interestingly, CISH and/or qRT-PCR analysis revealed the presence of KIT gene amplification in 6 glioblastomas and 2 anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, corresponding to 33% (8/24 of CD117 positive cases. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that KIT gene amplification rather than gene mutation is a common genetic mechanism underlying KIT expression in subset of malignant gliomas. Further studies are warranted to determine whether glioma patients exhibiting KIT overexpression and KIT gene amplification may benefit from therapy with anti-KIT RTK

  17. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Roland Bénabou; Jean Tirole

    2003-01-01

    A central tenet of economics is that individuals respond to incentives. For psychologists and sociologists, in contrast, rewards and punishments are often counterproductive, because they undermine "intrinsic motivation". We reconcile these two views, showing how performance incentives offered by an informed principal (manager, teacher, parent) can adversely impact an agent's (worker, child) perception of the task, or of his own abilities. Incentives are then only weak reinforcers in the short...

  18. [Guidelines for the radiotherapy of gliomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuvret, L; Antoni, D; Biau, J; Truc, G; Noël, G; Mazeron, J-J

    2016-09-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent primary brain tumours. Treating these tumours is difficult because of the proximity of organs at risk, infiltrating nature, and radioresistance. Clinical prognostic factors such as age, Karnofsky performance status, tumour location, and treatments such as surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have long been recognized in the management of patients with gliomas. Molecular biomarkers are increasingly evolving as additional factors that facilitate diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making. These practice guidelines aim at helping in choosing the best treatment, in particular radiation therapy. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Contemporary management of high-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Hao-Wen; Morgan, Erin R; Mason, Warren P

    2018-01-01

    High-grade gliomas, including glioblastoma, are the most common malignant brain tumors in adults. Despite intensive efforts to develop new therapies for these diseases, treatment options remain limited and prognosis is poor. Recently, there have been important advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of glioma, leading to refinements in our diagnostic and management approach. There is new evidence to guide the treatment of elderly patients. A multitude of new agents have been investigated, including targeted therapies, immunotherapeutics and tumor-treating fields. This review summarizes the key findings from this research, and presents a perspective on future opportunities to advance the field.

  20. Revealing the potential pathogenesis of glioma by utilizing a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weiran; Li, Gang; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Miao, Jinming

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to explore the potential mechanism of glioma through bioinformatic approaches. The gene expression profile (GSE4290) of glioma tumor and non-tumor samples was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. A total of 180 samples were available, including 23 non-tumor and 157 tumor samples. Then the raw data were preprocessed using robust multiarray analysis, and 8,890 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by using t-test (false discovery rate What' more, for the top 10 sub-networks, Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis (p value tissue-specific genes were calculated (p value = 1.0, 1.0, and 0.00014, respectively) and visualized by Venn Diagram package in R. About 61% of human tissue-specific genes were DEGs as well. This research shed new light on the pathogenesis of glioma based on DEGs and GAPN, and our findings might provide potential targets for clinical glioma treatment.

  1. Microsurgery Resection of Intrinsic Insular Tumors via Transsylvian Surgical Approach in 12 Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Ming-can; Chen, Shi-jie; Xu, Xian-ping; Yang, Yong; Cai, Jie

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics, operative methods, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in the resection of intrinsic insular gliomas via transsylvian approach. From June 2008 to June 2010, 12 patients with intrinsic insular gliomas were treated via transsylvian microsurgical approach, with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging diffusion tensor imaging (MR DTI) evaluation. The data of these patients were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had astrocytoma, including 8 patients of Grades I to II, 2 patients of Grades III to IV, and 2 patients of mixed glial tumors. The insular tumors were completely removed in 9 patients, whereas they were only partially removed from 3 patients. No death was related to the operations. Two patients had transient aphasia, 2 experienced worsened hemiplegia on opposite sides of their bodies, and 2 had mild hemiplegia and language function disturbance. Most of the insular gliomas are of low grade. By evaluating the damage of the corticospinal tract through DTI and using ultrasonography to locate the tumors during operation, microsurgery treatment removes the lesions as much as possible, protects the surrounding areas, reduces the mobility rate, and improves the postoperative quality of life

  2. Intrinsic and extrinsic mortality reunited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, Jacob J E; Wensink, Maarten J; Rozing, Maarten P

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic and extrinsic mortality are often separated in order to understand and measure aging. Intrinsic mortality is assumed to be a result of aging and to increase over age, whereas extrinsic mortality is assumed to be a result of environmental hazards and be constant over age. However......, allegedly intrinsic and extrinsic mortality have an exponentially increasing age pattern in common. Theories of aging assert that a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic stressors underlies the increasing risk of death. Epidemiological and biological data support that the control of intrinsic as well...... as extrinsic stressors can alleviate the aging process. We argue that aging and death can be better explained by the interaction of intrinsic and extrinsic stressors than by classifying mortality itself as being either intrinsic or extrinsic. Recognition of the tight interaction between intrinsic and extrinsic...

  3. The Association between Some Nutrients and Adult Gliomas: A Case-Control Study of Adult Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shayanfar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Abestract Background & aim: It has been estimated that about 30–40 percent of all cancers could be prevented by diet and lifestyle. In the present study, associations between food groups and some nutrients were studied in adult glioma. Methods: In the present hospital-based case-control study which took place in Tehran, Iran, from 2010 to 2012, socio-economic information, demographics, lifestyle factors, health and dietary intakes of 128 patients with glioma as cases, and 256 healthy controls, were collected through interviews and questionnaires. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. SPSS version 19 was used for all statistical analyses. Results: After adjusting for potential confounders, inverse associations between calcium intake and adult glioma and vitamin C were observed. (Highest tertile versus lowest: OR = 0.20, 95% CI = 0.87-0.46, P for trend = 0.001 and vitamin C (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.15-0.76, P for trend = 0.002. In addition, we observed elevated ORs for highest vs. lowest tertile of cholesterol intake (OR = 2.78, 95% CI = 1.29-5.99, P for trend = 0.061. We observed no significant associations with adult glioma for intakes of total fat, carbohydrate, protein, vitamin A, vitamin E and beta carotene. Conclusion: the results showed that intake of calcium and vitamin C may possibly prevent glioma in adults. Key words: Gliomas, Adult, Ca, Vitamin C

  4. Known glioma risk loci are associated with glioma with a family history of brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melin, Beatrice; Dahlin, Anna M; Andersson, Ulrika

    2013-01-01

    family history of brain tumours, defined as having at least one first- or second-degree relative with a history of brain tumour, are associated with known glioma risk loci. One thousand four hundred and thirty-one glioma cases and 2,868 cancer-free controls were identified from four case-control studies...... and two prospective cohorts from USA, Sweden and Denmark and genotyped for seven SNPs previously reported to be associated with glioma risk in case-control designed studies. Odds ratios were calculated by unconditional logistic regression. In analyses including glioma cases with a family history of brain...... tumours (n = 104) and control subjects free of glioma at baseline, three of seven SNPs were associated with glioma risk: rs2736100 (5p15.33, TERT), rs4977756 (9p21.3, CDKN2A-CDKN2B) and rs6010620 (20q13.33, RTEL1). After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, only one marker was statistically...

  5. Radiosurgery in gliomas (middle-line tumors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betti, O.O.; Rosler, R.

    1989-01-01

    The clinical experience is presented obtained from treatment with high-energy linac radiosurgery of 22 patients with stereotactically biopsed gliomas located in middle-line, from thalamus to brain stem and from infundibulum to pineo-tectal regions, during the period 1982-1987. (H.W.). 10 refs

  6. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lene; Friis, Søren; Hallas, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Several studies indicate that use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with an increased risk of intracranial meningioma, while associations between HRT use and risk of other brain tumors have been less explored. We investigated the influence of HRT use on the risk of glioma...

  7. Mean Diffusional Kurtosis in Patients with Glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tietze, A.; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Østergaard, Leif

    2015-01-01

    , and the contralateral normal appearing white and grey matter of 34 patients (22 high-grade, 12 low-grade gliomas). MK’ and MD in different grades were compared using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves and the area under the curve were calculated to determine the diagnostic accuracy of MK...

  8. Kynurenic acid synthesis by human glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vezzani, A; Gramsbergen, J B; Versari, P

    1990-01-01

    Biopsy material from human gliomas obtained during neurosurgery was used to investigate whether pathological human brain tissue is capable of producing kynurenic acid (KYNA), a natural brain metabolite which can act as an antagonist at excitatory amino acid receptors. Upon in vitro exposure to 40...

  9. Neuromyelitis Optica Lesion Mimicking Brainstem Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year-old girl who presented with weakness of the left extremities and right sided sixth cranial nerve palsy had neuromyelitis optica (NMO mistaken for brainstem glioma on MRI, in a report from Brain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine,Seoul, Republic of KoreaNeuromyelitis Optica, Optic-Spinal Syndrome, Spectroscopy.

  10. Glia to glioma: A wrathful journey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendu Ghosh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Glial cells, unlike neurons in the brain, can undergo cellular division to maintain their functional continuity. However, sometimes this divisional attribute gets uncontrolled, which breaches tissue organization and transforms tissues into neoplasm. The proliferative abnormality of neuroglia results in one of the most dreaded neoplasm amounting to 30% of all brain tumors—the glioma. The abnormal proliferation, high level of progression and invasive potential makes glioma one of the most lethal killers in its class. The pathological scenario becomes more moribund owing to poor prognosis and high mortality rate of the menace. Conventional onco-therapies yield dismal results compared to other soft tissue tumors. In time, with the advent of newer trends of prognosis and treatment modalities in the field of oncology, a hope for betterment is expected, but not yet achieved. These advancements would fetch some better results with proper and minute understanding of the biology of glioma, both at physiological as well as molecular level. In the present context, we have tried to document an insight to glioma biology that can serve as a primer to understand this lethal killer and its killing spree, with some approaches to combat its carnage.

  11. Clinical study of 20 cases of primary pontine hemorrhage. With special reference to correlations between clinical, computed tomographic, and electroencephalographic findings and outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwabara, Satoshi; Yamane, Kanji; Uemura, Yoshihiko (Matsue Red Cross Hospital, Shimane (Japan)); Ohta, Keiji; Ueda, Tohru

    1982-11-01

    Twenty cases of primary pontine hemorrhage were classified into four types according to their outcome. Five cases in Type I showed a full recovery or could resume most activities (ADL I or II). The initial clinical picture of this type was characterized by alertness, no disturbance of autonomic function, and mild hemiparesis. CT scan demonstrated a small hematoma which was localized in the unilateral region or midportion of the pontine tegmentum. In four cases, the largest diameter of the hematoma on a transverse section through the pons was less than 20 mm, and its extension was limited to 2 slices, (each 10 mm in width). Three cases of Type II recovered to daily life partially assisted (ADL III). Hematoma was located in the bilateral pontine tegmentum and partially involved the pontine basis. The size of hematoma was less than 30 mm and its extension was 2 to 3 slices. Seven cases of Type III were severely disabled in prolonged coma or the ''locked-in'' syndrome (ADL IV). Hematoma was located in the entire pontine tegmentum and unilateral pontine basis extending to the midbrain. The size of hematoma was less than 30 mm in five patients and more than 31 mm in two. Alpha-pattern coma was present in two cases and beta-coma was observed in two. All five cases of Type IV died within a few days after the onset. The clinical picture was coma, tetraplegia, respiratory failure, hyperthemia, and hypertension in all cases. Hematoma involved the entire tegmentum and basis pontis and extended to the cerebellum and midbrain. The size of hematoma was less than 30 mm in two patients and more than 31 mm in three. The sagittal extension was 3 to 6 slices.

  12. Fear Extinction Memory Consolidation Requires Potentiation of Pontine-Wave Activity during REM Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subimal; O'Malley, Matthew W .

    2013-01-01

    Sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation within multiple memory systems including contextual fear extinction memory, but little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this process. Here, we show that fear extinction training in rats, which extinguished conditioned fear, increased both slow-wave sleep and rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Surprisingly, 24 h later, during memory testing, only 57% of the fear-extinguished animals retained fear extinction memory. We found that these animals exhibited an increase in phasic pontine-wave (P-wave) activity during post-training REM sleep, which was absent in the 43% of animals that failed to retain fear extinction memory. The results of this study provide evidence that brainstem activation, specifically potentiation of phasic P-wave activity, during post-training REM sleep is critical for consolidation of fear extinction memory. The results of this study also suggest that, contrary to the popular hypothesis of sleep and memory, increased sleep after training alone does not guarantee consolidation and/or retention of fear extinction memory. Rather, the potentiation of specific sleep-dependent physiological events may be a more accurate predictor for successful consolidation of fear extinction memory. Identification of this unique mechanism will significantly improve our present understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the sleep-dependent regulation of emotional memory. Additionally, this discovery may also initiate development of a new, more targeted treatment method for clinical disorders of fear and anxiety in humans that is more efficacious than existing methods such as exposure therapy that incorporate only fear extinction. PMID:23467372

  13. Head impulse gain and saccade analysis in pontine-cerebellar stroke and vestibular neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luke; Todd, Michael; Halmagyi, Gabor M; Aw, Swee

    2014-10-21

    We sought to quantify and compare angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) gain and compensatory saccade properties elicited by the head impulse test (HIT) in pontine-cerebellar stroke (PCS) and vestibular neuritis (VN). Horizontal HIT was recorded ≤7 days from vertigo onset with dual-search coils in 33 PCS involving the anterior inferior, posterior inferior, and superior cerebellar arteries (13 AICA, 17 PICA, 3 SCA) confirmed by MRI and 20 VN. We determined the aVOR gain and asymmetry, and compensatory overt saccade properties including amplitude asymmetry and cumulative amplitude (ipsilesional trials [I]; contralesional trials [C]). The aVOR gain (normal: 0.96; asymmetry = 2%) was bilaterally reduced, greater in AICA (I = 0.39, C = 0.57; asymmetry = 20%) than in PICA/SCA strokes (I = 0.75, C = 0.74; asymmetry = 7%), in contrast to the unilateral deficit in VN (I = 0.22, C = 0.76; asymmetry = 54%). Cumulative amplitude (normal: 1.1°) was smaller in AICA (I = 4.2°, C = 3.0°) and PICA/SCA strokes (I = 2.1°, C = 3.0°) compared with VN (I = 8.5°, C = 1.3°). Amplitude asymmetry in AICA and PICA/SCA strokes was comparable, but favored the contralesional side in PICA/SCA strokes and the ipsilesional side in VN. Saccade asymmetry AICA stroke by more symmetric bilateral gain reduction with smaller saccades, and PICA stroke by contralesional gain bias with the smallest saccades. Saccade and gain asymmetry should be investigated further in future diagnostic accuracy studies. This study provides Class II evidence that aVOR testing accurately distinguishes patients with PCS from VN (sensitivity 94%-97%, specificity 90%-100%). © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Economics of Malignant Gliomas: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizer, Jeffrey J; Fitzner, Karen A; Jacobs, Daniel I; Bennett, Charles L; Liebling, Dustin B; Luu, Thanh Ha; Trifilio, Steven M; Grimm, Sean A; Fisher, Matthew J; Haleem, Meraaj S; Ray, Paul S; McKoy, Judith M; DeBoer, Rebecca; Tulas, Katrina-Marie E; Deeb, Mohammed; McKoy, June M

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 18,500 persons are diagnosed with malignant glioma in the United States annually. Few studies have investigated the comprehensive economic costs. We reviewed the literature to examine costs to patients with malignant glioma and their families, payers, and society. A total of 18 fully extracted studies were included. Data were collected on direct and indirect costs, and cost estimates were converted to US dollars using the conversion rate calculated from the study's publication date, and updated to 2011 values after adjustment for inflation. A standardized data abstraction form was used. Data were extracted by one reviewer and checked by another. Before approval of effective chemotherapeutic agents for malignant gliomas, estimated total direct medical costs in the United States for surgery and radiation therapy per patient ranged from $50,600 to $92,700. The addition of temozolomide (TMZ) and bevacizumab to glioblastoma treatment regimens has resulted in increased overall costs for glioma care. Although health care costs are now less front-loaded, they have increased over the course of illness. Analysis using a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000 per quality-adjusted life-year suggests that the benefits of TMZ fall on the edge of acceptable therapies. Furthermore, indirect medical costs, such as productivity losses, are not trivial. With increased chemotherapy use for malignant glioma, the paradigm for treatment and associated out-of-pocket and total medical costs continue to evolve. Larger out-of-pocket costs may influence the choice of chemotherapeutic agents, the economic implications of which should be evaluated prospectively. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Terahertz reflectometry imaging for low and high grade gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Young Bin; Oh, Seung Jae; Kang, Seok-Gu; Heo, Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Choi, Yuna; Song, Seungri; Son, Hye Young; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Haam, Seung Joo; Huh, Yong Min; Chang, Jong Hee; Joo, Chulmin; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2016-01-01

    Gross total resection (GTR) of glioma is critical for improving the survival rate of glioma patients. One of the greatest challenges for achieving GTR is the difficulty in discriminating low grade tumor or peritumor regions that have an intact blood brain barrier (BBB) from normal brain tissues and delineating glioma margins during surgery. Here we present a highly sensitive, label-free terahertz reflectometry imaging (TRI) that overcomes current key limitations for intraoperative detection of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), and grade III and IV (high grade) gliomas. We demonstrate that TRI provides tumor discrimination and delineation of tumor margins in brain tissues with high sensitivity on the basis of Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained image. TRI may help neurosurgeons to remove gliomas completely by providing visualization of tumor margins in WHO grade II, III, and IV gliomas without contrast agents, and hence, improve patient outcomes. PMID:27782153

  16. Selective uptake of boronophenylalanine by glioma stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Ting; Zhou, Youxin; Xie, Xueshun; Chen, Guilin; Li, Bin; Wei, Yongxin; Chen, Jinming; Huang, Qiang; Du, Ziwei

    2012-01-01

    The success of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) depends on the amount of boron in cells and the tumor/blood and tumor/(normal tissue) boron concentration ratios. For the first time, measurements of boron uptake in both stem/progenitor and differentiated glioma cells were performed along with measurements of boron biodistribution in suitable animal models. In glioma stem/progenitor cells, the selective accumulation of boronophenylalanine (BPA) was lower, and retention of boron after BPA removal was longer than in differentiated glioma cells in vitro. However, boron biodistribution was not statistically significantly different in mice with xenografts. - Highlights: ► Uptake of BPA was analyzed in stem/progenitor and differentiated glioma cells. ► Selective accumulation of BPA was lower in glioma stem/progenitor cells. ► Retention of boron after BPA removal was longer in glioma stem/progenitor cells. ► Boron biodistribution was not statistically different in mice with xenografts.

  17. Use of tricyclic antidepressants and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; García Rodríguez, Luis Alberto; Rasmussen, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    glioma (cases) in Denmark between 2000 and 2012 and matched these 1 : 20 to population controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for glioma associated with long-term (⩾3 years) use of TCAs. Similar analyses were performed for selective serotonin reuptake...... inhibitors (SSRIs). RESULTS: We identified 3767 glioma cases and 75 340 population controls. Long-term use of TCAs was inversely associated with risk of glioma (OR 0.72, 95% CI: 0.41-1.25). Long-term SSRI use was not associated with glioma risk (OR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.75-1.16). CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicated...... that long-term use of TCAs may be associated with a reduced risk of glioma, however, the statistical precision was limited. A similar pattern was not observed for use of SSRIs....

  18. The AAA+ proteins Pontin and Reptin enter adult age: from understanding their basic biology to the identification of selective inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Pedro M; Baek, Sung Hee; Bandeiras, Tiago M; Dutta, Anindya; Houry, Walid A; Llorca, Oscar; Rosenbaum, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Pontin and Reptin are related partner proteins belonging to the AAA+ (ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities) family. They are implicated in multiple and seemingly unrelated processes encompassing the regulation of gene transcription, the remodeling of chromatin, DNA damage sensing and repair, and the assembly of protein and ribonucleoprotein complexes, among others. The 2nd International Workshop on Pontin and Reptin took place at the Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier in Oeiras, Portugal on October 10-12, 2014, and reported significant new advances on the mechanisms of action of these two AAA+ ATPases. The major points under discussion were related to the mechanisms through which these proteins regulate gene transcription, their roles as co-chaperones, and their involvement in pathophysiology, especially in cancer and ciliary biology and disease. Finally, they may become anticancer drug targets since small chemical inhibitors were shown to produce anti-tumor effects in animal models.

  19. Assessment of the Endoscopic Endonasal Transclival Approach for Surgical Clipping of Anterior Pontine Anterior-Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmillan, Jose L; Lawton, Michael T; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; El-Sayed, Ivan H; Zhang, Xin; Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Gabarros, Andreu; Benet, Arnau

    2016-05-01

    Aneurysms of the anterior pontine segment of the anterior-inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are uncommon. Their treatment is challenging because critical neurovascular structures are adjacent to it and the available surgical corridors are narrow and deep. Although endoscopic endonasal approaches are accepted for treating midline skull base lesions, their role in the treatment vascular lesions remains undefined. The present study is aimed to assess the anatomic feasibility of the endoscopic endonasal transclival (EET) approach for treating anterior pontine AICA aneurysms and compare it with the subtemporal anterior transpetrosal (SAT) approach. Twelve cadaveric specimens were prepared for surgical simulation. The AICAs were exposed using both EET and SAT approaches. Surgical window area and the length of the exposed artery were measured. The distance from the origin of the artery to the clip applied for proximal control was measured. The number of AICA perforators exposed and the anatomic features of each AICA were recorded. The EET approach provided a wider surgical window area compared with the SAT (P AICA perforators were visualized using the EET approach (P AICA, an aneurysm clip could be applied closer to the origin of AICA using EET (0.2 ± 0.42 mm) compared with SAT (6.26 ± 3.4 mm) (P AICA aneurysms using the EET approach is feasible. Compared with SAT, the EET approach provides advantages in surgical window area, ensuring proximal control before aneurysm dissection, visualization of perforating branches, and better proximal control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Complete clinical recovery of a central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis delayed onset in a child with acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, D; Karapinar, B; Balkan, C; Ay, Y; Kavakli, K

    2011-02-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is a demyelinating disease of the pons often associated with the demyelination of extrapontine areas of the central nervous system. It typically occurs 0.5-7 days after a rapid increment in serum Na level in hyponatremic patients and may lead to death. A 2.5-year-old child with a diagnosis of acute myeloblastic leukemia developed febril neutropenia, diarrhea, gastrointestinal hemorrhage followed by pulmonary aspergillosis. He could not tolerate enteral nutrition. He was given broad spectrum antibiotics and antifungal treatment. Laboratory tests showed electrolyte abnormalities including hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia in a chronic course. Twenty three days after a rapid correction of hyponatremia (16 mEq/L/24 h) he revealed flask quadriparesis, disphagia, mutism, irregular respiratory pattern and loss of cough and gag reflex. Cranial magnetic resonance showed central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis. He required mechanical ventilation and then he regained his neurologic functions. He completed chemotherapy protocol and underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. After 2.5 years of the occurrence of CPM he is in completely normal physical and neurological status. CPM is a very severe but rare disorder in children with underlying disease. In the presence of multiple etiologic factors it may reveal a delayed onset and optimum outcome can be seen even in the severe clinical presentation with adequate intensive support.

  1. Coordination of eye and head components of movements evoked by stimulation of the paramedian pontine reticular formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Ellen J.; Sparks, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Constant frequency microstimulation of the paramedian pontine reticular formation (PPRF) in head-restrained monkeys evokes a constant velocity eye movement. Since the PPRF receives significant projections from structures that control coordinated eye-head movements, we asked whether stimulation of the pontine reticular formation in the head-unrestrained animal generates a combined eye-head movement or only an eye movement. Microstimulation of most sites yielded a constant-velocity gaze shift executed as a coordinated eye-head movement, although eye-only movements were evoked from some sites. The eye and head contributions to the stimulation-evoked movements varied across stimulation sites and were drastically different from the lawful relationship observed for visually-guided gaze shifts. These results indicate that the microstimulation activated elements that issued movement commands to the extraocular and, for most sites, neck motoneurons. In addition, the stimulation-evoked changes in gaze were similar in the head-restrained and head-unrestrained conditions despite the assortment of eye and head contributions, suggesting that the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) gain must be near unity during the coordinated eye-head movements evoked by stimulation of the PPRF. These findings contrast the attenuation of VOR gain associated with visually-guided gaze shifts and suggest that the vestibulo-ocular pathway processes volitional and PPRF stimulation-evoked gaze shifts differently. PMID:18458891

  2. Malignant clinical features of anaplastic gliomas without IDH mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, Ichiyo; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Shoji, Takuhiro; Kanamori, Masayuki; Saito, Ryuta; Inoue, Tomoo; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yoji; Watanabe, Takashi; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Mika; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of WHO grade III anaplastic gliomas does not always correspond to its clinical outcome because of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene status. Anaplastic gliomas without IDH mutation result in a poor prognosis, similar to grade IV glioblastomas. However, the malignant features of anaplastic gliomas without IDH mutation are not well understood. The aim of this study was to examine anaplastic gliomas, in particular those without IDH mutation, with regard to their malignant features, recurrence patterns, and association with glioma stem cells. We retrospectively analyzed 86 cases of WHO grade III anaplastic gliomas. Data regarding patient characteristics, recurrence pattern, and prognosis were obtained from medical records. We examined molecular alterations such as IDH mutation, 1p19q loss, TP53 mutation, MGMT promoter methylation, Ki67 labeling index, and CD133, SOX2, and NESTIN expression. Of the 86 patients with anaplastic gliomas, 58 carried IDH mutation, and 40 experienced recurrence. The first recurrence was local in 25 patients and distant in 15. Patients without IDH mutation exhibited significantly higher CD133 and SOX2 expression (P = .025 and .020, respectively) and more frequent distant recurrence than those with IDH mutation (P = .022). Patients with anaplastic gliomas without IDH mutation experienced distant recurrence and exhibited glioma stem cell markers, indicating that this subset may share some malignant characteristics with glioblastomas. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. IGFBP2 expression predicts IDH-mutant glioma patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin Eric; Cohen, Adam L; Colman, Howard; Jensen, Randy L; Fults, Daniel W; Couldwell, William T

    2017-01-03

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2 genes occur in ~80% of lower-grade (WHO grade II and grade III) gliomas. Mutant IDH produces (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate, which induces DNA hypermethylation and presumably drives tumorigenesis. Interestingly, IDH mutations are associated with improved survival in glioma patients, but the underlying mechanism for the difference in survival remains unclear. Through comparative analyses of 286 cases of IDH-wildtype and IDH-mutant lower-grade glioma from a TCGA data set, we report that IDH-mutant gliomas have increased expression of tumor-suppressor genes (NF1, PTEN, and PIK3R1) and decreased expression of oncogenes(AKT2, ARAF, ERBB2, FGFR3, and PDGFRB) and glioma progression genes (FOXM1, IGFBP2, and WWTR1) compared with IDH-wildtype gliomas. Furthermore, each of these genes is prognostic in overall gliomas; however, within the IDH-mutant group, none remains prognostic except IGFBP2 (encodinginsulin-like growth factor binding protein 2). Through validation in an independent cohort, we show that patients with low IGFBP2 expressiondisplay a clear advantage in overall and disease-free survival, whereas those with high IGFBP2 expressionhave worse median survival than IDH-wildtype patients. These observations hold true across different histological and molecular subtypes of lower-grade glioma. We propose therefore that an unexpected biological consequence of IDH mutations in glioma is to ameliorate patient survival by promoting tumor-suppressor signaling while inhibiting that of oncogenes, particularly IGFBP2.

  4. Current status of cerebral glioma surgery in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-song; Zhang, Jie; Zhuang, Dong-xiao; Yao, Cheng-jun; Qiu, Tian-ming; Lu, Jun-feng; Zhu, Feng-ping; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-fu

    2011-09-01

    The treatment of gliomas is highly individualized. Surgery for gliomas is essentially for histological diagnosis, to alleviate mass effect, and most importantly, to favor longer survival expectancy. During the past two decades, many surgical techniques and adjuvants have been applied to glioma surgery in China, which lead to a rapid development in the field of cerebral glioma surgery. This article broadly and critically reviewed the existing studies on cerebral glioma surgery and to portrait the current status of glioma surgery in China. A literature search was conducted covering major innovative surgical techniques and adjuvants for glioma surgery in China. The following databases were searched: the Pubmed (January 1995 to date); China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (January 1995 to date) and VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals (January 1995 to date). A selection criterion was established to exclude duplicates and irrelevant studies. The outcome measures were extracted from included studies. A total of 3307 articles were initially searched. After excluded by abstracts and full texts, 69 studies conducted in the mainland of China were included and went through further analysis. The philosophy of surgical strategies for cerebral gliomas in China is undergoing tremendous change. Nowadays Chinese neurosurgeons pay more attention to the postoperative neurofunctional status of the patients. The aim of the glioma surgery is not only the more extensive tumor resection but also the maximal safety of intervention. The well balance of longer overall survival and higher quality of life should be judged with respect to each individual patient.

  5. Intraoperative Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Evaluates the Grade of Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Gang Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of our study was to investigate the value of intraoperative contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS for evaluating the grade of glioma and the correlation between microvessel density (MVD and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Methods. We performed intraoperative conventional ultrasound (CUS and CEUS on 88 patients with gliomas. All of the patients have undergone surgery and obtained the results of pathology. All patients have undergone intraoperative CUS and CEUS to compare the characteristics of different grade gliomas and the results of CUS and CEUS were compared with pathological results. Results. The time to start (TTS and time to peak (TTP of low grade glioma (LGG were similar to those of edema and normal brain surrounding glioma. The enhanced extent of LGG was higher than that of the normal brain and edema. The TTS and TTP of high grade glioma were earlier than those of the edema and normal brain surrounding glioma. The enhancement of HGG was higher than that of LGG. The absolute peak intensity (API was correlated with MVD and VEGF. Conclusion. Intraoperative CEUS could help in determining boundary of peritumoral brain edema of glioma. Intraoperative CEUS parameters in cerebral gliomas could indirectly reflect the information of MVD and VEGF.

  6. Intrinsic Chevrolets at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.; Collins, J.C.; Ellis, S.D.; Gunion, J.F.; Mueller, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of the production at high energy of heavy quarks, supersymmetric particles and other large mass colored systems via the intrinsic twist-six components in the proton wave function is discussed. While the existing data do not rule out the possible relevance of intrinsic charm production at present energies, the extrapolation of such intrinsic contributions to very high masses and energies suggests that they will not play an important role at the SSC

  7. Bevacizumab and Irinotecan in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent, Progressive, or Refractory Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Ependymoma, or Low Grade Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-23

    Childhood Cerebral Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma

  8. The ascending reticular activating system from pontine reticular formation to the hypothalamus in the human brain: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2015-03-17

    The ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) is responsible for regulation of consciousness. Precise evaluation of the ARAS is important for diagnosis and management of patients with impaired consciousness. In the current study, we attempted to reconstruct the portion of the ARAS from the pontine reticular formation (RF) to the hypothalamus in normal subjects, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). A total of 31 healthy subjects were recruited for this study. DTI scanning was performed using 1.5-T, and the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus was reconstructed. Values of fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tract volume of the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus were measured. In all subjects, the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus originated from the RF at the level of the mid-pons, where the trigeminal nerve could be seen, ascended through the periaqueductal gray matter of the midbrain anterolaterally to the anterior commissure level, and then terminated into the hypothalamus. No significant differences in DTI parameters were observed between the left and right hemispheres and between males and females (phypothalamus in normal subjects using DTI. We believe that the reconstruction methodology and the results of this study would be useful to clinicians involved in the care of patients with impaired consciousness and researchers in studies of the ARAS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of the Occipito-Pontine Tract Using Diffusion-Tensor Fiber Tracking in Adult-Onset Adrenoleukodystrophy with Topographic Disorientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Uchida

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a severe and progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by the peroxisomal transporter ATP-binding cassette, subfamily D, member 1 gene mutations. The defect of this gene product results in accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids in organs and serum, central demyelination, and peripheral axonopathy. Although there are different magnetic resonance (MR findings which reflect various phenotypes in adrenoleukodystrophy, some cases present with specific symmetrical occipital white-matter lesions. We describe a patient with adult-onset X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy with topographic disorientation, whose brain MR images revealed T2-signal hyperintensity along the occipito-pontine tract and lateral lemnisci, but not in the cortico-spinal tract in the brainstem. The occipito-pontine tract and lateral lemnisci were clearly detected using diffusion-tensor fiber tracking, suggesting that the topographic disorientation of this patient might be related to the occipito-pontine tract. MR tractography can effectively identify the occipito-pontine tract and may help to localize the fibers associated with clinical symptoms.

  10. Role of MRI in the management of children with diffuse pontine tumors: a study of 15 patients and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornreich, Liora; Schwarz, Michael; Karmazyn, Boaz; Horev, Gadi [Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Department of Imaging, Petah Tiqva (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Cohen, Ian J.; Shuper, Avinoam; Yaniv, Issac [Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Department of Hematology-Oncology, Petah Tiqva (Israel); Michovitz, Shalom [Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Department of Neurosurgery, Petah Tiqva (Israel); Fenig, Eyal [Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Rabin Medical Center,Beilinson Campus, Institute of Oncology, Radiotherapy Unit, Petah Tiqva (Israel)

    2005-09-01

    Pontine tumors carry the worst prognosis of all brain tumors. In most cases, the diagnosis is based solely on MR imaging, without biopsy. To describe the MR findings of pontine tumors at diagnosis and during follow-up and correlate those with prognosis and to assess the value of MR imaging in patient management compared to clinical evaluation. Ninety-one MR scans of 15 children with diffuse pontine tumors were reviewed at diagnosis and during follow-up. The parameters analyzed were as follows: tumor extent, area, and volume; encasement of the basilar artery; presence of exophytic component; necrosis; cysts; hydrocephalus; and intensity and enhancement. Findings were correlated to length of progression-free and overall survival. Trends of amelioration or worsening on imaging were compared with the clinical findings. Median length of progression-free survival was 10 months, and median survival was 20 months. Only hydrocephalus at presentation was associated with shorter progression-free survival (P=0.02). On the last examination of each patient, the craniocaudal diameter was significantly greater than at diagnosis (P=0.03). The concordance between the imaging and the clinical findings was good. MR is the mainstay for the diagnosis and management of pontine tumors. Cranial growth seems to be an ominous sign. However, the prognostic value of MR is limited. MR findings correlate well with the clinical examination. (orig.)

  11. Intrinsically dynamic population models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Schoen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsically dynamic models (IDMs depict populations whose cumulative growth rate over a number of intervals equals the product of the long term growth rates (that is the dominant roots or dominant eigenvalues associated with each of those intervals. Here the focus is on the birth trajectory produced by a sequence of population projection (Leslie matrices. The elements of a Leslie matrix are represented as straightforward functions of the roots of the matrix, and new relationships are presented linking the roots of a matrix to its Net Reproduction Rate and stable mean age of childbearing. Incorporating mortality changes in the rates of reproduction yields an IDM when the subordinate roots are held constant over time. In IDMs, the birth trajectory generated by any specified sequence of Leslie matrices can be found analytically. In the Leslie model with 15 year age groups, the constant subordinate root assumption leads to reasonable changes in the age pattern of fertility, and equations (27 and (30 provide the population size and structure that result from changing levels of net reproduction. IDMs generalize the fixed rate stable population model. They can characterize any observed population, and can provide new insights into dynamic demographic behavior, including the momentum associated with gradual or irregular paths to zero growth.

  12. Glioma infiltration sign on high b-value diffusion-weighted imaging in gliomas and its prognostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang; Ling, Chenhan; Shi, Feina; Dong, Fei; Jiang, Biao; Zhang, Jianmin

    2018-03-01

    Glioma cells may infiltrate beyond the tumor margins revealed on conventional structural images. To investigate whether the presence of a glioma infiltration sign on high b-value diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can predict the prognosis of gliomas. Retrospective cohort. Fifty-two patients with gliomas (14 WHO grade II; 13 WHO grade III; 25 WHO grade IV). 3.0T, including a T 1 -weighted contrast-enhanced (T 1 w-CE) sequence, contrast-enhanced T 2 -flair sequence, and a DWI sequence. T 1 w-CE images and contrast-enhanced T 2 -flair images were used for identifying the tumor region for enhancing and nonenhancing gliomas, respectively. The glioma infiltration sign was defined as the presence of a peritumoral abnormal high signal region on DWI map, which was adjacent to the tumor region and had higher signal than surrounding areas. This sign was assessed on a high b-value DWI map with b = 3000 s/mm 2 . For patients with glioma infiltration sign, DWI3000 max , DWI1000 max , ADC3000 min , and ADC1000 min were measured by drawing a region of interest over the peritumoral abnormal high signal region. Survival analysis was conducted by using Cox regression. Glioma infiltration sign was observed in 28 (53.8%) patients. The occurrence rate of this sign was 92.0% in grade IV gliomas, 30.8% in grade III gliomas, and 7.1% in grade II gliomas. The glioma infiltration sign could independently predict both the progression-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.58 [3.19-23.03], P sign, DWI3000 max (P = 0.005) and ADC3000 min (P = 0.008) were both independent predictors of overall survival after adjustment, while DWI1000 max and ADC1000 min were not. The glioma infiltration sign on high b-value DWI is an independent predictor of poor prognosis in glioma patients. High b-value DWI might be a convenient method to detect glioma infiltration. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018. © 2018 International Society for

  13. ABCG2 is related with the grade of glioma and resistance to mitoxantone, a chemotherapeutic drug for glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yao; Bin, Zhang Quan; Qiang, Huang; Liang, Chu; Hua, Chen; Jun, Dong; Dong, Wang Ai; Qing, Lan

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study is to explore if ABCG2 is related to the grade of glioma and resistance to chemotherapeutic drug for glioma. The ABCG2 expression and distribution among glioma tissues of different grades and other samples were examined using tissue microarray technique. The enhancement of sensitivity of CD133+ glioma stem cells to chemotherapeutic agent, mitoxantone through addition of ABCG2 competitive inhibitor nicardipine was testified by MTT assay and FACS analysis. The positive immunostaining of ABCG2 was observed in less than 10% of low-grade gliomas (3/31 in grade I + II) and in more than 40% of high-grade gliomas (16/37 in grade III + IV), which was statistically different (chi (2) = 10.710, P = 0.0011). In samples consisting of glioma stem cells (CD133+), the positive-straining rate was 100% (4/4), while in CD133- fraction, no positive staining was observed. A simultaneous treatment of CD133+ tumor cells with concentration-dependent mitoxantone (10(-5)-1 microM) and 2.5/5.0 microM nicardipine resulted in synergistic cytotoxicity. The apoptotic rate of CD133+ cells treated with mitoxantone plus nicardipine was significantly higher than that treated with mitoxantone alone (58.54 +/- 7.06% vs. 30.7 +/- 3.79%, P level of ABCG2 is positively associated with the increasing pathological grade of glioma (poor cell differentiation). ABCG2 plays a key role in glioma cells resistance to mitoxantone, chemotherapeutic drug for glioma. Thus, inhibition of ABCG2 protein activity by nicardipine in glioma can sensitize it to mitoxantone, which may lead to better treatment strategies for cancers.

  14. The functional role of Notch signaling in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2010-01-01

    Gliomas are among the most devastating adult tumors for which there is currently no cure. The tumors are derived from brain glial tissue and comprise several diverse tumor forms and grades. Recent reports highlight the importance of cancer-initiating cells in the malignancy of gliomas. These cell...

  15. Glioma infiltration and extracellular matrix: key players and modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Valéria Pereira; Moura Neto, Vivaldo; Mentlein, Rolf

    2018-02-21

    An outstanding characteristic of gliomas is their infiltration into brain parenchyma, a property that impairs complete surgical resection; consequently, these tumors might recur, resulting in a high mortality rate. Gliomas invade along preferential routes, such as those along white matter tracts and in the perineuronal and perivascular spaces. Brain extracellular components and their partners and modulators play a crucial role in glioma cell invasion. This review presents an extensive survey of the literature, showing how the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) is modulated during the glioma infiltration process. We explore aspects of ECM interaction with glioma cells, reviewing the main glycosaminoglycans, glycoproteins and proteoglycans. We discuss the roles of ECM-binding proteins, including CD44, RHAMM, integrins and axonal guidance molecules, and highlight the role of proteases and glycosidases in glioma infiltration; in binding and release chemokines, cytokines and growth factors; and in generating new bioactive ECM fragments. We also consider the roles of cytoskeletal signaling, angiogenesis, miRNAs and the glial-to-mesenchymal transition linked to glioma invasion. We closely discuss therapeutic approaches based on the modulation of the extracellular matrix, targeting the control of glioma infiltration, its relative failure in clinical trials, and potential means to overcome this difficulty. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. TWIST is Expressed in Human Gliomas, Promotes Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Elias

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available TWIST is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor that regulates mesodermal development, promotes tumor cell metastasis, and, in response to cytotoxic stress, enhances cell survival. Our screen for bHLH gene expression in rat C6 glioma revealed TWIST. To delineate a possible oncogenic role for TWIST in the human central nervous system (CNS, we analyzed TWIST message, protein expression in gliomas, normal brain. TWIST was detected in the large majority of human glioma-derived cell lines, human gliomas examined. Increased TWIST mRNA levels were associated with the highest grade gliomas, increased TWIST expression accompanied transition from low grade to high grade in vivo, suggesting a role for TWIST in promoting malignant progression. In accord, elevated TWIST mRNA abundance preceded the spontaneous malignant transformation of cultured mouse astrocytes hemizygous for p53. Overexpression of TWIST protein in a human glioma cell line significantly enhanced tumor cell invasion, a hallmark of high-grade gliomas. These findings support roles for TWIST both in early glial tumorigenesis, subsequent malignant progression. TWIST was also expressed in embryonic, fetal human brain, in neurons, but not glia, of mature brain, indicating that, in gliomas, TWIST may promote the functions also critical for CNS development or normal neuronal physiology.

  17. Epileptic seizures in patients with glioma: A single centrebased ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To elucidate the outcomes of treatment and epidemiology of epilepsy related to glioma in a single center in Chinese patients. Methods: Prescription medicines usage and clinical data were collected from medical records of 119 patients with gliomas between August 2009 and September 2015. Fisher's exact and ...

  18. Central pontine myelinolysis with a hyperintense lesion in diffusion weighted MRI: overview by means of a case report; Zentrale pontine Myelinolyse mit hyperintenser Laesion im diffusionsgewichteten MRT: Uebersicht anhand eines Fallberichtes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, J.; Bewermeyer, H. [Neurologische Klinik, Kliniken der Stadt Koeln gGmbH, Krankenhaus Merheim, Koeln (Germany); Harzheim, A. [Radiologische Klinik, Kliniken der Stadt Koeln gGmbH, Krankenhaus Merheim, Koeln (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is a demyelinating disease of the pons often associated with demyelination of other areas of the central nervous system (CNS). The etiology and pathogenesis of this disorder are still not fully understood. However, almost all cases of CPM are related to severe diseases or chronic alcoholism and occur in the setting of rapidly corrected serum hyponatremia and hypotonicity respectively. Depending on the involvement of other CNS structures, the clinical picture can vary considerably. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive investigation for the antemortem diagnosis of CPM, although the radiological findings lag behind and do not necessarily correlate with the clinical picture. Quite obviously diffusion-weighted imaging can be useful in the rapid diagnosis of CPM. This short review summarizes the current knowledge on the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, radiological findings, prognosis and therapeutic approaches of CPM. Characteristical clinical features and MR-findings including hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images are illustrated by a typical case. (orig.)

  19. Laminin associated with BMP7 as potential secondary astrocytic glioma fiber differentiation targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, G-S; Yan, M; Ma, Z-Z; Sun, L-Z; Liu, Y

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the activation of the BMP7 and laminin pathway is associated with glioma cell proliferation and differentiation. We enrolled 65 patients with primary operable glioma. Laminin and BMP7 protein expression and its subcellular localization were studied by immunofluorescence. We detected a higher level of BMP7 expression in glioma tissue in patients with a lower grade of glioma who had a lower eosinophil count. Compared to patients with a higher grade of glioma, we observed a lower level of laminin expression in patients with a lower grade of glioma. Our data indicated a potential link between eosinophil counts and the expression levels of laminin and BMP7 in glioma differentiation.

  20. IDH1 and IDH2 Mutations in Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam; Holmen, Sheri; Colman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2, originally discovered in 2009, occur in the vast majority of low grade gliomas and secondary high grade gliomas. These mutations, which occur early in gliomagenesis, change the function of the enzymes, causing them to produce 2-hydroxyglutarate, a possible oncometabolite, and to not produce NADPH. IDH mutations are oncogenic, although whether the mechanism is through alterations in hydroxylases, redox potential, cellular metabolism, or gene expression is not clear. The mutations also drive increased methylation in gliomas. Gliomas with mutated IDH1 and IDH2 have improved prognosis compared to gliomas with wild-type IDH. Mutated IDH can now be detected by immunohistochemistry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. No drugs currently target mutated IDH, although this remains an area of active research. PMID:23532369

  1. Molecular and Genetic Determinants of Glioma Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Masui

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A diffusely invasive nature is a major obstacle in treating a malignant brain tumor, “diffuse glioma”, which prevents neurooncologists from surgically removing the tumor cells even in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. Recently updated classification of diffuse gliomas based on distinct genetic and epigenetic features has culminated in a multilayered diagnostic approach to combine histologic phenotypes and molecular genotypes in an integrated diagnosis. However, it is still a work in progress to decipher how the genetic aberrations contribute to the aggressive nature of gliomas including their highly invasive capacity. Here we depict a set of recent discoveries involving molecular genetic determinants of the infiltrating nature of glioma cells, especially focusing on genetic mutations in receptor tyrosine kinase pathways and metabolic reprogramming downstream of common cancer mutations. The specific biology of glioma cell invasion provides an opportunity to explore the genotype-phenotype correlation in cancer and develop novel glioma-specific therapeutic strategies for this devastating disease.

  2. Preclinical evaluation of spatial frequency domain-enabled wide-field quantitative imaging for enhanced glioma resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibai, Mira; Fisher, Carl; Veilleux, Israel; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Leblond, Frederic; Roberts, David W.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2017-07-01

    5-Aminolevelunic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence-guided resection (FGR) enables maximum safe resection of glioma by providing real-time tumor contrast. However, the subjective visual assessment and the variable intrinsic optical attenuation of tissue limit this technique to reliably delineating only high-grade tumors that display strong fluorescence. We have previously shown, using a fiber-optic probe, that quantitative assessment using noninvasive point spectroscopic measurements of the absolute PpIX concentration in tissue further improves the accuracy of FGR, extending it to surgically curable low-grade glioma. More recently, we have shown that implementing spatial frequency domain imaging with a fluorescent-light transport model enables recovery of two-dimensional images of [PpIX], alleviating the need for time-consuming point sampling of the brain surface. We present first results of this technique modified for in vivo imaging on an RG2 rat brain tumor model. Despite the moderate errors in retrieving the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in the subdiffusive regime of 14% and 19%, respectively, the recovered [PpIX] maps agree within 10% of the point [PpIX] values measured by the fiber-optic probe, validating its potential as an extension or an alternative to point sampling during glioma resection.

  3. Glioma Association and Balancing Selection of ZFPM2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shui-Ying Tsang

    Full Text Available ZFPM2, encoding a zinc finger protein and abundantly expressed in the brain, uterus and smooth muscles, plays important roles in cardiac and gonadal development. Abnormal expression of ZFPM2 in ovarian tumors and neuroblastoma has been reported but hitherto its genetic association with cancer and effects on gliomas have not been studied. In the present study, the hexamer insertion-deletion polymorphism rs71305152, located within a large haplotype block spanning intron 1 to intron 3 of ZFPM2, was genotyped in Chinese cohorts of glioma (n = 350, non-glioma cancer (n = 354 and healthy control (n = 463 by direct sequencing and length polymorphism in gel electrophoresis, and ZFPM2 expression in glioma tissues (n = 69 of different grades was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, potential natural selection pressure acting on the gene was investigated. Disease-association analysis showed that the overall genotype of rs71305152 was significantly associated with gliomas (P = 0.016, and the heterozygous genotype compared to the combined homozygous genotypes was less frequent in gliomas than in controls (P = 0.005 or non-glioma cancers (P = 0.020. ZFPM2 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with the grades of gliomas (P = 0.002, with higher expression levels in the low-grade gliomas. In the astrocytoma subtype, higher ZFPM2 expression was also correlated with the rs71305152 heterozygous genotype (P = 0.028. In addition, summary statistics tests gave highly positive values, demonstrating that the gene is under the influence of balancing selection. These findings suggest that ZFPM2 is a glioma susceptibility gene, its genotype and expression showing associations with incidence and severity, respectively. Moreover, the balancing selection acting on ZFPM2 may be related to the important roles it has to play in multiple organ development or associated disease etiology.

  4. Shikonin kills glioma cells through necroptosis mediated by RIP-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjiang Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Shikonin was reported to induce necroptosis in leukemia cells, but apoptosis in glioma cell lines. Thus, it is needed to clarify whether shikonin could cause necroptosis in glioma cells and investigate its underlying mechanisms. METHODS: Shikonin and rat C6 glioma cell line and Human U87 glioma cell line were used in this study. The cellular viability was assayed by MTT. Flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC and PI double staining was used to analyze cellular death modes. Morphological alterations in C6 glioma cells treated with shikoinin were evaluated by electronic transmission microscopy and fluorescence microscopy with Hoechst 33342 and PI double staining. The level of reactive oxygen species was assessed by using redox-sensitive dye DCFH-DA. The expressional level of necroptosis associated protein RIP-1 was analyzed by western blotting. RESULTS: Shikonin induced cell death in C6 and U87 glioma cells in a dose and time dependent manner. The cell death in C6 and U87 glioma cells could be inhibited by necroptosis inhibitor necrotatin-1, not by pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Shikonin treated C6 glioma cells presented electron-lucent cytoplasm, loss of plasma membrane integrity and intact nuclear membrane in morphology. The increased ROS level caused by shikonin was attenuated by necrostatin-1 and blocking ROS by anti-oxidant NAC rescued shikonin-induced cell death in both C6 and U87 glioma cells. Moreover, the expressional level of RIP-1 was up-regulated by shikonin in a dose and time dependent manner as well, but NAC suppressed RIP-1 expression. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that the cell death caused by shikonin in C6 and U87 glioma cells was mainly via necroptosis. Moreover, not only RIP-1 pathway, but also oxidative stress participated in the activation of shikonin induced necroptosis.

  5. Cognitive impairments in patients with low grade gliomas and high grade gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane C. Miotto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The relationship between brain tumors and cognitive deficits is well established in the literature. However, studies investigating the cognitive status in low and high-grade gliomas patients are scarce, particularly in patients with average or lower educational level. This study aimed at investigating the cognitive functioning in a sample of patients with low and high-grade gliomas before surgical intervention. METHOD: The low-grade (G1, n=19 and high-grade glioma (G2, n=8 patients underwent a detailed neuropsychological assessment of memory, executive functions, visuo-perceptive and visuo-spatial abilities, intellectual level and language. RESULTS: There was a significant impairment on verbal and visual episodic memory, executive functions including mental flexibility, nominal and categorical verbal fluency and speed of information processing in G2. G1 showed only specific deficits on verbal and visual memory recall, mental flexibility and processing speed. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrated different levels of impairments in the executive and memory domains in patients with low and high grade gliomas.

  6. Optic gliomas - study of 26 cases; Gliomas opticos - estudo de 26 casos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenicis Junior, Osvaldo de; Florencio, Filipe Toledo; Haetinger, Rainer G.; Amaral, Lazaro Luis Faria do; Mendonca, Renato Adam; Lima, Sergio Santos [Hospital da Beneficiencia Portuguesa, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1994-07-01

    The authors present a retrospective analysis of 26 cases of patients with optic gliomas, studied between April, 1984, and October, 1993. Association with neurofibromatosis type I (Von Recklinghausen disease) was seen on 6 cases (23%). Magnetic resonance was more sensitive in detecting the pathology, specially to evaluate the retrochiasmatic involvement by the tumor. (author) 7 refs., 7 figs.

  7. c-fos expression in the trigeminal sensory complex and pontine parabrachial areas following experimental tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashiro, T; Nakagawa, K; Satoh, K; Moriyama, H; Takada, K

    1997-07-07

    Ortodontic tooth movement causes continuous pain. However, it does not appear immediately, usually appearing after the application of orthodontic force to the teeth. Mechanically induced inflammatory responses in the periodontal membrane are assumed to be related to the mechanism of the later pain sensation. In the present study, we investigated Fos-like immunoreactivity in the trigeminal sensory complex and pontine parabrachial areas 24 h after the commencement of experimental tooth movement. An orthodontic elastic module was unilaterally inserted between upper molars. Following experimental tooth movement, Fos-like immunoreactive neurons appeared ipsilaterally in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and bilaterally in the lateral parabrachial nucleus. These results indicate that experimental tooth movement evokes delayed and continuous nociception after application of orthodontic force to the teeth and that the nociceptive information would be conveyed to the ipsilateral trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and further processed, at least in part, to the lateral parabrachial nucleus.

  8. Central pontine myelinolysis with a hyperintense lesion in diffusion weighted MRI: overview by means of a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, J.; Bewermeyer, H.; Harzheim, A.

    2005-01-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is a demyelinating disease of the pons often associated with demyelination of other areas of the central nervous system (CNS). The etiology and pathogenesis of this disorder are still not fully understood. However, almost all cases of CPM are related to severe diseases or chronic alcoholism and occur in the setting of rapidly corrected serum hyponatremia and hypotonicity respectively. Depending on the involvement of other CNS structures, the clinical picture can vary considerably. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive investigation for the antemortem diagnosis of CPM, although the radiological findings lag behind and do not necessarily correlate with the clinical picture. Quite obviously diffusion-weighted imaging can be useful in the rapid diagnosis of CPM. This short review summarizes the current knowledge on the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, radiological findings, prognosis and therapeutic approaches of CPM. Characteristical clinical features and MR-findings including hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images are illustrated by a typical case. (orig.)

  9. PCR-Based Simple Subgrouping Is Validated for Classification of Gliomas and Defines Negative Prognostic Copy Number Aberrations in IDH Mutant Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Hikaru; Hayashi, Saeko; Hattori, Natsuki; Kumon, Masanobu; Nishiyama, Yuya; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hayashi, Takuro; Inamasu, Joji; Abe, Masato; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic subgrouping of gliomas has been emphasized recently, particularly after the finding of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations. In a previous study, we investigated whole-chromosome copy number aberrations (CNAs) of gliomas and have described genetic subgrouping based on CNAs and IDH1 mutations. Subsequently, we classified gliomas using simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods to improve the availability of genetic subgrouping. We selected IDH1/2 and TP53 as markers and analyzed 237 adult supratentorial gliomas using Sanger sequencing. Using these markers, we classified gliomas into three subgroups that were strongly associated with patient prognoses. These included IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations, and IDH wild-type gliomas. IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, which mostly corresponded to gliomas carrying 1p19q co-deletions, showed lower recurrence rates than the other 2 groups. In the other high-recurrence groups, the median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations were significantly longer than those of patients with IDH wild-type gliomas. Notably, most IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations had at least one of the CNAs +7q, +8q, -9p, and -11p. Moreover, IDH mutant gliomas with at least one of these CNAs had a significantly worse prognosis than did other IDH mutant gliomas. PCR-based mutation analyses of IDH and TP53 were sufficient for simple genetic diagnosis of glioma that were strongly associated with prognosis of patients and enabled us to detect negative CNAs in IDH mutant gliomas.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells show little tropism for the resting and differentiated cancer stem cell-like glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenlin; Jiang, Zhongmin; Huang, Jianyong; Huang, Shuqiang; Li, Yanxia; Sheng, Feng; Yu, Simiao; Yu, Shizhu; Liu, Xiaozhi

    2014-04-01

    Intrinsic resistance of glioma cells to radiation and chemotherapy is currently hypothesized to be partially attributed to the existence of cancer stem cells. Emerging studies suggest that mesenchymal stem cells may serve as a potential carrier for delivery of therapeutic genes to disseminated glioma cells. However, the tropism character of mesenchymal stem cells for cancer stem cell-like glioma cells has rarely been described. In this study, we obtained homologous bone marrow-derived (BM-) and adipose tissue-derived (AT-) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), fibroblast, and cancer stem cell-like glioma cells (CSGCs) from tumor-bearing mice, and compared the tropism character of BM- and AT-MSCs for CSGCs with various form of existence. To characterize the cell proliferation and differentiation, the spheroids of CSGCs were cultured on the surface of the substrate with different stiffness, combined with or withdrew basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in medium. Our results showed that the CSGCs during the process of cell proliferation, but not in resting and differentiated status, display strong tropism characteristics on both BM- and AT-MSCs, as well as the expression of their cell chemokine factors which mediate cell migration. If the conclusion is further confirmed, it may expose a fatal flaw of MSCs as tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents in the treatment of the CSGCs, even other cancer stem cells, because there always exist a part of cancer stem cells that are in resting status. Overall, our findings provide novel insight into the complex issue of the MSCs as drug delivery in the treatment of brain tumors, especially in tumor stem cells.

  11. Therapeutic options for recurrent malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Siefert, Axel; Schwarz, Silke Birgit; Ganswindt, Ute; Kreth, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Belka, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Despite the given advances in neuro-oncology most patients with high grade malignant glioma ultimately fail locally or locoregionally. In parallel with improvements of initial treatment options, several salvage strategies have been elucidated and already entered clinical practice. Aim of this article is to review the current status of salvage strategies in recurrent high grade glioma. Using the following MESH headings and combinations of these terms the pubmed database was searched: "Glioma", "Recurrence", "Neoplasm Recurrence, Local", "Radiosurgery", "Brachytherapy", "Neurosurgical Procedures" and "Drug Therapy". For citation crosscheck the ISI web of science database was used employing the same search terms. In parallel, the abstracts of ASCO 2008-2009 were analyzed accordingly. Currently the following options for salvage entered clinical practice: re-resection, re-irradiation (stereotactic radiosurgery, (hypo-)fractionated (stereotactic) radiotherapy, interstitial brachytherapy) or single/poly-chemotherapy schedules including new dose-intensified or alternative treatment protocols employing targeted drugs. Re-operation is associated with high morbidity and mortality, however, is an option in a highly selected patient cohort. Since toxicity has been overestimated, re-irradiation is an increasingly used option with precise fractionated radiotherapy being the most optimal technique. On average, time to secondary progression is in the range of several months. Conventional chemotherapy regimens also improve time to secondary progression; however the efficacy is only modest and treatment-related toxicities like myelo-suppression occur very frequently. Molecular targeted agents/kinases are undergoing clinical testing; however no final recommendations can be made. Currently, several re-treatment options with only modest efficacy exist. The relative value of each approach compared to other options is unknown as well as it remains open which sequence of modalities should

  12. Intrinsically Passive Handling and Grasping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stramigioli, Stefano; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Khodabandehloo, Koorosh

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents a control philosophy called Intrinsically Passive Control, which has the feature to properly behave during interaction with any passive objects. The controlled robot will never become unstable due to the physical structure of the controller.

  13. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-07

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  14. Emerging microtubule targets in glioma therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Reginato, M.J.; Baas, P.W.; D'Agostino, L.; Legido, A.; Tuszynski, J. A.; Dráberová, Eduarda; Dráber, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 49-72 ISSN 1071-9091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12050; GA MZd NT14467 Grant - others:GA AV ČR M200521203PIPP; NIH(US) R01 NS028785; Philadelphia Health Education Corporation (PHEC)–St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children Reunified Endowment (C.D.K.)(US) 323256 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : glioma tumorigenesis * glioblastoma * tubulin * microtubules Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.303, year: 2015

  15. Tipifarnib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Progressive High-Grade Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor, or Brain Stem Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-07

    Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma

  16. Correlation of immune phenotype with IDH mutation in diffuse glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghoff, Anna Sophie; Kiesel, Barbara; Widhalm, Georg; Wilhelm, Dorothee; Rajky, Orsolya; Kurscheid, Sebastian; Kresl, Philip; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Marosi, Christine; Hegi, Monika E; Preusser, Matthias

    2017-10-19

    Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) are targets of immune checkpoint inhibitors. Forty-three World Health Organization (WHO) grade II/III gliomas (39 IDH-mutant [mut], 4 IDH-wildtype [wt]) and 14 IDH-mut glioblastomas (GBM) were analyzed for TIL (CD3+; PD1+) infiltration and PD-L1 expression. Results were compared with the data of a previously published series of 117 IDH-wt glioblastomas. PD-L1 gene expression levels were evaluated in 677 diffuse gliomas grades II-IV from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. TIL and PD-L1 expression were observed in approximately half of WHO grade II/III gliomas. IDH-wt status was associated with significantly higher TIL infiltration and PD-L1 expression among all (grades II-IV) cases (n = 174, P IDH-wt compared with IDH-mut samples (LGG: N = 516; P = 1.933e-11, GBM: N = 161; P IDH-mut gliomas had higher PD-L1 gene promoter methylation levels than IDH-wt gliomas (P IDH mutation status. IDH-wt gliomas display a more prominent TIL infiltration and higher PD-L1 expression than IDH-mut cases. Mechanistically this may be at least in part due to differential PD-L1 gene promoter methylation levels. Our findings may be relevant for immune modulatory treatment strategies in glioma patients.

  17. The value of intraoperative sonography in low grade glioma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Athanasios K; Anokhin, Maxim; Vavruska, Jan; Mahvash, Mehran; Scholz, Martin

    2015-04-01

    There is a number of different methods to localize a glioma intraoperatively. Neuronavigation, intraoperative MRI, 5-aminolevulinic acid, as well as intraoperative sonography. Every method has its advantages and disadvantages. Low grade gliomas do not show a specific signal with 5-aminolevulinic acid and are difficult to distinguish macroscopically from normal tissue. In the present study we stress out the importance of intraoperative diagnostic ultrasound for localization of low grade gliomas. We retrospectively evaluated the charts and MRIs of 34 patients with low grade gliomas operated in our department from 2011 until December 2014. The efficacy of ultrasound as an intraoperative navigational tool was assessed. In 15 patients ultrasound was used and in 19 not. Only histologically proven low grades gliomas (astrocytomas grade II) were evaluated. In none of the patients where ultrasound (combined with neuronavigation) was used (N=15) to find the tumors, the target was missed, whereas the exclusive use of neuronavigation missed the target in 5 of 19 cases of small subcortical low grade gliomas. Intraoperative ultrasound is an excellent tool in localizing low grade gliomas intraoperatively. It is an inexpensive, real time neuronavigational tool, which overcomes brain shift. Even when identifying the tumors with ultrasound is very reliable, the extend of resection and the decision to remove any residual tumor with the help of ultrasound is at the moment unreliable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of molecular pathways facilitating glioma cell invasion in situ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ido Nevo

    Full Text Available Gliomas are mostly incurable secondary to their diffuse infiltrative nature. Thus, specific therapeutic targeting of invasive glioma cells is an attractive concept. As cells exit the tumor mass and infiltrate brain parenchyma, they closely interact with a changing micro-environmental landscape that sustains tumor cell invasion. In this study, we used a unique microarray profiling approach on a human glioma stem cell (GSC xenograft model to explore gene expression changes in situ in Invading Glioma Cells (IGCs compared to tumor core, as well as changes in host cells residing within the infiltrated microenvironment relative to the unaffected cortex. IGCs were found to have reduced expression of genes within the extracellular matrix compartment, and genes involved in cell adhesion, cell polarity and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT processes. The infiltrated microenvironment showed activation of wound repair and tissue remodeling networks. We confirmed by protein analysis the downregulation of EMT and polarity related genes such as CD44 and PARD3 in IGCs, and EFNB3, a tissue-remodeling agent enriched at the infiltrated microenvironment. OLIG2, a proliferation regulator and glioma progenitor cell marker upregulated in IGCs was found to function in enhancing migration and stemness of GSCs. Overall, our results unveiled a more comprehensive picture of the complex and dynamic cell autonomous and tumor-host interactive pathways of glioma invasion than has been previously demonstrated. This suggests targeting of multiple pathways at the junction of invading tumor and microenvironment as a viable option for glioma therapy.

  19. Loss of heterozygosity of TRIM3 in malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulay, Jean-Louis; Stiefel, Urs; Taylor, Elisabeth; Dolder, Béatrice; Merlo, Adrian; Hirth, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are frequent primary brain tumors associated with poor prognosis and very limited response to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Besides sharing common growth features with other types of solid tumors, gliomas are highly invasive into adjacent brain tissue, which renders them particularly aggressive and their surgical resection inefficient. Therefore, insights into glioma formation are of fundamental interest in order to provide novel molecular targets for diagnostic purposes and potential anti-cancer drugs. Human Tripartite motif protein 3 (TRIM3) encodes a structural homolog of Drosophila brain tumor (brat) implicated in progenitor cell proliferation control and cancer stem cell suppression. TRIM3 is located within the loss of allelic heterozygosity (LOH) hotspot of chromosome segment 11p15.5, indicating a potential role in tumor suppression. ... Here we analyze 70 primary human gliomas of all types and grades and report somatic deletion mapping as well as single nucleotide polymorphism analysis together with quantitative real-time PCR of chromosome segment 11p15.5. Our analysis identifies LOH in 17 cases (24%) of primary human glioma which defines a common 130 kb-wide interval within the TRIM3 locus as a minimal area of loss. We further detect altered genomic dosage of TRIM3 in two glioma cases with LOH at 11p15.5, indicating homozygous deletions of TRIM3. Loss of heterozygosity of chromosome segment 11p15.5 in malignant gliomas suggests TRIM3 as a candidate brain tumor suppressor gene

  20. The potential for genetically altered microglia to influence glioma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Holsinger, R M D; Kruse, C A; Flügel, A; Graeber, M B

    2013-09-01

    Diffuse and unstoppable infiltration of brain and spinal cord tissue by neoplastic glial cells is the single most important therapeutic problem posed by the common glioma group of tumors: astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, their malignant variants and glioblastoma. These neoplasms account for more than two thirds of all malignant central nervous system tumors. However, most glioma research focuses on an examination of the tumor cells rather than on host-specific, tumor micro-environmental cells and factors. This can explain why existing diffuse glioma therapies fail and why these tumors have remained incurable. Thus, there is a great need for innovation. We describe a novel strategy for the development of a more effective treatment of diffuse glioma. Our approach centers on gaining control over the behavior of the microglia, the defense cells of the CNS, which are manipulated by malignant glioma and support its growth. Armoring microglia against the influences from glioma is one of our research goals. We further discuss how microglia precursors may be genetically enhanced to track down infiltrating glioma cells.

  1. Glioma epidemiology in the central Tunisian population: 1993-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, Saoussen; Brahim, Dorra H'mida-Ben; Ladib, Mohamed; Mama, Nadia; Harrabi, Imed; Tlili, Kalthoum; Yacoubi, Mohamed Tahar; Krifa, Hedi; Hmissa, Sihem; Saad, Ali; Mokni, Moncef

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is a heterogeneous central nervous system (CNS) tumor group that encompasses different histological subtypes with high variability in prognosis. The lesions account for almost 80% of primary malignant brain tumors. The aim of this study is to extend our understanding of the glioma epidemiology in the central Tunisian region. We analyzed 393 gliomas recorded in cancer registry of central Tunisia from 1993 to 2012. Crude incidence rates (CR) and world age-standardized rates (ASR) were estimated using annual population data size and age structure. Statistic correlations were established using Chi-square and Kaplan-Meier test. Tunisian glioma patients were identified with a mean age at diagnosis of 48 years and 1.5 sex ratio (male/female). During the 19 years period of study the highest incidence value was observed in male group between 1998 and 2002 (CR: 0.28, ASR: 0.3). Incidence results underline increasing high grade glioma occurring in the adulthood in the last period (2007-2012). Median survival was 27 months, with 1-, 2- and 5-year survival rates of 42%, 30% and 26%, respectively. Survival was greater in patients with younger age, lower tumor grade, infratentrial tumor location and undergoing a palliative treatment. This central Tunisia gliomas registry study provides important information that could improve glioma management and healthcare practice.

  2. Activation of glioma cells generates immune tolerant NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo; Wu, Wei; Wei, Xiaowei; Li, Yang; Ren, Gang; Fan, Wenhai

    2014-12-12

    Therapeutic outcomes of glioma are currently not encouraging. Tumor tolerance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of glioma. It is reported that micro RNAs (miR) are associated with tumor development. This study aims to investigate the role of miR-92a in the development of tolerant natural killer T (NKT) cells. In this study, U87 cells (a human glioma cell line) and primary glioma cells were prepared. The assessment of miR-92a was performed by real time RT-PCR. The expression of interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-6 in NKT cells was evaluated by flow cytometry. Results showed that abundant IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells were detected in glioma tissue. Cultures of glioma cells and NKT cells induced the expression of IL-6 and IL-10 in NKT cells. Glioma cells expressed miR-92a; the latter played a critical role in the induction of IL-6 and IL-10 expression in NKT cells. The expression of the antitumor molecules, including perforin, Fas ligand, and interferon-γ, was significantly attenuated compared with control NKT cells. The IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells showed less capability in the induction of apoptosis in glioma cells, but showed the immune suppressor functions on CD8(+) T cell activities. We conclude that glioma-derived miR-92a induces IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells; this fraction of NKT cells can suppress cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Selective Targeting to Glioma with Nucleic Acid Aptamers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shraddha Aptekar

    Full Text Available Malignant glioma is characterised by a rapid growth rate and high capacity for invasive infiltration to surrounding brain tissue; hence, diagnosis and treatment is difficult and patient survival is poor. Aptamers contribute a promising and unique technology for the in vitro imaging of live cells and tissues, with a potentially bright future in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics for malignant glioma. The binding selectivity, uptake capacity and binding target of two DNA aptamers, SA43 and SA44, were investigated in glioma cells and patient tissues. The binding assay showed that SA43 and SA44 bound with strong affinity (Kd, 21.56 ± 4.60 nM and Kd, 21.11 ± 3.30 nM respectively to the target U87MG cells. Quantitative analysis by flow cytometry showed that the aptamers were able to actively internalise in U87MG and 1321N1 glioma cells compared to the non-cancerous and non-glioma cell types. Confocal microscopy confirmed staining in the cytoplasm, and co-localisation studies with endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and lysosomal markers suggested internalisation and compartmentalisation within the endomembrane system. Both aptamers selectively bound to Ku 70 and Ku 80 DNA repair proteins as determined by aptoprecipitation (AP followed by mass spectrometry analysis and confirmation by Western blot. In addition, aptohistochemical (AHC staining on paraffin embedded, formalin fixed patient tissues revealed that the binding selectivity was significantly higher for SA43 aptamer in glioma tissues (grade I, II, III and IV compared to the non-cancerous tissues, whereas SA44 did not show selectivity towards glioma tissues. The results indicate that SA43 aptamer can differentiate between glioma and non-cancerous cells and tissues and therefore, shows promise for histological diagnosis of glioma.

  4. Season of Birth and Risk for Adult Onset Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy T. Efird

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Adult onset glioma is a rare cancer which occurs more frequently in Caucasians than African Americans, and in men than women. The etiology of this disease is largely unknown. Exposure to ionizing radiation is the only well established environmental risk factor, and this factor explains only a small percentage of cases. Several recent studies have reported an association between season of birth and glioma risk. This paper reviews the plausibility of evidence focusing on the seasonal interrelation of farming, allergies, viruses, vitamin D, diet, birth weight, and handedness. To date, a convincing explanation for the occurrence of adult gliomas decades after a seasonal exposure at birth remains elusive.

  5. Comprehensive, Integrative Genomic Analysis of Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brat, Daniel J; Verhaak, Roel G W; Aldape, Kenneth D; Yung, W K Alfred; Salama, Sofie R; Cooper, Lee A D; Rheinbay, Esther; Miller, C Ryan; Vitucci, Mark; Morozova, Olena; Robertson, A Gordon; Noushmehr, Houtan; Laird, Peter W; Cherniack, Andrew D; Akbani, Rehan; Huse, Jason T; Ciriello, Giovanni; Poisson, Laila M; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Berger, Mitchel S; Brennan, Cameron; Colen, Rivka R; Colman, Howard; Flanders, Adam E; Giannini, Caterina; Grifford, Mia; Iavarone, Antonio; Jain, Rajan; Joseph, Isaac; Kim, Jaegil; Kasaian, Katayoon; Mikkelsen, Tom; Murray, Bradley A; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Pachter, Lior; Parsons, Donald W; Sougnez, Carrie; Sulman, Erik P; Vandenberg, Scott R; Van Meir, Erwin G; von Deimling, Andreas; Zhang, Hailei; Crain, Daniel; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Troy; Sherman, Mark; Yena, Peggy; Black, Aaron; Bowen, Jay; Dicostanzo, Katie; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Leraas, Kristen M; Lichtenberg, Tara M; Pierson, Christopher R; Ramirez, Nilsa C; Taylor, Cynthia; Weaver, Stephanie; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Davidsen, Tanja; Demchok, John A; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin L; Hutter, Carolyn M; Mills Shaw, Kenna R; Ozenberger, Bradley A; Sheth, Margi; Sofia, Heidi J; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean Claude; Ayala, Brenda; Baboud, Julien; Chudamani, Sudha; Jensen, Mark A; Liu, Jia; Pihl, Todd; Raman, Rohini; Wan, Yunhu; Wu, Ye; Ally, Adrian; Auman, J Todd; Balasundaram, Miruna; Balu, Saianand; Baylin, Stephen B; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bootwalla, Moiz S; Bowlby, Reanne; Bristow, Christopher A; Brooks, Denise; Butterfield, Yaron; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Scott; Chin, Lynda; Chu, Andy; Chuah, Eric; Cibulskis, Kristian; Clarke, Amanda; Coetzee, Simon G; Dhalla, Noreen; Fennell, Tim; Fisher, Sheila; Gabriel, Stacey; Getz, Gad; Gibbs, Richard; Guin, Ranabir; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Hayes, D Neil; Hinoue, Toshinori; Hoadley, Katherine; Holt, Robert A; Hoyle, Alan P; Jefferys, Stuart R; Jones, Steven; Jones, Corbin D; Kucherlapati, Raju; Lai, Phillip H; Lander, Eric; Lee, Semin; Lichtenstein, Lee; Ma, Yussanne; Maglinte, Dennis T; Mahadeshwar, Harshad S; Marra, Marco A; Mayo, Michael; Meng, Shaowu; Meyerson, Matthew L; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Moore, Richard A; Mose, Lisle E; Mungall, Andrew J; Pantazi, Angeliki; Parfenov, Michael; Park, Peter J; Parker, Joel S; Perou, Charles M; Protopopov, Alexei; Ren, Xiaojia; Roach, Jeffrey; Sabedot, Thaís S; Schein, Jacqueline; Schumacher, Steven E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Seth, Sahil; Shen, Hui; Simons, Janae V; Sipahimalani, Payal; Soloway, Matthew G; Song, Xingzhi; Sun, Huandong; Tabak, Barbara; Tam, Angela; Tan, Donghui; Tang, Jiabin; Thiessen, Nina; Triche, Timothy; Van Den Berg, David J; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Waring, Scot; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Wong, Tina; Wu, Junyuan; Xi, Liu; Xu, Andrew W; Yang, Lixing; Zack, Travis I; Zhang, Jianhua; Aksoy, B Arman; Arachchi, Harindra; Benz, Chris; Bernard, Brady; Carlin, Daniel; Cho, Juok; DiCara, Daniel; Frazer, Scott; Fuller, Gregory N; Gao, JianJiong; Gehlenborg, Nils; Haussler, David; Heiman, David I; Iype, Lisa; Jacobsen, Anders; Ju, Zhenlin; Katzman, Sol; Kim, Hoon; Knijnenburg, Theo; Kreisberg, Richard Bailey; Lawrence, Michael S; Lee, William; Leinonen, Kalle; Lin, Pei; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Liu, Yingchun; Liu, Yuexin; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon; Ng, Sam; Noble, Michael S; Paull, Evan; Rao, Arvind; Reynolds, Sheila; Saksena, Gordon; Sanborn, Zack; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Shen, Ronglai; Shmulevich, Ilya; Sinha, Rileen; Stuart, Josh; Sumer, S Onur; Sun, Yichao; Tasman, Natalie; Taylor, Barry S; Voet, Doug; Weinhold, Nils; Weinstein, John N; Yang, Da; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Zheng, Siyuan; Zhang, Wei; Zou, Lihua; Abel, Ty; Sadeghi, Sara; Cohen, Mark L; Eschbacher, Jenny; Hattab, Eyas M; Raghunathan, Aditya; Schniederjan, Matthew J; Aziz, Dina; Barnett, Gene; Barrett, Wendi; Bigner, Darell D; Boice, Lori; Brewer, Cathy; Calatozzolo, Chiara; Campos, Benito; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Chan, Timothy A; Cuppini, Lucia; Curley, Erin; Cuzzubbo, Stefania; Devine, Karen; DiMeco, Francesco; Duell, Rebecca; Elder, J Bradley; Fehrenbach, Ashley; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Friedman, William; Fulop, Jordonna; Gardner, Johanna; Hermes, Beth; Herold-Mende, Christel; Jungk, Christine; Kendler, Ady; Lehman, Norman L; Lipp, Eric; Liu, Ouida; Mandt, Randy; McGraw, Mary; Mclendon, Roger; McPherson, Christopher; Neder, Luciano; Nguyen, Phuong; Noss, Ardene; Nunziata, Raffaele; Ostrom, Quinn T; Palmer, Cheryl; Perin, Alessandro; Pollo, Bianca; Potapov, Alexander; Potapova, Olga; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Rotin, Daniil; Scarpace, Lisa; Schilero, Cathy; Senecal, Kelly; Shimmel, Kristen; Shurkhay, Vsevolod; Sifri, Suzanne; Singh, Rosy; Sloan, Andrew E; Smolenski, Kathy; Staugaitis, Susan M; Steele, Ruth; Thorne, Leigh; Tirapelli, Daniela P C; Unterberg, Andreas; Vallurupalli, Mahitha; Wang, Yun; Warnick, Ronald; Williams, Felicia; Wolinsky, Yingli; Bell, Sue; Rosenberg, Mara; Stewart, Chip; Huang, Franklin; Grimsby, Jonna L; Radenbaugh, Amie J; Zhang, Jianan

    2015-06-25

    Diffuse low-grade and intermediate-grade gliomas (which together make up the lower-grade gliomas, World Health Organization grades II and III) have highly variable clinical behavior that is not adequately predicted on the basis of histologic class. Some are indolent; others quickly progress to glioblastoma. The uncertainty is compounded by interobserver variability in histologic diagnosis. Mutations in IDH, TP53, and ATRX and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion) have been implicated as clinically relevant markers of lower-grade gliomas. We performed genomewide analyses of 293 lower-grade gliomas from adults, incorporating exome sequence, DNA copy number, DNA methylation, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and targeted protein expression. These data were integrated and tested for correlation with clinical outcomes. Unsupervised clustering of mutations and data from RNA, DNA-copy-number, and DNA-methylation platforms uncovered concordant classification of three robust, nonoverlapping, prognostically significant subtypes of lower-grade glioma that were captured more accurately by IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than by histologic class. Patients who had lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation and 1p/19q codeletion had the most favorable clinical outcomes. Their gliomas harbored mutations in CIC, FUBP1, NOTCH1, and the TERT promoter. Nearly all lower-grade gliomas with IDH mutations and no 1p/19q codeletion had mutations in TP53 (94%) and ATRX inactivation (86%). The large majority of lower-grade gliomas without an IDH mutation had genomic aberrations and clinical behavior strikingly similar to those found in primary glioblastoma. The integration of genomewide data from multiple platforms delineated three molecular classes of lower-grade gliomas that were more concordant with IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than with histologic class. Lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation either had 1p/19q codeletion or carried a TP53 mutation. Most

  6. Photodynamic therapy of recurrent cerebral glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu-Gan; Wu, Si-En; Chen, Zong-Qian; Sun, Wei

    1993-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed on 11 cases of recurrent cerebral glioma, including 3 cases of recurrent glioblastoma, 7 of recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma, and 1 recurrent ependymoma. Hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) was administered intravenously at a dose of 4 - 7 mg/kg 5 - 24 hours before the operation. All patients underwent a craniotomy with a nearly radical excision of the tumor following which the tumor bed was irradiated with 630 nm laser light emitting either an argon pumped dye laser or frequency double YAG pumped dye laser for 30 to 80 minutes with a total dose of 50 J/cm2 (n equals 1), 100 J/cm2 (n equals 2), 200 J/cm2 (n equals 7), and 300 J/cm2 (n equals 1). The temperature was kept below 37 degree(s)C by irrigation. Two patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy. There was no evidence of increased cerebral edema, and no other toxicity by the therapy. All patients were discharged from the hospital within 15 days after surgery. We conclude that PDT using 4 - 7 mg/kg of HPD and 630 nm light with a dose of up to 300 J/cm2 can be used as an adjuvant therapy with no additional complications. Adjuvant PDT in the treatment of recurrent glioma is better than simple surgery.

  7. Cerebral Connectivity and High-grade Gliomas: Evolving Concepts of Eloquent Brain in Surgery for Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Konakondla

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in imaging the human brain help us map and understand the intricacies of cerebral connectivity. Current techniques and specific imaging sequences, however, do come with limitations. Image resolution, variability of techniques and interpretation of images across institutions are just a few concerns. In the setting of high-grade gliomas, understanding how these pathways are affected during tumor growth, surgical resection, and in the brain plasticity presents an even greater challenge. Clinical symptoms, tumor growth, and intraoperative electrical stimulation are important peri-operative considerations to assist in determining neuronal re-wiring and establish a basis of anatomic and functional correlation. The application of functional mapping coupled with the understanding of the natural history of gliomas and implications of neural plasticity, is critical in achieving the goals of maximal tumor resection while minimizing post operative deficits and improving quality of life.

  8. Progression of pathological changes in the middle cerebellar peduncle by diffusion tensor imaging correlates with lesser motor gains after pontine infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhijian; Zeng, Jinsheng; Zhang, Cuimei; Liu, Sirun; Ling, Xueying; Wang, Fang; Ling, Li; Hou, Qinghua; Xing, Shihui; Pei, Zhong

    2009-09-01

    Wallerian degeneration in pyramidal tract following supratentorial stroke has been detected by some studies using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), but the Wallerian degeneration in middle cerebellar peduncle after pontine infarction and its potential clinical significance remain to be confirmed. Seventeen patients with a recent focal pontine infarct underwent 3 DTIs at week 1 (W1), week 4 (W4), and week 12 (W12) after onset. Seventeen age-matched and gender-matched controls underwent DTI one time. Mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy (FA) were measured in the basis pontis and bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles. Neurological deficit, motor deficit, functional independence, and limbs ataxia were assessed with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Stroke Scale, Fugl-Meyer scale, Barthel Index, and the second part of International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale. FA values at the bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles decreased significantly from W1 to W12 progressively (PScale, Fugl-Meyer scale, and Barthel Index over time (PScale and less increase in the Fugl-Meyer scale, as well as greater ataxia over time. Wallerian degeneration in the middle cerebellar peduncle revealed by DTI may hinder the process of neurological recovery following a focal pontine infarct.

  9. A Phase I and Biology Study of Gefitinib and Radiation in Children with Newly Diagnosed Brain Stem Gliomas or Supratentorial Malignant Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, J. Russell; Stewart, Clinton F.; Kocak, Mehmet; Broniscer, Alberto; Phillips, Peter; Douglas, James G.; Blaney, Susan M.; Packer, Roger J.; Gururangan, Sri; Banerjee, Anu; Kieran, Mark W.; Kun, Larry E.; Gilbertson, Richard J.; Boyett, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD); study the pharmacology of escalating doses of gefitinib combined with radiation therapy in patients ≤21 years with newly diagnosed intrinsic brainstem gliomas (BSG) and incompletely resected supratentorial malignant gliomas (STMG); and to investigate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification and expression in STMG. Patients and methods Three strata were identified: Stratum 1A - BSG; Stratum IB - incompletely resected STMG not receiving enzyme inducing anti-convulsant drugs (EIACD); and Stratum II - incompletely resected STMG receiving EIACD. Dose escalation using a modified 3 + 3 cohort design was performed in strata IA & II. The initial gefitinib dosage was 100mg/m2/day commencing with radiation therapy and the dose-finding period extended until 2 weeks post-radiation. Pharmacokinetics (PK) and biology studies were performed in consenting patients. Results Of 23 eligible patients, 20 were evaluable for dose-finding. MTDs for strata IA and II were not established as accrual was halted due to four patients experiencing symptomatic intratumoral hemorrhage (ITH); 2 during and 2 post dose-finding. ITH was observed in 0 of 11 patients treated at 100mg/m2/day, 1 of 10 at 250mg/m2/day, and 3 of 12 at 375mg/m2/day. Subsequently a second patient at 250mg/m2/day experienced ITH. PK analysis showed the median gefitinib systemic exposure increased with dosage (p=0.04). EGFR was overexpressed in 5 of 11 STMG and amplified in 4 (36%) samples. Conclusion This trial provides clear evidence of EGFR amplification in a significant proportion of paediatric STMG and 250mg/m2/day was selected for the Phase II trial. PMID:20708924

  10. Immunotherapy Approaches for Malignant Glioma From 2007 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant glioma is a deadly disease for which there have been few therapeutic advances over the past century. Although previous treatments were largely unsuccessful, glioma may be an ideal target for immune-based therapy. Recently, translational research led to several clinical trials based on tumor immunotherapy to treat patients with malignant glioma. Here we review 17 recent glioma immunotherapy clinical trials, published over the past 3 years. Various approaches were used, including passive transfer of naked and radiolabeled antibodies, tumor antigen-specific peptide immunization, and the use of patient tumor cells with or without dendritic cells as vaccines. We compare and discuss the current state of the art of clinical immunotherapy treatment, as well as its limited successes, pitfalls, and future potential. PMID:20424975

  11. Cognitive rehabilitation in patients with gliomas : a randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gehring, Karin; Sitskoorn, Margriet M; Gundy, Chad M; Sikkes, Sietske A M; Klein, Martin; Postma, Tjeerd J; van den Bent, Martin J; Beute, Guus N; Enting, Roelien H.; Kappelle, Arnoud C; Boogerd, Willem; Veninga, Theo; Twijnstra, Albert; Boerman, Dolf H; Taphoorn, Martin J B; Aaronson, Neil K

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with gliomas often experience cognitive deficits, including problems with attention and memory. This randomized, controlled trial evaluated the effects of a multifaceted cognitive rehabilitation program (CRP) on cognitive functioning and selected quality-of-life domains in patients

  12. Glioma-Associated Antigen HEATR1 Induces Functional Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Patients with Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Bao Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A2B5+ glioblastoma (GBM cells have glioma stem-like cell (GSC properties that are crucial to chemotherapy resistance and GBM relapse. T-cell-based antigens derived from A2B5+ GBM cells provide important information for immunotherapy. Here, we show that HEAT repeat containing 1 (HEATR1 expression in GBM tissues was significantly higher than that in control brain tissues. Furthermore, HEATR1 expression in A2B5+ U87 cells was higher than that in A2B5−U87 cells (P=0.016. Six peptides of HEATR1 presented by HLA-A*02 were selected for testing of their ability to induce T-cell responses in patients with GBM. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors (n=6 and patients with glioma (n=33 were stimulated with the peptide mixture, eight patients with malignant gliomas had positive reactivity with a significantly increased number of responding T-cells. The peptides HEATR1682–690, HEATR11126–1134, and HEATR1757–765 had high affinity for binding to HLA-A*02:01 and a strong capacity to induce CTL response. CTLs against HEATR1 peptides were capable of recognizing and lysing GBM cells and GSCs. These data are the first to demonstrate that HEATR1 could induce specific CTL responses targeting both GBM cells and GSCs, implicating that HEATR1 peptide-based immunotherapy could be a novel promising strategy for treating patients with GBM.

  13. Podoplanin increases migration and angiogenesis in malignant glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Grau, Stefan J; Trillsch, Fabian; Tonn, Joerg-Christian; Goldbrunner, Roland H; Noessner, Elfriede; Nelson, Peter J; von Luettichau, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Expression of podoplanin in glial brain tumors is grade dependent. While serving as a marker for tumor progression and modulating invasion in various neoplasms, little is known about podoplanin function in gliomas. Therefore we stably transfected two human glioma cell lines (U373MG and U87MG) with expression plasmids encoding podoplanin. The efficacy of transfection was confirmed by FACS analysis, PCR and immunocytochemistry. Cells were then sorted for highly podoplanin expressing cells (U373...

  14. Molecular Subtyping of Tumors from Patients with Familial Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Vanessa Y; Praska, Corinne E; Armstrong, Georgina; Kollmeyer, Thomas M; Yamada, Seiji; Decker, Paul A; Kosel, Matthew L; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Consortium, The Gliogene; Lachance, Daniel H; Bainbridge, Matthew N; Melin, Beatrice S; Bondy, Melissa L; Jenkins, Robert B

    2017-10-10

    Single-gene mutation syndromes account for some familial glioma (FG); however, they make up only a small fraction of glioma families. Gliomas can be classified into 3 major molecular subtypes based on IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion. We hypothesized that the prevalence of molecular subtypes might differ in familial versus sporadic gliomas, and that tumors in the same family should have the same molecular subtype. Participants in the FG study (Gliogene) provided samples for germline DNA analysis. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor was obtained for a subset of FG cases, and DNA was extracted. We analyzed tissue from 75 families, including 10 families containing a second affected family member. Copy number variation (CNV) data was obtained using a first-generation Affymetrix molecular inversion probe (MIP) array. Samples from 62 of 75 (83%) FG cases could be classified into the 3 subtypes. The prevalence of the molecular subtypes was: 30 (48%) IDH-wild type, 21 (34%) IDH-mutant non-codeleted, and 11 (19%) IDH-mutant and 1p/19q-codeleted. This distribution of molecular subtypes was not statistically different from that of sporadic gliomas (p=0.54). Of 10 paired FG samples, molecular subtypes were concordant for 7 (κ=0.59): 3 IDH-mutant non-codeleted, 2 IDH-wild type, and 2 IDH-mutant and 1p/19q-codeleted gliomas. Our data suggest that within individual families, patients develop gliomas of the same molecular subtype. However, we did not observe differences in the prevalence of the molecular subtypes in FG compared with sporadic gliomas. These observations provide further insight about the distribution of molecular subtypes in FG. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. Multiple Daily Fractionated RT for Malignant Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kang Mo; Chang, Hye Sook; Ahn, Seoung Do; Choi, Eun Kyung [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-15

    Since Jan. 1992, authors have conducted a pilot study to treat malignant glioma with multiple daily fractionated (MDF) radiation therapy and this paper presents the outcome compared MDF to conventional fractionated (CF) radiation therapy. Between Sep. 1989 and Jan. 1993, forty-three patients with high grade glioma of brain except brain stem glioma were treated: nineteen patients were treated with CF radiation therapy and 24 patients were treated with MDF radiation therapy. In CF radiation therapy, total dose was 6300cHy/35fx in 7 weeks, which 5040cGy was delivered to the initial target volume and 1260cGy to reduced target volume. And in MDF radiation therapy, total dose was 6400cGy/40fx in 4 weeks, which 3200cGy was delivered to the initial target volume as 160cGy 2 times daily 6hr apart. All patients had histologically confirmed anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) of glioblastoma multiforme(GBM) with stereotactic biopsy or craniotomy for subtotal or gross tumor resection. The rage of follow-up was 7 months to 4 years with a median follow-up of 9 months. The Median survival from surgery was 9 months for all patients. The median survival was 9 months and 10 months for MDF group and CF group and 10 months and 9.5 months for glioblastoma multiforme and anaplastic astrocytoma, respectively. In 36 patients with follow-up CT scan or MRI scan, disease status was evaluated according to treatment group. Four patients (GBM:3, AA:1) of 21 patients in MDF group, were alive with no evidence of disease, while none of patient was alive with no evidence of disease in CF group. The progression of disease had occurred in 20 patients, 11 patients and 9 patients in MDF group and CF group, respectively. All of these patients showed in-field progression of disease. Four of 11 patients (27%) in MDF group showed the new lesion outside of the treatment field, while 5 of 9 patients(56%) in CF group. In our study the prognosis was not influenced by age, KPS, grade, extent of surgery and different

  16. Extra-Neural Metastases of Malignant Gliomas: Myth or Reality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauchesne, Patrick [Neuro-Oncology, CHU de NANCY, Hôpital Central, CO n°34, 54035 Nancy Cedex (France)

    2011-01-27

    Malignant gliomas account for approximately 60% of all primary brain tumors in adults. Prognosis for these patients has not significantly changed in recent years— despite debulking surgery, radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy—with a median survival of 9–12 months. Virtually no patients are cured of their illness. Malignant gliomas are usually locally invasive tumors, though extra-neural metastases can sometimes occur late in the course of the disease (median of two years). They generally appear after craniotomy although spontaneous metastases have also been reported. The incidence of these metastases from primary intra-cranial malignant gliomas is low; it is estimated at less than 2% of all cases. Extra-neural metastases from gliomas frequently occur late in the course of the disease (median of two years), and generally appear after craniotomy, but spontaneous metastases have also been reported. Malignant glioma metastases usually involve the regional lymph nodes, lungs and pleural cavity, and occasionally the bone and liver. In this review, we present three cases of extra-neural metastasis of malignant gliomas from our department, summarize the main reported cases in literature, and try to understand the mechanisms underlying these systemic metastases.

  17. C-MET overexpression and amplification in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yoonjin; Kim, Seong-Ik; Park, Chul-Kee; Paek, Sun Ha; Lee, Soon-Tae; Park, Sung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    We investigated c-Met overexpression and MET gene amplification in gliomas to determine their incidence and prognostic significance. c-Met immunohistochemistry and MET gene fluorescence in situ hybridization were carried out on tissue microarrays from 250 patients with gliomas (137 grade IV GBMs and 113 grade II and III diffuse gliomas). Clinicopathological features of these cases were reviewed. c-Met overexpression and MET gene amplification were detected in 13.1% and 5.1% of the GBMs, respectively. All the MET-amplified cases showed c-Met overexpression, but MET amplification was not always concordant with c-Met overexpression. None of grade II and III gliomas demonstrated c-Met overexpression or MET gene amplification. Mean survival of the GBM patients with MET amplification was not significantly different from patients without MET amplification (P=0.155). However, GBM patients with c-Met overexpression survived longer than patients without c-Met overexpression (P=0.035). Although MET amplification was not related to poor GBM prognosis, it is partially associated with the aggressiveness of gliomas, as MET amplification was found only in grade IV, not in grade II and III gliomas. We suggest that MET inhibitor therapy may be beneficial in about 5% GBMs, which was the incidence of MET gene amplification found in the patients included in this study.

  18. Gamma-glutamylcyclotransferase promotes the growth of human glioma cells by activating Notch-Akt signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Shang-Hang; Yu, Ning; Liu, Xi-Yao; Tan, Guo-Wei; Wang, Zhan-Xiang, E-mail: md_wzx7189@163.com

    2016-03-18

    Glioma as an aggressive type tumor is rapidly growing and has become one of the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. γ-Glutamylcyclotransferase (GGCT) has been shown as a diagnostic marker in various cancers. To reveal whether there is a correlation between GGCT and human glioma, GGCT expression in human glioma tissues and cell lines was first determined. We found that GGCT expression was up-regulated in human glioma tissues and cell lines. Further, we demonstrate that GGCT knockdown inhibits glioma cell T98G and U251 proliferation and colony formation, whereas GGCT overexpression leads to oppose effects. GGCT overexpression promotes the expression of Notch receptors and activates Akt signaling in glioma cells, and Notch-Akt signaling is activated in glioma tissues with high expression of GGCT. Finally, we show that inhibition of Notch-Akt signaling with Notch inhibitor MK-0752 blocks the effects of GGCT on glioma proliferation and colony formation. In conclusion, GGCT plays a critical role in glioma cell proliferation and may be a potential cancer therapeutic target. - Highlights: • GGCT expression is up-regulated in human glioma tissues and cell lines. • GGCT promotes glioma cell growth and colony formation. • GGCT promotes the activation of Notch-Akt signaling in glioma cells and tissues. • Notch inhibition blocks the role of GGCT in human glioma cells.

  19. Characterization of Partial Intrinsic Symmetries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shehu, Aurela; Brunton, Alan; Wuhrer, Stefanie; Wand, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We present a mathematical framework and algorithm for characterizing and extracting partial intrinsic symmetries of surfaces, which is a fundamental building block for many modern geometry processing algorithms. Our goal is to compute all “significant” symmetry information of the shape, which we

  20. Reading: Intrinsic versus Extrinsic Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    Much debate centers on motivating student in reading achievement. Should students feel motivated from within (intrinsic motivation), or is it better to have extrinsic motivation whereby external stimuli are used to help learners achieve optimally in reading? This paper aims to analyze the two points of view about motivating students in reading…

  1. Intrinsic volumes of symmetric cones

    OpenAIRE

    Amelunxen, Dennis; Bürgisser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We compute the intrinsic volumes of the cone of positive semidefinite matrices over the real numbers, over the complex numbers, and over the quaternions, in terms of integrals related to Mehta's integral. Several applications for the probabilistic analysis of semidefinite programming are given.

  2. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy intrinsic seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinger, C.T.; Burr, T.; Vnuk, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    We have begun to quantify the ability of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to detect the removal and replacement of the lid of a simulated special nuclear materials drum. Conceptually, the acoustic spectrum of a container establishcs a baseline fingerprint, which we refer to as an intrinsic seal, for the container. Simply removing and replacing the lid changes some of the resonant frequencies because it is impossible to exactly duplicate all of the stress patterns between the lid and container. Preliminary qualitative results suggested that the ARS intrinsic seal could discriminate between cases where a lid has or has not been removed. The present work is directed at quantifying the utility of the ARS intrinsic seal technique, including the technique's sensitivity to ''nuisance'' effects, such as temperature swings, movement of the container, and placement of the transducers. These early quantitative tests support the potential of the ARS intrinsic seal application, but also reveal a possible sensitivity to nuisance effects that could limit environments or conditions under which the technique is effective

  3. Intrinsic Motivation in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Benjamin; Nambiar, Nathan; Hemphill, Caroline; Devietti, Elizabeth; Massengale, Alexandra; McCredie, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    This article describes ways in which educators can use Harter's perceived competence motivation theory, the achievement goal theory, and self-determination theory to develop students' intrinsic motivation to maintain physical fitness, as demonstrated by the Sound Body Sound Mind curriculum and proven effective by the 2013 University of…

  4. Immunotherapy of diffuse gliomas: biological background, current status and future developments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauer, O.M.; Wesseling, P.; Adema, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Despite aggressive multimodal treatment approaches, the prognosis for patients with diffuse gliomas remains disappointing. Glioma cells often extensively infiltrate in the surrounding brain parenchyma, a phenomenon that helps them to escape surgical removal, radiation exposure and chemotherapy.

  5. Elevation of Urinary 2-Hydroxyglutarate in IDH-Mutant Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Amir T; Nahed, Brian V; Wander, Seth A; Iafrate, A John; Borger, Darrell R; Hu, Ranliang; Thabet, Ashraf; Cahill, Daniel P; Perry, Ashley M; Joseph, Christelle P; Muzikansky, Alona; Chi, Andrew S

    2016-02-01

    Recurrent mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 genes, which are frequent in gliomas, result in marked accumulation of the metabolic by-product 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) within tumors. In other malignancies, such as acute myeloid leukemia, presence of IDH mutation is associated with elevated 2-HG levels in serum or urine compartments. Circulating 2-HG in patients with glial malignancies has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we analyzed 2-HG levels in the serum and urine of a large set of patients with IDH-mutant and IDH-wild-type glioma, and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a subset of this cohort. We found that 2-HG was elevated in the urine of patients with IDH-mutant versus IDH-wild-type glioma, although no significant differences in 2-HG levels were observed in the serum or the small set of CSF samples obtained. Among patients with IDH-mutant glioma, 2-HG levels did not differ based on the histopathologic grade, genetic subtype (TP53 mutant or 1p/19q codeleted), presence of a canonical (IDH1 R132H) or noncanonical (any other IDH variant) mutation, or treatment type. Our finding suggests that urinary 2-HG is increased among patients with IDH-mutant gliomas, and may represent a future surrogate, noninvasive biomarker to aid in diagnosis, prognosis, and management. Patients with glioma who harbor mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase genes showed selective elevation of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate in the urine. Similar elevations were not identified in the serum or cerebrospinal fluid. 2-Hydroxyglutarate may serve as a useful, noninvasive biomarker to stratify patients newly diagnosed with glioma with regard to prognosis and management. ©AlphaMed Press.

  6. The role of drebrin in glioma migration and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terakawa, Yuzo [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Agnihotri, Sameer; Golbourn, Brian; Nadi, Mustafa; Sabha, Nesrin; Smith, Christian A. [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Croul, Sidney E. [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Division of Neuropathology, University Health Network, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology (Canada); Rutka, James T., E-mail: james.rutka@sickkids.ca [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-02-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current advances in therapy consisting of surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation, the overall survival rate still remains poor. Therapeutic failures are partly attributable to the highly infiltrative nature of tumor adjacent to normal brain parenchyma. Recently, evidence is mounting to suggest that actin cytoskeleton dynamics are critical components of the cell invasion process. Drebrin is an actin-binding protein involved in the regulation of actin filament organization, and plays a significant role in cell motility; however, the role of drebrin in glioma cell invasiveness has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study was aimed to clarify the role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and cell motility. Here we show that drebrin is expressed in glioma cell lines and in operative specimens of GBM. We demonstrate that stable overexpression of drebrin in U87 cells leads to alterations in cell morphology, and induces increased invasiveness in vitro while knockdown of drebrin in U87 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases invasion and migration. In addition, we show that depletion of drebrin by siRNA alters glioma cell morphology in A172 GBM cell line. Our results suggest that drebrin contributes to the maintenance of cell shape, and may play an important role in glioma cell motility. - Highlights: ► Drebrin is an actin-binding protein aberrantly expressed in several cancers. ► Role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and motility is previously unknown. ► We demonstrate that drebrin is expressed in 40% of glioblastoma specimens. ► Drebrin plays a significant role in modulating glioma cell migration and invasion.

  7. Early life exposures and the risk of adult glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anic, Gabriella M; Madden, Melissa H; Sincich, Kelly; Thompson, Reid C; Nabors, L Burton; Olson, Jeffrey J; LaRocca, Renato V; Browning, James E; Pan, Edward; Egan, Kathleen M

    2013-09-01

    Exposure to common infections in early life may stimulate immune development and reduce the risk for developing cancer. Birth order and family size are proxies for the timing of exposure to childhood infections with several studies showing a reduced risk of glioma associated with a higher order of birth (and presumed younger age at infection). The aim of this study was to examine whether birth order, family size, and other early life exposures are associated with the risk of glioma in adults using data collected in a large clinic-based US case-control study including 889 glioma cases and 903 community controls. A structured interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on family structure, childhood exposures and other potential risk factors. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between early life factors and glioma risk. Persons having any siblings were at significantly lower risk for glioma when compared to those reporting no siblings (OR=0.64; 95% CI 0.44-0.93; p=0.020). Compared to first-borns, individuals with older siblings had a significantly lower risk (OR=0.75; 95% CI 0.61-0.91; p=0.004). Birth weight, having been breast fed in infancy, and season of birth were not associated with glioma risk. The current findings lend further support to a growing body of evidence that early exposure to childhood infections reduces the risk of glioma onset in children and adults.

  8. Treating malignant glioma in Chinese patients: update on temozolomide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang L

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Liang Chang,1 Jun Su,1 Xiuzhi Jia,2,3 Huan Ren2,3 1Department of Neurosurgery, The Tumor Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 2Department of Immunology, Harbin Medical University, 3Key Lab Infection and Immunity, Heilongjiang Province, Harbin, People's Republic of China Abstract: Malignant glioma, ie, anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma, is the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor in the People's Republic of China, and is particularly aggressive. The median survival of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma is only 12–14 months despite advanced therapeutic strategies. Treatment of malignant glioma consists mainly of surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy. Temozolomide (TMZ, a second-generation oral alkylating agent, is playing an increasingly important role in the treatment of malignant glioma in Chinese patients. Since the publication of a study by Stupp et al in 2005, which used a protocol of conventional fractionated irradiation with concomitant TMZ followed by standard TMZ for six cycles, many clinical studies in the People's Republic of China have demonstrated that such a treatment strategy has significantly improved efficacy with limited side effects for newly diagnosed glioblastoma after surgery as compared with strategies that do not contain TMZ. However, as a relatively new agent, the history and development of TMZ for malignant glioma is not well documented in Chinese patients. Multicenter, randomized controlled trials including appropriately sized patient populations investigating multiple aspects of TMZ therapy and related combination therapies are warranted in patients with malignant glioma. This review provides an update on the efficacy, mechanism of action, adverse reactions, and clinical role of TMZ in the treatment of malignant glioma in Chinese patients. Keywords: malignant glioma, chemotherapy, temozolomide, efficacy, side effect, People's Republic of China

  9. Loss of heterozygosity of TRIM3 in malignant gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolder Béatrice

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant gliomas are frequent primary brain tumors associated with poor prognosis and very limited response to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Besides sharing common growth features with other types of solid tumors, gliomas are highly invasive into adjacent brain tissue, which renders them particularly aggressive and their surgical resection inefficient. Therefore, insights into glioma formation are of fundamental interest in order to provide novel molecular targets for diagnostic purposes and potential anti-cancer drugs. Human Tripartite motif protein 3 (TRIM3 encodes a structural homolog of Drosophila brain tumor (brat implicated in progenitor cell proliferation control and cancer stem cell suppression. TRIM3 is located within the loss of allelic heterozygosity (LOH hotspot of chromosome segment 11p15.5, indicating a potential role in tumor suppression. ... Methods Here we analyze 70 primary human gliomas of all types and grades and report somatic deletion mapping as well as single nucleotide polymorphism analysis together with quantitative real-time PCR of chromosome segment 11p15.5. Results Our analysis identifies LOH in 17 cases (24% of primary human glioma which defines a common 130 kb-wide interval within the TRIM3 locus as a minimal area of loss. We further detect altered genomic dosage of TRIM3 in two glioma cases with LOH at 11p15.5, indicating homozygous deletions of TRIM3. Conclusion Loss of heterozygosity of chromosome segment 11p15.5 in malignant gliomas suggests TRIM3 as a candidate brain tumor suppressor gene.

  10. [18F]-fluoro-l-thymidine PET and advanced MRI for preoperative grading of gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Collet

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Whereas advanced MRI parameters give indications for the grading of gliomas, the addition of [18F]-FLT-PET could be of interest for the accurate preoperative classification of diffuse gliomas, particularly for identification of doubtful grade III and IV gliomas.

  11. Description of selected characteristics of familial glioma patients – Results from the Gliogene Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadetzki, Siegal; Bruchim, Revital; Oberman, Bernice

    2013-01-01

    While certain inherited syndromes (e.g. Neurofibromatosis or Li-Fraumeni) are associated with an increased risk of glioma, most familial gliomas are non-syndromic. This study describes the demographic and clinical characteristics of the largest series of non-syndromic glioma families ascertained...

  12. Extracellular diffusion quantified by magnetic resonance imaging during rat C6 glioma cell progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Song

    Full Text Available Solution reflux and edema hamper the convection-enhanced delivery of the standard treatment for glioma. Therefore, a real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI method was developed to monitor the dosing process, but a quantitative analysis of local diffusion and clearance parameters has not been assessed. The objective of this study was to compare diffusion into the extracellular space (ECS at different stages of rat C6 gliomas, and analyze the effects of the extracellular matrix (ECM on the diffusion process. At 10 and 20 days, after successful glioma modeling, gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA was introduced into the ECS of rat C6 gliomas. Diffusion parameters and half-life of the reagent were then detected using MRI, and quantified according to the mathematical model of diffusion. The main ECM components [chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs, collagen IV, and tenascin C] were detected by immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses. In 20-day gliomas, Gd-DTPA diffused more slowly and derived higher tortuosity, with lower clearance rate and longer half-life compared to 10-day gliomas. The increased glioma ECM was associated with different diffusion and clearance parameters in 20-day rat gliomas compared to 10-day gliomas. ECS parameters were altered with C6 glioma progression from increased ECM content. Our study might help better understand the glioma microenvironment and provide benefits for interstitial drug delivery to treat brain gliomas.

  13. Spontaneous immune responses against glioma-associated antigens in a long term survivor with malignant glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujita Mitsugu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with high grade glioma, little is known regarding existence of naturally occurring adaptive T cell reactivity against glioma-associated antigens (GAAs. In this report, we characterized GAA-specific CD8+ T cells and innate immune cells in a patient who has survived with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA for over 12 years without recurrence. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs derived from the long term survivor with AA were evaluated for the frequency, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL activity and differentiation status of CD8+ cells recognizing GAA-derived epitopes as well as relative numbers of other immune cell subsets. This patient's AA tissue was evaluated for expression of two GAAs EphA2 and interleukin-13 receptor α2 subunit (IL-13Rα2 by immunohistochemistry. Results The patient's tumor expressed both EphA2 and IL-13Rα2, and in vitro stimulated PBMC demonstrated superior EphA2883–891 and IL-13Rα2345–353-specific CTL reactivity compared to PBMC samples from two other patients with progressing malignant glioma. Unstimulated EphA2883–891-reactive CD8+ T cells contained high numbers of CD45RA-/CCR7- late effector and CD45RA-/CCR7+ central memory cells. Among other leukocyte subsets, elevated numbers of NK-T cells were found. Conclusion To our knowledge, the current study is one of the first demonstrating the presence of antigen-experienced, GAA-reactive CD8+ T cells in a patient who has survived with AA for over 12 years without recurrence. Further studies are warranted to determine whether the status of GAA-reactive CD8+ T cells dictates survival of patients and/or response to therapeutic vaccines.

  14. Possible novel therapy for malignant gliomas with secretable trimeric TRAIL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonsup Jeong

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Despite intensive clinical investigation and many novel therapeutic approaches, average survival for the patients with malignant gliomas is only about 1 year. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL has shown potent and cancer-selective killing activity and drawn considerable attention as a promising therapy for cancers, but concerns over delivery and toxicity have limited progress. We have developed a secretable trimeric TRAIL (stTRAIL and here evaluated the therapeutic potential of this stTRAIL-based gene therapy in brain tumors. An adenovirus (Ad-stTRAIL delivering stTRAIL was injected into intra-cranial human glioma tumors established in nude mice and tumor growth monitored using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Ad-stTRAIL gene therapy showed potent tumor suppressor activity with no toxic side effects at therapeutically effective doses. When compared with 1, 3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU, a conventional therapy for malignant gliomas, Ad-stTRAIL suppressed tumor growth more potently. The combination of Ad-stTRAIL and BCNU significantly increased survival compared to the control mice or mice receiving Ad-stTRAIL alone. Our data indicate that Ad-stTRAIL, either alone or combined with BCNU, has promise as a novel therapy for malignant gliomas.

  15. Expression of microRNA-184 in glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Ben; Yang, Wei; Fan, Gang; Lin, Wan-Run; Liu, Fang; Lu, Zhi-Ming

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the expression of microRNA (miRNA)-184 in gliomas with different pathological grades, and its effect on survival prognosis. For the present study, 40 participants were selected with different pathological grades of glioma tissues with grade I (n=10), grade II (n=8), grade III (n=16), and grade IV (n=6). In addition, 10 cases of normal brain tissue (obtained by decompression because of traumatic brain injury) were selected. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical techniques were used to detect the expression level and intensity of miRNA-184 in different grades of glioma tissues. The length of survival of miRNA-184-positive patients was analyzed. miRNA-184 mRNA expression was found in normal tissues and tumor tissues, and the expression in tumor tissues was significant (P184 expression were observed among different grades (P184 expression increased with the increase of grade level. The differences in expression across grade levels was statistically significant (P184-positive expression was significantly shorter than that of the negative expression group (P184 is highly expressed in gliomas, which is positively correlated with pathological grade, and is not correlated with pathological type, and negatively correlated with survival time. Thus, miRNA-184 is a potentially important molecular marker for glioma.

  16. Clinical Relevance of Prognostic and Predictive Molecular Markers in Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Tali

    2016-01-01

    Sorting and grading of glial tumors by the WHO classification provide clinicians with guidance as to the predicted course of the disease and choice of treatment. Nonetheless, histologically identical tumors may have very different outcome and response to treatment. Molecular markers that carry both diagnostic and prognostic information add useful tools to traditional classification by redefining tumor subtypes within each WHO category. Therefore, molecular markers have become an integral part of tumor assessment in modern neuro-oncology and biomarker status now guides clinical decisions in some subtypes of gliomas. The routine assessment of IDH status improves histological diagnostic accuracy by differentiating diffuse glioma from reactive gliosis. It carries a favorable prognostic implication for all glial tumors and it is predictive for chemotherapeutic response in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas with codeletion of 1p/19q chromosomes. Glial tumors that contain chromosomal codeletion of 1p/19q are defined as tumors of oligodendroglial lineage and have favorable prognosis. MGMT promoter methylation is a favorable prognostic marker in astrocytic high-grade gliomas and it is predictive for chemotherapeutic response in anaplastic gliomas with wild-type IDH1/2 and in glioblastoma of the elderly. The clinical implication of other molecular markers of gliomas like mutations of EGFR and ATRX genes and BRAF fusion or point mutation is highlighted. The potential of molecular biomarker-based classification to guide future therapeutic approach is discussed and accentuated.

  17. Concurrent thermochemoradiotherapy for brain high-grade glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabova, A. I., E-mail: ranigor@mail.ru; Novikov, V. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Bober, E. E.; Frolova, I. G. [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Choinzonov, E. L. [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Gribova, O. V. [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Baranova, A. V. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    Despite the achievements in the current strategies for treatment, the prognosis in malignant glioma patients remains unsatisfactory. Hyperthermia is currently considered to be the most effective and universal modifier of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Preliminary treatment outcomes for 28 patients with newly diagnosed (23) and recurrent (5) high-grade gliomas were presented. All the patients received multimodality treatment including surgery, thermoche-moradiotherapy followed by 4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. All the patients endured thermochemoradiotherapy well. A complication, limited skin burn (II stage), was diagnosed in two cases and treated conservatively without treatment interruption. A month after thermochemoradiotherapy the results were as follows: complete regression was achieved in 4 cases, partial regression in 4 cases, stable disease in 14 cases and disease progression in 6 cases (one of them is pseudo-progression). After completing the adjuvant chemotherapy 2 more patients demonstrated complete response and 1 patient had disease progression. Introduction of local hyperthermia in multimodal therapy of malignant glioma does not impair the combined modality treatment tolerability of patients with malignant gliomas. A small number of studied patients and short follow-up time do not allow making reliable conclusions about the impact of local hyperthermia on the treatment outcomes; however, there is a tendency towards the increase in disease-free survival in the patients with newly diagnosed malignant gliomas.

  18. Concurrent thermochemoradiotherapy for brain high-grade glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabova, A. I.; Novikov, V. A.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Gribova, O. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Bober, E. E.; Frolova, I. G.; Baranova, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Despite the achievements in the current strategies for treatment, the prognosis in malignant glioma patients remains unsatisfactory. Hyperthermia is currently considered to be the most effective and universal modifier of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Preliminary treatment outcomes for 28 patients with newly diagnosed (23) and recurrent (5) high-grade gliomas were presented. All the patients received multimodality treatment including surgery, thermoche-moradiotherapy followed by 4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. All the patients endured thermochemoradiotherapy well. A complication, limited skin burn (II stage), was diagnosed in two cases and treated conservatively without treatment interruption. A month after thermochemoradiotherapy the results were as follows: complete regression was achieved in 4 cases, partial regression in 4 cases, stable disease in 14 cases and disease progression in 6 cases (one of them is pseudo-progression). After completing the adjuvant chemotherapy 2 more patients demonstrated complete response and 1 patient had disease progression. Introduction of local hyperthermia in multimodal therapy of malignant glioma does not impair the combined modality treatment tolerability of patients with malignant gliomas. A small number of studied patients and short follow-up time do not allow making reliable conclusions about the impact of local hyperthermia on the treatment outcomes; however, there is a tendency towards the increase in disease-free survival in the patients with newly diagnosed malignant gliomas.

  19. [The re-introduction of malaria in the Pontine Marshes and the Cassino district during the end of World War II. Biological warfare or global war tactics?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatani, Sergio; Fiorino, Sirio; Manfredi, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    After the fall of the Fascist regime on September 8, 1943, Italy was split into two parts: (i) the Southern regions where the King Victor Emanuel III and the military general staff escaped was under the control of English-American allied armies, and (ii) the northern regions comprising Lazio, Tuscany, Umbria, and Marche still under the control of the Germans. The German Wehrmacht, after suffering several defeats on Southern lines, established a new strengthened line of defence called the Gustav line, located south of Rome and crossing in the western portion the recently-drained Pontine Marshes. In his book published in 2006, Frank Snowden hypothesised that occupying German armies in 1943 had initiated a programme of re-flooding the Pontine plain as a biological warfare strategy to re-introduce malaria infection in the territories south of Rome, Such a plan was intended (i) to slow down the advance of English-American forces, and (ii) to punish Italians who abandoned their former allies. Other authors, including Annibale Folchi, Erhard Geissler, and Jeanne Guillemin, have disputed this hypothesis based on an analysis of recently-uncovered archive documents. What is not disputed is that the flooding of the Pontine and Roman plains in 1943 contributed to a severe malaria epidemic in 1944, which was associated with exceptionally high morbidity and mortality rates in the afflicted populations. Herein, we critically evaluate the evidence and arguments of whether the Wehrmacht specifically aimed to spread malaria as a novel biological warfare strategy in Italy during the Second World War. In our opinion, evidence for specific orders to deliberately spread malaria by the German army is lacking, although the strategy itself may have been considered by Nazis during the waning years of the war.

  20. The rise and fall of "biopsy and radiate": a history of surgical nihilism in glioma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seunggu J; Sughrue, Michael E

    2012-04-01

    Many neurosurgeons take a nihilistic approach to surgical treatment of gliomas, stating the inability to achieve a cure. Where this idea comes from is somewhat nebulous to most neurosurgeons. A review of the scientific studies supporting the commonly held beliefs about gliomas shows that these ideas regarding the surgical treatment of gliomas are based on overgeneralizations of data from older studies. One should avoid the temptation to apply them to the greater concept of what gliomas are, how they behave, and what should be done, but rather we should continue to scientifically evaluate the role of surgical resection in glioma treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pontine μ-opioid receptors mediate bradypnea caused by intravenous remifentanil infusions at clinically relevant concentrations in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prkic, Ivana; Mustapic, Sanda; Radocaj, Tomislav; Stucke, Astrid G; Stuth, Eckehard A E; Hopp, Francis A; Dean, Caron; Zuperku, Edward J

    2012-11-01

    Life-threatening side effects such as profound bradypnea or apnea and variable upper airway obstruction limit the use of opioids for analgesia. It is yet unclear which sites containing μ-opioid receptors (μORs) within the intact in vivo mammalian respiratory control network are responsible. The purpose of this study was 1) to define the pontine region in which μOR agonists produce bradypnea and 2) to determine whether antagonism of those μORs reverses bradypnea produced by intravenous remifentanil (remi; 0.1-1.0 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)). The effects of microinjections of agonist [D-Ala(2),N-Me-Phe(4),Gly-ol(5)]-enkephalin (DAMGO; 100 μM) and antagonist naloxone (NAL; 100 μM) into the dorsal rostral pons on the phrenic neurogram were studied in a decerebrate, vagotomized, ventilated, paralyzed canine preparation during hyperoxia. A 1-mm grid pattern of microinjections was used. The DAMGO-sensitive region extended from 5 to 7 mm lateral of midline and from 0 to 2 mm caudal of the inferior colliculus at a depth of 3-4 mm. During remi-induced bradypnea (~72% reduction in fictive breathing rate) NAL microinjections (~500 nl each) within the region defined by the DAMGO protocol were able to reverse bradypnea by 47% (SD 48.0%) per microinjection, with 13 of 84 microinjections producing complete reversal. Histological examination of fluorescent microsphere injections shows that the sensitive region corresponds to the parabrachial/Kölliker-Fuse complex.

  2. Adenosine A1 Receptors in Mouse Pontine Reticular Formation Depress Breathing, Increase Anesthesia Recovery Time, and Decrease Acetylcholine Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettys, George C.; Liu, Fang; Kimlin, Ed; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical and preclinical data demonstrate the analgesic actions of adenosine. Central administration of adenosine agonists, however, suppresses arousal and breathing by poorly understood mechanisms. This study tested the two-tailed hypothesis that adenosine A1 receptors in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) of C57BL/6J mice modulate breathing, behavioral arousal, and PRF acetylcholine release. Methods Three sets of experiments used 51 mice. First, breathing was measured by plethysmography after PRF microinjection of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-sulfophenyl adenosine (SPA) or saline. Second, mice were anesthetized with isoflurane and time to recovery of righting response (RoRR) was quantified after PRF microinjection of SPA or saline. Third, acetylcholine release in the PRF was measured before and during microdialysis delivery of SPA, the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX), or SPA and DPCPX. Results First, SPA significantly decreased respiratory rate (−18%), tidal volume (−12%) and minute ventilation (−16%). Second, SPA concentration accounted for 76% of the variance in RoRR. Third, SPA concentration accounted for a significant amount of the variance in acetylcholine release (52%), RoRR (98%), and breathing rate (86%). DPCPX alone caused a concentration-dependent increase in acetylcholine, decrease in RoRR, and decrease in breathing rate. Coadministration of SPA and DPCPX blocked the SPA-induced decrease in acetylcholine and increase in RoRR. Conclusions Endogenous adenosine acting at adenosine A1 receptors in the PRF modulates breathing, behavioral arousal, and acetylcholine release. The results support the interpretation that an adenosinergic-cholinergic interaction within the PRF comprises one neurochemical mechanism underlying the wakefulness stimulus for breathing. PMID:23263018

  3. Adenosine A(1) receptors in mouse pontine reticular formation depress breathing, increase anesthesia recovery time, and decrease acetylcholine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettys, George C; Liu, Fang; Kimlin, Ed; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Lydic, Ralph

    2013-02-01

    Clinical and preclinical data demonstrate the analgesic actions of adenosine. Central administration of adenosine agonists, however, suppresses arousal and breathing by poorly understood mechanisms. This study tested the two-tailed hypothesis that adenosine A1 receptors in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) of C57BL/6J mice modulate breathing, behavioral arousal, and PRF acetylcholine release. Three sets of experiments used 51 mice. First, breathing was measured by plethysmography after PRF microinjection of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N-sulfophenyl adenosine (SPA) or saline. Second, mice were anesthetized with isoflurane and the time to recovery of righting response (RoRR) was quantified after a PRF microinjection of SPA or saline. Third, acetylcholine release in the PRF was measured before and during microdialysis delivery of SPA, the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine, or SPA and 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine. First, SPA significantly decreased respiratory rate (-18%), tidal volume (-12%), and minute ventilation (-16%). Second, SPA concentration accounted for 76% of the variance in RoRR. Third, SPA concentration accounted for a significant amount of the variance in acetylcholine release (52%), RoRR (98%), and breathing rate (86%). 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine alone caused a concentration-dependent increase in acetylcholine, a decrease in RoRR, and a decrease in breathing rate. Coadministration of SPA and 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine blocked the SPA-induced decrease in acetylcholine and increase in RoRR. Endogenous adenosine acting at adenosine A1 receptors in the PRF modulates breathing, behavioral arousal, and acetylcholine release. The results support the interpretation that an adenosinergic-cholinergic interaction within the PRF comprises one neurochemical mechanism underlying the wakefulness stimulus for breathing.

  4. Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS): A lymphocytic reactive response of the central nervous system? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Huang, Dehui; Huang, Xusheng; Zhang, Jiatang; Ran, Ye; Lou, Xin; Gui, Qiuping; Yu, Shengyuan

    2017-04-15

    Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroid (CLIPPERS) was first described in 2010. The characteristic clinical picture, radiological distribution and steroid response have been well-described in previous reports. However, the underlying pathogenesis and nosological position of CLIPPERS in the CNS require further investigation for the primary CNS lymphoma have been identified by autopsy subsequently. Here, we report a 51-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CLIPPERS but progressed to primary CNS lymphomatoid granulomatosis, which supports that CLIPPERS is not just an inflammatory CNS disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Insights From Molecular Profiling of Adult Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandis, Phedias; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2017-07-20

    The comprehensive molecular profiling of cancer has resulted in new insights into the biology and classification of numerous tumor types. In the case of primary brain tumors that commonly affect adults, an emerging set of disease-defining biomarker sets is reshaping existing diagnostic entities that had previously been defined on the basis of their microscopic appearance. Substantial progress has been made in this regard for common primary brain tumors in adults, especially diffuse gliomas, where large-scale profiling efforts have led to the incorporation of highly prevalent molecular alterations that promote a biologically based classification as an adjunct to the traditional histopathologic approach. The growing awareness that histologically indistinguishable tumors can be divided into more precise and biologically relevant subgroups has demanded a more global routine approach to biomarker assessment. These considerations have begun to intersect with the decreasing costs and availability of genome-wide analysis tools and, thus, incorporation into routine practice. We review how molecular profiling already has led to an evolution in the classification of brain tumors. In addition, we discuss the likely trajectory of incorporation of global molecular profiling platforms into the routine clinical classification of adult brain tumors.

  6. Current standard treatment for pediatric glioma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Saito, Ryuta; Kanamori, Masayuki; Yamashita, Yoji; Tominaga, Teiji

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we selected three representative disorders among pediatric gliomas and reviewed standard treatments for these diseases. The formation of this rare disease is involved with BRAF mutation as well as cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma. Radical resection is not recommended as initial therapy due to high morbidity. Despite its good tumor control, radiotherapy is not a standard therapy due to neuroendocrine and neurocognitive dysfunction. Several papers have reported the effectiveness of platinum-based chemotherapy, which is a useful for induction therapy. Recent progress in molecular analyses has suggested that some markers might be used for staging ependymoma. While total resection is considered to be strongly correlated with patients' survival, the majority of recurrence occurs in the primary site. Despite many clinical trials, chemotherapeutic agents were not found to be effective for this disease. Since whole brain radiation cannot prevent dissemination, local radiation is recommended for adjuvant therapy. The prognosis of this disease is still dismal, and median survival time is within 1 year. Although clinical trials have been conducted to assess the efficacy of chemotherapy prior to, concomitantly with, or after radiotherapy, an effective regimen has not yet been established. Therefore, only conventional local radiotherapy is the standard regimen for this disease. A new therapeutic approach, such as convection-enhanced drug delivery, would be required for improved outcomes in patients with this disease. (author)

  7. Postoperative radiotherapy of supratentorial anaplastic gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendt, T.G.; Bacherler, B.; Baumer, K.; Rohloff, R.; Willich, N.

    1986-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1983, 149 patients with high grade anaplastic supratentorial gliomas received a postoperative irradiation during primary treatment. 118 out of these patients had an anaplastic astrocytoma, 18 an anaplastic oligodendroglioma, and 13 an anaplastic ependymoma. Most of these patients were treated by irradiation of a great volume with 50 Gy within five weeks, the others by irradiation of the total brain with 50 Gy within five weeks and saturation with 10 Gy within one week. The one-year survival of the total group was 35.5% and the two-year survival 10.6%. Patients at an age of less than 40 years show a significantly longer survival than older patients (one-year survival rates 40% and 30.7%, respectively). Patients suffering from anaplastic tumors with astrocytic and oligodendrocytic differentiation have a comparable prognosis. Patients suffering from anaplastic tumors with ependymal differentiation, however, have prolonged survival times. The therapy results of different treatment methods are discussed using the communications of literature. (orig.) [de

  8. Treatment of brain gliomas in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, H.J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Some neurologists and pediatricians regard the great majority of children with brain tumours as being incurable and suspect that in any long-term survivors the quality of remaining life following treatment will inevitably be greatly impaired. This general pessimism is not supported by the current results of modern treatment and past opinions may need to be revised. In fact, the survival outlook for children with intracranial gliomas is considerably better than that for adults, and this applies to tumours of both low-grade and high-grade malignancy. At the Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) between 1952 and 1976 a total of 461 children under age 16 years with primary intracranial tumours were referred for radiotherapy. The actuarial survival rate for all cases at 5 years was 48%, at 10 years 41% and at 20 years 38%. Of the 415 children who completed a radical course of irradiation, given either post-operatively or as the sole treatment, 53% were still alive at 5 years, 45% at 10 years and 41% at 20 years. Overall survival was influenced by age, the best results being seen in children aged 10-15 years and the worst in children under 3 years

  9. Management of Patients with High-Grade Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simge Yukse

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The scientific basis for the surgical management of patients with glioma is rapidly evolving. The infiltrative nature of these cancers precludes a surgical cure, but despite this, cytoreductive surgery remains central to high-quality patient’s care. In addition to tissue sampling for accurate histopathological diagnosis and molecular genetic characterisation, clinical benefit from decompression of space-occupying lesions and microsurgical cytoreduction has been reported in patients with different grades of glioma. By integrating advanced surgical techniques with molecular genetic characterisation of the disease and targeted radiotherapy and chemotherapy, it is possible to construct a programme of personalised surgical therapy throughout the patient’s journey. The goal of therapeutic packages tailored to each patient is to optimise patient safety and clinical outcome, and must be delivered in a multidisciplinary setting. Here we review the current concepts that underlie surgical management of patients with high-grade glioma.

  10. Detecting Nosocomial Intrinsic Infections through Relating Bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research ... Surgical procedures often lead to both intrinsic and extrinsic infections. ... This study demonstrated surgical procedures as precursory to intrinsic infections and that bacterial pathogens found on wounds and endogenous indicators of surgery are links to intrinsic infection.

  11. Ketamine suppresses the proliferation of rat C6 glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Hidetomo; Furukawa, Ken-Ichi; Seya, Kazuhiko; Hirota, Kazuyoshi

    2017-10-01

    The present study investigated the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist ketamine, on the growth of gliomas. To analyze the effects of ketamine treatment, rat C6 glioma cells arising from astrocytes, and RNB cells representing non-malignant astrocytes, were examined. In ketamine-treated C6 cells, the gene expression changes associated with cell proliferation following ketamine treatment were evaluated using a cDNA microarray. A cell proliferation assay was performed to analyze the dose-dependent proliferation of C6 glioma and RNB cells following culture (72 h) with ketamine treatment (0-100 µM). Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were performed following cell incubation with/without ketamine, to confirm if the ketamine-induced cell death of C6 glioma and RNB cells were due to apoptosis. In addition, cell proliferation and TUNEL assays were performed following cell incubations with a selective NMDAR antagonist, D-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (D-AP5). Analysis of the cDNA microarray indicated that the growth of C6 glioma cells were suppressed by the effects of ketamine. Furthermore, results of the proliferation assay confirmed that ketamine treatment inhibited C6 cell proliferation, most notably at a dose of 30 µM (n=7, 66.4%; Pcells, with a significant effect on the rate of death observed at all tested concentrations (3, 10, 30 and 100 µM). Results of the aforementioned proliferation and TUNEL assay experiments were reproduced when ketamine was replaced with a selective NMDAR antagonist, D-AP5. However, the NMDARantagonist-induced effects were not observed in RNB cell cultures. Although it would be premature to apply the results from the present study to human cases, these results indicated that ketamine is an anesthetic candidate providing potential benefit for glioma resection.

  12. Molecular subtypes of glioblastoma are relevant to lower grade glioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Guan

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary malignant brain tumors in adults with great heterogeneity in histopathology and clinical course. The intent was to evaluate the relevance of known glioblastoma (GBM expression and methylation based subtypes to grade II and III gliomas (ie. lower grade gliomas.Gene expression array, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array and clinical data were obtained for 228 GBMs and 176 grade II/II gliomas (GII/III from the publically available Rembrandt dataset. Two additional datasets with IDH1 mutation status were utilized as validation datasets (one publicly available dataset and one newly generated dataset from MD Anderson. Unsupervised clustering was performed and compared to gene expression subtypes assigned using the Verhaak et al 840-gene classifier. The glioma-CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (G-CIMP was assigned using prediction models by Fine et al.Unsupervised clustering by gene expression aligned with the Verhaak 840-gene subtype group assignments. GII/IIIs were preferentially assigned to the proneural subtype with IDH1 mutation and G-CIMP. GBMs were evenly distributed among the four subtypes. Proneural, IDH1 mutant, G-CIMP GII/III s had significantly better survival than other molecular subtypes. Only 6% of GBMs were proneural and had either IDH1 mutation or G-CIMP but these tumors had significantly better survival than other GBMs. Copy number changes in chromosomes 1p and 19q were associated with GII/IIIs, while these changes in CDKN2A, PTEN and EGFR were more commonly associated with GBMs.GBM gene-expression and methylation based subtypes are relevant for GII/III s and associate with overall survival differences. A better understanding of the association between these subtypes and GII/IIIs could further knowledge regarding prognosis and mechanisms of glioma progression.

  13. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 406, Taiwan (China); Kuan, Yu-Hsiang [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri [Division of Urology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Cheng [Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Pan, Pin-Ho [Department of Pediatrics, Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, Taichung 435, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ying [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsuan-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: cjchen@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Center for General Education, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, HungKuang University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  14. Anatomic mapping of molecular subtypes in diffuse glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qisheng; Lian, Yuxi; Yu, Jinhua; Wang, Yuanyuan; Shi, Zhifeng; Chen, Liang

    2017-09-15

    Tumor location served as an important prognostic factor in glioma patients was considered to postulate molecular features according to cell origin theory. However, anatomic distribution of unique molecular subtypes was not widely investigated. The relationship between molecular phenotype and histological subgroup were also vague based on tumor location. Our group focuses on the study of glioma anatomic location of distinctive molecular subgroups and histology subtypes, and explores the possibility of their consistency based on clinical background. We retrospectively reviewed 143 cases with both molecular information (IDH1/TERT/1p19q) and MRI images diagnosed as cerebral diffuse gliomas. The anatomic distribution was analyzed between distinctive molecular subgroups and its relationship with histological subtypes. The influence of tumor location, molecular stratification and histology diagnosis on survival outcome was investigated as well. Anatomic locations of cerebral diffuse glioma indicate varied clinical outcome. Based on that, it can be stratified into five principal molecular subgroups according to IDH1/TERT/1p19q status. Triple-positive (IDH1 and TERT mutation with 1p19q codeletion) glioma tended to be oligodendroglioma present with much better clinical outcome compared to TERT mutation only group who is glioblastoma inclined (median overall survival 39 months VS 18 months). Five molecular subgroups were demonstrated with distinctive locational distribution. This kind of anatomic feature is consistent with its corresponding histological subtypes. Each molecular subgroup in glioma has unique anatomic location which indicates distinctive clinical outcome. Molecular diagnosis can be served as perfect complementary tool for the precise diagnosis. Integration of histomolecular diagnosis will be much more helpful in routine clinical practice in the future.

  15. Radiation effects on human glia and glioma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, S.

    1983-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of human glia and glioma cells has been studied in vitro, and a new cloning method has been developed to overcome the difficulties due to the very low cloning efficiency of these cells. The cells were confined to small palladium areas surrounded by agarose, which increased the cell density, but kept the clones separated. Using this method, the glia cells were found to be very sensitive to gamma irradiation (D 0 =1.0-1.5 Gy and n=1) in comparision with the glioma cells (D 0 =1.5-2.5 Gy and n=3.5). The induction and repair of DNA strand breaks were studied with two DNA unwinding techniques. No differences between the two cell-lines were detected when induction and fast repair were studied with the single-labelling method, while the glioma cells showed less unrepaired DNA strand breaks than the glia cells after 1, 2 and 3 hours, when the double-labelling method was used. Detachment, attachment and growth kinetics were studied using the palladium-agarose cloning method. All of the glioma cell-lines studied, detached and attached themselves at rates higher than the normal diploid glia cell-lines. All of the cell-lines contained clones with different properties. Some clones were rapidly growing, others maintained a nearly constant number of cells or even decreased. The effects of chronic hypoxia were tested in a few experiments. Low oxygen tension in the culture medium reduced the rate of growth and the DNA synthesis of the glioma cells. The present study indicates that cultured human glioma cells are less radiosensitive than cultured glia cells. The palladium-agarose technique, enable studying growth kinetics detachment, attachment and radiosensitivity in a quantitative manner for cells with low cloning efficiency. (author)

  16. Corpus callosum involvement and postoperative outcomes of patients with gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ko-Ting; Wu, Tai-Wei Erich; Chuang, Chi-Cheng; Hsu, Yung-Hsin; Hsu, Peng-Wei; Huang, Yin-Cheng; Lin, Tzu-Kang; Chang, Chen-Nen; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wu, Chieh-Tsai; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Pai, Ping-Ching; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Pin-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Corpus callosum involvement is associated with poorer survival in high grade glioma (HGG), but the prognostic value in low grade glioma (LGG) is unclear. To determine the prognostic impact of corpus callosum involvement on progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in HGG and LGG, the records of 233 glioma patients treated from 2008 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images were used to identify corpus callosum involvement. Age, sex, preoperative Karnofsky performance scale, postoperative Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score and extent of resection (EOR) were evaluated with respect to PFS and OS. The incidence of corpus callosum involvement was similar among HGG (14 %) and LGG (14.5 %). Univariate analysis revealed that PFS and OS were significantly shorter in both WHO grade II and grade IV glioma with corpus callosum involvement (both, p corpus callosum involvement have shorter PFS (p = 0.03), while EOR, instead of corpus callosum involvement (p = 0.16), was an independent factor associated with PFS in grade IV glioma (p Corpus callosum involvement was no longer significantly associated with OS after adjusting age, gender, EOR, preoperative and postoperative performance status (p = 0.16, 0.17 and 0.56 in grade II, III and IV gliomas, respectively). Corpus callosum involvement happened in both LGG and HGG, and is associated with lower EOR and higher postoperative ECOG score both in LGG and HGG. Corpus callosum involvement tends to be an independent prognostic factor for PFS in LGG, but not for OS in LGG or in HGG.

  17. The functional role of Notch signaling in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2010-01-01

    Gliomas are among the most devastating adult tumors for which there is currently no cure. The tumors are derived from brain glial tissue and comprise several diverse tumor forms and grades. Recent reports highlight the importance of cancer-initiating cells in the malignancy of gliomas. These cells...... have been referred to as brain cancer stem cells (bCSC), as they share similarities to normal neural stem cells in the brain. The Notch signaling pathway is involved in cell fate decisions throughout normal development and in stem cell proliferation and maintenance. The role of Notch in cancer is now...

  18. Intrinsic cylindrical and spherical waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlow, I K

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic waveforms associated with cylindrical and spherical Bessel functions are obtained by eliminating the factors responsible for the inverse radius and inverse square radius laws of wave power per unit area of wavefront. The resulting expressions are Riccati-Bessel functions for both cases and these can be written in terms of amplitude and phase functions of order v and wave variable z. When z is real, it is shown that a spatial phase angle of the intrinsic wave can be defined and this, together with its amplitude function, is systematically investigated for a range of fixed orders and varying z. The derivatives of Riccati-Bessel functions are also examined. All the component functions exhibit different behaviour in the near field depending on the order being less than, equal to or greater than 1/2. Plots of the phase angle can be used to display the locations of the zeros of the general Riccati-Bessel functions and lead to new relations concerning the ordering of the real zeros of Bessel functions and the occurrence of multiple zeros when the argument of the Bessel function is fixed

  19. Differential utilization of ketone bodies by neurons and glioma cell lines: a rationale for ketogenic diet as experimental glioma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Gabriele D; Brucker, Daniel P; Bähr, Oliver; Harter, Patrick N; Hattingen, Elke; Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Steinbach, Joachim P; Rieger, Johannes

    2011-07-26

    Even in the presence of oxygen, malignant cells often highly depend on glycolysis for energy generation, a phenomenon known as the Warburg effect. One strategy targeting this metabolic phenotype is glucose restriction by administration of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diet. Under these conditions, ketone bodies are generated serving as an important energy source at least for non-transformed cells. To investigate whether a ketogenic diet might selectively impair energy metabolism in tumor cells, we characterized in vitro effects of the principle ketone body 3-hydroxybutyrate in rat hippocampal neurons and five glioma cell lines. In vivo, a non-calorie-restricted ketogenic diet was examined in an orthotopic xenograft glioma mouse model. The ketone body metabolizing enzymes 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (BDH1 and 2), 3-oxoacid-CoA transferase 1 (OXCT1) and acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) were expressed at the mRNA and protein level in all glioma cell lines. However, no activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) pathway was observed in glioma cells, consistent with the absence of substantial 3-hydroxybutyrate metabolism and subsequent accumulation of succinate. Further, 3-hydroxybutyrate rescued hippocampal neurons from glucose withdrawal-induced cell death but did not protect glioma cell lines. In hypoxia, mRNA expression of OXCT1, ACAT1, BDH1 and 2 was downregulated. In vivo, the ketogenic diet led to a robust increase of blood 3-hydroxybutyrate, but did not alter blood glucose levels or improve survival. In summary, glioma cells are incapable of compensating for glucose restriction by metabolizing ketone bodies in vitro, suggesting a potential disadvantage of tumor cells compared to normal cells under a carbohydrate-restricted ketogenic diet. Further investigations are necessary to identify co-treatment modalities, e.g. glycolysis inhibitors or antiangiogenic agents that efficiently target non-oxidative pathways.

  20. Differential utilization of ketone bodies by neurons and glioma cell lines: a rationale for ketogenic diet as experimental glioma therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller-Klieser Wolfgang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even in the presence of oxygen, malignant cells often highly depend on glycolysis for energy generation, a phenomenon known as the Warburg effect. One strategy targeting this metabolic phenotype is glucose restriction by administration of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate (ketogenic diet. Under these conditions, ketone bodies are generated serving as an important energy source at least for non-transformed cells. Methods To investigate whether a ketogenic diet might selectively impair energy metabolism in tumor cells, we characterized in vitro effects of the principle ketone body 3-hydroxybutyrate in rat hippocampal neurons and five glioma cell lines. In vivo, a non-calorie-restricted ketogenic diet was examined in an orthotopic xenograft glioma mouse model. Results The ketone body metabolizing enzymes 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (BDH1 and 2, 3-oxoacid-CoA transferase 1 (OXCT1 and acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1 were expressed at the mRNA and protein level in all glioma cell lines. However, no activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α pathway was observed in glioma cells, consistent with the absence of substantial 3-hydroxybutyrate metabolism and subsequent accumulation of succinate. Further, 3-hydroxybutyrate rescued hippocampal neurons from glucose withdrawal-induced cell death but did not protect glioma cell lines. In hypoxia, mRNA expression of OXCT1, ACAT1, BDH1 and 2 was downregulated. In vivo, the ketogenic diet led to a robust increase of blood 3-hydroxybutyrate, but did not alter blood glucose levels or improve survival. Conclusion In summary, glioma cells are incapable of compensating for glucose restriction by metabolizing ketone bodies in vitro, suggesting a potential disadvantage of tumor cells compared to normal cells under a carbohydrate-restricted ketogenic diet. Further investigations are necessary to identify co-treatment modalities, e.g. glycolysis inhibitors or antiangiogenic

  1. Differential utilization of ketone bodies by neurons and glioma cell lines: a rationale for ketogenic diet as experimental glioma therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, Gabriele D; Brucker, Daniel P; Bähr, Oliver; Harter, Patrick N; Hattingen, Elke; Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Steinbach, Joachim P; Rieger, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Even in the presence of oxygen, malignant cells often highly depend on glycolysis for energy generation, a phenomenon known as the Warburg effect. One strategy targeting this metabolic phenotype is glucose restriction by administration of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diet. Under these conditions, ketone bodies are generated serving as an important energy source at least for non-transformed cells. To investigate whether a ketogenic diet might selectively impair energy metabolism in tumor cells, we characterized in vitro effects of the principle ketone body 3-hydroxybutyrate in rat hippocampal neurons and five glioma cell lines. In vivo, a non-calorie-restricted ketogenic diet was examined in an orthotopic xenograft glioma mouse model. The ketone body metabolizing enzymes 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (BDH1 and 2), 3-oxoacid-CoA transferase 1 (OXCT1) and acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) were expressed at the mRNA and protein level in all glioma cell lines. However, no activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) pathway was observed in glioma cells, consistent with the absence of substantial 3-hydroxybutyrate metabolism and subsequent accumulation of succinate. Further, 3-hydroxybutyrate rescued hippocampal neurons from glucose withdrawal-induced cell death but did not protect glioma cell lines. In hypoxia, mRNA expression of OXCT1, ACAT1, BDH1 and 2 was downregulated. In vivo, the ketogenic diet led to a robust increase of blood 3-hydroxybutyrate, but did not alter blood glucose levels or improve survival. In summary, glioma cells are incapable of compensating for glucose restriction by metabolizing ketone bodies in vitro, suggesting a potential disadvantage of tumor cells compared to normal cells under a carbohydrate-restricted ketogenic diet. Further investigations are necessary to identify co-treatment modalities, e.g. glycolysis inhibitors or antiangiogenic agents that efficiently target non-oxidative pathways

  2. Inhibition of Intrinsic Thrombin Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Stief MD

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The contact phase of coagulation is of physiologic/pathophysiologic importance, whenever unphysiologic polynegative substances such as cell fragments (microparticles get in contact with blood. There are several clinically used inhibitors of intrinsic thrombin generation. Here the inhibitory concentrations 50% (IC50 of these anticoagulants are measured by the highly specific thrombin generation assay INCA. Methods Unfrozen pooled normal citrated plasma in polystyrole tubes was supplemented at 23°C in duplicate with 0–2 IU/ml low molecular weight heparin (dalteparin, 0–2 IU/ml unfractionated heparin, 0–500 KIU/ml aprotinin, or 0–40 mM arginine. 50 μl plasma or 1 IU/ml thrombin standard were pipetted into a polystyrole microtiter plate with flat bottom. 5 μl SiO 2 /CaCl 2 - reagent (INCA activator were added and after 0–30 min incubation at 37°C 100 μl 2.5 M arginine, pH 8.6, were added; arginine inhibits hemostasis activation and depolymerizes generated fibrin within 20 min at 23°C. The in the physiologic 37°C incubation phase generated thrombin was then chromogenically detected. The intra-assay CV values were < 5%. Results and Discussion The approximate IC50 were 0.01 IU/ml dalteparin, 0.02 IU/ml heparin, 25 KIU/ml aprotinin, and 12 mM arginine. The efficiency of any anticoagulant on intrinsic thrombin generation should be measured for each individual patient. Abbreviations IIa, thrombin; δA, increase in absorbance; APTT, activated partial thromboplastin time; CRT, coagulation reaction time (at 37°C in water-bath; F-wells, polystyrole microtiter plates with flat bottom; IC50, inhibitory concentration 50%; INCA, intrinsic coagulation activity assay; IU, international units; KIU, kallikrein inhibiting unis; LMWH, low molecular weight heparin; mA, milli-absorbance units; PSL, pathromtin SL®; RT, room temperature (23°C; U-wells, polystyrole microtiter plates with round bottom.

  3. An analysis of 170 glioma patients and systematic review to investigate the association between IDH-1 mutations and preoperative glioma-related epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuan; Mao, Qing; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Yanhui; Mao, Yunhe; Zhou, Qiao; Luo, Jiewen

    2016-09-01

    Seizure is a common presenting symptom of glioma, and many biomarkers have been suggested to be associated with preoperative seizure; however, the relationships between IDH (isocitrate dehydrogenase) mutations and glioma-related epilepsy only recently been studied. The authors aimed to examine the correlations between IDH mutations in glioma patients with preoperative seizures and tumor location. A series of 170 glioma samples were analyzed for IDH1 R132H mutations (amino acid change from arginine to histidine at codon 132) with immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining and for IDH mutations with direct DNA sequencing when the IHC results were negative. If either the IHC or direct DNA sequencing result was positive, the IDH status was defined as mutated. The results of the IDH mutation examinations were used to analyze the relationship between mutations and glioma-related epilepsy. The study population consisted of 64 (37.6%) World Health Organization (WHO) grade II gliomas, 58 (34.1%) grade III, and 48 (28.3%) grade IV gliomas. A total of 84 samples with IDH1 mutations were observed in our study, and 54 of these presented with seizures as the initial symptoms, whereas 28 of the patients with wild-type IDH status presented with seizures (p=0.043 for the WHO grade II gliomas, p=0.002 for the grade III gliomas and p=0.942 for the grade IV gliomas, chi-squared tests). Among the WHO grade II and III gliomas, IDH1 mutations were significantly associated with preoperative seizures, but no significant relationship between IDH mutations and preoperative seizures was found with glioblastoma multiforme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Approaching a Scientific Consensus on the Association between Allergies and Glioma Risk: A Report from the Glioma International Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirian, E Susan; Zhou, Renke; Wrensch, Margaret R; Olson, Sara H; Scheurer, Michael E; Il'yasova, Dora; Lachance, Daniel; Armstrong, Georgina N; McCoy, Lucie S; Lau, Ching C; Claus, Elizabeth B; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Schildkraut, Joellen; Ali-Osman, Francis; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Houlston, Richard S; Jenkins, Robert B; Bernstein, Jonine L; Merrell, Ryan T; Davis, Faith G; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I; Melin, Beatrice S; Bondy, Melissa L

    2016-02-01

    Several previous studies have found inverse associations between glioma susceptibility and a history of allergies or other atopic conditions. Some evidence indicates that respiratory allergies are likely to be particularly relevant with regard to glioma risk. Using data from the Glioma International Case-Control Study (GICC), we examined the effects of respiratory allergies and other atopic conditions on glioma risk. The GICC contains detailed information on history of atopic conditions for 4,533 cases and 4,171 controls, recruited from 14 study sites across five countries. Using two-stage random-effects restricted maximum likelihood modeling to calculate meta-analysis ORs, we examined the associations between glioma and allergy status, respiratory allergy status, asthma, and eczema. Having a history of respiratory allergies was associated with an approximately 30% lower glioma risk, compared with not having respiratory allergies (mOR, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-0.90). This association was similar when restricting to high-grade glioma cases. Asthma and eczema were also significantly protective against glioma. A substantial amount of data on the inverse association between atopic conditions and glioma has accumulated, and findings from the GICC study further strengthen the existing evidence that the relationship between atopy and glioma is unlikely to be coincidental. As the literature approaches a consensus on the impact of allergies in glioma risk, future research can begin to shift focus to what the underlying biologic mechanism behind this association may be, which could, in turn, yield new opportunities for immunotherapy or cancer prevention. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Intrinsic rotation with gyrokinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Felix I.; Barnes, Michael; Catto, Peter J.; Calvo, Iván

    2012-01-01

    The generation of intrinsic rotation by turbulence and neoclassical effects in tokamaks is considered. To obtain the complex dependences observed in experiments, it is necessary to have a model of the radial flux of momentum that redistributes the momentum within the tokamak in the absence of a preexisting velocity. When the lowest order gyrokinetic formulation is used, a symmetry of the model precludes this possibility, making small effects in the gyroradius over scale length expansion necessary. These effects that are usually small become important for momentum transport because the symmetry of the lowest order gyrokinetic formulation leads to the cancellation of the lowest order momentum flux. The accuracy to which the gyrokinetic equation needs to be obtained to retain all the physically relevant effects is discussed.

  6. Insulator dysfunction and oncogene activation in IDH mutant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavahan, William A; Drier, Yotam; Liau, Brian B; Gillespie, Shawn M; Venteicher, Andrew S; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Suvà, Mario L; Bernstein, Bradley E

    2016-01-07

    Gain-of-function IDH mutations are initiating events that define major clinical and prognostic classes of gliomas. Mutant IDH protein produces a new onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate, which interferes with iron-dependent hydroxylases, including the TET family of 5'-methylcytosine hydroxylases. TET enzymes catalyse a key step in the removal of DNA methylation. IDH mutant gliomas thus manifest a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP), although the functional importance of this altered epigenetic state remains unclear. Here we show that human IDH mutant gliomas exhibit hypermethylation at cohesin and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-binding sites, compromising binding of this methylation-sensitive insulator protein. Reduced CTCF binding is associated with loss of insulation between topological domains and aberrant gene activation. We specifically demonstrate that loss of CTCF at a domain boundary permits a constitutive enhancer to interact aberrantly with the receptor tyrosine kinase gene PDGFRA, a prominent glioma oncogene. Treatment of IDH mutant gliomaspheres with a demethylating agent partially restores insulator function and downregulates PDGFRA. Conversely, CRISPR-mediated disruption of the CTCF motif in IDH wild-type gliomaspheres upregulates PDGFRA and increases proliferation. Our study suggests that IDH mutations promote gliomagenesis by disrupting chromosomal topology and allowing aberrant regulatory interactions that induce oncogene expression.

  7. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) inhibitors decrease glioma progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikari, Vijaya Pooja; Kota, Rajesh; Chen, Kevin; Yeh, Tzu-Shao; Jhaveri, Niyati; Groshen, Susan L.; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z.; Chen, Thomas C.; Hofman, Florence M.; Shih, Jean C.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor which is currently treated with temozolomide (TMZ). Tumors usually become resistant to TMZ and recur; no effective therapy is then available. Monoamine Oxidase A (MAO A) oxidizes monoamine neurotransmitters resulting in reactive oxygen species which cause cancer. This study shows that MAO A expression is increased in human glioma tissues and cell lines. MAO A inhibitors, clorgyline or the near-infrared-dye MHI-148 conjugated to clorgyline (NMI), were cytotoxic for glioma and decreased invasion in vitro. Using the intracranial TMZ-resistant glioma model, clorgyline or NMI alone or in combination with low-dose TMZ reduced tumor growth and increased animal survival. NMI was localized specifically to the tumor. Immunocytochemistry studies showed that the MAO A inhibitor reduced proliferation, microvessel density and invasion, and increased macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, we have identified MAO A inhibitors as potential novel stand-alone drugs or as combination therapy with low dose TMZ for drug-resistant gliomas. NMI can also be used as a non-invasive imaging tool. Thus has a dual function for both therapy and diagnosis. PMID:26871599

  8. Interrelationship between differentiation and malignancy-associated properties in glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, M C; Freshney, R I; Vaughan, P F; Graham, D I; Shaw, R

    1984-03-01

    The phenotypic expression of cells derived from human anaplastic astrocytomas, rat glioma, normal human adult and foetal brain tissue have been examined for differentiated and malignancy-associated properties. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), high affinity glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) uptake and glutamine synthetase were used as indicators of astroglial differentiation. Plasminogen activator and tumour angiogenesis factor were the malignancy-associated markers. The normal adult brain-derived lines showed some differentiated astroglial features and expressed low levels of the malignancy-associated properties. The foetal cultures contained highly differentiated astroglia while the glioma lines showed considerable phenotypic heterogeneity from highly differentiated to undifferentiated. The least differentiated glioma cells exhibited the highest plasminogen activator activities. The density-dependent control of phenotypic expression was also investigated. High affinity GABA uptake, and GFAP in rat C6 glioma cultures, increased with increasing monolayer cell density, events probably mediated by an increase in the formation of cell-cell contacts at confluence. Plasminogen activator activity decreased with increasing cell density.

  9. Targeted therapies for malignant gliomas: novel agents, same barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, F.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are common and devastating brain malignancies. Despite this extensive treatment the mean overall survival is still only 14.6 months and more effective treatments are urgently needed. Targeted therapy holds the promise for the new generation of chemotherapy due to the selectively

  10. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV in two human glioma cell lines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedo, A.; Mali, R.; Drbal, Karel; Lisa, V.; Vlasicova, K.; Mareš, V.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2001), s. 57-63 ISSN 1121-760X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A026 Keywords : protease * glioma * dipeptidyl peptidase IV Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.959, year: 2001

  11. Surgical oncology for gliomas: the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanai, Nader; Berger, Mitchel S

    2018-02-01

    Surgical resection remains the mainstay of treatment for patients with glioma of any grade. Maximal resection of the tumour is central to achieving long-term disease control; however, the relationship between the extent of glioma resection and actual clinical benefit for the patient is predicated on the balance between cytoreduction and neurological morbidity. For the neurosurgical oncologist, the clinical rationale for undertaking increasingly extensive resections has gained traction. In parallel, novel surgical techniques and technologies have been developed that help improve patient outcomes. During the past decade, neurosurgeons have leveraged advanced intraoperative imaging methods, fluorescence-based tumour biomarkers, and real-time mutational analyses to maximize the extent of tumour resection. In addition, approaches to minimizing the risk of perioperative morbidity continue to be improved through the combined use of stimulation-mapping techniques, corticospinal tract imaging, and stereotactic thermal ablation. Taken together, these modern principles of neurosurgical oncology bear little resemblance to historical therapeutic strategies for patients with glioma and have dramatically altered the approach to the treatment of patients with these brain tumours. Herein, we outline the state of the art in surgical oncology for gliomas.

  12. Gliomas and the vascular fragility of the blood brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gustavo eDubois

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes, members of the glial family, interact through the exchange of soluble factors or by directly contacting neurons and other brain cells, such as microglia and endothelial cells. Astrocytic projections interact with vessels and act as additional elements of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB. By mechanisms not fully understood, astrocytes can undergo oncogenic transformation and give rise to gliomas. The tumors take advantage of the BBB to ensure survival and continuous growth. A glioma can develop into a very aggressive tumor, the glioblastoma (GBM, characterized by a highly heterogeneous cell population (including tumor stem cells, extensive proliferation and migration. Nevertheless, gliomas can also give rise to slow growing tumors and in both cases, the afflux of blood, via BBB is crucial. Glioma cells migrate to different regions of the brain guided by the extension of blood vessels, colonizing the healthy adjacent tissue. In the clinical context, GBM can lead to tumor-derived seizures, which represent a challenge to patients and clinicians, since drugs used for its treatment must be able to cross the BBB. Uncontrolled and fast growth also leads to the disruption of the chimeric and fragile vessels in the tumor mass resulting in peritumoral edema. Although hormonal therapy is currently used to control the edema, it is not always efficient. In this review we comment the points cited above, considering the importance of the blood brain barrier and the concerns that arise when this barrier is affected.

  13. An unusual cystic appearance of disseminated low-grade gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, T.; Zimmerman, R.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Perilongo, G. [Dipt. di Pediatria, Univ. di Padova (Italy); Kaufman, B.A. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, St Louis Children' s Hospital, St Louis, MO (United States); Holden, K.R. [Division of Pediatric Neurology, Room 511, Children' s Hospital, Medical University of South Carolina, 171 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425-2232 (United States); Carollo, C. [Division of Neuroradiology, Regione Veneto, Azienda Ospedalieri di Padova, Universita di Padova, Via Giustiniani 3, 35 128 Padua (Italy); Kling Chong, W.K. [Dept. of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom)

    2001-10-01

    We report five cases of pediatric disseminated low-grade gliomas of the brainstem or spinal cord that exhibited an unusual, cystic pattern. Leptomeningeal disease was present in three of these at diagnosis, and was detected shortly afterwards in the other two. Four patients are alive up to 5 years later, following minimal to no intervention, while one is dead. (orig.)

  14. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Rie [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Nakano, Ichiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Seimiya, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hseimiya@jfcr.or.jp [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  15. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Rie; Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  16. Glioma surgery in eloquent areas: can we preserve cognition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.D. Satoer (Djaina); E.G. Visch-Brink (Evy); C.M.F. Dirven (Clemens); A. Vincent (Audrey)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ Cognitive preservation is crucial in glioma surgery, as it is an important aspect of daily life functioning. Several studies claimed that surgery in eloquent areas is possible without causing severe cognitive damage. However, this conclusion was relatively ungrounded

  17. Glioma surgery in eloquent areas : can we preserve cognition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Satoer, Djaina; Visch-Brink, Evy; Dirven, Clemens; Vincent, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive preservation is crucial in glioma surgery, as it is an important aspect of daily life functioning. Several studies claimed that surgery in eloquent areas is possible without causing severe cognitive damage. However, this conclusion was relatively ungrounded due to the lack of

  18. Growth hormone and cancer: GH production and action in glioma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Robert W; Dawson, Timothy; Martinez-Moreno, Carlos G; El-Abry, Nasra; Harvey, Steve

    2015-09-01

    The hypersecretion of pituitary growth hormone (GH) is associated with an increased risk of cancer, while reducing pituitary GH signaling reduces this risk. Roles for pituitary GH in cancer are therefore well established. The expression of the GH gene is, however, not confined to the pituitary gland and it is now known to occur in many extrapituitary tissues, in which it has local autocrine or paracrine actions, rather than endocrine function. It is, for instance, expressed in cancers of the prostate, lung, skin, endometrium and colon. The oncogenicity of autocrine GH may also be greater than that induced by endocrine or exogenous GH, as higher concentrations of GHR antagonists are required to inhibit its actions. This may reflect the fact that autocrine GH is thought to act at intracellular receptors directly after synthesis, in compartments not readily accessible to endocrine (or exogenous) GH. The roles and actions of extrapituitary GH in cancer may therefore differ from those of pituitary GH. The possibility that GH may be expressed and act in glioma tumors was therefore examined by immunohistochemistry. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of abundant GH- and GH receptor (GHR-) immunoreactivity in glioma, in which they were co-localized in cytoplasmic but not nuclear compartments. These results demonstrate that glioma differs from most cancers in lacking nuclear GHRs, but GH is nevertheless likely to have autocrine or paracrine actions in the induction and progression of glioma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cryopreservation of organotypic multicellular spheroids from human gliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, P.; van den Berg, F.; van Amstel, P.; Troost, D.

    1996-01-01

    Fresh human glioma tissue can be cultured on agarose to form organotypic multicellular spheroids (OMS). The major advantage of OMS is the preservation of the cellular heterogeneity and the tumour architecture, which is lost in conventional monolayer cultures. The present study was undertaken to

  20. SNAI2/Slug promotes growth and invasion in human gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hong Wei; Menon, Lata G; Black, Peter M; Carroll, Rona S; Johnson, Mark D

    2010-01-01

    Numerous factors that contribute to malignant glioma invasion have been identified, but the upstream genes coordinating this process are poorly known. To identify genes controlling glioma invasion, we used genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of primary human glioblastomas to develop an expression-based rank ordering of 30 transcription factors that have previously been implicated in the regulation of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Using this approach, we identified the oncogenic transcriptional repressor, SNAI2/Slug, among the upper tenth percentile of invasion-related transcription factors overexpressed in glioblastomas. SNAI2 mRNA expression correlated with histologic grade and invasive phenotype in primary human glioma specimens, and was induced by EGF receptor activation in human glioblastoma cells. Overexpression of SNAI2/Slug increased glioblastoma cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and promoted angiogenesis and glioblastoma growth in vivo. Importantly, knockdown of endogenous SNAI2/Slug in glioblastoma cells decreased invasion and increased survival in a mouse intracranial human glioblastoma transplantation model. This genome-scale approach has thus identified SNAI2/Slug as a regulator of growth and invasion in human gliomas

  1. Pediatric glioma stem cells: biologic strategies for oncolytic HSV virotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory K Friedman

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available While glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common adult malignant brain tumor, GBMs in childhood represent less than 10% of pediatric malignant brain tumors and are phenotypically and molecularly distinct from adult GBMs. Similar to adult patients, outcomes for children with high-grade gliomas (HGGs remain poor. Furthermore, the significant morbidity and mortality yielded by pediatric GBM is compounded by neurotoxicity for the developing brain caused by current therapies. Poor outcomes have been attributed to a subpopulation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant cells, termed ‘glioma stem cells’ (GSCs, ‘glioma progenitor cells’, or ‘glioma-initiating cells', which have the ability to initiate and maintain the tumor and to repopulate the recurring tumor after conventional therapy. Future innovative therapies for pediatric HGGs must be able to eradicate these therapy-resistant GSCs. Oncolytic herpes simplex viruses, genetically engineered to be safe for normal cells and to express diverse foreign anti-tumor therapeutic genes, have been demonstrated in preclinical studies to infect and kill GSCs and tumor cells equally while sparing normal brain cells. In this review, we discuss the unique aspects of pediatric GSCs, including markers to identify them, the microenvironment they reside in, signaling pathways that regulate them, mechanisms of cellular resistance, and approaches to target GSCs, with a focus on the promising therapeutic, genetically engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV.

  2. An unusual cystic appearance of disseminated low-grade gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, T.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Perilongo, G.; Kaufman, B.A.; Holden, K.R.; Carollo, C.; Kling Chong, W.K.

    2001-01-01

    We report five cases of pediatric disseminated low-grade gliomas of the brainstem or spinal cord that exhibited an unusual, cystic pattern. Leptomeningeal disease was present in three of these at diagnosis, and was detected shortly afterwards in the other two. Four patients are alive up to 5 years later, following minimal to no intervention, while one is dead. (orig.)

  3. Levetiracetam improves verbal memory in high-grade glioma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Marjolein; Douw, Linda; Sizoo, Eefje M; Bosma, Ingeborg; Froklage, Femke E; Heimans, Jan J; Postma, Tjeerd J; Klein, Martin; Reijneveld, Jaap C

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of high-grade glioma (HGG) patients with anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) has met with various side effects, such as cognitive deterioration. The cognitive effects of both older and newer AEDs in HGG patients are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of

  4. Diffusion kurtosis imaging can efficiently assess the glioma grade and cellular proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rifeng; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhao, Lingyun; Zhang, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Shun; Yao, Yihao; Yang, Shiqi; Shi, Jingjing; Shen, Nanxi; Su, Changliang; Zhang, Ju; Zhu, Wenzhen

    2015-12-08

    Conventional diffusion imaging techniques are not sufficiently accurate for evaluating glioma grade and cellular proliferation, which are critical for guiding glioma treatment. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), an advanced non-Gaussian diffusion imaging technique, has shown potential in grading glioma; however, its applications in this tumor have not been fully elucidated. In this study, DKI and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) were performed on 74 consecutive patients with histopathologically confirmed glioma. The kurtosis and conventional diffusion metric values of the tumor were semi-automatically obtained. The relationships of these metrics with the glioma grade and Ki-67 expression were evaluated. The diagnostic efficiency of these metrics in grading was further compared. It was demonstrated that compared with the conventional diffusion metrics, the kurtosis metrics were more promising imaging markers in distinguishing high-grade from low-grade gliomas and distinguishing among grade II, III and IV gliomas; the kurtosis metrics also showed great potential in the prediction of Ki-67 expression. To our best knowledge, we are the first to reveal the ability of DKI to assess the cellular proliferation of gliomas, and to employ the semi-automatic method for the accurate measurement of gliomas. These results could have a significant impact on the diagnosis and subsequent therapy of glioma.

  5. An integrated transcriptomic and computational analysis for biomarker identification in human glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wenli; Zeng, Chun

    2016-06-01

    Malignant glioma is one of the most common primary brain tumors and is among the deadliest of human cancers. The molecular mechanism for human glioma is poorly understood. Early prognosis of this disease and early treatment are vital. Thus, it is crucial to target the key genes controlling pathogenesis in the early stage of glioma. In this study, differentially expressed genes in human glioma and paired peritumoral tissues were detected by transcriptome microarray analysis. Following gene microarray analysis, the gene expression profile in the differential grade glioma was further validated by bioinformatic analyses, co-expression network construction. Microarray analysis revealed that 1725 genes were differentially expressed and classified into different glioma stage. The analysis revealed 14 genes that were significantly associated with survival with a false discovery rate. Among these genes, macrophage capping protein (CAPG), a member of the actin-regulatory protein, was the key gene in a 20-gene network that modulates cell motility by interacting with the cytoskeleton. Furthermore, the prognostic impact of CAPG was validated by use of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry on human glioma tissue. CAPG protein was significantly upregulated in clinical high-grade glioblastoma as compared with normal brain tissues. Overexpression of CAPG levels also predict shorter overall survival of glioma patients. These data demonstrated CAPG protein expression in human glioma was associated with tumorigenesis and may be a biomarker for identification of the pathological grade of glioma.

  6. Astrocytes protect glioma cells from chemotherapy and upregulate survival genes via gap junctional communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qingtang; Liu, Zhao; Ling, Feng; Xu, Geng

    2016-02-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumor. Using current standard treatment regimens, the prognosis of patients with gliomas remains poor, which is predominantly due to the resistance of glioma cells to chemotherapy. The organ microenvironment has been implicated in the pathogenesis and survival of tumor cells. Thus, the aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that astrocytes (the housekeeping cells of the brain microenvironment) may protect glioma cells from chemotherapy and to investigate the underlying mechanism. Immunofluorescent and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that glioma cells were surrounded and infiltrated by activated astrocytes. In vitro co-culture of glioma cells with astrocytes significantly reduced the cytotoxic effects on glioma cells caused by various chemotherapeutic agents, as demonstrated by fluorescein isothiocyanate-propidium iodide flow cytometry. Transwell experiments indicated that this protective effect was dependent on physical contact and the gap junctional communication (GJC) between astrocytes and glioma cells. Microarray expression profiling further revealed that astrocytes upregulated the expression levels of various critical survival genes in the glioma cells via GJC. The results of the present study indicated that the organ microenvironment may affect the biological behavior of tumor cells and suggest a novel mechanism of resistance in glioma cells, which may be of therapeutic relevance clinically.

  7. UPA-sensitive ACPP-conjugated nanoparticles for multi-targeting therapy of brain glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yujie; Liao, Ziwei; Jiang, Ting; Zhao, Jingjing; Tuo, Yanyan; She, Xiaojian; Shen, Shun; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2015-01-01

    Now it is well evidenced that tumor growth is a comprehensive result of multiple pathways, and glioma parenchyma cells and stroma cells are closely associated and mutually compensatory. Therefore, drug delivery strategies targeting both of them simultaneously might obtain more promising therapeutic benefits. In the present study, we developed a multi-targeting drug delivery system modified with uPA-activated cell-penetrating peptide (ACPP) for the treatment of brain glioma (ANP). In vitro experiments demonstrated nanoparticles (NP) decorated with cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) or ACPP could significantly improve nanoparticles uptake by C6 glioma cells and nanoparticles penetration into glioma spheroids as compared with traditional NP and thus enhanced the therapeutic effects of its payload when paclitaxel (PTX) was loaded. In vivo imaging experiment revealed that ANP accumulated more specifically in brain glioma site than NP decorated with or without CPP. Brain slides further showed that ACPP contributed to more nanoparticles accumulation in glioma site, and ANP could co-localize not only with glioma parenchyma cells, but also with stroma cells including neo-vascular cells and tumor associated macrophages. The pharmacodynamics results demonstrated ACPP could significantly improve the therapeutic benefits of nanoparticles by significantly prolonging the survival time of glioma bearing mice. In conclusion, the results suggested that nanoparticles modified with uPA-sensitive ACPP could reach multiple types of cells in glioma tissues and provide a novel strategy for glioma targeted therapy.

  8. Upregulation of B23 promotes tumor cell proliferation and predicts poor prognosis in glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jianguo [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 1055 Sanxiang Road, Suzhou, 215004, Jiangsu Province (China); Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road, Nantong, 226001, Jiangsu Province (China); Sun, Jie; Yang, Liu; Yan, Yaohua; Shi, Wei; Shi, Jinlong; Huang, Qingfeng; Chen, Jian [Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road, Nantong, 226001, Jiangsu Province (China); Lan, Qing, E-mail: lanqingsj@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 1055 Sanxiang Road, Suzhou, 215004, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-10-09

    B23 (also known as Nucleophosmin, NPM, numatrin or NO38) is a ubiquitously expressed phosphoprotein belonging to the nucleoplasmin family of chaperones. In this study we intended to investigate the clinical significance of B23 expression in human glioma and its biological function in glioma cells. Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis showed that B23 was overexpressed in glioma tissues and glioma cell lines. In addition, the expression level of B23 was positively correlated with glioma pathological grade and Ki-67 expression. Kaplan–Meier analysis revealed that a higher B23 expression in patients with glioma was associated with a poorer prognosis. In vitro, after the release of glioma cell lines from serum starvation, the expression of B23 was upregulated, as well as PCNA (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) and cyclin A. In addition, knockdown of B23 by small interfering RNA transfection diminished the expression of PCNA, cyclin D1 and arrested cell growth at G1 phase. Taken together, our results implied that B23 could be a candidate prognostic biomarker as well as a potential therapeutical target of glioma. - Highlights: • B23 expression increased as the malignant degree of glioma increased, which was consistent with Ki-67 expression. • High expression of B23 could be a strong determinant of poor prognosis in glioma. • B23 may be involved in the proliferation of glioma in a cell-cycle-dependent pathway. • Knockdown of B23 expression by siRNA could affect the progression of glioma. • B23 may be a potential prognosis biomarker and a possible therapeutic target for glioma.

  9. Baseline trace metals in Patella caerulea in a central Tyrrhenian ecosystem (Pontine Islands archipelago and Lazio region coastal sites, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Mele, Giustino; Finoia, Maria Grazia

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we tested the aptitude of the gastropod mollusk Patella caerulea as biomonitor of elemental pollution in seawater of a central Tyrrhenian ecosystem (Pontine Islands archipelago and Lazio region coastal sites, Italy). Concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were measured in 120 individuals collected in six strategic locations in two sampling campaigns during 2011 and 2012. Samples of surrounding seawater were also collected in the same sites and tested for the same metals in order to obtain the respective concentration factors (CFs). Then, we analyzed the evolution of contamination in the selected sites and compared our results with the baseline levels (control charts) previously established for Tyrrhenian seas (Conti et al. Environ Sci Pollut R 22:3640-3651,2015). With this purpose, we defined six new variables (one for each metal) and then we applied multivariate statistics, i.e., cluster analysis and discriminant analysis on the principal component analysis factors in order to obtain more reliable results. Patella resulted to be a strong bioaccumulator of Cd (CFs = 8990) and a good accumulator of Cr, Pb, and Zn. The levels of the majority of metals (i.e., Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in Patella decreased in the range from -13.06% of Zn to -42.51% of Ni in Fiumicino harbor, Anzio beach, and Ponza Harbor from 2011 to 2012. In general, the metal levels in these marine areas are low and within the previously established baseline ranges for Tyrrhenian Sea (control charts). Here, we found a not univocal trend of metal bioaccumulation patterns between the two sampling campaigns (2011-2012) in the selected sites. No one site resulted to be clearly more contaminated than another (i.e., harbor sites as expected). For instance, for Cd, we detected a relevant increase of its levels (+118%) in the harbors and Anzio beach sites from 2011 to 2012; however, they remained at lower levels of the lower limit (Q 2.5 ) of the control chart. Higher Pb levels with

  10. Lactate dehydrogenase A silencing in IDH mutant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnelong, Charles; Chaumeil, Myriam M; Blough, Michael D; Al-Najjar, Mohammad; Stechishin, Owen D; Chan, Jennifer A; Pieper, Russell O; Ronen, Sabrina M; Weiss, Samuel; Luchman, H Artee; Cairncross, J Gregory

    2014-05-01

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 gene (IDH1/2) were initially thought to enhance cancer cell survival and proliferation by promoting the Warburg effect. However, recent experimental data have shown that production of 2-hydroxyglutarate by IDH mutant cells promotes hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α degradation and, by doing so, may have unexpected metabolic effects. We used human glioma tissues and derived brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) to study the expression of HIF1α target genes in IDH mutant ((mt)) and IDH wild-type ((wt)) tumors. Focusing thereafter on the major glycolytic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), we used standard molecular methods and pyrosequencing-based DNA methylation analysis to identify mechanisms by which LDHA expression was regulated in human gliomas. We found that HIF1α-responsive genes, including many essential for glycolysis (SLC2A1, PDK1, LDHA, SLC16A3), were underexpressed in IDH(mt) gliomas and/or derived BTSCs. We then demonstrated that LDHA was silenced in IDH(mt) derived BTSCs, including those that did not retain the mutant IDH1 allele (mIDH(wt)), matched BTSC xenografts, and parental glioma tissues. Silencing of LDHA was associated with increased methylation of the LDHA promoter, as was ectopic expression of mutant IDH1 in immortalized human astrocytes. Furthermore, in a search of The Cancer Genome Atlas, we found low expression and high methylation of LDHA in IDH(mt) glioblastomas. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of downregulation of LDHA in cancer. Although unexpected findings, silencing of LDHA and downregulation of several other glycolysis essential genes raise the intriguing possibility that IDH(mt) gliomas have limited glycolytic capacity, which may contribute to their slow growth and better prognosis.

  11. Innate immune functions of microglia isolated from human glioma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimm Elizabeth

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Innate immunity is considered the first line of host defense and microglia presumably play a critical role in mediating potent innate immune responses to traumatic and infectious challenges in the human brain. Fundamental impairments of the adaptive immune system in glioma patients have been investigated; however, it is unknown whether microglia are capable of innate immunity and subsequent adaptive anti-tumor immune responses within the immunosuppressive tumor micro-environment of human glioma patients. We therefore undertook a novel characterization of the innate immune phenotype and function of freshly isolated human glioma-infiltrating microglia (GIM. Methods GIM were isolated by sequential Percoll purification from patient tumors immediately after surgical resection. Flow cytometry, phagocytosis and tumor cytotoxicity assays were used to analyze the phenotype and function of these cells. Results GIM expressed significant levels of Toll-like receptors (TLRs, however they do not secrete any of the cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α critical in developing effective innate immune responses. Similar to innate macrophage functions, GIM can mediate phagocytosis and non-MHC restricted cytotoxicity. However, they were statistically less able to mediate tumor cytotoxicity compared to microglia isolated from normal brain. In addition, the expression of Fas ligand (FasL was low to absent, indicating that apoptosis of the incoming lymphocyte population may not be a predominant mode of immunosuppression by microglia. Conclusion We show for the first time that despite the immunosuppressive environment of human gliomas, GIM are capable of innate immune responses such as phagocytosis, cytotoxicity and TLR expression but yet are not competent in secreting key cytokines. Further understanding of these innate immune functions could play a critical role in understanding and developing effective immunotherapies to malignant human gliomas.

  12. ECHOGRAPHIC PICTURE OF OPTIC NERVE GLIOMA IN NEUROFIBROMATOSIS TYPE-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Kuzmanović

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Authors want to present echographic picture of orbital part of low-grade pilocytic astrocytoma involving the optic nerve and/or chiasm and optic tract (optic pathway glioma or visual pathway glioma.Methods. 4 children with neurofibromatosis type-1 complicated with optic pathway glioma diagnosed earlier with magnetic resonance were examined by ultrasound. Standardised A-scan technique was used for optic nerve width measurement. The 30° test and B-scan (axial, transverse and longitudinal sections of both eyes and orbits were performed as well.Results. The optic nerve diameter in our cases ranged from 4.48 to 8.5 mm. Two children had the left side optic pathway glioma, one boy had the right side optic pathway glioma and in one tumour was bilateral. The transversal section of the nerve revealed dark oval and in more perpendicular sections round void of the nerve. As the beam is swept towards the orbital apex void becomes more fusiform. The nerve and its sheaths are markedly widened. An abnormal increase in reflectivity and irregularity of the spike’s pattern is exhibited as well. No calcification along the sheaths is noticed. The transverse section of the tumour demonstrated an »inverse doughnut« sign. The outer whiter outline of the widened sheaths surrounds an inner darker circle. The longitudinal section revealed the optic nerve head continuing into the widened optic nerve. The 30° test was negative. The differential diagnosis of meningeoma, optic neuritis and orbital cysticercosis should be considered.Conclusions. Ultrasound as a cheap, safe, easily repeatable imaging method should become a method of choice for screening optic nerve tumours in neurofibromatosis type-1, especially in children, as well as for follow-up after treatment.

  13. Incentives and intrinsic motivation in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Berdud

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: The conclusions could act as a guide to support the optimal design of incentive policies and schemes within health organisations when healthcare professionals are intrinsically motivated.

  14. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intrinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. (author).

  15. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    1990-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intrinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. (author)

  16. Discrimination between glioma grades II and III in suspected low-grade gliomas using dynamic contrast-enhanced and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Anna; Fahlström, Markus; Rostrup, Egill

    2014-01-01

    that could best discriminate between grade II and III gliomas. METHODS: MRI (3 T) including morphological ((T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T1-weighted (T1W)+Gd)) and perfusion (DCE and DSC) sequences was performed in 39 patients with newly diagnosed suspected low-grade glioma after...... written informed consent in this review board-approved study. Regions of interests (ROIs) in tumour area were delineated on FLAIR images co-registered to DCE and DSC, respectively, in 25 patients with histopathological grade II (n = 18) and III (n = 7) gliomas. Statistical analysis of differences between...... grade II and grade III gliomas in histogram perfusion parameters was performed, and the areas under the curves (AUC) from the ROC analyses were evaluated. RESULTS: In DCE, the skewness of transfer constant (k(trans)) was found superior for differentiating grade II from grade III in all gliomas (AUC 0...

  17. Efficacy of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG in human glioma cell lines and tumorigenic glioma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvageot, Claire Marie-Elisabeth; Weatherbee, Jessica Leigh; Kesari, Santosh; Winters, Susan Elizabeth; Barnes, Jessica; Dellagatta, Jamie; Ramakrishna, Naren Raj; Stiles, Charles Dean; Kung, Andrew Li-Jen; Kieran, Mark W; Wen, Patrick Yung Chih

    2009-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) arises from genetic and signaling abnormalities in components of signal transduction pathways involved in proliferation, survival, and the cell cycle axis. Studies to date with single-agent targeted molecular therapy have revealed only modest effects in attenuating the growth of these tumors, suggesting that targeting multiple aberrant pathways may be more beneficial. Heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone that is involved in the conformational maturation of a defined group of client proteins, many of which are deregulated in GBM. 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is a well-characterized HSP90 inhibitor that should be able to target many of the aberrant signal transduction pathways in GBM. We assessed the ability of 17-AAG to inhibit the growth of glioma cell lines and glioma stem cells both in vitro and in vivo and assessed its ability to synergize with radiation and/or temozolomide, the standard therapies for GBM. Our results reveal that 17-AAG is able to inhibit the growth of both human glioma cell lines and glioma stem cells in vitro and is able to target the appropriate proteins within these cells. In addition, 17-AAG can inhibit the growth of intracranial tumors and can synergize with radiation both in tissue culture and in intracranial tumors. This compound was not found to synergize with temozolomide in any of our models of gliomas. Our results suggest that HSP90 inhibitors like 17-AAG may have therapeutic potential in GBM, either as a single agent or in combination with radiation.

  18. Geochemical indicators of intrinsic bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borden, R.C.; Gomez, C.A.; Becker, M.T.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed field investigation has been completed at a gasoline-contaminated aquifer near Rocky Point, NC, to examine possible indicators of intrinsic bioremediation and identify factors that may significantly influence the rae and extent of bioremediation. The dissolved plume of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) in ground water is naturally degrading. Toluene and o-xylene are most rapidly degraded followed by m-, p-xylene, and benzene. Ethylbenzene appears to degrade very slowly under anaerobic conditions present in the center of the plume. The rate and extent of biodegradation appears to be strongly influenced by the type and quantity of electron acceptors present in the aquifer. At the upgradient edge of the plume, nitrate, ferric iron, and oxygen are used as terminal electron acceptors during hydrocarbon biodegradation. The equivalent of 40 to 50 mg/l of hydrocarbon is degraded based on the increase in dissolved CO 2 relative to background ground water. Immediately downgradient of the source area, sulfate and iron are the dominant electron acceptors. Toluene and o-xylene are rapidly removed in this region. Once the available oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate are consumed, biodegradation is limited and appears to be controlled by mixing and aerobic biodegradation at the plume fringes

  19. Protein intrinsic disorder in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Florencio; Pietrosemoli, Natalia; García-Martín, Juan A; Solano, Roberto

    2013-09-12

    To some extent contradicting the classical paradigm of the relationship between protein 3D structure and function, now it is clear that large portions of the proteomes, especially in higher organisms, lack a fixed structure and still perform very important functions. Proteins completely or partially unstructured in their native (functional) form are involved in key cellular processes underlain by complex networks of protein interactions. The intrinsic conformational flexibility of these disordered proteins allows them to bind multiple partners in transient interactions of high specificity and low affinity. In concordance, in plants this type of proteins has been found in processes requiring these complex and versatile interaction networks. These include transcription factor networks, where disordered proteins act as integrators of different signals or link different transcription factor subnetworks due to their ability to interact (in many cases simultaneously) with different partners. Similarly, they also serve as signal integrators in signaling cascades, such as those related to response to external stimuli. Disordered proteins have also been found in plants in many stress-response processes, acting as protein chaperones or protecting other cellular components and structures. In plants, it is especially important to have complex and versatile networks able to quickly and efficiently respond to changing environmental conditions since these organisms cannot escape and have no other choice than adapting to them. Consequently, protein disorder can play an especially important role in plants, providing them with a fast mechanism to obtain complex, interconnected and versatile molecular networks.

  20. Protein intrinsic disorder in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencio ePazos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To some extent contradicting the classical paradigm of the relationship between protein 3D structure and function, now it is clear that large portions of the proteomes, especially in higher organisms, lack a fixed structure and still perform very important functions. Proteins completely or partially unstructured in their native (functional form are involved in key cellular processes underlain by complex networks of protein interactions. The intrinsic conformational flexibility of these disordered proteins allows them to bind multiple partners in transient interactions of high specificity and low affinity. In concordance, in plants this type of proteins has been found in processes requiring these complex and versatile interaction networks. These include transcription factor networks, where disordered proteins act as integrators of different signals or link different transcription factor subnetworks due to their ability to interact (in many cases simultaneously with different partners. Similarly, they also serve as signal integrators in signalling cascades, such as those related to response to external stimuli. Disordered proteins have also been found in plants in many stress-response processes, acting as protein chaperones or protecting other cellular components and structures. In plants, it is especially important to have complex and versatile networks able to quickly and efficiently respond to changing environmental conditions since these organisms can not escape and have no other choice than adapting to them. Consequently, protein disorder can play an especially important role in plants, providing them with a fast mechanism to obtain complex, interconnected and versatile molecular networks.

  1. Diffusion kurtosis imaging can efficiently assess the glioma grade and cellular proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Rifeng; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhao, Lingyun; Zhang, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Shun; Yao, Yihao; Yang, Shiqi; Shi, Jingjing; Shen, Nanxi; Su, Changliang; Zhang, Ju; Zhu, Wenzhen

    2015-01-01

    Conventional diffusion imaging techniques are not sufficiently accurate for evaluating glioma grade and cellular proliferation, which are critical for guiding glioma treatment. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), an advanced non-Gaussian diffusion imaging technique, has shown potential in grading glioma; however, its applications in this tumor have not been fully elucidated. In this study, DKI and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) were performed on 74 consecutive patients with histopathologicall...

  2. K27M-mutant histone-3 as a novel target for glioma immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ochs, Katharina; Ott, Martina; Bunse, Theresa; Sahm, Felix; Bunse, Lukas; Deumelandt, Katrin; Sonner, Jana K.; Keil, Melanie; von Deimling, Andreas; Wick, Wolfgang; Platten, Michael

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutation-specific vaccines have become increasingly important in glioma immunotherapy; however, shared neoepitopes are rare. For diffuse gliomas, a driver mutation in the gene for isocitrate dehydrogenase type-1 has been shown to produce an immunogenic epitope currently targeted in clinical trials. For highly aggressive midline gliomas, a recurrent point mutation in the histone-3 gene (H3F3A) causes an amino acid change from lysine to methionine at position 27 (K27M). Here, we demons...

  3. Uptake of iodine-123-α-methyl tyrosine by gliomas and non-neoplastic brain lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwert, T.; Morgenroth, C.; Woesler, B.; Matheja, P.; Palkovic, S.; Vollet, B.; Samnick, S.; Maasjosthusmann, U.; Lerch, H.; Gildehaus, F.J.; Wassmann, H.; Schober, O.

    1996-01-01

    Using single-photon emission tomography (SPET), the radiopharmaceutical L-3-iodine-123-α-methyl tyrosine (IMT) has been applied to the imaging of amino acid transport into brain tumours. It was the aim of this study to investigate whether IMT SPET is capable of differentiating between high-grade gliomas, low-grade gliomas and non-neoplastic brain lesions. To this end, IMT uptake was determined in 53 patients using the triple-headed SPET camera MULTISPECT 3. Twenty-eight of these subjects suffered from high-grade gliomas (WHO grade III or IV), 12 from low-grade gliomas (WHO grade II), and 13 from non-neoplastic brain lesions, including lesions after effective therapy of a glioma (five cases), infarctions (four cases), inflammatory lesions (three cases), infarctions (four cases), inflammatory lesions (three cases) and traumatic haematoma (one case). IMT uptake was significantly higher in high-grade gliomas than in low-grade gliomas and non-neoplastic lesions. IMT uptake by low-grade gliomas was not significantly different from that by non-neoplastic lesions. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 71% and 83% for differentiating high-grade from low-grade gliomas, 82% and 100% for distinguishing high-grade gliomas from non-neoplastic lesions, and 50% and 100% for discriminating low-grade gliomas from non-neoplastic lesions. Analogously to positron emission tomography with radioactively labelled amino acids and fluorine-18 deoxyglucose, IMT SPET may aid in differentiating higc-grade gliomas from histologically benign brain tumours and non-neoplastic brain lesions; it is of only limited value in differentiating between non-neoplastic lesions and histologically benign brain tumours. (orig.)

  4. Subjective Quality of Life in Persons with Low-Grade Glioma and Their Next of Kin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, Tanja I.; Ahlstrom, Gerd I.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with low-grade glioma have a longer survival than patients with highly malignant glioma, and for this reason questions of quality of life (QoL) are of particular importance to such patients as well as to their next of kin. No studies have been found in which both adult patients with low-grade glioma and their next of kin have estimated…

  5. Retinoids in the treatment of glioma: a new perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mawson AR

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Anthony R MawsonDepartment of Health Policy and Management, School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USAAbstract: Primary brain tumors are among the top ten causes of cancer-related deaths in the US. Malignant gliomas account for approximately 70% of the 22,500 new cases of malignant primary brain tumors diagnosed in adults each year and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Despite optimal treatment, the prognosis for patients with gliomas remains poor. The use of retinoids (vitamin A and its congeners in the treatment of certain tumors was originally based on the assumption that these conditions were associated with an underlying deficiency of vitamin A and that supplementation with pharmacological doses would correct the deficiency. Yet the results of retinoid treatment have been only modestly beneficial and usually short-lived. Studies also indicate that vitamin A excess and supplementation have pro-oxidant effects and are associated with increased risks of mortality from cancer and other diseases. The therapeutic role of vitamin A in cancer thus remains uncertain and a new perspective on the facts is needed. The modest and temporary benefits of retinoid treatment could result from a process of feedback inhibition, whereby exogenous retinoid temporarily inhibits the endogenous synthesis of these compounds. In fact, repeated and/or excessive exposure of the tissues to endogenous retinoic acid may contribute to carcinogenesis. Gliomas, in particular, may result from an imbalance in retinoid receptor expression initiated by environmental factors that increase the endogenous production of retinoic acid in glia. At the receptor level, it is proposed that this imbalance is characterized by excessive expression of retinoic acid receptor-α(RARα and reduced expression of retinoic acid receptor-β (RARβ. This suggests a potential new treatment strategy for gliomas, possibly even at a

  6. Tumor localization of boronated porphyrins in an intracerebral model of glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.S.; Kaye, A.H.; Gonzales, M.F.; Stylli, S.S.; Nakamura, Y.; Kahl, S.B.; Vardaxis, N.J.; Johnson, C.I.

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of the most common cerebral tumor, cerebral glioma, is unsatisfactory as the tumor recurs due to inadequate local control. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) offer some promise as adjuvant treatments for cerebral glioma. Several clinical trials have been reported utilizing PDT and BNCT to treat the high grade glioma, glioblastoma multiforme. The authors have investigated the pharmacokinetic tissue distribution of the photosensitizer Haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), the nido carboranyl porphyrin, boron tetraphenyl porphine (BTPP) and the closo carboranyl monomeric protoporphyrin (BOPP) in CBA mice bearing the intracerebral C6 glioma xenograft

  7. Histamine-stimulated expression of insulin-like growth factors in human glioma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Ven, L. T.; Van Buul-Offers, S. C.; Gloudemans, T.; Roholl, P. J.; Sussenbach, J. S.; Den Otter, W.

    1997-01-01

    Glioma tumour growth is associated with the expression of insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGFs) and of both type I and type II IGF receptors. It has also been shown that IGFs can stimulate proliferation of cultured glioma cells. We previously reported that histamine too can stimulate the growth of glioma cells in vitro. In this report, we study whether the histamine-induced growth of G47 glioma cells is mediated by the IGFs. We found that histamine stimulates the expression of both IGF-...

  8. Forkhead Box A2 (FOXA2) Inhibits Invasion and Tumorigenesis in Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bingqian; Liang, Huimin; Gao, Ming; Li, Zhenjiang; Xu, Chenyang; Fan, Shaokang; Chang, Na

    2017-05-24

    The forkhead box A2 (FOXA2) is the key transcriptional factor that plays an important role in tumorigenesis. However, until now the expression pattern and role of FOXA2 in glioma have yet to be elucidated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of FOXA2 in glioma and investigate its role in glioma cells. Our data showed that FOXA2 was significantly downregulated in human glioma cell lines. Forced expression of FOXA2 suppressed the ability of glioma cells to proliferate, migrate, and invade and influenced the expression level of EMT-associated proteins. In addition, forced expression of FOXA2 attenuated tumor growth of glioma in a nude mouse xenograft model. Mechanistically, we disclosed that forced expression of FOXA2 greatly downregulated the expression of β-catenin, cyclin D1, and c-Myc in glioma cells. Taken together, these results show that FOXA2 may play an important role in proliferation, invasion, and tumorigenesis in glioma cells. Thus, FOXA2 may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of glioma.

  9. Risk assessment in paediatric glioma-Time to move on from the binary classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgshun, A J; Hansford, J R; Sullivan, M J

    2017-03-01

    Paediatric glioma encompasses a wide range of entities with highly variable prognoses. Gliomas are grouped by histopathological features into high- and low-grade glioma but this classification until recently has not taken into account many emerging risk factors in this disease. A comprehensive risk classification has not been published for paediatric glioma despite many risk factors being established in this disease. A comprehensive literature review was carried out identifying risk factors for paediatric low-grade and high-grade glioma. The most consistently described risk factors in high-grade glioma included midline location and extent of surgical resection. For patients with progressive unresectable low-grade glioma, age under 1, neurofibromatosis type I status and location were the most consistently prognostic. Molecular classification shows promise in accurately reassigning diagnosis for some gliomas. Risk profiling in paediatric glioma will require a focused multinational effort but will result in a more accurate and nuanced assessment of prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased Expression of microRNA-17 Predicts Poor Prognosis in Human Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengkui Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the clinical significance of microRNA-17 (miR-17 expression in human gliomas. Methods. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analysis was used to characterize the expression patterns of miR-17 in 108 glioma and 20 normal brain tissues. The associations of miR-17 expression with clinicopathological factors and prognosis of glioma patients were also statistically analyzed. Results. Compared with normal brain tissues, miR-17 expression was significantly higher in glioma tissues (P<0.001. In addition, the increased expression of miR-17 in glioma was significantly associated with advanced pathological grade (P=0.006 and low Karnofsky performance score (KPS, P=0.01. Moreover, Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox regression analyses showed that miR-17 overexpression (P=0.008 and advanced pathological grade (P=0.02 were independent factors predicting poor prognosis for gliomas. Furthermore, subgroup analyses showed that miR-17 expression was significantly associated with poor overall survival in glioma patients with high pathological grades (for grade III~IV: P<0.001. Conclusions. Our data offer the convinced evidence that the increased expression of miR-17 may have potential value for predicting poor prognosis in glioma patients with high pathological grades, indicating that miR-17 may contribute to glioma progression and be a candidate therapeutic target for this disease.

  11. Plasma IGFBP-2 levels predict clinical outcomes of patients with high-grade gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yi; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Kaijia; Xu, Li; Chen, Baoshi; Li, Guilin; Qiu, Xiaoguang; Jiang, Tianzi; Zhang, Wei; Song, Sonya W.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP-2) is a malignancy-associated protein measurable in tumors and blood. Increased IGFBP-2 is associated with shortened survival of advanced glioma patients. Thus, we examined plasma IGFBP-2 levels in glioma patients and healthy controls to evaluate its value as a plasma bio-marker for glioma. Plasma IGFBP-2 levels in 196 patients with newly diagnosed glioma and 55 healthy controls were analyzed using an IGFBP-2 ELISA kit. Blood was collected b...

  12. Overexpression of NIMA-related kinase 2 is associated with poor prognoses in malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huajie; Liu, Bin; Hou, Xianzeng; Pang, Bo; Guo, Pengbo; Jiang, Wanli; Ding, Qian; Zhang, Rui; Xin, Tao; Guo, Hua; Xu, Shangchen; Pang, Qi

    2017-05-01

    Eleated expression of NIMA-related kinase 2 (NEK2) was frequently observed in a variety of malignant cancers, and it appears to be involved in the initiation, maintenance, progression, metastasis of cancer and is positively associated with poor prognosis. We sought to investigate NEK2 expression and its predictive roles in malignant gliomas, and study the correlation of NEK2 protein expression with proliferation, clinical parameters, overall survival and some other parameters. We investigate NEK2 protein expression in 99 samples of malignant gliomas, including 35 WHO grade II, 22 grade III, and 42 grade IV gliomas, by immunohistochemistry and western blot (n = 50). We then made correlative analysis of protein overexpression using the Kaplan-Meier method, Log rank test, and Cox proportional-hazards model analysis. NEK2 protein was overexpressed in malignant gliomas, but not in normal brain tissues. Overexpression of NEK2 correlated with malignancy, proliferation and adverse overall survival in gliomas. Moreover, chemotherapy, resection extent and WHO grade also correlate with overall survival in gliomas. However, within WHO grade II glioma subgroup, NEK2 overexpression showed no impact on overall survival. The present study firstly reveals that NEK2 protein is widely overexpressed in gliomas. NEK2 overexpression correlates significantly with malignancy (WHO grades), proliferation (Ki-67) and prognosis in malignant gliomas. NEK2 is a potential gene therapy target and prognostic indicator.

  13. Preradiation chemotherapy may improve survival in pediatric diffuse intrinsic brainstem gliomas: final results of BSG 98 prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frappaz, Didier; Schell, Matthias; Thiesse, Philippe; Marec-Bérard, Perrine; Mottolese, Carmine; Perol, David; Bergeron, Christophe; Philip, Thierry; Ricci, Anne Claire; Galand-Desme, Sophie; Szathmari, Alexandru; Carrie, Christian

    2008-08-01

    Radiation therapy remains the only treatment that provides clinical benefit to children with diffuse brainstem tumors. Their median survival, however, rarely exceeds 9 months. The authors report a prospective trial of frontline chemotherapy aimed at delaying radiation until time of clinical progression. The aim was to investigate the possibility that radiotherapy would maintain its activity in children whose disease progressed after chemotherapy. Twenty-three patients took part in this protocol, the BSG 98 protocol, which consisted of frontline chemotherapy alternating hematotoxic and nonhematotoxic schedules. Each cycle included three courses delivered monthly; the first course was 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosoureacisplatin, and the second and third were high-dose methotrexate. Three patients underwent one cycle; 5 patients each, two and three cycles; and 10 patients, four cycles. Twenty of the 23 patients eventually received local radiation therapy. A historical cohort of 14 patients who received at least local radiation therapy served as controls. Four patients experienced severe iatrogenic infections, and 11 patients required platelet transfusions. Median survival increased significantly in patients participating in the protocol compared to that in the historical controls (17 months, 95% confidence interval [CI], 10-23 months, vs. 9 months, 95% CI, 8-10 months; p = 0.022), though hospitalization was prolonged (57 vs. 25 days, p = 0.001). Although frontline chemotherapy alternating hematotoxic and nonhematotoxic schedules significantly increases overall median survival, its cost from infection and hospitalization deserves honest discussion with the children and their parents.

  14. LEADERSHIP STYLE AND EMPLOYEES' INTRINSIC JOB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This study investigates the impact of leadership style on employees' intrinsic job satisfaction in the Cross River State Newspaper Corporation, Calabar,. Nigeria. The study examined the problem of dissatisfaction in the work place as far as intrinsic factors of job satisfaction are concerned. Structured questionnaire ...

  15. Intrinsic bioremediation of landfills interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigmon, R.L.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    Intrinsic bioremediation is a risk management option that relies on natural biological and physical processes to contain the spread of contamination from a source. Evidence is presented in this report that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the Sanitary Landfill is fundamental to support incorportion into a Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

  16. Differential scanning microcalorimetry of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permyakov, Sergei E

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasensitive differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is an indispensable thermophysical technique enabling to get direct information on enthalpies accompanying heating/cooling of dilute biopolymer solutions. The thermal dependence of protein heat capacity extracted from DSC data is a valuable source of information on intrinsic disorder level of a protein. Application details and limitations of DSC technique in exploration of protein intrinsic disorder are described.

  17. Intrinsic bioremediation of landfills interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Fliermans, C.B.

    1997-07-14

    Intrinsic bioremediation is a risk management option that relies on natural biological and physical processes to contain the spread of contamination from a source. Evidence is presented in this report that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the Sanitary Landfill is fundamental to support incorportion into a Corrective Action Plan (CAP).

  18. An Intrinsic Coordinate System for Fingerprint Matching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazen, A.M.; Gerez, Sabih H.; Bigun, J.; Smeraldi, F.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, an intrinsic coordinate system is proposed for fingerprints. First the fingerprint is partitioned in regular regions, which are regions that contain no singular points. In each regular region, the intrinsic coordinate system is defined by the directional field. When using the

  19. Central Pontine Myelinolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diuretics), and women with eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia. The risk for CPM is greater if the ... diuretics), and women with eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia. The risk for CPM is greater if the ...

  20. Central pontine myelinolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms may include any of the following: Confusion , delirium , hallucinations Balance problems, tremor Problem swallowing Reduced alertness , drowsiness or sleepiness , lethargy , poor responses Slurred speech ...

  1. Patterns of diagnostic marker assessment in adult diffuse glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woehrer, Adelheid; Kristensen, Bjarne W.; Vital, Anne

    2017-01-01

    markers to routine diagnostic use. Adult diffuse glioma is a prototypic example for a group of tumors that underwent substantial regrouping, and it represents a major workload for surgical neuropathologists. Hence, we conducted a survey among members of the European Confederation of Neuropathological......The 2016 update of the WHO classification has introduced an integrated diagnostic approach that incorporates both tumor morphology and molecular information. This conceptual change has far-reaching implications, especially for neuropathologists who are in the forefront of translating molecular...... Societies (Euro-CNS) in order to assess 1) the extent to which molecular markers have already been incorporated in glioma diagnoses, 2) which molecular techniques are in daily use, and 3) to set a baseline for future surveys in this field. Based on 130 responses from participants across 40 nations...

  2. Radioimmunoimaging of experimental gliomas using radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaessner, H.

    1986-01-01

    The biodistribution and tumour uptake of radiolabelled (131 I) glioma-seeking monoclonal antibodies (14 AC1) and their F(ab') 2 fragments were investigated in nude mice having received glioma transplants. Radioimmunoimaging by external scintigraphy at 48 and 96 hours pointed to a superior tumour localisation by the fragments that was clearly related to the dose. Wholebody determinations of the biokinetic behaviour led to the following results: Faster clearance anc more ready elimination from the blood pool for the fragments, preferential uptake in the tumour; intact antibodies; binding in the liver, spleen and lungs. The study confirmed the value of fragments of monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis of tumours and pointed to the possibility of using intact monoclonal antibodies as carriers of radioisotopes and cytotoxic drugs within the scope of therapeutic programmes. (TRV) [de

  3. Fenofibrate dose not protect glioma cells from irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Jae Lim; Kim, Won Dong; Park, Woo Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Fenofibrate(FF) is a ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and used clinically as a hypolipidemic drug. FF has been reported to have a radioprotective effect of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus 1) and inhibit radiation-induced microglial pro-inflammatory response 2). However, if FF also protect tumor cells, it can not be used clinically during radiotherapy. Thus, we're interested in whether FF has an radioprotective effect of brain tumor cells or not Although the radiosensitive G0/G1 phase cells were increased, radiosensitization by FF was not observed in three human glioma cells. This may be due to counterbalance of radiosensitizing and radioprotecting proteins increased by FF. Taken together, FF neither radiosensitize nor radioprotect glioma cells, so it can be used to protect normal neural cells from radiation damage

  4. Ultrasonography-guided cobalt-60 brachytherapy for malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Noboru; Takenaka, Katsunobu; Ueda, Tatsuya

    1989-01-01

    Brachytherapy with cobalt-60 source is reported. In this method it is characterized that the source is inserted interstitially with remote control system by after-loading method via outer catheter (using tandem tube), which was established in the center of residual tumor, using ultrasonography guide with trepanation, or intraoperatively put within the dead space after tumor resection. Six cases of deep-seated and recurrent malignant glioma, were treated with this method. A total dose of 20 to 45 Gy (10 to 15 Gy/day for 2 to 3 days) was delivered to the target. Additionally conventional external irradiation was followed. The effect of cobalt-60 brachytherapy on such tumors were favorable especially for well-circumscribed glioma less than 3 cm on CT scan. (author)

  5. Hormonal contraceptive use and risk of glioma among younger women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lene; Friis, Søren; Hallas, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Oral contraceptive use influences the risk for certain cancers. However, few studies have examined any link with risk of central nervous system tumours. We investigated the association between hormonal contraceptive use and glioma risk among premenopausal women in a population-based setting...... risk set sampling. Based on prescription data, exposure until 2 years prior to the index date was categorized according to hormonal contraceptive type, i.e. combined oestrogen-progestagen or progestagen only, and duration of use (... to compute odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for glioma associated with hormonal contraceptive use, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: We identified 317 cases and 2126 controls. Ever use of hormonal contraceptive was associated with an OR of 1.5 (95% CI 1.2, 2...

  6. Molecular pathology in adult gliomas: diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive markers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jansen, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Over the past 10 years, there has been an increasing use of molecular markers in the assessment and management of adult malignant gliomas. Some molecular signatures are used diagnostically to help pathologists classify tumours, whereas others are used to estimate prognosis for patients. Most crucial, however, are those markers that are used to predict response to certain therapies, thereby directing clinicians to a particular treatment while avoiding other potentially deleterious therapies. Recently, large-scale genome-wide surveys have been used to identify new biomarkers that have been rapidly developed as diagnostic and prognostic tools. Given these developments, the pace of discovery of new molecular assays will quicken to facilitate personalised medicine in the setting of malignant glioma.

  7. The Effect of Molecular Diagnostics on the Treatment of Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Nancy Ann Oberheim; Butowski, Nicholas

    2017-04-01

    This review summarizes the use of molecular diagnostics in glioma and its effect on the development of novel therapeutics and management decisions. Genomic and proteomic profiling of brain tumors has provided significant expansion of our understanding of oncogenesis, characterization, and prognostication of brain tumors. Molecular markers such as MGMT, EGFR, IDH, 1p19q, ATRX, TERT, FGFR-TACC, and BRAF are now being used to classify brain tumors as well as influence management decisions. Several of these markers are also being used as therapeutic targets. We review the use of several molecular diagnostics in gliomas and discuss their impact on drug development and clinical trial design. In the future, molecular characterization based on a specific genomic, proteomic as well as transcriptomes for bioformatics analysis will provide clinicians the ability to rationally select drugs with actionable targets for each patient.

  8. SVM-based glioma grading. Optimization by feature reduction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoellner, Frank G.; Schad, Lothar R.; Emblem, Kyrre E.; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Oslo Univ. Hospital

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the predictive power of feature reduction analysis approaches in support vector machine (SVM)-based classification of glioma grade. In 101 untreated glioma patients, three analytic approaches were evaluated to derive an optimal reduction in features; (i) Pearson's correlation coefficients (PCC), (ii) principal component analysis (PCA) and (iii) independent component analysis (ICA). Tumor grading was performed using a previously reported SVM approach including whole-tumor cerebral blood volume (CBV) histograms and patient age. Best classification accuracy was found using PCA at 85% (sensitivity = 89%, specificity = 84%) when reducing the feature vector from 101 (100-bins rCBV histogram + age) to 3 principal components. In comparison, classification accuracy by PCC was 82% (89%, 77%, 2 dimensions) and 79% by ICA (87%, 75%, 9 dimensions). For improved speed (up to 30%) and simplicity, feature reduction by all three methods provided similar classification accuracy to literature values (∝87%) while reducing the number of features by up to 98%. (orig.)

  9. Mechanisms of Glioma Formation: Iterative Perivascular Glioma Growth and Invasion Leads to Tumor Progression, VEGF-Independent Vascularization, and Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Baker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As glioma cells infiltrate the brain they become associated with various microanatomic brain structures such as blood vessels, white matter tracts, and brain parenchyma. How these distinct invasion patterns coordinate tumor growth and influence clinical outcomes remain poorly understood. We have investigated how perivascular growth affects glioma growth patterning and response to antiangiogenic therapy within the highly vascularized brain. Orthotopically implanted rodent and human glioma cells are shown to commonly invade and proliferate within brain perivascular space. This form of brain tumor growth and invasion is also shown to characterize de novo generated endogenous mouse brain tumors, biopsies of primary human glioblastoma (GBM, and peripheral cancer metastasis to the human brain. Perivascularly invading brain tumors become vascularized by normal brain microvessels as individual glioma cells use perivascular space as a conduit for tumor invasion. Agent-based computational modeling recapitulated biological perivascular glioma growth without the need for neoangiogenesis. We tested the requirement for neoangiogenesis in perivascular glioma by treating animals with angiogenesis inhibitors bevacizumab and DC101. These inhibitors induced the expected vessel normalization, yet failed to reduce tumor growth or improve survival of mice bearing orthotopic or endogenous gliomas while exacerbating brain tumor invasion. Our results provide compelling experimental evidence in support of the recently described failure of clinically used antiangiogenics to extend the overall survival of human GBM patients.

  10. Multimodal imaging in cerebral gliomas and its neuropathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gempt, Jens, E-mail: jens.gempt@lrz.tum.de [Neurochirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Soehngen, Eric [Abteilung für Neuroradiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Abteilung für Neuropathologie des Instituts für Allgemeine Pathologie und Pathologische Anatomie, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Förster, Stefan [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Ryang, Yu-Mi [Neurochirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Schlegel, Jürgen [Abteilung für Neuropathologie des Instituts für Allgemeine Pathologie und Pathologische Anatomie, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); and others

    2014-05-15

    Introduction: Concerning the preoperative clinical diagnostic work-up of glioma patients, tumor heterogeneity challenges the oncological therapy. The current study assesses the performance of a multimodal imaging approach to differentiate between areas in malignant gliomas and to investigate the extent to which such a combinatorial imaging approach might predict the underlying histology. Methods: Prior to surgical resection, patients harboring intracranial gliomas underwent MRIs (MR-S, PWI) and {sup 18}F-FET-PETs. Intratumoral and peritumoral biopsy targets were defined, by MRI only, by FET-PET only, and by MRI and FET-PET combined, and biopsied prior to surgical resection and which then received separate histopathological examinations. Results: In total, 38 tissue samples were acquired (seven glioblastomas, one anaplastic astrocytoma, one anaplastic oligoastrocytoma, one diffuse astrocytoma, and one oligoastrocytoma) and underwent histopathological analysis. The highest mean values of Mib1 and CD31 were found in the target point “T’ defined by MRI and FET-PET combined. A significant correlation between NAA/Cr and PET tracer uptake (−0.845, p < 0.05) as well as Cho/Cr ratio and cell density (0.742, p < 0.05) and NAA/Cr ratio and MIB-1 (−0761, p < 0.05) was disclosed for this target point, though not for target points defined by MRI and FET-PET alone. Conclusion: Multimodal-imaging-guided stereotactic biopsy correlated more with histological malignancy indices, such as cell density and MIB-1 labeling, than targets that were based solely on the highest amino acid uptake or contrast enhancement on MRI. The results of our study indicate that a combined PET-MR multimodal imaging approach bears potential benefits in detecting glioma heterogeneity.

  11. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV in two human glioma cell lines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedo, A.; Malík, Radek; Drbal, K.; Lisá, Věra; Vlašicová, K.; Mareš, Vladislav

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2000), s. 57-63 ISSN 1121-760X Grant - others:GA UK(XC) 58/1999/C; GA UK(XC) 206019-2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : dipeptidyl peptidase IV * glioma cell lines * cell proliferation and differentiation Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.039, year: 2000

  12. Differential Signature of the Centrosomal MARK4 Isoforms in Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Magnani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: MAP/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 (MARK4 is a serine-threonine kinase expressed in two spliced isoforms, MARK4L and MARK4S, of which MARK4L is a candidate for a role in neoplastic transformation. Methods: We performed mutation analysis to identify sequence alterations possibly affecting MARK4 expression. We then investigated the MARK4L and MARK4S expression profile in 21 glioma cell lines and 36 tissues of different malignancy grades, glioblastoma-derived cancer stem cells (GBM CSCs and mouse neural stem cells (NSCs by real-time PCR, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. We also analyzed the sub-cellular localisation of MARK4 isoforms in glioma and normal cell lines by immunofluorescence. Results: Mutation analysis rules out sequence variations as the cause of the altered MARK4 expression in glioma. Expression profiling confirms that MARK4L is the predominant isoform, whereas MARK4S levels are significantly decreased in comparison and show an inverse correlation with tumour grade. A high MARK4L/MARK4S ratio also characterizes undifferentiated cells, such as GBM CSCs and NSCs. Accordingly, only MARK4L is expressed in brain neurogenic regions. Moreover, while both MARK4 isoforms are localised to the centrosome and midbody in glioma and normal cells, the L isoform exhibits an additional nucleolar localisation in tumour cells. Conclusions: The observed switch towards MARK4L suggests that the balance between the MARK4 isoforms is carefully guarded during neural differentiation but may be subverted in gliomagenesis. Moreover, the MARK4L nucleolar localisation in tumour cells features this MARK4 isoform as a nucleolus-associated tumour marker.

  13. Treatment Resistance Mechanisms of Malignant Glioma Tumor Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmalz, Philip G.R.; Shen, Michael J.; Park, John K.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly lethal because of their resistance to conventional treatments. Recent evidence suggests that a minor subpopulation of cells with stem cell properties reside within these tumors. These tumor stem cells are more resistant to radiation and chemotherapies than their counterpart differentiated tumor cells and may underlie the persistence and recurrence of tumors following treatment. The various mechanisms by which tumor stem cells avoid or repair the damaging effects of cancer therapies are discussed

  14. Efficacy and toxicity of postoperative temozolomide radiochemotherapy in malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, M.; Kunze, S.; Eich, H.T.; Semrau, R.; Mueller, R.P. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Cologne (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of daily temozolomide concurrent with postoperative radiotherapy in malignant glioma. Patients and methods: from 11/1999 to 03/2003, n = 81 patients aged 15-72 years (median 52 years, karnofsky score 80-100% in 83%) suffering from primary glioblastoma (n = 47), anaplastic astrocytoma (n = 6), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (n = 16), and recurrent glioma (n = 12) were treated. Patients with primary gliomas received a combination of postoperative radiotherapy (60 Gy/1.8- to 2.0-Gy fractions) and daily oral temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2}) at all irradiation days (30-33 doses), while recurrent tumors were treated with 45-60 Gy and temozolomide. Initially, 6/81 patients had daily temozolomide doses of 50 mg/m{sup 2}. Results: in total, 70/81 patients (86%) completed both radio- and chemotherapy. Grade 1 nausea/vomiting was seen in 28%, grade 2 in 11%, grade 3 in 1%. Antiemetics were applied in 41%. Hematologic toxicities were observed as follows: leukopenia grade 3/4 1%, lymphopenia grade 3/4 46%, thrombopenia grade 3/4 1%. Two patients under dexamethasone suffered herpes encephalitis after one and 16 doses of temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2}). Median survival was 15 months for glioblastoma. In oligodendroglioma patients, a 4-year survival rate of 78% was observed. Conclusion: postoperative radiochemotherapy with 30-33 daily doses of temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2}) is safe in patients with malignant glioma. The combined schedule is effective in oligodendroglioma patients and may prolong survival in glioblastoma. Effort should be taken to minimize corticosteroid doses, since both steroids and temozolomide lead to immunosuppression. (orig.)

  15. Involvement of the kynurenine pathway in human glioma pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seray Adams

    Full Text Available The kynurenine pathway (KP is the principal route of L-tryptophan (TRP catabolism leading to the production of kynurenine (KYN, the neuroprotectants, kynurenic acid (KYNA and picolinic acid (PIC, the excitotoxin, quinolinic acid (QUIN and the essential pyridine nucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+. The enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO-1, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2 (IDO-2 and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO-2 initiate the first step of the KP. IDO-1 and TDO-2 induction in tumors are crucial mechanisms implicated to play pivotal roles in suppressing anti-tumor immunity. Here, we report the first comprehensive characterisation of the KP in 1 cultured human glioma cells and 2 plasma from patients with glioblastoma (GBM. Our data revealed that interferon-gamma (IFN-γ stimulation significantly potentiated the expression of the KP enzymes, IDO-1 IDO-2, kynureninase (KYNU, kynurenine hydroxylase (KMO and significantly down-regulated 2-amino-3-carboxymuconate semialdehyde decarboxylase (ACMSD and kynurenine aminotransferase-I (KAT-I expression in cultured human glioma cells. This significantly increased KP activity but significantly lowered the KYNA/KYN neuroprotective ratio in human cultured glioma cells. KP activation (KYN/TRP was significantly higher, whereas the concentrations of the neuroreactive KP metabolites TRP, KYNA, QUIN and PIC and the KYNA/KYN ratio were significantly lower in GBM patient plasma (n = 18 compared to controls. These results provide further evidence for the involvement of the KP in glioma pathophysiology and highlight a potential role of KP products as novel and highly attractive therapeutic targets to evaluate for the treatment of brain tumors, aimed at restoring anti-tumor immunity and reducing the capacity for malignant cells to produce NAD(+, which is necessary for energy production and DNA repair.

  16. The Tropism of Pleiotrophin: Orchestrating Glioma Brain Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, David H

    2017-08-24

    The lateral ventricle (LV) is a preferential location for brain tumor spread; however, the instructive cues responsible for this unique tropism were previously unknown. In this issue, Qin et al. elucidate the underlying mechanism, demonstrating that LV-neural progenitors secrete a pleiotrophin (PTN)-containing complex, which attracts glioma cells through ROCK/Rho activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tumor-derived hepatocyte growth factor is associated with poor prognosis of patients with glioma and influences the chemosensitivity of glioma cell line to cisplatin in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo You-feng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined the association of tumor-derived hepatocyte growth factor (HGF with the clinicopathological features of gliomas and investigated the effect of HGF inhibition on the biological behavior of tumor cells in vitro in order to determine whether HGF is a valuable prognostic predictor for glioma patients. Methods Seventy-six cases of glioma were collected. The tumor-derived HGF expression, cell proliferation index (PI and intratumoral microvessels were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Correlation between immunostaining and clinicopathological parameters, as well as the follow-up data of patients, was analyzed statistically. U87MG glioma cells were transfected with short interference (si-RNA for HGF, and the cell viability, migratory ability and chemosensitivity to cisplatin were evaluated in vitro. Results Both high HGF expression in tumor cells (59.2%, 45/76 and high PI were significantly associated with high-grade glioma and increased microvessels in tumors (P P = 0.004 and high-expression of HGF (P = 0.008 emerged as independent prognostic factors for the overall survival of glioma patients. The tumor-derived HGF mRNA and protein expressions were significantly decreased in vitro after transfection of HGF siRNA. HGF siRNA inhibited the cell growth and reduced cell migratory ability. Moreover, HGF siRNA transfection enhanced the chemosensitivity of U87MG glioma cells to cisplatin. Conclusion This study indicated that there was significant correlation among tumor cell-derived HGF, cell proliferation and microvessel proliferation in gliomas. HGF might influence tumor progression by modulating the cell growth, migration and chemoresistance to drugs. Increased expression of HGF may be a valuable predictor for prognostic evaluation of glioma patients.

  18. Cortical and Subcortical Structural Plasticity Associated with the Glioma Volumes in Patients with Cerebral Gliomas Revealed by Surface-Based Morphometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinping Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Postlesional plasticity has been identified in patients with cerebral gliomas by inducing a large functional reshaping of brain networks. Although numerous non-invasive functional neuroimaging methods have extensively investigated the mechanisms of this functional redistribution in patients with cerebral gliomas, little effort has been made to investigate the structural plasticity of cortical and subcortical structures associated with the glioma volume. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether the contralateral cortical and subcortical structures are able to actively reorganize by themselves in these patients. The compensation mechanism following contralateral cortical and subcortical structural plasticity is considered. We adopted the surface-based morphometry to investigate the difference of cortical and subcortical gray matter (GM volumes in a cohort of 14 healthy controls and 13 patients with left-hemisphere cerebral gliomas [including 1 patients with World Health Organization (WHO I, 8 WHO II, and 4 WHO III]. The glioma volume ranges from 5.1633 to 208.165 cm2. Compared to healthy controls, we found significantly increased GM volume of the right cuneus and the left thalamus, as well as a trend toward enlargement in the right globus pallidus in patients with cerebral gliomas. Moreover, the GM volumes of these regions were positively correlated with the glioma volumes of the patients. These results provide evidence of cortical and subcortical enlargement, suggesting the usefulness of surface-based morphometry to investigate the structural plasticity. Moreover, the structural plasticity might be acted as the compensation mechanism to better fulfill its functions in patients with cerebral gliomas as the gliomas get larger.

  19. PI3 kinase mutations and mutational load as poor prognostic markers in diffuse glioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draaisma, Kaspar; Wijnenga, Maarten M J; Weenink, Bas; Gao, Ya; Smid, Marcel; Robe, P; van den Bent, Martin J; French, Pim J

    2015-12-23

    Recent advances in molecular diagnostics allow diffuse gliomas to be classified based on their genetic changes into distinct prognostic subtypes. However, a systematic analysis of all molecular markers has thus far not been performed; most classification schemes use a predefined and select set of genes/molecular markers. Here, we have analysed the TCGA dataset (combined glioblastoma (GBM) and lower grade glioma (LGG) datasets) to identify all prognostic genetic markers in diffuse gliomas in order to generate a comprehensive classification scheme. Of the molecular markers investigated (all genes mutated at a population frequency >1.7 % and frequent chromosomal imbalances) in the entire glioma dataset, 57 were significantly associated with overall survival. Of these, IDH1 or IDH2 mutations are associated with lowest hazard ratio, which confirms IDH as the most important prognostic marker in diffuse gliomas. Subsequent subgroup analysis largely confirms many of the currently used molecular classification schemes for diffuse gliomas (ATRX or TP53 mutations, 1p19q codeletion). Our analysis also identified PI3-kinase mutations as markers of poor prognosis in IDH-mutated + ATRX/TP53 mutated diffuse gliomas, median survival 3.7 v. 6.3 years (P = 0.02, Hazard rate (HR) 2.93, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.16 - 7.38). PI3-kinase mutations were also prognostic in two independent datasets. In our analysis, no additional molecular markers were identified that further refine the molecular classification of diffuse gliomas. Interestingly, these molecular classifiers do not fully explain the variability in survival observed for diffuse glioma patients. We demonstrate that tumor grade remains an important prognostic factor for overall survival in diffuse gliomas, even within molecular glioma subtypes. Tumor grade was correlated with the mutational load (the number of non-silent mutations) of the tumor: grade II diffuse gliomas harbour fewer genetic changes than grade

  20. Glioma Groups Based on 1p/19q, IDH, and TERT Promoter Mutations in Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Lachance, Daniel H; Molinaro, Annette M; Walsh, Kyle M; Decker, Paul A; Sicotte, Hugues; Pekmezci, Melike; Rice, Terri; Kosel, Matt L; Smirnov, Ivan V; Sarkar, Gobinda; Caron, Alissa A; Kollmeyer, Thomas M; Praska, Corinne E; Chada, Anisha R; Halder, Chandralekha; Hansen, Helen M; McCoy, Lucie S; Bracci, Paige M; Marshall, Roxanne; Zheng, Shichun; Reis, Gerald F; Pico, Alexander R; O'Neill, Brian P; Buckner, Jan C; Giannini, Caterina; Huse, Jason T; Perry, Arie; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchell S; Chang, Susan M; Prados, Michael D; Wiemels, Joseph; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret R; Jenkins, Robert B

    2015-06-25

    The prediction of clinical behavior, response to therapy, and outcome of infiltrative glioma is challenging. On the basis of previous studies of tumor biology, we defined five glioma molecular groups with the use of three alterations: mutations in the TERT promoter, mutations in IDH, and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion). We tested the hypothesis that within groups based on these features, tumors would have similar clinical variables, acquired somatic alterations, and germline variants. We scored tumors as negative or positive for each of these markers in 1087 gliomas and compared acquired alterations and patient characteristics among the five primary molecular groups. Using 11,590 controls, we assessed associations between these groups and known glioma germline variants. Among 615 grade II or III gliomas, 29% had all three alterations (i.e., were triple-positive), 5% had TERT and IDH mutations, 45% had only IDH mutations, 7% were triple-negative, and 10% had only TERT mutations; 5% had other combinations. Among 472 grade IV gliomas, less than 1% were triple-positive, 2% had TERT and IDH mutations, 7% had only IDH mutations, 17% were triple-negative, and 74% had only TERT mutations. The mean age at diagnosis was lowest (37 years) among patients who had gliomas with only IDH mutations and was highest (59 years) among patients who had gliomas with only TERT mutations. The molecular groups were independently associated with overall survival among patients with grade II or III gliomas but not among patients with grade IV gliomas. The molecular groups were associated with specific germline variants. Gliomas were classified into five principal groups on the basis of three tumor markers. The groups had different ages at onset, overall survival, and associations with germline variants, which implies that they are characterized by distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.).

  1. Glioma cell fate decisions mediated by Dll1-Jag1-Fringe in Notch1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaofei; Wang, Ruiqi

    2017-09-21

    The Notch family of proteins plays a vital role in determining cell fates, such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. It has been shown that Notch1 and its ligands, Dll1 and Jag1, are overexpressed in many glioma cell lines and primary human gliomas. The roles of Notch1 in some cancers have been firmly established, and recent data implicate that it plays important roles in glioma cell fate decisions. This paper focuses on devising a specific theoretical framework that incorporates Dll1, Jag1, and Fringe in Notch1 signaling pathway to explore their functional roles of these proteins in glioma cells in the tumorigenesis and progression of human gliomas, and to study how glioma cell fate decisions are modulated by both trans-activation and cis-inhibition. This paper presents a computational model for Notch1 signaling pathway in glioma cells. Based on the bifurcation analysis of the model, we show that how the glioma cell fate decisions are modulated by both trans-activation and cis-inhibition mediated by the Fringe protein, providing insight into the design and control principles of the Notch signaling system and the gliomas. This paper presents a computational model for Notch1 signaling pathway in glioma cells based on intertwined dynamics with cis-inhibition and trans-activation involving the proteins Notch1, Dll1, Jag1, and Fringe. The results show that how the glioma cell fate transitions are performed by the Notch1 signaling. Transition from grade III ∼ IV with significantly high Notch1 to grade I ∼ II with high Notch1, and then to normal cells by repressing the Fringe levels or decreasing the strength of enhancement induced by Fringe.

  2. Differential expression of centrosomal proteins at different stages of human glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Fang-Yi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-grade gliomas have poor prognosis, requiring aggressive treatment. The aim of this study is to explore mitotic and centrosomal dysregulation in gliomas, which may provide novel targets for treatment. Methods A case-control study was performed using 34 resected gliomas, which were separated into low- and high-grade groups. Normal human brain tissue was used as a control. Using immunohistochemical analysis, immunofluorescent microscopy, and RT-PCR, detection of centrins 1 and 2, γ-tubulin, hNinein, Aurora A, and Aurora B, expression was performed. Analysis of the GBM8401 glioma cell line was also undertaken to complement the in vivo studies. Results In high-grade gliomas, the cells had greater than two very brightly staining centrioles within large, atypical nuclei, and moderate-to-strong Aurora A staining. Comparing with normal human brain tissue, most of the mRNAs expression in gliomas for centrosomal structural proteins, including centrin 3, γ-tubulin, and hNinein isoforms 1, 2, 5 and 6, Aurora A and Aurora B were elevated. The significant different expression was observed between high- and low-grade glioma in both γ-tubulin and Aurora A mRNA s. In the high-grade glioma group, 78.6% of the samples had higher than normal expression of γ-tubulin mRNA, which was significantly higher than in the low-grade glioma group (18.2%, p Conclusions Markers for mitotic dysregulation, such as supernumerary centrosomes and altered expression of centrosome-related mRNA and proteins were more frequently detected in higher grade gliomas. Therefore, these results are clinically useful for glioma staging as well as the development of novel treatments strategies.

  3. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV in two human glioma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sedo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that dipeptidyl peptidase IV [DPP-IV, EC 3.4.14.5] takes part in the metabolism of biologically active peptides participating in the regulation of growth and transformation of glial cells. However, the knowledge on the DPP-IV expression in human glial and glioma cells is still very limited. In this study, using histochemical and biochemical techniques, the DPP-IV activity was demonstrated in two commercially available human glioma cell lines of different transformation degree, as represented by U373 astrocytoma (Grade III and U87 glioblastoma multiforme (Grade IV lines. Higher total activity of the enzyme, as well as its preferential localisation in the plasma membrane, was observed in U87 cells. Compared to U373 population, U87 cells were morphologically more pleiomorphic, they were cycling at lower rate and expressing less Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein. The data revealed positive correlation between the degree of transformation of cells and activity of DPP-IV. Great difference in expression of this enzyme, together with the phenotypic differences of cells, makes these lines a suitable standard model for further 57 studies of function of this enzyme in human glioma cells.

  4. The ketogenic diet for the treatment of malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Eric C; Scheck, Adrienne C

    2015-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of glioma biology has led to an increase in targeted therapies in preclinical and clinical trials; however, cellular heterogeneity often precludes the targeted molecules from being found on all glioma cells, thus reducing the efficacy of these treatments. In contrast, one trait shared by virtually all tumor cells is altered (dysregulated) metabolism. Tumor cells have an increased reliance on glucose, suggesting that treatments affecting cellular metabolism may be an effective method to improve current therapies. Indeed, metabolism has been a focus of cancer research in the last few years, as many pathways long associated with tumor growth have been found to intersect metabolic pathways in the cell. The ketogenic diet (high fat, low carbohydrate and protein), caloric restriction, and fasting all cause a metabolic change, specifically, a reduction in blood glucose and an increase in blood ketones. We, and others, have demonstrated that these metabolic changes improve survival in animal models of malignant gliomas and can potentiate the anti-tumor effect of chemotherapies and radiation treatment. In this review we discuss the use of metabolic alteration for the treatment of malignant brain tumors. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Progress on Antiangiogenic Therapy for Patients with Malignant Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manmeet S. Ahluwalia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor occurring in America. Despite recent advances in therapeutics, the prognosis for patients with newly diagnosed GBM remains dismal. As these tumors characteristically show evidence of angiogenesis (neovascularization there has been great interest in developing anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategies for the treatment of patients with this disease and some anti-angiogenic agents have now been used for the treatment of patients with malignant glioma tumors. Although the results of these clinical trials are promising in that they indicate an initial therapeutic response, the anti-angiogenic therapies tested to date have not changed the overall survival of patients with malignant glioma tumors. This is due, in large part, to the development of resistance to these therapies. Ongoing research into key features of the neovasculature in malignant glioma tumors, as well as the general angiogenesis process, is suggesting additional molecules that may be targeted and an improved response when both the neovasculature and the tumor cells are targeted. Prevention of the development of resistance may require the development of anti-angiogenic strategies that induce apoptosis or cell death of the neovasculature, as well as an improved understanding of the potential roles of circulating endothelial progenitor cells and vascular co-option by tumor cells, in the development of resistance.

  6. Role of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress Mediators in Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Conti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors of the central nervous system. Despite relevant progress in conventional treatments, the prognosis of such tumors remains almost invariably dismal. The genesis of gliomas is a complex, multistep process that includes cellular neoplastic transformation, resistance to apoptosis, loss of control of the cell cycle, angiogenesis, and the acquisition of invasive properties. Among a number of different biomolecular events, the existence of molecular connections between inflammation and oxidative stress pathways and the development of this cancer has been demonstrated. In particular, the tumor microenvironment, which is largely orchestrated by inflammatory molecules, is an indispensable participant in the neoplastic process, promoting proliferation, survival and migration of such tumors. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and interferon-gamma, as well as chemokines and prostaglandins, are synthesized by resident brain cells and lymphocytes invading the affected brain tissue. Key mediators of cancer progression include nuclear factor-kappaB, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and specific microRNAs. The collective activity of these mediators is largely responsible for a pro-tumorigenic response through changes in cell proliferation, cell death, cellular senescence, DNA mutation rates, DNA methylation and angiogenesis. We provide a general overview of the connection between specific inflammation and oxidative stress pathway molecules and gliomas. The elucidation of specific effects and interactions of these factors may provide the opportunity for the identification of new target molecules leading to improved diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Evidence-based standard care of malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinoda, Jun; Yano, Hirohito; Sakai, Noboru

    2004-01-01

    The amount of scientific evidence regarding therapy for primary cases of glioblastoma and anaplastic astrocytoma is small compared with that for malignant tumors in other organs, and recommended therapeutic strategies derived from this evidence are not diverse. Evidence-based standard care of these tumors is very limited. At this moment, the benchmark treatment for these malignant gliomas is gross resection of the tumor bulk followed by local external beam radiotherapy (50-60 Gy) in combination with nitrosourea-based chemotherapy. Additional stereotactic radiosurgery or other strategies for localized therapeutic boosting have also been recommended. However, the clinical outcomes obtained through these standard treatments are unfortunately not always satisfactory. Novel therapeutic strategies for malignant gliomas are expected to develop and we hope that some scientific evidence would emerge from clinical trials using these novel strategies. New scientific evidence for practical and novel treatments appropriate for patients with malignant gliomas may come to be available as the evaluation of patients' quality of life is used as an end point for the analysis of clinical results, in addition to the commonly used survival analysis. (author)

  8. Predicting patterns of glioma recurrence using diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Stephen J.; Pickard, John D.; Jena, Rajesh; Burnet, Neil G.; Carpenter, T.A.; Gillard, Jonathan H.

    2007-01-01

    Although multimodality therapy for high-grade gliomas is making some improvement in outcome, most patients will still die from their disease within a short time. We need tools that allow treatments to be tailored to an individual. In this study we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a technique sensitive to subtle disruption of white-matter tracts due to tumour infiltration, to see if it can be used to predict patterns of glioma recurrence. In this study we imaged 26 patients with gliomas using DTI. Patients were imaged after 2 years or on symptomatic tumour recurrence. The diffusion tensor was split into its isotropic (p) and anisotropic (q) components, and these were plotted on T 2 -weighted images to show the pattern of DTI abnormality. This was compared to the pattern of recurrence. Three DTI patterns could be identified: (a) a diffuse pattern of abnormality where p exceeded q in all directions and was associated with diffuse increase in tumour size; (b) a localised pattern of abnormality where the tumour recurred in one particular direction; and (c) a pattern of minimal abnormality seen in some patients with or without evidence of recurrence. Diffusion tensor imaging is able to predict patterns of tumour recurrence and may allow better individualisation of tumour management and stratification for randomised controlled trials. (orig.)

  9. Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) for previously untreated malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Kenji; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Matsushita, Haruo; Takeda, Ken; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Shogo; Kumabe, Toshihiro

    2002-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is one of the methods used to deliver a large single dose to the tumor tissue while reducing the exposure of normal surrounding tissue. However, the usefulness of intraoperative electron therapy for malignant gliomas has not been established. During the period from 1987 to 1997, 32 patients with malignant gliomas were treated with IORT. The histological diagnoses were anaplastic astrocytoma in 11 patients and glioblastoma in 21 patients. Therapy consisted of surgical resection and intraoperative electron therapy using a dose of 12–15 Gy (median, 15 Gy). The patients later underwent postoperative external radiation therapy (EXRT) with a median total dose of 60 Gy. Each of the 32 patients treated with IORT was randomly matched with patients who had been treated with postoperative EXRT alone (control). Patients were matched according to histological grade, age, extent of tumor removal, and tumor location. In the anaplastic astrocytoma group, the one-, two- and five-year survival rates were 81%, 51% and 15%, respectively in the IORT patients and 54%, 43% and 21%, respectively in the control patients. In the glioblastoma group, one-, two- and five-year survival rates were 63%, 26% and 0%, respectively in the IORT patients and 70%, 18% and 6%, respectively in the control patients. There was no significant difference between survival rates in the IORT patients and control patients in either the anaplastic astrocytoma group or glioblastoma group. IORT dose not improve survival of patients with malignant gliomas compared to that of patients who have received EXRT alone

  10. Radiotherapeutic management of optic nerve gliomas in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danoff, B.F.; Kramer, S.; Thompson, N.

    1980-01-01

    Optic nerve gliomas represent one to five percent of all intracranial tumors in children. The management of these tumors remains controversial. From 1956 to 1977, 18 children with optic nerve gliomas were treated at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital using external beam radiotherapy. All children presented with decreased visual acuity and five of eighteen were blind in one eye. No patient was found to have involvement of a single optic nerve. in eight patients, the chiasm was involved, in ten patients, tumor had extended to the frontal lobes and/or hypothalamus. Initial surgical management included biopsy only in seven patients, inspection of tumor in two patients and partial excision in seven patients. Two patients were treated with radiotherapy based on radiological findings. A tumor dose of 5000 to 6000 rad was given in 5.5 to 6.5 weeks. Stabilization of visual impairment or improvement in vision was noted in 78 percent of patients who were evaluable. The ten year survival was 73 percent. Radiological evidence of tumor regression will be presented. It is our impression that radiotherapy is indicated in the treatment of children with optic nerve gliomas who have poor prognostic signs

  11. Interaction between 5 genetic variants and allergy in glioma risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoemaker, Minouk J; Robertson, Lindsay; Wigertz, Annette

    2010-01-01

    .047), and between "any allergy" and rs6010620 (greater protective effect; interaction OR = 0.70, P = 0.017). Case-only analyses provided further support for atopy interactions for rs4977756 and rs498872. This study provides evidence for possible gene-environment interactions in glioma development......., CDKN2A-CDKN2B), 11q23.3 (rs498872, PHLDB1), and 20q13.33 (rs6010620, RTEL1) as determinants of glioma risk. The authors investigated whether there is interaction between the effects of allergy and these 5 variants on glioma risk. Data from 5 case-control studies carried out in Denmark, Finland, Sweden......, and the United Kingdom (2000-2004) were used, totaling 1,029 cases and 1,668 controls. Risk was inversely associated with asthma, hay fever, eczema, and "any allergy," significantly for each factor except asthma, and was significantly positively associated with number of risk alleles for each of the 5 single...

  12. Second Surgery in Insular Low-Grade Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Ius

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Given the technical difficulties, a limited number of works have been published on insular gliomas surgery and risk factors for tumor recurrence (TR are poorly documented. Objective. The aim of the study was to determine TR in adult patients with initial diagnosis of insular Low-Grade Gliomas (LGGs that subsequently underwent second surgery. Methods. A consecutive series of 53 patients with insular LGGs was retrospectively reviewed; 23 patients had two operations for TR. Results. At the time of second surgery, almost half of the patients had experienced progression into high-grade gliomas (HGGs. Univariate analysis showed that TR is influenced by the following: extent of resection (EOR (P<0.002, ΔVT2T1 value (P<0.001, histological diagnosis of oligodendroglioma (P=0.017, and mutation of IDH1 (P=0.022. The multivariate analysis showed that EOR at first surgery was the independent predictor for TR (P<0.001. Conclusions. In patients with insular LGG the EOR at first surgery represents the major predictive factor for TR. At time of TR, more than 50% of cases had progressed in HGG, raising the question of the oncological management after the first surgery.

  13. Targeted therapy in the treatment of malignant gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimas V Lukas

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Rimas V Lukas1, Adrienne Boire2, M Kelly Nicholas1,2 1Department of Neurology; 2Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Malignant gliomas are invasive tumors with the potential to progress through current available therapies. These tumors are characterized by a number of abnormalities in molecular signaling that play roles in tumorigenesis, spread, and survival. These pathways are being actively investigated in both the pre-clinical and clinical settings as potential targets in the treatment of malignant gliomas. We will review many of the therapies that target the cancer cell, including the epidermal growth factor receptor, mammalian target of rapamycin, histone deacetylase, and farnesyl transferase. In addition, we will discuss strategies that target the extracellular matrix in which these cells reside as well as angiogenesis, a process emerging as central to tumor development and growth. Finally, we will briefly touch on the role of neural stem cells as both potential targets as well as delivery vectors for other therapies. Interdependence between these varied pathways, both in maintaining health and in causing disease, is clear. Thus, attempts to easily classify some targeted therapies are problematic.Keywords: glioma, EGFR, mTOR, HDAC, Ras, angiogenesis

  14. Anesthetic pentobarbital inhibits proliferation and migration of malignant glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun; Li, Yan; Huang, Yijun; Qiu, Pengxin; Shu, Minfeng; Zhu, Wenbo; Ou, Yanqiu; Yan, Guangmei

    2009-09-08

    Malignant gliomas are common and aggressive brain tumors in adults. The rapid proliferation and diffuse brain migration are main obstacles to successful treatment. Here we show that pentobarbital, a central depressant introduced clinically a century ago, is capable of suppressing proliferation and migration of C6 malignant glioma cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Pentobarbital also leads to a G1 phase cell cycle arrest accompanied by suppressed G1 cell cycle regulatory proteins Cyclin D1, Cyclin D3, CDK2 and phosphorylated Rb. In addition, noticeable morphological changes and interrupted alpha-tubulin microtubule assembly are induced by pentobarbital exposure. Intracellular signal pathways involved in the effect of pentobarbital is concerned with inactivation of ERK, c-Jun and Akt. Together, these findings suggest anti-proliferation and anti-migration effects of pentobarbital on malignant gliomas, most likely by arresting cell cycle and interfering microtubule. ERK, c-Jun MAPK and PI3K/Akt are possible signaling pathways involved.

  15. Germline rearrangements in families with strong family history of glioma and malignant melanoma, colon, and breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Cederquist, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although familial susceptibility to glioma is known, the genetic basis for this susceptibility remains unidentified in the majority of glioma-specific families. An alternative approach to identifying such genes is to examine cancer pedigrees, which include glioma as one of several can...

  16. Therapeutic vaccination against malignant gliomas based on allorecognition and syngeneic tumour antigens: proof of principle in two strains of rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stathopoulos, A.; Samuelson, C.; Milbouw, G.; Hermanne, J.P.; Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Chen, T.C.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study we investigated whether allogeneic glioma cells can be utilized to evoke prophylactic or therapeutic immune-mediated elimination of syngeneic glioma in two rat strains. Fisher 344 and Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were injected with two syngeneic glioma cell lines, 9L and C6,

  17. Increasing the efficacy of antitumor glioma vaccines by photodynamic therapy and local injection of allogeneic glioma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Peng, Qian; Madsen, Steen J.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Immunotherapy of brain tumors involves the stimulation of an antitumor immune response. This type of therapy can be targeted specifically to tumor cells thus sparing surrounding normal brain. Due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier, the brain is relatively isolated from the systemic circulation and, as such, the initiation of significant immune responses is more limited than other types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to show that the efficacy of tumor primed antigen presenting macrophage vaccines could be increased by: (1) PDT of the priming tumor cells, and (2) injection of allogeneic glioma cells directly into brain tumors. Experiments were conducted in an in vivo brain tumor model using Fisher rats and BT4C (allogeneic) and F98 (syngeneic) glioma cells. Preliminary results showed that vaccination alone had significantly less inhibitory effect on F98 tumor growth compared to the combination of vaccination and allogeneic cell (BT4C) injection.

  18. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. 28 refs., 1 fig

  19. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Gliomas do nervo óptico: estudo de 11 casos Optic nerve gliomas: a study of 11 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Bleggi Torres

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Os gliomas do nervo óptico podem apresentar-se esporadicamente ou como componentes da neurofibromatose. São neoplasias raras, correspondendo a 2 a 5% dos tumores intracranianos e cerca de 6% dos tumores intra-orbitários. No presente estudo, analisamos 11 casos de glioma de nervo óptico diagnosticados em Curitiba num período de 25 anos, sendo 10 pacientes do sexo feminino e 1 do sexo masculino. As idades variaram de 3 a 25 anos; 6 pacientes apresentavam idades inferiores a 15 anos. Dos casos desta série, 27,3% (n=3 apresentavam associação com neurofibromatose. Quanto à localização dos tumores, em 5 pacientes a lesão estava restrita ao nervo óptico e no restante havia extensão para o quiasma óptico, região supra-selar, lobo frontal ou temporal. Todos os pacientes tinham astrocitoma pilocítico.Optic nerve gliomas may occur alone or as components of neurofibromatosis. They are rare tumors accounting for 2 to 5% of all intracranial tumors and 6% of the intra-orbitary neoplasms. The authors present 11 cases of optic nerve glioma diagnosed in Curitiba in the last 25 years. Out of these 11 patients there were 10 women and only 1 man. The ages ranged from 3 to 25 years old, and 6 patients were under 15 years. In this series, 27,3% (n=3 of the cases were associated with neurofibromatosis. Five patients had their tumors restricted to the optic nerve while the others had either extension to the optic chiasm, supra-selar region, frontal or temporal lobe. All the patients had pilocytic astrocytomas.

  1. Survival advantage combining a BRAF inhibitor and radiation in BRAF V600E-mutant glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dasgupta, Tina; Olow, Aleksandra K.; Yang, Xiaodong; Hashizume, Rintaro; Nicolaides, Theodore P.; Tom, Maxwell; Aoki, Yasuyuki; Berger, Mitchel S.; Weiss, William A.; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Prados, Michael; James, C. David; Mueller, Sabine; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation (RT) is critical to the treatment of high-grade gliomas (HGGs) but cures remain elusive. The BRAF mutation V600E is critical to the pathogenesis of 10-20% of pediatric gliomas, and a small proportion of adult HGGs. Here we aim to determine whether PLX4720, a specific BRAF V600E inhibitor,

  2. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    [Phatak P, Selvi S K, Divya T, Hegde A S, Hegde S and Somasundaram K 2002 Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from Indian patients; J. Biosci. 27 673–678]. 1. Introduction. Glioma, a neoplasm of neuroglial cells, is the most common type of brain tumour, constituting more than 50% of all.

  3. The Role of Fascin in the Migration and Invasiveness of Malignant Glioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Hyun Hwang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Malignant glioma is the most common primary brain tumor, and its ability to invade the surrounding brain parenchyma is a leading cause of tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Whereas the molecular mechanisms of glioma invasion are incompletely understood, there is growing evidence that cytoskeletal-matrix interactions contribute to this process. Fascin, an actin-bundling protein, induces parallel actin bundles in cell protrusions and increases cell motility in multiple human malignancies. The role of fascin in glioma invasion remains unclear. We demonstrate that fascin is expressed in a panel of human malignant glioma cell lines, and downregulation of fascin expression in glioma cell lines by small interfering RNA (siRNA is associated with decreased cellular attachment to extracellular matrix (ECM and reduced migration. Using immunofluorescence analysis, we show that fascin depletion results in a reduced number of filopodia as well as altered glioma cell shape. In vitro invasiveness of U251, U87, and SNB19 glioma cells was inhibited by fascin siRNA treatment by 52.2%, 40.3%, and 23.8% respectively. Finally, we show a decreased invasiveness of U251-GFP cells by fascin knockdown in an ex vivo rat brain slice model system. This is the first study to demonstrate a role for fascin in glioma cell morphology, motility, and invasiveness.

  4. Variants near TERT and TERC influencing telomere length are associated with high-grade glioma risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walsh, Kyle M.; Codd, Veryan; Smirnov, Ivan V.; Rice, Terri; Decker, Paul A.; Hansen, Helen M.; Kollmeyer, Thomas; Kosel, Matthew L.; Molinaro, Annette M.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Bracci, Paige M.; Cabriga, Belinda S.; Pekmezci, Melike; Zheng, Shichun; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Pico, Alexander R.; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchell S.; Chang, Susan M.; Prados, Michael D.; Lachance, Daniel H.; O'Neill, Brain Patrick; Sicotte, Hugues; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; van der Harst, Pim; Wiencke, John K.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Wrensch, Margaret R.

    Glioma, the most common central nervous system cancer in adults, has poor prognosis. Here we identify a new SNP associated with glioma risk, rs1920116 (near TERC), that reached genome-wide significance (P-combined = 8.3 x 10(-9)) in a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of

  5. MiR-661 inhibits glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by targeting hTERT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhen, E-mail: lizhen7111@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, 110004 (China); Liu, Yun-hui; Diao, Hong-yu [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, 110004 (China); Ma, Jun [Department of Neurobiology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, 110001 (China); Yao, Yi-long [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, 110004 (China)

    2015-12-25

    In this study, we analyzed the functional role of miR-661 in glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that overexpression of miR-661 obviously suppressed the proliferation, migration and invasion of glioma cells. MiRNA target prediction algorithms implied that hTERT is a candidate target gene for miR-661. A fluorescent reporter assay confirmed that miR-661 could lead to hTERT gene silencing by recognizing and specifically binding to the predicted site of the hTERT mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) specifically. Furthermore, hTERT knockdown significantly decreased the growth and viability of glioma cells. These results indicate that miR-661 can inhibit glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by targeting hTERT. - Highlights: • MiR-661 was downregulated in glioma tissues and functional as a tumor suppressor. • MiR-661 modulates cell proliferation, invasion and migration of glioma cells. • MiR-661 directly target hTERT in glioma cells. • MiR-661 inhibits glioma cell tumorgenesis by targeting hTERT.

  6. Cholera Toxin Subunit B Enabled Multifunctional Glioma-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Juan; Zhang, Zui; Hu, Xuefeng; Yang, Yang; Chai, Zhilan; Liu, Xiaoqin; Liu, Jican; Gao, Bo; Lu, Weiyue; Qian, Jun; Zhan, Changyou

    2017-12-01

    Glioma is among the most formidable brain cancers due to location in the brain. Cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) is investigated to facilitate multifunctional glioma-targeted drug delivery by targeting the glycosphingolipid GM1 expressed in the blood-brain barrier (BBB), neovasulature, and glioma cells. When modified on the surface of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (CTB-NPs), CTB fully retains its bioactivity after 24 h incubation in the fresh mouse plasma. The formed protein corona (PC) of CTB-NP and plain PLGA nanoparticles (NP) after incubation in plasma is analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem massspectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS). CTB modification does not alter the protein components of the formed PC, macrophage phagocytosis, or pharmacokinetic profiles. CTB-NP can efficiently penetrate the in vitro BBB model and target glioma cells and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. Paclitaxel is loaded in NP (NP/PTX) and CTB-NP (CTB-NP/PTX), and their antiglioma effects are assessed in nude mice bearing intracranial glioma. CTB-NP/PTX can efficiently induce apoptosis of intracranial glioma cells and ablate neovasulature in vivo, resulting in significant prolongation of survival of nude mice bearing intracranial glioma (34 d) in comparison to those treated with NP/PTX (29 d), Taxol (24 d), and saline (21 d). The present study suggests a potential multifunctional glioma-targeted drug delivery system enabled by cholera toxin subunit B. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Characterization of infectivity of knob-modified adenoviral vectors in glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P.L. Paul (C. P L); M. Everts (M.); J.N. Glasgow (J.); P. Dent (P.); P.B. Fisher (P.); I.V. Ulasov (I.); M.S. Lesniak (M.); M.A. Stoff-Khalili (M.); J.C. Roth (J.); M. Preuss (Michael); C.M.F. Dirven (Clemens); M.L.M. Lamfers (Martine); T. Siegal (Tali); Z.B. Zhu (Z.); R.E. Curiel (Rafael E.)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMalignant glioma continues to be a major target for gene therapy and virotherapy due to its aggressive growth and the current lack of effective treatment. However, these approaches have been hampered by inefficient infection of glioma cells by viral vectors, particularly vectors derived

  8. MiR-661 inhibits glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by targeting hTERT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhen; Liu, Yun-hui; Diao, Hong-yu; Ma, Jun; Yao, Yi-long

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the functional role of miR-661 in glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that overexpression of miR-661 obviously suppressed the proliferation, migration and invasion of glioma cells. MiRNA target prediction algorithms implied that hTERT is a candidate target gene for miR-661. A fluorescent reporter assay confirmed that miR-661 could lead to hTERT gene silencing by recognizing and specifically binding to the predicted site of the hTERT mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) specifically. Furthermore, hTERT knockdown significantly decreased the growth and viability of glioma cells. These results indicate that miR-661 can inhibit glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by targeting hTERT. - Highlights: • MiR-661 was downregulated in glioma tissues and functional as a tumor suppressor. • MiR-661 modulates cell proliferation, invasion and migration of glioma cells. • MiR-661 directly target hTERT in glioma cells. • MiR-661 inhibits glioma cell tumorgenesis by targeting hTERT.

  9. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alterations in the tumour suppressor p53 gene are among the most common defects seen in a variety of human cancers. In order to study the significance of the p53 gene in the genesis and development of human glioma from Indian patients, we checked 44 untreated primary gliomas for mutations in exons 5–9 of the p53 ...

  10. Intrinsic endometriosis of ureter: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Myung Sun; Kim, Ho Chul; Yun, Ku Sup; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon; Kim, Sung Yong; Shin, Hyung Sik

    1995-01-01

    Endometriosis is a rare cause of an ureteral obstruction. We report a case of intrinsic ureteral endometriosis resulting in severe hydroureteronephrosis. The diagnosis of ureteral endometriosis may be considered in women with flank pain and ureteric obstruction within true pelvis

  11. The Intrinsic Dynamics of Psychological Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallacher, Robin R.; van Geert, Paul; Nowak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Psychological processes unfold on various timescales in accord with internally generated patterns. The intrinsic dynamism of psychological process is difficult to investigate using traditional methods emphasizing cause–effect relations, however, and therefore is rarely incorporated into social

  12. Deuterium NMR, induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were studied. Induced cholesteric lyomesophases based on potassium laurate (KL) system, with small amounts of cholesterol added, were studied by deuterium NMR and by polarizing microscopy. Order profiles obtained from deuterium NMR of KL perdenderated chains in both induced cholesteric and normal mesophases were compared. The intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were based on the amphiphile potassium N-lauroyl serinate (KLNS) in the resolved levo form. The study of the type I intrinsic cholesteric mesophase was made by optical microscopy under polarized light and the type II intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophase was characterized by deuterium NMR. The new texture was explained by the use of the theory of disclinations developed for thermotropic liquid crystals, specially for cholesteric type. (M.J.C.) [pt

  13. Intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms in enterococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, Brian L.; Rice, Louis B.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococci have the potential for resistance to virtually all clinically useful antibiotics. Their emergence as important nosocomial pathogens has coincided with increased expression of antimicrobial resistance by members of the genus. The mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci may be intrinsic to the species or acquired through mutation of intrinsic genes or horizontal exchange of genetic material encoding resistance determinants. This paper reviews the antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis and discusses treatment options. PMID:23076243

  14. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massi, Paola [Department of Pharmacology, Chemotherapy and Toxicology, University of Milan, Via Vanvitelli 32, 20129 Milan (Italy); Valenti, Marta; Solinas, Marta; Parolaro, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.parolaro@uninsubria.it [Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Section of Pharmacology, Center of Neuroscience, University of Insubria, Via A. da Giussano 10, 20152 Busto Arsizio, Varese (Italy)

    2010-05-26

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massi, Paola; Valenti, Marta; Solinas, Marta; Parolaro, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells

  16. A mathematical model describes the malignant transformation of low grade gliomas: Prognostic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena U Bogdańska

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most frequent type of primary brain tumours. Low grade gliomas (LGGs, WHO grade II gliomas may grow very slowly for the long periods of time, however they inevitably cause death due to the phenomenon known as the malignant transformation. This refers to the transition of LGGs to more aggressive forms of high grade gliomas (HGGs, WHO grade III and IV gliomas. In this paper we propose a mathematical model describing the spatio-temporal transition of LGGs into HGGs. Our modelling approach is based on two cellular populations with transitions between them being driven by the tumour microenvironment transformation occurring when the tumour cell density grows beyond a critical level. We show that the proposed model describes real patient data well. We discuss the relationship between patient prognosis and model parameters. We approximate tumour radius and velocity before malignant transformation as well as estimate the onset of this process.

  17. CT Perfusion with Acetazolamide Challenge in C6 Gliomas and Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao-Yuan; Qiang, Jin-Wei; Zhang, Jia-wen; Wang, Yong-gang; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was performed to investigate the correlation between CT perfusion with acetazolamide challenge and angiogenesis in C6 gliomas. Methods Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were evaluated. The rats were divided randomly to four groups: eight rats with orthotopically implanted C6 gliomas at 10-days old (Group A), eight rats with gliomas at 14-days old (Group B), eight rats with gliomas at 18-days old (Group C), eight rats with orthotopically injected normal saline served as controls. CT perfusion was performed before and after administration of acetazolamide. Changes in perfusion parameters due to acetazolamide administration were calculated and analyzed. Results Elevated carbon dioxide partial pressure and decreased pH were found in all 32 rats post acetazolamide challenge (PCT perfusion with challenge can provide new insight into non-invasive assessment of rat C6 glioma angiogenesis. PMID:25781321

  18. The intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Andrés Olivares Pacheco

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsically resistant bacteria have emerged as a relevant health problem in the last years. Those bacterial species, several of them with an environmental origin, present naturally a low-level susceptibility to several drugs. It has been proposed that intrinsic resistance is mainly the consequence of the impermeability of cellular envelopes, the activity of multidrug efflux pumps or the lack of appropriate targets for a given family of drugs. However, recently published articles indicate that the characteristic phenotype of susceptibility to antibiotics of a given bacterial species depends on the concerted activity of several elements, what has been named as intrinsic resistome. These determinants comprise not just classical resistance genes. Other elements, several of them involved in basic bacterial metabolic processes, are of relevance for the intrinsic resistance of bacterial pathogens. In the present review we analyse recent publications on the intrinsic resistomes of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present as well information on the role that global regulators of bacterial metabolism, as Crc from P. aeruginosa, may have on modulating bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics. Finally, we discuss the possibility of searching inhibitors of the intrinsic resistome in the aim of improving the activity of drugs currently in use for clinical practice.

  19. Incentives and intrinsic motivation in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdud, Mikel; Cabasés, Juan M; Nieto, Jorge

    It has been established in the literature that workers within public organisations are intrinsically motivated. This paper is an empirical study of the healthcare sector using methods of qualitative analysis research, which aims to answer the following hypotheses: 1) doctors are intrinsically motivated; 2) economic incentives and control policies may undermine doctors' intrinsic motivation; and 3) well-designed incentives may encourage doctors' intrinsic motivation. We conducted semi-structured interviews à-la-Bewley with 16 doctors from Navarre's Healthcare Service (Servicio Navarro de Salud-Osasunbidea), Spain. The questions were based on current theories of intrinsic motivation and incentives to test the hypotheses. Interviewees were allowed to respond openly without time constraints. Relevant information was selected, quantified and analysed by using the qualitative concepts of saturation and codification. The results seem to confirm the hypotheses. Evidence supporting hypotheses 1 and 2 was gathered from all interviewees, as well as indications of the validity of hypothesis 3 based on interviewees' proposals of incentives. The conclusions could act as a guide to support the optimal design of incentive policies and schemes within health organisations when healthcare professionals are intrinsically motivated. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Autologous glioma cell vaccine admixed with interleukin-4 gene transfected fibroblasts in the treatment of patients with malignant gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Trejo Alejandro

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis for malignant gliomas remains dismal. We addressed the safety, feasibility and preliminary clinical activity of the vaccinations using autologous glioma cells and interleukin (IL-4 gene transfected fibroblasts. Methods In University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI protocol 95-033, adult participants with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM or anaplastic astrocytoma (AA received gross total resection (GTR of the recurrent tumors, followed by two vaccinations with autologous fibroblasts retrovirally transfected with TFG-IL4-Neo-TK vector admixed with irradiated autologous glioma cells. In UPCI 99-111, adult participants with newly diagnosed GBM or AA, following GTR and radiation therapy, received two intradermal vaccinations with the TFG-IL4-Neo-TK-transfected fibroblasts admixed with type-1 dendritic cells (DC loaded with autologous tumor lysate. The participants were evaluated for occurrence of adverse events, immune response, and clinical response by radiological imaging. Results and Discussion In UPCI 95-033, only 2 of 6 participants received the vaccinations. Four other participants were withdrawn from the trial because of tumor progression prior to production of the cellular vaccine. However, both participants who received two vaccinations demonstrated encouraging immunological and clinical responses. Biopsies from the local vaccine sites from one participant displayed IL-4 dose-dependent infiltration of CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells. Interferon (IFN-γ Enzyme-Linked Immuno-SPOT (ELISPOT assay in another human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A2+ participant demonstrated systemic T-cell responses against an HLA-A2-restricted glioma-associated antigen (GAA epitope EphA2883–891. Moreover, both participants demonstrated clinical and radiological improvement with no evidence of allergic encephalitis, although both participants eventually succumbed with the tumor recurrence. In 99-111, 5 of 6 enrolled participants

  1. A new anti-glioma therapy, AG119: pre-clinical assessment in a mouse GL261 glioma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towner, Rheal A.; Ihnat, Michael; Saunders, Debra; Bastian, Anja; Smith, Nataliya; Pavana, Roheeth Kumar; Gangjee, Aleem

    2015-01-01

    High grade gliomas (HGGs; grades III and IV) are the most common primary brain tumors in adults, and their malignant nature ranks them fourth in incidence of cancer death. Standard treatment for glioblastomas (GBM), involving surgical resection followed by radiation and chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) and the anti-angiogenic therapy bevacizumab, have not substantially improved overall survival. New therapeutic agents are desperately needed for this devastating disease. Here we study the potential therapeutic agent AG119 in a pre-clinical model for gliomas. AG119 possesses both anti-angiogenic (RTK inhibition) and antimicrotubule cytotoxic activity in a single molecule. GL261 glioma-bearing mice were either treated with AG119, anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) antibody, anti c-Met antibody or TMZ, and compared to untreated tumor-bearing mice. Animal survival was assessed, and tumor volumes and vascular alterations were monitored with morphological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and perfusion-weighted imaging, respectively. Percent survival of GL261 HGG-bearing mice treated with AG119 was significantly higher (p < 0.001) compared to untreated tumors. Tumor volumes (21–31 days following intracerebral implantation of GL261 cells) were found to be significantly lower for AG119 (p < 0.001), anti-VEGF (p < 0.05) and anti-c-Met (p < 0.001) antibody treatments, and TMZ-treated (p < 0.05) mice, compared to untreated controls. Perfusion data indicated that both AG119 and TMZ were able to reduce the effect of decreasing perfusion rates significantly (p < 0.05 for both), when compared to untreated tumors. It was also found that IC 50 values for AG119 were much lower than those for TMZ in T98G and U251 cells. These data support further exploration of the anticancer activity AG119 in HGG, as this compound was able to increase animal survival and decrease tumor volumes in a mouse GL261 glioma model, and that AG119 is also not subject to methyl guanine

  2. Conditioned Media from Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Efficiently Induced the Apoptosis and Differentiation in Human Glioma Cell Lines In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have an intrinsic property for homing towards tumor sites and can be used as tumor-tropic vectors for tumor therapy. But very limited studies investigated the antitumor properties of MSCs themselves. In this study we investigated the antiglioma properties of two easily accessible MSCs, namely, human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs and umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs. We found (1 MSC conditioned media can significantly inhibit the growth of human U251 glioma cell line; (2 MSC conditioned media can significantly induce apoptosis in human U251 cell line; (3 real-time PCR experiments showed significant upregulation of apoptotic genes of both caspase-3 and caspase-9 and significant downregulation of antiapoptotic genes such as survivin and XIAP after MSC conditioned media induction in U 251 cells; (4 furthermore, MSCs conditioned media culture induced rapid and complete differentiation in U251 cells. These results indicate MSCs can efficiently induce both apoptosis and differentiation in U251 human glioma cell line. Whereas UC-MSCs are more efficient for apoptosis induction than ASCs, their capability of differentiation induction is not distinguishable from each other. Our findings suggest MSCs themselves have favorable antitumor characteristics and should be further explored in future glioma therapy.

  3. Eckol suppresses maintenance of stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Kyung-Hwan; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Lim, Eun-Jung; An, Sungkwan; Park, Myung-Jin; Hyun, Jin-Won; Suh, Yongjoon; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Su-Jae

    2011-01-01

    A subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell properties is responsible for tumor maintenance and progression, and may contribute to resistance to anticancer treatments. Thus, compounds that target cancer stem-like cells could be usefully applied to destroy cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of Eckol, a phlorotannin compound, on stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells. To determine whether Eckol targets glioma stem-like cells, we examined whether Eckol treatment could change the expression levels of glioma stem-like cell markers and self-renewal-related proteins as well as the sphere forming ability, and the sensitivity to anticancer treatments. Alterations in the malignant properties of sphere-derived cells by Eckol were also investigated by soft-agar colony forming assay, by xenograft assay in nude mice, and by cell invasion assay. Treatment of sphere-forming glioma cells with Eckol effectively decreased the sphere formation as well as the CD133 + cell population. Eckol treatment suppressed expression of the glioma stem-like cell markers and the self-renewal-related proteins without cell death. Moreover, treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol significantly attenuated anchorage-independent growth on soft agar and tumor formation in xenograft mice. Importantly, Eckol treatment effectively reduced the resistance of glioma stem-like cells to ionizing radiation and temozolomide. Treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol markedly blocked both phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt and Ras-Raf-1-Erk signaling pathways. These results indicate that the natural phlorotannin Eckol suppresses stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells, and thereby makes glioma stem-like cells more sensitive to anticancer treatments, providing novel therapeutic strategies targeting specifically cancer stem-like cells.

  4. KDM2B overexpression correlates with poor prognosis and regulates glioma cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Yiwei Wang,1 Jin Zang,1 Dongyong Zhang,2 Zhenxiang Sun,1 Bo Qiu,2 Xiaojie Wang1 1Department of Human Anatomy, Shenyang Medical College, Huanggu District, Shenyang City, 2Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Heping District, Shenyang City, Liaoning Province, ChinaBackground: Gliomas are one of the most lethal cancers in the human central nervous system. Despite clinical treatment advancements, the prognosis of patients with glioma remains poor. KDM2B is a histone lysine demethylase, which has been observed in multiple tumors. But the concrete role of KDM2B in gliomas remains to be further illustrated.Methods: The KDM2B expression in gliomas was detected with immunohistochemistry and Western blot assay. Furthermore, knockdown of KDM2B in U87 and U251 glioma cell lines, the proliferation capacity was evaluated by cell viability assay, colon formation assay and flow cytometry in vitro. Western blot assay was used to analyze the p21, EZH2 and cyclinD1 changes followed by knockdown of KDM2B.Results: KDM2B was upregulated in tissues of glioma patients, and the expression was correlated to cancer progression. Downregulation of KDM2B in U87 and U251 glioma cell lines inhibited cell proliferation and arrested cell cycle in G0/G1 phase. In addition, silencing KDM2B promoted the upregulation of p21 while reduced the expression of EZH2 and cyclinD1.Conclusion: Taken together, our results revealed that KDM2B might influence gliomas growth and act as a novel therapeutic target for glioma patients.Keywords: EZH2, glioma, KDM2B, P21

  5. Isolation and characterization of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells from malignant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ke-Tai; Juerchott, Kathrin; Fu, Peng; Selbig, Joachim; Eigenbrod, Sabina; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Schichor, Christian

    2012-11-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly-vascularised tumours. Neoangiogenesis is a crucial factor in the malignant behaviour of tumour and prognosis of patients. Several mechanisms are suspected to lead to neoangiogenesis, one of them is the recruitment of multipotent progenitor cells towards the tumour. Factors such as Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) were described to recruit bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to the glioma stroma and vasculature. Little is known about isolating EPCs from normal or malignant tissues. In this study, we addressed the topic of characterization of tumour-isolated EPCs and re-defined the clonal relationship between EPCs and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in gliomas. We first checked public gene expression data of glioma for putative marker expression, pointing towards a prevalence of EPCs and HSCs in glioma. Immunohistochemical staining of glioma tissue confirmed the higher expression of these progenitor markers in glioma tissue. EPCs and HSCs were consequently isolated and characterized at the phenotypic and functional levels. We applied a new isolation method, for the first time, to specimen from patients with high grade glioma including seven grade IV glioblastoma, five-grade III astrocytoma, and three grade III oligoastrocytoma. In all samples, we were able to isolate the tumour-derived EPCs, which were positive for characteristic markers: CD31, CD34 and VEGFR2. The EPCs formed capillary networks in vitro and had the ability to take up acetylated low-density lipoprotein. Glioma-derived HSCs were positive for CD34 and CD45, but they were unable to form a capillary network in vitro. These findings on tumour-derived EPCs/HSCs were in concordance with the results, derived from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers. In our study, we established a new method for EPC/HSC isolation from human gliomas, defined the contribution of EPCs and HSCs to the tumour tissue, and highlighted the intense in vivo tumour host

  6. Germline rearrangements in families with strong family history of glioma and malignant melanoma, colon, and breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Shete, Sanjay; Lau, Ching C.; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Lai, Rose; Il'yasova, Dora; Houlston, Richard S.; Schildkraut, Joellen; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Wrensch, Margaret; Davis, Faith G.; Merrell, Ryan; Johansen, Christoffer; Sadetzki, Siegal; Bondy, Melissa L.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Adatto, Phyllis; Morice, Fabian; Payen, Sam; McQuinn, Lacey; McGaha, Rebecca; Guerra, Sandra; Paith, Leslie; Roth, Katherine; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Yung, Alfred; Aldape, Kenneth; Gilbert, Mark; Weinberger, Jeffrey; Colman, Howard; Conrad, Charles; de Groot, John; Forman, Arthur; Groves, Morris; Levin, Victor; Loghin, Monica; Puduvalli, Vinay; Sawaya, Raymond; Heimberger, Amy; Lang, Frederick; Levine, Nicholas; Tolentino, Lori; Saunders, Kate; Thach, Thu-Trang; Iacono, Donna Dello; Sloan, Andrew; Gerson, Stanton; Selman, Warren; Bambakidis, Nicholas; Hart, David; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Alan; Cohen, Mark; Rogers, Lisa; Nock, Charles J; Wolinsky, Yingli; Devine, Karen; Fulop, Jordonna; Barrett, Wendi; Shimmel, Kristen; Ostrom, Quinn; Barnett, Gene; Rosenfeld, Steven; Vogelbaum, Michael; Weil, Robert; Ahluwalia, Manmeet; Peereboom, David; Staugaitis, Susan; Schilero, Cathy; Brewer, Cathy; Smolenski, Kathy; McGraw, Mary; Naska, Theresa; Rosenfeld, Steven; Ram, Zvi; Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix; Umansky, Felix; Zaaroor, Menashe; Cohen, Avi; Tzuk-Shina, Tzeela; Voldby, Bo; Laursen, René; Andersen, Claus; Brennum, Jannick; Henriksen, Matilde Bille; Marzouk, Maya; Davis, Mary Elizabeth; Boland, Eamon; Smith, Marcel; Eze, Ogechukwu; Way, Mahalia; Lada, Pat; Miedzianowski, Nancy; Frechette, Michelle; Paleologos, Nina; Byström, Gudrun; Svedberg, Eva; Huggert, Sara; Kimdal, Mikael; Sandström, Monica; Brännström, Nikolina; Hayat, Amina; Tihan, Tarik; Zheng, Shichun; Berger, Mitchel; Butowski, Nicholas; Chang, Susan; Clarke, Jennifer; Prados, Michael; Rice, Terri; Sison, Jeannette; Kivett, Valerie; Duo, Xiaoqin; Hansen, Helen; Hsuang, George; Lamela, Rosito; Ramos, Christian; Patoka, Joe; Wagenman, Katherine; Zhou, Mi; Klein, Adam; McGee, Nora; Pfefferle, Jon; Wilson, Callie; Morris, Pagan; Hughes, Mary; Britt-Williams, Marlin; Foft, Jessica; Madsen, Julia; Polony, Csaba; McCarthy, Bridget; Zahora, Candice; Villano, John; Engelhard, Herbert; Borg, Ake; Chanock, Stephen K; Collins, Peter; Elston, Robert; Kleihues, Paul; Kruchko, Carol; Petersen, Gloria; Plon, Sharon; Thompson, Patricia; Johansen, C.; Sadetzki, S.; Melin, B.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Lau, Ching C.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Liu, Yanhong; Shete, Sanjay; Yu, Robert K.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Houlston, Richard S.; Hosking, Fay J.; Robertson, Lindsay; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Sloan, Andrew E.; Barnett, Gene; Devine, Karen; Wolinsky, Yingli; Lai, Rose; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sadetzki, Siegal; Yechezkel, Galit Hirsh; Bruchim, Revital Bar-Sade; Aslanov, Lili; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Broholm, Helle; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Schubert, Erica; DeAngelis, Lisa; Jenkins, Robert B.; Yang, Ping; Rynearson, Amanda; Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Henriksson, Roger; Melin, Beatrice S.; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Merrell, Ryan; Lada, Patricia; Wrensch, Margaret; Wiencke, John; Wiemels, Joe; McCoy, Lucie; McCarthy, Bridget J.; Davis, Faith G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although familial susceptibility to glioma is known, the genetic basis for this susceptibility remains unidentified in the majority of glioma-specific families. An alternative approach to identifying such genes is to examine cancer pedigrees, which include glioma as one of several cancer phenotypes, to determine whether common chromosomal modifications might account for the familial aggregation of glioma and other cancers. Methods Germline rearrangements in 146 glioma families (from the Gliogene Consortium; http://www.gliogene.org/) were examined using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. These families all had at least 2 verified glioma cases and a third reported or verified glioma case in the same family or 2 glioma cases in the family with at least one family member affected with melanoma, colon, or breast cancer.The genomic areas covering TP53, CDKN2A, MLH1, and MSH2 were selected because these genes have been previously reported to be associated with cancer pedigrees known to include glioma. Results We detected a single structural rearrangement, a deletion of exons 1-6 in MSH2, in the proband of one family with 3 cases with glioma and one relative with colon cancer. Conclusions Large deletions and duplications are rare events in familial glioma cases, even in families with a strong family history of cancers that may be involved in known cancer syndromes. PMID:24723567

  7. The ketogenic diet reverses gene expression patterns and reduces reactive oxygen species levels when used as an adjuvant therapy for glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stafford Phillip

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant brain tumors affect people of all ages and are the second leading cause of cancer deaths in children. While current treatments are effective and improve survival, there remains a substantial need for more efficacious therapeutic modalities. The ketogenic diet (KD - a high-fat, low-carbohydrate treatment for medically refractory epilepsy - has been suggested as an alternative strategy to inhibit tumor growth by altering intrinsic metabolism, especially by inducing glycopenia. Methods Here, we examined the effects of an experimental KD on a mouse model of glioma, and compared patterns of gene expression in tumors vs. normal brain from animals fed either a KD or a standard diet. Results Animals received intracranial injections of bioluminescent GL261-luc cells and tumor growth was followed in vivo. KD treatment significantly reduced the rate of tumor growth and prolonged survival. Further, the KD reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS production in tumor cells. Gene expression profiling demonstrated that the KD induces an overall reversion to expression patterns seen in non-tumor specimens. Notably, genes involved in modulating ROS levels and oxidative stress were altered, including those encoding cyclooxygenase 2, glutathione peroxidases 3 and 7, and periredoxin 4. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the KD improves survivability in our mouse model of glioma, and suggests that the mechanisms accounting for this protective effect likely involve complex alterations in cellular metabolism beyond simply a reduction in glucose.

  8. The ketogenic diet reverses gene expression patterns and reduces reactive oxygen species levels when used as an adjuvant therapy for glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Phillip; Abdelwahab, Mohammed G; Kim, Do Young; Preul, Mark C; Rho, Jong M; Scheck, Adrienne C

    2010-09-10

    Malignant brain tumors affect people of all ages and are the second leading cause of cancer deaths in children. While current treatments are effective and improve survival, there remains a substantial need for more efficacious therapeutic modalities. The ketogenic diet (KD) - a high-fat, low-carbohydrate treatment for medically refractory epilepsy - has been suggested as an alternative strategy to inhibit tumor growth by altering intrinsic metabolism, especially by inducing glycopenia. Here, we examined the effects of an experimental KD on a mouse model of glioma, and compared patterns of gene expression in tumors vs. normal brain from animals fed either a KD or a standard diet. Animals received intracranial injections of bioluminescent GL261-luc cells and tumor growth was followed in vivo. KD treatment significantly reduced the rate of tumor growth and prolonged survival. Further, the KD reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in tumor cells. Gene expression profiling demonstrated that the KD induces an overall reversion to expression patterns seen in non-tumor specimens. Notably, genes involved in modulating ROS levels and oxidative stress were altered, including those encoding cyclooxygenase 2, glutathione peroxidases 3 and 7, and periredoxin 4. Our data demonstrate that the KD improves survivability in our mouse model of glioma, and suggests that the mechanisms accounting for this protective effect likely involve complex alterations in cellular metabolism beyond simply a reduction in glucose.

  9. CD44 Interacts with HIF-2α to Modulate the Hypoxic Phenotype of Perinecrotic and Perivascular Glioma Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Elinn; Grassi, Elisa S.; Pantazopoulou, Vasiliki

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors enhance glioma stemness, and glioma stem cells have an amplified hypoxic response despite residing within a perivascular niche. Still, little is known about differential HIF regulation in stem versus bulk glioma cells. We show that the intracellular domain of stem cell...... marker CD44 (CD44ICD) is released at hypoxia, binds HIF-2α (but not HIF-1α), enhances HIF target gene activation, and is required for hypoxia-induced stemness in glioma. In a glioma mouse model, CD44 was restricted to hypoxic and perivascular tumor regions, and in human glioma, a hypoxia signature...... correlated with CD44. The CD44ICD was sufficient to induce hypoxic signaling at perivascular oxygen tensions, and blocking CD44 cleavage decreased HIF-2α stabilization in CD44-expressing cells. Our data indicate that the stem cell marker CD44 modulates the hypoxic response of glioma cells and that the pseudo-hypoxic...

  10. Voxel-based clustered imaging by multiparameter diffusion tensor images for glioma grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inano, Rika; Oishi, Naoya; Kunieda, Takeharu; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Yamao, Yukihiro; Shibata, Sumiya; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Miyamoto, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common intra-axial primary brain tumour; therefore, predicting glioma grade would influence therapeutic strategies. Although several methods based on single or multiple parameters from diagnostic images exist, a definitive method for pre-operatively determining glioma grade remains unknown. We aimed to develop an unsupervised method using multiple parameters from pre-operative diffusion tensor images for obtaining a clustered image that could enable visual grading of gliomas. Fourteen patients with low-grade gliomas and 19 with high-grade gliomas underwent diffusion tensor imaging and three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging before tumour resection. Seven features including diffusion-weighted imaging, fractional anisotropy, first eigenvalue, second eigenvalue, third eigenvalue, mean diffusivity and raw T2 signal with no diffusion weighting, were extracted as multiple parameters from diffusion tensor imaging. We developed a two-level clustering approach for a self-organizing map followed by the K-means algorithm to enable unsupervised clustering of a large number of input vectors with the seven features for the whole brain. The vectors were grouped by the self-organizing map as protoclusters, which were classified into the smaller number of clusters by K-means to make a voxel-based diffusion tensor-based clustered image. Furthermore, we also determined if the diffusion tensor-based clustered image was really helpful for predicting pre-operative glioma grade in a supervised manner. The ratio of each class in the diffusion tensor-based clustered images was calculated from the regions of interest manually traced on the diffusion tensor imaging space, and the common logarithmic ratio scales were calculated. We then applied support vector machine as a classifier for distinguishing between low- and high-grade gliomas. Consequently, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic

  11. Irradiation and Bevacizumab in High-Grade Glioma Retreatment Settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Ganswindt, Ute; Schwarz, Silke Birgit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich (Germany); Kreth, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Tonn, Joerg-Christian [Department of Neurosurgery, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich (Germany); Geisler, Julia; Fougere, Christian la [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich (Germany); Ertl, Lorenz; Linn, Jennifer [Department of Neuroradiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich (Germany); Siefert, Axel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich (Germany); Belka, Claus, E-mail: claus.belka@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Reirradiation is a treatment option for recurrent high-grade glioma with proven but limited effectiveness. Therapies directed against vascular endothelial growth factor have been shown to exert certain efficacy in combination with chemotherapy and have been safely tested in combination with radiotherapy in a small cohort of patients. To study the feasibility of reirradiation combined with bevacizumab treatment, the toxicity and treatment outcomes of this approach were analyzed retrospectively. Patients and Methods: After previous treatment with standard radiotherapy (with or without temozolomide) patients with recurrent malignant glioma received bevacizumab (10 mg/kg intravenous) on Day 1 and Day 15 during radiotherapy. Maintenance therapy was selected based on individual considerations, and mainly bevacizumab-containing regimens were chosen. Patients received 36 Gy in 18 fractions. Results: The data of the medical charts of the 30 patients were analyzed retrospectively. All were irradiated in a single institution and received either bevacizumab (n = 20), no additional substance (n = 7), or temozolomide (n = 3). Reirradiation was tolerated well, regardless of the added drug. In 1 patient treated with bevacizumab, a wound dehiscence occurred. Overall survival was significantly better in patients receiving bevacizumab (p = 0.03, log-rank test). In a multivariate proportional hazards Cox model, bevacizumab, Karnovsky performance status, and World Health Organization grade at relapse turned out to be the most important predictors for overall survival. Conclusion: Reirradiation with bevacizumab is a feasible and effective treatment for patients with recurrent high-grade gliomas. A randomized trial is warranted to finally answer the question whether bevacizumab adds substantial benefit to a radiotherapeutic retreatment setting.

  12. Mutant Metabolic Enzymes Are at the Origin of Gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Hai; Bigner, Darell D.; Velculescu, Victor; Parsons, D.Williams

    2009-01-01

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) metabolic enzymes IDH1 and IDH2 have been found to be frequent and early genetic alterations in astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas. All mutations identified to date affect a single amino acid located within the isocitrate binding site (R132 of IDH1 and the analogous R172 residue of IDH2). IDH1 and IDH2 mutations define a specific subtype of gliomas and may have significant utility for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of patients with the...

  13. A 12-week interdisciplinary rehabilitation trial in patients with gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders; Søgaard, Karen; Minet, Lisbeth Rosenbek

    2018-01-01

    %) was achieved at part one. However, the failure to meet predefined feasibility objectives of drop-out, adherence and patient satisfaction of the unsupervised intervention at part two have led to a protocol revision for a future randomized controlled trial. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that an intensive...... that the foundation for conducting a successful randomized controlled trial among these vulnerable patients has been established. Implications for rehabilitation Brain tumors constitute some of the most challenging cancer diagnoses presenting for rehabilitation intervention. Patients with gliomas experiences...

  14. The antitumor action of cannabinoids on glioma tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogopoulos, Panagiotis; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-06-01

    Cannabinoids are a class of chemical compounds with a wide spectrum of pharmacological effects, mediated by two specific plasma membrane receptors (CB1 and CB2). Recently, CB1 and CB2 expression levels have been detected in human tumors, including those of brain. Cannabinoids-endocannabinoids exert anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, anti-invasive, anti-metastatic and pro-apoptotic effects in different cancer types, both in vitro and in vivo in animal models, after local or systemic administration. We present the available experimental and clinical data, to date, regarding the antitumor action of cannabinoids on the tumorigenesis of gliomas.

  15. A Metabolic Therapy for Malignant Glioma Requires a Clinical Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Zachary; Spielman, Daniel; Recht, Lawrence

    2017-11-02

    Cancers are "reprogrammed" to use a much higher rate of glycolysis (GLY) relative to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), even in the presence of adequate amounts of oxygenation. Originally identified by Nobel Laureate Otto Warburg, this hallmark of cancer has recently been termed metabolic reprogramming and represents a way for the cancer tissue to divert carbon skeletons to produce biomass. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie this metabolic shift should lead to better strategies for cancer treatments. Malignant gliomas, cancers that are very resistant to conventional treatments, are highly glycolytic and seem particularly suited to approaches that can subvert this phenotype.

  16. Glioma Grading and Determination of IDH Mutation Status and ATRX loss by DCE and ASL Perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendle, Cornelia; Hempel, Johann-Martin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Skardelly, Marco; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Bender, Benjamin; Ernemann, Ulrike; Klose, Uwe

    2017-05-09

    To evaluate arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) perfusion in glioma grading according to the previous WHO classification of 2007, as well as concerning isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation status and ATRX expression as required by the new WHO 2016 brain tumor classification. The mean values of Ktrans, Kep, Ve, and Vp by DCE perfusion, and cerebral blood flow (CBF) by ASL perfusion were assessed retrospectively in 40 patients with initial glioma diagnosis. Perfusion parameters were correlated and compared concerning glioma grading, IDH mutation status and ATRX expression. The DCE and ASL perfusion parameters showed merely moderate correlation. The Ktrans, Ve, and CBF by DCE perfusion were different in low-grade and high-grade gliomas (p = 0.0018, p IDH mutation (p = 0.014, sensitivity = 0.75, specificity = 0.88) and showed a trend for the discrimination of astrocytomas with IDH mutation from oligodendrogliomas (p = 0.074). In conclusion, DCE and ASL perfusion are complementary in the differentiation of gliomas. The discrimination of low- and high-grade gliomas is possible by the DCE perfusion parameter Ve, while ASL perfusion shows potential for the differentiation of the IDH and ATRX mutation status of gliomas following the new WHO classification 2016. Both perfusion techniques might represent different aspects of brain tumor perfusion.

  17. Temozolomide increases MHC-I expression via NF-κB signaling in glioma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongyong; Qiu, Bo; Wang, Yunjie; Guan, Yanlei; Zhang, Luyang; Wu, Anhua

    2017-06-01

    Gliomas are the most common and primary tumors of the central nervous system in adults. Temozolomide (TMZ) is the main drug used to treat glioma; however, prognosis remains poor for most patients. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) are thought to enable glioma initiation and evasion from immune surveillance; their immunogenicity can be determined by expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I. The present study investigated the effect of TMZ on MHC-I expression in GSCs. Glioma spheres were cultured in serum-free medium containing epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and B27; MHC-I expression was detected by immunocytochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, and flow cytometry. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression in glioma stem cells was detected by Western blot. TMZ enhanced MHC-I expression in GSCs, and NF-κB was activated. TMZ treatment increased MHC-I expression via modulation of NF-κB signaling in GSCs. In addition to being a chemotherapeutic agent, TMZ may also serve as an immunomodulatory agent in the treatment of glioma patients. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  18. Genetically Engineered Multilineage-Differentiating Stress-Enduring Cells as Cellular Vehicles against Malignant Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Yamasaki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Malignant glioma, the most common malignant brain tumor in adults, is difficult to treat due to its aggressive invasive nature. Enzyme/prodrug suicide gene therapy based on the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk/ganciclovir (GCV system is an efficient strategy for treating malignant gliomas. In the present study, we evaluated treatment with multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse cells, which are endogenous non-tumorigenic pluripotent-like stem cells that are easily collectable from the bone marrow as SSEA-3+ cells, as carriers of the HSVtk gene. Human Muse cells showed potent migratory activity toward glioma cells both in vitro and in vivo. HSVtk gene-transduced Muse cells (Muse-tk cells at a cell number of only 1/32 that of U87 human glioma cells completely eradicated U87 gliomas in nude mouse brains, showing a robust in vivo bystander effect. Pre-existing intracranial U87 gliomas in nude mouse brains injected intratumorally with Muse-tk cells followed by intraperitoneal GCV administration were significantly reduced in size within 2 weeks, and 4 of 10 treated mice survived over 200 days. These findings suggest that intratumoral Muse-tk cell injection followed by systemic GCV administration is safe and effective and that allogeneic Muse-tk cell-medicated suicide gene therapy for malignant glioma is clinically feasible.

  19. The melatonin-MT1 receptor axis modulates tumor growth in PTEN-mutated gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huihui; Wang, Zhen; Hu, Lei; Zhang, Shangrong; Zhao, Chenggang; Yang, Haoran; Wang, Hongzhi; Fang, Zhiyou; Wu, Lijun; Chen, Xueran

    2018-02-19

    More than 40% of glioma patients have tumors that harbor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten) mutations; this disease is associated with poor therapeutic resistance and outcome. Such mutations are linked to increased cell survival and growth, decreased apoptosis, and drug resistance; thus, new therapeutic strategies focusing on inhibiting glioma tumorigenesis and progression are urgently needed. Melatonin, an indolamine produced and secreted predominantly by the pineal gland, mediates a variety of physiological functions and possesses antioxidant and antitumor properties. Here, we analyzed the relationship between PTEN and the inhibitory effect of melatonin in primary human glioma cells and cultured glioma cell lines. The results showed that melatonin can inhibit glioma cell growth both in culture and in vivo. This inhibition was associated with PTEN levels, which significantly correlated with the expression level of MT1 in patients. In fact, c-fos-mediated MT1 was shown to be a key modulator of the effect of melatonin on gliomas that harbor wild type PTEN. Taken together, these data suggest that melatonin-MT1 receptor complexes represent a potential target for the treatment of glioma. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of Tumor Cells in a Mouse Model of Diffuse Infiltrative Glioma by Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuniaki Tanahashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioma of infiltrative nature is challenging for surgeons to achieve tumor-specific and maximal resection. Raman spectroscopy provides structural information on the targeted materials as vibrational shifts. We utilized Raman spectroscopy to distinguish invasive tumors from normal tissues. Spectra obtained from replication-competent avian sarcoma-(RCAS- based infiltrative glioma cells and glioma tissues (resembling low-grade human glioma were compared with those obtained from normal mouse astrocytes and normal tissues. In cell analysis, the spectra at 950–1000, 1030, 1050–1100, 1120–1130, 1120–1200, 1200–1300, 1300–1350, and 1450 cm−1 were significantly higher in infiltrative glioma cells than in normal astrocytes. In brain tissue analysis, the spectra at 1030, 1050–1100, and 1200–1300 cm−1 were significantly higher in infiltrative glioma tissues than in normal brain tissues. These spectra reflect the structures of proteins, lipids, and DNA content. The sensitivity and specificity to predict glioma cells by distinguishing normal cells were 98.3% and 75.0%, respectively. Principal component analysis elucidated the significance of spectral difference between tumor tissues and normal tissues. It is possible to distinguish invasive tumors from normal tissues by using Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Saw Palmetto Extract Inhibits Metastasis and Antiangiogenesis through STAT3 Signal Pathway in Glioma Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3 plays an important role in the proliferation and angiogenesis in human glioma. Previous research indicated that saw palmetto extract markedly inhibited the proliferation of human glioma cells through STAT3 signal pathway. But its effect on tumor metastasis and antiangiogenesis is not clear. This study is to further clear the impact of saw palmetto extract on glioma cell metastasis, antiangiogenesis, and its mechanism. TUNEL assay indicated that the apoptotic cells in the saw palmetto treated group are higher than that in the control group (p<0.05. The apoptosis related protein is detected and the results revealed that saw palmetto extract inhibits the proliferation of human glioma. Meanwhile pSTAT3 is lower in the experimental group and CD34 is also inhibited in the saw palmetto treated group. This means that saw palmetto extract could inhibit the angiogenesis in glioma. We found that saw palmetto extract was an important phytotherapeutic drug against the human glioma through STAT3 signal pathway. Saw palmetto extract may be useful as an adjunctive therapeutic agent for treatment of individuals with glioma and other types of cancer in which STAT3 signaling is activated.

  2. Advances in the molecular genetics of gliomas - implications for classification and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifenberger, Guido; Wirsching, Hans-Georg; Knobbe-Thomsen, Christiane B; Weller, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Genome-wide molecular-profiling studies have revealed the characteristic genetic alterations and epigenetic profiles associated with different types of gliomas. These molecular characteristics can be used to refine glioma classification, to improve prediction of patient outcomes, and to guide individualized treatment. Thus, the WHO Classification of Tumours of the Central Nervous System was revised in 2016 to incorporate molecular biomarkers - together with classic histological features - in an integrated diagnosis, in order to define distinct glioma entities as precisely as possible. This paradigm shift is markedly changing how glioma is diagnosed, and has important implications for future clinical trials and patient management in daily practice. Herein, we highlight the developments in our understanding of the molecular genetics of gliomas, and review the current landscape of clinically relevant molecular biomarkers for use in classification of the disease subtypes. Novel approaches to the genetic characterization of gliomas based on large-scale DNA-methylation profiling and next-generation sequencing are also discussed. In addition, we illustrate how advances in the molecular genetics of gliomas can promote the development and clinical translation of novel pathogenesis-based therapeutic approaches, thereby paving the way towards precision medicine in neuro-oncology.

  3. An automatic glioma grading method based on multi-feature extraction and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Tianming; Feng, Piaopiao; Hong, Xunning; Lu, Zhenyu; Xiao, Liang; Zhang, Yudong

    2017-07-20

    An accurate assessment of tumor malignancy grade in the preoperative situation is important for clinical management. However, the manual grading of gliomas from MRIs is both a tiresome and time consuming task for radiologists. Thus, it is a priority to design an automatic and effective computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) tool to assist radiologists in grading gliomas. To design an automatic computer-aided diagnosis for grading gliomas using multi-sequence magnetic resonance imaging. The proposed method consists of two steps: (1) the features of high and low grade gliomas are extracted from multi-sequence magnetic resonance images, and (2) then, a KNN classifier is trained to grade the gliomas. In the feature extraction step, the intensity, volume, and local binary patterns (LBP) of the gliomas are extracted, and PCA is used to reduce the data dimension. The proposed "Intensity-Volume-LBP-PCA-KNN" method is validated on the MICCAI 2015 BraTS challenge dataset, and an average grade accuracy of 87.59% is obtained. The proposed method is an effective method for automatically grading gliomas and can be applied to real situations.

  4. Anti-human-cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin G levels in glioma risk and prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susan Amirian, E.; Marquez-Do, Deborah; Bondy, Melissa L.; Scheurer, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    The role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in glioma development and progression remains controversial. The purpose of our study was to assess the potential associations between anti-HCMV antibodies (immunoglobulin G [IgG] and immunoglobulin M [IgM]) and glioma risk and prognosis using data from the Harris County Case–Control Study. Multivariable logistic regression models were utilized to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations between glioma status and antibody levels among glioma cases (n = 362) and cancer-free controls (n = 462). Hazard ratios and 95% CIs were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for age, race, and sex, to determine if antibody levels were associated with survival over time among cases. Among IgG-positive participants, increasing anti-HCMV IgG levels were associated with decreasing glioma risk (P for trend = 0.0008), and those with the lowest level of anti-HCMV IgG (<10 U/mL) had the highest glioma risk, controlling for age, sex, and race/ethnicity (OR: 2.51, 95% CI: 1.42–4.43). Antibody levels were not associated with survival among glioma cases. Our study contributes new evidence toward the potential importance of the direct and indirect effects of HCMV infection in gliomagenesis

  5. [Prognostic evaluations of recurrent gliomas and preliminary efficacies of combined modality therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Yao, Yu; Qin, Zhi-yong; Wang, Yang; Wu, Jin-song; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-fu

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the prognosis and efficacies of comprehensive treatment for recurrent gliomas. A total of 62 patients diagnosed as recurrent gliomas at our hospital between May 2007 and January 2012 were reviewed and analyzed. The investigators compared the prognosis of different grades of gliomas and evaluated the efficacies of combined modality therapy of surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Their median periods of time-to-progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 6.0 and 13.0 months respectively. The median TTP of WHO grade II (n = 21), III (n = 13) and IV (n = 28) recurrent gliomas were 9.0, 9.0 and 5.0 months respectively. And the average OS of WHO grade II, III and IV recurrent gliomas were 26.6, 21.4 and 13.8 months respectively. The efficacious rate of chemotherapy was 26.7%. Combined modality therapy based on chemotherapy may moderately improve the prognosis of recurrent gliomas. And the pathological grades of primary tumors are correlated with the prognosis of recurrent gliomas.

  6. The tropism of neurally differentiated bone marrow stromal cells towards C6 glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Qianfa; Liu, Weiping; Zhong, Jun; Yi, Xicai; Liu, Yang; Liu, Yuanyang; Yang, Yang; Han, Rui; Fei, Zhou

    2011-10-24

    Recent studies have indicated that bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have significant tropism towards glioma which makes them play an important role in carrying genes/drugs to inhibit the growth of glioma as cell vehicles. But BMSCs may differentiate into neural cells under entocranial environment and few researches support the idea that neurally differentiated bone marrow stromal cells (N-D-BMSCs) still hold the capacity of migrating to the tumor sites. The aim of our study was to investigate the tropism of N-D-BMSCs towards C6 glioma. In vitro migration assay was employed by transwell co-culture system and Student's t-test analysis indicated that N-D-BMSCs had the significant tropism towards C6 glioma-conditioned medium (GCM) (Ptropism of N-D-BMSCs towards C6 glioma sites presented time variation (P-value=2.9E-20). Moreover, multiple comparisons for the time variables with the Student's t-test and the results suggested that the migration capacity of N-D-BMSCs towards C6 glioma sites reach the peak on the 7th day after transplantation. These results demonstrate that N-D-BMSCs as well as BMSCs have significant tropism towards C6 glioma. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Functions of intrinsic disorder in transmembrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    2017-01-01

    mechanisms. (3) Trafficking of membrane proteins. (4) Transient membrane associations. (5) Post-translational modifications most notably phosphorylation and (6) disorder-linked isoform dependent function. We finish the review by discussing the future challenges facing the membrane protein community regarding......Intrinsic disorder is common in integral membrane proteins, particularly in the intracellular domains. Despite this observation, these domains are not always recognized as being disordered. In this review, we will discuss the biological functions of intrinsically disordered regions of membrane...... proteins, and address why the flexibility afforded by disorder is mechanistically important. Intrinsically disordered regions are present in many common classes of membrane proteins including ion channels and transporters; G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases and cytokine...

  8. Management Control, Intrinsic Motivation and Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godt Gregersen, Mikkel

    of the conclusion is that intrinsic motivation and management control can coexist under the conditions that all three basic needs, i.e. autonomy, competence and relatedness, are supported. This can happen when control takes point of departure in the individual employee. The second part of the conclusion......This thesis consists of a cape and three papers. The overall research question is: How can intrinsic motivation and management control coexist in a creative environment and how can coordination be possible in such a context? The cape ties together the research done in the three papers....... It is divided into six sections. The first section introduces the concepts of intrinsic motivation, creativity and management control. This is followed by a section on management control in a creative context. These two sections frame the thesis and introduce the setting in which the research has been done...

  9. Cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Fernando M; Bonni, Azad; Sousa, Mónica M

    2014-01-01

    Although neurons execute a cell intrinsic program of axonal growth during development, following the establishment of connections, the developmental growth capacity declines. Besides environmental challenges, this switch largely accounts for the failure of adult central nervous system (CNS) axons to regenerate. Here, we discuss the cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration, including not only the regulation of transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms, but also the modulation of local protein translation, retrograde and anterograde axonal transport, and microtubule dynamics. We further explore the causes underlying the failure of CNS neurons to mount a vigorous regenerative response, and the paradigms demonstrating the activation of cell intrinsic axon growth programs. Finally, we present potential mechanisms to support axon regeneration, as these may represent future therapeutic approaches to promote recovery following CNS injury and disease. PMID:24531721

  10. Targetable signaling pathway mutations are associated with malignant phenotype in IDH-mutant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Shota; Curry, William T; Loebel, Franziska; Zhao, Dan; Tateishi, Kensuke; Chen, Juxiang; Klofas, Lindsay K; Lelic, Nina; Kim, James C; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Ellisen, Leif W; Borger, Darrell R; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Batchelor, Tracy T; Iafrate, A John; Cahill, Daniel P; Chi, Andrew S

    2014-06-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutations occur in low-grade and high-grade gliomas. We sought to identify the genetic basis of malignant phenotype heterogeneity in IDH-mutant gliomas. We prospectively implanted tumor specimens from 20 consecutive IDH1-mutant glioma resections into mouse brains and genotyped all resection specimens using a CLIA-certified molecular panel. Gliomas with cancer driver mutations were tested for sensitivity to targeted inhibitors in vitro. Associations between genomic alterations and outcomes were analyzed in patients. By 10 months, 8 of 20 IDH1-mutant gliomas developed intracerebral xenografts. All xenografts maintained mutant IDH1 and high levels of 2-hydroxyglutarate on serial transplantation. All xenograft-producing gliomas harbored "lineage-defining" mutations in CIC (oligodendroglioma) or TP53 (astrocytoma), and 6 of 8 additionally had activating mutations in PIK3CA or amplification of PDGFRA, MET, or N-MYC. Only IDH1 and CIC/TP53 mutations were detected in non-xenograft-forming gliomas (P = 0.0007). Targeted inhibition of the additional alterations decreased proliferation in vitro. Moreover, we detected alterations in known cancer driver genes in 13.4% of IDH-mutant glioma patients, including PIK3CA, KRAS, AKT, or PTEN mutation or PDGFRA, MET, or N-MYC amplification. IDH/CIC mutant tumors were associated with PIK3CA/KRAS mutations whereas IDH/TP53 tumors correlated with PDGFRA/MET amplification. Presence of driver alterations at progression was associated with shorter subsequent progression-free survival (median 9.0 vs. 36.1 months; P = 0.0011). A subset of IDH-mutant gliomas with mutations in driver oncogenes has a more malignant phenotype in patients. Identification of these alterations may provide an opportunity for use of targeted therapies in these patients. Clin Cancer Res; 20(11); 2898-909. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. MicroRNA-184 promotes proliferation ability of glioma cells by regulating FOXO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Qing-Ke; Liu, Wei-Dong; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Wang, Yun-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the effect of microRNA (miR-184) on regulating the genesis, development and proliferation of glioma cells. Lipidosome was used to transfect miR-184 mimic and inhibitor to glioma cell line, and the cell proliferation ability changes were determined by MTT and plate cloning experiment after the transfection. WB test was used to measure the levels of cyclinD1, p27 and FOXO3. Meanwhile, QPCR was used to detect miR-184 expression in glioma cell line, glioma tissues and adjacent tissues. Luciferase experiment was used to test 3'UTR gene targeting regulation of miR-184 and FOXO3. QPCR results showed a significant lower miR-184 expression level in glioma cell line and glioma tissues than that in juxtacancerous tissue. MTT and plate cloning experiments have shown that after over-expressing of miR-184, the cell proliferation capacity of glioma U87 and T98G was significantly increased, which was significantly inhibited after the inhibition of miR-184. WB results showed a lower expression level of p27 in U87 and T98G cells, and a higher expression level of cyclinD1 after over-expressing of miR-184 was observed. However, a lower expression level of cyclinD1 and a higher expression level of p27 after the inhibition of miR-184. The luciferase activity was inhibited after the over-expressing of miR-184. MiR-184 can affect the proliferation abilities of glioma cells and regulate the cell cycle related protein. It plays an important role in the occurrence and development of gliomas. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. TRIM8 downregulation in glioma affects cell proliferation and it is associated with patients survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micale, Lucia; Fusco, Carmela; Fontana, Andrea; Barbano, Raffaela; Augello, Bartolomeo; De Nittis, Pasquelena; Copetti, Massimiliano; Pellico, Maria Teresa; Mandriani, Barbara; Cocciadiferro, Dario; Parrella, Paola; Fazio, Vito Michele; Dimitri, Lucia Maria Cecilia; D’Angelo, Vincenzo; Novielli, Chiara; Larizza, Lidia; Daga, Antonio; Merla, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Human gliomas are a heterogeneous group of primary malignant brain tumors whose molecular pathogenesis is not yet solved. In this regard, a major research effort has been directed at identifying novel specific glioma-associated genes. Here, we investigated the effect of TRIM8 gene in glioma. TRIM8 transcriptional level was profiled in our own glioma cases collection by qPCR and confirmed in the independent TCGA glioma cohort. The association between TRIM8 expression and Overall Survival and Progression-free Survival in TCGA cohort was determined by using uni-multivariable Cox regression analysis. The effect of TRIM8 on patient glioma cell proliferation was evaluated by performing MTT and clonogenic assays. The mechanisms causing the reduction of TRIM8 expression were explored by using qPCR and in vitro assays. We showed that TRIM8 expression correlates with unfavorable clinical outcome in glioma patients. We found that a restored TRIM8 expression induced a significant reduction of clonogenic potential in U87MG and patient’s glioblastoma cells. Finally we provide experimental evidences showing that miR-17 directly targets the 3′ UTR of TRIM8 and post-transcriptionally represses the expression of TRIM8. Our study provides evidences that TRIM8 may participate in the carcinogenesis and progression of glioma and that the transcriptional repression of TRIM8 might have potential value for predicting poor prognosis in glioma patients. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1449-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  13. Mielinólise pontina central e extra-pontina em paciente alcoolista sem distúrbios hidro-eletrolíticos: relato de caso Central pontine and extra-pontine myelinolysis in an alcoholic patient without electrolyte disturbances: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Manoel B. Germiniani

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A mielinólise pontina central (MPC e extra-pontina (MEP é enfermidade desmielinizante do encéfalo associada principalmente com a correção rápida da hiponatremia, que se manifesta principalmente por tetraparesia espástica e paralisia pseudo-bulbar. Existem na literatura poucos relatos de MPC/MEP em pacientes sem evidências de distúrbios hidro-eletrolíticos. Relatamos o caso de um paciente de 39 anos de idade, com história de alcoolismo intenso, com quadro de rápida evolução com tetraparesia espástica associada a paresia de diversos nervos cranianos, com exame de ressonância magnética demonstrando lesões compatíveis com MPC/MEP. Houve boa evolução clínica após tratamento com costicosteróide.Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM and extra-pontine myelinolysis (EPM are different presentations of a demyelinating disorder of the brain more commonly associated with rapid correction of hyponatremia, spastic tetraparesia and pseudo-bulbar palsy. There are in the literature a few cases of CPM/EPM in patients without electrolyte disturbances. We report the case of a 39 year-old man with severe alcoholism, who presented with spastic tetraparesis and palsy of several cranial nerves, associated with lesions in the magnetic resonance compatible with CPM/EPM. The patient had a good follow-up after pulse therapy with corticosteroids.

  14. Insulin aggregation tracked by its intrinsic TRES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Li Hung C.; Birch, David J. S.; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav; Ryadnov, Maxim G.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2017-12-01

    Time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) have been used to detect conformational changes of intrinsic tyrosines within bovine insulin at a physiological pH. The approach offers the ability to detect the initial stages of insulin aggregation at the molecular level. The data analysis has revealed the existence of at least three fluorescent species undergoing dielectric relaxation and significant spectral changes due to insulin aggregation. The results indicate the suitability of the intrinsic TRES approach for insulin studies and for monitoring its stability during storage and aggregation in insulin delivery devices.

  15. Intrinsic viscosity of a suspension of cubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mallavajula, Rajesh K.

    2013-11-06

    We report on the viscosity of a dilute suspension of cube-shaped particles. Irrespective of the particle size, size distribution, and surface chemistry, we find empirically that cubes manifest an intrinsic viscosity [η]=3.1±0.2, which is substantially higher than the well-known value for spheres, [η]=2.5. The orientation-dependent intrinsic viscosity of cubic particles is determined theoretically using a finite-element solution of the Stokes equations. For isotropically oriented cubes, these calculations show [η]=3.1, in excellent agreement with our experimental observations. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  16. Intrinsic entropy perturbations from the dark sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celoria, Marco; Comelli, Denis; Pilo, Luigi

    2018-03-01

    Perfect fluids are modeled by using an effective field theory approach which naturally gives a self-consistent and unambiguous description of the intrinsic non-adiabatic contribution to pressure variations. We study the impact of intrinsic entropy perturbation on the superhorizon dynamics of the curvature perturbation Script R in the dark sector. The dark sector, made of dark matter and dark energy is described as a single perfect fluid. The non-perturbative vorticity's dynamics and the Weinberg theorem violation for perfect fluids are also studied.

  17. A model of intrinsic symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Li; Li, Sheng; George, Thomas F.; Sun, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Different from the symmetry breaking associated with a phase transition, which occurs when the controlling parameter is manipulated across a critical point, the symmetry breaking presented in this Letter does not need parameter manipulation. Instead, the system itself suddenly undergoes symmetry breaking at a certain time during its evolution, which is intrinsic symmetry breaking. Through a polymer model, it is revealed that the origin of the intrinsic symmetry breaking is nonlinearity, which produces instability at the instance when the evolution crosses an inflexion point, where this instability breaks the original symmetry

  18. History of allergic disease and epilepsy and risk of glioma and meningioma (INTERPHONE study group, Germany)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele; Schüz, Joachim; Blettner, Maria

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present analysis was to examine the association of a medical history of asthma, hay fever, eczema, or epilepsy with the risk of glioma and meningioma. Data of a German population-based case-control study included 381 meningioma cases, 366 glioma cases, and 1,494 controls....... Participants' histories of asthma, hay fever, eczema, and epilepsy and the respective ages at onset were asked during a personal interview. A small inverse association between allergic condition and both glioma (odds ratio: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.70-1.22) and meningioma (odd ratio: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.66-1.14) was found...

  19. Mobile phone use and glioma risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Guo, WenWen; Yang, ChunSheng; Tang, JianQin; Huang, Qian; Feng, ShouXin; Jiang, AiJun; Xu, XiFeng; Jiang, Guan

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have previously investigated the potential association between mobile phone use and the risk of glioma. However, results from these individual studies are inconclusive and controversial. The objective of our study was to investigate the potential association between mobile phone use and subsequent glioma risk using meta-analysis. We performed a systematic search of the Science Citation Index Embase and PubMed databases for studies reporting relevant data on mobile phone use and glioma in 1980-2016. The data were extracted and measured in terms of the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) using the random effects model. Subgroup analyses were also carried out. This meta-analysis eventually included 11 studies comprising a total 6028 cases and 11488 controls. There was a significant positive association between long-term mobile phone use (minimum, 10 years) and glioma (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.08-1.91). And there was a significant positive association between long-term ipsilateral mobile phone use and the risk of glioma (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.12-1.92). Long-term mobile phone use was associated with 2.22 times greater odds of low-grade glioma occurrence (OR = 2.22, 95% CI = 1.69-2.92). Mobile phone use of any duration was not associated with the odds of high-grade glioma (OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.72-0.92). Contralateral mobile phone use was not associated with glioma regardless of the duration of use. Similarly, this association was not observed when the analysis was limited to high-grade glioma. Our results suggest that long-term mobile phone use may be associated with an increased risk of glioma. There was also an association between mobile phone use and low-grade glioma in the regular use or long-term use subgroups. However, current evidence is of poor quality and limited quantity. It is therefore necessary to conduct large sample, high quality research or better characterization of any potential association between long-term ipsilateral mobile

  20. Assessment of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase mutational status in cerebral gliomas by in vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tietze, Anna; Oettingen, Gorm von; Sangill, Ryan

    concentrations in normal tissue or in gliomas with wildtype IDH. It has recently been shown that 2-HG is detectable non-invasively by clinical Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) [2]. The aim of our study is to establish 2-HG MRS in patients suspected for cerebral gliomas on a clinical Magnetic Resonance (MR......) system. Material and Methods: We performed pre-surgical MRS in four grade 3 glioma patients. A standard MR protocol was combined with an optimized MRS sequence (single-voxel point-resolved spectroscopy)[3]. Metabolite quantification was performed using an unsuppressed water signal as reference...

  1. Comprehensive investigation of CASK mutations and other genetic etiologies in 41 patients with intellectual disability and microcephaly with pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia (MICPCH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hayashi

    Full Text Available The CASK gene (Xp11.4 is highly expressed in the mammalian nervous system and plays several roles in neural development and synaptic function. Loss-of-function mutations of CASK are associated with intellectual disability and microcephaly with pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia (MICPCH, especially in females. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of 41 MICPCH patients, analyzed by mutational search of CASK and screening of candidate genes using an SNP array, targeted resequencing and whole-exome sequencing (WES. In total, we identified causative or candidate genomic aberrations in 37 of the 41 cases (90.2%. CASK aberrations including a rare mosaic mutation in a male patient, were found in 32 cases, and a mutation in ITPR1, another known gene in which mutations are causative for MICPCH, was found in one case. We also found aberrations involving genes other than CASK, such as HDAC2, MARCKS, and possibly HS3ST5, which may be associated with MICPCH. Moreover, the targeted resequencing screening detected heterozygous variants in RELN in two cases, of uncertain pathogenicity, and WES analysis suggested that concurrent mutations of both DYNC1H1 and DCTN1 in one case could lead to MICPCH. Our results not only identified the etiology of MICPCH in nearly all the investigated patients but also suggest that MICPCH is a genetically heterogeneous condition, in which CASK inactivating mutations appear to account for the majority of cases.

  2. Promoter Methylation Analysis of IDH Genes in Human Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Simon; Lee, Maggie; Li, Cheryl C Y; Suter, Catherine M; Buckland, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-1 or -2 are found in the majority of WHO grade II and III astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, and secondary glioblastomas. Almost all described mutations are heterozygous missense mutations affecting a conserved arginine residue in the substrate binding site of IDH1 (R132) or IDH2 (R172). But the exact mechanism of IDH mutations in neoplasia is not understood. It has been proposed that IDH mutations impart a "toxic gain-of-function" to the mutant protein, however a dominant-negative effect of mutant IDH has also been described, implying that IDH may function as a tumor suppressor gene. As most, if not all, tumor suppressor genes are inactivated by epigenetic silencing, in a wide variety of tumors, we asked if IDH1 or IDH2 carry the epigenetic signature of a tumor suppressor by assessing cytosine methylation at their promoters. Methylation was quantified in 68 human brain tumors, including both IDH-mutant and IDH wildtype, by bisulfite pyrosequencing. In all tumors examined, CpG methylation levels were less than 8%. Our data demonstrate that inactivation of IDH function through promoter hypermethylation is not common in human gliomas and other brain tumors. These findings do not support a tumor suppressor role for IDH genes in human gliomas.

  3. Promoter methylation analysis of IDH genes in human gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eFlanagan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH -1 or -2 are found in the majority of WHO grade II and III astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, and secondary glioblastomas. Almost all described mutations are heterozygous missense mutations affecting a conserved arginine residue in the substrate binding site of IDH1 (R132 or IDH2 (R172. But the exact mechanism of IDH mutations in neoplasia is not understood. It has been proposed that IDH mutations impart a ‘toxic gain of function’ to the mutant protein, however a dominant-negative effect of mutant IDH has also been described, implying that IDH may function as a tumour suppressor gene. As most, if not all, tumour suppressor genes are inactivated by epigenetic silencing, in a wide variety of tumours, we asked if IDH1 or IDH2 carry the epigenetic signature of a tumour suppressor by assessing cytosine methylation at their promoters. Methylation was quantified in 68 human brain tumours, including both IDH-mutant and IDH wildtype, by bisulfite pyrosequencing. In all tumours examined, CpG methylation levels were less than 8%. Our data demonstrate that inactivation of IDH function through promoter hypermethylation is not common in human gliomas and other brain tumours. These findings do not support a tumour suppressor role for IDH genes in human gliomas.

  4. Resveratrol Represses Pokemon Expression in Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yutao; Cui, Jiajun; Xue, Feng; Overstreet, Anne-Marie; Zhan, Yiping; Shan, Dapeng; Li, Hui; Li, Hui; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Mengmeng; Yu, Chunjiang; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2016-03-01

    POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (Pokemon), an important proto-oncoprotein, is a transcriptional repressor that regulates the expression of many genes and plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Resveratrol (RSV), a natural polyphenolic compound, has many beneficial biological effects on health. In this study, we investigated the role of Pokemon in RSV-induced biological effects and the effect of RSV on the expression of Pokemon in glioma cells. We found that overexpression of Pokemon decreased RSV-induced cell apoptosis, senescence, and anti-proliferative effects. Moreover, we showed that RSV could efficiently decrease the activity of the Pokemon promoter and the expression of Pokemon. Meanwhile, RSV also inhibited Sp1 DNA binding activity to the Pokemon promoter; whereas, it did not influence the expression and nuclear translocation of Sp1. In addition, we found that RSV could increase the recruitment of HDAC1, but decreased p300 to the Pokemon promoter. Taken together, all these results extended our understanding on the anti-cancer mechanism of RSV in glioma cells.

  5. Promoter Methylation Analysis of IDH Genes in Human Gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, Simon; Lee, Maggie; Li, Cheryl C. Y.; Suter, Catherine M.; Buckland, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-1 or -2 are found in the majority of WHO grade II and III astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, and secondary glioblastomas. Almost all described mutations are heterozygous missense mutations affecting a conserved arginine residue in the substrate binding site of IDH1 (R132) or IDH2 (R172). But the exact mechanism of IDH mutations in neoplasia is not understood. It has been proposed that IDH mutations impart a “toxic gain-of-function” to the mutant protein, however a dominant-negative effect of mutant IDH has also been described, implying that IDH may function as a tumor suppressor gene. As most, if not all, tumor suppressor genes are inactivated by epigenetic silencing, in a wide variety of tumors, we asked if IDH1 or IDH2 carry the epigenetic signature of a tumor suppressor by assessing cytosine methylation at their promoters. Methylation was quantified in 68 human brain tumors, including both IDH-mutant and IDH wildtype, by bisulfite pyrosequencing. In all tumors examined, CpG methylation levels were less than 8%. Our data demonstrate that inactivation of IDH function through promoter hypermethylation is not common in human gliomas and other brain tumors. These findings do not support a tumor suppressor role for IDH genes in human gliomas.

  6. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from patients with glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhenjiang; Meng, Qingda; Bartek, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) may represent a viable source of T cells for the biological treatment of patients with gliomas. Glioma tissue was obtained from 16 patients, tumor cell lines were established, and TILs were expanded in 16/16 cases using a combination of IL-2/IL-15/IL-21....... Intracellular cytokine staining (ICS, IL-2, IL-17, TNFα and IFNγ production) as well as a cytotoxicity assay was used to detect TIL reactivity against autologous tumor cells or shared tumor-associated antigens (TAAs; i.e., NY-ESO-1, Survivin or EGFRvIII). TILs were analyzed by flow cytometry, including T......-cell receptor (TCR) Vβ family composition, exhaustion/activation and T-cell differentiation markers (CD45RA/CCR7). IL-2/IL-15/IL-21 expanded TILs exhibited a mixture of CD4+, CD8+, as well as CD3+ CD4-CD8- T cells with a predominant central memory CD45RA-CCR7+ phenotype. TIL showed low frequencies of T cells...

  7. Immune-Checkpoint Blockade and Active Immunotherapy for Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Ahn

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy has made tremendous progress, including promising results in patients with malignant gliomas. Nonetheless, the immunological microenvironment of the brain and tumors arising therein is still believed to be suboptimal for sufficient antitumor immune responses for a variety of reasons, including the operation of “immune-checkpoint” mechanisms. While these mechanisms prevent autoimmunity in physiological conditions, malignant tumors, including brain tumors, actively employ these mechanisms to evade from immunological attacks. Development of agents designed to unblock these checkpoint steps is currently one of the most active areas of cancer research. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the field of brain tumor immunology with particular foci in the area of immune-checkpoint mechanisms and development of active immunotherapy strategies. In the last decade, a number of specific monoclonal antibodies designed to block immune-checkpoint mechanisms have been developed and show efficacy in other cancers, such as melanoma. On the other hand, active immunotherapy approaches, such as vaccines, have shown encouraging outcomes. We believe that development of effective immunotherapy approaches should ultimately integrate those checkpoint-blockade agents to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic approaches. With these agents available, it is going to be quite an exciting time in the field. The eventual success of immunotherapies for brain tumors will be dependent upon not only an in-depth understanding of immunology behind the brain and brain tumors, but also collaboration and teamwork for the development of novel trials that address multiple layers of immunological challenges in gliomas.

  8. Immune-Checkpoint Blockade and Active Immunotherapy for Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Brian J. [Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Brain Tumor Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Pollack, Ian F. [Brain Tumor Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Okada, Hideho, E-mail: okadah@upmc.edu [Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Brain Tumor Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has made tremendous progress, including promising results in patients with malignant gliomas. Nonetheless, the immunological microenvironment of the brain and tumors arising therein is still believed to be suboptimal for sufficient antitumor immune responses for a variety of reasons, including the operation of “immune-checkpoint” mechanisms. While these mechanisms prevent autoimmunity in physiological conditions, malignant tumors, including brain tumors, actively employ these mechanisms to evade from immunological attacks. Development of agents designed to unblock these checkpoint steps is currently one of the most active areas of cancer research. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the field of brain tumor immunology with particular foci in the area of immune-checkpoint mechanisms and development of active immunotherapy strategies. In the last decade, a number of specific monoclonal antibodies designed to block immune-checkpoint mechanisms have been developed and show efficacy in other cancers, such as melanoma. On the other hand, active immunotherapy approaches, such as vaccines, have shown encouraging outcomes. We believe that development of effective immunotherapy approaches should ultimately integrate those checkpoint-blockade agents to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic approaches. With these agents available, it is going to be quite an exciting time in the field. The eventual success of immunotherapies for brain tumors will be dependent upon not only an in-depth understanding of immunology behind the brain and brain tumors, but also collaboration and teamwork for the development of novel trials that address multiple layers of immunological challenges in gliomas.

  9. [Optic chiasm glioma in children: Endocrine disorders in 14 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García García, Emilio; Márquez Vega, Catalina; Fajardo Cascos, Manuel; Venegas Moreno, Eva; Soto Moreno, Alfonso

    2016-05-20

    To describe the frequency of endocrine disorders in children with optic chiasm glioma and analyze related factors. Review of medical records by collecting sex, age, history of neurofibromatosis, clinical presentation, treatment of tumour, and presence of endocrine abnormalities. Statistical tests Wilcoxon and Fisher. 14 patients (6 female) with age at diagnosis of 0.5 to 7.0 years (mean±standard deviation: 2.97±2.32) and follow-up of 10.64±3.30 years (range 6.0 to 16.0). 12/14 presented endocrinopathy at follow-up: 8 precocious puberty, 5 hypopituitarism, and 5 obesity. The onset of deficits was related to the neuroophthalmological symptoms under the age of five (P=.02)and treatment of the tumour was required.(P=.03). Children with optic chiasm gliomas may present endocrine disorders from the time of diagnosis of the tumor and, in particular as they develop on. The most common of these is precocious puberty. Pituitary deficits are associated with more aggressive tumours (those presenting with neuroophthalmological signs and symptoms before the age of five and requiring treatment). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Future directions in the treatment of malignant gliomas with temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, M D

    2000-06-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is a new, orally administered, second-generation imidazotetrazine prodrug with essentially 100% oral bioavailability that has demonstrated meaningful efficacy and an acceptable safety profile in the treatment of patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. Because of its unique properties and broad spectrum of anticancer activity, preliminary studies are being conducted to evaluate the efficacy of TMZ in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents, radiation, or immunotherapy. The presence of de novo or acquired resistance to alkylating agents exhibited by malignant gliomas represents a serious impediment in the treatment of these tumors. This review discusses the mechanism of action of TMZ and strategies for overcoming pathways of resistance to this promising agent, including the use of TMZ in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents or radiation therapy, and exploration of alternate dosing schedules. Studies that have evaluated some of these strategies indicate that TMZ is a useful therapeutic option in patients with high-grade gliomas. Alternative approaches, including the use of high-dose TMZ with bone marrow transplantation and in combination with gene therapy, will also be discussed.

  11. Immune-Checkpoint Blockade and Active Immunotherapy for Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Brian J.; Pollack, Ian F.; Okada, Hideho

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has made tremendous progress, including promising results in patients with malignant gliomas. Nonetheless, the immunological microenvironment of the brain and tumors arising therein is still believed to be suboptimal for sufficient antitumor immune responses for a variety of reasons, including the operation of “immune-checkpoint” mechanisms. While these mechanisms prevent autoimmunity in physiological conditions, malignant tumors, including brain tumors, actively employ these mechanisms to evade from immunological attacks. Development of agents designed to unblock these checkpoint steps is currently one of the most active areas of cancer research. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the field of brain tumor immunology with particular foci in the area of immune-checkpoint mechanisms and development of active immunotherapy strategies. In the last decade, a number of specific monoclonal antibodies designed to block immune-checkpoint mechanisms have been developed and show efficacy in other cancers, such as melanoma. On the other hand, active immunotherapy approaches, such as vaccines, have shown encouraging outcomes. We believe that development of effective immunotherapy approaches should ultimately integrate those checkpoint-blockade agents to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic approaches. With these agents available, it is going to be quite an exciting time in the field. The eventual success of immunotherapies for brain tumors will be dependent upon not only an in-depth understanding of immunology behind the brain and brain tumors, but also collaboration and teamwork for the development of novel trials that address multiple layers of immunological challenges in gliomas

  12. SVM-based glioma grading. Optimization by feature reduction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoellner, Frank G.; Schad, Lothar R. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Emblem, Kyrre E. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Boston MA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Oslo Univ. Hospital (Norway). The Intervention Center

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the predictive power of feature reduction analysis approaches in support vector machine (SVM)-based classification of glioma grade. In 101 untreated glioma patients, three analytic approaches were evaluated to derive an optimal reduction in features; (i) Pearson's correlation coefficients (PCC), (ii) principal component analysis (PCA) and (iii) independent component analysis (ICA). Tumor grading was performed using a previously reported SVM approach including whole-tumor cerebral blood volume (CBV) histograms and patient age. Best classification accuracy was found using PCA at 85% (sensitivity = 89%, specificity = 84%) when reducing the feature vector from 101 (100-bins rCBV histogram + age) to 3 principal components. In comparison, classification accuracy by PCC was 82% (89%, 77%, 2 dimensions) and 79% by ICA (87%, 75%, 9 dimensions). For improved speed (up to 30%) and simplicity, feature reduction by all three methods provided similar classification accuracy to literature values ({proportional_to}87%) while reducing the number of features by up to 98%. (orig.)

  13. Recruited cells can become transformed and overtake PDGF-induced murine gliomas in vivo during tumor progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena I Fomchenko

    Full Text Available Gliomas are thought to form by clonal expansion from a single cell-of-origin, and progression-associated mutations to occur in its progeny cells. Glioma progression is associated with elevated growth factor signaling and loss of function of tumor suppressors Ink4a, Arf and Pten. Yet, gliomas are cellularly heterogeneous; they recruit and trap normal cells during infiltration.We performed lineage tracing in a retrovirally mediated, molecularly and histologically accurate mouse model of hPDGFb-driven gliomagenesis. We were able to distinguish cells in the tumor that were derived from the cell-of-origin from those that were not. Phenotypic, tumorigenic and expression analyses were performed on both populations of these cells. Here we show that during progression of hPDGFb-induced murine gliomas, tumor suppressor loss can expand the recruited cell population not derived from the cell-of-origin within glioma microenvironment to dominate regions of the tumor, with essentially no contribution from the progeny of glioma cell-of-origin. Moreover, the recruited cells can give rise to gliomas upon transplantation and passaging, acquire polysomal expression profiles and genetic aberrations typically present in glioma cells rather than normal progenitors, aid progeny cells in glioma initiation upon transplantation, and become independent of PDGFR signaling.These results indicate that non-cell-of-origin derived cells within glioma environment in the mouse can be corrupted to become bona fide tumor, and deviate from the generally established view of gliomagenesis.

  14. Expression of WW domain-containing protein 2 is correlated with pathological grade and recurrence of glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jun; Qi, Wei-Feng; Xie, Shao; Wang, Wei-Feng; Zhang, Xian-Li; Zhou, Xiu-Ping; Hu, Jin-Xia; Yu, Ru-Tong

    2017-01-01

    WW domain-containing protein 2 (WWP2) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, which belongs to the NEDD4-like protein family. Recently, it is reported to play a key role in tumorigenesis and development of tumors such as prostate and lung cancer. However, there has been not related report on glioma until now. The aim of this study is to detect the expression of WWP2 and analyze its correlation to the pathological grade and tumor recurrence in patients with glioma. Western blot and immunohistochemistry were separately used to detect the expression of WWP2 protein in 31 brain glioma tissue samples and 80 brain glioma paraffin specimens. The method of Kaplan-Meier was used to analyze the correlation between the WWP2 expression and glioma recurrence. The protein expression level of WWP2 in glioma tissue was significantly higher than that in nontumorous brain tissue (P level of WWP2 in high-grade glioma (Grade III-IV) was significantly higher than that in low-grade glioma (Grade I-II) (P study suggests that WWP2 may play a role in the genesis and development of glioma; it may be a potential biomarker to predict pathological grade and tumor recurrence in patients with glioma.

  15. Investigation of adhesion and mechanical properties of human glioma cells by single cell force spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Laura; Bourkoula, Eugenia; Migliorini, Elisa; Palma, Anita; Pucer, Anja; Skrap, Miran; Scoles, Giacinto; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela; Lazzarino, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Active cell migration and invasion is a peculiar feature of glioma that makes this tumor able to rapidly infiltrate into the surrounding brain tissue. In our recent work, we identified a novel class of glioma-associated-stem cells (defined as GASC for high-grade glioma--HG--and Gasc for low-grade glioma--LG) that, although not tumorigenic, act supporting the biological aggressiveness of glioma-initiating stem cells (defined as GSC for HG and Gsc for LG) favoring also their motility. Migrating cancer cells undergo considerable molecular and cellular changes by remodeling their cytoskeleton and cell interactions with surrounding environment. To get a better understanding about the role of the glioma-associated-stem cells in tumor progression, cell deformability and interactions between glioma-initiating stem cells and glioma-associated-stem cells were investigated. Adhesion of HG/LG-cancer cells on HG/LG-glioma-associated stem cells was studied by time-lapse microscopy, while cell deformability and cell-cell adhesion strengths were quantified by indentation measurements by atomic force microscopy and single cell force spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that for both HG and LG glioma, cancer-initiating-stem cells are softer than glioma-associated-stem cells, in agreement with their neoplastic features. The adhesion strength of GSC on GASC appears to be significantly lower than that observed for Gsc on Gasc. Whereas, GSC spread and firmly adhere on Gasc with an adhesion strength increased as compared to that obtained on GASC. These findings highlight that the grade of glioma-associated-stem cells plays an important role in modulating cancer cell adhesion, which could affect glioma cell migration, invasion and thus cancer aggressiveness. Moreover this work provides evidence about the importance of investigating cell adhesion and elasticity for new developments in disease diagnostics and therapeutics.

  16. Frustration-induced protein intrinsic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Katsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2013-03-14

    Spontaneous folding into a specific native structure is the most important property of protein to perform their biological functions within organisms. Spontaneous folding is understood on the basis of an energy landscape picture based on the minimum frustration principle. Therefore, frustration seemingly only leads to protein functional disorder. However, frustration has recently been suggested to have a function in allosteric regulation. Functional frustration has the possibility to be a key to our deeper understanding of protein function. To explore another functional frustration, we theoretically examined structural frustration, which is designed to induce intrinsic disorder of a protein and its function through the coupled folding and binding. We extended the Wako-Saitô-Muñoz-Eaton model to take into account a frustration effect. With the model, we analyzed the binding part of neuron-restrictive silencer factor and showed that designed structural frustration in it induces intrinsic disorder. Furthermore, we showed that the folding and the binding are cooperative in interacting with a target protein. The cooperativity enables an intrinsically disordered protein to exhibit a sharp switch-like folding response to binding chemical potential change. Through this switch-like response, the structural frustration may contribute to the regulation function of interprotein interaction of the intrinsically disordered protein.

  17. Simple intrinsic defects in InAs :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2013-03-01

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in indium arsenide, InAs, as computed by density functional theory using semi-local density functionals, intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models.

  18. INTRINSIC AND EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION IN THE SELECTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A psychological perspective is considered that applies intrinsic and extrinsic motivational concepts to communication phenomena. The paper also tries to develop an analytical understanding of human communication-related behavior with respect to the two types of motives. Proposals are also put forward to communication ...

  19. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation among Collegiate Instrumentalists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather and compare information on measures of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation among instrumentalists enrolled in collegiate ensembles. A survey instrument was developed to gather information concerning demographic data and responses to questions on motivational preference. Participants were undergraduate and…

  20. A rotational integral formula for intrinsic volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Eva Bjørn Vedel; Rataj, J.

    2008-01-01

    A rotational version of the famous Crofton formula is derived. The motivation for deriving the formula comes from local stereology, a new branch of stereology based on sections through fixed reference points. The formula shows how rotational averages of intrinsic volumes measured on sections...

  1. Original Paper Detecting Nosocomial Intrinsic Infections through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-20

    Apr 20, 2011 ... Key Words: Bacterial pathogens, Endogenous indicators, NosocomiaI infection, Surgery. Received 30 October 2010/ Accepted 30 March 2011. INTRODUCTION. Micro-organisms from intrinsic and extrinsic sources have been known to cause nosocomial infections (CDC, 1991). The human body enables.

  2. Organisational Learning and Employees' Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedios, Richard; Boreham, Nick

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effects of organisational learning initiatives on employee motivation. Four initiatives consistent with theories of organisational learning were a priori ranked in terms of concepts that underpin intrinsic-motivation theory. Eighteen employees in a UK petrochemical company were interviewed to ascertain their experiences of…

  3. Intrinsic Motivation, Organizational Justice, and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, Kalli; Narayan, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    For employees to generate creative ideas that are not only original, but also useful to their company, they must interact with their workplace environment to determine organizational needs. Therefore, it is important to consider aspects of the individual as well as their environment when studying creativity. Intrinsic motivation, a predictor of…

  4. Discovery of Intrinsic Primitives on Triangle Meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Solomon, Justin

    2011-04-01

    The discovery of meaningful parts of a shape is required for many geometry processing applications, such as parameterization, shape correspondence, and animation. It is natural to consider primitives such as spheres, cylinders and cones as the building blocks of shapes, and thus to discover parts by fitting such primitives to a given surface. This approach, however, will break down if primitive parts have undergone almost-isometric deformations, as is the case, for example, for articulated human models. We suggest that parts can be discovered instead by finding intrinsic primitives, which we define as parts that posses an approximate intrinsic symmetry. We employ the recently-developed method of computing discrete approximate Killing vector fields (AKVFs) to discover intrinsic primitives by investigating the relationship between the AKVFs of a composite object and the AKVFs of its parts. We show how to leverage this relationship with a standard clustering method to extract k intrinsic primitives and remaining asymmetric parts of a shape for a given k. We demonstrate the value of this approach for identifying the prominent symmetry generators of the parts of a given shape. Additionally, we show how our method can be modified slightly to segment an entire surface without marking asymmetric connecting regions and compare this approach to state-of-the-art methods using the Princeton Segmentation Benchmark. © 2011 The Author(s).

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Isolated From Human Gliomas Increase Proliferation and Maintain Stemness of Glioma Stem Cells Through the IL-6/gp130/STAT3 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Anwar; Gumin, Joy; Gao, Feng; Figueroa, Javier; Shinojima, Naoki; Takezaki, Tatsuya; Priebe, Waldemar; Villarreal, Diana; Kang, Seok-Gu; Joyce, Celine; Sulman, Erik; Wang, Qianghu; Marini, Frank C; Andreeff, Michael; Colman, Howard; Lang, Frederick F

    2015-08-01

    Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been implicated as stromal components of several cancers, their ultimate contribution to tumorigenesis and their potential to drive cancer stem cells, particularly in the unique microenvironment of human brain tumors, remain largely undefined. Consequently, using established criteria, we isolated glioma-associated-human MSCs (GA-hMSCs) from fresh human glioma surgical specimens for the first time. We show that these GA-hMSCs are nontumorigenic stromal cells that are phenotypically similar to prototypical bone marrow-MSCs. Low-passage genomic sequencing analyses comparing GA-hMSCs with matched tumor-initiating glioma stem cells (GSCs) suggest that most GA-hMSCs (60%) are normal cells recruited to the tumor (group 1 GA-hMSCs), although, rarely (10%), GA-hMSCs may differentiate directly from GSCs (group 2 GA-hMSCs) or display genetic patterns intermediate between these groups (group 3 GA-hMSCs). Importantly, GA-hMSCs increase proliferation and self-renewal of GSCs in vitro and enhance GSC tumorigenicity and mesenchymal features in vivo, confirming their functional significance within the GSC niche. These effects are mediated by GA-hMSC-secreted interleukin-6, which activates STAT3 in GSCs. Our results establish GA-hMSCs as a potentially new stromal component of gliomas that drives the aggressiveness of GSCs, and point to GA-hMSCs as a novel therapeutic target within gliomas. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  6. A population-based study of high-grade gliomas and mutated isocitrate dehydrogenase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlrot, Rikke H; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Hjelmborg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    High-grade gliomas have a dismal prognosis, and prognostic factors are needed to optimize treatment algorithms. In this study we identified clinical prognostic factors as well as the prognostic value of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) status in a population-based group of patients with high......-grade gliomas. Using the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Pathology Databank we identified 359 patients: 234 had WHO grade IV gliomas, 58 had WHO grade III gliomas, and 67 were diagnosed clinically. Mutated IDH1 was predominantly observed in oligodendroglial tumors (WHO grade III). Patients with mutated...... IDH1 had a significantly better outcome than patients with wildtype IDH1: 2-year OS 59% and 18%, respectively (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.21-0.68). However, when adjusting for other prognostic factors, IDH1 status was not a significant independent prognostic factor (HR=0.58, 95% CI 0.32-1.07). Young age...

  7. Determining optimal treatment strategy for diffuse glioma: the emerging role of IDH mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juratli, Tareq A; Cahill, Daniel P; McCutcheon, Ian E

    2015-06-01

    The isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) genes mutate frequently in gliomas, and it has become increasingly apparent that IDH mutation status accounts for much of the prognostic information previously rendered by histological grading. Most glioblastomas (90-95%) are IDH wild-type and most lower-grade diffuse gliomas (80%) are IDH-mutant. We examine here how IDH mutation status interacts with treatments known to influence survival (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy) in patients with gliomas, and the impact of the IDH mutations on patients' survival after such treatments. IDH mutations is associated with more complete surgical resection of enhancing disease, and with a better response to RT. In addition, there is increasing clinical evidence that, in certain contexts, IDH mutations predict chemotherapeutic sensitivity. Mutations in IDH and other genes are beginning to drive decisions on therapy for diffuse gliomas and will likely allow tailoring of treatment by molecular profile in the future.

  8. Malignant cerebral glioma. Pt. 1: Survival, disability, and morbidity after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Elizabeth; Clarke, Charles; Hopkins, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    The objective was to describe survival, disability, and morbidity after radiotherapy for malignant glioma. Severely disabled patients gain little physical benefit from radiotherapy, whereas those not so disabled may experience considerable adverse effects. (Author)

  9. Inter-hemispheric language functional reorganization in low-grade glioma patients after tumour surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kristo, Gert; Raemaekers, Mathijs; Rutten, Geert-Jan; de Gelder, Beatrice; Ramsey, Nick F.

    Despite many claims of functional reorganization following tumour surgery, empirical studies that investigate changes in functional activation patterns are rare. This study investigates whether functional recovery following surgical treatment in patients with a low-grade glioma in the left

  10. Disruption of NF-κB signaling by fluoxetine attenuates MGMT expression in glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song T

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tao Song,1 Hui Li,2 Zhiliang Tian,3 Chaojiu Xu,4 Jingfang Liu,1 Yong Guo1 1Department of Neurosurgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 2Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Medical School of Jishou University, 3Department of Neurosurgery, 4Department of Oncology, The Hospital of Xiangxi Autonomous Prefecture, Jishou, People’s Republic of China Background: Resistance to temozolomide (TMZ in glioma is modulated by the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT. This study aimed to examine the effects of fluoxetine (FLT on MGMT expression in glioma cells and to investigate its underlying mechanisms.Materials and methods: Expression of MGMT, GluR1, or IκB kinase β (IKKβ was attenuated using short hairpin RNA-mediated gene knockdown. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol -2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay was used to evaluate the growth inhibition induced by FLT or TMZ. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL was conducted to detect apoptotic cells. Western blotting was conducted to analyze the protein expression of MGMT, IKKβ, and NF-κB/p65 following FLT treatment. The murine subcutaneous xenograft model was used to evaluate the combinational effect of TMZ and FLT.Results: FLT markedly reduced MGMT expression in glioma cells, which was independent of GluR1 receptor function. Further, FLT disrupted NF-κB/p65 signaling in glioma cells and consequently attenuated NF-κB/p65 activity in regulating MGMT expression. Importantly, FLT sensitized MGMT-expressing glioma cells to TMZ, as FLT enhanced TMZ’s ability to impair the in vitro tumorigenic potential and to induce apoptosis in glioma cells. Knockdown of MGMT or IKKβ expression abolished the synergistic effect of FLT with TMZ in glioma cells, which suggested that FLT might sensitize glioma cells to TMZ through down-regulation of MGMT expression. Consistently, TMZ combined with FLT markedly attenuated NF

  11. Akt- or MEK-mediated mTOR inhibition suppresses Nf1 optic glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Aparna; Toonen, Joseph A; Cimino, Patrick J; Gianino, Scott M; Gutmann, David H

    2015-06-01

    Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) develop optic pathway gliomas, which result from impaired NF1 protein regulation of Ras activity. One obstacle to the implementation of biologically targeted therapies is an incomplete understanding of the individual contributions of the downstream Ras effectors (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase [MEK], Akt) to optic glioma maintenance. This study was designed to address the importance of MEK and Akt signaling to Nf1 optic glioma growth. Primary neonatal mouse astrocyte cultures were employed to determine the consequence of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt and MEK inhibition on Nf1-deficient astrocyte growth. Nf1 optic glioma-bearing mice were used to assess the effect of Akt and MEK inhibition on tumor volume, proliferation, and retinal ganglion cell dysfunction. Both MEK and Akt were hyperactivated in Nf1-deficient astrocytes in vitro and in Nf1 murine optic gliomas in vivo. Pharmacologic PI3K or Akt inhibition reduced Nf1-deficient astrocyte proliferation to wild-type levels, while PI3K inhibition decreased Nf1 optic glioma volume and proliferation. Akt inhibition of Nf1-deficient astrocyte and optic glioma growth reflected Akt-dependent activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Sustained MEK pharmacologic blockade also attenuated Nf1-deficient astrocytes as well as Nf1 optic glioma volume and proliferation. Importantly, these MEK inhibitory effects resulted from p90RSK-mediated, Akt-independent mTOR activation. Finally, both PI3K and MEK inhibition reduced optic glioma-associated retinal ganglion cell loss and nerve fiber layer thinning. These findings establish that the convergence of 2 distinct Ras effector pathways on mTOR signaling maintains Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth, supporting the evaluation of pharmacologic inhibitors that target mTOR function in future human NF1-optic pathway glioma clinical trials. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  12. Comparison of Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging and Arterial Spin Labeling MR Imaging in Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuankai Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas grading is important for treatment plan; we aimed to investigate the application of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI in gliomas grading, by comparing with the three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (3D pCASL. 24 patients (13 high grade gliomas and 11 low grade gliomas underwent IVIM DWI and 3D pCASL imaging before operation; maps of fast diffusion coefficient (D∗, slow diffusion coefficient (D, fractional perfusion-related volume (f, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC as well as cerebral blood flow (CBF were calculated and then coregistered to generate the corresponding parameter values. We found CBF and D∗ were higher in the high grade gliomas, whereas ADC, D, and f were lower (all P0.05. IVIM DWI showed more efficiency than 3D pCASL but less validity than conventional DWI in differentiating the high from low grade gliomas.

  13. The comparison of clinical and biological characteristics between IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hao-Yuan; Tang, Kai; Liang, Ting-Yu; Zhang, Wei-Zhong; Li, Ji-Ye; Wang, Wen; Hu, Hui-Min; Li, Ming-Yang; Wang, Hui-Qing; He, Xiao-Zheng; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Yan-Wei; Zhang, Shi-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) are frequent in low-grade gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (sGBM). Because they yield the same oncometabolite, D-2-hydroxyglutarate, they are often treated as equivalent and pooled. The objective of this study was to provide insight into the differences between IDH1 and IDH2 mutant gliomas. Methods To investigate the different clinical and molecular characterization between IDH1 mutant and IDH2 ...

  14. CXCR7 is induced by hypoxia and mediates glioma cell migration towards SDF-1α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esencay, Mine; Sarfraz, Yasmeen; Zagzag, David

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas, the most common and malignant brain tumors of the central nervous system, exhibit high invasive capacity, which hinders effective therapy. Therefore, intense efforts aimed at improved therapeutics are ongoing to delineate the molecular mechanisms governing glioma cell migration and invasion. In order to perform the studies, we employed optimal cell culture methods and hypoxic conditions, lentivirus-mediated knockdown of protein expression, Western Blot analysis, migration assays and immunoprecipitation. We determined statistical significance by unpaired t-test. In this report, we show that U87MG, LN229 and LN308 glioma cells express CXCR7 and that exposure to hypoxia upregulates CXCR7 protein expression in these cell lines. CXCR7-expressing U87MG, LN229 and LN308 glioma cells migrated towards stromal-derived factor (SDF)-1α/CXCL12 in hypoxic conditions in the Boyden chamber assays. While shRNA-mediated knockdown of CXCR7 expression did not affect the migration of any of the three cell lines in normoxic conditions, we observed a reduction in the migration of LN229 and LN308, but not U87MG, glioma cells towards SDF-1α in hypoxic conditions. In addition, knockdown of CXCR7 expression in LN229 and LN308 glioma cells decreased levels of SDF-1α-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. Inhibiting CXCR4 in LN229 and LN308 glioma cells that were knocked down for CXCR7 did not further reduce migration towards SDF-1α in hypoxic conditions and did not affect the levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and Akt. Analysis of immunoprecipitated CXCR4 from LN229 and LN308 glioma cells revealed co-precipitated CXCR7. Taken together, our findings indicate that both CXCR4 and CXCR7 mediate glioma cell migration towards SDF-1α in hypoxic conditions and support the development of therapeutic agents targeting these receptors

  15. Premature Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation Requires AKT Activity and Reactive Oxygen Species in Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Je Jung; Kim, Bong Cho; Yoo, Hee Jung; Lee, Jae Seon

    2010-01-01

    Loss of PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene has frequently observed in human gliomas, which conferred AKT activation and resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and anti-cancer drugs. Recent reports have shown that AKT activation induces premature senescence through increase of oxygen consumption and inhibition of expression of ROS scavenging enzymes. In this study, we compared cellular response to IR in the PTEN-deficient U87, U251, U373 or PTEN-proficient LN18, LN428 glioma cells

  16. Effect of Aspirin and Indomethacin on Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis in C6 Glioma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Shiuh-Lin; Lee, Kung-Shing; Lin, Chih-Lung; Lieu, Ann-Shung; Cheng, Chi-Yun; Loh, Joon-Khim; Hwang, Yan-Fen; Su, Yu-Feng; Howng, Shen-Long

    2004-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) plays an important role in immunosuppression and tumor growth. PGE2 inhibitors such as aspirin and indomethacin suppress experimental tumor growth. Little is known of the relationship between PGE2 synthesis in brain tumors and the dose of aspirin or indomethacin. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of different doses of aspirin and indomethacin on PGE2 synthesis in C6 glioma cells. C6 glioma cells were incubated with different concentrations (2, 4, ...

  17. International Differences in Treatment and Clinical Outcomes for High Grade Glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Chien, Li-Nien; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Gittleman, Haley; Lin, Jia-Wei; Sloan, Andrew E.; Barnett, Gene H.; Elder, J. Bradley; McPherson, Christopher; Warnick, Ronald; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Lin, Chieh-Min; Rogers, Lisa R.; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.

    2015-01-01

    Background High grade gliomas are the most common type of malignant brain tumor, and despite their rarity, cause significant morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to compare the treatment patterns of high grade glioma to examine survival patterns in patients who receive specific treatments between cohorts in Ohio and Taiwan. Method Patients aged 18 years and older at age of diagnosis with World Health Organization (WHO) grade III or IV astrocytoma from 2007-2012 were selected from the Ohi...

  18. Sirt2 suppresses glioma cell growth through targeting NF-κB–miR-21 axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ya’nan; Dai, Dongwei [Department of Neurosurgery, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Lu, Qiong; Fei, Mingyu [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Li, Mengmeng [Department of Rheumatology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Wu, Xi, E-mail: xiwuchh@sina.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression is down-regulated in human glioma tissues and cell lines. •Sirt2 regresses glioma cell growth and colony formation via inducing apoptosis. •miR-21 is essential for the functions of Sirt2 in glioma cells. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 to decrease miR-21 expression. -- Abstract: Sirtuins are NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylases that regulate numerous cellular processes including aging, DNA repair, cell cycle, metabolism, and survival under stress conditions. The roles of sirtuin family members are widely studied in carcinogenesis. However, their roles in glioma remain unclear. Here we report that Sir2 was under expressed in human glioma tissues and cell lines. We found that Sirt2 overexpression decreased cell proliferation and colony formation capacity. In addition, Sirt2 overexpression induced cellular apoptosis via up-regulating cleaved caspase 3 and Bax, and down-regulating anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Sirt2 knockdown obtained opposing results. We showed that Sirt2 overexpression inhibited miR-21 expression, and Sirt2 was not sufficient to reduce cell proliferation and colony formation as well as to induce apoptosis when miR-21 was knocked down in glioma cells. Mechanically, we demonstrated that Sirt2 deacetylated p65 at K310 and blocked p65 binding to the promoter region of miR-21, thus regressing the transcription of miR-21. In summary, Sirt2 is critical in human glioma via NF-κB–miR-21 pathway and Sirt2 activator may serve as candidate drug for glioma therapy.

  19. Alterations in gene expression profiles correlated with cisplatin cytotoxicity in the glioma U343 cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Oliveira Carminati; Stephano Spano Mello; Ana Lucia Fachin; Cristina Moraes Junta; Paula Sandrin-Garcia; Carlos Gilberto Carlotti; Eduardo Antonio Donadi; Geraldo Aleixo Silva Passos; Elza Tiemi Sakamoto-Hojo

    2010-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common tumors in the central nervous system, the average survival time of patients with glioblastoma multiforme being about 1 year from diagnosis, in spite of harsh therapy. Aiming to study the transcriptional profiles displayed by glioma cells undergoing cisplatin treatment, gene expression analysis was performed by the cDNA microarray method. Cell survival and apoptosis induction following treatment were also evaluated. Drug concentrations of 12.5 to 300 μM caused ...

  20. KDM2B overexpression correlates with poor prognosis and regulates glioma cell growth

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yiwei; Zang, Jin; Zhang, Dongyong; Sun, Zhenxiang; Qiu, Bo; Wang, Xiaojie

    2018-01-01

    Yiwei Wang,1 Jin Zang,1 Dongyong Zhang,2 Zhenxiang Sun,1 Bo Qiu,2 Xiaojie Wang1 1Department of Human Anatomy, Shenyang Medical College, Huanggu District, Shenyang City, 2Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Heping District, Shenyang City, Liaoning Province, ChinaBackground: Gliomas are one of the most lethal cancers in the human central nervous system. Despite clinical treatment advancements, the prognosis of patients with glioma remains ...