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Sample records for intrinsic hypoxia markers

  1. Endogenous markers of tumor hypoxia. Predictors of clinical radiation resistance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vordermark, D.; Brown, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Eppendorf electrode measurements of tumor oxygenation have defined an adverse effect of tumor hypoxia on prognosis after radiotherapy and other treatment modalities, in particular in head and neck and cervix carcinomas as well as soft tissue sarcomas. Recently, the immunohistochemical detection of proteins involved in the ''hypoxic response'' of tumor cells has been discussed as a method to estimate hypoxia in clinical tumor specimens. Material and Methods: This review focuses on clinical and experimental data, regarding prognostic impact and comparability with other methods of hypoxia detection, for three proteins suggested as endogenous markers of tumor hypoxia: hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA 9), and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Results: None of the three potential hypoxia markers is exclusively hypoxia-specific, and in each case protein can be detected under normoxic conditions in vitro. HIF-1α responds rapidly to hypoxia but also to reoxygenation, making this marker quite unstable in the context of clinical sample collection. The perinecrotic labeling pattern typical of chronic hypoxia and a reasonable agreement with injectable hypoxia markers such as pimonidazole have most consistently been described for CA 9. All three markers showed correlation with Eppendorf electrode measurements of tumor oxygenation in carcinoma of the cervix. In nine of 13 reports, among them all three that refer to curative radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, HIF-1α overexpression was associated with poor outcome. CA 9 was an adverse prognostic factor in cervix, head and neck and lung cancer, but not in two other head and neck cancer reports. GLUT1 predicted for poor survival in colorectal, cervix and lung cancer. Conclusion: Endogenous markers have the potential to indicate therapeutically relevant levels of hypoxia within tumors. Clinical trials assessing a marker's ability to predict a benefit from specific hypoxia

  2. Endogenous markers of tumor hypoxia. Predictors of clinical radiation resistance?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vordermark, D. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Brown, J.M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2003-12-01

    Background: Eppendorf electrode measurements of tumor oxygenation have defined an adverse effect of tumor hypoxia on prognosis after radiotherapy and other treatment modalities, in particular in head and neck and cervix carcinomas as well as soft tissue sarcomas. Recently, the immunohistochemical detection of proteins involved in the ''hypoxic response'' of tumor cells has been discussed as a method to estimate hypoxia in clinical tumor specimens. Material and Methods: This review focuses on clinical and experimental data, regarding prognostic impact and comparability with other methods of hypoxia detection, for three proteins suggested as endogenous markers of tumor hypoxia: hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA 9), and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Results: None of the three potential hypoxia markers is exclusively hypoxia-specific, and in each case protein can be detected under normoxic conditions in vitro. HIF-1{alpha} responds rapidly to hypoxia but also to reoxygenation, making this marker quite unstable in the context of clinical sample collection. The perinecrotic labeling pattern typical of chronic hypoxia and a reasonable agreement with injectable hypoxia markers such as pimonidazole have most consistently been described for CA 9. All three markers showed correlation with Eppendorf electrode measurements of tumor oxygenation in carcinoma of the cervix. In nine of 13 reports, among them all three that refer to curative radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, HIF-1{alpha} overexpression was associated with poor outcome. CA 9 was an adverse prognostic factor in cervix, head and neck and lung cancer, but not in two other head and neck cancer reports. GLUT1 predicted for poor survival in colorectal, cervix and lung cancer. Conclusion: Endogenous markers have the potential to indicate therapeutically relevant levels of hypoxia within tumors. Clinical trials assessing a marker's ability to predict a

  3. Understanding oceanic migrations with intrinsic biogeochemical markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raül Ramos

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Migratory marine vertebrates move annually across remote oceanic water masses crossing international borders. Many anthropogenic threats such as overfishing, bycatch, pollution or global warming put millions of marine migrants at risk especially during their long-distance movements. Therefore, precise knowledge about these migratory movements to understand where and when these animals are more exposed to human impacts is vital for addressing marine conservation issues. Because electronic tracking devices suffer from several constraints, mainly logistical and financial, there is emerging interest in finding appropriate intrinsic markers, such as the chemical composition of inert tissues, to study long-distance migrations and identify wintering sites. Here, using tracked pelagic seabirds and some of their own feathers which were known to be grown at different places and times within the annual cycle, we proved the value of biogeochemical analyses of inert tissue as tracers of marine movements and habitat use. Analyses of feathers grown in summer showed that both stable isotope signatures and element concentrations can signal the origin of breeding birds feeding in distinct water masses. However, only stable isotopes signalled water masses used during winter because elements mainly accumulated during the long breeding period are incorporated into feathers grown in both summer and winter. Our findings shed new light on the simple and effective assignment of marine organisms to distinct oceanic areas, providing new opportunities to study unknown migration patterns of secretive species, including in relation to human-induced mortality on specific populations in the marine environment.

  4. Tumor Hypoxia: Causative Mechanisms, Microregional Heterogeneities, and the Role of Tissue-Based Hypoxia Markers.

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    Vaupel, Peter; Mayer, Arnulf

    Tumor hypoxia is a hallmark of solid malignant tumor growth, profoundly influences malignant progression and contributes to the development of therapeutic resistance. Pathogenesis of tumor hypoxia is multifactorial, with contributions from both acute and chronic factors. Spatial distribution of hypoxia within tumors is markedly heterogeneous and often changes over time, e.g., during a course of radiotherapy. Substantial changes in the oxygenation status can occur within the distance of a few cell layers, explaining the inability of currently used molecular imaging techniques to adequately assess this crucial trait. Due to the possible importance of tumor hypoxia for clinical decision-making, there is a great demand for molecular tools which may provide the necessary resolution down to the single cell level. Exogenous and endogenous markers of tumor hypoxia have been investigated for this purpose. Their potential use may be greatly enhanced by multiparametric in situ methods in experimental and human tumor tissue.

  5. Noninvasive molecular imaging of hypoxia in human xenografts: comparing hypoxia-induced gene expression with endogenous and exogenous hypoxia markers.

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    He, Fuqiu; Deng, Xuelong; Wen, Bixiu; Liu, Yueping; Sun, Xiaorong; Xing, Ligang; Minami, Akiko; Huang, Yunhong; Chen, Qing; Zanzonico, Pat B; Ling, C Clifton; Li, Gloria C

    2008-10-15

    Tumor hypoxia is important in the development and treatment of human cancers. We have developed a novel xenograft model for studying and imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression. A hypoxia-inducible dual reporter herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and enhanced green fluorescence protein (HSV1-TKeGFP), under the control of hypoxia response element (9HRE), was stably transfected into human colorectal HT29 cancer cells. Selected clones were further enriched by repeated live cell sorting gated for hypoxia-induced eGFP expression. Fluorescent microscopy, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and radioactive substrate trapping assays showed strong hypoxia-induced expression of eGFP and HSV1-tk enzyme in the HT29-9HRE cells in vitro. Sequential micropositron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor-bearing animals, using the hypoxic cell tracer (18)F-FMISO and the reporter substrate (124)I-FIAU, yielded similar tumor hypoxia images for the HT29-9HRE xenograft but not in the parental HT29 tumor. Using autoradiography and IHC, detailed spatial distributions in tumor sections were obtained and compared for the following hypoxia-associated biomarkers in the HT29-9HRE xenograft: (124)I-FIAU, (18)F-FMISO, Hoechst (perfusion), lectin-TRITC (functional blood vessels), eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9. Intratumoral distributions of (124)I-FIAU and (18)F-FMISO were similar, and eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9 colocalized in the same areas but not in well-perfused regions that were positive for Hoechst and lectin-TRITC. In enabling the detection of hypoxia-induced molecular events and mapping their distribution in vivo with serial noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging, and multiple variable analysis with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy, this human xenograft model provides a valuable tool for studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future exogenous markers for tumor hypoxia.

  6. Pimonidazole: a novel hypoxia marker for complementary study of tumor hypoxia and tumor biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varia, Mahesh A.; Kennedy, Andrew S.; Calkins-Adams, Dennise P.; Rinker, Lillian; Novotny, Debra; Fowler, Wesley C.; Raleigh, James A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Tumor hypoxia appears to be associated with treatment resistance and with gene expression that may lead to hypoxia-mediated selection of tumor cells as a source for cell growth and metastases. The objective of this study was to develop complementary techniques of hypoxia detection with molecular markers of cell proliferation and metastases in order to investigate the role of tumor hypoxia in tumor biology. Materials and Methods: Pimonidazole is a 2-nitroimidazole which is reductively-activated and becomes covalently bound to thiol-containing proteins only in hypoxic cells. These adducts can be detected using immunohistochemistry, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay or flow cytometry as a measure of hypoxia in tumors. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis has been completed for five patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were given pimonidazole hydrochloride (0.5 g/m 2 intravenously) followed by cervical biopsies 24 hours later. Informed consent was obtained according to a protocol approved by the Institutional Review Board. A minimum of 3 random biopsies were obtained from the tumors and at least four sections examined from each biopsy site. Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue sections were immunostained for pimonidazole binding using a mouse monoclonal antibody. Commercially available monoclonal antibodies were used to detect cell proliferation markers MIB-1 (Ki-67) and to detect vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in tumor cells in contiguous sections. The extent of immunostaining was expressed as the percent of immunostained to total tumor cells as determined by Chalkley point counting. Results: No clinical toxicities were associated with pimonidazole infusion. Immunostaining with pimonidazole antibody was observed in all patients indicating the presence of tumor hypoxia. Qualitatively there is little or no overlap between the areas of hypoxia and proliferation. Quantitative data tabulated below show the

  7. [18F]-FMISO PET study of hypoxia in gliomas before surgery: correlation with molecular markers of hypoxia and angiogenesis

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    Bekaert, Lien [CHU de Caen, Department of Neurology, Caen (France); Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); CHU de Caen, Department of Neurosurgery, Caen (France); CHU de Caen, Service de Neurochirurgie, Caen (France); Valable, Samuel; Collet, Solene; Bordji, Karim; Petit, Edwige; Bernaudin, Myriam [Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele [Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); CHU de Caen, Department of Pathology, Caen (France); Ponte, Keven [CHU de Caen, Department of Neurosurgery, Caen (France); Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); Constans, Jean-Marc [Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); CHU de Caen, Department of Neuroradiology, Caen (France); Levallet, Guenaelle [CHU de Caen, Department of Pathology, Caen (France); Branger, Pierre [CHU de Caen, Department of Neurology, Caen (France); Emery, Evelyne [CHU de Caen, Department of Neurosurgery, Caen (France); Manrique, Alain [CHU de Caen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Barre, Louisa [Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/LDM-TEP group, Caen (France); Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien [CHU de Caen, Department of Neurology, Caen (France); Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); CHU de Nimes, Department of Neurology, Nimes (France)

    2017-08-15

    Hypoxia in gliomas is associated with tumor resistance to radio- and chemotherapy. However, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of hypoxia remains challenging, and the validation of biological markers is, therefore, of great importance. We investigated the relationship between uptake of the PET hypoxia tracer [18F]-FMISO and other markers of hypoxia and angiogenesis and with patient survival. In this prospective single center clinical study, 33 glioma patients (grade IV: n = 24, III: n = 3, and II: n = 6) underwent [18F]-FMISO PET and MRI including relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps before surgery. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and hypoxic volume were calculated, defining two groups of patients based on the presence or absence of [18F]-FMISO uptake. After surgery, molecular quantification of CAIX, VEGF, Ang2 (rt-qPCR), and HIF-1α (immunohistochemistry) were performed on tumor specimens. [18F]-FMISO PET uptake was closely linked to tumor grade, with high uptake in glioblastomas (GB, grade IV). Expression of biomarkers of hypoxia (CAIX, HIF-1α), and angiogenesis markers (VEGF, Ang2, rCBV) were significantly higher in the [18F]-FMISO uptake group. We found correlations between the degree of hypoxia (hypoxic volume and SUVmax) and expression of HIF-1α, CAIX, VEGF, Ang2, and rCBV (p < 0.01). Patients without [18F]-FMISO uptake had a longer survival time than uptake positive patients (log-rank, p < 0.005). Tumor hypoxia as evaluated by [18F]-FMISO PET is associated with the expression of hypoxia markers on a molecular level and is related to angiogenesis. [18F]-FMISO uptake is a mark of an aggressive tumor, almost always a glioblastoma. Our results underline that [18F]-FMISO PET could be useful to guide glioma treatment, and in particular radiotherapy, since hypoxia is a well-known factor of resistance. (orig.)

  8. A preclinical model for noninvasive imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression; comparison with an exogenous marker of tumor hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Bixiu; Burgman, Paul; Zanzonico, Pat; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Li, Gloria C.; Ling, C. Clifton; Cai Shangde; Finn, Ron; Serganova, Inna; Blasberg, Ronald; Gelovani, Juri

    2004-01-01

    Hypoxia is associated with tumor aggressiveness and is an important cause of resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Assays of tumor hypoxia could provide selection tools for hypoxia-modifying treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop and characterize a rodent tumor model with a reporter gene construct that would be transactivated by the hypoxia-inducible molecular switch, i.e., the upregulation of HIF-1. The reporter gene construct is the herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) fused with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the regulation of an artificial hypoxia-responsive enhancer/promoter. In this model, tumor hypoxia would up-regulate HIF-1, and through the hypoxia-responsive promoter transactivate the HSV1-tkeGFPfusion gene. The expression of this reporter gene can be assessed with the 124 I-labeled reporter substrate 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ( 124 I-FIAU), which is phosphorylated by the HSV1-tk enzyme and trapped in the hypoxic cells. Animal positron emission tomography (microPET) and phosphor plate imaging (PPI) were used in this study to visualize the trapped 124 I-FIAU, providing a distribution of the hypoxia-induced molecular events. The distribution of 124 I-FIAU was also compared with that of an exogenous hypoxic cell marker, 18 F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). Our results showed that 124 I-FIAU microPET imaging of the hypoxia-induced reporter gene expression is feasible, and that the intratumoral distributions of 124 I-FIAU and 18 F-FMISO are similar. In tumor sections, detailed radioactivity distributions were obtained with PPI which also showed similarity between 124 I-FIAU and 18 F-FMISO. This reporter system is sufficiently sensitive to detect hypoxia-induced transcriptional activation by noninvasive imaging and might provide a valuable tool in studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future exogenous markers for tumor hypoxia. (orig.)

  9. Identifying novel hypoxia-associated markers of chemoresistance in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEvoy, Lynda M.; O’Toole, Sharon A.; Spillane, Cathy D.; Martin, Cara M.; Gallagher, Michael F.; Stordal, Britta; Blackshields, Gordon; Sheils, Orla; O’Leary, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is associated with poor long-term survival due to late diagnosis and development of chemoresistance. Tumour hypoxia is associated with many features of tumour aggressiveness including increased cellular proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, increased invasion and metastasis, and chemoresistance, mostly mediated through hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. While HIF-1α has been associated with platinum resistance in a variety of cancers, including ovarian, relatively little is known about the importance of the duration of hypoxia. Similarly, the gene pathways activated in ovarian cancer which cause chemoresistance as a result of hypoxia are poorly understood. This study aimed to firstly investigate the effect of hypoxia duration on resistance to cisplatin in an ovarian cancer chemoresistance cell line model and to identify genes whose expression was associated with hypoxia-induced chemoresistance. Cisplatin-sensitive (A2780) and cisplatin-resistant (A2780cis) ovarian cancer cell lines were exposed to various combinations of hypoxia and/or chemotherapeutic drugs as part of a ‘hypoxia matrix’ designed to cover clinically relevant scenarios in terms of tumour hypoxia. Response to cisplatin was measured by the MTT assay. RNA was extracted from cells treated as part of the hypoxia matrix and interrogated on Affymetrix Human Gene ST 1.0 arrays. Differential gene expression analysis was performed for cells exposed to hypoxia and/or cisplatin. From this, four potential markers of chemoresistance were selected for evaluation in a cohort of ovarian tumour samples by RT-PCR. Hypoxia increased resistance to cisplatin in A2780 and A2780cis cells. A plethora of genes were differentially expressed in cells exposed to hypoxia and cisplatin which could be associated with chemoresistance. In ovarian tumour samples, we found trends for upregulation of ANGPTL4 in partial responders and down-regulation in non-responders compared with responders to chemotherapy; down

  10. Preclinical validation of 111In-girentuximab-F(ab')2 as a tracer to image hypoxia related marker CAIX expression in head and neck cancer xenografts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizing, F.J.; Hoeben, B.A.W.; Franssen, G.M.; Lok, J.; Heskamp, S.; Oosterwijk, E.; Boerman, O.C.; Bussink, J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Hypoxia is a major cause of radio- and chemoresistance. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is an endogenous hypoxia-related marker and an important prognostic marker. Assessment of CAIX expression may allow patient selection for hypoxia or CAIX-targeted treatment. The radioactive

  11. Role of cholinergic markers on memory function of rats exposed to hypobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuraju, Sangu; Maiti, Panchanan; Pati, Soumya; Solanki, Preeti; Sharma, Alpesh Kumar; Singh, Shashi Bala; Prasad, Dipti; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2011-12-15

    Hypobaric hypoxia is encountered at high altitude. It has a deleterious effect on cognitive functions. An important cause of memory impairment at high altitude is the impairment of neurotransmission. The present study investigates the role of cholinergic markers in hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment. Rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia at 6,100 m for 7 days in a simulated-decompression chamber. Memory performance was assessed using the Morris water maze task. Cholinergic markers such as acetylcholine, acetylcholinesterase, choline acetyltransferase, α-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and M(1) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor were also evaluated along with neuronal morphology and DNA fragmentation. We found impairment in memory function along with a decrease in acetylcholine levels, increase in acetylcholinesterase activity, down regulation of choline acetyltransferase, α-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and M(1) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. We also found that cellular damage is associated with a significant increase in DNA fragmentation. However, administration of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, such as physostigmine and galantamine, resulted in amelioration of the hypobaric hypoxia induced deleterious effects. It improved acetylcholine level, decreased acetylcholinesterase activity and increased the synthesis of acetylcholine by increasing choline acetyltransferase activity. Also, the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors improved neuronal morphology, perhaps by increasing the expression of α-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and by reducing the acetylcholinesterase level in the cortex and the hippocampus. Therefore, our results suggest cholinergic dysfunction is one of the mechanisms involved in hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment and that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors were able to restore cholinergic function and thus improve memory function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiosynthesis of [131I]IAZGP via nucleophilic substitution and its biological evaluation as a hypoxia marker - is specific activity a factor influencing hypoxia-mapping ability of a hypoxia marker?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suehiro, Makiko; Burgman, Paul; Carlin, Sean; Burke, Sean; Yang Guangbin; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Oehler-Janne, Christoph; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Ling, Clifton; Humm, John

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The hypoxia marker IAZGP, 1-(6-deoxy-6-iodo-β-D-galactopyranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole, has been labeled with 123 I/ 124 I/ 125 I/ 131 I via iodine-radioiodine exchange, which gives the radiotracer in a specific activity of 10-90 MBq/μmol. We synthesized the same radiotracer possessing several hundred to thousand times higher specific activity (high-SA IAZGP) via nucleophilic substitution and compared its biological behavior with that of conventionally produced IAZGP (low-SA IAZGP) to determine if specific activity is a factor influencing cell uptake kinetics, biodistribution and intratumor microregional localization of the radiotracer. Methods: High-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP was prepared by substitution of the tosyl functionality with [ 131 I]iodide. In vitro uptake of high- and low-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP by HCT8 and HT29 cells was assessed in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Biodistribution and intratumor localization of high- and low-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP were determined by injection into HT29 tumor-bearing mice. Results: The nucleophilic substitution reaction proceeded efficiently in acetonitrile at 150 o C, giving the final product in an average yield of 42% and an average specific activity of 30 GBq/μmol. In vitro, high-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP was incorporated into the tumor cells with similar kinetics and oxygen dependence to low-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP. In HT29 tumor-bearing mice, biodistributions of high- and low-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP were equivalent. Ex vivo autoradiography revealed heterogeneous intratumor localization of high-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP corresponding closely to distributions of other exogenous and endogenous hypoxia markers. Comparable microregional distribution patterns were observed with low-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP. Conclusions: Radiolabeled IAZGP produced via nucleophilic substitution is validated as an exogenous hypoxia marker. Specific activity does not appear to influence the in vivo hypoxia-mapping ability of the radiotracer.

  13. No oxygen? No problem! Intrinsic brain tolerance to hypoxia in vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, John; Drew, Kelly L.; Folkow, Lars P.; Milton, Sarah L.; Park, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Many vertebrates are challenged by either chronic or acute episodes of low oxygen availability in their natural environments. Brain function is especially vulnerable to the effects of hypoxia and can be irreversibly impaired by even brief periods of low oxygen supply. This review describes recent research on physiological mechanisms that have evolved in certain vertebrate species to cope with brain hypoxia. Four model systems are considered: freshwater turtles that can survive for months trapped in frozen-over lakes, arctic ground squirrels that respire at extremely low rates during winter hibernation, seals and whales that undertake breath-hold dives lasting minutes to hours, and naked mole-rats that live in crowded burrows completely underground for their entire lives. These species exhibit remarkable specializations of brain physiology that adapt them for acute or chronic episodes of hypoxia. These specializations may be reactive in nature, involving modifications to the catastrophic sequelae of oxygen deprivation that occur in non-tolerant species, or preparatory in nature, preventing the activation of those sequelae altogether. Better understanding of the mechanisms used by these hypoxia-tolerant vertebrates will increase appreciation of how nervous systems are adapted for life in specific ecological niches as well as inform advances in therapy for neurological conditions such as stroke and epilepsy. PMID:24671961

  14. Hypoxia induced expression of endogenous markers in vitro is highly influenced by pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genes such as carbonic anhydrase IX (Ca9), glucose transporter 1 (Glut1), lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A), osteopontin (OPN) and lysyl oxidase (LOX) have been suggested as hypoxic markers, but inconsistent results suggest that factors other than oxygen influence their expression...... hypoxia occurs in a deprived microenvironment, other environmental factors, for example low pH, might interact with the effect of low oxygen concentration on gene expression. This study shows that pH in two cell lines has a profound influence on the oxygen dependent induction of certain endogenous hypoxic....... The current study is a detailed investigation using a range of pH values from 6.3 to 7.5 in two human cell lines to establish the pH dependency of hypoxia induced gene expression. METHODS: Human tumour cell lines (uterine cervix squamous cell carcinoma (SiHa) and pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma [Fa...

  15. Effects of hypoxia on expression of a panel of stem cell and chemoresistance markers in glioblastoma-derived spheroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolenda, Jesper; Jensen, Stine Skov; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    ). Spheroids were formed in 21% and 1% O(2) in serum-free medium. The immunohistochemical panel included hypoxia (HIF-1α, HIF-2α), proliferation (Ki-67), and stem cell markers (CD133, podoplanin, Bmi-1, nestin, Sox-2) as well as markers related to chemoresistance (MGMT, TIMP-1, Lamp-1, MRP1, MDR-1....... Expression of stem cell markers CD133, podoplanin, Bmi-1, and nestin was increased in hypoxia, whereas Sox-2 was increased in SJ-1 only. TIMP-1 and Lamp-1 were increased in both SJ-1 and U87. In conclusion, the tumor cell phenotype related to stemness, and thereby potentially to chemoresistance, seems...

  16. Hypoxia induced expression of endogenous markers in vitro is highly influenced by pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorensen, Brita Singers; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens; Horsman, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Genes such as carbonic anhydrase IX (Ca9), glucose transporter 1 (Glut1), lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A), osteopontin (OPN) and lysyl oxidase (LOX) have been suggested as hypoxic markers, but inconsistent results suggest that factors other than oxygen influence their expression. The current study is a detailed investigation using a range of pH values from 6.3 to 7.5 in two human cell lines to establish the pH dependency of hypoxia induced gene expression. Methods: Human tumour cell lines (uterine cervix squamous cell carcinoma (SiHa) and pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma [FaDu DD ]) were used. Hypoxia was induced by gassing cells in airtight chambers with various oxygen concentrations (21%, 1%, 0.1%, 0.01% and 0%) for up to 24 h. The media were titrated to a range of pH values (7.5, 7.0, 6.7, 6.5 and 6.3). Gene expression was determined by real-time PCR. Results: In both SiHa and FaDu DD cells Ca9 and LOX reached the highest level of expression at 1% oxygen. In FaDu DD cells, a pH of 6.5 had a medium suppression effect on the hypoxia induced expression of Ca9. pH 6.3 resulted in severe suppression of expression for Ca9 and LOX in both SiHa and FaDu DD . Glut1 and LDH-A had a similar expression pattern to each other, with a maximum expression at 0.01% oxygen, in both cell lines. For these genes pH 6.5 and 6.3 changed the expression pattern in SiHa cells. OPN was up regulated at low oxygen in SiHa cells, but was not induced by hypoxia in FaDu DD cells. Conclusion: As tumour hypoxia occurs in a deprived microenvironment, other environmental factors, for example low pH, might interact with the effect of low oxygen concentration on gene expression. This study shows that pH in two cell lines has a profound influence on the oxygen dependent induction of certain endogenous hypoxic markers

  17. Hypoxia-Related MicroRNA-210 Is a Diagnostic Marker for Discriminating Osteoblastoma and Osteosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riester, Scott M.; Torres-Mora, Jorge; Dudakovic, Amel; Camilleri, Emily T.; Wang, Wei; Xu, Fuhua; Thaler, Roman R.; Evans, Jared M.; Zwartbol, René; Briaire-de Bruijn, Inge H.; Maran, Avudaiappan; Folpe, Andrew L.; Inwards, Carrie Y.; Rose, Peter S.; Shives, Thomas C.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Sim, Franklin H.; Deyle, David R.; Larson, Annalise N.; Galindo, Mario A.; Cleven, Arjen G. H.; Oliveira, Andre M.; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Bovée, Judith V. M. G.; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2017-01-01

    Osteoblastoma is a benign bone tumor that can often be difficult to distinguish from malignant osteosarcoma. Because misdiagnosis can result in unfavorable clinical outcomes, we have investigated microRNAs as potential diagnostic biomarkers for distinguishing between these two tumor types. Next generation RNA sequencing was used as an expression screen to evaluate >2,000 microRNAs present in tissue derived from rare formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) archival tumor specimens. MicroRNAs displaying the greatest ability to discriminate between these two tumors were validated on an independent tumor set, using qPCR assays. Initial screening by RNA-seq identified four microRNA biomarker candidates. Expression of three miRNAs (miR-451a, miR-144-3p, miR-486-5p) was higher in osteoblastoma, while the miR-210 was elevated in osteosarcoma. Validation of these microRNAs on an independent data set of 22 tumor specimens by qPCR revealed that miR-210 is the most discriminating marker. This microRNA displays low levels of expression across all of the osteoblastoma specimens and robust expression in the majority of the osteosarcoma specimens. Application of these biomarkers to a clinical test case showed that these microRNA biomarkers permit re-classification of a misdiagnosed FFPE tumor sample from osteoblastoma to osteosarcoma. Our findings establish that the hypoxia-related miR-210 is a discriminatory marker that distinguishes between osteoblastoma and osteosarcoma. This discovery provides a complementary molecular approach to support pathological classification of two diagnostically challenging musculoskeletal tumors. Because miR-210 is linked to the cellular hypoxia response, its detection may be linked to well-established pro-angiogenic and metastatic roles of hypoxia in osteosarcomas and other tumor cell types. PMID:27324965

  18. Temporo-spectral imaging of intrinsic optical signals during hypoxia-induced spreading depression-like depolarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mané

    Full Text Available Spreading depression (SD is characterized by a sustained near-complete depolarization of neurons, a massive depolarization of glia, and a negative deflection of the extracellular DC potential. These electrophysiological signs are accompanied by an intrinsic optical signal (IOS which arises from changes in light scattering and absorption. Even though the underlying mechanisms are unclear, the IOS serves as non-invasive tool to define the spatiotemporal dynamics of SD in brain slices. Usually the tissue is illuminated by white light, and light reflectance or transmittance is monitored. Using a polychromatic, fast-switchable light source we now performed temporo-spectral recordings of the IOS associated with hypoxia-induced SD-like depolarization (HSD in rat hippocampal slices kept in an interface recording chamber. Recording full illumination spectra (320-680 nm yielded distinct reflectance profiles for the different phases of HSD. Early during hypoxia tissue reflectance decreased within almost the entire spectrum due to cell swelling. HSD was accompanied by a reversible reflectance increase being most pronounced at 400 nm and 460 nm. At 440 nm massive porphyrin absorption (Soret band was detected. Hypotonic solutions, Ca(2+-withdrawal and glial poisoning intensified the reflectance increase during HSD, whereas hypertonic solutions dampened it. Replacement of Cl(- inverted the reflectance increase. Inducing HSD by cyanide distorted the IOS and reflectance at 340-400 nm increased irreversibly. The pronounced changes at short wavelengths (380 nm, 460 nm and their cyanide sensitivity suggest that block of mitochondrial metabolism contributes to the IOS during HSD. For stable and reliable IOS recordings during HSD wavelengths of 460-560 nm are recommended.

  19. Cyclic hypobaric hypoxia improves markers of glucose metabolism in middle-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Juan L; Rubinstein, Scott; Fattor, Jill A; Shah, Omer; Hoffman, Andrew R; Friedlander, Anne L

    2013-09-01

    Chronic hypoxia increases dependence on glucose in men and increases insulin sensitivity in men and women. Cyclic Variations in Altitude Conditioning (CVAC) is a novel technology that provides exposure to rapidly fluctuating cyclic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH). To test the hypothesis that markers of glucose metabolism would change with CVAC CHH, two groups of middle-aged men were exposed to 10 weeks (40 min/day, 3 day/week) of either CHH or sham (SH) sessions. CHH subjects (age: 48 ± 6, weight: 86 ± 12 kg, BMI: 27.1 ± 3, n=11) experienced cyclic pressures simulating altitudes ranging from sea level to 3048 m (week 1) and progressing to 6096 m (by week 5 through week 10). SH subjects (age: 50 ± 4, weight: 89 ± 15 kg, BMI: 27.5 ± 3, n=10) were exposed to slowly-fluctuating pressures up to 607 m (all subjects blinded to elevation). Physical function and blood markers of glucose metabolism were measured at baseline, 3, 6, and 10 weeks. Two CHH subjects were dropped from analysis for failure to progress past 3048 m (CHH: n=9). Weight and physical activity remained stable for both groups. There was a group-by-time interaction in fasting glucose (CHH: 96 ± 9 to 91 ± 7 mg/dL, SH: 94 ± 7 to 97 ± 9 mg/dL, pCHH compared to SH after 10 weeks of exposure (pCHH exposure improves markers of glucose metabolism in middle-aged men at risk for metabolic syndrome.

  20. An immunohistochemical study of the expression of the hypoxia markers Glut-1 and Ca-IX in canine sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbondati, E; Del-Pozo, J; Hoather, T M; Constantino-Casas, F; Dobson, J M

    2013-11-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been associated with increased malignancy, likelihood of metastasis, and increased resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy in human medicine. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key transcription factor that is induced by tumor hypoxia and regulates the pathways involved in cellular response and adaptation to the hostile tumor microenvironment. HIF-1 induces transcription of different proteins, including Ca-IX and Glut-1, which are considered endogenous markers of chronic hypoxia in solid tumors in humans. In this study, sections from 40 canine sarcomas (20 histiocytic sarcomas and 20 low-grade soft-tissue sarcomas) were immunostained for these markers. Expression of Glut-1 was scored based on percentage of positive staining cells (0 = 50%) and intensity of cellular staining (1 = weak; 2 = strong); Ca-IX was scored based on percentage of positive cells (0 = 30%). Intratumoral microvessel density was measured using CD31 to assess intratumoral neoangiogenesis. Histiocytic sarcomas showed statistically significant higher Glut-1 immunoreactivity and angiogenesis than did low-grade soft-tissue sarcomas. Intratumoral microvessel density in histiocytic sarcomas was positively associated with Glut-1 immunoreactivity score. These findings suggest a potential role of hypoxia in the biology of these tumors and may provide a base for investigation of the potential prognostic use of these markers in naturally occurring canine tumors.

  1. Hypoxia inducible BHLHB2 is a novel and independent prognostic marker in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Weibin; Reiser-Erkan, Carolin; Michalski, Christoph W.; Raggi, Matthias C.; Quan, Liao; Yupei, Zhao; Friess, Helmut; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    weak/absent nuclear BHLHB2 staining had significantly worse median survival compared to those with strong staining (13 months vs. 27 months, p = 0.03). In a multivariable analysis, BHLHB2 staining was an independent prognostic factor (Hazard-Ratio = 2.348, 95% CI = 1.250-4.411, p = 0.008). Conclusions: Hypoxia-inducible BHLHB2 expression is a novel independent prognostic marker in pancreatic cancer patients and indicates increased chemosensitivity towards gemcitabine.

  2. Hypoxia inducible BHLHB2 is a novel and independent prognostic marker in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Weibin; Reiser-Erkan, Carolin; Michalski, Christoph W.; Raggi, Matthias C. [Department of Surgery, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Quan, Liao; Yupei, Zhao [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Peking (China); Friess, Helmut [Department of Surgery, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Erkan, Mert, E-mail: erkan@chir.med.tu-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Kleeff, Joerg [Department of Surgery, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2010-10-22

    cells. Patients with weak/absent nuclear BHLHB2 staining had significantly worse median survival compared to those with strong staining (13 months vs. 27 months, p = 0.03). In a multivariable analysis, BHLHB2 staining was an independent prognostic factor (Hazard-Ratio = 2.348, 95% CI = 1.250-4.411, p = 0.008). Conclusions: Hypoxia-inducible BHLHB2 expression is a novel independent prognostic marker in pancreatic cancer patients and indicates increased chemosensitivity towards gemcitabine.

  3. Hypoxia marker labeling in tumor biopsies: quantification of labeling variation and criteria for biopsy sectioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrall, Donald E.; Rosner, Gary L.; Azuma, Chieko; McEntee, Margaret C.; Raleigh, James A.

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: The error associated with using biopsy-based methods for assessing parameters reflective of the tumor microenvironment depends on the variability in distribution of the parameter throughout the tumor and the biopsy sample. Some attention has been given to intratumoral distribution of parameters, but little attention has been given to their intrabiopsy distribution. We evaluated the intrabiopsy distribution of CCI-103F, a 2-nitroimidazole hypoxia marker. Materials and methods: The hypoxia marker CCI-103F was studied in dogs bearing spontaneous solid tumors. Two biopsies were taken from each of seven tumors, for a total of 14 biopsies. Biopsies were serially sectioned and four to six contiguous slides from each 100-150 μm of the biopsy were used to formulate the best estimate of CCI-103F labeled area throughout the biopsy sample. One, two or four slides were then randomly selected from each biopsy and the labeled area, based on this limited sample, was compared to the estimate obtained from counting all available slides. Random sampling of slides was repeated 1000 times for each biopsy sample. Results: CCI-103F labeling variance throughout the biopsy decreased as the estimated overall labeled area in the biopsy decreased. The error associated with estimating the overall labeled area in a biopsy from a randomly selected subset of slides decreased as the number of slides increased, and as the overall labeled area in the biopsy decreased. No minimally labeled biopsy was classified as unlabeled based on limited sampling. Conclusion: With regard to CCI-103F labeling, quantification of the labeled area in four randomly selected slides from a biopsy can provide, in most biopsies, an estimate of the labeled area in the biopsy within an absolute range of ±0.05

  4. {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics identification of markers of hypoxia-induced metabolic shifts in a breast cancer model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weljie, Aalim M., E-mail: aweljie@ucalgary.ca [University of Calgary, Department of Biological Sciences (Canada); Bondareva, Alla [Department of Comparative Biology and Experimental Medicine (Canada); Zang, Ping [University of Calgary, Department of Chemistry (Canada); Jirik, Frank R. [McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    Hypoxia can promote invasive behavior in cancer cells and alters the response to therapeutic intervention as a result of changes in the expression many genes, including genes involved in intermediary metabolism. Although metabolomics technologies are capable of simultaneously measuring a wide range of metabolites in an untargeted manner, these methods have been relatively under utilized in the study of cancer cell responses to hypoxia. Thus, {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics was used to examine the effects of hypoxia in the MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line, both in vitro and in vivo. Cell cultures were compared with respect to their metabolic responses during growth under either hypoxic (1% O{sub 2}) or normoxic conditions. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was used to identify a set of metabolites that were responsive to hypoxia. Via intracardiac administration, MDA-MB-231 cells were also used to generate widespread metastatic disease in immuno-compromised mice. Serum metabolite analysis was conducted to compare animals with and without a large tumor burden. Intriguingly, using a cross-plot of the OPLS loadings, both the in vitro and in vivo samples yielded a subset of metabolites that were significantly altered by hypoxia. These included primarily energy metabolites and amino acids, indicative of known alterations in energy metabolism, and possibly protein synthesis or catabolism. The results suggest that the metabolite pattern identified might prove useful as a marker for intra-tumoral hypoxia.

  5. Hypoxia-related microRNA-210 is a diagnostic marker for discriminating osteoblastoma and osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riester, Scott M; Torres-Mora, Jorge; Dudakovic, Amel; Camilleri, Emily T; Wang, Wei; Xu, Fuhua; Thaler, Roman R; Evans, Jared M; Zwartbol, René; Briaire-de Bruijn, Inge H; Maran, Avudaiappan; Folpe, Andrew L; Inwards, Carrie Y; Rose, Peter S; Shives, Thomas C; Yaszemski, Michael J; Sim, Franklin H; Deyle, David R; Larson, Annalise N; Galindo, Mario A; Cleven, Arjen G H; Oliveira, Andre M; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Bovée, Judith V M G; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2017-05-01

    Osteoblastoma is a benign bone tumor that can often be difficult to distinguish from malignant osteosarcoma. Because misdiagnosis can result in unfavorable clinical outcomes, we have investigated microRNAs as potential diagnostic biomarkers for distinguishing between these two tumor types. Next generation RNA sequencing was used as an expression screen to evaluate >2,000 microRNAs present in tissue derived from rare formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) archival tumor specimens. MicroRNAs displaying the greatest ability to discriminate between these two tumors were validated on an independent tumor set, using qPCR assays. Initial screening by RNA-seq identified four microRNA biomarker candidates. Expression of three miRNAs (miR-451a, miR-144-3p, miR-486-5p) was higher in osteoblastoma, while the miR-210 was elevated in osteosarcoma. Validation of these microRNAs on an independent data set of 22 tumor specimens by qPCR revealed that miR-210 is the most discriminating marker. This microRNA displays low levels of expression across all of the osteoblastoma specimens and robust expression in the majority of the osteosarcoma specimens. Application of these biomarkers to a clinical test case showed that these microRNA biomarkers permit re-classification of a misdiagnosed FFPE tumor sample from osteoblastoma to osteosarcoma. Our findings establish that the hypoxia-related miR-210 is a discriminatory marker that distinguishes between osteoblastoma and osteosarcoma. This discovery provides a complementary molecular approach to support pathological classification of two diagnostically challenging musculoskeletal tumors. Because miR-210 is linked to the cellular hypoxia response, its detection may be linked to well-established pro-angiogenic and metastatic roles of hypoxia in osteosarcomas and other tumor cell types. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1137-1146, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by

  6. Systematic analysis of 18F-FDG PET and metabolism, proliferation and hypoxia markers for classification of head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeben, Bianca AW; Starmans, Maud HW; Leijenaar, Ralph TH; Dubois, Ludwig J; Kogel, Albert J van der; Kaanders, Johannes HAM; Boutros, Paul C; Lambin, Philippe; Bussink, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Quantification of molecular cell processes is important for prognostication and treatment individualization of head and neck cancer (HNC). However, individual tumor comparison can show discord in upregulation similarities when analyzing multiple biological mechanisms. Elaborate tumor characterization, integrating multiple pathways reflecting intrinsic and microenvironmental properties, may be beneficial to group most uniform tumors for treatment modification schemes. The goal of this study was to systematically analyze if immunohistochemical (IHC) assessment of molecular markers, involved in treatment resistance, and 18 F-FDG PET parameters could accurately distinguish separate HNC tumors. Several imaging parameters and texture features for 18 F-FDG small-animal PET and immunohistochemical markers related to metabolism, hypoxia, proliferation and tumor blood perfusion were assessed within groups of BALB/c nu/nu mice xenografted with 14 human HNC models. Classification methods were used to predict tumor line based on sets of parameters. We found that 18 F-FDG PET could not differentiate between the tumor lines. On the contrary, combined IHC parameters could accurately allocate individual tumors to the correct model. From 9 analyzed IHC parameters, a cluster of 6 random parameters already classified 70.3% correctly. Combining all PET/IHC characteristics resulted in the highest tumor line classification accuracy (81.0%; cross validation 82.0%), which was just 2.2% higher (p = 5.2×10 -32 ) than the performance of the IHC parameter/feature based model. With a select set of IHC markers representing cellular processes of metabolism, proliferation, hypoxia and perfusion, one can reliably distinguish between HNC tumor lines. Addition of 18 F-FDG PET improves classification accuracy of IHC to a significant yet minor degree. These results may form a basis for development of tumor characterization models for treatment allocation purposes

  7. Independent validation of the prognostic value of cancer stem cell marker expression and hypoxia-induced gene expression for patients with locally advanced HNSCC after postoperative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett Linge

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: The HPV status, CSC marker expression of CD44 and SLC3A2 as well as hypoxia status are potential prognostic biomarkers for patients with locally advanced HNSCC treated by postoperative radiotherapy.

  8. Identifying novel hypoxia-associated markers of chemoresistance in ovarian cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEvoy, Lynda M

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is associated with poor long-term survival due to late diagnosis and development of chemoresistance. Tumour hypoxia is associated with many features of tumour aggressiveness including increased cellular proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, increased invasion and metastasis, and chemoresistance, mostly mediated through hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. While HIF-1α has been associated with platinum resistance in a variety of cancers, including ovarian, relatively little is known about the importance of the duration of hypoxia. Similarly, the gene pathways activated in ovarian cancer which cause chemoresistance as a result of hypoxia are poorly understood. This study aimed to firstly investigate the effect of hypoxia duration on resistance to cisplatin in an ovarian cancer chemoresistance cell line model and to identify genes whose expression was associated with hypoxia-induced chemoresistance.

  9. Tumor hypoxia at the micro-regional level: clinical relevance and predictive value of exogenous and endogenous hypoxic cell markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Tumor oxygenation is recognized as an important determinant of the outcome of radiotherapy and possibly also of other treatment modalities in a number of tumor types and in particular in squamous cell carcinomas. The hypoxic status of various solid tumors has been related to a poor prognosis due to tumor progression towards a more malignant phenotype, with increased metastatic potential, and an increased resistance to treatment. It has been demonstrated in head and neck cancer that hypoxic radioresistance can be successfully counteracted by hypoxia modifying approaches. The microregional distribution and the level of tumor hypoxia depend on oxygen consumption and temporal and spatial variations in blood supply. It is unclear if severely hypoxic cells can resume clonogenicity when O 2 and nutrients become available again as a result of (treatment related) changes in the tumor microenvironment. Non-terminally differentiated hypoxic cells that are capable of proliferation are important for outcome because of their resistance to radiotherapy and possibly other cytotoxic treatments. Various exogenous and endogenous markers for hypoxia are currently available and can be studied in relation to each other, the tumor architecture and the tumor microenvironment. Use of nitroimidazole markers with immunohistochemical detection allows studying tumor cell hypoxia at the microscopic level. Co-registration with other microenvironmental parameters, such as vascular architecture (vascular density), blood perfusion, tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis, offers the possibility to obtain a comprehensive functional image of tumor patho-physiology and to study the effects of different modalities of cancer treatment. Conclusion: A number of functional microregional parameters have emerged that are good candidates for future use as indicators of tumor aggressiveness and treatment response. The key question is whether these parameters can be used as tools for

  10. The prognostic value of endogenous hypoxia-related markers for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas treated with ARCON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonathan, Ruth A.; Wijffels, Karien I.E.M.; Peeters, Wenny; Wilde, Peter C.M. de; Marres, Henri A.M.; Merkx, Matthias A.W.; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Kogel, Albert van der J.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypoxic radioresistance is an important cause for treatment failure in a number of tumor types including head and neck cancers. Recent studies suggest that outcome can be improved by oxygenation modifying treatments such as ARCON. A robust endogenous marker of hypoxia might be a valuable aid to select patients for such treatments. The aim of this investigation was to study associations between the putative endogenous hypoxia markers CA-IX, Glut-1 and Glut-3 and clinical tumor and patient characteristics and to evaluate the prognostic value of these markers. Patients and methods: Tumor biopsies from 58 patients treated with ARCON in a phase II trial were included. Tumor sections were immunohistochemically stained for CA-IX, Glut-1 and Glut-3. Sections were scored for relative tumor area stained by the markers (CA-IX and Glut-3) and for intensity of staining (Glut-1 and Glut-3). Further, sections were stained for CD34, an endothelial marker to assess microvascular density. Results: Staining of CA-IX and Glut-3 was observed at some distance from vessels and adjacent to necrosis. Glut-1 staining was generally very diffuse. The distribution of clinical characteristics was equal between tumors with high and low marker expression. Significant differences were found for locoregional control (P=0.04) and for freedom of distant metastases (P=0.02) in favour of patients with high CA-IX positivity (>25% of tumor area). High Glut-3 expression was associated with a better locoregional control (P=0.04). Higher Glut-1 intensity was associated with an increased rate of distant metastases (P=0.0005) and a worse overall survival (P=0.001). Conclusions: The inconsistent associations with outcome of CA-IX and the glucose transporters indicate that different factors play a role in up-regulation of these markers. Compared to studies with conventional treatment, the correlation between CA-IX expression and Glut-3 expression and outcome was reversed after treatment

  11. Markers of Hypoxia/Reoxygenation in the Development of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gamcsik, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    A novel in vitro cell perfusion system was designed and constructed. This system can maintain cultured breast cancer cells under conditions simulating the hypoxia/reoxygenation cycles observed in vivo...

  12. Hypoxia and oxidative stress markers in pediatric patients undergoing hemodialysis: cross section study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Enas A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue injury due to hypoxia and/or free radicals is common in a variety of disease processes. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate effect of chronic kidney diseases (CKD and hemodialysis (HD on hypoxia and oxidative stress biomarkers. Methods Forty pediatric patients with CKD on HD and 20 healthy children were recruited. Plasma hypoxia induced factor-1α (HIF-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF were measured by specific ELISA kits while, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, total peroxide (TPX, pyruvate and lactate by enzymatic/chemical colorimetric methods. Oxidative stress index (OSI and lactate/pyruvate (L/P ratio were calculated. Results TAC was significantly lower while TPX, OSI and VEGF were higher in patients at before- and after-dialysis session than controls. Lactate and HIF-1α levels were significantly higher at before-dialysis session than controls. Before dialysis, TAC and L/P ratio were lower than after-dialysis. In before-dialysis session, VEGF correlated positively with pyruvate, HIF-1α and OSI correlated positively with TPX, but, negatively with TAC. In after-dialysis session, HIF-1α correlated negatively with TPX and OSI; while, OSI correlated positively with TPX. Conclusions CKD patients succumb considerable tissue hypoxia with oxidative stress. Hemodialysis ameliorated hypoxia but lowered antioxidants as evidenced by decreased levels of HIF-1α and TAC at before- compared to after-dialysis levels.

  13. A phase I study of the nitroimidazole hypoxia marker SR4554 using 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C P; Payne, G S; Oregioni, A; Ruddle, R; Tan, S; Raynaud, F I; Eaton, D; Campbell, M J; Cross, K; Halbert, G; Tracy, M; McNamara, J; Seddon, B; Leach, M O; Workman, P; Judson, I

    2009-12-01

    SR4554 is a fluorine-containing 2-nitroimidazole, designed as a hypoxia marker detectable with 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In an initial phase I study of SR4554, nausea/vomiting was found to be dose-limiting, and 1400 mg m(-2) was established as MTD. Preliminary MRS studies demonstrated some evidence of 19F retention in tumour. In this study we investigated higher doses of SR4554 and intratumoral localisation of the 19F MRS signal. Patients had tumours > or = 3 cm in diameter and Spectra were obtained immediately post infusion (MRS no. 1), at 16 h (MRS no. 2) and 20 h (MRS no. 3), based on the SR4554 half-life of 3.5 h determined from a previous study. 19Fluorine retention index (%) was defined as (MRS no. 2/MRS no. 1)*100. A total of 26 patients enrolled at: 1400 (n=16), 1800 (n=1), 2200 (n=1) and 2600 mg m(-2) (n=8). SR4554 was well tolerated and toxicities were all index in tumour was 13.6 (range 0.6-43.7) compared with 4.1 (range 0.6-7.3) for plasma samples taken at the same times (P=0.001) suggesting (19)F retention in tumour and, therefore, the presence of hypoxia. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using 19F MRS with SR4554 as a potential method of detecting hypoxia. Certain patients showed evidence of 19F retention in tumour, supporting further development of this technique for detection of tumour hypoxia.

  14. Effects of hypoxia on expression of a panel of stem cell and chemosensitivity markers in glioblastoma cell line-derived spheroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolenda, Jesper; Jensen, Stine Skov; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte

    Glioblastomas are the most frequent and malignant primary brain tumor. Tumor stem cells in these tumors have recently been suggested to possess innate resistance mechanisms against radiation and chemotherapy possibly explaining their high level of therapeutic resistance. Moreover tumor hypoxia...... of a panel of stem cell and chemosensitivity markers was therefore investigated using glioma spheroids derived from the conventional glioblastoma cell line U87. The glioma spheroids were derived at normoxic (21% O2) and hypoxic (1% O2) culturing conditions in serum-free medium with EGF and bFGF. The entire...... immunohistochemical panel included hypoxia (HIF-1α, HIF-2α), proliferation (Ki-67) and stem cell (CD133, nestin, podoplanin, Bmi-1, Sox-2) markers as well as markers related to chemosensitivity (MGMT, MDR-1, TIMP-1, Lamp-1). Since spheroids derived in hypoxia were smaller than in normoxia, a set of experiments...

  15. Irradiation-Dependent Effects on Tumor Perfusion and Endogenous and Exogenous Hypoxia Markers in an A549 Xenograft Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Haenze, Joerg; Kamlah, Florentine; Eul, Bastian G.; Lang, Nico; Keil, Boris; Heverhagen, Johannes T.; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; An Hanxiang; Rose, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia is a major determinant of tumor radiosensitivity, and microenvironmental changes in response to ionizing radiation (IR) are often heterogenous. We analyzed IR-dependent changes in hypoxia and perfusion in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts. Materials and Methods: Immunohistological analysis of two exogenously added chemical hypoxic markers, pimonidazole and CCI-103F, and of the endogenous marker Glut-1 was performed time dependently after IR. Tumor vessels and apoptosis were analyzed using CD31 and caspase-3 antibodies. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and fluorescent beads (Hoechst 33342) were used to monitor vascular perfusion. Results: CCI-103F signals measuring the fraction of hypoxic areas after IR were significantly decreased by approximately 50% when compared with pimonidazole signals, representing the fraction of hypoxic areas from the same tumors before IR. Interestingly, Glut-1 signals were significantly decreased at early time point (6.5 h) after IR returning to the initial levels at 30.5 h. Vascular density showed no difference between irradiated and control groups, whereas apoptosis was significantly induced at 10.5 h post-IR. DCE-MRI indicated increased perfusion 1 h post-IR. Conclusions: The discrepancy between the hypoxic fractions of CCI-103F and Glut-1 forces us to consider the possibility that both markers reflect different metabolic alterations of tumor microenvironment. The reliability of endogenous markers such as Glut-1 to measure reoxygenation in irradiated tumors needs further consideration. Monitoring tumor microvascular response to IR by DCE-MRI and measuring tumor volume alterations should be encouraged.

  16. Metabolic markers in relation to hypoxia; staining patterns and colocalization of pimonidazole, HIF-1α, CAIX, LDH-5, GLUT-1, MCT1 and MCT4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rademakers, Saskia E; Lok, Jasper; Kogel, Albert J van der; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes HAM

    2011-01-01

    The cellular response of malignant tumors to hypoxia is diverse. Several important endogenous metabolic markers are upregulated under hypoxic conditions. We examined the staining patterns and co-expression of HIF-1α, CAIX, LDH-5, GLUT-1, MCT1 and MCT4 with the exogenous hypoxic cell marker pimonidazole and the association of marker expression with clinicopathological characteristics. 20 biopsies of advanced head and neck carcinomas were immunohistochemically stained and analyzed. All patients were given the hypoxia marker pimonidazole intravenously 2 h prior to biopsy taking. The tumor area positive for each marker, the colocalization of the different markers and the distribution of the markers in relation to the blood vessels were assessed by semiautomatic quantitative analysis. MCT1 staining was present in hypoxic (pimonidazole stained) as well as non-hypoxic areas in almost equal amounts. MCT1 expression showed a significant overall correlation (r = 0.75, p < 0.001) and strong spatial relationship with CAIX. LDH-5 showed the strongest correlation with pimonidazole (r = 0.66, p = 0.002). MCT4 and GLUT-1 demonstrated a typical diffusion-limited hypoxic pattern and showed a high degree of colocalization. Both MCT4 and CAIX showed a higher expression in the primary tumor in node positive patients (p = 0.09 both). Colocalization and staining patterns of metabolic and hypoxia-related proteins provides valuable additional information over single protein analyses and can improve the understanding of their functions and environmental influences

  17. Low Cancer Stem Cell Marker Expression and Low Hypoxia Identify Good Prognosis Subgroups in HPV(-) HNSCC after Postoperative Radiochemotherapy: A Multicenter Study of the DKTK-ROG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linge, Annett; Löck, Steffen; Gudziol, Volker

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the impact of hypoxia-induced gene expression and cancer stem cell (CSC) marker expression on outcome of postoperative cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy (PORT-C) in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Expressio...

  18. Intrinsic bevacizumab resistance is associated with prolonged activation of autocrine VEGF signaling and hypoxia tolerance in colorectal cancer cells and can be overcome by nintedanib, a small molecule angiokinase inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mésange, Paul; Poindessous, Virginie; Sabbah, Michèle; Escargueil, Alexandre E.; de Gramont, Aimery; Larsen, Annette K.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common tumor type with a high mortality rate, in part due to intrinsic drug resistance. Although bevacizumab, a VEGF-directed neutralizing antibody, is particularly active in this pathology, some patients never respond for reasons not well understood. We here wish to clarify the role of autocrine VEGF signaling in the response of CRC cells to angiogenesis inhibition. Our results show that CRC cells with intrinsic bevacizumab-resistance displayed pronounced upregulation of autocrine HIF-VEGF-VEGFR signaling in response to prolonged bevacizumab exposure whereas the same signaling pathway was downregulated in bevacizumab-sensitive xenografts. Importantly, both bevacizumab-sensitive and -resistant CRC xenografts were sensitive to nintedanib, a small molecule angiokinase inhibitor, which was associated with inhibition of mTORC1. In vitro studies revealed that bevacizumab-resistant cells displayed intrinsically higher HIF-VEGF signaling intensity and hypoxia tolerance compared to their bevacizumab-sensitive counterparts. Interestingly, although nintedanib showed comparable activity toward bevacizumab-sensitive cells under normoxia and hypoxia, the drug was three-fold more toxic to the resistant cells under hypoxia, suggesting that nintedanib attenuated the survival signaling that usually protects these cells from hypoxia-mediated cell death. In conclusion, our findings support a role for autocrine VEGF signaling in the survival of CRC cells to hypoxia and thus to angiogenesis inhibition. We further show that nintedanib, a small molecule angiokinase inhibitor, is active toward CRC models with intrinsic bevacizumab resistance supporting clinical trials of nintedanib in patients that do not respond to bevacizumab, alone or in combination with bevacizumab to increase angiogenesis inhibition. PMID:25015210

  19. Hypoxia Marker GLUT-1 (Glucose Transporter 1) is an Independent Prognostic Factor for Survival in Bladder Cancer Patients Treated with Radical Cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, P J; Thoms, J; Sykes, J; Ahmed, O; Evans, A; van Rhijn, B W G; Mirtti, T; Stakhovskyi, O; Laato, M; Margel, D; Pintilie, M; Kuk, C; Milosevic, M; Zlotta, A R; Bristow, R G

    2016-01-07

    Tumour hypoxia, which is frequent in many cancer types, is associated with treatment resistance and poor prognosis. The role of hypoxia in surgically treated bladder cancer (BC) is not well described. We studied the role of hypoxia in two independent series of urothelial bladder cancers treated with radical cystectomy. 279 patients from the University Hospital Network (UHN), Toronto, Canada, and Turku University, Finland were studied. Hypoxia biomarkers (HIF1-α, CAIX, GLUT-1) and proliferation marker Ki-67 were analyzed with immunohistochemistry using defined tissue microarrays. Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to investigate prognostic role of the factors. In univariate analyses, strong GLUT-1 positivity and a high Ki-67 index were associated with poor survival. In multivariate model containing clinical prognostic variables, GLUT-1 was an independent prognostic factor associated with worse disease-specific survival (HR 2.9, 95% CI 0.7-12.6, Wald p  = 0.15 in the Toronto cohort and HR 3.2, 95% CI 1.3-7.5, Wald p  = 0.0085 in the Turku cohort). GLUT-1 is frequently upregulated and is an independent prognostic factor in surgically treated bladder cancer. Further studies are needed to evaluate the potential role of hypoxia-based and targeted therapies in hypoxic bladder tumours.

  20. HPV status, cancer stem cell marker expression, hypoxia gene signatures and tumour volume identify good prognosis subgroups in patients with HNSCC after primary radiochemotherapy: A multicentre retrospective study of the German Cancer Consortium Radiation Oncology Group (DKTK-ROG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linge, Annett; Lohaus, Fabian; Löck, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of the tumour volume, HPV status, cancer stem cell (CSC) marker expression and hypoxia gene signatures, as potential markers of radiobiological mechanisms of radioresistance, in a contemporary cohort of patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell...... expression on LRC. The tumour hypoxia classification showed a significant impact only for small tumours. In multivariate analyses an independent correlation of tumour volume, SLC3A2 expression, and the 15-gene hypoxia signature with LRC was identified (CD44 protein n/a because of no event in the CD44...

  1. Preclinical evaluation and validation of [18F]HX4, a promising hypoxia marker for PET imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, L.J.; Lieuwes, N.G.; Janssen, M.H.; Peeters, W.J.M.; Windhorst, A.D.; Walsh, J.C.; Kolb, H.C.; Ollers, M.C.; Bussink, J.; Dongen, G.A. van; Kogel, A.J. van der; Lambin, P.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be an important microenvironmental parameter influencing tumor progression and treatment efficacy. Patient guidance for hypoxia-targeted therapy requires evaluation of tumor oxygenation, preferably in a noninvasive manner. The aim of this study was to evaluate and validate

  2. Food intake during the previous 24 h as a percentage of usual intake: a marker of hypoxia in infants with bronchiolitis: an observational, prospective, multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrard François

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia associated with bronchiolitis is not always easy to assess on clinical grounds alone. The aim of this study was to determine the value of food intake during the previous 24 hours (bottle and spoon feeding, as a percentage of usual intake (24h FI, as a marker of hypoxia, and to compare its diagnostic value with that of usual clinical signs. Methods In this observational, prospective, multicenter study, 18 community pediatricians, enrolled 171 infants, aged from 0 to 6 months, with bronchiolitis (rhinorrhea + dyspnea + cough + expiratory sounds. Infants with risk factors (history of prematurity, chronic heart or lung disorders, breast-fed infants, and infants having previously been treated for bronchial disorders were excluded. The 24h FI, subcostal, intercostal, supracostal retractions, nasal flaring, respiratory rate, pauses, cyanosis, rectal temperature and respiratory syncytial virus test results were noted. The highest stable value of transcutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2 was recorded. Hypoxia was noted if SpO2 was below 95% and verified. Results 24h FI ≥ 50% was associated with a 96% likelihood of SpO2 ≥ 95% [95% CI, 91–99]. In univariate analysis, 24h FI  Conclusion In practice, the measure of 24 h FI may be useful in identifying hypoxia and deserves further study.

  3. Fifteen days of 3,200 m simulated hypoxia marginally regulates markers for protein synthesis and degradation in human skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Hulst G

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gommaar D'Hulst,1 Alessandra Ferri,2,3 Damien Naslain,4 Luc Bertrand,5 Sandrine Horman,5 Marc Francaux,4 David J Bishop,2 Louise Deldicque1,41Department of Kinesiology, Exercise Physiology Research Group, FaBeR, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 2Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia; 3Department of Health Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy; 4Institute of Neuroscience, Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, 5Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique, Pôle de Recherche Cardiovasculaire, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, BelgiumAbstract: Chronic hypoxia leads to muscle atrophy. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are not well defined in vivo. We sought to determine how chronic hypoxia regulates molecular markers of protein synthesis and degradation in human skeletal muscle and whether these regulations were related to the regulation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF pathway. Eight young male subjects lived in a normobaric hypoxic hotel (FiO2 14.1%, 3,200 m for 15 days in well-controlled conditions for nutrition and physical activity. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained in the musculus vastus lateralis before (PRE and immediately after (POST hypoxic exposure. Intramuscular hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α protein expression decreased (−49%, P=0.03, whereas hypoxia-inducible factor-2 alpha (HIF-2α remained unaffected from PRE to POST hypoxic exposure. Also, downstream HIF-1α target genes VEGF-A (−66%, P=0.006 and BNIP3 (−24%, P=0.002 were downregulated, and a tendency was measured for neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally Nedd4 (−47%, P=0.07, suggesting lowered HIF-1α transcriptional activity after 15 days of exposure to environmental hypoxia. No difference was found on microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 type II/I (LC3b-II/I ratio, and P62 protein expression tended to increase

  4. Differentiation in neuroblastoma: diffusion-limited hypoxia induces neuro-endocrine secretory protein 55 and other markers of a chromaffin phenotype.

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    Fredrik Hedborg

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is a childhood malignancy of sympathetic embryonal origin. A high potential for differentiation is a hallmark of neuroblastoma cells. We have previously presented data to suggest that in situ differentiation in tumors frequently proceeds along the chromaffin lineage and that decreased oxygen (hypoxia plays a role in this. Here we explore the utility of Neuro-Endocrine Secretory Protein 55 (NESP55, a novel member of the chromogranin family, as a marker for this process.Immunohistochemical analyses and in situ hybridizations were performed on human fetal tissues, mouse xenografts of human neuroblastoma cell lines, and on specimens of human neuroblastoma/ganglioneuroma. Effects of anaerobic exposure on gene expression by cultured neuroblastoma cells was analyzed with quantitative real-time PCR. Fetal sympathetic nervous system expression of NESP55 was shown to be specific for chromaffin cell types. In experimental and clinical neuroblastoma NESP55 immunoreactivity was specific for regions of chronic hypoxia. NESP55 expression also correlated strikingly with morphological evidence of differentiation and with other chromaffin-specific patterns of gene expression, including IGF2 and HIF2α. Anaerobic culture of five neuroblastoma cell lines resulted in an 18.9-fold mean up-regulation of NESP55.The data confirms that chronic tumor hypoxia is a key microenvironmental factor for neuroblastoma cell differentiation, causing induction of chromaffin features and NESP55 provides a reliable marker for this neuronal to neuroendocrine transition. The hypoxia-induced phenotype is the predominant form of differentiation in stroma-poor tumors, while in stroma-rich tumors the chromaffin phenotype coexists with ganglion cell-like differentiation. The findings provide new insights into the biological diversity which is a striking feature of this group of tumors.

  5. Preclinical validation of111In-girentuximab-F(ab')2as a tracer to image hypoxia related marker CAIX expression in head and neck cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizing, Fokko J; Hoeben, Bianca A W; Franssen, Gerben; Lok, Jasper; Heskamp, Sandra; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Boerman, Otto C; Bussink, Johan

    2017-09-01

    Hypoxia is a major cause of radio- and chemoresistance. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is an endogenous hypoxia-related marker and an important prognostic marker. Assessment of CAIX expression may allow patient selection for hypoxia or CAIX-targeted treatment. The radioactive tracer 111 In-girentuximab-F(ab') 2 targets CAIX and can be used for SPECT imaging. Aim of this study was to validate and optimize 111 In-girentuximab-F(ab') 2 for imaging of CAIX expression in head and neck tumor xenografts. Affinity and internalization kinetics of 111 In-girentuximab-F(ab') 2 were determined in vitro using CAIX-expressing SK-RC-52 cells. Tumor targeting characteristics were determined in athymic mice with six different head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCCNij) xenografts. Tracer uptake was measured by ex vivo radioactivity counting. Intratumoral distribution of tracer uptake was measured using autoradiography and CAIX expression was determined immunohistochemically. 26% of the tracer was internalized into the SK-RC-52 cells within 24h. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) was 0.69±0.08nM. In biodistribution studies SCCNij153 tumors showed the highest tracer uptake: 4.1±0.8ID/g at 24h p.i. Immunohistochemical and autoradiographic analyses of the xenografts showed a distinct spatial correlation between localization of the tracer and CAIX expression. 111 In-girentuximab-F(ab') 2 has a high affinity for CAIX. In vivo tumor uptake correlated strongly with CAIX expression in different head and neck xenografts. These results suggest that 111 In-girentuximab-F(ab') 2 is a promising tracer for imaging of hypoxia-related CAIX expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Low Cancer Stem Cell Marker Expression and Low Hypoxia Identify Good Prognosis Subgroups in HPV(-) HNSCC after Postoperative Radiochemotherapy: A Multicenter Study of the DKTK-ROG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linge, Annett; Löck, Steffen; Gudziol, Volker; Nowak, Alexander; Lohaus, Fabian; von Neubeck, Cläre; Jütz, Martin; Abdollahi, Amir; Debus, Jürgen; Tinhofer, Inge; Budach, Volker; Sak, Ali; Stuschke, Martin; Balermpas, Panagiotis; Rödel, Claus; Avlar, Melanie; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Bayer, Christine; Belka, Claus; Pigorsch, Steffi; Combs, Stephanie E; Welz, Stefan; Zips, Daniel; Buchholz, Frank; Aust, Daniela E; Baretton, Gustavo B; Thames, Howard D; Dubrovska, Anna; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens; Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the impact of hypoxia-induced gene expression and cancer stem cell (CSC) marker expression on outcome of postoperative cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy (PORT-C) in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Expression of the CSC markers CD44, MET, and SLC3A2, and hypoxia gene signatures were analyzed in the resected primary tumors using RT-PCR and nanoString technology in a multicenter retrospective cohort of 195 patients. CD44 protein expression was further analyzed in tissue microarrays. Primary endpoint was locoregional tumor control. Univariate analysis showed that hypoxia-induced gene expression was significantly associated with a high risk of locoregional recurrence using the 15-gene signature (P = 0.010) or the 26-gene signature (P = 0.002). In multivariate analyses, in patients with HPV16 DNA-negative but not with HPV16 DNA-positive tumors the effect of hypoxia-induced genes on locoregional control was apparent (15-gene signature: HR 4.54, P = 0.006; 26-gene signature: HR 10.27, P = 0.024). Furthermore, MET, SLC3A2, CD44, and CD44 protein showed an association with locoregional tumor control in multivariate analyses (MET: HR 3.71, P = 0.016; SLC3A2: HR 8.54, P = 0.037; CD44: HR 3.36, P = 0.054; CD44 protein n/a because of no event in the CD44-negative group) in the HPV16 DNA-negative subgroup. We have shown for the first time that high hypoxia-induced gene expression and high CSC marker expression levels correlate with tumor recurrence after PORT-C in patients with HPV16 DNA-negative HNSCC. After validation in a currently ongoing prospective trial, these parameters may help to further stratify patients for individualized treatment de-escalation or intensification strategies. Clin Cancer Res; 22(11); 2639-49. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Inhibition of hypoxia inducible factor-1α downregulates the expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition early marker proteins without undermining cell survival in hypoxic lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarata, Patrick R; Neelam, Sudha; Brooks, Morgan M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify potential therapeutic strategies to slow down or prevent the expression of early-onset epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker proteins (fibronectin and alpha smooth muscle actin, α-SMA) without sacrificing the synthesis and accumulation of the prosurvival protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cultured virally transformed human lens epithelial (HLE) cells. HLE-B3 cells, maintained in a continuous hypoxic environment (1% oxygen), were treated with SB216763, a specific inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) catalytic activity. Western blot analysis was employed to detect the cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of β-catenin, as well as the total lysate content of fibronectin and α-SMA. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure the levels of VEGF in cell culture medium. A hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) translation inhibitor and an HIF-2α translation inhibitor were independently employed to evaluate the effect of hypoxia inducible factor inhibition on EMT marker protein and VEGF expression. XAV932 was used to assess the suppression of nuclear β-catenin and its downstream effect on EMT marker proteins and VEGF expression. SB216763-treated HLE-B3 cells caused marked inhibition of GSK-3β activity prompting a significant increase in the translocation of cytoplasmic β-catenin to the nucleus. The enhancement of nuclear β-catenin looked as if it positively correlated with a significant increase in the basal expression of VEGF as well as increased expression of fibronectin and α-SMA. In conjunction with SB216763, coadministration of an HIF-1α translation inhibitor, but not an HIF-2α translation inhibitor, markedly suppressed the expression of fibronectin and α-SMA without affecting VEGF levels. Treatment with XAV932 significantly reduced the level of nuclear β-catenin, but the levels of neither the EMT marker proteins nor VEGF were changed. Recently, we reported

  8. Metabolic profiling reveals potential metabolic markers associated with Hypoxia Inducible Factor-mediated signalling in hypoxic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Emily G; Kotze, Helen L; Allwood, J William; Dunn, Warwick B; Goodacre, Royston; Williams, Kaye J

    2015-10-28

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) plays an important role in oxygen compromised environments and therefore in tumour survival. In this research, metabolomics has been applied to study HIFs metabolic function in two cell models: mouse hepatocellular carcinoma and human colon carcinoma, whereby the metabolism has been profiled for a range of oxygen potentials. Wild type cells have been compared to cells deficient in HIF signalling to reveal its effect on cellular metabolism under normal oxygen conditions as well as low oxygen, hypoxic and anoxic environments. Characteristic responses to hypoxia that were conserved across both cell models involved the anti-correlation between 2-hydroxyglutarate, 2-oxoglutarate, fructose, hexadecanoic acid, hypotaurine, pyruvate and octadecenoic acid with 4-hydroxyproline, aspartate, cysteine, glutamine, lysine, malate and pyroglutamate. Further to this, network-based correlation analysis revealed HIF specific pathway responses to each oxygen condition that were also conserved between cell models. From this, 4-hydroxyproline was revealed as a regulating hub in low oxygen survival of WT cells while fructose appeared to be in HIF deficient cells. Pathways surrounding these hubs were built from the direct connections of correlated metabolites that look beyond traditional pathways in order to understand the mechanism of HIF response to low oxygen environments.

  9. Klotho and S100A8/A9 as Discriminative Markers between Pre-Renal and Intrinsic Acute Kidney Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ae Jin Kim

    Full Text Available Early detection and accurate differentiation of the cause of AKI may improve the prognosis of the patient. However, to date, there are few reliable biomarkers that can discriminate between pre-renal and intrinsic AKI. In this study, we determined whether AKI is associated with altered serum and urinary levels of Klotho, S100A8/A9 (an endogenous ligand of toll-like receptor 4, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, which may allow differentiation between pre-renal and intrinsic AKI. A volume-depleted pre-renal AKI model was induced in male Sprague Dawley rats fed a low-salt diet (0.03% without water 96 h before two intraperitoneal (IP injections of furosemide (20 mg/kg at a 24 h interval. In contrast, in the cisplatin-induced intrinsic AKI model, animals were given a single IP injection of cisplatin (5 mg/kg. All of the animals were euthanized 72 h after the first IP injection. Serum and urinary levels of Klotho, S100A8/A9, and NGAL were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We also performed a proof-of-concept cross-sectional study to measure serum and urinary biomarkers in 61 hospitalized patients with established AKI. Compared to the intrinsic AKI group, the pre-renal AKI group showed a marked depression in urinary Klotho levels (13.21 ± 17.32 vs. 72.97 ± 17.96 pg/mL; P = 0.002. In addition, the intrinsic AKI group showed marked elevation of S100A8/A9 levels compared to the pre-renal AKI group (2629.97 ± 598.05 ng/mL vs. 685.09 ± 111.65 ng/mL; P = 0.002 in serum; 3361.11 ± 250.86 ng/mL vs. 741.72 ± 101.96 ng/mL; P = 0.003 in urine. There was no difference in serum and urinary NGAL levels between the pre-renal and intrinsic AKI groups. The proof-of-concept study with the hospitalized AKI patients also demonstrated decreased urinary Klotho in pre-renal AKI patients and increased urinary S100A8/A9 concentrations in intrinsic AKI patients. The attenuation of urinary Klotho and increase in urinary S100A8/A9 may

  10. HPV status, cancer stem cell marker expression, hypoxia gene signatures and tumour volume identify good prognosis subgroups in patients with HNSCC after primary radiochemotherapy: A multicentre retrospective study of the German Cancer Consortium Radiation Oncology Group (DKTK-ROG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linge, Annett; Lohaus, Fabian; Löck, Steffen; Nowak, Alexander; Gudziol, Volker; Valentini, Chiara; von Neubeck, Cläre; Jütz, Martin; Tinhofer, Inge; Budach, Volker; Sak, Ali; Stuschke, Martin; Balermpas, Panagiotis; Rödel, Claus; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Abdollahi, Amir; Debus, Jürgen; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus; Pigorsch, Steffi; Combs, Stephanie E; Mönnich, David; Zips, Daniel; Buchholz, Frank; Aust, Daniela E; Baretton, Gustavo B; Thames, Howard D; Dubrovska, Anna; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the impact of the tumour volume, HPV status, cancer stem cell (CSC) marker expression and hypoxia gene signatures, as potential markers of radiobiological mechanisms of radioresistance, in a contemporary cohort of patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), who received primary radiochemotherapy (RCTx). For 158 patients with locally advanced HNSCC of the oral cavity, oropharynx or hypopharynx who were treated at six DKTK partner sites, the impact of tumour volume, HPV DNA, p16 overexpression, p53 expression, CSC marker expression and hypoxia-associated gene signatures on outcome of primary RCTx was retrospectively analyzed. The primary endpoint of this study was loco-regional control (LRC). Univariate Cox regression revealed a significant impact of tumour volume, p16 overexpression, and SLC3A2 and CD44 protein expression on LRC. The tumour hypoxia classification showed a significant impact only for small tumours. In multivariate analyses an independent correlation of tumour volume, SLC3A2 expression, and the 15-gene hypoxia signature with LRC was identified (CD44 protein n/a because of no event in the CD44-negative group). Logistic modelling showed that inclusion of CD44 protein expression and p16 overexpression significantly improved the performance to predict LRC at 2years compared to the model with tumour volume alone. Tumour volume, HPV status, CSC marker expression and hypoxia gene signatures are potential prognostic biomarkers for patients with locally advanced HNSCC, who were treated by primary RCTx. The study also supports that the individual tumour volumes should generally be included in biomarker studies and that panels of biomarkers are superior to individual parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypoxia Room

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypoxia Room is a 8x8x8 ft. clear vinyl plastic and aluminum frame construction enclosure located within USAREIM laboratory 028. The Hypoxia Room (manufactured...

  12. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing the clinical course of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: prognostic markers with pathogenetic relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaidano Gianluca

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, the most frequent leukemia in the Western world, is characterized by extremely variable clinical courses with survivals ranging from 1 to more than 15 years. The pathogenetic factors playing a key role in defining the biological features of CLL cells, hence eventually influencing the clinical aggressiveness of the disease, are here divided into "intrinsic factors", mainly genomic alterations of CLL cells, and "extrinsic factors", responsible for direct microenvironmental interactions of CLL cells; the latter group includes interactions of CLL cells occurring via the surface B cell receptor (BCR and dependent to specific molecular features of the BCR itself and/or to the presence of the BCR-associated molecule ZAP-70, or via other non-BCR-dependent interactions, e.g. specific receptor/ligand interactions, such as CD38/CD31 or CD49d/VCAM-1. A putative final model, discussing the pathogenesis and the clinicobiological features of CLL in relationship of these factors, is also provided.

  13. Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

  14. Copper-64-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) Pharmacokinetics in FaDu Xenograft Tumors and Correlation With Microscopic Markers of Hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCall, Keisha C.; Humm, John L.; Bartlett, Rachel; Reese, Megan; Carlin, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The behavior of copper-64-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ( 64 Cu-ATSM) in hypoxic tumors was examined through a combination of in vivo dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo autoradiographic and histologic evaluation using a xenograft model of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: 64 Cu-ATSM was administered during dynamic PET imaging, and temporal changes in 64 Cu-ATSM distribution within tumors were evaluated for at least 1 hour and up to 18 hours. Animals were sacrificed at either 1 hour (cohort A) or after 18 hours (cohort B) postinjection of radiotracer and autoradiography performed. Ex vivo analysis of microenvironment subregions was conducted by immunohistochemical staining for markers of hypoxia (pimonidazole hydrochloride) and blood flow (Hoechst-33342). Results: Kinetic analysis revealed rapid uptake of radiotracer by tumors. The net influx (K i ) constant was 12-fold that of muscle, whereas the distribution volume (V d ) was 5-fold. PET images showed large tumor-to-muscle ratios, which continually increased over the entire 18-hour course of imaging. However, no spatial changes in 64 Cu-ATSM distribution occurred in PET imaging at 20 minutes postinjection. Microscopic intratumoral distribution of 64 Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole were not correlated at 1 hour or after 18 hours postinjection, nor was 64 Cu-ATSM and Hoechst-33342. Conclusions: The oxygen partial pressures at which 64 Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole are reduced and bound in cells are theorized to be distinct and separable. However, this study demonstrated that microscopic distributions of these tracers within tumors are independent. Researchers have shown 64 Cu-ATSM uptake to be specific to malignant expression, and this work has also demonstrated clear tumor targeting by the radiotracer.

  15. Copper-64-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) pharmacokinetics in FaDu xenograft tumors and correlation with microscopic markers of hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Keisha C; Humm, John L; Bartlett, Rachel; Reese, Megan; Carlin, Sean

    2012-11-01

    The behavior of copper-64-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) in hypoxic tumors was examined through a combination of in vivo dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo autoradiographic and histologic evaluation using a xenograft model of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. (64)Cu-ATSM was administered during dynamic PET imaging, and temporal changes in (64)Cu-ATSM distribution within tumors were evaluated for at least 1 hour and up to 18 hours. Animals were sacrificed at either 1 hour (cohort A) or after 18 hours (cohort B) postinjection of radiotracer and autoradiography performed. Ex vivo analysis of microenvironment subregions was conducted by immunohistochemical staining for markers of hypoxia (pimonidazole hydrochloride) and blood flow (Hoechst-33342). Kinetic analysis revealed rapid uptake of radiotracer by tumors. The net influx (K(i)) constant was 12-fold that of muscle, whereas the distribution volume (V(d)) was 5-fold. PET images showed large tumor-to-muscle ratios, which continually increased over the entire 18-hour course of imaging. However, no spatial changes in (64)Cu-ATSM distribution occurred in PET imaging at 20 minutes postinjection. Microscopic intratumoral distribution of (64)Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole were not correlated at 1 hour or after 18 hours postinjection, nor was (64)Cu-ATSM and Hoechst-33342. The oxygen partial pressures at which (64)Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole are reduced and bound in cells are theorized to be distinct and separable. However, this study demonstrated that microscopic distributions of these tracers within tumors are independent. Researchers have shown (64)Cu-ATSM uptake to be specific to malignant expression, and this work has also demonstrated clear tumor targeting by the radiotracer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pre-analytical sample quality: metabolite ratios as an intrinsic marker for prolonged room temperature exposure of serum samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Anton

    Full Text Available Advances in the "omics" field bring about the need for a high number of good quality samples. Many omics studies take advantage of biobanked samples to meet this need. Most of the laboratory errors occur in the pre-analytical phase. Therefore evidence-based standard operating procedures for the pre-analytical phase as well as markers to distinguish between 'good' and 'bad' quality samples taking into account the desired downstream analysis are urgently needed. We studied concentration changes of metabolites in serum samples due to pre-storage handling conditions as well as due to repeated freeze-thaw cycles. We collected fasting serum samples and subjected aliquots to up to four freeze-thaw cycles and to pre-storage handling delays of 12, 24 and 36 hours at room temperature (RT and on wet and dry ice. For each treated aliquot, we quantified 127 metabolites through a targeted metabolomics approach. We found a clear signature of degradation in samples kept at RT. Storage on wet ice led to less pronounced concentration changes. 24 metabolites showed significant concentration changes at RT. In 22 of these, changes were already visible after only 12 hours of storage delay. Especially pronounced were increases in lysophosphatidylcholines and decreases in phosphatidylcholines. We showed that the ratio between the concentrations of these molecule classes could serve as a measure to distinguish between 'good' and 'bad' quality samples in our study. In contrast, we found quite stable metabolite concentrations during up to four freeze-thaw cycles. We concluded that pre-analytical RT handling of serum samples should be strictly avoided and serum samples should always be handled on wet ice or in cooling devices after centrifugation. Moreover, serum samples should be frozen at or below -80°C as soon as possible after centrifugation.

  17. Cerebral Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... off. When hypoxia lasts for longer periods of time, it can cause coma, seizures, and even brain death. In brain death, there is no measurable activity in the brain, although cardiovascular function is preserved. Life support is required for respiration. × Definition Cerebral hypoxia ...

  18. A pilot study on potential plasma hypoxia markers in the radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer. Osteopontin, carbonic anhydrase IX and vascular endothelial growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostheimer, C.; Bache, M.; Guettler, A.; Vordermark, D. [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Kotzsch, M. [Technical University Dresden, Department of Pathology, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Hypoxic radioresistance plays a critical role in the radiotherapy of cancer and adversely impacts prognosis and treatment response. This prospective study investigated the interrelationship and the prognostic significance of several hypoxia-related proteins in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy. Pretreatment osteopontin (OPN), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) plasma levels were determined by ELISA in 55 NSCLC (M0) patients receiving 66 Gy curative-intent radiotherapy or chemoradiation. Marker correlation, association with clinicopathological parameters and the prognostic value of a biomarker combination was evaluated. All biomarkers were linearly correlated and linked to different clinical parameters including lung function, weight loss (OPN), gross tumor volume (VEGF) and T stage (CA IX). High OPN (p = 0.03), VEGF (p = 0.02) and CA IX (p = 0.04) values were significantly associated with poor survival. Double marker combination additively increased the risk of death by a factor of 2 and high plasma levels of the triple combination OPN/VEGF/CA IX yielded a 5.9-fold risk of death (p = 0.009). The combined assessment of OPN/VEGF/CA IX correlated independently with prognosis (p = 0.03) in a multivariate Cox regression model including N stage, T stage and GTV. This pilot study suggests that a co-detection augments the prognostic value of single markers and that the integration of OPN, VEGF and CA IX into a hypoxic biomarker profile for the identification of patients with largely hypoxic and radioresistant tumors should be further evaluated. (orig.) [German] Hypoxische Radioresistenz spielt eine kritische Rolle in der Radiotherapie maligner Tumoren und beeinflusst Prognose und Therapieansprechen negativ. Diese prospektive Studie untersuchte den Zusammenhang und die prognostische Bedeutung einiger hypoxieassoziierter Proteine bei Patienten mit nicht-kleinzelligem Bronchialkarzinom

  19. The Impact of Experimental Hypoxia and Subsequent Normoxia on the Content of Some Ions and Markers of Physiological Stress-adaptation in Gastropod Species Lymnaea stagnalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubyaga J.А.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of hypoxia and subsequent normoxiaon the maintenance of respiratory pigment hemocyanin, total protein, lactate and some ions (Na +, K +, Ca2+, NH4+, Mg2+ in the mantle liquid in palaearctic gastropod species Lymnaea stagnalis. It was shown that short-term experimental hypoxia leads to the activation of the physiological mechanisms of stress adaptation in widespread Palaearctic eurybiotic gastropod species and does not lead to the activation of the stress-resistance mechanisms on the biochemical and molecular levels.

  20. Use of Molecular Imaging Markers of Glycolysis, Hypoxia and Proliferation (18F-FDG, 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FLT) in a Dog with Fibrosarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zornhagen, Kamilla; Clausen, Malene; Hansen, Anders Elias

    2015-01-01

    Glycolysis, hypoxia, and proliferation are important factors in the tumor microenvironment contributing to treatment-resistant aggressiveness. Imaging these factors using combined functional positron emission tomography and computed tomography can potentially guide diagnosis and management...... tracers were seen. Tracer distributions partially overlapped. It appears that each tracer provides distinct information about tumor heterogeneity and treatment response....

  1. Exosomal Proteome Profiling: A Potential Multi-Marker Cellular Phenotyping Tool to Characterize Hypoxia-Induced Radiation Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefani N. Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation and drug resistance are significant challenges in the treatment of locally advanced, recurrent and metastatic breast cancer that contribute to mortality. Clinically, radiotherapy requires oxygen to generate cytotoxic free radicals that cause DNA damage and allow that damage to become fixed in the genome rather than repaired. However, approximately 40% of all breast cancers have hypoxic tumor microenvironments that render cancer cells significantly more resistant to irradiation. Hypoxic stimuli trigger changes in the cell death/survival pathway that lead to increased cellular radiation resistance. As a result, the development of noninvasive strategies to assess tumor hypoxia in breast cancer has recently received considerable attention. Exosomes are secreted nanovesicles that have roles in paracrine signaling during breast tumor progression, including tumor-stromal interactions, activation of proliferative pathways and immunosuppression. The recent development of protocols to isolate and purify exosomes, as well as advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have facilitated the comprehensive analysis of exosome content and function. Using these tools, studies have demonstrated that the proteome profiles of tumor-derived exosomes are indicative of the oxygenation status of patient tumors. They have also demonstrated that exosome signaling pathways are potentially targetable drivers of hypoxia-dependent intercellular signaling during tumorigenesis. This article provides an overview of how proteomic tools can be effectively used to characterize exosomes and elucidate fundamental signaling pathways and survival mechanisms underlying hypoxia-mediated radiation resistance in breast cancer.

  2. Intrinsic Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    the activity. There has been very little research and theorizing which considers the topic of intrinsic motivation , yet there is a substantial amount...reported within the framework of intrinsic motivation , yet the paper reinterprets the work within that framework. It considers several approaches of

  3. The Clinical Importance of Assessing Tumor Hypoxia: Relationship of Tumor Hypoxia to Prognosis and Therapeutic Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Joseph C.; Lebedev, Artem; Aten, Edward; Madsen, Kathleen; Marciano, Liane

    2014-01-01

    I. Introduction II. The Clinical Importance of Tumor Hypoxia A. Pathophysiology of hypoxia B. Hypoxia's negative impact on the effectiveness of curative treatment 1. Hypoxic tumors accumulate and propagate cancer stem cells 2. Hypoxia reduces the effectiveness of radiotherapy 3. Hypoxia increases metastasis risk and reduces the effectiveness of surgery 4. Hypoxic tumors are resistant to the effects of chemotherapy and chemoradiation C. Hypoxia is prognostic for poor patient outcomes III. Diagnosis of Tumor Hypoxia A. Direct methods 1. Oxygen electrode—direct pO2 measurement most used in cancer research 2. Phosphorescence quenching—alternative direct pO2 measurement 3. Electron paramagnetic resonance 4. 19F-magnetic resonance spectroscopy 5. Overhauser-enhanced MRI B. Endogenous markers of hypoxia 1. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α 2. Carbonic anhydrase IX 3. Glucose transporter 1 4. Osteopontin 5. A combined IHC panel of protein markers for hypoxia 6. Comet assay C. Physiologic methods 1. Near-infrared spectroscopy/tomography—widely used for pulse oximetry 2. Photoacoustic tomography 3. Contrast-enhanced color duplex sonography 4. MRI-based measurements 5. Blood oxygen level-dependent MRI 6. Pimonidazole 7. EF5 (pentafluorinated etanidazole) 8. Hypoxia PET imaging—physiologic hypoxia measurement providing tomographic information a. 18F-fluoromisonidazole b. 18F-fluoroazomycinarabinofuranoside c. 18F-EF5 (pentafluorinated etanidazole) d. 18F-flortanidazole e. Copper (II) (diacetyl-bis (N4-methylthiosemicarbazone)) f. 18F-FDG imaging of hypoxia IV. Modifying Hypoxia to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes A. Use of hypoxia information in radiation therapy planning B. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients responsive to nimorazole C. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients responsive to tirapazamine D. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients

  4. [Birth hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Větr, M

    2015-03-01

    Evaluation of the commonly used laboratory and clinical parameters of the newborn shortly after birth. Check thresholds acidemia, and in relation to the method of termination of pregnancy. Retrospective epidemiological study. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital, Olomouc. Of the 26,869 children born in the years 2000 to 2013 Inclusion criteria (complete clinical and laboratory findings after birth) fulfill 23,471 (87.4%) neonates. Methods for evaluation of newborns included Apgar score calculation and arterial umbilical cord blood pH and lactate analysis. A total of 0.7% (157) of the neonates had severe acidosis pH below 7.00 arterial umbilical cord blood, its prevalence varies annually between 0.1 to 1.1%. Cutoff lactate in relation to pH reserves. Operating cesarean births in particular accounts for more than half of those with worse clinical findings Apgar and pH <7.00, but only 30% supratreshold lactate values. Also worse clinical evaluation after caesarean section is not in accordance with the laboratory findings. Vaginal surgery, especially forceps have a significant share of severe acidosis than cesarean, regardless of their frequency. Risk factor of forceps to pH less 7.00,OR = 9.28 (5.39 -15.77), P = 0.0000000, while caesarean to pH less 7,00 had OR = 1.52 (1.08 to 2.14), P = 0.01408156. The results obtained confirm that acidosis after birth is quite common, although they may not have response on the clinical condition of the newborn after birth. Evaluation of Apgar is little objective for the detection of hypoxia during birth and is influenced by the immaturity of newborn and method of delivery. Lactate levels may contribute to an objective assessment of hypoxia during birth. Values above 6.3 mmol/l can be considered an important indicator of newborn acidosis and birth hypoxia.

  5. Evaluation of uterine cervix cancer hypoxia by PET with {sup 18}F-F.E.T.N.I.M.. Relation with squamous cell carcinoma (S.C.C.) and osteopontin tumoral markers; Evaluation de l'hypoxie du cancer du col uterin par la TEP au {sup 18}F-FETNIM. Relation avec les marqueurs tumoraux SCC et osteopontine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barre, E.; Schlageter, M.H.; Groheux, D.; Vercellino, L.; Lussato, D.; Thoury, A.; Hennequin, V.; Hindie, E.; Barranger, E.; Moretti, J.L. [CHU Saint-Louis-Lariboisiere, universite Paris-7, IMDCT, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the imaging feasibility of hypoxia of cervical squamous cell carcinoma by PET with {sup 18}F-F.E.T.N.I.M. (Iason). to compare the {sup 18}F-F.E.T.N.I.M. uptake to the metabolic uptake in {sup 18}F-F.D.G. and to study their relationship with the squamous cell carcinoma, tumoral marker and osteoponin, circulating tracer of hypoxia. Conclusions: the F.E.T.N.I.M. uptake by the tumor is always of lower level than the {sup 18}F-F.D.G. uptake. By using the ratio Tumor/Muscle, these preliminary results do not enlighten any correlation between the circulating hypoxia tracer and the tumor uptake of {sup 18}F-F.E.T.N.I.M.. (N.C.)

  6. Immunohistochemical Detection of Changes in Tumor Hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, James; Carlin, Sean; Burke, Sean A.; Wen Bixiu; Yang, Kwang Mo; Ling, C. Clifton

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Although hypoxia is a known prognostic factor, its effect will be modified by the rate of reoxygenation and the extent to which the cells are acutely hypoxic. We tested the ability of exogenous and endogenous markers to detect reoxygenation in a xenograft model. Our technique might be applicable to stored patient samples. Methods and Materials: The human colorectal carcinoma line, HT29, was grown in nude mice. Changes in tumor hypoxia were examined by injection of pimonidazole, followed 24 hours later by EF5. Cryosections were stained for these markers and for carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). Tumor hypoxia was artificially manipulated by carbogen exposure. Results: In unstressed tumors, all four markers showed very similar spatial distributions. After carbogen treatment, pimonidazole and EF5 could detect decreased hypoxia. HIF1α staining was also decreased relative to CAIX, although the effect was less pronounced than for EF5. Control tumors displayed small regions that had undergone spontaneous changes in tumor hypoxia, as judged by pimonidazole relative to EF5; most of these changes were reflected by CAIX and HIF1α. Conclusion: HIF1α can be compared with either CAIX or a previously administered nitroimidazole to provide an estimate of reoxygenation

  7. The prognostic value of the hypoxia markers CA IX and GLUT 1 and the cytokines VEGF and IL 6 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goethals Laurence

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several parameters of the tumor microenvironment, such as hypoxia, inflammation and angiogenesis, play a critical role in tumor aggressiveness and treatment response. A major question remains if these markers can be used to stratify patients to certain treatment protocols. The purpose of this study was to investigate the inter-relationship and the prognostic significance of several biological and clinicopathological parameters in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy. Methods We used two subgroups of a retrospective series for which CT-determined tumoral perfusion correlated with local control. In the first subgroup (n = 67, immunohistochemistry for carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX and glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1 was performed on the pretreatment tumor biopsy. In the second subgroup (n = 34, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to determine pretreatment levels of the cytokines vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and interleukin-6 (IL-6 in serum. Correlation was investigated between tumoral perfusion and each of these biological markers, as well as between the markers mutually. The prognostic value of these microenvironmental parameters was also evaluated. Results For CA IX and GLUT-1, the combined assessment of patients with both markers expressed above the median showed an independent correlation with local control (p = 0.02 and disease-free survival (p = 0.04 with a trend for regional control (p = 0.06. In the second subgroup, IL-6 pretreatment serum level above the median was the only independent predictor of local control (p = 0.009, disease-free survival (p = 0.02 and overall survival (p = 0.005. Conclusion To our knowledge, we are the first to report a link in HNSCC between IL-6 pretreatment serum levels and radioresistance in vivo. This link is supported by the strong prognostic association of pretreatment IL-6 with local control, known to be

  8. The prognostic value of the hypoxia markers CA IX and GLUT 1 and the cytokines VEGF and IL 6 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Schutter, Harlinde; Landuyt, Willy; Verbeken, Erik; Goethals, Laurence; Hermans, Robert; Nuyts, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    Several parameters of the tumor microenvironment, such as hypoxia, inflammation and angiogenesis, play a critical role in tumor aggressiveness and treatment response. A major question remains if these markers can be used to stratify patients to certain treatment protocols. The purpose of this study was to investigate the inter-relationship and the prognostic significance of several biological and clinicopathological parameters in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy. We used two subgroups of a retrospective series for which CT-determined tumoral perfusion correlated with local control. In the first subgroup (n = 67), immunohistochemistry for carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) and glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) was performed on the pretreatment tumor biopsy. In the second subgroup (n = 34), enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine pretreatment levels of the cytokines vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum. Correlation was investigated between tumoral perfusion and each of these biological markers, as well as between the markers mutually. The prognostic value of these microenvironmental parameters was also evaluated. For CA IX and GLUT-1, the combined assessment of patients with both markers expressed above the median showed an independent correlation with local control (p = 0.02) and disease-free survival (p = 0.04) with a trend for regional control (p = 0.06). In the second subgroup, IL-6 pretreatment serum level above the median was the only independent predictor of local control (p = 0.009), disease-free survival (p = 0.02) and overall survival (p = 0.005). To our knowledge, we are the first to report a link in HNSCC between IL-6 pretreatment serum levels and radioresistance in vivo. This link is supported by the strong prognostic association of pretreatment IL-6 with local control, known to be the most important parameter to judge radiotherapy

  9. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of the hypoxia marker 18F-HX4 in monkeys and humans determined by using whole-body PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Mohan; Zhang, James J; Bélanger, Marie-José; Stubbs, James B; Hostetler, Eric D; Alpaugh, Katherine; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Yu, Jian Q

    2010-12-01

    F-HX4 is a novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for imaging hypoxia. The purpose of this study was to determine the biodistribution and estimate the radiation dose of F-HX4 using whole-body PET/computed tomography (CT) scans in monkeys and humans. Successive whole-body PET/CT scans were done after the injection of F-HX4 in four healthy humans (422±142 MBq) and in three rhesus monkeys (189±3 MBq). Biodistribution was determined from PET images and organ doses were estimated using OLINDA/EXM software. The bladder, liver, and kidneys showed the highest percentage of the injected radioactivity for humans and monkeys. For humans, approximately 45% of the activity is eliminated by bladder voiding in 3.6 h, and for monkeys 60% is in the bladder content after 3 h. The critical organ is the urinary bladder wall with the highest absorbed radiation dose of 415±18 (monkeys) and 299±38 μGy/MBq (humans), in the 4.8-h bladder voiding interval model. The average value of effective dose for the adult male was estimated at 42±4.2 μSv/MBq from monkey data and 27±2 μSv/MBq from human data. Bladder, kidneys, and liver have the highest uptake of injected F-HX4 activity for both monkeys and humans. The urinary bladder wall receives the highest dose of F-HX4 and is the critical organ. Thus, patients should be encouraged to maintain adequate hydration and void frequently. The effective dose of F-HX4 is comparable with that of other F-based imaging agents.

  10. Determination of tissue hypoxia by physicochemical approach in premature anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeliha Özdemir

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that the determination of the level of tissue hypoxia by the Stewart approach may be an alternative to restrictive transfusion guidelines for timing of transfusion in premature anemia. It also showed that a low Cl/Na ratio can be used as a simple marker of tissue hypoxia.

  11. Hypoxia as a Biomarker and for Personalized Radiation Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vordermark, Dirk; Horsman, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a clinically relevant cause of radiation resistance. Direct measurements of tumor oxygenation have been performed predominantly with the Eppendorf histograph and these have defined the reduced prognosis after radiotherapy in poorly oxygenated tumors, especially head-and-neck cancer...... linked to poor prognosis after radiotherapy and such proteins are considered as potential endogenous hypoxia markers....

  12. Maternal sickle cell trait and fetal hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzar, S

    2000-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell trait (SCT) usually run a benign course. But they may develop vaso-occlusive crisis, which may lead to hypoxia. During these episodes, pregnant women with SCT may effect the developing fetus. This report describes an interesting finding of subtle degree of fetal hypoxia associated with maternal SCT. Twenty mothers with SCT were compared with 20 controls for the amount of circulating nucleated red blood cells (NRBC) and marker of fetal hypoxia at birth. Elevated number of circulating NRBC were noted in the cord blood of neonates born to mother with SCT as compared with controls, suggesting evidence of intrauterine fetal hypoxia. A larger prospective study is needed to elaborate further on this association.

  13. Migraine induced by hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Britze, Josefine

    2016-01-01

    response to hypoxia. In a randomized double-blind crossover study design, 15 migraine with aura patients were exposed to 180 min of normobaric hypoxia (capillary oxygen saturation 70-75%) or sham on two separate days and 14 healthy controls were exposed to hypoxia. Glutamate and lactate concentrations...

  14. Hypoxia induces adipogenic differentitation of myoblastic cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kishimoto, Koshi N., E-mail: kishimoto@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Okuno, Hiroshi; Sano, Hirotaka [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Kaneko, Kazuo [Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Itoi, Eiji [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} C2C12 and G8 myogenic cell lines treated by hypoxia differentiate into adipocytes. {yields} The expression of C/EBP{beta}, {alpha} and PPAR{gamma} were increased under hypoxia. {yields} Myogenic differentiation of C2C12 was inhibited under hypoxia. -- Abstract: Muscle atrophy usually accompanies fat accumulation in the muscle. In such atrophic conditions as back muscles of kyphotic spine and the rotator cuff muscles with torn tendons, blood flow might be diminished. It is known that hypoxia causes trans-differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow into adipocytes. However, it has not been elucidated yet if hypoxia turned myoblasts into adipocytes. We investigated adipogenesis in C2C12 and G8 murine myogenic cell line treated by hypoxia. Cells were also treated with the cocktail of insulin, dexamethasone and IBMX (MDI), which has been known to inhibit Wnt signaling and promote adipogenesis. Adipogenic differentiation was seen in both hypoxia and MDI. Adipogenic marker gene expression was assessed in C2C12. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) {beta}, {alpha} and peroxisome proliferator activating receptor (PPAR) {gamma} were increased by both hypoxia and MDI. The expression profile of Wnt10b was different between hypoxia and MDI. The mechanism for adipogenesis of myoblasts in hypoxia might be regulated by different mechanism than the modification of Wnt signaling.

  15. Hypoxia. 3. Hypoxia and neurotransmitter synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ganesh K

    2011-04-01

    Central and peripheral neurons as well as neuroendocrine cells express a variety of neurotransmitters/modulators that play critical roles in regulation of physiological systems. The synthesis of several neurotransmitters/modulators is regulated by O(2)-requiring rate-limiting enzymes. Consequently, hypoxia resulting from perturbations in O(2) homeostasis can affect neuronal functions by altering neurotransmitter synthesis. Two broad categories of hypoxia are frequently encountered: continuous hypoxia (CH) and intermittent hypoxia (IH). CH is often seen during high altitude sojourns, whereas IH is experienced in sleep-disordered breathing with recurrent apneas (i.e., brief, repetitive cessations of breathing). This article presents what is currently known on the effects of both forms of hypoxia on neurotransmitter levels and neurotransmitter synthesizing enzymes in the central and peripheral nervous systems.

  16. Bayesian Inference of Tumor Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, R.; Tenti, G.; Sivaloganathan, S.

    2009-12-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a state of oxygen deprivation in tumors. It has been associated with aggressive tumor phenotypes and with increased resistance to conventional cancer therapies. In this study, we report on the application of Bayesian sequential analysis in estimating the most probable value of tumor hypoxia quantification based on immunohistochemical assays of a biomarker. The `gold standard' of tumor hypoxia assessment is a direct measurement of pO2 in vivo by the Eppendorf polarographic electrode, which is an invasive technique restricted to accessible sites and living tissues. An attractive alternative is immunohistochemical staining to detect proteins expressed by cells during hypoxia. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is an enzyme expressed on the cell membrane during hypoxia to balance the immediate extracellular microenvironment. CAIX is widely regarded as a surrogate marker of chronic hypoxia in various cancers. The study was conducted with two different experimental procedures. The first data set was a group of three patients with invasive cervical carcinomas, from which five biopsies were obtained. Each of the biopsies was fully sectioned and from each section, the proportion of CAIX-positive cells was estimated. Measurements were made by image analysis of multiple deep sections cut through these biopsies, labeled for CAIX using both immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical techniques [1]. The second data set was a group of 24 patients, also with invasive cervical carcinomas, from which two biopsies were obtained. Bayesian parameter estimation was applied to obtain a reliable inference about the proportion of CAIX-positive cells within the carcinomas, based on the available biopsies. From the first data set, two to three biopsies were found to be sufficient to infer the overall CAIX percentage in the simple form: best estimate±uncertainty. The second data-set led to a similar result in 70% of the cases. In the remaining cases Bayes' theorem warned us

  17. Hypoxia. 3. Hypoxia and neurotransmitter synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ganesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Central and peripheral neurons as well as neuroendocrine cells express a variety of neurotransmitters/modulators that play critical roles in regulation of physiological systems. The synthesis of several neurotransmitters/modulators is regulated by O2-requiring rate-limiting enzymes. Consequently, hypoxia resulting from perturbations in O2 homeostasis can affect neuronal functions by altering neurotransmitter synthesis. Two broad categories of hypoxia are frequently encountered: continuous hyp...

  18. Selective vulnerability in brain hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervos-Navarro, J.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis......Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis...

  19. Nuclear medicine markers of tumor oxygenation and radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J. Donald; Schneider, R.H.; Stobbe, C.C.; Kim, E.; Engelhardt, E.L.; Coia, L.

    1996-01-01

    showed significant differences between marker avidity to R3327-H and R3327-AT tumors. Furthermore, the T/M ratios of this marker in R3327-AT tumor-bearing rats which varied between 1.5 to 7.2 correlated with Eppendorf pO 2 electrode measurements of tumor oxygenation. Measurements of intrinsic tumor radioresistance (plating efficiencies of cells released from tumors irradiated in vivo with 20 Gy) are currently being obtained to determine if nuclear medicine measurements of tumor hypoxia (T/M ratios) can indeed predict for individual tumor radioresistance. Reoxygenation of individual tumors induced by various pharmacologic procedures can be investigated by I-131 and I-125 labeled β-D-IAZXP administration before and after tumor modulation. Conclusion: This research has identified β-D-IAZXP as a second-generation nuclear medicine marker of the iodoazomycin nucleoside class with superior properties to IAZA. The avidity of this marker to tumor tissue in vivo measured by nuclear medicine procedures correlates with independent assays of tumor oxygenation. β-D-IAZXP should become a useful hypoxic marker for studies of intrinsic oxygenation status, reoxygenation mechanisms and hypoxia-targeted therapies in rodent tumor systems. Its chemical, pharmacological and bioreductive properties indicate that it should also have superior hypoxic marking activity in human tumors relative to that of IAZA

  20. Hypoxia and Mucosal Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Sean P.; Campbell, Eric L.; Kominsky, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Sites of inflammation are defined by significant changes in metabolic activity. Recent studies have suggested that O2 metabolism and hypoxia play a prominent role in inflammation so-called “inflammatory hypoxia,” which results from a combination of recruited inflammatory cells (e.g., neutrophils and monocytes), the local proliferation of multiple cell types, and the activation of multiple O2-consuming enzymes during inflammation. These shifts in energy supply and demand result in localized regions of hypoxia and have revealed the important function off the transcription factor HIF (hypoxia-inducible factor) in the regulation of key target genes that promote inflammatory resolution. Analysis of these pathways has provided multiple opportunities for understanding basic mechanisms of inflammation and has defined new targets for intervention. Here, we review recent work addressing tissue hypoxia and metabolic control of inflammation and immunity. PMID:27193451

  1. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of 125I-labeled monoclonal antibody M75 specific for carbonic anhydrase IX, an intrinsic marker of hypoxia, in nude mice xenografted with human colorectal carcinoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chrastina, A.; Závada, Jan; Parkkila, S.; Kaluz, Š.; Kaluzová, M.; Rajcani, J.; Pastorek, J.; Pastorekova, S.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 4 (2003), s. 873-881 ISSN 0020-7136 R&D Projects: GA MZd 45362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : carbonic anhydrase IX Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 4.375, year: 2003

  2. The role of carbonic anhydrase IX in hypoxia control in OSCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sayáns, Mario; Supuran, Claudiu T; Pastorekova, Silvia; Suárez-Peñaranda, José Manuel; Pilar, Gayoso-Diz; Barros-Angueira, Francisco; Gándara-Rey, José Manuel; García-García, Abel

    2013-01-01

    Tumoral microenvironments play a key role in the evolution of solid tumors. Tumor hypoxia is actively involved in the promotion of genetic instability, the invasive capacity of tumor cells, metastasis, and a worsening of the clinical evolution. Endogenous hypoxia markers are controlled by hypoxia-related genes, formed by HIF-1, which is related to several target genes that involve the energy metabolism, angiogenesis, and transmembrane carbonic anhydrases (CAs), mainly CA-IX that is one of the tumor-related carbonic anhydrases. The goal of this paper is to establish the role of CA-IX as a hypoxia marker in OSCC, while analyzing its expression in this type of tumors and its relationship with several clinical and pathological parameters and prognosis, evaluating its relationship with angiogenesis, other hypoxia markers, and clarifying its role in chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Radiation-induced hypoxia may perpetuate late normal tissue injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Feng, Q.-F.; Rabbani, Zahid N.; Amin, Khalid; Samulski, Thaddeus S.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Haroon, Zishan A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not hypoxia develops in rat lung tissue after radiation. Methods and Materials: Fisher-344 rats were irradiated to the right hemithorax using a single dose of 28 Gy. Pulmonary function was assessed by measuring the changes in respiratory rate every 2 weeks, for 6 months after irradiation. The hypoxia marker was administered 3 h before euthanasia. The tissues were harvested at 6 weeks and 6 months after irradiation and processed for immunohistochemistry. Results: A moderate hypoxia was detected in the rat lungs at 6 weeks after irradiation, before the onset of functional or histopathologic changes. The more severe hypoxia, that developed at the later time points (6 months) after irradiation, was associated with a significant increase in macrophage activity, collagen deposition, lung fibrosis, and elevation in the respiratory rate. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed an increase in TGF-β, VEGF, and CD-31 endothelial cell marker, suggesting a hypoxia-mediated activation of the profibrinogenic and proangiogenic pathways. Conclusion: A new paradigm of radiation-induced lung injury should consider postradiation hypoxia to be an important contributing factor mediating a continuous production of a number of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines

  4. Effect of intermittent hypoxic training on hypoxia tolerance based on single-channel EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tinglin; Wang, You; Li, Guang

    2016-03-23

    A single-channel algorithm was proposed in order to study effect of intermittent hypoxic training on hypoxia tolerance based on EEG pattern. EEG was decomposed by ensemble empirical mode decomposition into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) based on the intrinsic local characteristic time scale. Analytic amplitude, analytic frequency, and recurrence property quantified by recurrence quantification analysis were explored on IMFs, and the first two scales revealed difference between normal EEG and hypoxia EEG. Classification accuracy of hypoxia EEG and normal EEG could reach 67.8% before decline of neurobehavioral ability, which represented that hypoxia EEG pattern could be detected at an early stage. Classification accuracy of hypoxia EEG and normal EEG increased with time and deepened intensity of hypoxia was observed by regular shift of hypoxia EEG pattern with time in a three dimensional subspace. The reduced shift and classification accuracy after intermittent hypoxic training represented that hypoxia tolerance enhanced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Stromal Expression of Hypoxia Regulated Proteins Is an Adverse Prognostic Factor in Colorectal Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen H. G. Cleven

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia modifies the phenotype of tumors in a way that promotes tumor aggressiveness and resistance towards chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, the expression and influence of hypoxia-regulated proteins on tumor biology are not well characterized in colorectal tumors. We studied the role of protein expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α, HIF-2α, carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9 and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 in patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. Methods: Expression of HIF-1α, HIF-2α, CA9 and GLUT1 was quantified by immunohistochemistry in 133 colorectal adenocarcinomas. The expression of hypoxia markers was correlated with clinicopathological variables and overall patient survival. Results: Expression of these hypoxia markers was detected in the epithelial compartment of the tumor cells as well as in tumor-associated stromal cells. Although tumor cells frequently showed expression of one or more of the investigated hypoxia markers, no correlation among these markers or with clinical response was found. However, within the tumor stroma, positive correlations between the hypoxia markers HIF-2α, CA9 and GLUT1 were observed. Furthermore expression of HIF-2α and CA9 in tumor-associated stroma were both associated with a significantly reduced overall survival. In the Cox proportional hazard model, stromal HIF-2α expression was an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusion: These observations show, that expression of hypoxia regulated proteins in tumor-associated stromal cells, as opposed to their expression in epithelial tumor cells, is associated with poor outcome in colorectal cancer. This study suggests that tumor hypoxia may influence tumor-associated stromal cells in a way that ultimately contributes to patient prognosis.

  6. Intermittent hypoxia can aggravate motor neuronal loss and cognitive dysfunction in ALS mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Min Kim

    Full Text Available Patients with ALS may be exposed to variable degrees of chronic intermittent hypoxia. However, all previous experimental studies on the effects of hypoxia in ALS have only used a sustained hypoxia model and it is possible that chronic intermittent hypoxia exerts effects via a different molecular mechanism from that of sustained hypoxia. No study has yet shown that hypoxia (either chronic intermittent or sustained can affect the loss of motor neurons or cognitive function in an in vivo model of ALS.To evaluate the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia on motor and cognitive function in ALS mice.Sixteen ALS mice and 16 wild-type mice were divided into 2 groups and subjected to either chronic intermittent hypoxia or normoxia for 2 weeks. The effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia on ALS mice were evaluated using the rotarod, Y-maze, and wire-hanging tests. In addition, numbers of motor neurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord were counted and western blot analyses were performed for markers of oxidative stress and inflammatory pathway activation.Compared to ALS mice kept in normoxic conditions, ALS mice that experienced chronic intermittent hypoxia had poorer motor learning on the rotarod test, poorer spatial memory on the Y-maze test, shorter wire hanging time, and fewer motor neurons in the ventral spinal cord. Compared to ALS-normoxic and wild-type mice, ALS mice that experienced chronic intermittent hypoxia had higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation.Chronic intermittent hypoxia can aggravate motor neuronal death, neuromuscular weakness, and probably cognitive dysfunction in ALS mice. The generation of oxidative stress with activation of inflammatory pathways may be associated with this mechanism. Our study will provide insight into the association of hypoxia with disease progression, and in turn, the rationale for an early non-invasive ventilation treatment in patients with ALS.

  7. Acute hypoxia induces upregulation of microRNA-210 expression in glioblastoma spheroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Tine Agerbo; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Stine Skov

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Tumor hypoxia and presence of tumor stem cells are related to therapeutic resistance and tumorigenicity in glioblastomas. The aim of the present study was therefore to identify microRNAs deregulated in acute hypoxia and to identify possible associated changes in stem cell markers. MATERIALS...... & METHODS: Glioblastoma spheroid cultures were grown in either 2 or 21% oxygen. Subsequently, miRNA profiling was performed and expression of ten stem cell markers was examined. RESULTS: MiRNA-210 was significantly upregulated in hypoxia in patient-derived spheroids. The stem cell markers displayed...... a complex regulatory pattern. CONCLUSION: MiRNA-210 appears to be upregulated in hypoxia in immature glioblastoma cells. This miRNA may represent a therapeutic target although it is not clear from the results whether this miRNA may be related to specific cancer stem cell functions....

  8. Use of Molecular Imaging Markers of Glycolysis, Hypoxia and Proliferation (18F-FDG, 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FLT in a Dog with Fibrosarcoma: The Importance of Individualized Treatment Planning and Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamilla Westarp Zornhagen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Glycolysis, hypoxia, and proliferation are important factors in the tumor microenvironment contributing to treatment-resistant aggressiveness. Imaging these factors using combined functional positron emission tomography and computed tomography can potentially guide diagnosis and management of cancer patients. A dog with fibrosarcoma was imaged using 18F-FDG, 64Cu-ATSM, and 18F-FLT before, during, and after 10 fractions of 4.5 Gy radiotherapy. Uptake of all tracers decreased during treatment. Fluctuations in 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET uptakes and a heterogeneous spatial distribution of the three tracers were seen. Tracer distributions partially overlapped. It appears that each tracer provides distinct information about tumor heterogeneity and treatment response.

  9. Quercetin reverses hypobaric hypoxia-induced hippocampal neurodegeneration and improves memory function in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Jyotsna; Baitharu, Iswar; Sharma, Alpesh Kumar; Dutta, Ruma; Prasad, Dipti; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2013-12-01

    Inadequate oxygen availability at high altitude causes elevated oxidative stress, resulting in hippocampal neurodegeneration and memory impairment. Though oxidative stress is known to be a major cause of neurodegeneration in hypobaric hypoxia, neuroprotective and ameliorative potential of quercetin, a flavonoid with strong antioxidant properties in reversing hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment has not been studied. Four groups of male adult Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia for 7 days in an animal decompression chamber at an altitude of 7600 meters. Rats were supplemented with quercetin orally by gavage during 7 days of hypoxic exposure. Spatial working memory was assessed by a Morris Water Maze before and after exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Changes in oxidative stress markers and apoptotic marker caspase 3 expression in hippocampus were assessed. Histological assessment of neurodegeneration was performed by cresyl violet and fluoro Jade B staining. Our results showed that quercetin supplementation during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia decreased reactive oxygen species levels and consequent lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus by elevating antioxidant status and free radical scavenging enzyme system. There was reduction in caspase 3 expression, and decrease in the number of pyknotic and fluoro Jade B-positive neurons in hippocampus after quercetin supplementation during hypoxic exposure. Behavioral studies showed that quercetin reversed the hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment. These findings suggest that quercetin provides neuroprotection to hippocampal neurons during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia through antioxidative and anti-apoptotic mechanisms, and possesses promising therapeutic potential to ameliorate hypoxia-induced memory dysfunction.

  10. Intermittent hypoxia and neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Lee, Kun-Ze; Dale, Erica A; Reier, Paul J; Mitchell, Gordon S; Fuller, David D

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, it has become clear that brief, repeated presentations of hypoxia [i.e., acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH)] can boost the efficacy of more traditional therapeutic strategies in certain cases of neurologic dysfunction. This hypothesis derives from a series of studies in animal models and human subjects performed over the past 35 yr. In 1980, Millhorn et al. (Millhorn DE, Eldridge FL, Waldrop TG. Respir Physiol 41: 87-103, 1980) showed that electrical stimulation of carotid chemoafferent neurons produced a persistent, serotonin-dependent increase in phrenic motor output that outlasts the stimulus for more than 90 min (i.e., a "respiratory memory"). AIH elicits similar phrenic "long-term facilitation" (LTF) by a mechanism that requires cervical spinal serotonin receptor activation and de novo protein synthesis. From 2003 to present, a series of studies demonstrated that AIH can induce neuroplasticity in the injured spinal cord, causing functional recovery of breathing capacity after cervical spinal injury. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that repeated AIH (rAIH) can induce recovery of limb function, and the functional benefits of rAIH are greatest when paired with task-specific training. Since uncontrolled and/or prolonged intermittent hypoxia can elicit pathophysiology, a challenge of intermittent hypoxia research is to ensure that therapeutic protocols are well below the threshold for pathogenesis. This is possible since many low dose rAIH protocols have induced functional benefits without evidence of pathology. We propose that carefully controlled rAIH is a safe and noninvasive modality that can be paired with other neurorehabilitative strategies including traditional activity-based physical therapy or cell-based therapies such as intraspinal transplantation of neural progenitors. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Hypoxia and Fetal Heart Development

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, A.J.; Zhang, L

    2010-01-01

    Fetal hearts show a remarkable ability to develop under hypoxic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of fetal hearts allows sustained development under low oxygen conditions. In fact, hypoxia is critical for proper myocardial formation. Particularly, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor play central roles in hypoxia-dependent signaling in fetal heart formation, impacting embryonic outflow track remodeling and coronary vessel growth. Although HIF is not th...

  12. Nutrition and exercise can attenuate inflammatory and psychobiological changes in hypoxia?

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    Aline Venticinque Caris

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to hypoxia causes damage in several physiological systems, whose tissues are dependent on the O2 supply. Recently, there has been growing attention on the immunosuppressive and inflammatory potential of the hypoxia, including stimulation, nuclear factor kappa B pathway in macrophages and Th2 response from lymphocytes. These changes may result in transient immunosuppression and happen at the same time to worsening of cognition and other psychobiological aspects. Furthermore, exercise and nutrition, especially glutamine supplementation may provide important role, not pharmacological partially reversing the effects of hypoxia. In fact, recent studies show that moderate exercise can improve cognition in people exposed to hypoxia while the exercise associated with glutamine supplementation can reverse the increase in inflammatory markers and the Th1/Th2 balance. This review aims to bring the light of the discussion about nonpharmacological ways to prevent the effects of hypoxia on the connection between the immune system and the central nervous system.

  13. Is hypoxia training good for muscles and exercise performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Michael; Hoppeler, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Altitude training has become very popular among athletes as a means to further increase exercise performance at sea level or to acclimatize to competition at altitude. Several approaches have evolved during the last few decades, with "live high-train low" and "live low-train high" being the most popular. This review focuses on functional, muscular, and practical aspects derived from extensive research on the "live low-train high" approach. According to this, subjects train in hypoxia but remain under normoxia for the rest of the time. It has been reasoned that exercising in hypoxia could increase the training stimulus. Hypoxia training studies published in the past have varied considerably in altitude (2300-5700 m) and training duration (10 days to 8 weeks) and the fitness of the subjects. The evidence from muscle structural, biochemical, and molecular findings point to a specific role of hypoxia in endurance training. However, based on the available performance capacity data such as maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) and (maximal) power output, hypoxia as a supplement to training is not consistently found to be advantageous for performance at sea level. Stronger evidence exists for benefits of hypoxic training on performance at altitude. "Live low-train high" may thus be considered when altitude acclimatization is not an option. In addition, the complex pattern of gene expression adaptations induced by supplemental training in hypoxia, but not normoxia, suggest that muscle tissue specifically responds to hypoxia. Whether and to what degree these gene expression changes translate into significant changes in protein concentrations that are ultimately responsible for observable structural or functional phenotypes remains open. It is conceivable that the global functional markers such as Vo(2)max and (maximal) power output are too coarse to detect more subtle changes that might still be functionally relevant, at least to high-level athletes.

  14. Hypoxia-Related Hormonal Appetite Modulation in Humans during Rest and Exercise: Mini Review

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    Tadej Debevec

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with numerous chronic ailments and represents one of the major health and economic issues in the modernized societies. Accordingly, there is an obvious need for novel treatment approaches. Recently, based on the reports of reduced appetite and subsequent weight loss following high-altitude sojourns, exposure to hypoxia has been proposed as a viable weight-reduction strategy. While altitude-related appetite modulation is complex and not entirely clear, hypoxia-induced alterations in hormonal appetite modulation might be among the key underlying mechanisms. The present paper summarizes the up-to-date research on hypoxia/altitude-induced changes in the gut and adipose tissue derived peptides related to appetite regulation. Orexigenic hormone ghrelin and anorexigenic peptides leptin, glucagon-like peptide-1, peptide YY, and cholecystokinin have to-date been investigated as potential modulators of hypoxia-driven appetite alterations. Current evidence suggests that hypoxia can, especially acutely, lead to decreased appetite, most probably via reduction of acylated ghrelin concentration. Hypoxia-related short and long-term changes in other hormonal markers are more unclear although hypoxia seems to importantly modulate leptin levels, especially following prolonged hypoxic exposures. Limited evidence also suggests that different activity levels during exposures to hypoxia do not additively affect hormonal appetite markers. Although very few studies have been performed in obese/overweight individuals, the available data indicate that hypoxia/altitude exposures do not seem to differentially affect appetite regulation via hormonal pathways in this cohort. Given the lack of experimental data, future well-controlled acute and prolonged studies are warranted to expand our understanding of hypoxia-induced hormonal appetite modulation and its kinetics in health and disease.

  15. Hypoxia in atherosclerosis and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsch, Elke; Sluimer, Judith C.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia triggers various cellular processes, both in physiological and pathological conditions, and has recently also been implicated in atherosclerosis. This review summarizes the recent evidence for the presence and the role of hypoxia in atherosclerosis. Additionally, it will elucidate on hypoxic

  16. The Role of Hypoxia in the Tumor Microenvironment: Implications for Ovarian Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    kit (Rankin et al., 2012). Tumor sections will be stained and quantified for CD31, an endothelial cell marker . The number of CD31 positive vessels...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0097 TITLE: The Role of Hypoxia in the Tumor Microenvironment: Implications for Ovarian Cancer Therapy PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 0097W81XW 0097The Role of Hypoxia in the Tumor Microenvironment: Implications for Ovarian Cancer Therapy

  17. Minocycline-Suppression of Early Peripheral Inflammation Reduces Hypoxia-Induced Neonatal Brain Injury

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    Yingjun Min

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available While extensive studies report that neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI induces long-term cognitive impairment via inflammatory responses in the brain, little is known about the role of early peripheral inflammation response in HI injury. Here we used a neonatal hypoxia rodent model by subjecting postnatal day 0 (P0d rat pups to systemic hypoxia (3.5 h, a condition that is commonly seen in clinic neonates, Then, an initial dose of minocycline (45 mg/kg was injected intraperitoneally (i.p. 2 h after the hypoxia exposure ended, followed by half dosage (22.5 mg/kg minocycline treatment for next 6 consecutive days daily. Saline was injected as vehicle control. To examine how early peripheral inflammation responded to hypoxia and whether this peripheral inflammation response was associated to cognitive deficits. We found that neonatal hypoxia significantly increased leukocytes not only in blood, but also increased the monocytes in central nervous system (CNS, indicated by presence of C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2+/CD11b+CD45+ positive cells and CCR2 protein expression level. The early onset of peripheral inflammation response was followed by a late onset of brain inflammation that was demonstrated by level of cytokine IL-1β and ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1(Iba-1; activated microglial cell marker. Interrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB, hypomyelination and learning and memory deficits were seen after hypoxia. Interestingly, the cognitive function was highly correlated with hypoxia-induced leukocyte response. Notably, administration of minocycline even after the onset of hypoxia significantly suppressed leukocyte-mediated inflammation as well as brain inflammation, demonstrating neuroprotection in systemic hypoxia-induced brain damage. Our data provided new insights that systemic hypoxia induces cognitive dysfunction, which involves the leukocyte-mediated peripheral inflammation response.

  18. Minocycline-Suppression of Early Peripheral Inflammation Reduces Hypoxia-Induced Neonatal Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yingjun; Li, Hongchun; Xu, Kaiyu; Huang, Yilong; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Weizhou; Li, Longjun; Yang, Ting; Huang, Lixuan; Yang, Ling; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Qian; Zhao, Min; Hua, HaiRong; Mei, Rong; Li, Fan

    2017-01-01

    While extensive studies report that neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) induces long-term cognitive impairment via inflammatory responses in the brain, little is known about the role of early peripheral inflammation response in HI injury. Here we used a neonatal hypoxia rodent model by subjecting postnatal day 0 (P0d) rat pups to systemic hypoxia (3.5 h), a condition that is commonly seen in clinic neonates, Then, an initial dose of minocycline (45 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) 2 h after the hypoxia exposure ended, followed by half dosage (22.5 mg/kg) minocycline treatment for next 6 consecutive days daily. Saline was injected as vehicle control. To examine how early peripheral inflammation responded to hypoxia and whether this peripheral inflammation response was associated to cognitive deficits. We found that neonatal hypoxia significantly increased leukocytes not only in blood, but also increased the monocytes in central nervous system (CNS), indicated by presence of C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2+)/CD11b+CD45+ positive cells and CCR2 protein expression level. The early onset of peripheral inflammation response was followed by a late onset of brain inflammation that was demonstrated by level of cytokine IL-1β and ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1(Iba-1; activated microglial cell marker). Interrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB), hypomyelination and learning and memory deficits were seen after hypoxia. Interestingly, the cognitive function was highly correlated with hypoxia-induced leukocyte response. Notably, administration of minocycline even after the onset of hypoxia significantly suppressed leukocyte-mediated inflammation as well as brain inflammation, demonstrating neuroprotection in systemic hypoxia-induced brain damage. Our data provided new insights that systemic hypoxia induces cognitive dysfunction, which involves the leukocyte-mediated peripheral inflammation response. PMID:28955196

  19. [Hypoxia and polytrauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottó, S; Janos, S G

    1976-01-01

    The importance of polytrauma and hypoxia, resp., is discussed by the authors with regard to the mortality and the common effect of these is analysed. It was found that in the mortality of the patients suffered polytraumatism the first place (59,4%) is taken by such lesions, in which simultaneous lesion of the skull and the thorax occurs. The values of the blood gas and the acid-base balance of the patients who had suffered polytraumatism, were examined in the 12th--24th hours proceding the death. It was found that whereas--using the possibilities of the intensive therapy--the values of pH, paCO2 and BE could be kept in a part of the cases between the physiological limits--the paO2 value was under the normal value in all cases--moreover 2/3 of the values fell into the domain between 40--60 mmHg--signifying severe hypoxia. On the basis of the analysis it may be presumed that in the process leading to death of the patients who had suffered polytraumatism the anoxic hypoxy plays considerable role. This is supported also by the earlier data published by the institute, according to which the mortality in itself high--33.8%--of polytraumatism increases to 71.4%, if it is associated hypoxy. Consequently the aim of the therapy must be to exert the greatest activity in order to prevent or to combat, resp., the anoxic hypoxy.

  20. Intrinsic contractures of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksima, Nader; Besh, Basil R

    2012-02-01

    Contractures of the intrinsic muscles of the fingers disrupt the delicate and complex balance of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles, which allows the hand to be so versatile and functional. The loss of muscle function primarily affects the interphalangeal joints but also may affect etacarpophalangeal joints. The resulting clinical picture is often termed, intrinsic contracture or intrinsic-plus hand. Disruption of the balance between intrinsic and extrinsic muscles has many causes and may be secondary to changes within the intrinsic musculature or the tendon unit. This article reviews diagnosis, etiology, and treatment algorithms in the management of intrinsic contractures of the fingers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Coastal hypoxia and sediment biogeochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Middelburg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The intensity, duration and frequency of coastal hypoxia (oxygen concentration <63 μM are increasing due to human alteration of coastal ecosystems and changes in oceanographic conditions due to global warming. Here we provide a concise review of the consequences of coastal hypoxia for sediment biogeochemistry. Changes in bottom-water oxygen levels have consequences for early diagenetic pathways (more anaerobic at expense of aerobic pathways, the efficiency of re-oxidation of reduced metabolites and the nature, direction and magnitude of sediment-water exchange fluxes. Hypoxia may also lead to more organic matter accumulation and burial and the organic matter eventually buried is also of higher quality, i.e. less degraded. Bottom-water oxygen levels also affect the organisms involved in organic matter processing with the contribution of metazoans decreasing as oxygen levels drop. Hypoxia has a significant effect on benthic animals with the consequences that ecosystem functions related to macrofauna such as bio-irrigation and bioturbation are significantly affected by hypoxia as well. Since many microbes and microbial-mediated biogeochemical processes depend on animal-induced transport processes (e.g. re-oxidation of particulate reduced sulphur and denitrification, there are indirect hypoxia effects on biogeochemistry via the benthos. Severe long-lasting hypoxia and anoxia may result in the accumulation of reduced compounds in sediments and elimination of macrobenthic communities with the consequences that biogeochemical properties during trajectories of decreasing and increasing oxygen may be different (hysteresis with consequences for coastal ecosystem dynamics.

  2. Role of catalase on the hypoxia/reoxygenation stress in the hypoxia-tolerant Nile tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, Alexis F; Campos, Elida G; Cardoso, Luciano A; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2012-05-01

    The specific contribution of each antioxidant enzyme to protection against the reoxygenation-associated oxidative stress after periods of hypoxia is not well understood. We assessed the physiological role of catalase during posthypoxic reoxygenation by the combination of two approaches. First, catalase activity of Nile tilapias (Oreochromis niloticus) was 90% suppressed by intraperitoneal injection of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATZ, 1g/kg). In ATZ-injected fish, liver GSH levels, oxidative stress markers, and activities of other antioxidant enzymes remained unchanged. Second, animals with depleted catalase activity (or those saline-injected) were subjected to a cycle of severe hypoxia (dissolved O(2) = 0.28 mg/l for 3 h) followed by reoxygenation (0.5 to 24 h). Hypoxia did not induce changes in the above-mentioned parameters, either in saline- or in ATZ-injected animals. Reoxygenation increased superoxide dismutase activity in saline-injected fish, whose levels were similar to ATZ-injected animals. The activities of glutathione S-transferase, selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase, and total-GPX and the levels of GSH-eq, GSSG, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances remained unchanged during reoxygenation in both saline- and ATZ-injected fish. The GSSG/GSH-eq ratio in ATZ-injected fish increased at 30 min of reoxygenation compared with saline-injected ones. Reoxygenation also increased carbonyl protein levels in saline-injected fish, whose levels were similar to the ATZ-injected group. Our work shows that inhibition of liver tilapia catalase causes a redox imbalance during reoxygenation, which is insufficient to induce further oxidative stress. This indicates the relevance of hepatic catalase for hypoxia/reoxygenation stress in tilapia fish.

  3. Predicting Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Rob; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Intrinsic motivation can be predicted from participants' perceptions of the social environment and the task environment (Ryan & Deci, 2000)in terms of control, relatedness and competence. To determine the degree of independence of these factors 251 students in higher vocational education (physiotherapy and hotel management) indicated the…

  4. Pretreatment microRNA Expression Impacting on Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Predicts Intrinsic Radiosensitivity in Head and Neck Cancer Cell Lines and Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Monique C.; ten Hoeve, Jelle J.; Grénman, Reidar; Wessels, Lodewyk F.; Kerkhoven, Ron; te Riele, Hein; van den Brekel, Michiel W. M.; Verheij, Marcel; Begg, Adrian C.

    2015-01-01

    Predominant causes of head and neck cancer recurrence after radiotherapy are rapid repopulation, hypoxia, fraction of cancer stem cells, and intrinsic radioresistance. Currently, intrinsic radioresistance can only be assessed by ex vivo colony assays. Besides being time-consuming, colony assays do

  5. Pretreatment microRNA Expression Impacting on Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Predicts Intrinsic Radiosensitivity in Head and Neck Cancer Cell Lines and Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, M.C.; ten Hoeve, J.J.; Grénman, R.; Wessels, L.F.; Kerkhoven, R.; te Riele, H.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.; Verheij, M.; Begg, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Predominant causes of head and neck cancer recurrence after radiotherapy are rapid repopulation, hypoxia, fraction of cancer stem cells, and intrinsic radioresistance. Currently, intrinsic radioresistance can only be assessed by ex vivo colony assays. Besides being time-consuming, colony

  6. Pretreatment microRNA Expression Impacting on Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Predicts Intrinsic Radiosensitivity in Head and Neck Cancer Cell Lines and Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M.C. de; Hoeve, J.J. Ten; Grenman, R.; Wessels, L.F.; Kerkhoven, R.; Riele, H. Te; Brekel, M.W. van den; Verheij, M.; Begg, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Predominant causes of head and neck cancer recurrence after radiotherapy are rapid repopulation, hypoxia, fraction of cancer stem cells, and intrinsic radioresistance. Currently, intrinsic radioresistance can only be assessed by ex vivo colony assays. Besides being time-consuming, colony

  7. Mechanical and hypoxia stress can cause chondrocytes apoptosis through over-activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ziwei; Zhou, Min; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Mengjiao; Chen, Sheng; Li, Huang

    2017-12-01

    To examine the role of mechanical force and hypoxia on chondrocytes apoptosis and osteoarthritis (OA)-liked pathological change on mandibular cartilage through over-activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). We used two in vitro models to examine the effect of mechanical force and hypoxia on chondrocytes apoptosis separately. The mandibular condylar chondrocytes were obtained from three-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. Flexcell 5000T apparatus was used to produce mechanical forces (12%, 0.5Hz, 24h vs 20%, 0.5Hz, 24h) on chondrocytes. For hypoxia experiment, the concentration of O 2 was down regulated to 5% or 1%. Cell apoptosis rates were quantified by annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) double staining and FACS analysis. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blot were performed to evaluate the activation of ERS and cellular hypoxia. Then we used a mechanical stress loading rat model to verify the involvement of ERS in OA-liked mandibular cartilage pathological change. Histological changes in mandibular condylar cartilage were assessed via hematoxylin & eosin (HE) staining. Immunohistochemistry of GRP78, GRP94, HIF-1α, and HIF-2α were performed to evaluate activation of the ERS and existence of hypoxia. Apoptotic cells were detected by the TUNEL method. Tunicamycin, 20% mechanical forces and hypoxia (1% O 2 ) all significantly increased chondrocytes apoptosis rates and expression of ERS markers (GRP78, GRP94 and Caspase 12). However, 12% mechanical forces can only increase the apoptotic sensitivity of chondrocytes. Mechanical stress resulted in OA-liked pathological change on rat mandibular condylar cartilage which included thinning cartilage and bone erosion. The number of apoptotic cells increased. ERS and hypoxia markers expressions were also enhanced. Salubrinal, an ERS inhibitor, can reverse these effects in vitro and in vivo through the down-regulation of ERS markers and hypoxia markers. We confirmed that mechanical stress and local hypoxia both

  8. Augmentation of aerobic respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle by hypoxia preconditioning with cobalt chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Saurabh; Shukla, Dhananjay; Bansal, Anju

    2012-01-01

    High altitude/hypoxia training is known to improve physical performance in athletes. Hypoxia induces hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its downstream genes that facilitate hypoxia adaptation in muscle to increase physical performance. Cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ), a hypoxia mimetic, stabilizes HIF-1, which otherwise is degraded in normoxic conditions. We studied the effects of hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl 2 supplementation on physical performance, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis using rodent model. The results showed significant increase in physical performance in cobalt supplemented rats without (two times) or with training (3.3 times) as compared to control animals. CoCl 2 supplementation in rats augmented the biological activities of enzymes of TCA cycle, glycolysis and cytochrome c oxidase (COX); and increased the expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) in muscle showing increased glucose metabolism by aerobic respiration. There was also an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle observed by increased mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis markers which was further confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, nitric oxide production increased in skeletal muscle in cobalt supplemented rats, which seems to be the major reason for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) induction and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, in conclusion, we state that hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl 2 supplementation in rats increases mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose uptake and metabolism by aerobic respiration in skeletal muscle, which leads to increased physical performance. The significance of this study lies in understanding the molecular mechanism of hypoxia adaptation and improvement of work performance in normal as well as extreme conditions like hypoxia via hypoxia preconditioning. -- Highlights: ► We supplemented rats with CoCl 2 for 15 days along with training. ► CoCl 2 supplementation

  9. Autophagy-associated atrophy and metabolic remodeling of the mouse diaphragm after short-term intermittent hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Giordano

    Full Text Available Short-term intermittent hypoxia (IH is common in patients with acute respiratory disorders. Although prolonged exposure to hypoxia induces atrophy and increased fatigability of skeletal muscle, the response to short-term IH is less well known. We hypothesized that the diaphragm and limb muscles would adapt differently to short-term IH given that hypoxia stimulates ventilation and triggers a superimposed exercise stimulus in the diaphragm.We determined the structural, metabolic, and contractile properties of the mouse diaphragm after 4 days of IH (8 hours per day, 30 episodes per hour to a FiO2 nadir=6%, and compared responses in the diaphragm to a commonly studied reference limb muscle, the tibialis anterior. Outcome measures included muscle fiber size, assays of muscle proteolysis (calpain, ubiquitin-proteasome, and autophagy pathways, markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, quantification of intramyocellular lipid and lipid metabolism genes, type I myosin heavy chain (MyHC expression, and in vitro contractile properties.After 4 days of IH, the diaphragm alone demonstrated significant atrophy (30% decrease of myofiber size together with increased LC3B-II protein (2.4-fold and mRNA markers of the autophagy pathway (LC3B, Gabarapl1, Bnip3, whereas active calpain and E3 ubiquitin ligases (MuRF1, atrogin-1 were unaffected in both muscles. Succinate dehydrogenase activity was significantly reduced by IH in both muscles. However, only the diaphragm exhibited increased intramyocellular lipid droplets (2.5-fold after IH, along with upregulation of genes linked to activated lipid metabolism. In addition, although the diaphragm showed evidence for acute fatigue immediately following IH, it underwent an adaptive fiber type switch toward slow type I MyHC-expressing fibers, associated with greater intrinsic endurance of the muscle during repetitive stimulation in vitro.Short-term IH induces preferential atrophy in the mouse diaphragm

  10. Hypoxia, Oxidative Stress and Fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus Netzer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disturbances in white adipose tissue in obese individuals contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Impaired insulin action in adipocytes is associated with elevated lipolysis and increased free fatty acids leading to ectopic fat deposition in liver and skeletal muscle. Chronic adipose tissue hypoxia has been suggested to be part of pathomechanisms causing dysfunction of adipocytes. Hypoxia can provoke oxidative stress in human and animal adipocytes and reduce the production of beneficial adipokines, such as adiponectin. However, time-dose responses to hypoxia relativize the effects of hypoxic stress. Long-term exposure of fat cells to hypoxia can lead to the production of beneficial substances such as leptin. Knowledge of time-dose responses of hypoxia on white adipose tissue and the time course of generation of oxidative stress in adipocytes is still scarce. This paper reviews the potential links between adipose tissue hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation caused by adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage infiltration and production of inflammatory mediators.

  11. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Roland Bénabou; Jean Tirole

    2003-01-01

    A central tenet of economics is that individuals respond to incentives. For psychologists and sociologists, in contrast, rewards and punishments are often counterproductive, because they undermine "intrinsic motivation". We reconcile these two views, showing how performance incentives offered by an informed principal (manager, teacher, parent) can adversely impact an agent's (worker, child) perception of the task, or of his own abilities. Incentives are then only weak reinforcers in the short...

  12. Screening of hypoxia-inducible genes in sporadic ALS.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, Simon

    2008-10-01

    Genetic variations in two hypoxia-inducible angiogenic genes, VEGF and ANG, have been linked with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS). Common variations in these genes may reduce the levels or functioning of their products. VEGF and ANG belong to a larger group of angiogenic genes that are up-regulated under hypoxic conditions. We hypothesized that common genetic variation across other members of this group may also predispose to sporadic ALS. To screen other hypoxia-inducible angiogenic genes for association with SALS, we selected 112 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tgSNPs) that captured the common genetic variation across 16 VEGF-like and eight ANG-like hypoxia-inducible genes. Screening for association was performed in 270 Irish individuals with typical SALS and 272 ethnically matched unrelated controls. SNPs showing association in the Irish phase were genotyped in a replication sample of 281 Swedish sporadic ALS patients and 286 Swedish controls. Seven markers showed association in the Irish. The one modest replication signal observed in the Swedish replication sample, at rs3801158 in the gene inhibin beta A, was for the opposite allele vs. the Irish cohort. We failed to detect association of common variation across 24 candidate hypoxia-inducible angiogenic genes with SALS.

  13. Hypobaric intermittent hypoxia attenuates hypoxia-induced depressor response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Cui

    Full Text Available Hypobaric intermittent hypoxia (HIH produces many favorable effects in the cardiovascular system such as anti-hypertensive effect. In this study, we showed that HIH significantly attenuated a depressor response induced by acute hypoxia.Sprague-Dawley rats received HIH in a hypobaric chamber simulating an altitude of 5000 m. The artery blood pressure (ABP, heart rate (HR and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA were recorded in anesthetized control rats and rats received HIH. The baseline ABP, HR and RSNA were not different between HIH and control rats. Acute hypoxia-induced decrease in ABP was significantly attenuated in HIH rat compared with control rats. However, acute hypoxia-induced increases in HR and RSNA were greater in HIH rat than in control rats. After removal of bilateral ascending depressor nerves, acute hypoxia-induced depressor and sympathoexcitatory responses were comparable in control and HIH rats. Furthermore, acute hypoxia-induced depressor and sympathoexcitatory responses did not differ between control and HIH groups after blocking ATP-dependent K(+ channels by glibenclamide. The baroreflex function evaluated by intravenous injection of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside was markedly augmented in HIH rats compared with control rats. The pressor and sympathoexcitatory responses evoked by intravenous injection of cyanide potassium were also significantly greater in HIH rats than in control rats.Our findings suggest that HIH suppresses acute hypoxia-induced depressor response through enhancement of baroreflex and chemoreflex function, which involves activation of ATP-dependent K(+ channels. This study provides new information and underlying mechanism on the beneficiary effect of HIH on maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis.

  14. Intrinsic and extrinsic mortality reunited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, Jacob J E; Wensink, Maarten J; Rozing, Maarten P

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic and extrinsic mortality are often separated in order to understand and measure aging. Intrinsic mortality is assumed to be a result of aging and to increase over age, whereas extrinsic mortality is assumed to be a result of environmental hazards and be constant over age. However......, allegedly intrinsic and extrinsic mortality have an exponentially increasing age pattern in common. Theories of aging assert that a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic stressors underlies the increasing risk of death. Epidemiological and biological data support that the control of intrinsic as well...... as extrinsic stressors can alleviate the aging process. We argue that aging and death can be better explained by the interaction of intrinsic and extrinsic stressors than by classifying mortality itself as being either intrinsic or extrinsic. Recognition of the tight interaction between intrinsic and extrinsic...

  15. 12TH Biennial International Hypoxia Symposium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roach, Robert

    2001-01-01

    The International Hypoxia Symposia (IHS) meet every other year to bring together international experts from many fields to focus on and discuss the state of the art in normal and pathophysiological responses to hypoxia...

  16. Physiological determinants of human acute hypoxia tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    AbstractIntroduction. We investigated possible physiological determinants of variability in hypoxia tolerance in subjects given a 5-minute normobaric exposure to 25,000 ft equivalent. Physiological tolerance to hypoxia was defined as the magnitude of...

  17. Overexpression of Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase Enhances Tumor Hypoxia: An Insight into the Relationship of Hypoxia and Angiogenesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliki Kostourou

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxygenation status of tumors derived from wild-type C6 glioma cells and clone D27 cells overexpressing dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH was assessed in vivo using a variety of direct and indirect assays of hypoxia. Clone D27 tumors exhibit a more aggressive and better-vascularized phenotype compared to wild-type C6 gliomas. Immunohistochemical analyses using the 2-nitroimidazole hypoxia marker pimonidazole, fiber optic OxyLite measurements of tumor pO2, and localized 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of tumor bioenergetic status and pH clearly demonstrated that the D27 tumors were more hypoxic compared to C6 wild type. In the tumor extracts, only glucose concentrations were significantly lower in the D27 tumors. Elevated Glut-1 expression, a reliable functional marker for hypoxia-inducible factor-1-mediated metabolic adaptation, was observed in the D27 tumors. Together, the data show that overexpression of DDAH results in C6 gliomas that are more hypoxic compared to wild-type tumors, and point strongly to an inverse relationship of tumor oxygenation and angiogenesis in vivo-a concept now being supported by the enhanced understanding of oxygen sensing at the molecular level.

  18. Energy status parameters, hypoxia fraction and radiocurability across tumor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerweck, L.E.; Koutcher, J.; Zaidi, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    Under full nutrient in vitro conditions, the cellular adenylate energy charge of six different rodent and human tumor cell types was identical, i.e., 0.94 ± 0.01, suggesting the potential utility of this parameter as a cell (and tissue) independent marker of nutrient deprivation and hypoxia, across tumor types. The adenylate energy charge values of tumors, arising from these cells, was reduced and variable ranging from 0.72 to 0.91 for the various tumor types. However, neither the tumor adenylate energy charge, NTP/Pi, nor PCr/Pi ratios correlated with the radiobiologic hypoxic cell fractions across tumor types. The reduced adenylate energy charge in vivo suggests varying degrees of nutrient deprivation in the different tumor types, however, factors other than or in addition to hypoxia likely contribute to tumor energy status. (orig.)

  19. Clinical Aspects of Hypoxia-inducible Factors in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Birgitte Mayland; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2010-01-01

    Clinical Aspects of Hypoxia-inducible Factors in Colorectal Cancer  Birgitte Mayland Havelund1,4 MD, Karen-Lise Garm Spindler1,4 MD, PhD, Flemming Brandt Sørensen2,4 MD, DMSc, Ivan Brandslund3 MD, DMSc, Anders Jakobsen1,4 MD, DMSc.1Department of Oncology, 2Pathology and 3Biochemistry, Vejle...... Hospital, Vejle, Denmark4Institute of Regional Health Services Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense DenmarkBackgroundPrognostic and predictive markers are needed for individualizing the treatment of colorectal cancer. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is a transcription-inducing factor which...... the predictive and prognostic value of HIF-1α in colorectal cancer.Materials and MethodsThe project is divided into 3 substudies:1. Biological and methodological aspects. The expression of HIF-1α measured by immunohistochemistry in paraffin embedded tissue is related to single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP...

  20. Clinical Aspects of Hypoxia-inducible Factors in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Birgitte Mayland; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    is to investigate the predictive and prognostic value of HIF-1α in colorectal cancer. Materials and Methods The project is divided into 3 substudies: 1. Biological and methodological aspects. The expression of HIF-1α measured by immunohistochemistry in paraffin embedded tissue is related to single nucleotide......Clinical Aspects of Hypoxia-inducible Factors in Colorectal Cancer   Birgitte Mayland Havelund1,4 MD, Karen-Lise Garm Spindler1,4 MD, PhD, Flemming Brandt Sørensen2,4 MD, DMSc, Ivan Brandslund3 MD, DMSc, Anders Jakobsen1,4 MD, DMSc. 1Department of Oncology, 2Pathology and 3Biochemistry, Vejle...... Hospital, Vejle, Denmark 4Institute of Regional Health Services Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense Denmark Background Prognostic and predictive markers are needed for individualizing the treatment of colorectal cancer. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is a transcription-inducing factor...

  1. Clinical Aspects of Hypoxia-inducible Factors in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Birgitte Mayland; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    Hospital, Vejle, Denmark 4Institute of Regional Health Services Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense Denmark Background Prognostic and predictive markers are needed for individualizing the treatment of colorectal cancer. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is a transcription-inducing factor......Clinical Aspects of Hypoxia-inducible Factors in Colorectal Cancer   Birgitte Mayland Havelund1,4 MD, Karen-Lise Garm Spindler1,4 MD, PhD, Flemming Brandt Sørensen2,4 MD, DMSc, Ivan Brandslund3 MD, DMSc, Anders Jakobsen1,4 MD, DMSc. 1Department of Oncology, 2Pathology and 3Biochemistry, Vejle...... is to investigate the predictive and prognostic value of HIF-1α in colorectal cancer. Materials and Methods The project is divided into 3 substudies: 1. Biological and methodological aspects. The expression of HIF-1α measured by immunohistochemistry in paraffin embedded tissue is related to single nucleotide...

  2. Hypoxia: Exposure Time Until Significant Performance Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-07

    1994). Acute hypoxia fails to influence two aspects of short-term memory : implications for the source of cognitive deficits. Aviation, Space...Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton HYPOXIA : EXPOSURE TIME UNTIL SIGNIFICANT PERFORMANCE EFFECTS PHILLIPS, J.P., DRUMMOND, L.A...Andrews, CAPT, MSC, USN Commanding Officer i 1 ARTICLE TYPE: Research Article TITLE: Hypoxia : Exposure Time Until Significant Performance

  3. Teleosts in hypoxia : Aspects of anaerobic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Thillart, G.; van Waarde, Aren

    1985-01-01

    Moderate hypoxia can be tolerated by many fish species, while only some species survive severe hypoxia or anoxia. Hypoxia usually activates anaerobic glycolysis, which may be temporary when the animals are able to improve their oxygen extraction capacity. Switching over to aerobic metabolism allows

  4. Hypoxia-Independent Downregulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Targets by Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragnum, Harald Bull [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Røe, Kathrine [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Division of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog (Norway); Holm, Ruth; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana [Department of Pathology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Nesland, Jahn Marthin [Department of Pathology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Aarnes, Eva-Katrine [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Ree, Anne Hansen [Division of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog (Norway); Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Flatmark, Kjersti [Department of Tumor Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Seierstad, Therese [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen (Norway); Lilleby, Wolfgang [Department of Oncology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Lyng, Heidi, E-mail: heidi.lyng@rr-research.no [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We explored changes in hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) signaling during androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenografts under conditions in which no significant change in immunostaining of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole had occurred. Methods and Materials: Gene expression profiles of volume-matched androgen-exposed and androgen-deprived CWR22 xenografts, with similar pimonidazole-positive fractions, were compared. Direct targets of androgen receptor (AR) and HIF1 transcription factors were identified among the differentially expressed genes by using published lists. Biological processes affected by ADT were determined by gene ontology analysis. HIF1α protein expression in xenografts and biopsy samples from 35 patients receiving neoadjuvant ADT was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: A total of 1344 genes showed more than 2-fold change in expression by ADT, including 35 downregulated and 5 upregulated HIF1 targets. Six genes were shared HIF1 and AR targets, and their downregulation was confirmed with quantitative RT-PCR. Significant suppression of the biological processes proliferation, metabolism, and stress response in androgen-deprived xenografts was found, consistent with tumor regression. Nineteen downregulated HIF1 targets were involved in those significant biological processes, most of them in metabolism. Four of these were shared AR and HIF1 targets, including genes encoding the regulatory glycolytic proteins HK2, PFKFB3, and SLC2A1. Most of the downregulated HIF1 targets were induced by hypoxia in androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines, confirming their role as hypoxia-responsive HIF1 targets in prostate cancer. Downregulation of HIF1 targets was consistent with the absence of HIF1α protein in xenografts and downregulation in patients by ADT (P<.001). Conclusions: AR repression by ADT may lead to downregulation of HIF1 signaling independently of hypoxic fraction, and this may contribute to

  5. Hypoxia-Independent Downregulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Targets by Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragnum, Harald Bull; Røe, Kathrine; Holm, Ruth; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana; Nesland, Jahn Marthin; Aarnes, Eva-Katrine; Ree, Anne Hansen; Flatmark, Kjersti; Seierstad, Therese; Lilleby, Wolfgang; Lyng, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We explored changes in hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) signaling during androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenografts under conditions in which no significant change in immunostaining of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole had occurred. Methods and Materials: Gene expression profiles of volume-matched androgen-exposed and androgen-deprived CWR22 xenografts, with similar pimonidazole-positive fractions, were compared. Direct targets of androgen receptor (AR) and HIF1 transcription factors were identified among the differentially expressed genes by using published lists. Biological processes affected by ADT were determined by gene ontology analysis. HIF1α protein expression in xenografts and biopsy samples from 35 patients receiving neoadjuvant ADT was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: A total of 1344 genes showed more than 2-fold change in expression by ADT, including 35 downregulated and 5 upregulated HIF1 targets. Six genes were shared HIF1 and AR targets, and their downregulation was confirmed with quantitative RT-PCR. Significant suppression of the biological processes proliferation, metabolism, and stress response in androgen-deprived xenografts was found, consistent with tumor regression. Nineteen downregulated HIF1 targets were involved in those significant biological processes, most of them in metabolism. Four of these were shared AR and HIF1 targets, including genes encoding the regulatory glycolytic proteins HK2, PFKFB3, and SLC2A1. Most of the downregulated HIF1 targets were induced by hypoxia in androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines, confirming their role as hypoxia-responsive HIF1 targets in prostate cancer. Downregulation of HIF1 targets was consistent with the absence of HIF1α protein in xenografts and downregulation in patients by ADT (P<.001). Conclusions: AR repression by ADT may lead to downregulation of HIF1 signaling independently of hypoxic fraction, and this may contribute to

  6. Coastal hypoxia responses to remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, W. M.; Testa, J. M.; Conley, D. J.; Gilbert, D.; Hagy, J. D.

    2009-07-01

    The incidence and intensity of hypoxic waters in coastal aquatic ecosystems has been expanding in recent decades coincident with eutrophication of the coastal zone. Because of the negative effects hypoxia has on many organisms, extensive efforts have been made to reduce the size and duration of hypoxia in many coastal waters. Although it has been broadly assumed that reductions in nutrient loading rates would reverse eutrophication and consequently, hypoxia, recent analyses of historical data from European and North American coastal systems suggest little evidence for simple linear response trajectories. We review existing data, analyses, and models that relate variations in the extent and intensity of hypoxia to changes in loading rates for inorganic nutrients and labile organic matter. We also assess existing knowledge of physical and ecological factors regulating oxygen in coastal marine waters and examine a broad range of examples where hypoxia responses to reductions in nutrient (or organic matter) inputs have been documented. Of the 22 systems identified where concurrent time series of loading and O2 were available, half displayed relatively clear and direct recoveries following remediation. We explored in detail 5 well-studied systems that have exhibited complex, non-linear responses to loading, including apparent "regime shifts." A summary of these analyses suggests that O2 conditions improved rapidly and linearly in systems where remediation focused on organic inputs from sewage plants, which were the primary drivers of hypoxia. In larger more open systems where diffuse nutrient loads are more important in fueling O2 depletion and where climatic influences are pronounced, responses to remediation tend to follow non-linear trends that may include hysteresis and time-lags. Improved understanding of hypoxia remediation requires that future studies use comparative approaches and consider multiple regulating factors including: (1) the dominant temporal scales

  7. Effect of intermittent hypoxic training on hypoxia tolerance based on brain functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Zhang, Tinglin; Chen, Xiaojian; Shang, Chungang; Wang, You

    2016-12-01

    The difference of brain functional connectivity between hypoxic and normal states was studied. The impact of intermittent hypoxic training on the hypoxia tolerance of the brain was explored. Multivariable empirical mode decomposition was applied to extract common inherent modes of multichannel EEG adaptively instead of a priori selection of filter bandwidth, and the first two scales of intrinsic mode functions expressed the differences in brain connectivity. To quantify synchronization and search for consistent performance, coherence, phase locking value and synchronization likelihood were all utilized. Brain networks extracted from these synchronization measures all displayed that both local and global functional connectivity declined with increasing time in a hypoxic state. Furthermore, early hypoxia of the brain was represented on brain connectivity before mental fatigue was detected by conventional neurobehavioral evaluation. The decrease of connectivity tended to slow down in hypoxic conditions after training, which indicated that hypoxia tolerance strengthened because of the hypoxic training.

  8. Marker development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    This report is to discuss the marker development for radioactive waste disposal sites. The markers must be designed to last 10,000 years, and place no undue burdens on the future generations. Barriers cannot be constructed that preclude human intrusion. Design specifications for surface markers will be discussed, also marker pictograms will also be covered.

  9. Hypoxia-induced changes in neuronal network properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Fernando; Ramirez, Jan-Marino

    2005-12-01

    Because of their high energetic demand, neurons within the mammalian central nervous system are extremely sensitive to changes in partial pressure of oxygen. Faced with acute hypoxic conditions, an organism must follow a complex and highly dynamic emergency plan to secure survival. Behavioral functions that are not immediately essential for survival are turned off, and critical behaviors (such as breathing) undergo a biphasic response. An augmentation of breathing is initially adaptive, whereas prolonged hypoxic conditions are better served by an energy-saving mode. However, the hypoxic response of an organism depends on many additional factors. Environmental conditions, the animal's age and health, and the pattern (continuous vs intermittent) and duration (chronic vs acute) of hypoxia greatly determine the specific course of a hypoxic response. Different forms of hypoxia can cause pathology or be used as therapy. Therefore, it is not surprising that the hypoxic response of an organism results from widespread and highly diverse reconfigurations of neuronal network functions in different brain areas that are accomplished by diverse hypoxic changes at all levels of the nervous system (i.e., molecular, cellular, synaptic, neuronal, network). Hypoxia-induced changes in synaptic transmission are generally depressive and result primarily from presynaptic mechanisms, whereas changes in intrinsic properties involve excitatory and inhibitory alterations involving the majority of K+, Na+, and Ca2+ channels. This article reviews the response of the nervous system to hypoxia, accounting for all levels of integration from the cellular to the network level, and postulates that a better understanding of the diversity of cellular events is only possible if cellular and network events are considered in a functional and organismal context.

  10. Emerging evidence of the physiological role of hypoxia in mammary development and lactation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a physiological or pathological condition of a deficiency of oxygen supply in the body as a whole or within a tissue. During hypoxia, tissues undergo a series of physiological responses to defend themselves against a low oxygen supply, including increased angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, and glucose uptake. The effects of hypoxia are mainly mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), which is a heterodimeric transcription factor consisting of α and β subunits. HIF-1β is constantly expressed, whereas HIF-1α is degraded under normal oxygen conditions. Hypoxia stabilizes HIF-1α and the HIF complex, and HIF then translocates into the nucleus to initiate the expression of target genes. Hypoxia has been extensively studied for its role in promoting tumor progression, and emerging evidence also indicates that hypoxia may play important roles in physiological processes, including mammary development and lactation. The mammary gland exhibits an increasing metabolic rate from pregnancy to lactation to support mammary growth, lactogenesis, and lactation. This process requires increasing amounts of oxygen consumption and results in localized chronic hypoxia as confirmed by the binding of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole HCl in mouse mammary gland. We hypothesized that this hypoxic condition promotes mammary development and lactation, a hypothesis that is supported by the following several lines of evidence: i) Mice with an HIF-1α deletion selective for the mammary gland have impaired mammary differentiation and lipid secretion, resulting in lactation failure and striking changes in milk compositions; ii) We recently observed that hypoxia significantly induces HIF-1α-dependent glucose uptake and GLUT1 expression in mammary epithelial cells, which may be responsible for the dramatic increases in glucose uptake and GLUT1 expression in the mammary gland during the transition period from late pregnancy to early lactation; and iii) Hypoxia and HIF-1α increase the

  11. Intrinsic Chevrolets at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.; Collins, J.C.; Ellis, S.D.; Gunion, J.F.; Mueller, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of the production at high energy of heavy quarks, supersymmetric particles and other large mass colored systems via the intrinsic twist-six components in the proton wave function is discussed. While the existing data do not rule out the possible relevance of intrinsic charm production at present energies, the extrapolation of such intrinsic contributions to very high masses and energies suggests that they will not play an important role at the SSC

  12. Differential expression of sirtuin 2 and adipocyte maturation restriction: an adaptation process during hypoxia in fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmini Ekambaram

    2017-09-01

    b; Padmini and Tharani, 2015. In this context, fish adipocytes of both conditions were subjected to in vitro hypoxia for 1 h (in the pre/trigassed incubator with the supply of 1% O2; 94% N2; 5% CO2 and were analysed for the expression of adipokines, adipogenic transcription factors and anti-adipogenic markers in fish adipocytes. Elevation of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, TNFα and leptin along with decreased adiponectin, adipogenic transcription factors and altering sirtuins were observed in test adipocytes and in control adipocytes on in vitro hypoxia. This suggests that adipocytes may follow internal caloric restriction as portrayed from cytomorphological/ultrastructural analysis, limiting adipocyte maturation process, one of the adaptive mechanisms triggered by adipocyte of fish surviving in Ennore estuary. Prolonged exposure to hypoxia (test on in vitro hypoxia for 1 h showed a drastic alteration in these components leading to both structural and biological fluctuation when compared to limited hypoxic condition (field-hypoxic and control on in vitro hypoxia. Our study concludes that hypoxia may serve as the chief molecular cue in eliciting adipocyte maturation restriction though metabolic reprogramming and it also shows the significance of adipocyte maturation restriction in imparting survival mechanism.

  13. Plasma volume in acute hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T D; Klausen, T; Richalet, J P

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to acute hypoxia is associated with changes in body fluid homeostasis and plasma volume (PV). This study compared a dye dilution technique using Evans' blue (PV[Evans']) with a carbon monoxide (CO) rebreathing method (PV[CO]) for measurements of PV in ten normal subjects at sea level...

  14. Hypoxia and development : Air conditional

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voesenek, L.A.C.J.; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    Hypoxia has long been studied in relation to anaerobic metabolism. It has now been shown to control development, acting as a cue to maintain the seedling’s protective apical hook and a trigger of developmental decisions both before and after the plantlet emerges from the soil into the light.

  15. Nitric oxide signaling in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J J David; Man, H S Jeffrey; Marsden, Philip A

    2012-03-01

    Endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) is classically viewed as a regulator of vasomotor tone. NO plays an important role in regulating O(2) delivery through paracrine control of vasomotor tone locally and cardiovascular and respiratory responses centrally. Very soon after the cloning and functional characterization of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), studies on the interaction between O(2) and NO made the paradoxical finding that hypoxia led to decreases in eNOS expression and function. Why would decreases in O(2) content in tissues elicit a loss of a potent endothelial-derived vasodilator? We now know that restricting our view of NO as a regulator of vasomotor tone or blood pressure limited deeper levels of mechanistic insight. Exciting new studies indicate that functional interactions between NO and O(2) exhibit profound complexity and are relevant to diseases states, especially those associated with hypoxia in tissues. NOS isoforms catalytically require O(2). Hypoxia regulates steady-state expression of the mRNA and protein abundance of the NOS enzymes. Animals genetically deficient in NOS isoforms have perturbations in their ability to adapt to changes in O(2) supply or demand. Most interestingly, the intracellular pathways for O(2) sensing that evolved to ensure an appropriate balance of O(2) delivery and utilization intersect with NO signaling networks. Recent studies demonstrate that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilization and transcriptional activity is achieved through two parallel pathways: (1) a decrease in O(2)-dependent prolyl hydroxylation of HIF and (2) S-nitrosylation of HIF pathway components. Recent findings support a role for S-nitrosothiols as hypoxia-mimetics in certain biological and/or disease settings, such as living at high altitude, exposure to small molecules that can bind NO, or anemia.

  16. Intrinsically dynamic population models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Schoen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsically dynamic models (IDMs depict populations whose cumulative growth rate over a number of intervals equals the product of the long term growth rates (that is the dominant roots or dominant eigenvalues associated with each of those intervals. Here the focus is on the birth trajectory produced by a sequence of population projection (Leslie matrices. The elements of a Leslie matrix are represented as straightforward functions of the roots of the matrix, and new relationships are presented linking the roots of a matrix to its Net Reproduction Rate and stable mean age of childbearing. Incorporating mortality changes in the rates of reproduction yields an IDM when the subordinate roots are held constant over time. In IDMs, the birth trajectory generated by any specified sequence of Leslie matrices can be found analytically. In the Leslie model with 15 year age groups, the constant subordinate root assumption leads to reasonable changes in the age pattern of fertility, and equations (27 and (30 provide the population size and structure that result from changing levels of net reproduction. IDMs generalize the fixed rate stable population model. They can characterize any observed population, and can provide new insights into dynamic demographic behavior, including the momentum associated with gradual or irregular paths to zero growth.

  17. Ubiquitination and regulation of AURKA identifies a hypoxia-independent E3 ligase activity of VHL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanov, E; Chen, G; Chowdhury, P; Weldon, J; Ding, Z; Jonasch, E; Sen, S; Walker, C L; Dere, R

    2017-06-15

    The hypoxia-regulated tumor-suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) is an E3 ligase that recognizes its substrates as part of an oxygen-dependent prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) reaction, with hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIFα) being its most notable substrate. Here we report that VHL has an equally important function distinct from its hypoxia-regulated activity. We find that Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is a novel, hypoxia-independent target for VHL ubiquitination. In contrast to its hypoxia-regulated activity, VHL mono-, rather than poly-ubiquitinates AURKA, in a PHD-independent reaction targeting AURKA for degradation in quiescent cells, where degradation of AURKA is required to maintain the primary cilium. Tumor-associated variants of VHL differentiate between these two functions, as a pathogenic VHL mutant that retains intrinsic ability to ubiquitinate HIFα is unable to ubiquitinate AURKA. Together, these data identify VHL as an E3 ligase with important cellular functions under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions.

  18. Guanfacine ameliorates hypobaric hypoxia induced spatial working memory deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauser, H; Sahu, S; Kumar, S; Panjwani, U

    2014-01-17

    Hypobaric hypoxia (HH) observed at high altitude causes mild cognitive impairment specifically affecting attention and working memory. Adrenergic dysregulation and neuronal damage in prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been implicated in hypoxia induced memory deficits. Optimal stimulation of alpha 2A adrenergic receptor in PFC facilitates the spatial working memory (SWM) under the conditions of adrenergic dysregulation. Therefore the present study was designed to test the efficacy of alpha 2A adrenergic agonist, Guanfacine (GFC), to restore HH induced SWM deficits and PFC neuronal damage. The rats were exposed to chronic HH equivalent to 25,000ft for 7days in an animal decompression chamber and received daily treatment of GFC at a dose of 1mg/kg body weight via the intramuscular route during the period of exposure. The cognitive performance was assessed by Delayed Alternation Task (DAT) using T-Maze and PFC neuronal damage was studied by apoptotic and neurodegenerative markers. Percentage of correct choice decreased significantly while perseverative errors showed a significant increase after 7days HH exposure, GFC significantly ameliorated the SWM deficits and perseveration. There was a marked and significant increase in chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, neuronal pyknosis and fluoro Jade positive cells in layer II of the medial PFC in hypoxia exposed group, administration of GFC significantly reduced the magnitude of these changes. Modulation of adrenergic mechanisms by GFC may serve as an effective countermeasure in amelioration of prefrontal deficits and neurodegenerative changes during HH. © 2013.

  19. Hypoxia refines plasticity of mitochondrial respiration to repeated muscle work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplanches, Dominique; Amami, Myriam; Dupré-Aucouturier, Sylvie; Valdivieso, Paola; Schmutz, Silvia; Mueller, Matthias; Hoppeler, Hans; Kreis, Roland; Flück, Martin

    2014-02-01

    We explored whether altered expression of factors tuning mitochondrial metabolism contributes to muscular adaptations with endurance training in the condition of lowered ambient oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and whether these adaptations relate to oxygen transfer as reflected by subsarcolemmal mitochondria and oxygen metabolism in muscle. Male volunteers completed 30 bicycle exercise sessions in normoxia or normobaric hypoxia (4,000 m above sea level) at 65% of the respective peak aerobic power output. Myoglobin content, basal oxygen consumption, and re-oxygenation rates upon reperfusion after 8 min of arterial occlusion were measured in vastus muscles by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Biopsies from vastus lateralis muscle, collected pre and post a single exercise bout, and training, were assessed for levels of transcripts and proteins being associated with mitochondrial metabolism. Hypoxia specifically lowered the training-induced expression of markers of respiratory complex II and IV (i.e. SDHA and isoform 1 of COX-4; COX4I1) and preserved fibre cross-sectional area. Concomitantly, trends (p muscle work are reflected by expressional adaptations within the respiratory chain and modified muscle oxygen metabolism.

  20. Characterization of the inflammatory and metabolic profile of adipose tissue in a mouse model of chronic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Borst, Bram; Schols, Annemie M W J; de Theije, Chiel; Boots, Agnes W; Köhler, S Eleonore; Goossens, Gijs H; Gosker, Harry R

    2013-06-01

    In both obesity and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), altered oxygen tension in adipose tissue (AT) has been suggested to evoke AT dysfunction, subsequently contributing to metabolic complications. Studying the effects of chronic hypoxia on AT function will add to our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of alterations in AT inflammation, metabolism, and mass observed in both obesity and COPD. This study investigated the inflammatory and metabolic profile of AT after chronic hypoxia. Fifty-two-week-old C57Bl/6J mice were exposed to chronic hypoxia (8% O2) or normoxia for 21 days, after which AT and plasma were collected. Adipocyte size, AT gene expression of inflammatory and metabolic genes, AT macrophage density, and circulating adipokine concentrations were measured. Food intake and body weight decreased upon initiation of hypoxia. However, whereas food intake normalized after 10 days, lower body weight persisted. Chronic hypoxia markedly reduced AT mass and adipocyte size. AT macrophage density and expression of Emr1, Ccl2, Lep, and Tnf were decreased, whereas Serpine1 and Adipoq expression levels were increased after chronic hypoxia. Concomitantly, chronic hypoxia increased AT expression of regulators of oxidative metabolism and markers of mitochondrial function and lipolysis. Circulating IL-6 and PAI-1 concentrations were increased, and leptin concentration was decreased after chronic hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia is associated with decreased rather than increased AT inflammation, and markedly decreased fat mass and adipocyte size. Furthermore, our data indicate that chronic hypoxia is accompanied by significant alterations in AT metabolic gene expression, pointing toward an enhanced AT metabolic rate.

  1. Approximate Simulation of Acute Hypobaric Hypoxia with Normobaric Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, J.; Wessel, J. H., III

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Some manufacturers of reduced oxygen (O2) breathing devices claim a comparable hypobaric hypoxia (HH) training experience by providing F(sub I) O2 pO2) of the target altitude. METHODS. Literature from investigators and manufacturers indicate that these devices may not properly account for the 47 mmHg of water vapor partial pressure that reduces the inspired partial pressure of O2 (P(sub I) O2). Nor do they account for the complex reality of alveolar gas composition as defined by the Alveolar Gas Equation. In essence, by providing iso-pO2 conditions for normobaric hypoxia (NH) as for HH exposures the devices ignore P(sub A)O2 and P(sub A)CO2 as more direct agents to induce signs and symptoms of hypoxia during acute training exposures. RESULTS. There is not a sufficient integrated physiological understanding of the determinants of P(sub A)O2 and P(sub A)CO2 under acute NH and HH given the same hypoxic pO2 to claim a device that provides isohypoxia. Isohypoxia is defined as the same distribution of hypoxia signs and symptoms under any circumstances of equivalent hypoxic dose, and hypoxic pO2 is an incomplete hypoxic dose. Some devices that claim an equivalent HH experience under NH conditions significantly overestimate the HH condition, especially when simulating altitudes above 10,000 feet (3,048 m). CONCLUSIONS. At best, the claim should be that the devices provide an approximate HH experience since they only duplicate the ambient pO2 at sea level as at altitude (iso-pO2 machines). An approach to reduce the overestimation is to at least provide machines that create the same P(sub I)O2 (iso-P(sub I)O2 machines) conditions at sea level as at the target altitude, a simple software upgrade.

  2. Impact of tissue transport on PET hypoxia quantification in pancreatic tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Edward; Gottwald, Jennifer; Yeung, Ivan; Keller, Harald; Milosevic, Michael; Dhani, Neesha C; Siddiqui, Iram; Hedley, David W; Jaffray, David A

    2017-12-22

    hypoxia surrogate marker k b . Hypoxia-sensitive PET tracers are slow to reach diffusive equilibrium in a substantial fraction of pancreatic tumours, confounding quantification of hypoxia using both static (TBR) and dynamic (k 3 ) PET imaging. TBR is reduced by distribution volume effects and k 3 is enhanced by slow equilibration. We proposed a novel model to quantify tissue transport properties and hypoxia-sensitive tracer binding in order to improve the sensitivity of hypoxia-PET imaging.

  3. Hypoxia induces mitochondrial mutagenesis and dysfunction in inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the levels and spectrum of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations in synovial tissue from patients with inflammatory arthritis in relation to in vivo hypoxia and oxidative stress levels. METHODS: Random Mutation Capture assay was used to quantitatively evaluate alterations of the synovial mitochondrial genome. In vivo tissue oxygen levels (tPO(2)) were measured at arthroscopy using a Licox probe. Synovial expression of lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal [4-HNE]) and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (CytcO II) deficiency were assessed by immunohistochemistry. In vitro levels of mtDNA point mutations, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, and markers of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanine [8-oxodG]) and lipid peroxidation (4-HNE) were determined in human synoviocytes under normoxia and hypoxia (1%) in the presence or absence of superoxide dismutase (SOD) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or a hydroxylase inhibitor (dimethyloxalylglycine [DMOG]). Patients were categorized according to their in vivo tPO(2) level (<20 mm Hg or >20 mm Hg), and mtDNA point mutations, immunochemistry features, and stress markers were compared between groups. RESULTS: The median tPO(2) level in synovial tissue indicated significant hypoxia (25.47 mm Hg). Higher frequency of mtDNA mutations was associated with reduced in vivo oxygen tension (P = 0.05) and with higher synovial 4-HNE cytoplasmic expression (P = 0.04). Synovial expression of CytcO II correlated with in vivo tPO(2) levels (P = 0.03), and levels were lower in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (P < 0.05). In vitro levels of mtDNA mutations, ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential, 8-oxo-dG, and 4-HNE were higher in synoviocytes exposed to 1% hypoxia (P < 0.05); all of these increased levels were rescued by SOD and DMOG and, with the exception of ROS, by NAC. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate that hypoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives

  4. Preclinical assessment of hypoxic marker specificity and sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, Renuka V.; Engelhardt, Edward L.; Stobbe, Corinne C.; Schneider, Richard F.; Chapman, J. Donald

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: In the search for a sensitive, accurate, and noninvasive technique for quantifying human tumor hypoxia, our laboratory has synthesized several potential radiodiagnostic agents. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the hypoxic marking properties of both radioiodinated and Tc-99m labeled markers in appropriate test systems which can predict for in vivo activity. Materials and Methods: Preclinical assessment of hypoxic marker specificity and sensitivity employed three laboratory assays with tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Radiolabeled marker uptake and/or binding to whole EMT-6 tumor cells under extremely hypoxic and aerobic conditions was measured and their ratio defined hypoxia-specific factor (HSF). Marker specificity to hypoxic tumor tissue was estimated from its selective avidity to two rodent tumors in vivo, whose radiobiologic hypoxic fractions (HF) had been measured. The ratios of % injected dose/gram (%ID/g) of marker at various times in EMT-6 tumor tissue relative to that in the blood and muscle of scid mice were used to quantify hypoxia-specific activity. This tumor in this host exhibited an average radiobiologic HF of ∼35%. As well, nuclear medicine images were acquired from R3327-AT (HF ≅15%) and R3327-H (no measurable HF) prostate carcinomas growing in rats to distinguish between marker avidity due to hypoxia versus perfusion. Results: The HSF for FC-103 and other iodinated markers were higher (5-40) than those for FC-306 and other Tc-99m labeled markers. The latter did not show hypoxia-specific uptake into cells in vitro. Qualitative differences were observed in the biodistribution and clearance kinetics of the iodinated azomycin nucleosides relative to the technetium chelates. The largest tumor/blood (T/B) and tumor/muscle (T/M) ratios were observed for compounds of the azomycin nucleoside class in EMT-6 tumor-bearing scid mice. These markers also showed a 3-4 x higher uptake into R3327-AT tumors relative to the well

  5. Plasma volume in acute hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T D; Klausen, T; Richalet, J P

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to acute hypoxia is associated with changes in body fluid homeostasis and plasma volume (PV). This study compared a dye dilution technique using Evans' blue (PV[Evans']) with a carbon monoxide (CO) rebreathing method (PV[CO]) for measurements of PV in ten normal subjects at sea level...... and again 24 h after rapid passive ascent to high altitude (4,350 m). Hypobaric hypoxia decreased arterial oxygen saturation to 79 (74-83)% (mean with 95% confidence intervals). The PV(Evans') remained unchanged from 3.49 (3.30-3.68) l at sea level to 3.46 (3.24-3.68) l at high altitude. In contrast PV......(Evans') and PV(CO) increased from 1.04 (0.99-1.09) at sea level to 1.15 (1.06-1.24) at high altitude (P hypoxia-induced changes in PV. The mechanism responsible for the bias remains unknown, but it is suggested that the results may...

  6. Cognition Effects of Low-Grade Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Denison found a significant effect on rate of learning, suggesting that hypoxia affected learning and memory at lower altitudes such as 2438 m (8000 ft...studies, reported memory and learning were not affected by hypoxia at any altitude below 3658 m (12,000 ft).2,3,10,11 Fowler et al. also came to the...significant result, it seems likely that hypoxia affects working memory capacity by decreasing an individual’s ability to quickly encode and recall

  7. The regulation of transcriptional repression in hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Cavadas, Miguel A.S.; Cheong, Alex; Taylor, Cormac T.

    2017-01-01

    A sufficient supply molecular oxygen is essential for the maintenance of physiologic metabolism and bioenergetic homeostasis for most metazoans. For this reason, mechanisms have evolved for eukaryotic cells to adapt to conditions where oxygen demand exceeds supply (hypoxia). These mechanisms rely on the modification of pre-existing proteins, translational arrest and transcriptional changes. The hypoxia inducible factor (HIF; a master regulator of gene induction in response to hypoxia) is resp...

  8. The role of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) in hypoxia induced apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greijer, A.E.; Wall, E. van der

    2004-01-01

    Apoptosis can be induced in response to hypoxia. The severity of hypoxia determines whether cells become apoptotic or adapt to hypoxia and survive. A hypoxic environment devoid of nutrients prevents the cell undergoing energy dependent apoptosis and cells become necrotic. Apoptosis regulatory

  9. Intrinsically Passive Handling and Grasping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stramigioli, Stefano; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Khodabandehloo, Koorosh

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents a control philosophy called Intrinsically Passive Control, which has the feature to properly behave during interaction with any passive objects. The controlled robot will never become unstable due to the physical structure of the controller.

  10. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1-mediated human GATA1 induction promotes erythroid differentiation under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-Lin; Shen, Guo-Min; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Fang; Zhao, Ying-Ze; Zhang, Jun-Wu

    2012-08-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor promotes erythropoiesis through coordinated cell type-specific hypoxia responses. GATA1 is essential to normal erythropoiesis and plays a crucial role in erythroid differentiation. In this study, we show that hypoxia-induced GATA1 expression is mediated by HIF1 in erythroid cells. Under hypoxic conditions, significantly increased GATA1 mRNA and protein levels were detected in K562 cells and erythroid induction cultures of CD34(+) haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Enforced HIF1α expression increased GATA1 expression, while HIF1α knockdown by RNA interference decreased GATA1 expression. In silico analysis revealed one potential hypoxia response element (HRE). The results from reporter gene and mutation analysis suggested that this element is necessary for hypoxic response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-PCR showed that the putative HRE was recognized and bound by HIF1 in vivo. These results demonstrate that the up-regulation of GATA1 during hypoxia is directly mediated by HIF1.The mRNA expression of some erythroid differentiation markers was increased under hypoxic conditions, but decreased with RNA interference of HIF1α or GATA1. Flow cytometry analysis also indicated that hypoxia, desferrioxamine or CoCl(2) induced expression of erythroid surface markers CD71 and CD235a, while expression repression of HIF1α or GATA1 by RNA interference led to a decreased expression of CD235a. These results suggested that HIF1-mediated GATA1 up-regulation promotes erythropoiesis in order to satisfy the needs of an organism under hypoxic conditions. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Non-injurious neonatal hypoxia confers resistance to brain senescence in aged male rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Martin

    Full Text Available Whereas brief acute or intermittent episodes of hypoxia have been shown to exert a protective role in the central nervous system and to stimulate neurogenesis, other studies suggest that early hypoxia may constitute a risk factor that influences the future development of mental disorders. We therefore investigated the effects of a neonatal "conditioning-like" hypoxia (100% N₂, 5 min on the brain and the cognitive outcomes of rats until 720 days of age (physiologic senescence. We confirmed that such a short hypoxia led to brain neurogenesis within the ensuing weeks, along with reduced apoptosis in the hippocampus involving activation of Erk1/2 and repression of p38 and death-associated protein (DAP kinase. At 21 days of age, increased thicknesses and cell densities were recorded in various subregions, with strong synapsin activation. During aging, previous exposure to neonatal hypoxia was associated with enhanced memory retrieval scores specifically in males, better preservation of their brain integrity than controls, reduced age-related apoptosis, larger hippocampal cell layers, and higher expression of glutamatergic and GABAergic markers. These changes were accompanied with a marked expression of synapsin proteins, mainly of their phosphorylated active forms which constitute major players of synapse function and plasticity, and with increases of their key regulators, i.e. Erk1/2, the transcription factor EGR-1/Zif-268 and Src kinase. Moreover, the significantly higher interactions between PSD-95 scaffolding protein and NMDA receptors measured in the hippocampus of 720-day-old male animals strengthen the conclusion of increased synaptic functional activity and plasticity associated with neonatal hypoxia. Thus, early non-injurious hypoxia may trigger beneficial long term effects conferring higher resistance to senescence in aged male rats, with a better preservation of cognitive functions.

  12. Non-injurious neonatal hypoxia confers resistance to brain senescence in aged male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicolas; Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Koziel, Violette; Jazi, Rozat; Audonnet, Sandra; Vert, Paul; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Daval, Jean-Luc; Pourié, Grégory

    2012-01-01

    Whereas brief acute or intermittent episodes of hypoxia have been shown to exert a protective role in the central nervous system and to stimulate neurogenesis, other studies suggest that early hypoxia may constitute a risk factor that influences the future development of mental disorders. We therefore investigated the effects of a neonatal "conditioning-like" hypoxia (100% N₂, 5 min) on the brain and the cognitive outcomes of rats until 720 days of age (physiologic senescence). We confirmed that such a short hypoxia led to brain neurogenesis within the ensuing weeks, along with reduced apoptosis in the hippocampus involving activation of Erk1/2 and repression of p38 and death-associated protein (DAP) kinase. At 21 days of age, increased thicknesses and cell densities were recorded in various subregions, with strong synapsin activation. During aging, previous exposure to neonatal hypoxia was associated with enhanced memory retrieval scores specifically in males, better preservation of their brain integrity than controls, reduced age-related apoptosis, larger hippocampal cell layers, and higher expression of glutamatergic and GABAergic markers. These changes were accompanied with a marked expression of synapsin proteins, mainly of their phosphorylated active forms which constitute major players of synapse function and plasticity, and with increases of their key regulators, i.e. Erk1/2, the transcription factor EGR-1/Zif-268 and Src kinase. Moreover, the significantly higher interactions between PSD-95 scaffolding protein and NMDA receptors measured in the hippocampus of 720-day-old male animals strengthen the conclusion of increased synaptic functional activity and plasticity associated with neonatal hypoxia. Thus, early non-injurious hypoxia may trigger beneficial long term effects conferring higher resistance to senescence in aged male rats, with a better preservation of cognitive functions.

  13. Arabidopsis CML38, a Calcium Sensor That Localizes to Ribonucleoprotein Complexes under Hypoxia Stress1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Carlee; Li, Tian

    2016-01-01

    During waterlogging and the associated oxygen deprivation stress, plants respond by the induction of adaptive programs, including the redirected expression of gene networks toward the synthesis of core hypoxia-response proteins. Among these core response proteins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is the calcium sensor CML38, a protein related to regulator of gene silencing calmodulin-like proteins (rgsCaMs). CML38 transcripts are up-regulated more than 300-fold in roots within 6 h of hypoxia treatment. Transfer DNA insertional mutants of CML38 show an enhanced sensitivity to hypoxia stress, with lowered survival and more severe inhibition of root and shoot growth. By using yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) translational fusions, CML38 protein was found to be localized to cytosolic granule structures similar in morphology to hypoxia-induced stress granules. Immunoprecipitation of CML38 from the roots of hypoxia-challenged transgenic plants harboring CML38pro::CML38:YFP followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of protein targets associated with messenger RNA ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes including stress granules, which are known to accumulate as messenger RNA storage and triage centers during hypoxia. This finding is further supported by the colocalization of CML38 with the mRNP stress granule marker RNA Binding Protein 47 (RBP47) upon cotransfection of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Ruthenium Red treatment results in the loss of CML38 signal in cytosolic granules, suggesting that calcium is necessary for stress granule association. These results confirm that CML38 is a core hypoxia response calcium sensor protein and suggest that it serves as a potential calcium signaling target within stress granules and other mRNPs that accumulate during flooding stress responses. PMID:26634999

  14. Arabidopsis CML38, a Calcium Sensor That Localizes to Ribonucleoprotein Complexes under Hypoxia Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokdarshi, Ansul; Conner, W Craig; McClintock, Carlee; Li, Tian; Roberts, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    During waterlogging and the associated oxygen deprivation stress, plants respond by the induction of adaptive programs, including the redirected expression of gene networks toward the synthesis of core hypoxia-response proteins. Among these core response proteins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is the calcium sensor CML38, a protein related to regulator of gene silencing calmodulin-like proteins (rgsCaMs). CML38 transcripts are up-regulated more than 300-fold in roots within 6 h of hypoxia treatment. Transfer DNA insertional mutants of CML38 show an enhanced sensitivity to hypoxia stress, with lowered survival and more severe inhibition of root and shoot growth. By using yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) translational fusions, CML38 protein was found to be localized to cytosolic granule structures similar in morphology to hypoxia-induced stress granules. Immunoprecipitation of CML38 from the roots of hypoxia-challenged transgenic plants harboring CML38pro::CML38:YFP followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of protein targets associated with messenger RNA ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes including stress granules, which are known to accumulate as messenger RNA storage and triage centers during hypoxia. This finding is further supported by the colocalization of CML38 with the mRNP stress granule marker RNA Binding Protein 47 (RBP47) upon cotransfection of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Ruthenium Red treatment results in the loss of CML38 signal in cytosolic granules, suggesting that calcium is necessary for stress granule association. These results confirm that CML38 is a core hypoxia response calcium sensor protein and suggest that it serves as a potential calcium signaling target within stress granules and other mRNPs that accumulate during flooding stress responses. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Impact of interleukin-6 on hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and lung inflammation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izziki Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of various forms of pulmonary hypertension (PH. Recent studies in patients with idiopathic PH or PH associated with underlying diseases suggest a role for interleukin-6 (IL-6. Methods To determine whether endogenous IL-6 contributes to mediate hypoxic PH and lung inflammation, we studied IL-6-deficient (IL-6-/- and wild-type (IL-6+/+ mice exposed to hypoxia for 2 weeks. Results Right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricle hypertrophy, and the number and media thickness of muscular pulmonary vessels were decreased in IL-6-/- mice compared to wild-type controls after 2 weeks' hypoxia, although the pressure response to acute hypoxia was similar in IL-6+/+ and IL-6-/- mice. Hypoxia exposure of IL-6+/+ mice led to marked increases in IL-6 mRNA and protein levels within the first week, with positive IL-6 immunostaining in the pulmonary vessel walls. Lung IL-6 receptor and gp 130 (the IL-6 signal transducer mRNA levels increased after 1 and 2 weeks' hypoxia. In vitro studies of cultured human pulmonary-artery smooth-muscle-cells (PA-SMCs and microvascular endothelial cells revealed prominent synthesis of IL-6 by PA-SMCs, with further stimulation by hypoxia. IL-6 also markedly stimulated PA-SMC migration without affecting proliferation. Hypoxic IL-6-/- mice showed less inflammatory cell recruitment in the lungs, compared to hypoxic wild-type mice, as assessed by lung protein levels and immunostaining for the specific macrophage marker F4/80, with no difference in lung expression of adhesion molecules or cytokines. Conclusion These data suggest that IL-6 may be actively involved in hypoxia-induced lung inflammation and pulmonary vascular remodeling in mice.

  16. Differential roles of hypoxia and innate immunity in juvenile and adult dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuße, Corinna; Allenbach, Yves; Hoffmann, Olaf; Goebel, Hans-Hilmar; Pehl, Debora; Radke, Josefine; Doeser, Alexandra; Schneider, Udo; Alten, Rieke H E; Kallinich, Tilmann; Benveniste, Olivier; von Moers, Arpad; Schoser, Benedikt; Schara, Ulrike; Stenzel, Werner

    2016-04-27

    Dermatomyositis (DM) can occur in both adults and juveniles with considerable clinical differences. The links between immune-mediated mechanisms and vasculopathy with respect to development of perifascicular pathology are incompletely understood. We investigated skeletal muscle from newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve juvenile (jDM) and adult dermatomyositis (aDM) patients focusing on hypoxia-related pathomechanisms, vessel pathology, and immune mechanisms especially in the perifascicular region. Therefore, we assessed the skeletal muscle biopsies from 21 aDM, and 15 jDM patients by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Transcriptional analyses of genes involved in hypoxia, as well as in innate and adaptive immunity were performed by quantitative Polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of whole tissue cross sections including perifascicular muscle fibers.Through these analysis, we found that basic features of DM, like perifascicular atrophy and inflammatory infiltrates, were present at similar levels in jDM and aDM patients. However, jDM was characterized by predominantly hypoxia-driven pathology in perifascicular small fibers and by macrophages expressing markers of hypoxia. A more pronounced regional loss of capillaries, but no relevant activation of type-1 Interferon (IFN)-associated pathways was noted. Conversely, in aDM, IFN-related genes were expressed at significantly elevated levels, and Interferon-stimulated gene (ISG)15 was strongly positive in small perifascicular fibers whereas hypoxia-related mechanisms did not play a significant role.In our study we could provide new molecular data suggesting a conspicuous pathophysiological 'dichotomy' between jDM and aDM: In jDM, perifascicular atrophy is tightly linked to hypoxia-related pathology, and poorly to innate immunity. In aDM, perifascicular atrophy is prominently associated with molecules driving innate immunity, while hypoxia-related mechanisms seem to be less relevant.

  17. Augmentation of aerobic respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle by hypoxia preconditioning with cobalt chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Saurabh [Experimental Biology Division, Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi, 110054 (India); Shukla, Dhananjay [Department of Biotechnology, Gitam University, Gandhi Nagar, Rushikonda, Visakhapatnam-530 045 Andhra Pradesh (India); Bansal, Anju, E-mail: anjubansaldipas@gmail.com [Experimental Biology Division, Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi, 110054 (India)

    2012-11-01

    High altitude/hypoxia training is known to improve physical performance in athletes. Hypoxia induces hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its downstream genes that facilitate hypoxia adaptation in muscle to increase physical performance. Cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}), a hypoxia mimetic, stabilizes HIF-1, which otherwise is degraded in normoxic conditions. We studied the effects of hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation on physical performance, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis using rodent model. The results showed significant increase in physical performance in cobalt supplemented rats without (two times) or with training (3.3 times) as compared to control animals. CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats augmented the biological activities of enzymes of TCA cycle, glycolysis and cytochrome c oxidase (COX); and increased the expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) in muscle showing increased glucose metabolism by aerobic respiration. There was also an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle observed by increased mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis markers which was further confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, nitric oxide production increased in skeletal muscle in cobalt supplemented rats, which seems to be the major reason for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) induction and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, in conclusion, we state that hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats increases mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose uptake and metabolism by aerobic respiration in skeletal muscle, which leads to increased physical performance. The significance of this study lies in understanding the molecular mechanism of hypoxia adaptation and improvement of work performance in normal as well as extreme conditions like hypoxia via hypoxia preconditioning. -- Highlights: ► We supplemented rats with CoCl{sub 2} for 15 days along with training. ► Co

  18. Hypoxia Induces Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Follicular Thyroid Cancer: Involvement of Regulation of Twist by Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yeon Ju; Na, Hwi Jung; Suh, Michelle J; Ban, Myung Jin; Byeon, Hyung Kwon; Kim, Won Shik; Kim, Jae Wook; Choi, Eun Chang; Kwon, Hyeong Ju; Chang, Jae Won; Koh, Yoon Woo

    2015-11-01

    Although follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) has a relatively fair prognosis, distant metastasis sometimes results in poor prognosis and survival. There is little understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the aggressiveness potential of thyroid cancer. We showed that hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) induced aggressiveness in FTC cells and identified the underlying mechanism of the HIF-1α-induced invasive characteristics. Cells were cultured under controlled hypoxic environments (1% O₂) or normoxic conditions. The effect of hypoxia on HIF-1α, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) related markers were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Invasion and wound healing assay were conducted to identify functional character of EMT. The involvement of HIF-1α and Twist in EMT were studied using gene overexpression or silencing. After orthotopic nude mouse model was established using the cells transfected with lentiviral shHIF-1α, tissue analysis was done. Hypoxia induces HIF-1α expression and EMT, including typical morphologic changes, cadherin shift, and increased vimentin expression. We showed that overexpression of HIF-1α via transfection resulted in the aforementioned changes without hypoxia, and repression of HIF-1α with RNA interference suppressed hypoxia-induced HIF-1α and EMT. Furthermore, we also observed that Twist expression was regulated by HIF-1α. These were confirmed in the orthotopic FTC model. Hypoxia induced HIF-1α, which in turn induced EMT, resulting in the increased capacity for invasion and migration of cells via regulation of the Twist signal pathway in FTC cells. These findings provide insight into a possible therapeutic strategy to prevent invasive and metastatic FTC.

  19. Characterization of positron emission tomography hypoxia tracer uptake and tissue oxygenation via electrochemical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Stephen R; van der Kogel, Albert J; Nordsmark, Marianne; Bentzen, Søren M; Jeraj, Robert

    2011-08-01

    Unique uptake and retention mechanisms of positron emission tomography (PET) hypoxia tracers make in vivo comparison between them challenging. Differences in imaged uptake of two common hypoxia radiotracers, [(61)Cu]Cu-ATSM and [(18)F]FMISO, were characterized via computational modeling to address these challenges. An electrochemical formalism describing bioreductive retention mechanisms of these tracers under steady-state conditions was adopted to relate time-averaged activity concentration to tissue partial oxygen tension (PO(2)), a common metric of hypoxia. Chemical equilibrium constants of product concentration to reactant concentration ratios were determined from free energy changes and reduction potentials of pertinent reactions reported in the literature. Resulting transformation functions between tracer uptake and PO(2) were compared against measured values in preclinical models. Additionally, calculated PO(2) distributions from imaged Cu-ATSM tracer activity concentrations of 12 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients were validated against microelectrode PO(2) measurements in 69 HNSCC patients. Both Cu-ASTM- and FMISO-modeled PO(2) transformation functions were in agreement with preclinical measured values within single-deviation confidence intervals. High correlation (r(2)=0.94, Ptracers. Comprehensive and robust assessment of tumor hypoxia prior to as well as in response to therapy may be best provided by imaging of multiple hypoxia markers that provide complementary rather than interchangeable information. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hypoxia targeted bifunctional suicide gene expression enhances radiotherapy in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xiaorong; Xing, Ligang; Deng, Xuelong; Hsiao, Hung Tsung; Manami, Akiko; Koutcher, Jason A.; Clifton Ling, C.; Li, Gloria C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether hypoxia targeted bifunctional suicide gene expression-cytosine deaminase (CD) and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) with 5-FC treatments can enhance radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Stable transfectants of R3327-AT cells were established which express a triple-fusion-gene: CD, UPRT and monomoric DsRed (mDsRed) controlled by a hypoxia inducible promoter. Hypoxia-induced expression/function of CDUPRTmDsRed was verified by western blot, flow cytometry, fluorescent microscopy, and cytotoxicity assay of 5-FU and 5-FC. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with 5-FC and local radiation. Tumor volume was monitored and compared with those treated with 5-FC or radiation alone. In addition, the CDUPRTmDsRed distribution in hypoxic regions of tumor sections was visualized with fluorescent microscopy. Results: Hypoxic induction of CDUPRTmDsRed protein correlated with increased sensitivity to 5-FC and 5-FU. Significant radiosensitization effects were detected after 5-FC treatments under hypoxic conditions. In the tumor xenografts, the distribution of CDUPRTmDsRed expression visualized with fluorescence microscopy was co-localized with the hypoxia marker pimonidazole positive staining cells. Furthermore, administration of 5-FC to mice in combination with local irradiation resulted in significant tumor regression, as in comparison with 5-FC or radiation treatments alone. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the hypoxia-inducible CDUPRT/5-FC gene therapy strategy has the ability to specifically target hypoxic cancer cells and significantly improve the tumor control in combination with radiotherapy.

  1. Synovial tissue hypoxia and inflammation in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ng, C T

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hypoxia is a microenvironmental feature in the inflamed joint, which promotes survival advantage for cells. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of partial oxygen pressure in the synovial tissue (tPO(2)) in patients with inflammatory arthritis with macroscopic\\/microscopic inflammation and local levels of proinflammatory mediators. METHODS: Patients with inflammatory arthritis underwent full clinical assessment and video arthroscopy to quantify macroscopic synovitis and measure synovial tPO(2) under direct visualisation. Cell specific markers (CD3 (T cells), CD68 (macrophages), Ki67 (cell proliferation) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (cell apoptosis)) were quantified by immunohistology. In vitro migration was assessed in primary and normal synoviocytes (synovial fibroblast cells (SFCs)) using a wound repair scratch assay. Levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 1beta (IL1beta), interferon gamma (IFNgamma), IL6, macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha (MIP3alpha) and IL8 were quantified, in matched serum and synovial fluid, by multiplex cytokine assay and ELISA. RESULTS: The tPO(2) was 22.5 (range 3.2-54.1) mm Hg and correlated inversely with macroscopic synovitis (r=-0.421, p=0.02), sublining CD3 cells (-0.611, p<0.01) and sublining CD68 cells (r=-0.615, p<0.001). No relationship with cell proliferation or apoptosis was found. Primary and normal SFCs exposed to 1% and 3% oxygen (reflecting the median tPO(2) in vivo) induced cell migration. This was coupled with significantly higher levels of synovial fluid tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), IL1beta, IFNgamma and MIP3alpha in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (all p values <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to show a direct in vivo correlation between synovial tPO(2), inflammation and cell migration, thus it is proposed that hypoxia is a possible primary driver of inflammatory processes in the arthritic joint.

  2. No effect of isolated long-term supine immobilization or profound prolonged hypoxia on blood coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venemans-Jellema, A; Schreijer, A J M; Le Cessie, S; Emmerich, J; Rosendaal, F R; Cannegieter, S C

    2014-06-01

    Long-distance air travel is associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis. The most obvious factor that can explain air travel-related thrombosis is prolonged seated immobilization. In addition, hypobaric hypoxia has been shown to affect coagulation, and the lowered atmospheric pressures present in the cabin during the flight may therefore play an etiologic role. Because immobilization and hypoxic conditions are usually present simultaneously in airplanes or hypobaric chambers, their separate effects on the coagulation system or on thrombosis risk have not been studied extensively. To investigate the separate effects of long-term immobilization and profound prolonged hypoxia on blood coagulation. We performed two studies in collaboration with European Space Agency/European Space Research and Technology Centre. In the first study, 24 healthy, non-smoking, adult women underwent 60 days of -6° head-down bed rest. In the second study, we took blood samples from 25 healthy men who participated during their stay in the Concordia station in Antarctica, where, due to the atmospheric conditions, continuous severe hypobaric hypoxia is present. In both studies, we measured markers of blood coagulation at baseline and at several time points during the exposures. We observed no increase in coagulation markers during immobilization or in the hypobaric environment, compared with baseline measurements. Our results indicate that neither immobilization nor hypoxia per se affects blood coagulation. These results implicate that a combination of risk factors is necessary to induce the coagulation system during air travel. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  3. The regulation of transcriptional repression in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavadas, Miguel A S; Cheong, Alex; Taylor, Cormac T

    2017-07-15

    A sufficient supply molecular oxygen is essential for the maintenance of physiologic metabolism and bioenergetic homeostasis for most metazoans. For this reason, mechanisms have evolved for eukaryotic cells to adapt to conditions where oxygen demand exceeds supply (hypoxia). These mechanisms rely on the modification of pre-existing proteins, translational arrest and transcriptional changes. The hypoxia inducible factor (HIF; a master regulator of gene induction in response to hypoxia) is responsible for the majority of induced gene expression in hypoxia. However, much less is known about the mechanism(s) responsible for gene repression, an essential part of the adaptive transcriptional response. Hypoxia-induced gene repression leads to a reduction in energy demanding processes and the redirection of limited energetic resources to essential housekeeping functions. Recent developments have underscored the importance of transcriptional repressors in cellular adaptation to hypoxia. To date, at least ten distinct transcriptional repressors have been reported to demonstrate sensitivity to hypoxia. Central among these is the Repressor Element-1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST), which regulates over 200 genes. In this review, written to honor the memory and outstanding scientific legacy of Lorenz Poellinger, we provide an overview of our existing knowledge with respect to transcriptional repressors and their target genes in hypoxia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular imaging of hypoxia with radiolabelled agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mees, Gilles; Dierckx, Rudi; Vangestel, Christel; Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Tissue hypoxia results from an inadequate supply of oxygen (O(2)) that compromises biological functions. Structural and functional abnormalities of the tumour vasculature together with altered diffusion conditions inside the tumour seem to be the main causes of tumour hypoxia. Evidence from

  5. Hypoxia: From Placental Development to Fetal Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajersztajn, Lais; Veras, Mariana Matera

    2017-10-16

    Hypoxia may influence normal and different pathological processes. Low oxygenation activates a variety of responses, many of them regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 complex, which is mostly involved in cellular control of O 2 consumption and delivery, inhibition of growth and development, and promotion of anaerobic metabolism. Hypoxia plays a significant physiological role in fetal development; it is involved in different embryonic processes, for example, placentation, angiogenesis, and hematopoiesis. More recently, fetal hypoxia has been associated directly or indirectly with fetal programming of heart, brain, and kidney function and metabolism in adulthood. In this review, the role of hypoxia in fetal development, placentation, and fetal programming is summarized. Hypoxia is a basic mechanism involved in different pregnancy disorders and fetal health developmental complications. Although there are scientific data showing that hypoxia mediates changes in the growth trajectory of the fetus, modulates gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms, and determines the health status later in adulthood, more mechanistic studies are needed. Furthermore, if we consider that intrauterine hypoxia is not a rare event, and can be a consequence of unavoidable exposures to air pollution, nutritional deficiencies, obesity, and other very common conditions (drug addiction and stress), the health of future generations may be damaged and the incidence of some diseases will markedly increase as a consequence of disturbed fetal programming. Birth Defects Research 109:1377-1385, 2017.© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. (SSR) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-30

    Jul 30, 2014 ... al., 2004; Lefebvre et al., 2001; Moon et al., 2003; Paran et al., 1998; Prince et al., 1992). These markers have proven to be very useful in assessing genetic diversity and phylogeny, characterization of germplasm and detection of duplicates, parental verification in crosses, gene tagging in marker assisted ...

  7. (RAPD) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-21

    Sep 21, 2011 ... RAPD markers reveal polymorphism among some Iranian pomegranate genotypes. Sci. Hortic. 111: 24-29. Shasany AK, Darokar MP, Dhawan S, Gupta AK, Gupta S, Shukla AK,. Patra NK, Khanuja SPS (2005). Use of RAPD and AFLP Markers to. Identify Inter- and Intraspecific Hybrids of Mentha. J. Hered.

  8. Cancer cell-associated cytoplasmic B7–H4 is induced by hypoxia through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and promotes cancer cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, You-Kyoung [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Research Center for Multiple Myeloma, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sae-Gwang; Choi, Il-Whan [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo-Woong [Advanced Research Center for Multiple Myeloma, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Inhak, E-mail: miccih@inje.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Research Center for Multiple Myeloma, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Aberrant B7–H4 expression in cancer tissues serves as a novel prognostic biomarker for poor survival in patients with cancer. However, the factor(s) that induce cancer cell-associated B7–H4 remain to be fully elucidated. We herein demonstrate that hypoxia upregulates B7–H4 transcription in primary CD138{sup +} multiple myeloma cells and cancer cell lines. In support of this finding, analysis of the Multiple Myeloma Genomics Portal (MMGP) data set revealed a positive correlation between the mRNA expression levels of B7–H4 and the endogenous hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrogenase 9. Hypoxia-induced B7–H4 expression was detected in the cytoplasm, but not in cancer cell membranes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated binding of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) to proximal hypoxia-response element (HRE) sites within the B7–H4 promoter. Knockdown of HIF-1α and pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α diminished B7–H4 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of cytoplasmic B7–H4 in MCF-7 decreased the S-phase cell population under hypoxia. Finally, MMGP analysis revealed a positive correlation between the transcript levels of B7–H4 and proliferation-related genes including MKI67, CCNA1, and Myc in several patients with multiple myeloma. Our results provide insight into the mechanisms underlying B7–H4 upregulation and its role in cancer cell proliferation in a hypoxic tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • Hypoxia upregulates B7–H4 transcription and protein expression. • Hypoxia-induced B7–H4 is detected in the cytoplasm, but not on membrane. • ChIP assay reveals a binding of HIF-1α to B7–H4 promoter at HRE site. • Knockdown and pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α reduce B7–H4 expression. • B7–H4 knockdown decrease the number of cells in S-phase of cell cycle.

  9. Ecosystem impacts of hypoxia: thresholds of hypoxia and pathways to recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steckbauer, A; Duarte, C M; Vaquer-Sunyer, R [Department of Global Change Research, IMEDEA (CSIC-UIB), Institut Mediterrani d' Estudis Avancats, C/Miquel Marques 21, 07190 Esporles (Mallorca), Islas Baleares (Spain); Carstensen, J [Department of Marine Ecology, National Environmental Research Institute, Aarhus University, PO Box 358, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Conley, D J, E-mail: asteckbauer@imedea.uib-csic.es [Department of Earth and Ecosystem Sciences, Lund University, SE-223 62 Lund (Sweden)

    2011-04-15

    Coastal hypoxia is increasing in the global coastal zone, where it is recognized as a major threat to biota. Managerial efforts to prevent hypoxia and achieve recovery of ecosystems already affected by hypoxia are largely based on nutrient reduction plans. However, these managerial efforts need to be informed by predictions on the thresholds of hypoxia (i.e. the oxygen levels required to conserve biodiversity) as well as the timescales for the recovery of ecosystems already affected by hypoxia. The thresholds for hypoxia in coastal ecosystems are higher than previously thought and are not static, but regulated by local and global processes, being particularly sensitive to warming. The examination of recovery processes in a number of coastal areas managed for reducing nutrient inputs and, thus, hypoxia (Northern Adriatic; Black Sea; Baltic Sea; Delaware Bay; and Danish Coastal Areas) reveals that recovery timescales following the return to normal oxygen conditions are much longer than those of loss following the onset of hypoxia, and typically involve decadal timescales. The extended lag time for ecosystem recovery from hypoxia results in non-linear pathways of recovery due to hysteresis and the shift in baselines, affecting the oxygen thresholds for hypoxia through time.

  10. Intrinsic thermodynamics of inhibitor binding to human carbonic anhydrase IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkuvienė, Vaida; Matulienė, Jurgita; Juozapaitienė, Vaida; Michailovienė, Vilma; Jachno, Jelena; Matulis, Daumantas

    2016-04-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase 9th isoform (CA IX) is an important marker of numerous cancers and is increasingly interesting as a potential anticancer drug target. Various synthetic aromatic sulfonamide-bearing compounds are being designed as potent inhibitors of CA IX. However, sulfonamide compound binding to CA IX is linked to several reactions, the deprotonation of the sulfonamide amino group and the protonation of the CA active site Zn(II)-bound hydroxide. These linked reactions significantly affect the affinities and other thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpies and entropies of binding. The observed and intrinsic affinities of compound binding to CA IX were determined by the fluorescent thermal shift assay. The enthalpies and entropies of binding were determined by the isothermal titration calorimetry. The pKa of CA IX was determined to be 6.8 and the enthalpy of CA IX-Zn(II)-bound hydroxide protonation was -24 kJ/mol. These values enabled the analysis of intrinsic thermodynamics of a library of compounds binding to CA IX. The most strongly binding compounds exhibited the intrinsic affinity of 0.01 nM and the observed affinity of 2 nM. The intrinsic thermodynamic parameters of compound binding to CA IX helped to draw the compound structure to thermodynamics relationship. It is important to distinguish the intrinsic from observed parameters of any disease target protein interaction with its inhibitors as drug candidates when drawing detailed compound structure to thermodynamics correlations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Sources of amniotic fluid erythropoietin during normoxia and hypoxia in fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, Robert A; Cheung, Cecilia Y; Davis, Lowell E; Gagnon, Robert; Harding, Richard; Widness, John A

    2006-07-01

    Erythropoietin is present in human amniotic fluid and has been suggested as a marker of fetal hypoxia. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether erythropoietin is present in ovine amniotic fluid, fetal urine, and/or lung liquid and whether concentrations in these compartments change in parallel with endogenous fetal plasma erythropoietin concentration when the latter is increased experimentally. In late gestation chronically catheterized fetal sheep, samples of amniotic fluid and plasma, urine and plasma, lung liquid, amniotic fluid, and plasma were collected before and up to 7 days after induction of 4 types of fetal hypoxia: (1) acute anemic hypoxia that was induced by a single fetal hemorrhage, (2) progressive anemic hypoxia that was induced by daily exchange transfusion, (3) acute hypoxic hypoxia that was induced by the reduction of maternal inspired oxygen content, or (4) chronic placental insufficiency that was induced by daily umbilicoplacental embolization for 4 days. Erythropoietin concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay. Statistical testing included analysis of variance and least squares regression. Under basal, nonhypoxic conditions, amniotic fluid erythropoietin concentration averaged 33.2% +/- 1.6% (SE) of fetal plasma erythropoietin concentration, and basal fetal urine and lung liquid erythropoietin concentrations ranged from low (humans, basal amniotic fluid and plasma erythropoietin concentrations were correlated only weakly (r = 0.259; r2 = 6.7%; P = .0027; n = 132). Amniotic fluid erythropoietin concentration approximately doubled after 12 hours of severe hypoxic hypoxia or after 24 hours of embolization-induced severe hypoxia but was unchanged after 12 hours of mild-moderate hypoxic hypoxia or 24 hours of anemic hypoxia. Concomitant fetal plasma erythropoietin concentrations increased to 28.1 +/- 5.3, 12.5 +/- 2.7, 10.8 +/- 4.6, and 10.0 +/- 1.3 times basal values, respectively. During progressive fetal anemia

  12. Tumors markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi-Mizumoto, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study blood and cell components alterations (named tumor markers) that may indicate the presence of a tumor, several methods are presented. Aspects as diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic value and clinical evaluation are discussed. (M.A.C.)

  13. Tumor Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... only a small number of people will test positive for the disease who do not have it—in other words, it will result in very few false-positive results. Although tumor markers are extremely useful in ...

  14. Bone Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Iron-binding Capacity (TIBC, UIBC) Trichomonas Testing Triglycerides Troponin Tryptase Tumor Markers Uric Acid Urinalysis Urine ... Replacement or Calcium Supplementation. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism Vol. 82, No. 6 1904-1910, 1997. N. ...

  15. A 26-Gene Hypoxia Signature Predicts Benefit from Hypoxia-Modifying Therapy in Laryngeal Cancer but Not Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eustace, A.; Mani, N.; Span, P.N.; Irlam, J.J.; Taylor, J.; Betts, G.N.; Denley, H.; Miller, C.J.; Homer, J.J.; Rojas, A.M.; Hoskin, P.J.; Buffa, F.M.; Harris, A.L.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; West, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Tumor hypoxia is associated with a poor prognosis, hypoxia modification improves outcome, and hypoxic status predicts benefit from treatment. Yet, there is no universal measure of clinical hypoxia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a 26-gene hypoxia signature predicted

  16. Sleep disordered breathing, hypoxia and inflammation: associations with sickness behaviour in community dwelling elderly with and without cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Peter; Svensson, Erland; Alehagen, Urban; Dahlström, Ulf; Jaarsma, Tiny; Broström, Anders

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation can induce a cluster of symptoms, referred to as sickness behaviour (e.g., depressive symptoms, sleep disturbances, pain and fatigue). Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and sleep disordered breathing (SDB) are common in older adults. CVD is associated with an increased inflammatory activity and in SDB, hypoxia can also increase inflammation. The purpose of this study is to explore if SDB-related hypoxia is associated differently with inflammation and the presence of sickness behaviour in older adults with and without CVD. Three hundred and thirty-one older adults, whose mean age is 78 years, underwent one-night polygraphic recording to measure SDB and hypoxia. CVD was established by a clinical investigation. Questionnaires were used to measure sickness behaviour and depressive symptoms. High sensitivity C-reactive protein was used as a marker of inflammation. Structural Equation Modelling showed that SDB-related hypoxia was associated with inflammation (β > 0.40) which mediated indirect associations with sickness behaviour (β = 0.19) and depressive symptoms (β = 0.11), but only in those with CVD (n = 119). In this model, inflammation had a direct effect on sickness behaviour (β = 0.43) and an indirect effect on depressive symptoms (β = 0.24). Hypoxia had the strongest effect (i.e., β = 0.41; significant) on inflammation, whereas the AHI or ODI had weak and non-significant effects (β = 0.03 and β = 0.15). Older adults with CVD and SDB are at a particular risk of developing sickness behaviour and depressive symptoms. The effect of SDB was mainly caused by hypoxia, suggesting that hypoxia is an important marker of SDB severity in older adults with CVD.

  17. Mitochondrial respiratory function induces endogenous hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Sara; Kim, Ara; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia influences many key biological functions. In cancer, it is generally believed that hypoxic condition is generated deep inside the tumor because of the lack of oxygen supply. However, consumption of oxygen by cancer should be one of the key means of regulating oxygen concentration to induce hypoxia but has not been well studied. Here, we provide direct evidence of the mitochondrial role in the induction of intracellular hypoxia. We used Acetylacetonatobis [2-(2'-benzothienyl) pyridinato-kN, kC3'] iridium (III) (BTP), a novel oxygen sensor, to detect intracellular hypoxia in living cells via microscopy. The well-differentiated cancer cell lines, LNCaP and MCF-7, showed intracellular hypoxia without exogenous hypoxia in an open environment. This may be caused by high oxygen consumption, low oxygen diffusion in water, and low oxygen incorporation to the cells. In contrast, the poorly-differentiated cancer cell lines: PC-3 and MDAMB231 exhibited intracellular normoxia by low oxygen consumption. The specific complex I inhibitor, rotenone, and the reduction of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content reduced intracellular hypoxia, indicating that intracellular oxygen concentration is regulated by the consumption of oxygen by mitochondria. HIF-1α was activated in endogenously hypoxic LNCaP and the activation was dependent on mitochondrial respiratory function. Intracellular hypoxic status is regulated by glucose by parabolic dose response. The low concentration of glucose (0.045 mg/ml) induced strongest intracellular hypoxia possibly because of the Crabtree effect. Addition of FCS to the media induced intracellular hypoxia in LNCaP, and this effect was partially mimicked by an androgen analog, R1881, and inhibited by the anti-androgen, flutamide. These results indicate that mitochondrial respiratory function determines intracellular hypoxic status and may regulate oxygen-dependent biological functions.

  18. Mitochondrial respiratory function induces endogenous hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Prior

    Full Text Available Hypoxia influences many key biological functions. In cancer, it is generally believed that hypoxic condition is generated deep inside the tumor because of the lack of oxygen supply. However, consumption of oxygen by cancer should be one of the key means of regulating oxygen concentration to induce hypoxia but has not been well studied. Here, we provide direct evidence of the mitochondrial role in the induction of intracellular hypoxia. We used Acetylacetonatobis [2-(2'-benzothienyl pyridinato-kN, kC3'] iridium (III (BTP, a novel oxygen sensor, to detect intracellular hypoxia in living cells via microscopy. The well-differentiated cancer cell lines, LNCaP and MCF-7, showed intracellular hypoxia without exogenous hypoxia in an open environment. This may be caused by high oxygen consumption, low oxygen diffusion in water, and low oxygen incorporation to the cells. In contrast, the poorly-differentiated cancer cell lines: PC-3 and MDAMB231 exhibited intracellular normoxia by low oxygen consumption. The specific complex I inhibitor, rotenone, and the reduction of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA content reduced intracellular hypoxia, indicating that intracellular oxygen concentration is regulated by the consumption of oxygen by mitochondria. HIF-1α was activated in endogenously hypoxic LNCaP and the activation was dependent on mitochondrial respiratory function. Intracellular hypoxic status is regulated by glucose by parabolic dose response. The low concentration of glucose (0.045 mg/ml induced strongest intracellular hypoxia possibly because of the Crabtree effect. Addition of FCS to the media induced intracellular hypoxia in LNCaP, and this effect was partially mimicked by an androgen analog, R1881, and inhibited by the anti-androgen, flutamide. These results indicate that mitochondrial respiratory function determines intracellular hypoxic status and may regulate oxygen-dependent biological functions.

  19. Characterization of Partial Intrinsic Symmetries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shehu, Aurela; Brunton, Alan; Wuhrer, Stefanie; Wand, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We present a mathematical framework and algorithm for characterizing and extracting partial intrinsic symmetries of surfaces, which is a fundamental building block for many modern geometry processing algorithms. Our goal is to compute all “significant” symmetry information of the shape, which we

  20. Reading: Intrinsic versus Extrinsic Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    Much debate centers on motivating student in reading achievement. Should students feel motivated from within (intrinsic motivation), or is it better to have extrinsic motivation whereby external stimuli are used to help learners achieve optimally in reading? This paper aims to analyze the two points of view about motivating students in reading…

  1. Intrinsic volumes of symmetric cones

    OpenAIRE

    Amelunxen, Dennis; Bürgisser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We compute the intrinsic volumes of the cone of positive semidefinite matrices over the real numbers, over the complex numbers, and over the quaternions, in terms of integrals related to Mehta's integral. Several applications for the probabilistic analysis of semidefinite programming are given.

  2. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy intrinsic seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinger, C.T.; Burr, T.; Vnuk, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    We have begun to quantify the ability of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to detect the removal and replacement of the lid of a simulated special nuclear materials drum. Conceptually, the acoustic spectrum of a container establishcs a baseline fingerprint, which we refer to as an intrinsic seal, for the container. Simply removing and replacing the lid changes some of the resonant frequencies because it is impossible to exactly duplicate all of the stress patterns between the lid and container. Preliminary qualitative results suggested that the ARS intrinsic seal could discriminate between cases where a lid has or has not been removed. The present work is directed at quantifying the utility of the ARS intrinsic seal technique, including the technique's sensitivity to ''nuisance'' effects, such as temperature swings, movement of the container, and placement of the transducers. These early quantitative tests support the potential of the ARS intrinsic seal application, but also reveal a possible sensitivity to nuisance effects that could limit environments or conditions under which the technique is effective

  3. Intrinsic Motivation in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Benjamin; Nambiar, Nathan; Hemphill, Caroline; Devietti, Elizabeth; Massengale, Alexandra; McCredie, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    This article describes ways in which educators can use Harter's perceived competence motivation theory, the achievement goal theory, and self-determination theory to develop students' intrinsic motivation to maintain physical fitness, as demonstrated by the Sound Body Sound Mind curriculum and proven effective by the 2013 University of…

  4. Sirtuin 6 Modulates Hypoxia-induced Apoptosis in Osteoblasts via Inhibition of Glycolysis: Implication for Pathogenesis of Periapical Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Sang-Heng; Hou, Kuo-Liang; Hong, Chi-Yuan; Chao, Ling-Hsiu; Hsiang-Hua Lai, Eddie; Wang, Han-Wei; Yang, Hsiang; Shun, Chia-Tung; Wang, Juo-Song; Lin, Sze-Kwan

    2015-10-01

    Osteoblast apoptosis is important in the regulation of inflammatory bone resorption. Hypoxia resulting from inflammation enhances glycolysis and apoptosis. Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is a modulator of glucose metabolism and apoptosis. In the study we assessed the role of SIRT6 in hypoxia-induced glycolysis and apoptosis in osteoblasts, with special attention on the significance of these cellular processes in periapical lesions. Human bone marrow-derived osteoblasts were cultured under hypoxia. Expression of lactate dehydrogenase A was examined by Western blot, and production of lactate was measured by colorimetric assay. Cleavage of poly (adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase was used as an apoptosis marker and assessed by Western blot. SIRT6 was overexpressed in osteoblasts by lentiviral gene transduction, and then glycolytic and apoptotic responses were studied. In a rat model of bacteria-induced periapical lesions, expressions of SIRT6 and markers of glycolysis and apoptosis in osteoblasts were examined. Hypoxia enhanced lactate dehydrogenase A expression and lactate production in osteoblasts. Poly (adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase cleavage was induced by hypoxia or lactate treatment. SIRT6 suppressed hypoxia-augmented glycolysis and inhibited apoptosis induced by hypoxia or lactate treatment. Expression of SIRT6 in osteoblasts was downregulated by hypoxia and inflammatory mediators. Development of periapical lesions in rats was associated with decreased expression of SIRT6 and increased glycolysis and apoptosis in osteoblasts. Our study suggested that hypoxia-induced apoptosis of osteoblasts is dependent on glycolytic activity. SIRT6 is a negative regulator of inflammation and may alleviate periapical lesions by suppressing osteoblastic glycolysis and apoptosis. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Hansen, Anders E

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can...... be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET...... analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia....

  6. Direct effects of hypoxia and nitric oxide on ecdysone secretion by insect prothoracic glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLalio, Leon J; Dion, Sara M; Bootes, Abigail M; Smith, Wendy A

    2015-05-01

    Insect molting and metamorphosis are controlled by the molt stimulating hormone ecdysone. A recent study suggests that reduced tissue oxygenation correlates with the size-sensing mechanism responsible for triggering molting. When reared in hypoxia, larvae of Manduca sexta and Drosophila melanogaster initiate molting at lower weights than do larvae reared in normoxia. Furthermore, in Drosophila, the signaling gas nitric oxide (NO) appears to be required for normal developmental timing. As observed in Drosophila, NO signaling targets the nuclear hormone receptor beta fushi tarazu transcription factor 1 (βFTZ-F1) through activation of Drosophila hormone receptor 3 (DHR3), two key regulators of ecdysone production and metamorphic tissue progression. We set out to directly examine the effects of hypoxia and NO on ecdysone secretion using prothoracic glands from feeding fifth (last) larval stage M. sexta. Our results indicate that in vitro treatment of prothoracic glands with hypoxia (2% oxygen) or the NO donor DETA-NONOate significantly inhibit ecdysone secretion. Protein markers of glandular activity were also in keeping with an initial inhibition, measured a decrease in phosphorylated ERK (extracellular signal regulated kinase) and an increase in non-phosphorylated 4EBP (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein). Additionally, gene expression levels of Manduca hormone receptor 3 (mhr3), βftz-f1, nitric oxide synthase (nos), and the PTTH receptor torso, were quantified using real-time PCR. NO treatment increased mhr3 expression and decreased nos expression. Hypoxia increased mhr3 transcription after 2 hr, but decreased transcription after 12 hr, with no effect on nos expression. Both NO and hypoxia had small effects on βftz-f1 expression, yet strongly increased torso transcription. Our results demonstrate that, in isolated prothoracic glands, hypoxia and NO signaling directly inhibit ecdysteroid secretion, but at the same time alter aspects of prothoracic

  7. Asymmetric distribution of hypoxia-inducible factor α regulates dorsoventral axis establishment in the early sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Lun; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Kuan-Ting; Li, Han-Ru; Pai, Chih-Yu; Chen, Jen-Hao; Su, Yi-Hsien

    2017-08-15

    Hypoxia signaling is an ancient pathway by which animals can respond to low oxygen. Malfunction of this pathway disturbs hypoxic acclimation and can result in various diseases, including cancers. The role of hypoxia signaling in early embryogenesis remains unclear. Here, we show that in the blastula of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus , hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIFα), the downstream transcription factor of the hypoxia pathway, is localized and transcriptionally active on the future dorsal side. This asymmetric distribution is attributable to its oxygen-sensing ability. Manipulations of the HIFα level entrained the dorsoventral axis, as the side with the higher level of HIFα tends to develop into the dorsal side. Gene expression analyses revealed that HIFα restricts the expression of nodal to the ventral side and activates several genes encoding transcription factors on the dorsal side. We also observed that intrinsic hypoxic signals in the early embryos formed a gradient, which was disrupted under hypoxic conditions. Our results reveal an unprecedented role of the hypoxia pathway in animal development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. The stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor modulates differentiation status and inhibits the proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binó, Lucia; Kučera, Jan; Štefková, Kateřina; Švihálková Šindlerová, Lenka; Lánová, Martina; Kudová, Jana; Kubala, Lukáš; Pacherník, Jiří

    2016-01-25

    Hypoxic conditions are suggested to affect the differentiation status of stem cells (SC), including embryonic stem cells (ESC). Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is one of the main intracellular molecules responsible for the cellular response to hypoxia. Hypoxia stabilizes HIF by inhibiting the activity of HIF prolyl-hydroxylases (PHD), which are responsible for targeting HIF-alpha subunits for proteosomal degradation. To address the impact of HIF stabilization on the maintenance of the stemness signature of mouse ESC (mESC), we tested the influence of the inhibition of PHDs and hypoxia (1% O2 and 5% O2) on spontaneous ESC differentiation triggered by leukemia inhibitory factor withdrawal for 24 and 48 h. The widely used panhydroxylase inhibitor dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG) and PHD inhibitor JNJ-42041935 (JNJ) with suggested higher specificity towards PHDs were employed. Both inhibitors and both levels of hypoxia significantly increased HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha protein levels and HIF transcriptional activity in spontaneously differentiating mESC. This was accompanied by significant downregulation of cell proliferation manifested by the complete inhibition of DNA synthesis and partial arrest in the S phase after 48 h. Further, HIF stabilization enhanced downregulation of the expressions of some pluripotency markers (OCT-4, NANOG, ZFP-42, TNAP) in spontaneously differentiating mESC. However, at the same time, there was also a significant decrease in the expression of some genes selected as markers of cell differentiation (e.g. SOX1, BRACH T, ELF5). In conclusion, the short term stabilization of HIF mediated by the PHD inhibitors JNJ and DMOG and hypoxia did not prevent the spontaneous loss of pluripotency markers in mESC. However, it significantly downregulated the proliferation of these cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tumor microenvironment in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas: predictive value and clinical relevance of hypoxic markers. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J; Marres, Henri A M; Bussink, Johan; van der Kogel, Albert J; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2007-06-01

    Hypoxia and tumor cell proliferation are important factors determining the treatment response of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. Successful approaches have been developed to counteract these resistance mechanisms although usually at the cost of increased short- and long-term side effects. To provide the best attainable quality of life for individual patients and the head and neck cancer patient population as a whole, it is of increasing importance that tools be developed that allow a better selection of patients for these intensified treatments. A literature review was performed with special focus on the predictive value and clinical relevance of endogenous hypoxia-related markers. New methods for qualitative and quantitative assessment of functional microenvironmental parameters such as hypoxia, proliferation, and vasculature have identified several candidate markers for future use in predictive assays. Hypoxia-related markers include hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha, carbonic anhydrase IX, glucose transporters, erythropoietin receptor, osteopontin, and others. Although several of these markers and combinations of markers are associated with treatment outcome, their clinical value as predictive factors remains to be established. A number of markers and marker profiles have emerged that may have potential as a predictive assay. Validation of these candidate assays requires testing in prospective trials comparing standard treatment against experimental treatments targeting the related microregional constituent. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2007.

  10. Effect of Ca2EDTA on zinc mediated inflammation and neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus of an in vivo mouse model of hypobaric hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udayabanu Malairaman

    Full Text Available Calcium overload has been implicated as a critical event in glutamate excitotoxicity associated neurodegeneration. Recently, zinc accumulation and its neurotoxic role similar to calcium has been proposed. Earlier, we reported that free chelatable zinc released during hypobaric hypoxia mediates neuronal damage and memory impairment. The molecular mechanism behind hypobaric hypoxia mediated neuronal damage is obscure. The role of free zinc in such neuropathological condition has not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the underlying role of free chelatable zinc in hypobaric hypoxia-induced neuronal inflammation and apoptosis resulting in hippocampal damage.Adult male Balb/c mice were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia and treated with saline or Ca2EDTA (1.25 mM/kg i.p daily for four days. The effects of Ca2EDTA on apoptosis (caspases activity and DNA fragmentation, pro-inflammatory markers (iNOS, TNF-α and COX-2, NADPH oxidase activity, poly(ADP ribose polymerase (PARP activity and expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, HIF-1α, metallothionein-3, ZnT-1 and ZIP-6 were examined in the hippocampal region of brain.Hypobaric hypoxia resulted in increased expression of metallothionein-3 and zinc transporters (ZnT-1 and ZIP-6. Hypobaric hypoxia elicited an oxidative stress and inflammatory response characterized by elevated NADPH oxidase activity and up-regulation of iNOS, COX-2 and TNF-α. Furthermore, hypobaric hypoxia induced HIF-1α protein expression, PARP activation and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Administration of Ca2EDTA significantly attenuated the hypobaric hypoxia induced oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the hippocampus.We propose that hypobaric hypoxia/reperfusion instigates free chelatable zinc imbalance in brain associated with neuroinflammation and neuronal apoptosis. Therefore, zinc chelating strategies which block zinc mediated neuronal damage linked with cerebral hypoxia and other neurodegenerative conditions can be

  11. Effect of Ca2EDTA on Zinc Mediated Inflammation and Neuronal Apoptosis in Hippocampus of an In Vivo Mouse Model of Hypobaric Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malairaman, Udayabanu; Dandapani, Kumaran; Katyal, Anju

    2014-01-01

    Background Calcium overload has been implicated as a critical event in glutamate excitotoxicity associated neurodegeneration. Recently, zinc accumulation and its neurotoxic role similar to calcium has been proposed. Earlier, we reported that free chelatable zinc released during hypobaric hypoxia mediates neuronal damage and memory impairment. The molecular mechanism behind hypobaric hypoxia mediated neuronal damage is obscure. The role of free zinc in such neuropathological condition has not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the underlying role of free chelatable zinc in hypobaric hypoxia-induced neuronal inflammation and apoptosis resulting in hippocampal damage. Methods Adult male Balb/c mice were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia and treated with saline or Ca2EDTA (1.25 mM/kg i.p) daily for four days. The effects of Ca2EDTA on apoptosis (caspases activity and DNA fragmentation), pro-inflammatory markers (iNOS, TNF-α and COX-2), NADPH oxidase activity, poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity and expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, HIF-1α, metallothionein-3, ZnT-1 and ZIP-6 were examined in the hippocampal region of brain. Results Hypobaric hypoxia resulted in increased expression of metallothionein-3 and zinc transporters (ZnT-1 and ZIP-6). Hypobaric hypoxia elicited an oxidative stress and inflammatory response characterized by elevated NADPH oxidase activity and up-regulation of iNOS, COX-2 and TNF-α. Furthermore, hypobaric hypoxia induced HIF-1α protein expression, PARP activation and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Administration of Ca2EDTA significantly attenuated the hypobaric hypoxia induced oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Conclusion We propose that hypobaric hypoxia/reperfusion instigates free chelatable zinc imbalance in brain associated with neuroinflammation and neuronal apoptosis. Therefore, zinc chelating strategies which block zinc mediated neuronal damage linked with cerebral hypoxia and other

  12. Hypoxia, HIF-1 Regulation and Cancer Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen insufficiency (hypoxia) is a common feature of human cancer and associated with tumor aggressiveness and poor clinical outcome. Furthermore, hypoxic tumors are more resistant to ionizing radiation and chemotherapy contributing to their unfavorable prognosis. The oxygen sensing pathway is

  13. Hypoxia and the heart of poikilotherms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2014), s. 28-32 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : blood supply heart * poikilotherms * tolerance to hypoxia Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  14. 2007 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  15. 2004 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  16. 2005 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  17. 2002 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  18. 2003 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  19. 2001 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  20. Bacopa monniera leaf extract ameliorates hypobaric hypoxia induced spatial memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hota, Sunil Kumar; Barhwal, Kalpana; Baitharu, Iswar; Prasad, Dipti; Singh, Shashi Bala; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2009-04-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia induced memory impairment has been attributed to several factors including increased oxidative stress, depleted mitochondrial bioenergetics, altered neurotransmission and apoptosis. This multifactorial response of the brain to hypobaric hypoxia limits the use of therapeutic agents that target individual pathways for ameliorating hypobaric hypoxia induced memory impairment. The present study aimed at exploring the therapeutic potential of a bacoside rich leaf extract of Bacopa monniera in improving the memory functions in hypobaric conditions. The learning ability was evaluated in male Sprague Dawley rats along with memory retrieval following exposure to hypobaric conditions simulating an altitude of 25,000 ft for different durations. The effect of bacoside administration on apoptosis, cytochrome c oxidase activity, ATP levels, and oxidative stress markers and on plasma corticosterone levels was investigated. Expression of NR1 subunit of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, neuronal cell adhesion molecules and was also studied along with CREB phosphorylation to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of bacoside action. Bacoside administration was seen to enhance learning ability in rats along with augmentation in memory retrieval and prevention of dendritic atrophy following hypoxic exposure. In addition, it decreased oxidative stress, plasma corticosterone levels and neuronal degeneration. Bacoside administration also increased cytochrome c oxidase activity along with a concomitant increase in ATP levels. Hence, administration of bacosides could be a useful therapeutic strategy in ameliorating hypobaric hypoxia induced cognitive dysfunctions and other related neurological disorders.

  1. In vivo characterization of a reporter gene system for imaging hypoxia-induced gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlin, Sean; Pugachev, Andrei; Sun Xiaorong; Burke, Sean; Claus, Filip; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Ling, C. Clifton; Humm, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize a tumor model containing a hypoxia-inducible reporter gene and to demonstrate utility by comparison of reporter gene expression to the uptake and distribution of the hypoxia tracer 18 F-fluoromisonidazole ( 18 F-FMISO). Methods: Three tumors derived from the rat prostate cancer cell line R3327-AT were grown in each of two rats as follows: (1) parental R3327-AT, (2) positive control R3327-AT/PC in which the HSV1-tkeGFP fusion reporter gene was expressed constitutively, (3) R3327-AT/HRE in which the reporter gene was placed under the control of a hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive promoter sequence (HRE). Animals were coadministered a hypoxia-specific marker (pimonidazole) and the reporter gene probe 124 I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ( 124 I-FIAU) 3 h prior to sacrifice. Statistical analysis of the spatial association between 124 I-FIAU uptake and pimonidazole fluorescent staining intensity was then performed on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Utility of this system was demonstrated by assessment of reporter gene expression versus the exogenous hypoxia probe 18 F-FMISO. Two rats, each bearing a single R3327-AT/HRE tumor, were injected with 124 I-FIAU (3 h before sacrifice) and 18 F-FMISO (2 h before sacrifice). Statistical analysis of the spatial association between 18 F-FMISO and 124 I-FIAU on a pixel-by-pixel basis was performed. Results: Correlation coefficients between 124 I-FIAU uptake and pimonidazole staining intensity were: 0.11 in R3327-AT tumors, -0.66 in R3327-AT/PC and 0.76 in R3327-AT/HRE, confirming that only in the R3327-AT/HRE tumor was HSV1-tkeGFP gene expression associated with hypoxia. Correlation coefficients between 18 F-FMISO and 124 I-FIAU uptakes in R3327-AT/HRE tumors were r=0.56, demonstrating good spatial correspondence between the two tracers. Conclusions: We have confirmed hypoxia-specific expression of the HSV1-tkeGFP fusion gene in the R3327-AT/HRE tumor model and demonstrated the utility of

  2. (SSR) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    Unknown. Unknown. V. vinifera L. 2000s. Chile. Stary goru. Ancient variety of Japan. V. vinifera L. 1980s. Japan. Medoc Noir. Unknown. V. vinifera L. 1980s. France. Vidal Blanc. Ugni blanc × seyval blanc. V. vinifera L. 1940s. France. Table 2. Summary of genetic variation statistics for the 19 simple sequence repeat markers ...

  3. (ISSR) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-25

    Jul 25, 2011 ... Heredity, 65: 179-188. Galvan MZ, Bornet B, Balatti PA, Branchard M (2003). Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers as a tool for the assessment of both genetic diversity and gene pool origin in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Euphytica, 132: 297-301. Kojima T, Nagaoka T, Noda K, Ogihara Y ...

  4. Human erythropoietin response to hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, and hypocapnic normoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Christensen, H; Hansen, J M

    1996-01-01

    exposed to 2 h each of hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, hypocapnic normoxia, and normal breathing of room air (control experiment). During the control experiment, serum-EPO showed significant variations (ANOVA P = 0.047) with a 15% increase in mean values. The serum-EPO measured in the other...

  5. The impact of hypoxia and oxygenation modification on the radiation response of an intracranial rat glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bean, J.M.; Archer, G.E.; Munley, M.T.; Ong, E.; Snyder, S.A.; Haroon, Z.A.; McLendon, R.E.; Marks, L.B.; Stratford, M.R.L.; Chaplin, D.J.; Brizel, D.M.; Bigner, D.D.; Dewhirst, M.W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The median survival for a patient treated for GBM is 1 year. Reasons for the poor long term benefit of conventional therapy, which includes radiation therapy, are poorly understood. Gliomas have areas of hypoxia which may predict for radioresistance. The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that hyperbaric oxygen was superior to nicotinamide plus carbogen in decreasing the extent of hypoxia and in increasing survival following fractionated irradiation in an intracranial glioma tumor model. Materials and Methods: RG-2 tumor cells were transplanted intracranially into female Fischer 344 rats. Hypoxia was studied using immunohistochemical staining of drug-protein adducts in tumor following removal of the brain after i.p. injection of pimonidazole hydrochloride under conditions of room air, 3 atmospheres oxygen (HBO), or nicotinamide (200 mg/kg i.p.) with carbogen. Serum nicotinamide and metabolites were measured by HPLC on samples taken 20 minutes after giving nicotinamide (200 mg/kg, i.p.). In a survival study animals were randomized on day 14 post-transplant to 1 of 4 treatment groups: 1) sham - anesthesia only; 2) XRT - 4 Gy x 5; 3) HBO - XRT after breathing for 5 minutes once 3 atmospheres of 100% oxygen was obtained; and 4) Carbogen/Nicotinamide - XRT with i.p. nicotinamide 20 minutes prior to irradiation and carbogen breathing for 5 minutes after saturation of the chamber. Following treatment, animals were followed until death. Results: Immunohistochemical evaluation of the tumors from animals breathing room air revealed pimonidazole adducts indicating the presence of hypoxia. Those tumors evaluated from animals treated with HBO did not show evidence of hypoxia marker binding. The median serum nicotinamide level obtained was 258.2 μg/ml. Median survivals post-transplant were: 1) Sham - 22 days; 2) XRT - 28 days; 3) HBO - 28 days; and 4) Carbogen/Nicotinamide - 26 days. Only XRT and HBO were statistically better than Sham (p = 0.002 and p

  6. Hypoxia and hypoxia-regulated proteins in gastric cancer: prognostic significance for clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osinsky, S.; Gumenjuk, L.; Bubnovskaya, L.; Merentsev, S.; Kovelskaya, A.; Shalimov, S.; Osinsky, D.; Olijnichenko, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: To examine the relationship between hypoxia level, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression, tumor vascularity, and clinicopathologic parameters in gastric cancer; to assess the impact of hypoxia-associated events on the prognosis of clinical outcome. High hypoxia levels were found in 29 % of pts., and low - in 71 % of pts. Strong nuclear expressions of HIF-1α were found in 7 % of pts., moderate - in 80 % of pts., and weak - in 13 % of pts. Strong microvessel densities were observed in 54 % of pts. and moderate - in 46 % of pts. It was revealed a close association between the hypoxia level in tumor assessed by 31 P NMR spectroscopy and expression of HIF-1α in tumor cells (P 0.05). Hypoxia level and microvessel density in tumor tissue correlated with clinical stage (P<0.05). High hypoxia levels positively correlated with decreased overall survival (P=0.044). For overall survival, hypoxia level and HIF-1α expression (hazard ratio, 2.10; 95 % CI, 0.67-4.67; P=0.035 and 3.45; 0.89-3.01, 0.047, respectively) were independently predictive in multivariate analysis for lymph-node negative patients; and hypoxia level (hazard ratio, 4.50; 95 % CI, 0.42-2.57; P=0.027) for lymph-node positive patients. Statistical analysis has indicated that PME/Pi ratio in tumor tissue may be used as an parameter of hypoxia level as well as independent prognostic factor of clinical outcome in patients with gastric cancer. Methodological approaches are started now to be used in the analysis of head and neck tumors treated with hyperthermia combined with radiation/chemotherapy. (author)

  7. Detecting Nosocomial Intrinsic Infections through Relating Bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research ... Surgical procedures often lead to both intrinsic and extrinsic infections. ... This study demonstrated surgical procedures as precursory to intrinsic infections and that bacterial pathogens found on wounds and endogenous indicators of surgery are links to intrinsic infection.

  8. Hypoxia training: symptom replication in experienced military aircrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Ben J; Iremonger, Gareth S; Hunt, Sheena; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2012-10-01

    Military aircrew are trained to recognize the signs and symptoms of hypoxia in a safe environment using a variety of methods to simulate altitude. In order to investigate the effectiveness of hypoxia training, this study compared the recall of hypoxia symptoms in military aircrew between two consecutive hypobaric chamber hypoxia training sessions conducted, on average, 4.5 yr apart. Previously trained subjects completed a questionnaire immediately before and after they underwent refresher hypoxia training and recorded the occurrence, order, and severity of symptoms experienced. Responses from refresher training were compared with their recall of symptoms experienced during previous training. There was no difference in the recall of most hypoxia symptoms between training sessions. Slurred speech was recalled more frequently from previous training compared to refresher training (14 vs. 4 subjects), whereas hot/cold flushes were recalled less frequently from previous training compared to refresher training (5 vs. 17 subjects). There was a statistically significant difference in overall hypoxia score (10.3 vs. 8.3), suggesting that from memory subjects may underestimate the level of hypoxia experienced in previous training. A high level of similarity between the recall of previously experienced hypoxia symptoms and recent experience supports the effectiveness of hypoxia training. These results replicate the finding of a 'hypoxia signature' reported by a previous study. Small differences in the recall of some symptoms and in overall hypoxia score highlight the importance of drawing attention to the more subtle symptoms of early hypoxia, and of using training techniques which optimize aircrew recall.

  9. Hypoxia-on-a-chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busek Mathias

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work a microfluidic cell cultivation device for perfused hypoxia assays as well as a suitable controlling unit are presented. The device features active components like pumps for fluid actuation and valves for fluid direction as well as an oxygenator element to ensure a sufficient oxygen transfer. It consists of several individually structured layers which can be tailored specifically to the intended purpose. Because of its clearness, its mechanical strength and chemical resistance as well as its well-known biocompatibility polycarbonate was chosen to form the fluidic layers by thermal diffusion bonding. Several oxygen sensing spots are integrated into the device and monitored with fluorescence lifetime detection. Furthermore an oxygen regulator module is implemented into the controlling unit which is able to mix different process gases to achieve a controlled oxygenation. First experiments show that oxygenation/deoxygenation of the system is completed within several minutes when pure nitrogen or air is applied to the oxygenator. Lastly the oxygen input by the pneumatically driven micro pump was quantified by measuring the oxygen content before and after the oxygenator.

  10. An insert-based enzymatic cell culture system to rapidly and reversibly induce hypoxia: investigations of hypoxia-induced cell damage, protein expression and phosphorylation in neuronal IMR-32 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2013-11-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury and tissue hypoxia are of high clinical relevance because they are associated with various pathophysiological conditions such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms causing cell damage are still not fully understood, which is at least partially due to the lack of cell culture systems for the induction of rapid and transient hypoxic conditions. The aim of the study was to establish a model that is suitable for the investigation of cellular and molecular effects associated with transient and long-term hypoxia and to gain insights into hypoxia-mediated mechanisms employing a neuronal culture system. A semipermeable membrane insert system in combination with the hypoxia-inducing enzymes glucose oxidase and catalase was employed to rapidly and reversibly generate hypoxic conditions in the culture medium. Hydrogen peroxide assays, glucose measurements and western blotting were performed to validate the system and to evaluate the effects of the generated hypoxia on neuronal IMR-32 cells. Using the insert-based two-enzyme model, hypoxic conditions were rapidly induced in the culture medium. Glucose concentrations gradually decreased, whereas levels of hydrogen peroxide were not altered. Moreover, a rapid and reversible (onoff generation of hypoxia could be performed by the addition and subsequent removal of the enzyme-containing inserts. Employing neuronal IMR-32 cells, we showed that 3 hours of hypoxia led to morphological signs of cellular damage and significantly increased levels of lactate dehydrogenase (a biochemical marker of cell damage. Hypoxic conditions also increased the amounts of cellular procaspase-3 and catalase as well as phosphorylation of the pro-survival kinase Akt, but not Erk1/2 or STAT5. In summary, we present a novel framework for investigating hypoxia-mediated mechanisms at the cellular level. We claim that the model, the first of its kind, enables researchers to rapidly and

  11. Hypoxia Enhances Differentiation of Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells toward the Smooth Muscle Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Zachar, Vladimir; Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Fink, Trine; Maeda, Yasuko; Emmersen, Jeppe

    2018-02-08

    Smooth muscle differentiated adipose tissue-derived stem cells are a valuable resource for regeneration of gastrointestinal tissues, such as the gut and sphincters. Hypoxia has been shown to promote adipose tissue-derived stem cells proliferation and maintenance of pluripotency, but the influence of hypoxia on their smooth myogenic differentiation remains unexplored. This study investigated the phenotype and contractility of adipose-derived stem cells differentiated toward the smooth myogenic lineage under hypoxic conditions. Oxygen concentrations of 2%, 5%, 10%, and 20% were used during differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells. Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence staining were used to detect the expression of smooth muscle cells-specific markers, including early marker smooth muscle alpha actin, middle markers calponin, caldesmon, and late marker smooth muscle myosin heavy chain. The specific contractile properties of cells were verified with both a single cell contraction assay and a gel contraction assay. Five percent oxygen concentration significantly increased the expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin, calponin, and myosin heavy chain in adipose-derived stem cell cultures after 2 weeks of induction ( p Cells differentiated in 5% oxygen conditions showed greater contraction effect ( p cells from adipose stem cells and 5% oxygen was the optimal condition to generate smooth muscle cells that contract from adipose stem cells.

  12. Sensing hypoxia: physiology, genetics and epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2013-05-01

    The carotid body is a sensory organ for detecting arterial blood O2 levels and reflexly mediates systemic cardiac, vascular and respiratory responses to hypoxia. This article presents a brief review of the roles of gaseous messengers in the sensory transduction at the carotid body, genetic and epigenetic influences on hypoxic sensing and the role of the carotid body chemoreflex in cardiorespiratory diseases. Type I (also called glomus) cells, the site of O2 sensing in the carotid body, express haem oxygenase-2 and cystathionine-γ-lyase, the enzymes which catalyse the generation of CO and H2S, respectively. Physiological studies have shown that CO is an inhibitory gas messenger, which contributes to the low sensory activity during normoxia, whereas H2S is excitatory and mediates sensory stimulation by hypoxia. Hypoxia-evoked H2S generation in the carotid body requires the interaction of cystathionine-γ-lyase with haem oxygenase-2, which generates CO. Hypoxia-inducible factors 1 and 2 constitute important components of the genetic make-up in the carotid body, which influence hypoxic sensing by regulating the intracellular redox state via transcriptional regulation of pro- and antioxidant enzymes. Recent studies suggest that developmental programming of the carotid body response to hypoxia involves epigenetic changes, e.g. DNA methylation of genes encoding redox-regulating enzymes. Emerging evidence implicates heightened carotid body chemoreflex in the progression of autonomic morbidities associated with cardiorespiratory diseases, such as sleep-disordered breathing with apnoea, congestive heart failure and essential hypertension.

  13. Erythrocytes induce proinflammatory endothelial activation in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Alice; Das, Shonit R; Emin, Memet; Sun, Li; Rifkind, Joseph M; Bhattacharya, Jahar; Bhattacharya, Sunita

    2013-01-01

    Although exposure to ambient hypoxia is known to cause proinflammatory vascular responses, the mechanisms initiating these responses are not understood. We tested the hypothesis that in systemic hypoxia, erythrocyte-derived H(2)O(2) induces proinflammatory gene transcription in vascular endothelium. We exposed mice or isolated, perfused murine lungs to 4 hours of hypoxia (8% O(2)). Leukocyte counts increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage. The expression of leukocyte adhesion receptors, reactive oxygen species, and protein tyrosine phosphorylation increased in freshly recovered lung endothelial cells (FLECs). These effects were inhibited by extracellular catalase and by the removal of erythrocytes, indicating that the responses were attributable to erythrocyte-derived H(2)O(2). Concomitant nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stabilization in FLECs occurred only in the presence of erythrocytes. Hemoglobin binding to the erythrocyte membrane protein, band 3, induced the release of H(2)O(2) from erythrocytes and the p65 translocation in FLECs. These data indicate for the first time, to our knowledge, that erythrocytes are responsible for endothelial transcriptional responses in hypoxia.

  14. Hypoxia in a neonate caused by intermittent positive pressure ventilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Beddis, I R; Silverman, M

    1980-01-01

    A newborn baby receiving mechanical ventilation was noted to have an extremely variable degree of hypoxia, despite the administration of 100% oxygen. The hypoxia was relieved rapidly when mechanical ventilation was withdrawn.

  15. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Is Associated With Sprouting Angiogenesis in the Murine Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Helder; Tunik, Selcuk; Aronsson, Monica; Kvanta, Anders

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the expression and distribution of neoangiogenic molecules and the role of hypoxia during the development of experimental choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Lesions were induced on C57Bl6 mice using laser photocoagulation. Animals were euthanized in a timely manner and eyecups were dissected from enucleated eyes. Choroids were immunostained for pericytes, sprouting endothelial cells (EC), or vascular EC. Choroidal neovascularization lesions where analyzed for tissue hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF), and heat-shock proteins (HSP). Choroidal neovascularization lesions showed a trend of increased cellular recruitment throughout the time-course and the lesions displayed positive staining for angiogenic markers. Both pericytes and sprouting EC displayed a radial progression, while vascular EC displayed a more uniform distribution across the CNV lesions. Furthermore, positive tissue hypoxia staining was observed and associated with expression of HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our data delimitate specific temporal windows during CNV initiation, propagation, maturation, and even recovery in experimental CNV. We show that murine CNV undergoes hypoxia-associated sprouting angiogenesis, and demonstrate involvement of pericytes. Moreover, we have shown expression of HIF-1α to the retinal pigment epithelium surrounding the CNV lesions, together with VEGF upregulation, independently of the HSP response induced by the laser thermal insult.

  16. Intrinsic cylindrical and spherical waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlow, I K

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic waveforms associated with cylindrical and spherical Bessel functions are obtained by eliminating the factors responsible for the inverse radius and inverse square radius laws of wave power per unit area of wavefront. The resulting expressions are Riccati-Bessel functions for both cases and these can be written in terms of amplitude and phase functions of order v and wave variable z. When z is real, it is shown that a spatial phase angle of the intrinsic wave can be defined and this, together with its amplitude function, is systematically investigated for a range of fixed orders and varying z. The derivatives of Riccati-Bessel functions are also examined. All the component functions exhibit different behaviour in the near field depending on the order being less than, equal to or greater than 1/2. Plots of the phase angle can be used to display the locations of the zeros of the general Riccati-Bessel functions and lead to new relations concerning the ordering of the real zeros of Bessel functions and the occurrence of multiple zeros when the argument of the Bessel function is fixed

  17. Endocannabinoids participate in placental apoptosis induced by hypoxia inducible factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abán, C; Martinez, N; Carou, C; Albamonte, I; Toro, A; Seyahian, A; Franchi, A; Leguizamón, G; Trigubo, D; Damiano, A; Farina, M

    2016-10-01

    During pregnancy, apoptosis is a physiological event critical in the remodeling and aging of the placenta. Increasing evidence has pointed towards the relevance of endocannabinoids (ECs) and hypoxia as modulators of trophoblast cell death. However, the relation between these factors is still unknown. In this report, we evaluated the participation of ECs in placental apoptosis induced by cobalt chloride (CoCl2), a hypoxia mimicking agent that stabilizes the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). We found that HIF-1α stabilization decreased FAAH mRNA and protein levels, suggesting an increase in ECs tone. Additionally, CoCl2 incubation and Met-AEA treatment reduced cell viability and increased TUNEL-positive staining in syncytiotrophoblast layer. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated Bax and Bcl-2 protein expression in the cytoplasm of syncytiotrophoblast. Finally, HIF-1α stabilization produced an increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, activation of caspase 3 and PARP cleavage. All these changes in apoptotic parameters were reversed with AM251, a CB1 antagonist. These results demonstrate that HIF-1α may induce apoptosis in human placenta via intrinsic pathway by a mechanism that involves activation of CB1 receptor suggesting a role of the ECs in this process.

  18. The clinical impact of hypoxia-regulated gene expression in loco-regional gastroesophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, M.; Alsner, J.; Tramm, T.

    2015-01-01

    squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) compared with adenocarcinomas of the esophago-gastric junction and the stomach (AC), and was a potential prognostic marker in patients with ESCC. The purpose of the present study was to confirm these results. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 152......Purpose/Objective: In a former study (1), the hypoxia gene expression classifier, developed in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, was applied in 89 patients with loco-regional gastroesophageal cancer (GC). Analysis of the 15 genes was indicative of hypoxia being more profound in esophagus...... were available in 135 patients; ESCC: 89 patients (66%), AC: 43 patients (32%) and other carcinomas: 3 patients (2%). Comparing the cohorts of the original and present study, patient characteristics were similar except for a significantly lower T- and N-stage in the present cohort. Tumor specimens were...

  19. Targeting tumour hypoxia to improve outcome of stereotactic radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittenborn, Thomas R; Horsman, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia is a characteristic feature of solid tumours that significantly reduces the efficacy of conventional radiation therapy. In this study we investigated the role of hypoxia in a stereotactic radiation schedule by using a variety of hypoxic modifiers in a preclinical tumour model...... OXi4503 and heat with the final 15 Gy had a significantly larger effect (TCD50 = 2 Gy). CONCLUSIONS: Clinically relevant modifiers of hypoxia effectively enhanced an equivalent stereotactic radiation treatment confirming the importance of hypoxia in such schedules....

  20. Inflammation and hypoxia in the kidney: friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Volker H

    2015-08-01

    Hypoxic injury is commonly associated with inflammatory-cell infiltration, and inflammation frequently leads to the activation of cellular hypoxia response pathways. The molecular mechanisms underlying this cross-talk during kidney injury are incompletely understood. Yamaguchi and colleagues identify CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ as a cytokine- and hypoxia-regulated transcription factor that fine-tunes hypoxia-inducible factor-1 signaling in renal epithelial cells and thus provide a novel molecular link between hypoxia and inflammation in kidney injury.

  1. Visceral White Adipose Tissue after Chronic Intermittent and Sustained Hypoxia in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozal, David; Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Cortese, Rene; Li, Yan; Almendros, Isaac; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Khalyfa, Ahamed A; Andrade, Jorge; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby

    2017-04-01

    Angiogenesis, a process induced by hypoxia in visceral white adipose tissues (vWAT) in the context of obesity, mediates obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction and insulin resistance. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) and sustained hypoxia (SH) induce body weight reductions and insulin resistance of different magnitudes, suggesting different hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α-related activity. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6J mice (n = 10-12/group) were exposed to either IH, SH, or room air (RA). vWAT were analyzed for insulin sensitivity (phosphorylated (pAKT)/AKT), HIF-1α transcription using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-sequencing, angiogenesis using immunohistochemistry, and gene expression of different fat cell markers and HIF-1α gene targets using quantitative polymerase chain reaction or microarrays. Body and vWAT weights were reduced in hypoxia (SH > IH > RA; P  > > SH = RA; P < 0.001). IH induces preferential whitening of vWAT, as opposed to prominent browning in SH. Unlike SH, IH elicits early HIF-1α activity that is unsustained over time and is accompanied by concurrent vascular rarefaction, inflammation, and insulin resistance. Thus, the dichotomous changes in HIF-1α transcriptional activity and brown/beige/white fat balance in IH and SH should enable exploration of mechanisms by which altered sympathetic outflow, such as that which occurs in apneic patients, results in whitening, rather than the anticipated browning of adipose tissues that occurs in SH.

  2. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 plays a role in phosphate-induced vascular smooth muscle cell calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokas, Sophie; Larivière, Richard; Lamalice, Laurent; Gobeil, Stéphane; Cornfield, David N; Agharazii, Mohsen; Richard, Darren E

    2016-09-01

    Medial vascular calcification is a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although elevated inorganic phosphate stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) osteogenic transdifferentiation and calcification, the mechanisms involved in their calcification during CKD are not fully defined. Because hypoxic gene activation is linked to CKD and stimulates bone cell osteogenic differentiation, we used in vivo and in vitro rodent models to define the role of hypoxic signaling during elevated inorganic phosphate-induced VSMC calcification. Cell mineralization studies showed that elevated inorganic phosphate rapidly induced VSMC calcification. Hypoxia strongly enhanced elevated inorganic phosphate-induced VSMC calcification and osteogenic transdifferentiation, as seen by osteogenic marker expression. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), the key hypoxic transcription factor, was essential for enhanced VSMC calcification. Targeting HIF-1 expression in murine VSMC blocked calcification in hypoxia with elevated inorganic phosphate while HIF-1 activators, including clinically used FG-4592/Roxadustat, recreated a procalcifying environment. Elevated inorganic phosphate rapidly activated HIF-1, even in normal oxygenation; an effect mediated by HIF-1α subunit stabilization. Thus, hypoxia synergizes with elevated inorganic phosphate to enhance VSMC osteogenic transdifferentiation. Our work identifies HIF-1 as an early CKD-related pathological event, prospective marker, and potential target against vascular calcification in CKD-relevant conditions. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Hypoxia-Mimetic Agent Cobalt Chloride Differently Affects Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Their Chondrogenic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Teti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult stem cells are a promising cell source for cartilage regeneration. They resided in a special microenvironment known as the stem-cell niche, characterized by the presence of low oxygen concentration. Cobalt chloride (CoCl2 imitates hypoxia in vitro by stabilizing hypoxia-inducible factor-alpha (HIF-1α, which is the master regulator in the cellular adaptive response to hypoxia. In this study, the influence of CoCl2 on the chondrogenic potential of human MSCs, isolated from dental pulp, umbilical cord, and adipose tissue, was investigated. Cells were treated with concentrations of CoCl2 ranging from 50 to 400 μM. Cell viability, HIF-1α protein synthesis, and the expression of the chondrogenic markers were analyzed. The results showed that the CoCl2 supplementation had no effect on cell viability, while the upregulation of chondrogenic markers such as SOX9, COL2A1, VCAN, and ACAN was dependent on the cellular source. This study shows that hypoxia, induced by CoCl2 treatment, can differently influence the behavior of MSCs, isolated from different sources, in their chondrogenic potential. These findings should be taken into consideration in the treatment of cartilage repair and regeneration based on stem cell therapies.

  4. Overexpression of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Exacerbates Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction Induced by Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The mechanisms involved in endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by hypoxia are incompletely understood. There is debate about the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α in endothelial barrier disruption. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of genetic overexpression of HIF-1α on barrier function and the underlying mechanisms in hypoxic endothelial cells. Methods: The plasmid pcDNA3.1/V5-His-HIF-1α was stably transfected into human endothelial cells. The cells were exposed to normoxia or hypoxia. The mRNA and protein expressions of HIF-1α were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot respectively. The barrier function was assessed by measuring the transendothelial electrical resistance (TER. The Western blot analysis was used to determine the protein expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1, zonular occludens-1 (ZO-1, occludin, and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK in endothelial cells. The mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines was detected by qRT-PCR. Results: Genetic overexpression of HIF-1α significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression of HIF-1α in endothelial cells. The overexpression of HIF-1α enhanced the hypoxia-induced increase of HIF-1α and GLUT-1 protein expression. HIF-1α overexpression not only exacerbated hypoxia-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction but also augmented hypoxia-induced up-regulation of MLCK protein expression. HIF-1α overexpression also enhanced IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression. Conclusion: We provide evidence that genetic overexpression of HIF-1α aggravates the hypoxia-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction via enhancing the up-regulation of MLCK protein expression caused by hypoxia, suggesting a potential role for HIF-1α in the pathogenesis of endothelial barrier dysfunction in hypoxia.

  5. Analysis of hypoxia and hypoxia-like states through metabolite profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie E Gleason

    Full Text Available In diverse organisms, adaptation to low oxygen (hypoxia is mediated through complex gene expression changes that can, in part, be mimicked by exposure to metals such as cobalt. Although much is known about the transcriptional response to hypoxia and cobalt, little is known about the all-important cell metabolism effects that trigger these responses.Herein we use a low molecular weight metabolome profiling approach to identify classes of metabolites in yeast cells that are altered as a consequence of hypoxia or cobalt exposures. Key findings on metabolites were followed-up by measuring expression of relevant proteins and enzyme activities. We find that both hypoxia and cobalt result in a loss of essential sterols and unsaturated fatty acids, but the basis for these changes are disparate. While hypoxia can affect a variety of enzymatic steps requiring oxygen and heme, cobalt specifically interferes with diiron-oxo enzymatic steps for sterol synthesis and fatty acid desaturation. In addition to diiron-oxo enzymes, cobalt but not hypoxia results in loss of labile 4Fe-4S dehydratases in the mitochondria, but has no effect on homologous 4Fe-4S dehydratases in the cytosol. Most striking, hypoxia but not cobalt affected cellular pools of amino acids. Amino acids such as aromatics were elevated whereas leucine and methionine, essential to the strain used here, dramatically decreased due to hypoxia induced down-regulation of amino acid permeases.These studies underscore the notion that cobalt targets a specific class of iron proteins and provide the first evidence for hypoxia effects on amino acid regulation. This research illustrates the power of metabolite profiling for uncovering new adaptations to environmental stress.

  6. Nitric oxide and hypoxia signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey Man, H S; Tsui, Albert K Y; Marsden, Philip A

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) production is catalyzed by three distinct enzymes, namely, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS), and endothelial NOS (eNOS). The production of NO by vascular endothelium relies mainly on eNOS. Curiously, iNOS and nNOS also are relevant for vascular NO production in certain settings. By relaxing vascular smooth muscle, the classical view is that NO participates in O2 homeostasis by increasing local blood flow and O2 delivery. It is now appreciated that NO has an even more fundamental role in cellular oxygen sensing at the cellular and physiological level. A key component of cellular oxygen sensing is the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) that activates a transcriptional program to promote cellular survival under conditions of inadequate oxygen supply. Important new insights demonstrate that HIF protein is stabilized by two parallel pathways: (1) a decrease in the O2-dependent prolyl hydroxylation of HIF and (2) NO-dependent S-nitrosylation of HIF pathway components including HIF-α. The need for these two complementary pathways to HIF activation arises because decreased oxygen delivery can occur not only by decreased ambient oxygen but also by decreased blood oxygen-carrying capacity, as with anemia. In turn, NO production is tightly linked to O2 homeostasis. O2 is a key substrate for the generation of NO and impacts the enzymatic activity and expression of the enzymes that catalyze the production of NO, the nitric oxide synthases. These relationships manifest in a variety of clinical settings ranging from the unique situation of humans living in hypoxic environments at high altitudes to the common scenario of anemia and the use of therapeutics that can bind or release NO. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypoxia as a therapy for mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Isha H; Zazzeron, Luca; Goli, Rahul; Alexa, Kristen; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Dhillon, Harveen; Goldberger, Olga; Peng, Jun; Shalem, Ophir; Sanjana, Neville E; Zhang, Feng; Goessling, Wolfram; Zapol, Warren M; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-04-01

    Defects in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) underlie a spectrum of human conditions, ranging from devastating inborn errors of metabolism to aging. We performed a genome-wide Cas9-mediated screen to identify factors that are protective during RC inhibition. Our results highlight the hypoxia response, an endogenous program evolved to adapt to limited oxygen availability. Genetic or small-molecule activation of the hypoxia response is protective against mitochondrial toxicity in cultured cells and zebrafish models. Chronic hypoxia leads to a marked improvement in survival, body weight, body temperature, behavior, neuropathology, and disease biomarkers in a genetic mouse model of Leigh syndrome, the most common pediatric manifestation of mitochondrial disease. Further preclinical studies are required to assess whether hypoxic exposure can be developed into a safe and effective treatment for human diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Hypoxia: An Unusual Cause with Specific Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Berger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a well-recognized consequence of venous admixture resulting from right to left intracardiac shunting. Right to left shunting is usually associated with high pulmonary artery pressure or alteration in the direction of blood flow due to an anatomical abnormality of the thorax. Surgical or percutaneous closure remains controversial; however it is performed frequently for patients presenting with clinical sequela presumed to be resulting from paradoxical embolization secondary to right to left shunting. We report two patients with hypoxia and dyspnea due to right to left shunting through a patent foramen ovale (PFO and venous admixture in the absence of elevated pulmonary artery pressures or other predisposing conditions like pneumonectomy or diaphragmatic weakness. Percutaneous closures of the PFOs with the self-centering Amplatzer device resulted in resolution of hypoxia and symptoms related to it.

  9. Withanolide A prevents neurodegeneration by modulating hippocampal glutathione biosynthesis during hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iswar Baitharu

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera root extract has been used traditionally in ayurvedic system of medicine as a memory enhancer. Present study explores the ameliorative effect of withanolide A, a major component of withania root extract and its molecular mechanism against hypoxia induced memory impairment. Withanolide A was administered to male Sprague Dawley rats before a period of 21 days pre-exposure and during 07 days of exposure to a simulated altitude of 25,000 ft. Glutathione level and glutathione dependent free radicals scavenging enzyme system, ATP, NADPH level, γ-glutamylcysteinyl ligase (GCLC activity and oxidative stress markers were assessed in the hippocampus. Expression of apoptotic marker caspase 3 in hippocampus was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional alteration and expression of GCLC and Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 were investigated by real time PCR and immunoblotting respectively. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia decreased reduced glutathione (GSH level and impaired reduced gluatathione dependent free radical scavenging system in hippocampus resulting in elevated oxidative stress. Supplementation of withanolide A during hypoxic exposure increased GSH level, augmented GSH dependent free radicals scavenging system and decreased the number of caspase and hoescht positive cells in hippocampus. While withanolide A reversed hypoxia mediated neurodegeneration, administration of buthionine sulfoximine along with withanolide A blunted its neuroprotective effects. Exogenous administration of corticosterone suppressed Nrf2 and GCLC expression whereas inhibition of corticosterone synthesis upregulated Nrf2 as well as GCLC. Thus present study infers that withanolide A reduces neurodegeneration by restoring hypoxia induced glutathione depletion in hippocampus. Further, Withanolide A increases glutathione biosynthesis in neuronal cells by upregulating GCLC level through Nrf2 pathway in a corticosterone

  10. Withanolide A prevents neurodegeneration by modulating hippocampal glutathione biosynthesis during hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baitharu, Iswar; Jain, Vishal; Deep, Satya Narayan; Shroff, Sabita; Sahu, Jayanta Kumar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2014-01-01

    Withania somnifera root extract has been used traditionally in ayurvedic system of medicine as a memory enhancer. Present study explores the ameliorative effect of withanolide A, a major component of withania root extract and its molecular mechanism against hypoxia induced memory impairment. Withanolide A was administered to male Sprague Dawley rats before a period of 21 days pre-exposure and during 07 days of exposure to a simulated altitude of 25,000 ft. Glutathione level and glutathione dependent free radicals scavenging enzyme system, ATP, NADPH level, γ-glutamylcysteinyl ligase (GCLC) activity and oxidative stress markers were assessed in the hippocampus. Expression of apoptotic marker caspase 3 in hippocampus was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional alteration and expression of GCLC and Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were investigated by real time PCR and immunoblotting respectively. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) level and impaired reduced gluatathione dependent free radical scavenging system in hippocampus resulting in elevated oxidative stress. Supplementation of withanolide A during hypoxic exposure increased GSH level, augmented GSH dependent free radicals scavenging system and decreased the number of caspase and hoescht positive cells in hippocampus. While withanolide A reversed hypoxia mediated neurodegeneration, administration of buthionine sulfoximine along with withanolide A blunted its neuroprotective effects. Exogenous administration of corticosterone suppressed Nrf2 and GCLC expression whereas inhibition of corticosterone synthesis upregulated Nrf2 as well as GCLC. Thus present study infers that withanolide A reduces neurodegeneration by restoring hypoxia induced glutathione depletion in hippocampus. Further, Withanolide A increases glutathione biosynthesis in neuronal cells by upregulating GCLC level through Nrf2 pathway in a corticosterone dependenet manner.

  11. Inhibition of Intrinsic Thrombin Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Stief MD

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The contact phase of coagulation is of physiologic/pathophysiologic importance, whenever unphysiologic polynegative substances such as cell fragments (microparticles get in contact with blood. There are several clinically used inhibitors of intrinsic thrombin generation. Here the inhibitory concentrations 50% (IC50 of these anticoagulants are measured by the highly specific thrombin generation assay INCA. Methods Unfrozen pooled normal citrated plasma in polystyrole tubes was supplemented at 23°C in duplicate with 0–2 IU/ml low molecular weight heparin (dalteparin, 0–2 IU/ml unfractionated heparin, 0–500 KIU/ml aprotinin, or 0–40 mM arginine. 50 μl plasma or 1 IU/ml thrombin standard were pipetted into a polystyrole microtiter plate with flat bottom. 5 μl SiO 2 /CaCl 2 - reagent (INCA activator were added and after 0–30 min incubation at 37°C 100 μl 2.5 M arginine, pH 8.6, were added; arginine inhibits hemostasis activation and depolymerizes generated fibrin within 20 min at 23°C. The in the physiologic 37°C incubation phase generated thrombin was then chromogenically detected. The intra-assay CV values were < 5%. Results and Discussion The approximate IC50 were 0.01 IU/ml dalteparin, 0.02 IU/ml heparin, 25 KIU/ml aprotinin, and 12 mM arginine. The efficiency of any anticoagulant on intrinsic thrombin generation should be measured for each individual patient. Abbreviations IIa, thrombin; δA, increase in absorbance; APTT, activated partial thromboplastin time; CRT, coagulation reaction time (at 37°C in water-bath; F-wells, polystyrole microtiter plates with flat bottom; IC50, inhibitory concentration 50%; INCA, intrinsic coagulation activity assay; IU, international units; KIU, kallikrein inhibiting unis; LMWH, low molecular weight heparin; mA, milli-absorbance units; PSL, pathromtin SL®; RT, room temperature (23°C; U-wells, polystyrole microtiter plates with round bottom.

  12. Acute hypoxia influences collagen and matrix metalloproteinase expression by human keratoconus cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina B McKay

    Full Text Available Keratoconus (KC is a progressive corneal ectasia linked to thinning of the central cornea. Hard contact lenses, rigid gas permeable lenses, and scleral lenses are the primary treatment modalities for early to mid- stages of KC to correct refractive error and astigmatism that develops as a result of an irregular corneal structure. These treatments are associated with significant drawbacks, including reduced availability of the tear film and oxygen to the corneal epithelium and stroma. However, it remains unknown whether hypoxia affects corneal integrity in the KC pathobiology. A number of studies have associated elevated oxidative stress with KC both in vitro and ex vivo. We hypothesized that KC-derived corneal fibroblasts are more susceptible to hypoxia-induced oxidative stress compared to healthy controls leading to exacerbation of corneal thinning in KC. This study investigated the effects of hypoxia on ECM secretion, assembly, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP expression in human corneal fibroblasts from healthy controls (HCFs and KC patients (HKCs in vitro. HCFs and HKCs were cultured in 3D constructs for 3 weeks and maintained or transferred to normoxic (21% O2 or hypoxic (2% O2 conditions, respectively, for 1 additional week. At the 4 week time-point, constructs were isolated and probed for Collagen I, III, and V, keratocan and MMP-1, -2, -3, -9, and -13, as well as hypoxia markers, hypoxia inducible factor-1α and lactoferrin. Conditioned media was also collected and probed for Collagen I, III, and V by Western blot. Thickness of the ECM assembled by HCFs and HKCs was measured using immunofluorescence microscopy. Results showed that hypoxia significantly reduced Collagen I secretion in HKCs, as well as upregulated the expression of MMP-1 and -2 with no significant effects on MMP-3, -9, or -13. ECM thickness was reduced in both cell types following 1 week in a low oxygen environment. Our study shows that hypoxia influences collagen and MMP

  13. Intrinsic rotation with gyrokinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Felix I.; Barnes, Michael; Catto, Peter J.; Calvo, Iván

    2012-01-01

    The generation of intrinsic rotation by turbulence and neoclassical effects in tokamaks is considered. To obtain the complex dependences observed in experiments, it is necessary to have a model of the radial flux of momentum that redistributes the momentum within the tokamak in the absence of a preexisting velocity. When the lowest order gyrokinetic formulation is used, a symmetry of the model precludes this possibility, making small effects in the gyroradius over scale length expansion necessary. These effects that are usually small become important for momentum transport because the symmetry of the lowest order gyrokinetic formulation leads to the cancellation of the lowest order momentum flux. The accuracy to which the gyrokinetic equation needs to be obtained to retain all the physically relevant effects is discussed.

  14. Human Primary Trophoblast Cell Culture Model to Study the Protective Effects of Melatonin Against Hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagrillo-Fagundes, Lucas; Clabault, Hélène; Laurent, Laetitia; Hudon-Thibeault, Andrée-Anne; Salustiano, Eugênia Maria Assunção; Fortier, Marlène; Bienvenue-Pariseault, Josianne; Wong Yen, Philippe; Sanderson, J Thomas; Vaillancourt, Cathy

    2016-07-30

    This protocol describes how villous cytotrophoblast cells are isolated from placentas at term by successive enzymatic digestions, followed by density centrifugation, media gradient isolation and immunomagnetic purification. As observed in vivo, mononucleated villous cytotrophoblast cells in primary culture differentiate into multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast cells after 72 hr. Compared to normoxia (8% O2), villous cytotrophoblast cells that undergo hypoxia/reoxygenation (0.5% / 8% O2) undergo increased oxidative stress and intrinsic apoptosis, similar to that observed in vivo in pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, preterm birth, and intrauterine growth restriction. In this context, primary villous trophoblasts cultured under hypoxia/reoxygenation conditions represent a unique experimental system to better understand the mechanisms and signalling pathways that are altered in human placenta and facilitate the search for effective drugs that protect against certain pregnancy disorders. Human villous trophoblasts produce melatonin and express its synthesizing enzymes and receptors. Melatonin has been suggested as a treatment for preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction because of its protective antioxidant effects. In the primary villous cytotrophoblast cell model described in this paper, melatonin has no effect on trophoblast cells in normoxic state but restores the redox balance of syncytiotrophoblast cells disrupted by hypoxia/reoxygenation. Thus, human villous trophoblast cells in primary culture are an excellent approach to study the mechanisms behind the protective effects of melatonin on placental function during hypoxia/reoxygenation.

  15. Up-regulation of gene expression by hypoxia is mediated predominantly by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greijer, A.E.; van der Groep, P.; Kemming, D.; Shvarts, A.; Semenza, G.L.; Meijer, G.J.; van de Wiel, M.A.; Belien, J.A.M.; Van Diest, P; van der Wall, E.E.

    2005-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) plays a critical role in cellular responses to hypoxia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate which genes are induced by hypoxia, and whether this induction is mediated by HIF-1, by expression microarray analysis of wt and HIF-1α null mouse fibroblasts.

  16. Dynamic regulation of metabolic efficiency explains tolerance to acute hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Tomas A; Ekblom, Björn; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Larsen, Filip J

    2014-10-01

    The maximum power principle dictates that open biological systems tend to self-organize to a level of efficiency that allows maximal power production. Applying this principle to cellular energetics and whole-body physiology would suggest that for every metabolic challenge, an optimal efficiency exists that maximizes power production. On exposure to hypoxia, it would be favorable if metabolic efficiency would rapidly adjust so as to better preserve work performance. We tested this idea in humans by measuring metabolic efficiency and exercise tolerance under normoxic (Fio2=20.9%) and hypoxic (Fio2=16%) conditions, where Fio2 is fraction of inhaled oxygen. The results were compared with respirometric analyses of skeletal muscle mitochondria from the same individuals. We found that among healthy trained subjects (n=14) with a wide range of metabolic efficiency (ME), those with a high ME during normoxic exercise were able to better maintain exercise capacity (Wmax) in hypoxia. On hypoxic exposure, these subjects acutely decreased their efficiency from 19.2 to 17.4%, thereby likely shifting it closer to a degree of efficiency where maximal power production is achieved. In addition, mitochondria from these subjects had a lower intrinsic respiration compared to subjects that showed a large drop in Wmax in hypoxia An acute shift in efficiency was also demonstrated in isolated mitochondria exposed to physiological levels of hypoxia as P/O ratio increased from 0.9 to 1.3 with hypoxic exposure. These findings suggest the existence of a physiological adaptive response by which metabolic efficiency is dynamically optimized to maximize power production. © FASEB.

  17. High expression of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase and proinflammatory markers in human ischemic heart tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, Lisa U.; Lundqvist, Annika; Asp, Julia; Synnergren, Jane; Johansson, Cecilia Thalén; Palmqvist, Lars; Jeppsson, Anders; Hultén, Lillemor Mattsson

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We found a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 in the ischemic heart. ► Incubation of human muscle cells in hypoxia showed a 22-fold upregulation of ALOX15. ► We observed increased levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue. ► Suggesting a link between ischemia and inflammation in ischemic heart biopsies. -- Abstract: A common feature of the ischemic heart and atherosclerotic plaques is the presence of hypoxia (insufficient levels of oxygen in the tissue). Hypoxia has pronounced effects on almost every aspect of cell physiology, and the nuclear transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) regulates adaptive responses to low concentrations of oxygen in mammalian cells. In our recent work, we observed that hypoxia increases the proinflammatory enzyme arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (ALOX15B) in human carotid plaques. ALOX15 has recently been shown to be present in the human myocardium, but the effect of ischemia on its expression has not been investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that ischemia of the heart leads to increased expression of ALOX15, and found an almost 2-fold increase in HIF-1α mRNA expression and a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 mRNA expression in the ischemic heart biopsies from patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery compared with non ischemic heart tissue. To investigate the effect of low oxygen concentration on ALOX15 we incubated human vascular muscle cells in hypoxia and showed that expression of ALOX15 increased 22-fold compared with cells incubated in normoxic conditions. We also observed increased mRNA levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue compared with non-ischemic controls. In summary, we demonstrate increased ALOX15 in human ischemic heart biopsies. Furthermore we demonstrate that hypoxia increases ALOX15 in human muscle cells. Our results yield important insights into the underlying association between hypoxia and inflammation in the human ischemic heart disease.

  18. Role of hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factor in physiological and pathological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Jahani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Organisms are exposed to oxygen deprivation (Hypoxia in various physiological and pathological conditions. There are different conserve evolutionary responses to counterview with this stress that primary transcriptional response to stress related to hypoxia is interceded by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1 in mammals. This factor can regulate different genes that have essential roles in adaptation to this condition. In this review, the role of this factor in physiological and pathological conditions under hypoxic condition has been evaluated after examining structural features and regulation characteristics of HIF-1. Methods: First, articles related to the keywords of hypoxia and HIF-1 (from 1991-2016 were searched from valid databases such as Springer Link, Google Scholar, PubMed and Science direct. Then, the articles correlated with hypoxia, HIF-1 and their roles in physiological and pathological conditions (120 articles were searched and just 64 articles were selected for this study. Result: According to studies, there are different genes in cells and organs that can be regulated by HIF-1. Activation of genes expression by this protein occurs through its linkage to cis-acting of 50 base pair hypoxia response element (HRE region located in their promotor and enhancer. Depending on circumstances, activation of these genes can be beneficial or harmful. Conclusion: Activation of different genes in hypoxia by HIF-1 has different effects on physiological and pathological conditions. Therefore, HIF-1, as a hypoxia-inducible factor in hypoxic conditions, plays an essential role in the adaptation of cells and organs to changes related to the presence of oxygen.

  19. [Effects of hypoxia on the phenotype transformation of human dermal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts and the mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, B; Han, F; Zhang, W; Wang, X J; Zhang, J; Yang, F F; Shi, J H; Su, L L; Hu, D H

    2017-06-20

    Objective: To investigate the effects of hypoxia on the phenotype transformation of human dermal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts and the mechanism. Methods: The third passage of healthy adult human dermal fibroblasts in logarithmic phase were cultured in DMEM medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum for the following five experiments. (1) In experiments 1, 2, and 3, cells were divided into normoxia group and hypoxia group according to the random number table, with 10 dishes in each group. Cells of normoxia group were cultured in incubator containing 21% oxygen, while those of hypoxia group with 1% oxygen. At post culture hour (PCH) 0 and 48, 5 dishes of cells were collected from each group, respectively. mRNA expressions of markers of myofibroblasts including alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), type Ⅰ collagen, and type Ⅲ collagen of cells were determined with real time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in experiment 1. Protein expressions of α-SMA, type Ⅰ collagen, and type Ⅲ collagen of cells were determined with Western blotting in experiment 2. The protein expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) of cells was determined with Western blotting in experiment 3. (2) In experiment 4, cells were divided into normoxia group, hypoxia group, and hypoxia+ pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) group according to the random number table, with 5 dishes in each group. Cells in the former two groups were treated the same as those in experiment 1. Cells in hypoxia+ PDTC group were treated the same as those in hypoxia group plus adding 4 mL PDTC with a final molarity of 10 μmol/L in the culture medium. At PCH 48, the protein expression of NF-κB of cells was determined with Western blotting. (3) In experiment 5, cells were divided into normoxia group, hypoxia group, hypoxia+ PDTC group, and normoxia+ PDTC group according to the random number table, with 5 dishes in each group. Cells in the former three groups were treated the

  20. Sevoflurane suppresses hypoxia-induced growth and metastasis of lung cancer cells via inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hua; Yang, Cheng Xiang; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Han Bing; Liu, Hong Zhen; Lai, Xiao Hong; Liao, Mei Juan; Zhang, Tao

    2015-12-01

    Hypoxia promotes the progression of lung cancer cells. Unfortunately, anesthetic technique might aggravate hypoxia of lung cancer cells. Sevoflurane is a commonly used anesthetic. Its effect on hypoxia-induced aggressiveness of lung cancer cells remains unknown. The aim of the study is to investigate the effects of sevoflurane on hypoxia-induced growth and metastasis of lung cancer cells. As hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) plays a pivotal role in mediating the adaptation and tolerance of cancer cells under hypoxic microenvironment, the role of HIF-1α in the effect of sevoflurane on hypoxia-induced growth and metastasis has also been elucidated. A549 cells were treated with normoxia, hypoxia, co-treatment of sevoflurane and hypoxia, and dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG, a HIF-1α agonist) for 4 h, respectively. MTT assay and colony formation assay were used to evaluate cell growth. Transwell assay was performed to detect invasion and migration ability. The protein level of HIF-1α, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), survivin, fascin, heparanase (HPA), and p38 MAPK were determined by Western blotting. Hypoxia enhanced proliferation and metastatic potential of cells. Sevoflurane could suppress hypoxia-induced growth and metastasis ability of cells. Furthermore, HIF-1α, XIAP, survivin, fascin and HPA were down-regulated significantly by the co-treatment of sevoflurane and hypoxia as compared to hypoxia treatment. DMOG abolished the inhibiting effects of sevoflurane on hypoxia-induced growth and metastasis ability of cells. In addition, sevoflurane partly reversed the increase of p38 MAPK activity that was induced by hypoxia. Sevoflurane could suppress hypoxia-induced growth and metastasis of lung cancer cells, which might be associated with modulating HIF-1α and its down-stream genes. Moreover, p38 MAPK signaling pathway was involved in the regulation of HIF-1α by sevoflurane.

  1. Working memory impairment in pilots exposed to acute hypobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malle, Carine; Quinette, Peggy; Laisney, Mickaël; Bourrilhon, Cyprien; Boissin, Jacqueline; Desgranges, Beatrice; Eustache, Francis; Piérard, Christophe

    2013-08-01

    During an acute hypoxia exposure, impairment of memory is one of the most frequently reported symptoms, either during hypoxia awareness training of aircrews or after an in-flight hypoxic incident. However, the effects of acute hypoxia on memory have been little studied in laboratory-controlled conditions. Moreover, none of these studies were performed in hypobaric conditions. The main aim of our study was to investigate the effects of acute hypobaric hypoxia on working memory (WM). This study also aimed to find links between physiological measurements and cognitive performance during acute hypoxia exposure. During hypoxia awareness training, 28 subjects (experimental group) were exposed to a simulated altitude level of 10,000 m (31,000 ft) in a hypobaric chamber, while 29 subjects (control group) stayed at sea level. WM was assessed in both groups with the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT). Peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate were recorded. WM was strongly impaired in the hypoxic group. One major finding is that hypoxia highly increased the mean error frequency rate. WM performance decreased linearly with hypoxemia, but SpO2 was weakly predictive of PASAT performance and vice versa. WM is impaired by acute hypobaric hypoxia. Given the importance of WM in aircraft piloting and its sensitivity to hypoxia, the PASAT, in association with SpO2 and EEG recordings, could improve both hypoxia training and our understanding of the effects of hypoxia on memory.

  2. Rhodiola crenulata extract counteracts the effect of hypobaric hypoxia in rat heart via redirection of the nitric oxide and arginase 1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Wei; Chang, Tsu-Chung; Wu, Yu-Kuan; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Shi, Li-Shian; Lee, Shih-Yu

    2017-01-07

    Rhodiola crenulata is traditionally used as a folk medicine in Tibet for preventing high-altitude illnesses, including sudden cardiac death (SCD). The cardio-protective effects of Rhodiola crenulata root extract (RCE) against hypoxia in vivo have been recently confirmed. However, the way in which RCE produces these effects remains unclear. The present study is designed to confirm the protective effects of RCE on the heart in acute hypobaric hypoxia exposure and examine the mechanisms by which this occurs. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were pretreated with or without RCE and then exposed to a simulated altitude of 8000 m in a hypobaric hypoxia chamber for 9 h. The expression of cardiac arginase 1 (Arg-1) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and the activity of associated signaling pathways was examined. Hypoxia reduced cardiac eNOS phosphorylation and increased Arg-1 expression, but both responses were reversed by RCE pre-treatment. In addition, RCE decreased the hypoxia-induced oxidative stress markers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, malondialdehyde (MDA) level, and protein carbonyl content. Furthermore, RCE protected cardiomyocytes from hypoxia-induced cardiac apoptosis and restored the phosphorylation level of AKT and p38 MAPK as well as the superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) content in hypoxic animals. The findings provide evidence that the effects of Rhodiola crenulata against altitude illness are partially mediated by modulation of eNOS and Arg-1 pathways in the heart.

  3. Signaling hypoxia by hypoxia-inducible factor protein hydroxylases: a historical overview and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Tammie; Ratcliffe, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    By the early 1900s, the close matching of oxygen supply with demand was recognized to be a fundamental requirement for physiological function, and multiple adaptive responses to environment hypoxia had been described. Nevertheless, the widespread operation of mechanisms that directly sense and respond to levels of oxygen in animal cells was not appreciated for most of the twentieth century with investigators generally stressing the regulatory importance of metabolic products. Work over the last 25 years has overturned that paradigm. It has revealed the existence of a set of “oxygen-sensing” 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases that catalyze the hydroxylation of specific amino acid residues and thereby control the stability and activity of hypoxia-inducible factor. The hypoxia-inducible factor hydroxylase pathway regulates a massive transcriptional cascade that is operative in essentially all animal cells. It transduces a wide range of responses to hypoxia, extending well beyond the classical boundaries of hypoxia physiology. Here we review the discovery and elucidation of these pathways, and consider the opportunities and challenges that have been brought into focus by the findings, including new implications for the integrated physiology of hypoxia and therapeutic approaches to ischemic/hypoxic disease. PMID:27774477

  4. Adipose Tissue Hypoxia in Obesity and Its Impact on Preadipocytes and Macrophages: Hypoxia Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engin, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    Obese subjects exhibit lower adipose tissue oxygen consumption in accordance with the lower adipose tissue blood flow. Thus, compared with lean subjects, obese subjects have 44% lower capillary density and 58% lower vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The VEGF expression together with hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1 (HIF-1) activity also requires phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)- and target of rapamycin (TOR)-mediated signaling. HIF-1alpha is an important signaling molecule for hypoxia to induce the inflammatory responses. Hypoxia affects a number of biological functions, such as angiogenesis, cell proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation and insulin resistance. Additionally, reactive oxygen radical (ROS) generation at mitochondria is responsible for propagation of the hypoxic signal. Actually mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) production, but not oxygen consumption is required for hypoxic HIF-1alpha protein stabilization. Adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity is reduced in obese compared with non-obese adults. In this respect, mitochondrial dysfunction of adipocyte is associated with the overall adiposity. Furthermore, hypoxia also inhibits macrophage migration from the hypoxic adipose tissue. Alterations in oxygen availability of adipose tissue directly affect the macrophage polarization and are responsible from dysregulated adipocytokines production in obesity. Hypoxia also inhibits adipocyte differentiation from preadipocytes. In addition to stressed adipocytes, hypoxia contributes to immune cell immigration and activation which further aggravates adipose tissue fibrosis. Fibrosis is initiated in response to adipocyte hypertrophy in obesity.

  5. Frequently asked questions in hypoxia research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenger RH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Roland H Wenger,1,2 Vartan Kurtcuoglu,1,2 Carsten C Scholz,1,2 Hugo H Marti,3 David Hoogewijs1,2,4 1Institute of Physiology and Zurich Center for Human Physiology (ZIHP, University of Zurich, 2National Center of Competence in Research “Kidney.CH”, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 4Institute of Physiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany Abstract: “What is the O2 concentration in a normoxic cell culture incubator?” This and other frequently asked questions in hypoxia research will be answered in this review. Our intention is to give a simple introduction to the physics of gases that would be helpful for newcomers to the field of hypoxia research. We will provide background knowledge about questions often asked, but without straightforward answers. What is O2 concentration, and what is O2 partial pressure? What is normoxia, and what is hypoxia? How much O2 is experienced by a cell residing in a culture dish in vitro vs in a tissue in vivo? By the way, the O2 concentration in a normoxic incubator is 18.6%, rather than 20.9% or 20%, as commonly stated in research publications. And this is strictly only valid for incubators at sea level. Keywords: gas laws, hypoxia-inducible factor, Krogh tissue cylinder, oxygen diffusion, partial pressure, tissue oxygen levels

  6. Hypoxia and Angiogenesis in Endometrioid Endometrial Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Horrée

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α plays an essential role in the adaptive response of cells to hypoxia, triggering biologic events associated with aggressive tumor behavior. Methods: Expression of HIF-1α and proteins in the HIF-1α pathway (Glut-1, CAIX, VEGF in paraffin-embedded specimens of normal (n = 17, premalignant (n = 17 and endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (n = 39 was explored by immunohistochemistry, in relation to microvessel density (MVD. Results: HIF-1α overexpression was absent in inactive endometrium but present in hyperplasia (61% and carcinoma (87%, with increasing expression in a perinecrotic fashion pointing to underlying hypoxia. No membranous expression of Glut-1 and CAIX was noticed in inactive endometrium, in contrast with expression in hyperplasia (Glut-1 0%, CAIX 61%, only focal and diffuse and carcinoma (Glut-1 94.6%, CAIX 92%, both mostly perinecrotically. Diffuse HIF-1α was accompanied by activation of downstream targets. VEGF was significantly higher expressed in hyperplasias and carcinomas compared to inactive endometrium. MVD was higher in hyperplasias and carcinomas than in normal endometrium (p < 0.001. Conclusion: HIF-1α and its downstream genes are increasingly expressed from normal through premalignant to endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the endometrium, paralleled by activation of its downstream genes and increased angiogenesis. This underlines the potential importance of hypoxia and its key regulator HIF-1α in endometrial carcinogenesis.

  7. Hypoxanthine as a measurement of hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugstad, O D

    1975-04-01

    The hypoxanthine concentration in plasma was found to be a sensitive parameter of hypoxia of the fetus and the newborn infant. The plasma level of hypoxanthine in the umbilical cord in 29 newborn infants with normal delivery varied between 0 and 11.0 mumol/liter with a mean of 5.8 mumol/liter, SD 3.0 mumol/liter. Compared with this reference group the hypoxanthine concentration in plasma of the umbilical cord in 10 newborn infants with clinical signs of intrauterine hypoxia during labor was found to be significantly higher, with a range of 11.0-61.5 mumol/liter, with a mean of 25.0 mumol/liter, SD 18.0 mumol/liter. The plasma level of hypoxanthine in two premature babies developing an idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome was monitored. The metabolite was found to be considerably increased, in one of them more than 24 hr after a period of hypoxia necessitating artificial ventilation. The hypoxanthine level in plasma of umbilical arterial blood was followed about 2 hr postpartum in three newborn infants with clinical signs of intrauterine hypoxia. The decrease of the plasma concentration of the metabolite seemed to be with a constant velocity, as it was about 10 mumol/liter/hr in these cases. A new method was used for the determination of hypoxanthine in plasma, based on the principle that PO2 decreased when hypoxanthine is oxidized to uric acid.

  8. Incentives and intrinsic motivation in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Berdud

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: The conclusions could act as a guide to support the optimal design of incentive policies and schemes within health organisations when healthcare professionals are intrinsically motivated.

  9. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intrinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. (author).

  10. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    1990-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intrinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. (author)

  11. Biomolecular Markers in Cancer of the Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daris Ferrari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of tongue cancer is increasing worldwide, and its aggressiveness remains high regardless of treatment. Genetic changes and the expression of abnormal proteins have been frequently reported in the case of head and neck cancers, but the little information that has been published concerning tongue tumours is often contradictory. This review will concentrate on the immunohistochemical expression of biomolecular markers and their relationships with clinical behaviour and prognosis. Most of these proteins are associated with nodal stage, tumour progression and metastases, but there is still controversy concerning their impact on disease-free and overall survival, and treatment response. More extensive clinical studies are needed to identify the patterns of molecular alterations and the most reliable predictors in order to develop tailored anti-tumour strategies based on the targeting of hypoxia markers, vascular and lymphangiogenic factors, epidermal growth factor receptors, intracytoplasmatic signalling and apoptosis.

  12. Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Since 1985, scientists have been documenting a hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico each year. The hypoxic zone, an area of low dissolved oxygen that cannot support marine life, generally manifests itself in the spring. Since marine species either die or flee the hypoxic zone, the spread of hypoxia reduces the available habitat for marine species, which are important for the ecosystem as well as commercial and recreational fishing in the Gulf. Since 2001, the hypoxic zone has averaged 16,500 km{sup 2} during its peak summer months, an area slightly larger than the state of Connecticut, and ranged from a low of 8,500 km{sup 2} to a high of 22,000 km{sup 2}. To address the hypoxia problem, the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force (or Task Force) was formed to bring together representatives from federal agencies, states, and tribes to consider options for responding to hypoxia. The Task Force asked the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to conduct a scientific assessment of the causes and consequences of Gulf hypoxia through its Committee on Environment and Natural Resources (CENR). In 2000 the CENR completed An Integrated Assessment: Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (or Integrated Assessment), which formed the scientific basis for the Task Force's Action Plan for Reducing, Mitigating, and Controlling Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (Action Plan, 2001). In its Action Plan, the Task Force pledged to implement ten management actions and to assess progress every 5 years. This reassessment would address the nutrient load reductions achieved, the responses of the hypoxic zone and associated water quality and habitat conditions, and economic and social effects. The Task Force began its reassessment in 2005. In 2006 as part of the reassessment, USEPA's Office of Water, on behalf of the Task Force, requested that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Science Advisory Board (SAB) convene an independent

  13. Regulation of mRNA translation influences hypoxia tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koritzinsky, M.; Wouters, B.G.; Koumenis, C.

    2003-01-01

    Hypoxia is a heterogenous but common characteristic of human tumours and poor oxygenation is associated with poor prognosis. We believe that the presence of viable hypoxic tumor cells reflects in part an adaptation and tolerance of these cells to oxygen deficiency. Since oxidative phosphorylation is compromized during hypoxia, adaptation may involve both the upregulation of glycolysis as well as downregulation of energy consumption. mRNA translation is one of the most energy costly cellular processes, and we and others have shown that global mRNA translation is rapidly inhibited during hypoxia. However, some mRNAs, including those coding for HIF-1 α and VEGF, remain efficiently translated during hypoxia. Clearly, the mechanisms responsible for the overall inhibition of translation during hypoxia does not compromize the translation of certain hypoxia-induced mRNA species. We therefore hypothesize that the inhibition of mRNA translation serves to promote hypoxia tolerance in two ways: i) through conservation of energy and ii) through differential gene expression involved in hypoxia adaptation. We have recently identified two pathways that are responsible for the global inhibition of translation during hypoxia. The phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF2 α by the ER resident kinase PERK results in down-regulation of protein synthesis shortly after the onset of hypoxia. In addition, the initiation complex eIF4F is disrupted during long lasting hypoxic conditions. The identification of the molecular pathways responsible for the inhibition of overall translation during hypoxia has rendered it possible to investigate their importance for hypoxia tolerance. We have found that mouse embryo fibroblasts that are knockout for PERK and therefore not able to inhibit protein synthesis efficiently during oxygen deficiency are significantly less tolerant to hypoxia than their wildtype counterparts. We are currently also investigating the functional significance

  14. Effect of hypoxia on equine mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranera Beatriz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs derived from bone marrow (BM-MSCs and adipose tissue (AT-MSCs are being applied to equine cell therapy. The physiological environment in which MSCs reside is hypoxic and does not resemble the oxygen level typically used in in vitro culture (20% O2. This work compares the growth kinetics, viability, cell cycle, phenotype and expression of pluripotency markers in both equine BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs at 5% and 20% O2. Results At the conclusion of culture, fewer BM-MSCs were obtained in hypoxia than in normoxia as a result of significantly reduced cell division. Hypoxic AT-MSCs proliferated less than normoxic AT-MSCs because of a significantly higher presence of non-viable cells during culture. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the immunophenotype of both MSCs was maintained in both oxygen conditions. Gene expression analysis using RT-qPCR showed that statistically significant differences were only found for CD49d in BM-MSCs and CD44 in AT-MSCs. Similar gene expression patterns were observed at both 5% and 20% O2 for the remaining surface markers. Equine MSCs expressed the embryonic markers NANOG, OCT4 and SOX2 in both oxygen conditions. Additionally, hypoxic cells tended to display higher expression, which might indicate that hypoxia retains equine MSCs in an undifferentiated state. Conclusions Hypoxia attenuates the proliferative capacity of equine MSCs, but does not affect the phenotype and seems to keep them more undifferentiated than normoxic MSCs.

  15. Geochemical indicators of intrinsic bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borden, R.C.; Gomez, C.A.; Becker, M.T.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed field investigation has been completed at a gasoline-contaminated aquifer near Rocky Point, NC, to examine possible indicators of intrinsic bioremediation and identify factors that may significantly influence the rae and extent of bioremediation. The dissolved plume of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) in ground water is naturally degrading. Toluene and o-xylene are most rapidly degraded followed by m-, p-xylene, and benzene. Ethylbenzene appears to degrade very slowly under anaerobic conditions present in the center of the plume. The rate and extent of biodegradation appears to be strongly influenced by the type and quantity of electron acceptors present in the aquifer. At the upgradient edge of the plume, nitrate, ferric iron, and oxygen are used as terminal electron acceptors during hydrocarbon biodegradation. The equivalent of 40 to 50 mg/l of hydrocarbon is degraded based on the increase in dissolved CO 2 relative to background ground water. Immediately downgradient of the source area, sulfate and iron are the dominant electron acceptors. Toluene and o-xylene are rapidly removed in this region. Once the available oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate are consumed, biodegradation is limited and appears to be controlled by mixing and aerobic biodegradation at the plume fringes

  16. Protein intrinsic disorder in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Florencio; Pietrosemoli, Natalia; García-Martín, Juan A; Solano, Roberto

    2013-09-12

    To some extent contradicting the classical paradigm of the relationship between protein 3D structure and function, now it is clear that large portions of the proteomes, especially in higher organisms, lack a fixed structure and still perform very important functions. Proteins completely or partially unstructured in their native (functional) form are involved in key cellular processes underlain by complex networks of protein interactions. The intrinsic conformational flexibility of these disordered proteins allows them to bind multiple partners in transient interactions of high specificity and low affinity. In concordance, in plants this type of proteins has been found in processes requiring these complex and versatile interaction networks. These include transcription factor networks, where disordered proteins act as integrators of different signals or link different transcription factor subnetworks due to their ability to interact (in many cases simultaneously) with different partners. Similarly, they also serve as signal integrators in signaling cascades, such as those related to response to external stimuli. Disordered proteins have also been found in plants in many stress-response processes, acting as protein chaperones or protecting other cellular components and structures. In plants, it is especially important to have complex and versatile networks able to quickly and efficiently respond to changing environmental conditions since these organisms cannot escape and have no other choice than adapting to them. Consequently, protein disorder can play an especially important role in plants, providing them with a fast mechanism to obtain complex, interconnected and versatile molecular networks.

  17. Protein intrinsic disorder in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencio ePazos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To some extent contradicting the classical paradigm of the relationship between protein 3D structure and function, now it is clear that large portions of the proteomes, especially in higher organisms, lack a fixed structure and still perform very important functions. Proteins completely or partially unstructured in their native (functional form are involved in key cellular processes underlain by complex networks of protein interactions. The intrinsic conformational flexibility of these disordered proteins allows them to bind multiple partners in transient interactions of high specificity and low affinity. In concordance, in plants this type of proteins has been found in processes requiring these complex and versatile interaction networks. These include transcription factor networks, where disordered proteins act as integrators of different signals or link different transcription factor subnetworks due to their ability to interact (in many cases simultaneously with different partners. Similarly, they also serve as signal integrators in signalling cascades, such as those related to response to external stimuli. Disordered proteins have also been found in plants in many stress-response processes, acting as protein chaperones or protecting other cellular components and structures. In plants, it is especially important to have complex and versatile networks able to quickly and efficiently respond to changing environmental conditions since these organisms can not escape and have no other choice than adapting to them. Consequently, protein disorder can play an especially important role in plants, providing them with a fast mechanism to obtain complex, interconnected and versatile molecular networks.

  18. Pancreatic Fibroblasts Stimulate the Motility of Pancreatic Cancer Cells through IGF1/IGF1R Signaling under Hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Hirakawa

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is characterized by its hypovascularity, with an extremely poor prognosis because of its highly invasive nature. PDAC proliferates with abundant stromal cells, suggesting that its invasive activity might be controlled by intercellular interactions between cancer cells and fibroblasts. Using four PDAC cell lines and two pancreas cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs, the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1 and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R was evaluated by RT-PCR, FACScan, western blot, or ELISA. Correlation between IGF1R and the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9 was examined by immunohistochemical staining of 120 pancreatic specimens. The effects of CAFs, IGF1, and IGF1R inhibitors on the motility of cancer cells were examined by wound-healing assay or invasion assay under normoxia (20% O2 and hypoxia (1% O2. IGF1R expression was significantly higher in RWP-1, MiaPaCa-2, and OCUP-AT cells than in Panc-1 cells. Hypoxia increased the expression level of IGF1R in RWP-1, MiaPaCa-2, and OCUP-AT cells. CA9 expression was correlated with IGF1R expression in pancreatic specimens. CAFs produced IGF1 under hypoxia, but PDAC cells did not. A conditioned medium from CAFs, which expressed αSMA, stimulated the migration and invasion ability of MiaPaCa-2, RWP-1, and OCUP-AT cells. The motility of all PDAC cells was greater under hypoxia than under normoxia. The motility-stimulating ability of CAFs was decreased by IGF1R inhibitors. These findings might suggest that pancreas CAFs stimulate the invasion activity of PDAC cells through paracrine IGF1/IGF1R signaling, especially under hypoxia. Therefore the targeting of IGF1R signaling might represent a promising therapeutic approach in IGF1R-dependent PDAC.

  19. Cyclosporine treatment reduces oxygen free radical generation and oxidative stress in the brain of hypoxia-reoxygenated newborn piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richdeep S Gill

    Full Text Available Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It has previously been shown in traumatic brain injury animal models that treatment with cyclosporine reduces brain injury. However, the potential neuroprotective effect of cyclosporine in asphyxiated neonates has yet to be fully studied. Using an acute newborn swine model of hypoxia-reoxygenation, we evaluated the effects of cyclosporine on the brain, focusing on hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 production and markers of oxidative stress. Piglets (1-4 d, 1.4-2.5 kg were block-randomized into three hypoxia-reoxygenation experimental groups (2 h hypoxia followed by 4 h reoxygenation (n = 8/group. At 5 min after reoxygenation, piglets were given either i.v. saline (placebo, controls or cyclosporine (2.5 or 10 mg/kg i.v. bolus in a blinded-randomized fashion. An additional sham-operated group (n = 4 underwent no hypoxia-reoxygenation. Systemic hemodynamics, carotid arterial blood flow (transit-time ultrasonic probe, cerebral cortical H(2O(2 production (electrochemical sensor, cerebral tissue glutathione (ELISA and cytosolic cytochrome-c (western blot levels were examined. Hypoxic piglets had cardiogenic shock (cardiac output 40-48% of baseline, hypotension (mean arterial pressure 27-31 mmHg and acidosis (pH 7.04 at the end of 2 h of hypoxia. Post-resuscitation cyclosporine treatment, particularly the higher dose (10 mg/kg, significantly attenuated the increase in cortical H(2O(2 concentration during reoxygenation, and was associated with lower cerebral oxidized glutathione levels. Furthermore, cyclosporine treatment significantly attenuated the increase in cortical cytochrome-c and lactate levels. Carotid blood arterial flow was similar among groups during reoxygenation. Conclusively, post-resuscitation administration of cyclosporine significantly attenuates H(2O(2 production and minimizes oxidative stress in newborn piglets following hypoxia-reoxygenation.

  20. Sensory deficits and olfactory system injury detected by novel application of MEMRI in newborn rabbit after antenatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobyshevsky, Alexander; Robinson, Alan M; Derrick, Matthew; Wyrwicz, Alice M; Ji, Xinhai; Englof, Ila; Tan, Sidhartha

    2006-09-01

    Sensory deficits are frequently observed in cerebral palsy patients. The motor response to smell was found to be abnormal in an animal model of cerebral palsy following fetal hypoxia-ischemia. We hypothesized that fetal hypoxia-ischemia causes long-lasting and selective olfactory tract injury. A population of newborn rabbits with motor deficits was selected after spontaneous delivery following uterine ischemia at 22 days gestation (E22, 70% term). MnCl(2), 20 mg/kg, was administered in both nostrils at postnatal day 1 (E32). One nostril was occluded to control for smell augmentation through the other open nostril by intermittent amyl acetate stimulation for 6 h. T1-weighted MRI images were obtained on newborn rabbits. Amyl acetate exposure increased augmentation of Mn(2+) uptake in olfactory epithelium on the open side in control group but the augmentation was decreased after hypoxia. The proportion of animals with a greater enhancement in the open side increased in controls after amyl acetate, but not in hypoxia. Mn(2+) took longer to arrive at the olfactory bulbs and the rate of subsequent increase was slower in hypoxia. Concomitantly, the thickness of olfactory epithelium and the number of mature olfactory neurons, detected on olfactory marker protein immunostaining, were significantly less in the hypoxic group. Functional MRI studies are superior to neurobehavioral smell testing in the rabbit kits as they are more sensitive and quantifiable measures and do not depend upon the motor response. Antenatal hypoxia-ischemia causes long-lasting injury to neuronal tracts of the olfactory system including olfactory epithelium.

  1. LEADERSHIP STYLE AND EMPLOYEES' INTRINSIC JOB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This study investigates the impact of leadership style on employees' intrinsic job satisfaction in the Cross River State Newspaper Corporation, Calabar,. Nigeria. The study examined the problem of dissatisfaction in the work place as far as intrinsic factors of job satisfaction are concerned. Structured questionnaire ...

  2. Intrinsic bioremediation of landfills interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigmon, R.L.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    Intrinsic bioremediation is a risk management option that relies on natural biological and physical processes to contain the spread of contamination from a source. Evidence is presented in this report that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the Sanitary Landfill is fundamental to support incorportion into a Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

  3. Differential scanning microcalorimetry of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permyakov, Sergei E

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasensitive differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is an indispensable thermophysical technique enabling to get direct information on enthalpies accompanying heating/cooling of dilute biopolymer solutions. The thermal dependence of protein heat capacity extracted from DSC data is a valuable source of information on intrinsic disorder level of a protein. Application details and limitations of DSC technique in exploration of protein intrinsic disorder are described.

  4. Intrinsic bioremediation of landfills interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Fliermans, C.B.

    1997-07-14

    Intrinsic bioremediation is a risk management option that relies on natural biological and physical processes to contain the spread of contamination from a source. Evidence is presented in this report that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the Sanitary Landfill is fundamental to support incorportion into a Corrective Action Plan (CAP).

  5. An Intrinsic Coordinate System for Fingerprint Matching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazen, A.M.; Gerez, Sabih H.; Bigun, J.; Smeraldi, F.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, an intrinsic coordinate system is proposed for fingerprints. First the fingerprint is partitioned in regular regions, which are regions that contain no singular points. In each regular region, the intrinsic coordinate system is defined by the directional field. When using the

  6. Cellular normoxic biophysical markers of hydroxyurea treatment in sickle cell disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini, Poorya; Abidi, Sabia Z.; Du, E; Papageorgiou, Dimitrios P.; Choi, Youngwoon; Park, YongKeun; Higgins, John M.; Kato, Gregory J.; Suresh, Subra; Dao, Ming; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter T. C.

    2016-01-01

    There exists a critical need for developing biomarkers reflecting clinical outcomes and for evaluating the effectiveness of treatments for sickle cell disease patients. Prior attempts to find such patient-specific markers have mostly relied upon chemical biomarkers or biophysical properties at hypoxia with limited success. We introduce unique biomarkers based on characterization of cellular biophysical properties at normoxia and show that these markers correlate sensitively with treatment usi...

  7. Hypoxia-Inducible Factors: Mediators of Cancer Progression; Prognostic and Therapeutic Targets in Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadri, Navid; Zhang, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Soft-tissue sarcomas remain aggressive tumors that result in death in greater than a third of patients due to either loco-regional recurrence or distant metastasis. Surgical resection remains the main choice of treatment for soft tissue sarcomas with pre- and/or post-operational radiation and neoadjuvant chemotherapy employed in more advanced stage disease. However, in recent decades, there has been little progress in the average five-year survival for the majority of patients with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas, highlighting the need for improved targeted therapeutic agents. Clinical and preclinical studies demonstrate that tumor hypoxia and up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) is associated with decreased survival, increased metastasis, and resistance to therapy in soft tissue sarcomas. HIF-mediated gene expression regulates many critical aspects of tumor biology, including cell survival, metabolic programming, angiogenesis, metastasis, and therapy resistance. In this review, we discuss HIFs and HIF-mediated genes as potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in sarcomas. Many pharmacological agents targeting hypoxia-related pathways are in development that may hold therapeutic potential for treating both primary and metastatic sarcomas that demonstrate increased HIF expression

  8. Synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy induces hypoxia in intracerebral gliosarcoma but not in the normal brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchet, Audrey; Lemasson, Benjamin; Christen, Thomas; Potez, Marine; Rome, Claire; Coquery, Nicolas; Le Clec’h, Céline; Moisan, Anaick; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Leduc, Géraldine; Rémy, Chantal; Laissue, Jean A.; Barbier, Emmanuel L.; Brun, Emmanuel; Serduc, Raphaël

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is an innovative irradiation modality based on spatial fractionation of a high-dose X-ray beam into lattices of microbeams. The increase in lifespan of brain tumor-bearing rats is associated with vascular damage but the physiological consequences of MRT on blood vessels have not been described. In this manuscript, we evaluate the oxygenation changes induced by MRT in an intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma model. Methods: Tissue responses to MRT (two orthogonal arrays (2 × 400 Gy)) were studied using magnetic resonance-based measurements of local blood oxygen saturation (MR S O 2 ) and quantitative immunohistology of RECA-1, Type-IV collagen and GLUT-1, marker of hypoxia. Results: In tumors, MR S O 2 decreased by a factor of 2 in tumor between day 8 and day 45 after MRT. This correlated with tumor vascular remodeling, i.e. decrease in vessel density, increases in half-vessel distances (×5) and GLUT-1 immunoreactivity. Conversely, MRT did not change normal brain MR S O 2 , although vessel inter-distances increased slightly. Conclusion: We provide new evidence for the differential effect of MRT on tumor vasculature, an effect that leads to tumor hypoxia. As hypothesized formerly, the vasculature of the normal brain exposed to MRT remains sufficiently perfused to prevent any hypoxia

  9. Inhibition of calcium uptake during hypoxia in developing zebrafish is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Kumai, Yusuke; Tzaneva, Velislava; Azzi, Estelle; Hochhold, Nina; Robertson, Cayleih; Pelster, Bernd; Perry, Steve F

    2016-12-15

    The present study investigated the potential role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) in calcium homeostasis in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio). It was demonstrated that zebrafish raised in hypoxic water (30 mmHg; control, 155 mmHg P O 2 ) until 4 days post-fertilization exhibited a substantial reduction in whole-body Ca 2+ levels and Ca 2+ uptake. Ca 2+ uptake in hypoxia-treated fish did not return to pre-hypoxia (control) levels within 2 h of transfer back to normoxic water. Results from real-time PCR showed that hypoxia decreased the whole-body mRNA expression levels of the epithelial Ca 2+ channel (ecac), but not plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase (pmca2) or Na + /Ca 2+ -exchanger (ncx1b). Whole-mount in situ hybridization revealed that the number of ecac-expressing ionocytes was reduced in fish raised in hypoxic water. These findings suggested that hypoxic treatment suppressed the expression of ecac, thereby reducing Ca 2+ influx. To further evaluate the potential mechanisms for the effects of hypoxia on Ca 2+ regulation, a functional gene knockdown approach was employed to prevent the expression of HIF-1αb during hypoxic treatment. Consistent with a role for HIF-1αb in regulating Ca 2+ balance during hypoxia, the results demonstrated that the reduction of Ca 2+ uptake associated with hypoxic exposure was not observed in fish experiencing HIF-1αb knockdown. Additionally, the effects of hypoxia on reducing the number of ecac-expressing ionocytes was less pronounced in HIF-1αb-deficient fish. Overall, the current study revealed that hypoxic exposure inhibited Ca 2+ uptake in developing zebrafish, probably owing to HIF-1αb-mediated suppression of ecac expression. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Cycling hypoxia: A key feature of the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, Carine; Tellier, Céline; Feron, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    A compelling body of evidence indicates that most human solid tumors contain hypoxic areas. Hypoxia is the consequence not only of the chaotic proliferation of cancer cells that places them at distance from the nearest capillary but also of the abnormal structure of the new vasculature network resulting in transient blood flow. Hence two types of hypoxia are observed in tumors: chronic and cycling (intermittent) hypoxia. Most of the current work aims at understanding the role of chronic hypoxia in tumor growth, response to treatment and metastasis. Only recently, cycling hypoxia, with spatial and temporal fluctuations in oxygen levels, has emerged as another key feature of the tumor environment that triggers different responses in comparison to chronic hypoxia. Either type of hypoxia is associated with distinct effects not only in cancer cells but also in stromal cells. In particular, cycling hypoxia has been demonstrated to favor, to a higher extent than chronic hypoxia, angiogenesis, resistance to anti-cancer treatments, intratumoral inflammation and tumor metastasis. These review details these effects as well as the signaling pathway it triggers to switch on specific transcriptomic programs. Understanding the signaling pathways through which cycling hypoxia induces these processes that support the development of an aggressive cancer could convey to the emergence of promising new cancer treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Response of immortalized murine cementoblast cells to hypoxia in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yeke; Han, Xianglong; Guo, Yongwen; Wu, Hao; Ren, Jing; Li, Jingyu; Ai, Dongqing; Wang, Lufei; Bai, Ding

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of hypoxia on proliferation, apoptosis and mineralization of cementoblast-like cells (OCCM-30) in vitro. The effects of different periods of hypoxia (2% O2) on proliferation, apoptosis, cementoblastic potential and root cementum resorption capability of OCCM-30 were evaluated, by using MTT, flow cytometry, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction measurement, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and mineralization nodule formation assay. OCCM-30 viability was significantly inhibited by hypoxia while the apoptosis ratio was enhanced in a time-dependent manner; hypoxia inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA were induced by hypoxia in different manners; temporary hypoxia (osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, osteopontin and osteoprotegerin. In addition, hypoxia affected mineralized nodule formation of OCCM-30 in a time-dependent fashion; moreover, root cementum resorption function was also induced by hypoxia, manifested by increased receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand mRNA and protein expression. Temporary exposure of OCCM-30 to hypoxia inhibited proliferation, promoted apoptosis and mineralization, while longer duration of hypoxia could inhibit the cementoblast function. The findings may provide theoretical basis for developing novel therapeutics to prevent root resorption during orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hypoxia Is a Critical Parameter for Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Type I/III Collagen Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tangni Gómez-Leduc

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord blood (UCB is an attractive alternative to bone marrow for isolation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to treat articular cartilage defects. Here, we set out to determine the growth factors (bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β1 and oxygen tension effects during chondrogenesis of human UCB-MSCs for cartilage engineering. Chondrogenic differentiation was induced using 3D cultures in type I/III collagen sponges with chondrogenic factors in normoxia (21% O2 or hypoxia (<5% O2 for 7, 14 and 21 days. Our results show that UCB-MSCs can be committed to chondrogenesis in the presence of BMP-2+TGF-β1. Normoxia induced the highest levels of chondrocyte-specific markers. However, hypoxia exerted more benefit by decreasing collagen X and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP13 expression, two chondrocyte hypertrophy markers. However, a better chondrogenesis was obtained by switching oxygen conditions, with seven days in normoxia followed by 14 days in hypoxia, since these conditions avoid hypertrophy of hUCB-MSC-derived chondrocytes while maintaining the expression of chondrocyte-specific markers observed in normoxia. Our study demonstrates that oxygen tension is a key factor for chondrogenesis and suggests that UBC-MSCs 3D-culture should begin in normoxia to obtain a more efficient chondrocyte differentiation before placing them in hypoxia for chondrocyte phenotype stabilization. UCB-MSCs are therefore a reliable source for cartilage engineering.

  13. High twin resemblance for sensitivity to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masschelein, Evi; Van Thienen, Ruud; Thomis, Martine; Hespel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Physiological responses to hypoxia vary between individuals, and genetic factors are conceivably involved. Using a monozygotic twin design, we investigated the role of genetic factors in physiological responses to acute hypoxia. Thirteen pairs of monozygotic twin brothers participated in two experimental sessions in a normobaric hypoxic facility with a 2-wk interval. In one session, fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2) was gradually reduced to 10.7% (approximately 5300 m altitude) over 5 h. During the next 3 h at 10.7%, FiO2 subjects performed a 20-min submaximal exercise bout (EXSUB, 1.2 W·kg) and a maximal incremental exercise test (EXMAX). An identical control experiment was done in normoxia. Cardiorespiratory measurements were continuously performed, and 8-h urine output was collected. Compared with normoxia, hypoxia decreased (P < 0.05) arterial O2 saturation (%SpO2) at rest (-22%) and during exercise (-28%). Furthermore, V˙O2max (-39%), HRmax (HR, -8%), maximal pulmonary ventilation (V˙Emax, -11%), and urinary norepinephrine excretion (-31%) were reduced (P < 0.05) whereas HR at rest (25%) and during EXSUB (16%) and V˙E at rest (38%) and during EXSUB (70%) were increased (P < 0.05). However, hypoxia-induced changes (Δ) were not randomly distributed between subjects. Between-pair variance was substantially larger than within-pair variance (P < 0.05) for Δ%SpO2 at rest (approximately threefold) and during exercise (approximately fourfold), ΔV˙O2max (approximately fourfold), ΔHR during exercise (approximately seven- to eightfold), hypoxic ventilatory response (approximately sixfold), and Δ urinary norepinephrine output (approximately threefold). Incidence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) also yielded significant twin similarity (P < 0.05). AMS subjects showed approximately 50% greater drop in urinary norepinephrine and lower hypoxic ventilator response than AMS individuals. Our data suggest that genetic factors regulate cardiorespiratory responses, exercise

  14. Hypoxia affects cellular responses to plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Sien-Yei; Stanbridge, Eric J; Yusoff, Khatijah; Shafee, Norazizah

    2012-11-21

    Microenvironmental conditions contribute towards varying cellular responses to plant extract treatments. Hypoxic cancer cells are known to be resistant to radio- and chemo-therapy. New therapeutic strategies specifically targeting these cells are needed. Plant extracts used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) can offer promising candidates. Despite their widespread usage, information on their effects in hypoxic conditions is still lacking. In this study, we examined the cytotoxicity of a series of known TCM plant extracts under normoxic versus hypoxic conditions. Pereskia grandifolia, Orthosiphon aristatus, Melastoma malabathricum, Carica papaya, Strobilanthes crispus, Gynura procumbens, Hydrocotyle sibthorpioides, Pereskia bleo and Clinacanthus nutans leaves were dried, blended into powder form, extracted in methanol and evaporated to produce crude extracts. Human Saos-2 osteosarcoma cells were treated with various concentrations of the plant extracts under normoxia or hypoxia (0.5% oxygen). 24h after treatment, an MTT assay was performed and the IC(50) values were calculated. Effect of the extracts on hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) activity was evaluated using a hypoxia-driven firefly luciferase reporter assay. The relative cytotoxicity of each plant extract on Saos-2 cells was different in hypoxic versus normoxic conditions. Hypoxia increased the IC(50) values for Pereskia grandifola and Orthosiphon aristatus extracts, but decreased the IC(50) values for Melastoma malabathricum and Carica papaya extracts. Extracts of Strobilanthes crispus, Gynura procumbens, Hydrocotyle sibthorpioides had equivalent cytotoxic effects under both conditions. Pereskia bleo and Clinacanthus nutans extracts were not toxic to cells within the concentration ranges tested. The most interesting result was noted for the Carica papaya extract, where its IC(50) in hypoxia was reduced by 3-fold when compared to the normoxic condition. This reduction was found to be associated with HIF

  15. Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin: Its Response to Hypoxia and Association with Acute Mountain Sickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Mellor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS is a common clinical challenge at high altitude (HA. A point-of-care biochemical marker for AMS could have widespread utility. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL rises in response to renal injury, inflammation and oxidative stress. We investigated whether NGAL rises with HA and if this rise was related to AMS, hypoxia or exercise. NGAL was assayed in a cohort (n=22 undertaking 6 hours exercise at near sea-level (SL; a cohort (n=14 during 3 hours of normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 11.6% and on two trekking expeditions (n=52 to over 5000 m. NGAL did not change with exercise at SL or following normobaric hypoxia. During the trekking expeditions NGAL levels (ng/ml, mean ± sd, range rose significantly (P<0.001 from 68 ± 14 (60–102 at 1300 m to 183 ± 107 (65–519; 143 ± 66 (60–315 and 150 ± 71 (60–357 at 3400 m, 4270 m and 5150 m respectively. At 5150 m there was a significant difference in NGAL between those with severe AMS (n=7, mild AMS (n=16 or no AMS (n=23: 201 ± 34 versus 171 ± 19 versus 124 ± 12 respectively (P=0.009 for severe versus no AMS; P=0.026 for mild versus no AMS. In summary, NGAL rises in response to prolonged hypobaric hypoxia and demonstrates a relationship to the presence and severity of AMS.

  16. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1α induction in acetaminophen toxicity in mice occurs without hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S.; Hennings, Leah; Letzig, Lynda; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hinson, Jack A.; James, Laura P.

    2011-01-01

    HIF-1α is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1α. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1α in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1α in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2 h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48 h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the sites of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10 mg/kg) reduced HIF-1α induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4 h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1α induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism.

  17. Hypoxia inhibits growth, proliferation, and increases response to chemotherapy in retinoblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Tripathy, Arushi; Yu, Wayne; Eberhart, Charles G; Asnaghi, Laura

    2017-09-01

    Retinoblastoma is a malignant tumor of the retina and the most frequent intraocular cancer in children. Low oxygen tension (hypoxia) is a common phenomenon in advanced retinoblastomas, but its biological effect on retinoblastoma growth is not clearly understood. Here we studied how hypoxia altered retinoblastoma gene expression and modulated growth and response to chemotherapy. The hypoxic marker lysyl oxidase (LOX) was expressed in 8 of 12 human retinoblastomas analyzed by immunohistochemistry, suggesting that a hypoxic microenvironment is present in up to two thirds of the cases. WERI Rb1 and Y79 retinoblastoma lines were exposed to 1% or 5% pO 2 , cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ), or to normoxia (21% pO 2 ) for up to 8 days. Both 1% and 5% pO 2 inhibited growth of both lines by more than 50%. Proliferation was reduced by 25-50% when retinoblastoma cells were exposed to 1% vs 21% pO 2 , as determined by Ki67 assay. Surprisingly, Melphalan, Carboplatin, and Etoposide produced greater reduction in growth and survival of hypoxic cells than normoxic ones. Gene expression profile analysis of both lines, exposed for 48 h to 1%, 5%, or 21% pO 2 , showed that glycolysis and glucose transport were the most up-regulated pathways, whereas oxidative phosphorylation was the most down-regulated pathway in hypoxia as compared to normoxia. These data support a role for hypoxia in suppressing growth, proliferation, and enhancing response of retinoblastoma cells to chemotherapy, possibly by impairing energy production through activation of glycolysis and inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. Targeting glucose metabolism or enhancing delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to hypoxic regions may improve treatment of advanced retinoblastomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hypoxia and Hypoxia Mimetics Decrease Aquaporin 5 (AQP5) Expression through Both Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α and Proteasome-Mediated Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawedia, Jitesh D.; Yang, Fan; Sartor, Maureen A.; Gozal, David; Czyzyk-Krzeska, Maria; Menon, Anil G.

    2013-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium plays a central role in gas exchange and fluid transport, and is therefore critical for normal lung function. Since the bulk of water flux across this epithelium depends on the membrane water channel Aquaporin 5 (AQP5), we asked whether hypoxia had any effect on AQP5 expression. We show that hypoxia causes a significant (70%) decrease in AQP5 expression in the lungs of mice exposed to hypoxia. Hypoxia and the hypoxia mimetic, cobalt, also caused similar decreases in AQP5 mRNA and protein expression in the mouse lung epithelial cell line MLE-12. The action of hypoxia and cobalt on AQP5 transcription was demonstrated by directly quantifying heternonuclear RNA by real-time PCR. Dominant negative mutants of Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF-1α) and HIF-1α siRNA blocked the action of cobalt, showing that HIF-1α is a key component in this mechanism. The proteasome inhibitors, lactacystin or proteasome inhibitor-III completely abolished the effect of hypoxia and cobalt both at the protein and mRNA level indicating that the proteasome pathway is probably involved not only for the stability of HIF-1α protein, but for the stability of unidentified transcription factors that regulate AQP5 transcription. These studies reveal a potentially important physiological mechanism linking hypoxic stress and membrane water channels. PMID:23469202

  19. Intermittent hypoxia and cancer: Undesirable bed partners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendros, Isaac; Gozal, David

    2017-08-14

    The deleterious effects of intermittent hypoxia (IH) on cancer biology have been primarily evaluated in the context of the aberrant circulation observed in solid tumors which results in recurrent intra-tumoral episodic hypoxia. From those studies, IH has been linked to an accelerated tumor progression, metastasis and resistance to therapies. More recently, the role of IH in cancer has also been studied in the context of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), since IH is a hallmark characteristic of this condition. Such recent studies are undoubtedly adding more information regarding the role of IH on tumor malignancy. In terms of the IH patterns associated with OSA, this altered oxygenation paradigm has been recently proposed as a determinant factor in fostering cancer incidence and progression from both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Here, we summarize all the available evidence to date linking IH effects on several types of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Psychomotor skills learning under chronic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, C A; Gardette, B; Gortan, C; Abraini, J H

    1999-09-29

    Psychomotor deficits are a prominent feature in subjects exposed to hypoxia. Eight subjects exposed to chronic hypoxia during a simulated climb to 8848 m (Everest-Comex 97) were investigated using both a simple psychomotor task (Purdue pegboard) and two complex psychomotor tasks including a recognition task of either a color stimulus (high semantic level) or an abstract sign (low semantic level). Exposure to hypoxic stress mainly produced psychomotor skills learning deficits compared to control study, with greater deficits in the complex psychomotor task. The pattern of results suggests disruptions of motor strategic process. Our data further suggest that the relative strength of implicit or automatic memory processes associated with semantic information processing may increase when disturbances occur in brain functions.

  1. Targeting Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α in a New Orthotopic Model of Glioblastoma Recapitulating the Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigim, Fares; Cavanaugh, Jill; Patel, Anoop P; Curry, William T; Esaki, Shin-ichi; Kasper, Ekkehard M; Chi, Andrew S; Louis, David N; Martuza, Robert L; Rabkin, Samuel D; Wakimoto, Hiroaki

    2015-07-01

    Tissue hypoxia and necrosis represent pathophysiologic and histologic hallmarks of glioblastoma (GBM). Although hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) plays crucial roles in the malignant phenotypes of GBM, developing HIF-1α-targeted agents has been hampered by the lack of a suitable preclinical model that recapitulates the complex biology of clinical GBM. We present a new GBM model, MGG123, which was established from a recurrent human GBM. Orthotopic xenografting of stem-like MGG123 cells reproducibly generated lethal tumors that were characterized by foci of palisading necrosis, hypervascularity, and robust stem cell marker expression. Perinecrotic neoplastic cells distinctively express HIF-1α and are proliferative in both xenografts and the patient tissue. The xenografts contain scattered hypoxic foci that were consistently greater than 50 μm distant from blood vessels, indicating intratumoral heterogeneity of oxygenation. Hypoxia enhanced HIF-1α expression in cultured MGG123 cells, which was abrogated by the HIF-1α inhibitors digoxin or ouabain. In vivo, treatment of orthotopic MGG123 xenografts with digoxin decreased HIF-1α expression, vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels, and CD34-positive vasculature within the tumors, and extended survival of mice bearing the aggressive MGG123 GBM. This preclinical tumor model faithfully recapitulates the GBM-relevant hypoxic microenvironment and stemness and is a suitable platform for studying disease biology and developing hypoxia-targeted agents.

  2. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Is an Inductor of Transcription Factor Activating Protein 2 Epsilon Expression during Chondrogenic Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Niebler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor AP-2ε (activating enhancer-binding protein epsilon is expressed in cartilage of humans and mice. However, knowledge about regulatory mechanisms influencing AP-2ε expression is limited. Using quantitative real time PCR, we detected a significant increase in AP-2ε mRNA expression comparing initial and late stages of chondrogenic differentiation processes in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, in these samples the expression pattern of the prominent hypoxia marker gene angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4 strongly correlated with that of AP-2ε suggesting that hypoxia might represent an external regulator of AP-2ε expression in mammals. In order to show this, experiments directly targeting the activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1, the complex mediating responses to oxygen deprivation, were performed. While the HIF1-activating compounds 2,2′-dipyridyl and desferrioxamine resulted in significantly enhanced mRNA concentration of AP-2ε, siRNA against HIF1α led to a significantly reduced expression rate of AP-2ε. Additionally, we detected a significant upregulation of the AP-2ε mRNA level after oxygen deprivation. In sum, these different experimental approaches revealed a novel role for the HIF1 complex in the regulation of the AP-2ε gene in cartilaginous cells and underlined the important role of hypoxia as an important external regulatory stimulus during chondrogenic differentiation modulating the expression of downstream transcription factors.

  3. Hypoxia induces miR-210, leading to anti-apoptosis in ovarian follicular cells of marine medaka Oryzias melastigma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tse, Anna Chung-Kwan [School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR (China); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Hong Kong SAR (China); Li, Jing-Woei; Chan, Ting-Fung [School of Life Sciences, Hong Kong Bioinformatics Centre, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Wu, Rudolf Shiu-Sun [School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR (China); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Hong Kong SAR (China); Lai, Keng-Po, E-mail: balllai@hku.hk [School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR (China); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We demonstrate hypoxia induced miR-210 in ovarian follicular cells. • We show anti-apoptotic roles of miR-210 in ovarian follicular cells under hypoxia. • Apoptotic genes (DLC1, SLK, TNFRSF10B, RBM25, and USP7) are target of miR-210. • MiR-210 is vital for ovarian follicular cells proliferation in response to hypoxia. - Abstract: Hypoxia is a major global problem that impairs reproductive functions and reduces the quality and quantity of gametes and the fertilization success of marine fish. Nevertheless, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying hypoxia-induced female reproductive impairment remains largely unknown. There is increasing evidence that miRNA is vital in regulating ovarian functions and is closely associated with female fertility in humans. Certain miRNAs that regulate apoptotic genes can be induced by hypoxia, resulting in cell apoptosis. Using primary ovarian follicular cells of the marine medaka, Oryzias melastigma, as a model, we investigated the response of miR-210 to hypoxic stress in ovarian tissues to see if it would interrupt reproductive functions. A significant induction of miR-210 was found in primary ovarian follicular cells exposed to hypoxia, and gene ontology analysis further highlighted the potential roles of miR-210 in cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and cell apoptosis. A number of miR-210 target apoptotic genes, including Deleted in liver cancer 1 protein (DLC1), STE20-like serine/threonine-protein kinase (SLK), tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 10b (TNFRSF10B), RNA binding motif protein 25 (RBM25), and Ubiquitin-specific-processing protease 7 (USP7), were identified. We further showed that ectopic expression of miR-210 would result in down-regulation of these apoptotic genes. On the other hand, the inhibition of miR-210 promoted apoptotic cell death and the expression of apoptotic marker – caspase 3 in follicular cells under hypoxic treatment, supporting the regulatory role of mi

  4. Memory impairment associated with chronic hypoxia.

    OpenAIRE

    Huppert, F A

    1982-01-01

    A series of mental tests was administered to a group of patients who were chronically hypoxic as a result of chronic obstructive lung disease. The oxygen tension from arterialised ear lobe blood samples was correlated with scores on the mental tests. Hypoxia had a significant effect on the results of memory tests but not on the results of other tests of mental function. The same pattern of results has been reported in hypoxic animals. This finding has implications for the treatment of chronic...

  5. Hypoxia in the changing marine environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zhang, J.; Cowie, G.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    et al 2010 Biogeosciences 7 1–24). Keywords: hypoxia, marine ecosystem, sensitivity, hysteresis, global change The purpose of this focus issue is to consolidate recent substantial advances in understanding past, present and future changes in marine...-ocean low-oxygen events to biogeochemical cycling of critical elements, and then scaling up to ecosystem responses and social impacts, mitigation and adaptive management. Articles in this focus issue provide data from observations and monitoring, modeling...

  6. NASA Gulf of Mexico Initiative Hypoxia Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    The Applied Science & Technology Project Office at Stennis Space Center (SSC) manages NASA's Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI). Addressing short-term crises and long-term issues, GOMI participants seek to understand the environment using remote sensing, in-situ observations, laboratory analyses, field observations and computational models. New capabilities are transferred to end-users to help them make informed decisions. Some GOMI activities of interest to the hypoxia research community are highlighted.

  7. Measuring and monitoring eutrophication and hypoxia

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Heidemeier, J.

    dinoflagellates, can arise from this anthropogenic nutrient supply. The threshold oxygen concentration for hypoxia is not well defined, but a value of 2 mg l -1 (63 μmol) has been widely used as the behaviour of organisms has been found to be affected... with suboxia and anoxia could be better defined as they are associated with chang- es in modes of biogeochemical cycling. Suboxia is usually taken to represent the prevalence of reducing conditions short of sulfate reduction (mainly denitri- fication...

  8. Optical imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Zhang, Guoqing; Hanna, Gabi; Fraser, Cassandra L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-11-01

    The influence of the tumor microenvironment and hypoxia plays a significant role in determining cancer progression, treatment response, and treatment resistance. That the tumor microenvironment is highly heterogeneous with significant intratumor and intertumor variability presents a significant challenge in developing effective cancer therapies. Critical to understanding the role of the tumor microenvironment is the ability to dynamically quantify oxygen levels in the vasculature and tissue in order to elucidate the roles of oxygen supply and consumption, spatially and temporally. To this end, we describe the use of hyperspectral imaging to characterize hemoglobin absorption to quantify hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation, as well as dual emissive fluorescent/phosphorescent boron nanoparticles, which serve as ratiometric indicators of tissue oxygen tension. Applying these techniques to a window-chamber tumor model illustrates the role of fluctuations in hemoglobin saturation in driving changes in tissue oxygenation, the two being significantly correlated (r = 0.77). Finally, a green-fluorescence-protein reporter for hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) provides an endpoint for hypoxic stress in the tumor, which is used to demonstrate a significant association between tumor hypoxia dynamics and HIF-1 activity in an in vivo demonstration of the technique.

  9. Hypoxia in the changing marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Cowie, G; Naqvi, S W A

    2013-01-01

    The predicted future of the global marine environment, as a combined result of forcing due to climate change (e.g. warming and acidification) and other anthropogenic perturbation (e.g. eutrophication), presents a challenge to the sustainability of ecosystems from tropics to high latitudes. Among the various associated phenomena of ecosystem deterioration, hypoxia can cause serious problems in coastal areas as well as oxygen minimum zones in the open ocean (Diaz and Rosenberg 2008 Science 321 926–9, Stramma et al 2008 Science 320 655–8). The negative impacts of hypoxia include changes in populations of marine organisms, such as large-scale mortality and behavioral responses, as well as variations of species distributions, biodiversity, physiological stress, and other sub-lethal effects (e.g. growth and reproduction). Social and economic activities that are related to services provided by the marine ecosystems, such as tourism and fisheries, can be negatively affected by the aesthetic outcomes as well as perceived or real impacts on seafood quality (STAP 2011 (Washington, DC: Global Environment Facility) p 88). Moreover, low oxygen concentration in marine waters can have considerable feedbacks to other compartments of the Earth system, like the emission of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, and can affect the global biogeochemical cycles of nutrients and trace elements. It is of critical importance to prediction and adaptation strategies that the key processes of hypoxia in marine environments be precisely determined and understood (cf Zhang et al 2010 Biogeosciences 7 1–24). (synthesis and review)

  10. Hypoxia in the changing marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Cowie, G.; Naqvi, S. W. A.

    2013-03-01

    The predicted future of the global marine environment, as a combined result of forcing due to climate change (e.g. warming and acidification) and other anthropogenic perturbation (e.g. eutrophication), presents a challenge to the sustainability of ecosystems from tropics to high latitudes. Among the various associated phenomena of ecosystem deterioration, hypoxia can cause serious problems in coastal areas as well as oxygen minimum zones in the open ocean (Diaz and Rosenberg 2008 Science 321 926-9, Stramma et al 2008 Science 320 655-8). The negative impacts of hypoxia include changes in populations of marine organisms, such as large-scale mortality and behavioral responses, as well as variations of species distributions, biodiversity, physiological stress, and other sub-lethal effects (e.g. growth and reproduction). Social and economic activities that are related to services provided by the marine ecosystems, such as tourism and fisheries, can be negatively affected by the aesthetic outcomes as well as perceived or real impacts on seafood quality (STAP 2011 (Washington, DC: Global Environment Facility) p 88). Moreover, low oxygen concentration in marine waters can have considerable feedbacks to other compartments of the Earth system, like the emission of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, and can affect the global biogeochemical cycles of nutrients and trace elements. It is of critical importance to prediction and adaptation strategies that the key processes of hypoxia in marine environments be precisely determined and understood (cf Zhang et al 2010 Biogeosciences 7 1-24).

  11. The Role of Hypoxia in Glioblastoma Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Monteiro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, a grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common and deadly type of primary malignant brain tumor, with a patient’s median survival rate ranging from 15 to 17 months. The current treatment for GBM involves tumor resection surgery based on MRI image analysis, followed by radiotherapy and treatment with temozolomide. However, the gradual development of tumor resistance to temozolomide is frequent in GBM patients leading to subsequent tumor regrowth/relapse. For this reason, the development of more effective therapeutic approaches for GBM is of critical importance. Low tumor oxygenation, also known as hypoxia, constitutes a major concern for GBM patients, since it promotes cancer cell spreading (invasion into the healthy brain tissue in order to evade this adverse microenvironment. Tumor invasion not only constitutes a major obstacle to surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, but it is also the main cause of death in GBM patients. Understanding how hypoxia triggers the GBM cells to become invasive is paramount to developing novel and more effective therapies against this devastating disease. In this review, we will present a comprehensive examination of the available literature focused on investigating how GBM hypoxia triggers an invasive cancer cell phenotype and the role of these invasive proteins in GBM progression.

  12. Working memory impairment in pilots exposed to acute hypobaric hypoxia.

    OpenAIRE

    Malle, Carine; Quinette, Peggy; Laisney, Mickaël; Bourrilhon, Cyprien; Boissin, Jacqueline; Desgranges, Béatrice; Eustache, Francis; Piérard, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    International audience; INTRODUCTION: During an acute hypoxia exposure, impairment of memory is one of the most frequently reported symptoms, either during hypoxia awareness training of aircrews or after an in-flight hypoxic incident. However, the effects of acute hypoxia on memory have been little studied in laboratory-controlled conditions. Moreover, none of these studies were performed in hypobaric conditions. The main aim of our study was to investigate the effects of acute hypobaric hypo...

  13. Vitamin C Supplementation Does not Improve Hypoxia-Induced Erythropoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Bello, Vladimir E.; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Martinez-Bello, Daniel; Olaso-Gonzalez, Gloria; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Viña, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Martinez-Bello,Vladimir E., Fabian Sanchis-Gomar, Daniel Martinez-Bello, Gloria Olaso-Gonzalez, Mari Carmen Gomez-Cabrera, and Jose Viña. Vitamin C Supplementation Does Not Improve Hypoxia-Induced Erythropoiesis. High Alt Med Biol 13:269–274, 2012.—Hypoxia induces reactive oxygen species production. Supplements with antioxidant mixtures can compensate for the decline in red cell membrane stability following intermittent hypobaric hypoxia by decreasing protein and lipid oxidation. We aimed to ...

  14. NITRIC OXIDE INTERFERES WITH HYPOXIA SIGNALING DURING COLONIC INFLAMMATION

    OpenAIRE

    CARIA,Cintia Rabelo e Paiva; MOSCATO,Camila Henrique; TOMÉ,Renata Bortolin Guerra; PEDRAZZOLI Jr,José; RIBEIRO,Marcelo Lima; GAMBERO,Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Context Intestinal inflammation can induce a local reduction in oxygen levels that triggers an adaptive response centered on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Nitric oxide, a well-described inflammatory mediator, may interfere with hypoxia signaling. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation. Methods Colitis was induced by single (acute) or repeated (reactivated colitis) trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid administ...

  15. Hypoxia — a Leading Factor of Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Yu. Lysianska

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent data indicate the involvement of hypoxia in the formation of kidney fibrosis and progression of chronic renal disease. One of the main factors in the chain of damage in the tissue oxygen deficiency is a hypoxia-induced factor. Understanding the process of kidney damage during hypoxia can complement the concept of nephroprotection in patients with chronic kidney disease, will provide an opportunity to improve the guidelines on the management of this group of patients.

  16. Hypoxia symptoms during altitude training in professional Iranian fighter pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagha, Babak; AhmadBeygi, Shervin; Ahmadbeigy, Shervin; Moosavi, Seyed Ali Javad; Jalali, Seyed Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Susceptibility to hypoxia is influenced by a multitude of factors, including fatigue, physical activity, illnesses, ambient temperature, rate of ascent, destination altitude, medications, and alcohol. Anecdotally, several reports have been made regarding changes in the form of hypoxia presentation in Iranian fighter pilots in the absence of these factors. This study focused specifically on the effect of pilot age on susceptibility to hypoxia and its initial presentation. We assumed that a pilot's age may increase his susceptibility to hypoxia and consequently reduce the amount of time it takes for hypoxia to present. Because our literature review did not reveal any previous study addressing the possible relationship between age and susceptibility to hypoxia, the purpose of this study is to address and clarify this relationship. In this retrospective study, we collected information from Iranian fighter pilots (n = 30) through an anonymous questionnaire in 2000. The form of hypoxia presentation of each subject was evaluated during five altitude chamber training (ACT) sessions that were conducted routinely from 1972 to 1984. To enhance the accuracy of the study's results, confounding factors such as prior hypoxia experience in an ACT session have been taken into consideration. The results revealed a statistically significant relationship between age and a change in the form of hypoxia presentation in our subjects. Increased age reduced the amount of time before the first individual hypoxia symptom appeared (P < .000002). Although having previous hypoxia experience may help pilots to recognize their symptoms earlier, its effect was not statistically significant (P < .18). A few changes in the nature of individual symptoms were observed; however, we did not find a meaningful statistical correlation between pilot age and change in the nature of symptoms. Susceptibility ot hypoxia increases with pilot age. Copyright © 2012 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by

  17. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. 28 refs., 1 fig

  18. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  19. SurR9C84A protects and recovers human cardiomyocytes from hypoxia induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashok, Ajay [Nanomedicine-Laboratory of Immunology and Molecular Biomedical Research (NLIMBR), School of Medicine (SoM), Faculty of Health, Centre for Molecular and Medical Research - C-MMR, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, 2103 Cornell Rd. WRB 5128, Cleveland, OH 44106-7288 (United States); Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh [Nanomedicine-Laboratory of Immunology and Molecular Biomedical Research (NLIMBR), School of Medicine (SoM), Faculty of Health, Centre for Molecular and Medical Research - C-MMR, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Krishnan, Uma Maheswari [Centre for Nanotechnology & Advanced Biomaterials (CeNTAB), School of Chemical & Biotechnology (SCBT), SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Kanwar, Rupinder Kaur, E-mail: rupinder.kanwar@deakin.edu.au [Nanomedicine-Laboratory of Immunology and Molecular Biomedical Research (NLIMBR), School of Medicine (SoM), Faculty of Health, Centre for Molecular and Medical Research - C-MMR, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3216 (Australia)

    2017-01-01

    Survivin, as an anti-apoptotic protein and a cell cycle regulator, is recently gaining importance for its regenerative potential in salvaging injured hypoxic cells of vital organs such as heart. Different strategies are being employed to upregulate survivin expression in dying hypoxic cardiomyocytes. We investigated the cardioprotective potential of a cell permeable survivin mutant protein SurR9C84A, for the management of hypoxia mediated cardiomyocyte apoptosis, in a novel and clinically relevant model employing primary human cardiomyocytes (HCM). The aim of this research work was to study the efficacy and mechanism of SurR9C84A facilitated cardioprotection and regeneration in hypoxic HCM. To mimic hypoxic microenvironment in vitro, well characterized HCM were treated with 100 µm (48 h) cobalt chloride to induce hypoxia. Hypoxia induced (HI) HCM were further treated with SurR9C84A (1 µg/mL) in order to analyse its cardioprotective efficacy. Confocal microscopy showed rapid internalization of SurR9C84A and scanning electron microscopy revealed the reinstatement of cytoskeleton projections in HI HCM. SurR9C84A treatment increased cell viability, reduced cell death via, apoptosis (Annexin-V assay), and downregulated free cardiac troponin T and MMP-9 expression. SurR9C84A also upregulated the expression of proliferation markers (PCNA and Ki-67) and downregulated mitochondrial depolarization and ROS levels thereby, impeding cell death. Human Apoptosis Array further revealed that SurR9C84A downregulated expression of pro-apoptotic markers and augmented expression of HSPs and HTRA2/Omi. SurR9C84A treatment led to enhanced levels of survivin, VEGF, PI3K and pAkt. SurR9C84A proved non-toxic to normoxic HCM, as validated through unaltered cell proliferation and other marker levels. Its pre-treatment exhibited lesser susceptibility to hypoxia/damage. SurR9C84A holds a promising clinical potential for human cardiomyocyte survival and proliferation following hypoxic injury

  20. Delayed cell death signaling in traumatized central nervous system: hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Danielle; Qiu, JingXin; Grafe, Marjorie; Fabian, Roderick; Kent, Thomas A; Rassin, David; Nesic, Olivera; Werrbach-Perez, Karin; Perez-Polo, Regino

    2002-02-01

    There are two different ways for cells to die: necrosis and apoptosis. Cell death has traditionally been described as necrotic or apoptotic based on morphological criteria. There are controversy about the respective roles of apoptosis and necrosis in cell death resulting from trauma to the central nervous system (CNS). An evaluation of work published since 1997 in which electron microscopy was applied to ascertain the role of apoptosis and necrosis in: spinal cord injury, stroke, and hypoxia/ischemia (H/I) showed evidence for necrosis and apoptosis based on DNA degradation, presence of histones in cytoplasm, and morphological evidence in spinal cord. In the aftermath of stroke, many of the biochemical markers for apoptosis were present but the morphological determinations suggested that necrosis is the major source of post-traumatic cell death. This was not the case in H/I where both biochemical assays and the morphological studies gave more consistent results in a manner similar to the spinal cord injury studies. After H/I, major factors affecting cell death outcomes are DNA damage and repair processes, expression of bcl-like gene products and inflammation-triggered cytokine production.

  1. Cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia: implications for aviation training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuhaus C

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Neuhaus,1,2 Jochen Hinkelbein2,31Department of Anesthesiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Ruprecht Karls University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 2Emergency Medicine and Air Rescue Working Group, German Society of Aviation and Space Medicine (DGLRM, Munich, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyAbstract: The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview on cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia and to show relevant implications for aviation training. A principal element of hypoxia-awareness training is the intentional evocation of hypoxia symptoms during specific training sessions within a safe and controlled environment. Repetitive training should enable pilots to learn and recognize their personal hypoxia symptoms. A time span of 3–6 years is generally considered suitable to refresh knowledge of the more subtle and early symptoms especially. Currently, there are two different technical approaches available to induce hypoxia during training: hypobaric chamber training and reduced-oxygen breathing devices. Hypoxia training for aircrew is extremely important and effective, and the hypoxia symptoms should be emphasized clearly to aircrews. The use of tight-fitting masks, leak checks, and equipment checks should be taught to all aircrew and reinforced regularly. It is noteworthy that there are major differences in the required quality and quantity of hypoxia training for both military and civilian pilots.Keywords: cognitive response, aviation training, pilot, hypoxia, oxygen, loss of consciousness

  2. Postconditioning with repeated mild hypoxia protects neonatal hypoxia-ischemic rats against brain damage and promotes rehabilitation of brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qingqing; Chang, Yanqun; Cheng, Xiaomao; Luo, Xingang; Zhang, Jing; Tang, Xiaoyuan

    2018-02-06

    Mild hypoxia conditioning induced by repeated episodes of transient ischemia is a clinically applicable method for protecting the brain against injury after hypoxia-ischemic brain damage. To assess the effect of repeated mild hypoxia postconditioning on brain damage and long-term neural functional recovery after hypoxia-ischemic brain damage. Rats received different protocols of repeated mild hypoxia postconditioning. Seven-day-old rats with hypoxia ischemic brain damage (HIBD) from the left carotid ligation procedure plus 2 h hypoxic stress (8% O 2 at 37 °C) were further receiving repeated mild hypoxia intermittently. The gross anatomy, functional analyses, hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1a) expression, and neuronal apoptosis of the rat brains were subsequently examined. Compared to the HIBD group, rats postconditioned with mild hypoxia had elevated HIF-1a expression, more Nissl-stain positive cells in their brain tissue and their brains functioned better in behavioral analyses. The recovery of the brain function may be directly linked to the inhibitory effect of HIF-1α on neuronal apoptosis. Furthermore, there were significantly less neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampal CA1 region of the rats postconditioned with mild hypoxia, which might also be related to the higher HIF-1a expression and better brain performance. Overall, these results suggested that postconditioning of neonatal rats after HIBD with mild hypoxia increased HIF-1a expression, exerted a neuroprotective effect and promoted neural functional recovery. Repeated mild hypoxia postconditioning protects neonatal rats with HIBD against brain damage and improves neural functional recovery. Our results may have clinical implications for treating infants with HIBD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intrinsic endometriosis of ureter: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Myung Sun; Kim, Ho Chul; Yun, Ku Sup; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon; Kim, Sung Yong; Shin, Hyung Sik

    1995-01-01

    Endometriosis is a rare cause of an ureteral obstruction. We report a case of intrinsic ureteral endometriosis resulting in severe hydroureteronephrosis. The diagnosis of ureteral endometriosis may be considered in women with flank pain and ureteric obstruction within true pelvis

  4. The Intrinsic Dynamics of Psychological Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallacher, Robin R.; van Geert, Paul; Nowak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Psychological processes unfold on various timescales in accord with internally generated patterns. The intrinsic dynamism of psychological process is difficult to investigate using traditional methods emphasizing cause–effect relations, however, and therefore is rarely incorporated into social

  5. Deuterium NMR, induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were studied. Induced cholesteric lyomesophases based on potassium laurate (KL) system, with small amounts of cholesterol added, were studied by deuterium NMR and by polarizing microscopy. Order profiles obtained from deuterium NMR of KL perdenderated chains in both induced cholesteric and normal mesophases were compared. The intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were based on the amphiphile potassium N-lauroyl serinate (KLNS) in the resolved levo form. The study of the type I intrinsic cholesteric mesophase was made by optical microscopy under polarized light and the type II intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophase was characterized by deuterium NMR. The new texture was explained by the use of the theory of disclinations developed for thermotropic liquid crystals, specially for cholesteric type. (M.J.C.) [pt

  6. Cell and Signal Components of the Microenvironment of Bone Metastasis Are Affected by Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Bendinelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastatic cells release bone microenvironment proteins, such as the matricellular protein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, and share a cell signaling typical of the bone metabolism controlled by Runx2. The megakaryocytes in the bone marrow engrafted by the metastases seem to be one of the principal microenvironment sources of the biological stimuli, implicated in the formation of an osteoblastic niche, and affecting metastasis phenotype and colonization. Educated platelets in the circulation might derive from megakaryocytes in bone metastasis. The evaluation of predictive markers in the circulating platelets might be useful for the stratification of patients for therapeutic purposes. The hypoxic environment in bone metastasis is one of the key regulators of the network of the biological soluble and structural components of the matrix. In bone metastatic cells under hypoxia, similar patterns of Runx2 and SPARC are observed, both showing downregulation. Conversely, hypoxia induces Endothelin 1, which upregulates SPARC, and these biological stimuli may be considered prognostic markers of bone metastasis in breast carcinoma patients.

  7. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α predicts recurrence in high-grade soft tissue sarcoma of extremities and trunk wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyström, H; Jönsson, M; Werner-Hartman, L

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Sarcomas are of mesenchymal origin and typically show abundant tumour stroma and presence of necrosis. In search for novel biomarkers for personalised therapy, we determined the prognostic impact of stromal markers, hypoxia and neovascularity in high-grade soft tissue leiomyos......BACKGROUND AND AIM: Sarcomas are of mesenchymal origin and typically show abundant tumour stroma and presence of necrosis. In search for novel biomarkers for personalised therapy, we determined the prognostic impact of stromal markers, hypoxia and neovascularity in high-grade soft tissue...... leiomyosarcoma and pleomorphic undifferentiated sarcoma. METHOD: We evaluated CD163, colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1, CD16 and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)α using immunohistochemical staining and assessed microvessel density using CD31 in 73 high-grade leiomyosarcomas and undifferentiated pleomorphic...... sarcomas of the extremities and the trunk wall. The results were correlated to metastasis-free and overall survival. RESULTS: Expression of HIF-1α was associated with the presence of necrosis and independently predicted shorter metastasis-free survival (HR 3.2, CI 1.4 to 7.0, p=0.004), whereas neither...

  8. Intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms in enterococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, Brian L.; Rice, Louis B.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococci have the potential for resistance to virtually all clinically useful antibiotics. Their emergence as important nosocomial pathogens has coincided with increased expression of antimicrobial resistance by members of the genus. The mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci may be intrinsic to the species or acquired through mutation of intrinsic genes or horizontal exchange of genetic material encoding resistance determinants. This paper reviews the antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis and discusses treatment options. PMID:23076243

  9. Regression of Lung Cancer by Hypoxia Sensitizing Ruthenium Polypyridyl Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Abhishek; Janaratne, Thamara; Krishnan, Arthi; Singhal, Sharad S.; Yadav, Sushma; Dayoub, Adam S.; Hawkins, Doyle L.; Awasthi, Sanjay; MacDonnell, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    The ruthenium (II) polypyridyl complexes (RPCs) Δ-[(phen)2Ru(tatpp)]Cl2 (Δ-[3]Cl2) and ΔΔ-[(phen)2Ru(tatpp)Ru(phen)2]Cl4 (ΔΔ-[4]Cl4) are a new generation of metal-based anti-tumor agents. These RPCs bind DNA via intercalation of the tatpp ligand which itself is redox-active and easily reduced at biologically relevant potentials. We have previously shown that RPC 44+ cleaves DNA when reduced by glutathione to a radical species, and that this DNA cleavage is potentiated under hypoxic conditions in vitro. Here we show that 32+ also exhibits free-radical mediated DNA cleavage in vitro, and that 32+ and 44+ both exhibit selective cytotoxicity towards cultured malignant cell lines, and marked inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. The murine acute toxicity of RPCs 32+ and 44+ (maximum tolerable doses (MTD’s) ~ 65 µmol/kg) is comparable with that for cisplatin (LD50 ~57 µmol/kg) but unlike cisplatin, RPC’s are generally cleared from the body unchanged via renal excretion without appreciable metabolism or nephrotoxic side effects. RPCs 32+ and 44+ are demonstrated to suppress growth of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (~83%), show potentiated cytotoxicity in vitro under hypoxic conditions, and induce apoptosis through both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The novel hypoxia-enhanced DNA cleavage activity and biological activity suggest a promising new anti-cancer pharmacophore based on metal complexes with aromatic ligands that are easily reduced at biologically accessible potentials. PMID:23443803

  10. The intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Andrés Olivares Pacheco

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsically resistant bacteria have emerged as a relevant health problem in the last years. Those bacterial species, several of them with an environmental origin, present naturally a low-level susceptibility to several drugs. It has been proposed that intrinsic resistance is mainly the consequence of the impermeability of cellular envelopes, the activity of multidrug efflux pumps or the lack of appropriate targets for a given family of drugs. However, recently published articles indicate that the characteristic phenotype of susceptibility to antibiotics of a given bacterial species depends on the concerted activity of several elements, what has been named as intrinsic resistome. These determinants comprise not just classical resistance genes. Other elements, several of them involved in basic bacterial metabolic processes, are of relevance for the intrinsic resistance of bacterial pathogens. In the present review we analyse recent publications on the intrinsic resistomes of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present as well information on the role that global regulators of bacterial metabolism, as Crc from P. aeruginosa, may have on modulating bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics. Finally, we discuss the possibility of searching inhibitors of the intrinsic resistome in the aim of improving the activity of drugs currently in use for clinical practice.

  11. Incentives and intrinsic motivation in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdud, Mikel; Cabasés, Juan M; Nieto, Jorge

    It has been established in the literature that workers within public organisations are intrinsically motivated. This paper is an empirical study of the healthcare sector using methods of qualitative analysis research, which aims to answer the following hypotheses: 1) doctors are intrinsically motivated; 2) economic incentives and control policies may undermine doctors' intrinsic motivation; and 3) well-designed incentives may encourage doctors' intrinsic motivation. We conducted semi-structured interviews à-la-Bewley with 16 doctors from Navarre's Healthcare Service (Servicio Navarro de Salud-Osasunbidea), Spain. The questions were based on current theories of intrinsic motivation and incentives to test the hypotheses. Interviewees were allowed to respond openly without time constraints. Relevant information was selected, quantified and analysed by using the qualitative concepts of saturation and codification. The results seem to confirm the hypotheses. Evidence supporting hypotheses 1 and 2 was gathered from all interviewees, as well as indications of the validity of hypothesis 3 based on interviewees' proposals of incentives. The conclusions could act as a guide to support the optimal design of incentive policies and schemes within health organisations when healthcare professionals are intrinsically motivated. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Intrinsic-mediated caspase activation is essential for cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putinski, Charis; Abdul-Ghani, Mohammad; Stiles, Rebecca; Brunette, Steve; Dick, Sarah A.; Fernando, Pasan; Megeney, Lynn A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is the cellular response that mediates pathologic enlargement of the heart. This maladaptation is also characterized by cell behaviors that are typically associated with apoptosis, including cytoskeletal reorganization and disassembly, altered nuclear morphology, and enhanced protein synthesis/translation. Here, we investigated the requirement of apoptotic caspase pathways in mediating cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Cardiomyocytes treated with hypertrophy agonists displayed rapid and transient activation of the intrinsic-mediated cell death pathway, characterized by elevated levels of caspase 9, followed by caspase 3 protease activity. Disruption of the intrinsic cell death pathway at multiple junctures led to a significant inhibition of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy during agonist stimulation, with a corresponding reduction in the expression of known hypertrophic markers (atrial natriuretic peptide) and transcription factor activity [myocyte enhancer factor-2, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)]. Similarly, in vivo attenuation of caspase activity via adenoviral expression of the biologic effector caspase inhibitor p35 blunted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in response to agonist stimulation. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with procaspase 3 activating compound 1, a small-molecule activator of caspase 3, resulted in a robust induction of the hypertrophy response in the absence of any agonist stimulation. These results suggest that caspase-dependent signaling is necessary and sufficient to promote cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. These results also confirm that cell death signal pathways behave as active remodeling agents in cardiomyocytes, independent of inducing an apoptosis response. PMID:24101493

  13. Hypoxia Stress Modifies Na/K-ATPase, H/K-ATPase, , and Isoform Expression in the Brain of Immune-Challenged Air-Breathing Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MC Subhash Peter

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fishes are equipped to sense stressful stimuli and are able to respond to environmental stressor such as hypoxia with varying pattern of stress response. The functional attributes of brain to hypoxia stress in relation to ion transport and its interaction during immune challenge have not yet delineated in fish. We, therefore, explored the pattern of ion transporter functions and messenger RNA (mRNA expression of α1-subunit isoforms of Na + /K + -ATPase (NKA in the brain segments, namely, prosencephalon (PC, mesencephalon (MC, and metencephalon (MeC in an obligate air-breathing fish exposed either to hypoxia stress (30 minutes forced immersion in water or challenged with zymosan treatment (25-200 ng g −1 for 24 hours or both. Zymosan that produced nonspecific immune responses evoked differential regulation of NKA, H + /K + -ATPase (HKA, and Na + / NH 4 + - ATPase (NNA in the varied brain segments. On the contrary, hypoxia stress that demanded activation of NKA in PC and MeC showed a reversed NKA activity pattern in MeC of immune-challenged fish. A compromised HKA and NNA regulation during hypoxia stress was found in immune-challenged fish, indicating the role of these brain ion transporters to hypoxia stress and immune challenges. The differential mRNA expression of α1-subunit isoforms of NKA, nkaα1a , nkaα1b , and nkaα1c , in hypoxia-stressed brain showed a shift in its expression pattern during hypoxia stress-immune interaction in PC and MC. Evidence is thus presented for the first time that ion transporters such as HKA and NNA along with NKA act as functional brain markers which respond differentially to both hypoxia stress and immune challenges. Taken together, the data further provide evidence for a differential Na + , K + , H + , and NH 4 + ion signaling that exists in brain neuronal clusters during hypoxia stress-immune interaction as a result of modified regulations of NKA, HKA, and NNA transporter functions and nkaα1 isoform

  14. Markers for blood-brain barrier integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in brain barriers and various roles their intrinsic mechanisms may play in neurological disorders. Such studies require suitable models and markers to demonstrate integrity and functional changes at the interfaces between blood, brain...... known when first introduced, but seem to have been forgotten since. Understanding these limitations is important because Evans blue is still the most commonly used marker of brain barrier integrity and those using it seem oblivious to problems arising from its in vivo application. The introduction...... of HRP in the mid twentieth-century was an important advance because its reaction product can be visualized at the electron microscopical level, but it also has limitations. Advantages and disadvantages of these markers will be discussed together with a critical evaluation of alternative approaches...

  15. Hypoxic preconditioning protects photoreceptors against light damage independently of hypoxia inducible transcription factors in rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Brigitte; Schori, Christian; Grimm, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning protects photoreceptors against light-induced degeneration preserving retinal morphology and function. Although hypoxia inducible transcription factors 1 and 2 (HIF1, HIF2) are the main regulators of the hypoxic response, photoreceptor protection does not depend on HIF1 in rods. Here we used rod-specific Hif2a single and Hif1a;Hif2a double knockout mice to investigate the potential involvement of HIF2 in rods for protection after hypoxic preconditioning. To identify potential HIF2 target genes in rods we determined the retinal transcriptome of hypoxic control and rod-specific Hif2a knockouts by RNA sequencing. We show that rods do not need HIF2 for hypoxia-induced increased survival after light exposure. The transcriptomic analysis revealed a number of genes that are potentially regulated by HIF2 in rods; among those were Htra1, Timp3 and Hmox1, candidates that are interesting due to their connection to human degenerative diseases of the retina. We conclude that neither HIF1 nor HIF2 are required in photoreceptors for protection by hypoxic preconditioning. We hypothesize that HIF transcription factors may be needed in other cells to produce protective factors acting in a paracrine fashion on photoreceptor cells. Alternatively, hypoxic preconditioning induces a rod-intrinsic response that is independent of HIF transcription factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors as regulators of T cell development, differentiation, and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Eóin N.; Johnson, Darlynn Korns; Homann, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is a molecule that is central to cellular respiration and viability, yet there are multiple physiologic and pathological contexts in which cells experience conditions of insufficient oxygen availability, a state known as hypoxia. Given the metabolic challenges of a low oxygen environment, hypoxia elicits a range of adaptive responses at the cellular, tissue, and systemic level to promote continued survival and function. Within this context, T lymphocytes are a highly migratory cell type of the adaptive immune system that frequently encounters a wide range of oxygen tensions in both health and disease. It is now clear that oxygen availability regulates T cell differentiation and function, a response orchestrated in large part by the hypoxia-inducible factor transcription factors. Here, we discuss the physiologic scope of hypoxia and hypoxic signaling, the contribution of these pathways in regulating T cell biology, and current gaps in our understanding. Finally, we discuss how emerging therapies that modulate the hypoxic response may offer new modalities to alter T cell function and the outcome of acute and chronic pathologies. PMID:22961658

  17. Hypoxia positron emission tomography imaging: combining information on perfusion and tracer retention to improve hypoxia specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Morten; Munk, Ole L; Jakobsen, Steen S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Static positron emission tomography (PET) allows mapping of tumor hypoxia, but low resolution and slow tracer retention/clearance results in poor image contrast and the risk of missing areas where hypoxic cells and necrosis are intermixed. Fully dynamic PET may improve accuracy but scan...

  18. Human erythropoietin response to hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, and hypocapnic normoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Christensen, H; Hansen, J M

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the human erythropoietin (EPO) response to short-term hypocapnic hypoxia, its relationship to a normoxic or hypoxic increase of the haemoglobin oxygen affinity, and its suppression by the addition of CO2 to the hypoxic gas. On separate days, eight healthy male subjects wer...

  19. Effect of Acute Exposure to Moderate Altitude on Muscle Power: Hypobaric Hypoxia vs. Normobaric Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Calderón-Soto, Carmen; Drobnic, Franchek; Bonitch- Góngora, Juan G.; Galilea, Pedro A.; Riera, Joan; Padial, Paulino

    2014-01-01

    When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17) in conditions of normoxia (N1) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and G2 (n = 11) in conditions of normoxia (N2) and normobaric hypoxia (NH). Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax) was recorded as the highest Pmean obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to Pmax (∼3%) and maximal strength (1RM) (∼6%) in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (Pbarbell displacement velocity (P<0.001). No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press. PMID:25474104

  20. Morphological evaluation of the cerebral blood vessels in the late gestation fetal sheep following hypoxia in utero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburamani, Ana A; Lo, Camden; Castillo-Melendez, Margie; Walker, David W

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia can significantly contribute to the development of permanent brain injury in the term neonate; however the response of cerebral blood vessels is not well understood. This study aimed to quantitatively measure vascular density and morphology using laminin immunohistochemistry as a marker of blood vessels, and determine the effects of a single, severe bout of hypoxia (umbilical cord occlusion, UCO) late in gestation on the developing cerebrovasculature in fetal sheep. At 124-126 days gestation singleton fetal sheep underwent surgery for implantation of catheters and placement of an inflatable cuff around the umbilical cord. A 10 min UCO or sham UCO (n=5) occurred at 132 days gestation. Fetal brains were collected at 24 h (n=5) or 48 h (n=4) after UCO for vascular density and morphology analysis of laminin immunohistochemistry. 48 h following a single, brief bout of severe hypoxia late in gestation decreased vascular density was seen in the caudate nucleus and no changes in vascular morphology occurred. However closer analysis revealed a significant shift in the frequency of smaller (≤10 μm) to larger (≤100 μm) perimeter blood vessels in periventricular and subcortical white matter. Close examination of the frequency distribution of vascular perimeter highlights that alterations in vascular morphology persist in the near term fetal brain for up to 48 h following a brief (10 min) hypoxia in white but not gray matter. These findings suggest that the near term brain may still be vulnerable to white matter injury following in utero hypoxia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcription Factor Brn-3b Overexpression Enhances Neurite Outgrowth in PC12 Cells Under Condition of Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phatak, Nitasha R; Stankowska, Dorota L; Krishnamoorthy, Raghu R

    2015-08-01

    Transcription factor Brn-3b plays a key role in retinal ganglion cell differentiation, survival, and axon outgrowth during development. However, the precise role of Brn-3b in the normal adult retina as well as during neurodegeneration is unclear. In the current study, the effect of overexpression of Brn-3b was assessed in vitro, in PC12 cells under conditions of normoxia and hypoxia. Immunoblot analysis showed that overexpression of Brn-3b in PC12 cells as well as 661W cells produced significant increase in the growth cone marker, growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), and acetylated-tubulin (ac-TUBA). In addition, an increased immunostaining for GAP-43 and ac-TUBA was observed in PC12 cells overexpressing Brn-3b, which was accompanied by a marked increase in neurite outgrowth, compared to PC12 cells overexpressing the empty vector. In separate experiments, one set of PC12 cells transfected either with a Brn-3b expression vector or an empty vector was subjected to conditions of hypoxia for 2 h, while another set of similarly transfected PC12 cells was maintained in normoxic conditions. It was found that the upregulation of GAP-43 and ac-TUBA in PC12 cells overexpressing Brn-3b under conditions of normoxia was sustained under conditions of hypoxia. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed not only an upregulation of GAP-43 and ac-TUBA, but also increased neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells transfected with Brn-3b as compared to PC12 cells transfected with empty vector in both normoxia and hypoxia. The findings have implications for a potential role of Brn-3b in neurodegenerative diseases in which hypoxia/ischemia contribute to pathophysiology of the disease.

  2. Gene expression and enzyme activities of carbonic anhydrase and glutaminase in rat kidneys induced by chronic systemic hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi N.K. Syarifin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia can cause acidosis. Kidney plays an essential role in maintaining acid-base balance, which involves the activities of carbonic anhydrase (CA and glutaminase (GLS. This study is aimed to determine the expression and activities of the CA9 and GLS1 enzymes in relation to hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α, a transcription factor protein which is a marker of hypoxia.Methods: This study was an in vivo experimental study with coupled paralel design. used 25 male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 150-200 g. Rats were divided into 5 groups: the control group (normoxic condition and 4 treatment groups. The latter were kept in a hypoxic chamber (10% O2: 90% N2 for 1, 3, 5 and 7 days. All rats were euthanized after treatment, kidneys excised, tissues homogenized and investigated for gene expression of CA9, GLS1 and HIF-1α. On protein level, total enzymatic activities of CA and GLS and protein of HIF-1α were also investigated. Data were analyzed statistically using ANOVA for significance, and as its alternative, used Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis test.Results: Results showed that HIF-1α mRNA increased during hypoxia, but not HIF-1α protein. It seemed that acidosis occurs in kidney tissue, indicated by increased CA9 and GLS1 mRNA expression and specific activity of total CA and GLS1. Expression of CA9 and GLS1 mRNA both showed strong positive correlation with HIF-1α mRNA, but not with HIF-1α protein.Conclusion: It is suggested that during chronic systemic hypoxia, gene expression of CA9 and GLS1 and their enzyme activities were increased as a response to acidosis and related with the expression of HIF-1α mRNA.

  3. Intermittent hypoxia training in prediabetes patients: Beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis, hypoxia tolerance and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrovska, Tetiana V; Portnychenko, Alla G; Drevytska, Tetiana I; Portnichenko, Vladimir I; Xi, Lei; Egorov, Egor; Gavalko, Anna V; Naskalova, Svitlana; Chizhova, Valentina; Shatylo, Valeriy B

    2017-09-01

    The present study aimed at examining beneficial effects of intermittent hypoxia training (IHT) under prediabetic conditions. We investigate the effects of three-week IHT on blood glucose level, tolerance to acute hypoxia, and leukocyte mRNA expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and its target genes, i.e. insulin receptor, facilitated glucose transporter-solute carrier family-2, and potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily J. Seven healthy and 11 prediabetic men and women (44-70 years of age) were examined before, next day and one month after three-week IHT (3 sessions per week, each session consisting 4 cycles of 5-min 12% O 2 and 5-min room air breathing). We found that IHT afforded beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis in patients with prediabetes reducing fasting glucose and during standard oral glucose tolerance test. The most pronounced positive effects were observed at one month after IHT termination. IHT also significantly increased the tolerance to acute hypoxia (i.e. SaO 2 level at 20th min of breathing with 12% O 2 ) and improved functional parameters of respiratory and cardiovascular systems. IHT stimulated HIF-1α mRNA expression in blood leukocytes in healthy and prediabetic subjects, but in prediabetes patients the maximum increase was lagged. The greatest changes in mRNA expression of HIF-1α target genes occurred a month after IHT and coincided with the largest decrease in blood glucose levels. The higher expression of HIF-1α was positively associated with higher tolerance to hypoxia and better glucose homeostasis. In conclusion, our results suggest that IHT may be useful for preventing the development of type 2 diabetes. Impact statement The present study investigated the beneficial effects of intermittent hypoxia training (IHT) in humans under prediabetic conditions. We found that three-week moderate IHT induced higher HIF-1α mRNA expressions as well as its target genes, which were positively correlated with higher tolerance

  4. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α in chronic gastrointestinal ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Harki (Jihan); A. Sana (Aria); D. van Noord (Désirée); P.J. van Diest (Paul); P. van der Groep (Petra); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); L.M.G. Moons (Leon); K. Biermann (Katharina); E.T.T.L. Tjwa (Eric)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractChronic gastrointestinal ischemia (CGI) is the result of decreased mucosal perfusion. Typical histological characteristics are lacking which hamper its early diagnosis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is expressed under acute hypoxia. We investigated HIF-1α expression in chronic

  5. Overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl- hydoxylase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-08

    Aug 8, 2011 ... the activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α signaling contributes to the regulation of VEGF expression in the luteal cells (LCs) in response to hypoxia and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). This study was designed to test the hypothesis that, HIF prolyl-dydoxylases (PHDs) express in LCs and.

  6. Brain adaptation to hypoxia and hyperoxia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Terraneo

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Prolonged mild hyperoxia leads to persistent cerebral damage, comparable to that inferred by prolonged mild hypoxia. The underlying mechanism appears related to a model whereby the imbalance between ROS generation and anti-ROS defense is similar, but occurs at higher levels in hypoxia than in hyperoxia.

  7. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor in diabetic myocardial hypertrophy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This study was carried out to investigate the role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) in diabetic cardiomyopathy in vitro. Methods: Hypoxia was induced chemically in H9C2 cells (cardiac hypertrophy model), and the cells were treated with phenylephrine (PE), deferoxamine (DFO), PE + DFO, and HIF-1α siRNA under ...

  8. Effect of Chronic hypoxia on Carotid vascular responses to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine whether chronic hypoxia would alter the noradrenaline (NA)-evoked vascular responses in carotid circulation in rats. Furthermore, whether the carotid autoregulatory response to NA-evoked rise in arterial blood pressure (ABP) is compromised by chronic hypoxia or not. Also ...

  9. Hypoxia induced cognitive impairment modulating activity of Cyperus rotundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandikattu, Hemanth Kumar; Deep, Satya Narayan; Razack, Sakina; Amruta, Narayanappa; Prasad, Dipti; Khanum, Farhath

    2017-06-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia leads to decrease in cellular oxygen content which subsequently damages the hippocampus with an increase in brain oxidative stress and impairs the memory of the individual. In the present study, we have evaluated the cognitive impairment modulating activity of total oligomeric flavonoids fraction of Cyperus rotundus (TOF) in Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were trained for memory activity for a period of 7days followed by 7days exposure to 25,000ft. altitude and the spatial reference memory was evaluated. Behavioral analysis of the rats by Morris water maze experiment showed that TOF supplementation enhanced the spatial reference memory activity of the rats exposed to hypobaric hypoxia. The decrease in antioxidant status of the animals exposed to hypoxia was restored with TOF supplementation. The increase in ROS, lipid peroxidation products and protein carbonyls of the hippocampus was significantly decreased in animals with TOF administration. The histological assessment of the pyramidal cells of the hippocampus of hypoxia-exposed animals showed nuclear damage and TOF supplementation prevented nuclear damage. TOF administration suppressed hypoxia-induced increase in serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. GABA and Ach levels were decreased by hypoxia which was prevented by TOF supplementation. The increase in GFAP, HIF-1α and VEGF expression in CA3 region of the hippocampus in hypoxia-exposed rats was decreased in TOF administered rats. Taken together, TOF extract ameliorates hypobaric hypoxia induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration in hippocampus through its anti-stress effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Blockade of processing/activation of caspase-3 by hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang Hee; Kim, Moonil; Park, Kyoungsook; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Seol, Dai-Wu

    2008-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia, which is caused by the rapid proliferation of tumor cells and aberrant vasculature in tumors, results in inadequate supplies of oxygen and nutrients to tumor cells. Paradoxically, these unfavorable growth conditions benefit tumor cell survival, although the mechanism is poorly understood. We have demonstrated for the first time that hypoxia inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis by blocking translocation of Bax from cytosol to the mitochondria in tumor cells. However, it is largely unknown how hypoxia-inhibited Bax translocation attenuates TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate that despite its inhibitory activity in TRAIL-induced apoptosis, hypoxia does not affect TRAIL-triggered proximal apoptotic signaling events, including caspase-8 activation and Bid cleavage. Instead, hypoxia inhibited processing of caspase-3, leading to incomplete activation of the caspase. Importantly, hypoxia-blocked translocation of Bax to the mitochondria significantly inhibited releasing the mitochondrial factors, such as cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO, to the cytosol in response to TRAIL. It is well-known that complete processing/activation of caspase-3 requires Smac/DIABLO released from mitochondria. Therefore, our data indicate that an engagement of the apoptotic mitochondrial events leading to caspase-3 activation is blocked by hypoxia. Our data shed new light on understanding of the apoptotic signal transduction and targets regulated by tumor hypoxia

  11. The infectious hypoxia: occurrence and causes during Shigella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ellen T; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Marteyn, Benoit S

    2017-03-01

    Hypoxia is defined as a tissue oxygenation status below physiological needs. During Shigella infection, an infectious hypoxia is induced within foci of infection. In this review, we discuss how Shigella physiology and virulence are modulated and how the main recruited immune cells, the neutrophils, adapt to this environment. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Hypoxia in head and neck cancer: How much, how important?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, H. L.; Haustermans, K. M.; Balm, A. J.; Begg, A. C.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia develops in tumors because of a less ordered, often chaotic, and leaky vascular supply compared with that in normal tissues. In preclinical models, hypoxia has been shown to be associated with treatment resistance and increased malignant potential. In the clinic, several reports

  13. Short-term hypoxia/reoxygenation activates the angiogenic pathway ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-04-20

    Apr 20, 2013 ... Adult Wistar rats were submitted to acute hypoxia and analysed after 0 h, 24 h and 5 days of reoxygenation. Expression ... angiogenic pathway in the rat caudate putamen as a neuroprotective mechanism to hypoxia that seeks to maintain a ... ical, cardiovascular, and respiratory disorders (Mathur et al. 1999 ...

  14. The effect of altitude hypoxia on glucose homeostasis in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J J; Hansen, J M; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    1997-01-01

    1. Exposure to altitude hypoxia elicits changes in glucose homeostasis with increases in glucose and insulin concentrations within the first few days at altitude. Both increased and unchanged hepatic glucose production (HGP) have previously been reported in response to acute altitude hypoxia...

  15. Hypoxia influences expression profile of Pleckstrin homology-like ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... levels in analysed tissues. Short- and long-term hypoxia exposure resulted in significant changes in the expression of CbPHLDA2 in liver, spleen, head kidney, brain and muscle in a time-dependent manner. The results suggested that CbPHLDA2 might play an important role for adaptive significance under hypoxia.

  16. Evaluation of Notch and Hypoxia Signaling Pathways in Chemically ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common worldwide malignancy. Notch signaling pathway contributes to the genesis of diverse cancers, however, its role in HCC is unclear. Hypoxia is a common feature of HCC. Signal integration between Notch and hypoxia may be involved in HCC. The aim of this study was to ...

  17. Hypoxia-regulated MicroRNAs in Gastroesophageal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Mette; Alsner, Jan; Sørensen, Brita Singers

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: The present study aimed to identify hypoxia-regulated microRNAs (HRMs) in vitro and investigate the clinical role of candidate HRMs in patients with gastroesophageal cancer (GEC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: microRNA expression changes induced by hypoxia in human GEC cell lines were...

  18. Hypoxic hypoxia as a means of modifying radiosensibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumeister, K.; Niemiec, C.; Bolck, M.; Jahns, J.; Kamprad, F.; Arnold, P.; Johannsen, U.; Koch, F.; Mehlhorn, G.

    1977-01-01

    Following an overview of the various possibilities of creating hypoxia in mammals, the problem of reducing radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells is treated. Furthermore, the results of irradiation experiments with mice, rats and pigs breathing hypoxic mixtures of O 2 and N 2 are given and discussed with a view to applying hypoxic hypoxia in the radiotherapy of human tumors. (author)

  19. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor in diabetic myocardial hypertrophy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This study was carried out to investigate the role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) in diabetic cardiomyopathy in vitro. Methods: Hypoxia was induced chemically in H9C2 cells (cardiac hypertrophy model), and the cells were treated with phenylephrine (PE), deferoxamine (DFO), PE + DFO, and HIF-1α siRNA under.

  20. Hypoxia-induced dysfunction of rat diaphragm : role of peroxynitrite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, X.; Heunks, L.M.A.; Versteeg, E.M.M.; Heijden, E. van der; Ennen, L.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Vina, J.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.

    2005-01-01

    Oxidants may play a role in hypoxia-induced respiratory muscle dysfunction. In the present study we hypothesized that hypoxia-induced impairment in diaphragm contractility is associated with elevated peroxynitrite generation. In addition, we hypothesized that strenuous contractility of the diaphragm

  1. The effect of altitude hypoxia on glucose homeostasis in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J J; Hansen, J M; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    1997-01-01

    1. Exposure to altitude hypoxia elicits changes in glucose homeostasis with increases in glucose and insulin concentrations within the first few days at altitude. Both increased and unchanged hepatic glucose production (HGP) have previously been reported in response to acute altitude hypoxia. Ins...

  2. Evidence from intrinsic activity that asymmetry of the human brain is controlled by multiple factors

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hesheng; Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Sepulcre, Jorge; Hedden, Trey; Buckner, Randy L.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral lateralization is a fundamental property of the human brain and a marker of successful development. Here we provide evidence that multiple mechanisms control asymmetry for distinct brain systems. Using intrinsic activity to measure asymmetry in 300 adults, we mapped the most strongly lateralized brain regions. Both men and women showed strong asymmetries with a significant, but small, group difference. Factor analysis on the asymmetric regions revealed 4 separate factors that each ac...

  3. Hypoxia-targeting antitumor prodrugs and photosensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhouen; Nishimoto, S.I.

    2006-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been identified as a key subject for tumor therapy, since hypoxic tumor cells show resistance to treatment of tumor tissues by radiotherapy, chemotherapy and phototherapy. For improvement of tumor radiotherapy, we have proposed a series of radiation-activated prodrugs that could selectively release antitumor agent 5-fluorouracil or 5-fluorodeoxyuridine under hypoxic conditions. Recently, we attempted to develop two families of novel hypoxia-targeting antitumor agents, considering that tumor-hypoxic environment is favorable to biological and photochemical reductions. The first family of prodrugs was derived from camptothecin as a potent topoisomerase I inhibitor and several bioreductive motifs. These prodrugs could be activated by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase or DT-diaphorase to release free camptothecin, and thereby showed hypoxia-selective cytotoxictiy towards tumor cells. These prodrugs were also applicable to the real-time monitoring of activation and antitumor effect by fluorometry. Furthermore, the camptothecin-bioreductive motif conjugates was confirmed to show an oxygen-independent DAN photocleaving activity, which could overcome a drawback of back electron transfer occurring in the photosensitized one-electron oxidation of DNA. Thus, these camptothecin derivatives could be useful to both chemotherapy and phototherapy for hypoxic tumor cells. The second family of prodrugs harnessed UV light for cancer therapy, incorporating the antitumor agent 5-fluorourcil and the photolabile 2-nitrobenzyl chromophores. The attachment of a tumor-homing cyclic peptide CNGRC was also employed to construct the prototype of tumor-targeting photoactiaved antitumor prodrug. These novel prodrugs released high yield of 5-fluorourcil upon UV irradiation at λ ex =365 nm, while being quite stable in the dark. The photoactivation mechanism was also clarified by means of nanosecond laser flash photolysis. (authors)

  4. Hypoxia mediated pulmonary edema: potential influence of oxidative stress, sympathetic activation and cerebral blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Shadi; Frye, Melinda A; Jeckel, Kimberly M; Schroeder, Thies; Monnet, Eric; Irwin, Dave C; Cole, Patricia A; Bell, Christopher; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2015-10-09

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a non-cardiogenic form of pulmonary edema that can occur consequent to central neurologic insults including stroke, traumatic brain injury, and seizure. NPE is a public health concern due to high morbidity and mortality, yet the mechanism(s) are unknown. We hypothesized that NPE, evoked by cerebral hypoxia in the presence of systemic normoxia, would be accompanied by sympathetic activation, oxidative stress, and compensatory antioxidant mechanisms. Thirteen Walker hounds were assigned to cerebral hypoxia (SaO2 ~ 55 %) with systemic normoxia (SaO2 ~ 90 %) (CH; n = 6), cerebral and systemic (global) hypoxia (SaO2 ~ 60 %) (GH; n = 4), or cerebral and systemic normoxia (SaO2 ~ 90 %) (CON; n = 3). Femoral venous (CH and CON) perfusate was delivered via cardiopulmonary bypass to the brain and GH was induced by FiO2 = 10 % to maintain the SaO2 at ~60 %. Lung wet to lung dry weight ratios (LWW/LDW) were assessed as an index of pulmonary edema in addition to hemodynamic measurements. Plasma catecholamines were measured as markers of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. Total glutathione, protein carbonyls, and malondialdehyde were assessed as indicators of oxidative stress. Brain and lung compensatory antioxidants were measured with immunoblotting. Compared to CON, LWW/LDW and pulmonary artery pressure were greater in CH and GH. Expression of hemeoxygenase-1 in brain was higher in CH compared to GH and CON, despite no group differences in oxidative damage in any tissue. Catecholamines tended to be higher in CH and GH. Cerebral hypoxia, with systemic normoxia, is not systematically associated with an increase in oxidative stress and compensatory antioxidant enzymes in lung, suggesting oxidative stress did not contribute to NPE in lung. However, increased SNS activity may play a role in the induction of NPE during hypoxia.

  5. Effect of acute exposure to moderate altitude on muscle power: hypobaric hypoxia vs. normobaric hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Feriche

    Full Text Available When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17 in conditions of normoxia (N1 and hypobaric hypoxia (HH and G2 (n = 11 in conditions of normoxia (N2 and normobaric hypoxia (NH. Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax was recorded as the highest P(mean obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to P(max (∼ 3% and maximal strength (1 RM (∼ 6% in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (P<0.05. We also observed a stimulating effect of natural hypoxia on P(mean and P(peak in the middle-high part of the curve (≥ 60 kg; P<0.01 and a 7.8% mean increase in barbell displacement velocity (P<0.001. No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1 RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press.

  6. N-acetyl cysteine supplementation prevents impairment of spatial working memory functions in rats following exposure to hypobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayalakshmi, K; Singh, S B; Kalpana, B; Sairam, M; Muthuraju, S; Ilavazhagan, G

    2007-11-23

    Exposure to high altitude (HA), especially extreme altitude, is associated with impairment of cognitive functions including memory and increased oxidative stress. However, the underlying mechanisms involved are not well understood. It is hypothesized that HA induced oxidative stress may be one of the factors underlying hypoxia induced memory impairment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of hypobaric hypoxia (HH) on spatial working and reference memory functions, oxidative stress markers in rats and effect of supplementation of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). The rats were divided into four groups. Group I served as normoxic (n=6), Group II served as hypoxic (n=6), Group III as hypoxia group treated with NAC (n=6) and Group IV served as normoxic group treated with NAC (n=6). Group II & III were exposed to HH for 3 days equivalent to 6100 m and received oral NAC supplementation (750 mg/kg) daily. Rats from all the groups were trained in Morris Water Maze (MWM) task for 8 consecutive days. Spatial working and reference memory were tested immediately after the termination of HH and then the rats were sacrificed for estimation of oxidative stress markers in hippocampus. Rats displayed significant deficits in spatial working memory, and increased oxidative stress along with decrease in antioxidant status on hypoxic exposure. Supplementation with NAC in hypoxia-exposed group improved spatial memory performance, and decreased oxidative stress. These findings indicate that hypoxic exposure is associated with increased oxidative stress, which may have caused memory deficit in rats exposed to simulated HA.

  7. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2015-01-01

    survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...

  8. A new device to mimic intermittent hypoxia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil J Chodzyński

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxia (hypoxia-reoxygenation is often associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We describe a new device which can be used to submit cohorts of mice to controlled and standardised hypoxia-normoxia cycles at an individual level. Mice were placed in individual compartments to which similar gas flow parameters were provided using an open loop strategy. Evaluations made using computational fluid dynamics were confirmed by studying changes in haemoglobin oxygen saturation in vivo. We also modified the parameters of the system and demonstrated its ability to generate different severities of cyclic hypoxemia very precisely, even with very high frequency cycles of hypoxia-reoxygenation. The importance of the parameters on reoxygenation was shown. This device will allow investigators to assess the effects of hypoxia-reoxygenation on different pathological conditions, such as obstructive sleep apnoea or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  9. Cold stimulates the behavioral response to hypoxia in newborn mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, Bieke; Bouslama, Myriam; Matrot, Boris; Rotrou, Yann; Vardon, Guy; Lofaso, Frédéric; Van den Bergh, Omer; D'Hooge, Rudi; Gallego, Jorge

    2009-05-01

    In newborns, hypoxia elicits increased ventilation, arousal followed by defensive movements, and cries. Cold is known to affect the ventilatory response to hypoxia, but whether it affects the arousal response remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of cold on the ventilatory and arousal responses to hypoxia in newborn mice. We designed an original platform measuring noninvasively and simultaneously the breathing pattern by whole body plethysmography, body temperature by infrared thermography, as well as motor and ultrasonic vocal (USV) responses. Six-day-old mice were exposed twice to 10% O(2) for 3 min at either cold temperature (26 degrees C) or thermoneutrality (33 degrees C). At 33 degrees C, hypoxia elicited a marked increase in ventilation followed by a small ventilatory decline, small motor response, and almost no USVs. Body temperature was not influenced by hypoxia, and oxygen consumption (Vo(2)) displayed minimal changes. At 26 degrees C, hypoxia elicited a slight increase in ventilation with a large ventilatory decline and a large drop of Vo(2). This response was accompanied by marked USV and motor responses. Hypoxia elicited a small decrease in temperature after the return to normoxia, thus precluding any causal influence on the motor and USV responses to hypoxia. In conclusion, cold stimulated arousal and stress responses to hypoxia, while depressing hypoxic hyperpnea. Arousal is an important defense mechanism against sleep-disordered breathing. The dissociation between ventilatory and behavioral responses to hypoxia suggests that deficits in the arousal response associated with sleep breathing disorders cannot be attributed to a depressed hypoxic response.

  10. Hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, and macrophages in human atherosclerotic plaques are correlated with intraplaque angiogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluimer, Judith C.; Gasc, Jean-Marie; van Wanroij, Job L.; Kisters, Natasja; Groeneweg, Mathijs; Sollewijn Gelpke, Maarten D.; Cleutjens, Jack P.; van den Akker, Luc H.; Corvol, Pierre; Wouters, Bradly G.; Daemen, Mat J.; Bijnens, Ann-Pascale J.

    2008-01-01

    We sought to examine the presence of hypoxia in human carotid atherosclerosis and its association with hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) and intraplaque angiogenesis. Atherosclerotic plaques develop intraplaque angiogenesis, which is a typical feature of hypoxic tissue and expression of

  11. Plasma osteopontin, hypoxia, and response to the hypoxia sensitiser nimorazole in radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jens; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Nordsmark, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    all patients benefit from such modification of hypoxia is unclear. We aimed to assess whether the concentration of plasma osteopontin could predict response to the hypoxia radiosensitiser. METHODS: Plasma concentrations of osteopontin were measured by use of ELISA from stored samples of 320 patients...

  12. Impairment by hypoxia or hypoxia/reoxygenation of nitric oxide-mediated relaxation in isolated monkey coronary artery: the role of intracellular superoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawa, Masashi; Yamamizu, Kohei; Geddawy, Ayman; Shimosato, Takashi; Imamura, Takeshi; Ayajiki, Kazuhide; Okamura, Tomio

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of hypoxia or hypoxia/reoxygenation on vascular smooth muscle function, mechanical response of monkey coronary artery without endothelium was studied under normoxia, hypoxia, and hypoxia/reoxygenation. Hypoxia or hypoxia/reoxygenation impaired the relaxation by nitroglycerin or isosorbide dinitrate but not that by 8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate or isoproterenol. Tempol restored the impaired relaxation by nitroglycerin or isosorbide dinitrate, but superoxide dismutase had no effect. Apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, improved the nitroglycerin-induced relaxation under hypoxia, but not under reoxygenation. Under combined treatment of apocynin with oxypurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibitor), rotenone (mitochondria electron transport inhibitor), or both, hypoxic impairment of vasorelaxation was restored more effectively. Similarly, impairment of the nitroglycerin-induced vasorelaxation under hypoxia/reoxygenation was restored by combined treatment with three inhibitors, apocynin, oxypurinol, and rotenone. Increase in superoxide production under hypoxia tended to be inhibited by apocynin and that under hypoxia/reoxygenation was abolished by combined treatment with three inhibitors. These findings suggest that increased intracellular superoxide production under hypoxia or hypoxia/reoxygenation attenuates vasodilation mediated with a nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase, but not adenylyl cyclase, signaling pathway. The main source of superoxide production under hypoxia seems to be different from that under reoxygenation: superoxide is produced by NADPH oxidase during hypoxia, whereas it is produced by xanthine oxidase, mitochondria, or both during reoxygenation.[Supplementary Figure: available only at http://dx.doi.org/10.1254/jphs.11031FP].

  13. Functions of intrinsic disorder in transmembrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    2017-01-01

    mechanisms. (3) Trafficking of membrane proteins. (4) Transient membrane associations. (5) Post-translational modifications most notably phosphorylation and (6) disorder-linked isoform dependent function. We finish the review by discussing the future challenges facing the membrane protein community regarding......Intrinsic disorder is common in integral membrane proteins, particularly in the intracellular domains. Despite this observation, these domains are not always recognized as being disordered. In this review, we will discuss the biological functions of intrinsically disordered regions of membrane...... proteins, and address why the flexibility afforded by disorder is mechanistically important. Intrinsically disordered regions are present in many common classes of membrane proteins including ion channels and transporters; G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases and cytokine...

  14. Management Control, Intrinsic Motivation and Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godt Gregersen, Mikkel

    of the conclusion is that intrinsic motivation and management control can coexist under the conditions that all three basic needs, i.e. autonomy, competence and relatedness, are supported. This can happen when control takes point of departure in the individual employee. The second part of the conclusion......This thesis consists of a cape and three papers. The overall research question is: How can intrinsic motivation and management control coexist in a creative environment and how can coordination be possible in such a context? The cape ties together the research done in the three papers....... It is divided into six sections. The first section introduces the concepts of intrinsic motivation, creativity and management control. This is followed by a section on management control in a creative context. These two sections frame the thesis and introduce the setting in which the research has been done...

  15. Cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Fernando M; Bonni, Azad; Sousa, Mónica M

    2014-01-01

    Although neurons execute a cell intrinsic program of axonal growth during development, following the establishment of connections, the developmental growth capacity declines. Besides environmental challenges, this switch largely accounts for the failure of adult central nervous system (CNS) axons to regenerate. Here, we discuss the cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration, including not only the regulation of transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms, but also the modulation of local protein translation, retrograde and anterograde axonal transport, and microtubule dynamics. We further explore the causes underlying the failure of CNS neurons to mount a vigorous regenerative response, and the paradigms demonstrating the activation of cell intrinsic axon growth programs. Finally, we present potential mechanisms to support axon regeneration, as these may represent future therapeutic approaches to promote recovery following CNS injury and disease. PMID:24531721

  16. Protective effect of an intrinsic antioxidant, HMH (5-hydroxy-1-methylhydantoin; NZ-419), against cellular damage of kidney tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ienaga, Kazuharu; Park, Chan Hum; Yokozawa, Takako

    2013-07-01

    HMH (5-hydroxy-1-methylhydantoin; NZ-419) is a mammalian creatinine metabolite and an intrinsic antioxidant. HMH prevents the progression of chronic kidney disease in rats when a sufficient amount is taken orally. We assessed whether intrinsic and higher levels of HMH could protect tubular epithelial cells, LLC-PK(1) cells, against known cellular damage caused by xenobiotics, such as cisplatin and cephaloridine, or by hypoxia/reoxygenation treatment. Both cell damage and peroxidation, monitored as the leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and malondialdehyde (MDA), respectively, from cells into the media, were inhibited by HMH in a concentration-dependent manner. The minimum effective concentration of HMH (2.5 μM) seemed to be too low for HMH to only be a direct hydroxyl radical scavenger. Additional antioxidant effect(s) inhibiting reactive oxygen species generation and/or modulating signal transduction pathways were suggested. The possibility that intrinsic HMH could be a protectant for the kidney was indicated. At the same time, for sufficient inhibition, higher concentrations than intrinsic HMH concentrations may be necessary. Patterns of efficacies of HMH on LDH and MDA against different kinds of cellular damage were compared with our reported data on those of corresponding, naturally occurring antioxidants. A common and specific inhibitory mechanism as well as common target(s) in kidney injuries were indicated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypoxia and Matrix Manipulation for Vascular Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaci, Hasan E.; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Gerecht, Sharon

    The great majority of cell types are known to be capable of sensing changes in O2 tension and in the extracellular matrix (ECM), resulting in various responses depending on the cell type and other factors in the microenvironment, such as cell-cell interactions. A growing body of evidence suggests that hypoxia greatly influences the processes of angiogenesis/vasculogenesis through the transcription of several genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), the major regulatory protein of angiogenesis/vasculogenesis. At the same time, the spatial and temporal distribution of ECM components affects ECM properties and growth factor (GF) availability, which, in turn, regulates vascular development. This chapter will discuss how hypoxia and the ECM influence vascular morphogenesis. It seeks a better understanding of vascular development by considering recent research and emerging technologies focused on controlling O2 tension and manipulating ECM properties. The first part of the chapter focuses on the influences of O2 tension and ECM distribution on vascular formation. The second part presents strategies for manipulating the microenvironment using synthetic biomaterials. Control over O2 in three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments is thoroughly highlighted, along with the currently available O2 measurement techniques and mathematical models that are necessary to monitor O2 gradients in 3D microenvironments. Finally, the chapter discusses the state-of-the-art technology in microfluidics and smart biomaterials to provide insight into its future direction.

  18. Insulin aggregation tracked by its intrinsic TRES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Li Hung C.; Birch, David J. S.; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav; Ryadnov, Maxim G.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2017-12-01

    Time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) have been used to detect conformational changes of intrinsic tyrosines within bovine insulin at a physiological pH. The approach offers the ability to detect the initial stages of insulin aggregation at the molecular level. The data analysis has revealed the existence of at least three fluorescent species undergoing dielectric relaxation and significant spectral changes due to insulin aggregation. The results indicate the suitability of the intrinsic TRES approach for insulin studies and for monitoring its stability during storage and aggregation in insulin delivery devices.

  19. Intrinsic viscosity of a suspension of cubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mallavajula, Rajesh K.

    2013-11-06

    We report on the viscosity of a dilute suspension of cube-shaped particles. Irrespective of the particle size, size distribution, and surface chemistry, we find empirically that cubes manifest an intrinsic viscosity [η]=3.1±0.2, which is substantially higher than the well-known value for spheres, [η]=2.5. The orientation-dependent intrinsic viscosity of cubic particles is determined theoretically using a finite-element solution of the Stokes equations. For isotropically oriented cubes, these calculations show [η]=3.1, in excellent agreement with our experimental observations. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  20. Intrinsic entropy perturbations from the dark sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celoria, Marco; Comelli, Denis; Pilo, Luigi

    2018-03-01

    Perfect fluids are modeled by using an effective field theory approach which naturally gives a self-consistent and unambiguous description of the intrinsic non-adiabatic contribution to pressure variations. We study the impact of intrinsic entropy perturbation on the superhorizon dynamics of the curvature perturbation Script R in the dark sector. The dark sector, made of dark matter and dark energy is described as a single perfect fluid. The non-perturbative vorticity's dynamics and the Weinberg theorem violation for perfect fluids are also studied.

  1. A model of intrinsic symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Li; Li, Sheng; George, Thomas F.; Sun, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Different from the symmetry breaking associated with a phase transition, which occurs when the controlling parameter is manipulated across a critical point, the symmetry breaking presented in this Letter does not need parameter manipulation. Instead, the system itself suddenly undergoes symmetry breaking at a certain time during its evolution, which is intrinsic symmetry breaking. Through a polymer model, it is revealed that the origin of the intrinsic symmetry breaking is nonlinearity, which produces instability at the instance when the evolution crosses an inflexion point, where this instability breaks the original symmetry

  2. High expression of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase and proinflammatory markers in human ischemic heart tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Lisa U; Lundqvist, Annika; Asp, Julia; Synnergren, Jane; Johansson, Cecilia Thalén; Palmqvist, Lars; Jeppsson, Anders; Hultén, Lillemor Mattsson

    2012-07-27

    A common feature of the ischemic heart and atherosclerotic plaques is the presence of hypoxia (insufficient levels of oxygen in the tissue). Hypoxia has pronounced effects on almost every aspect of cell physiology, and the nuclear transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) regulates adaptive responses to low concentrations of oxygen in mammalian cells. In our recent work, we observed that hypoxia increases the proinflammatory enzyme arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (ALOX15B) in human carotid plaques. ALOX15 has recently been shown to be present in the human myocardium, but the effect of ischemia on its expression has not been investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that ischemia of the heart leads to increased expression of ALOX15, and found an almost 2-fold increase in HIF-1α mRNA expression and a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 mRNA expression in the ischemic heart biopsies from patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery compared with non ischemic heart tissue. To investigate the effect of low oxygen concentration on ALOX15 we incubated human vascular muscle cells in hypoxia and showed that expression of ALOX15 increased 22-fold compared with cells incubated in normoxic conditions. We also observed increased mRNA levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue compared with non-ischemic controls. In summary, we demonstrate increased ALOX15 in human ischemic heart biopsies. Furthermore we demonstrate that hypoxia increases ALOX15 in human muscle cells. Our results yield important insights into the underlying association between hypoxia and inflammation in the human ischemic heart disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Glycolysis determines dichotomous regulation of T cell subsets in hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Zhang, Ming; Savoldo, Barbara; Metelitsa, Leonid S.; Rodgers, John; Yustein, Jason T.; Neilson, Joel R.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia occurs in many pathological conditions, including chronic inflammation and tumors, and is considered to be an inhibitor of T cell function. However, robust T cell responses occur at many hypoxic inflammatory sites, suggesting that functions of some subsets are stimulated under low oxygen conditions. Here, we investigated how hypoxic conditions influence human T cell functions and found that, in contrast to naive and central memory T cells (TN and TCM), hypoxia enhances the proliferation, viability, and cytotoxic action of effector memory T cells (TEM). Enhanced TEM expansion in hypoxia corresponded to high hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) expression and glycolytic activity compared with that observed in TN and TCM. We determined that the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH negatively regulates HIF1A expression by binding to adenylate-uridylate–rich elements in the 3′-UTR region of HIF1A mRNA in glycolytically inactive TN and TCM. Conversely, active glycolysis with decreased GAPDH availability in TEM resulted in elevated HIF1α expression. Furthermore, GAPDH overexpression reduced HIF1α expression and impaired proliferation and survival of T cells in hypoxia, indicating that high glycolytic metabolism drives increases in HIF1α to enhance TEM function during hypoxia. This work demonstrates that glycolytic metabolism regulates the translation of HIF1A to determine T cell responses to hypoxia and implicates GAPDH as a potential mechanism for controlling T cell function in peripheral tissue. PMID:27294526

  4. Tumor hypoxia and reoxygenation: the yin and yang for radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Beom Ju; Kim, Jong Woo; Jeong, Hoi Bin; Bok, Seo Yeon; Kim, Young Eun; Ahn, G One [Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Tumor hypoxia, a common feature occurring in nearly all human solid tumors is a major contributing factor for failures of anticancer therapies. Because ionizing radiation depends heavily on the presence of molecular oxygen to produce cytotoxic effect, the negative impact of tumor hypoxia had long been recognized. In this review, we will highlight some of the past attempts to overcome tumor hypoxia including hypoxic radiosensitizers and hypoxia-selective cytotoxin. Although they were (still are) a very clever idea, they lacked clinical efficacy largely because of ‘reoxygenation’ phenomenon occurring in the conventional low dose hyperfractionation radiotherapy prevented proper activation of these compounds. Recent meta-analysis and imaging studies do however indicate that there may be a significant clinical benefit in lowering the locoregional failures by using these compounds. Latest technological advancement in radiotherapy has allowed to deliver high doses of radiation conformally to the tumor volume. Although this technology has brought superb clinical responses for many types of cancer, recent modeling studies have predicted that tumor hypoxia is even more serious because ‘reoxygenation’ is low thereby leaving a large portion of hypoxic tumor cells behind. Wouldn’t it be then reasonable to combine hypoxic radiosensitizers and/or hypoxia-selective cytotoxin with the latest radiotherapy? We will provide some preclinical and clinical evidence to support this idea hoping to revamp an enthusiasm for hypoxic radiosensitizers or hypoxia-selective cytotoxins as an adjunct therapy for radiotherapy.

  5. Hypoxia modulates infection of epithelial cells by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Schaible

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen commonly associated with lung and wound infections. Hypoxia is a frequent feature of the microenvironment of infected tissues which induces the expression of genes associated with innate immunity and inflammation in host cells primarily through the activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF and Nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB pathways which are regulated by oxygen-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases. Hypoxia also affects virulence and antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens. However, less is known about the impact of hypoxia on host-pathogen interactions such as bacterial adhesion and infection. In the current study, we demonstrate that hypoxia decreases the internalization of P. aeruginosa into cultured epithelial cells resulting in decreased host cell death. This response can also be elicited by the hydroxylase inhibitor Dimethyloxallyl Glycine (DMOG. Reducing HIF-2α expression or Rho kinase activity diminished the effects of hypoxia on P. aeruginosa infection. Furthermore, in an in vivo pneumonia infection model, application of DMOG 48 h before infection with P. aeruginosa significantly reduced mortality. Thus, hypoxia reduces P. aeruginosa internalization into epithelial cells and pharmacologic manipulation of the host pathways involved may represent new therapeutic targets in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infection.

  6. Evolutionary Genetics of Hypoxia Tolerance in Cetaceans during Diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ran; Wang, Zhengfei; Niu, Xu; Zhou, Kaiya; Xu, Shixia; Yang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia was a major challenge faced by cetaceans during the course of secondary aquatic adaptation. Although physiological traits of hypoxia tolerance in cetaceans have been well characterized, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. We investigated the sequences of 17 hypoxia-tolerance-related genes in representative cetaceans to provide a comprehensive insight into the genetic basis of hypoxia tolerance in these animals. Genes involved in carrying and transporting oxygen in the blood and muscle (hemoglobin-α and β, myoglobin), and genes involved in the regulation of vasoconstriction (endothelin-1, -2, and -3; endothelin receptor type A and B; adrenergic receptor α-1D; and arginine vasopressin) appear to have undergone adaptive evolution, evidence for positive selection on their particular sites, and radical physiochemical property changes of selected condons. Interestingly, “long-diving” cetaceans had relatively higher ω (dN/dS) values than “short-diving” cetaceans for the hemoglobin β gene, indicating divergent selective pressure presented in cetacean lineages with different diving abilities. Additionally, parallel positive selection or amino acid changes (ADRA1D: P50A, A53G, AVPR1B: I/V270T) among animals exposed to different hypoxia habitats reflect functional convergence or similar genetic mechanisms of hypoxia tolerance. In summary, positive selection, divergent selective pressures, and parallel evolution at the molecular level provided some new insights into the genetic adaptation of hypoxia tolerance. PMID:26912402

  7. Myocardial metabolism during hypoxia: maintained lactate oxidation during increased glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer, C D; Stanley, W C; Hickey, R F; Neese, R A; Cason, B A; Demas, K A; Wisneski, J A; Gertz, E W

    1990-09-01

    In the intact animal, myocardial lactate utilization and oxidation during hypoxia are not well understood. Nine dogs were chronically instrumented with flow probes on the left anterior descending coronary artery and with a coronary sinus sampling catheter. [14C]lactate and [13C]glucose tracers, or [13C]lactate and [14C]glucose were administered to quantitate lactate and glucose oxidation, lactate conversion to glucose, and simultaneous lactate extraction and release. The animals were anesthetized and exposed to 90 minutes of severe hypoxia (PO2 = 25 +/- 4 torr). Hypoxia resulted in significant increases in heart rate, cardiac output and myocardial blood flow, but no significant change in myocardial oxygen consumption. The arterial/coronary sinus differences for glucose and lactate did not change from normoxia to hypoxia; however, the rate of glucose uptake increased significantly due to the increase in myocardial blood flow. Tracer-measured lactate extraction did not decrease with hypoxia, despite a 250% increase in lactate release. During hypoxia, 90% +/- 4% of the extracted 14C-lactate was accounted for by the appearance of 14CO2 in the coronary sinus, compared with 88% +/- 4% during normoxia. Thus, in addition to the expected increase in glucose uptake and lactate production, we observed an increase in lactate oxidation during hypoxia.

  8. Myocardial metabolism during hypoxia: Maintained lactate oxidation during increased glycolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazer, C.D.; Stanley, W.C.; Hickey, R.F.; Neese, R.A.; Cason, B.A.; Demas, K.A.; Wisneski, J.A.; Gertz, E.W. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1990-09-01

    In the intact animal, myocardial lactate utilization and oxidation during hypoxia are not well understood. Nine dogs were chronically instrumented with flow probes on the left anterior descending coronary artery and with a coronary sinus sampling catheter. ({sup 14}C)lactate and ({sup 13}C)glucose tracers, or ({sup 13}C)lactate and ({sup 14}C)glucose were administered to quantitate lactate and glucose oxidation, lactate conversion to glucose, and simultaneous lactate extraction and release. The animals were anesthetized and exposed to 90 minutes of severe hypoxia (PO2 = 25 +/- 4 torr). Hypoxia resulted in significant increases in heart rate, cardiac output and myocardial blood flow, but no significant change in myocardial oxygen consumption. The arterial/coronary sinus differences for glucose and lactate did not change from normoxia to hypoxia; however, the rate of glucose uptake increased significantly due to the increase in myocardial blood flow. Tracer-measured lactate extraction did not decrease with hypoxia, despite a 250% increase in lactate release. During hypoxia, 90% +/- 4% of the extracted {sup 14}C-lactate was accounted for by the appearance of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in the coronary sinus, compared with 88% +/- 4% during normoxia. Thus, in addition to the expected increase in glucose uptake and lactate production, we observed an increase in lactate oxidation during hypoxia.

  9. Ceramic subsurface marker prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, C.E. [Rockwell International Corp., Richland, WA (United States). Rockwell Hanford Operations

    1985-05-02

    The client submitted 5 sets of porcelain and stoneware subsurface (radioactive site) marker prototypes (31 markers each set). The following were determined: compressive strength, thermal shock resistance, thermal crazing resistance, alkali resistance, color retention, and chemical resistance.

  10. Hypoxia Mediated Release of Endothelial Microparticles and Increased Association of S100A12 with Circulating Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca V. Vince

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Microparticles are released from the endothelium under normal homeostatic conditions and have been shown elevated in disease states, most notably those characterised by endothelial dysfunction. The endothelium is sensitive to oxidative stress/status and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 expression is upregulated upon activated endothelium, furthermore the presence of VCAM-1 on microparticles is known. S100A12, a calcium binding protein part of the S100 family, is shown to be present on circulating leukocytes and is thought a sensitive marker to local inflammatory process, which may be driven by oxidative stress. Eight healthy males were subjected to breathing hypoxic air (15% O2, approximately equivalent to 3000 metres altitude for 80 minutes in a temperature controlled laboratory and venous blood samples were processed immediately for VCAM-1 microparticles (VCAM-1 MP and S100A12 association with leukocytes by flow cytometry. A pre-hypoxic blood sample was used for comparison. Both VCAM-1 MP and S100A12 association with neutrophils were significantly elevated post hypoxic breathing later declining to levels observed in the pre-test samples. A similar trend was observed in both cases and a correlation may exist between these two markers in response to hypoxia. These data offer evidence using novel markers of endothelial and circulating blood responses to hypoxia.

  11. Acute Hypoxia Induced an Imbalanced M1/M2 Activation of Microglia through NF-κB Signaling in Alzheimer’s Disease Mice and Wild-Type Littermates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common neurodegenerative disease mainly caused by abnormal tau phosphorylation, amyloid β (Aβ deposition and neuroinflammation. As an important environmental factor, hypoxia has been reported to aggravate AD via exacerbating Aβ and tau pathologies. However, the link between hypoxia and neuroinflammation, especially the changes of pro-inflammatory M1 or anti-inflammation M2 microglia phenotypes in AD, is still far from being clearly investigated. Here, we evaluated the activation of microglia in the brains of APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic (Tg mice and their wild type (Wt littermates, after a single episode of acute hypoxia (24 h exposure. We found that acute hypoxia activated M1 microglia in both Tg and Wt mice as evidenced by the elevated M1 markers including cluster of differentiation 86 (CD86, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, C-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 and CCL3. In addition, the markers of M2 microglia phenotype (arginase-1 (Arg-1, CD206, IL-4 and IL-10 were decreased after acute hypoxia exposure, suggesting an attenuated M2 phenotype of microglia. Moreover, the activation of microglia and the release of cytokines and chemokines were associated with Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB induction through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4. In summary, our findings revealed that acute hypoxia modulated microglia M1/M2 subgroup profile, indicating the pathological role of hypoxia in the neuroinflammation of AD.

  12. The radiation response of cells recovering after chronic hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, T.T.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the influence of hypoxic pretreatment on the radiation response of A431 human squamous carcinoma cells. Reaeration for 10 min after chronic hypoxia (greater than 2 h) was found to enhance the radiosensitivity of A431 cells, and the maximal effect was seen for those cells reaerated after 12 h of hypoxia. The radiosensitivity enhancement for reaerated cells after 12 h of hypoxia was maximized by 5 min after the return to aerobic conditions and reached the control level by 12 h of reaeration. This enhanced radiosensitive state was characterized by a reduced shoulder region and increased slope of the radiation dose-response curve for cells in both the exponential and plateau phases of growth. There was a slight increase in the number of G1 and decrease in the number of S and G2 + M cells for both exponential- and plateau-phase cultures following 12 h hypoxic treatment. Although growth inhibition induced by 12 h of hypoxia was seen for cells in the exponential phase, there was no cell number change in the plateau-phase culture after hypoxia. Plating efficiency (PE) of cells in both growth phases was reduced by 30% after hypoxia. Furthermore, in the exponential-phase culture, the extent of reduction in PE after hypoxia was similar among cells in different phases of the cell cycle. Although S-phase cells in exponentially growing cultures were relatively more resistant to radiation than G1 and G2 + M cells, the cell age-response pattern was the same whether the cells had been aerobic or hypoxic before reaeration and irradiation. Furthermore, the enhancement ratio associated with reaeration after 12 h of hypoxia for these three subpopulations of cells was 1.3. Our results indicate that the increase in radiosensitivity due to reaeration after chronic hypoxia is unlikely to be related to the changes of cell cycle stage and growth phase during hypoxic treatment

  13. Frustration-induced protein intrinsic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Katsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2013-03-14

    Spontaneous folding into a specific native structure is the most important property of protein to perform their biological functions within organisms. Spontaneous folding is understood on the basis of an energy landscape picture based on the minimum frustration principle. Therefore, frustration seemingly only leads to protein functional disorder. However, frustration has recently been suggested to have a function in allosteric regulation. Functional frustration has the possibility to be a key to our deeper understanding of protein function. To explore another functional frustration, we theoretically examined structural frustration, which is designed to induce intrinsic disorder of a protein and its function through the coupled folding and binding. We extended the Wako-Saitô-Muñoz-Eaton model to take into account a frustration effect. With the model, we analyzed the binding part of neuron-restrictive silencer factor and showed that designed structural frustration in it induces intrinsic disorder. Furthermore, we showed that the folding and the binding are cooperative in interacting with a target protein. The cooperativity enables an intrinsically disordered protein to exhibit a sharp switch-like folding response to binding chemical potential change. Through this switch-like response, the structural frustration may contribute to the regulation function of interprotein interaction of the intrinsically disordered protein.

  14. Simple intrinsic defects in InAs :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2013-03-01

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in indium arsenide, InAs, as computed by density functional theory using semi-local density functionals, intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models.

  15. INTRINSIC AND EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION IN THE SELECTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A psychological perspective is considered that applies intrinsic and extrinsic motivational concepts to communication phenomena. The paper also tries to develop an analytical understanding of human communication-related behavior with respect to the two types of motives. Proposals are also put forward to communication ...

  16. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation among Collegiate Instrumentalists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather and compare information on measures of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation among instrumentalists enrolled in collegiate ensembles. A survey instrument was developed to gather information concerning demographic data and responses to questions on motivational preference. Participants were undergraduate and…

  17. A rotational integral formula for intrinsic volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Eva Bjørn Vedel; Rataj, J.

    2008-01-01

    A rotational version of the famous Crofton formula is derived. The motivation for deriving the formula comes from local stereology, a new branch of stereology based on sections through fixed reference points. The formula shows how rotational averages of intrinsic volumes measured on sections...

  18. Original Paper Detecting Nosocomial Intrinsic Infections through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-20

    Apr 20, 2011 ... Key Words: Bacterial pathogens, Endogenous indicators, NosocomiaI infection, Surgery. Received 30 October 2010/ Accepted 30 March 2011. INTRODUCTION. Micro-organisms from intrinsic and extrinsic sources have been known to cause nosocomial infections (CDC, 1991). The human body enables.

  19. Organisational Learning and Employees' Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedios, Richard; Boreham, Nick

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effects of organisational learning initiatives on employee motivation. Four initiatives consistent with theories of organisational learning were a priori ranked in terms of concepts that underpin intrinsic-motivation theory. Eighteen employees in a UK petrochemical company were interviewed to ascertain their experiences of…

  20. Intrinsic Motivation, Organizational Justice, and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, Kalli; Narayan, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    For employees to generate creative ideas that are not only original, but also useful to their company, they must interact with their workplace environment to determine organizational needs. Therefore, it is important to consider aspects of the individual as well as their environment when studying creativity. Intrinsic motivation, a predictor of…

  1. Discovery of Intrinsic Primitives on Triangle Meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Solomon, Justin

    2011-04-01

    The discovery of meaningful parts of a shape is required for many geometry processing applications, such as parameterization, shape correspondence, and animation. It is natural to consider primitives such as spheres, cylinders and cones as the building blocks of shapes, and thus to discover parts by fitting such primitives to a given surface. This approach, however, will break down if primitive parts have undergone almost-isometric deformations, as is the case, for example, for articulated human models. We suggest that parts can be discovered instead by finding intrinsic primitives, which we define as parts that posses an approximate intrinsic symmetry. We employ the recently-developed method of computing discrete approximate Killing vector fields (AKVFs) to discover intrinsic primitives by investigating the relationship between the AKVFs of a composite object and the AKVFs of its parts. We show how to leverage this relationship with a standard clustering method to extract k intrinsic primitives and remaining asymmetric parts of a shape for a given k. We demonstrate the value of this approach for identifying the prominent symmetry generators of the parts of a given shape. Additionally, we show how our method can be modified slightly to segment an entire surface without marking asymmetric connecting regions and compare this approach to state-of-the-art methods using the Princeton Segmentation Benchmark. © 2011 The Author(s).

  2. Regulation of wound healing and fibrosis by hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthenborg, Robin J; Ban, Jae-Jun; Wazir, Anum; Takeda, Norihiko; Kim, Jung-Whan

    2014-09-01

    Wound healing is a complex multi-step process that requires spatial and temporal orchestration of cellular and non-cellular components. Hypoxia is one of the prominent microenvironmental factors in tissue injury and wound healing. Hypoxic responses, mainly mediated by a master transcription factor of oxygen homeostasis, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), have been shown to be critically involved in virtually all processes of wound healing and remodeling. Yet, mechanisms underlying hypoxic regulation of wound healing are still poorly understood. Better understanding of how the wound healing process is regulated by the hypoxic microenvironment and HIF-1 signaling pathway will provide insight into the development of a novel therapeutic strategy for impaired wound healing conditions such as diabetic wound and fibrosis. In this review, we will discuss recent studies illuminating the roles of HIF-1 in physiologic and pathologic wound repair and further, the therapeutic potentials of HIF-1 stabilization or inhibition.

  3. [EFFECT OF Akt1 GENE TRANSFECTION ON HYPOXIA TOLERANCE OF BONE MARROW MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fengxu; Chen, Yongen; Chen, Feng; Xia, Jiyi; Liu, Hongduan; Fu, Yong; Li, Miaoling; Liao, Bin

    2016-04-01

    To investigate whether Akt1 gene transfection mediated by recombinant lentivirus (LVs) in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) could enhance the ability of hypoxia tolerance so as to provide a theoretical basis for improving the effectiveness of stem cells transplantation. LVs was used as transfection vector, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was used as markers to construct the pLVX-EGFP-3FLAG virus vector carrying the Akt1 gene. The 3rd generation BMSCs from 3-5 weeks old Sprague Dawley rats were transfected with pLVX-EGFP virus solution as group B and with pLVX-EGFP-3PLAG virus solution as group C; and untransfected BMSCs served as control group (group A). At 2-3 days after transfection, the expression of green fluorescent was observed by fluorescence microscope; and at 48 hours after transfection, Western blot method was used to detect the expression of Akt1 protein in groups B and C. BMSCs of groups B and C were given hypoxia intervention with 94% N₂, 1% O₂, and 5% CO₂ for 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 hours (group B1 and group C1). The flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell apoptosis rate and cell death rate, and the MTT method to analyze the cell proliferation, and Western blot to detect the expression of apoptosis related gene Caspase-3. After transfection, obvious green fluorescence was observed in BMSCs under fluorescence microscopy in groups B and C, the transfection efficiency was about 60%. Akt1 expression of group C was significantly higher than that of group B (t = 17.525, P = 0.013). The apoptosis rate and cell death rate of group B1 increased gradually with time, and difference was significant (P transfection mediated by recombinant LVs could significantly improve hypoxia tolerance of BMSCs by inhibiting the apoptosis, which could provide new ideas for improving the effectiveness of stem cells transplantation.

  4. Effect of hypoxia on cerebrovascular and cognitive function during moderate intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefferts, Wesley K; Babcock, Matthew C; Tiss, Matthew J; Ives, Stephen J; White, Corey N; Brutsaert, Tom D; Heffernan, Kevin S

    2016-10-15

    Exercise in hypoxia places added demands on the brain and cerebrovasculature that can impact cognitive function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acute hypoxia on cerebrovascular hemodynamics, markers of neuro-steroidal modulation and brain-blood barrier (BBB) integrity, and cognition during exercise. Thirty healthy participants (21±4yrs., BMI 24.0±2.6kg∙m(-2); 15 men) were randomized to both a≈2.5h normoxic (FiO2 20.0%) and hypoxic (FiO2 12.5%) condition on two separate days. After 1.25h, participants underwent 10min of exercise-alone (cycling at 55% HRmax) and 15min of exercise+cognitive testing. Prefrontal cortex (PFC) tissue oxygenation and middle cerebral artery (MCA) mean blood velocity (MnV) were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler respectively at rest, during exercise-alone, and during exercise+cognitive testing. Salivary levels of dehydroepiandosterone [DHEA], DHEA-sulfate [DHEAS]) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) were measured pre and post exercise. Cognition was assessed using standard metrics of accuracy and reaction time (RT), and advanced metrics from drift-diffusion modeling across memory recognition, N-Back and Flanker tasks. MCA MnV increased from rest to exercise (phypoxia. PFC oxygenation increased during exercise (phypoxia (phypoxia (phypoxia, while RT was slower in hypoxia vs normoxia across memory recognition (pmemory RT were due to increases in caution (phypoxia concomitant with slower RT in select cognitive tasks and reduced oxygenation in the PFC. These changes were accompanied by slight increases in neuro-steroidal modulation but appear independent of changes in NSE, a biomarker of BBB integrity. Maintained accuracy and select increases in RT during hypoxic exercise may be related behavioral changes in caution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Overexpression of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Protects against Brain Injury Induced by Chronic Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Nahla; Patel, Hardik; Codipilly, Champa; Marambaud, Philippe; Dewey, Stephen; Frattini, Stephen; Huerta, Patricio T.; Nasim, Mansoor; Miller, Edmund J.; Ahmed, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an isoform of SOD normally found both intra- and extra-cellularly and accounting for most SOD activity in blood vessels. Here we explored the role of EC-SOD in protecting against brain damage induced by chronic hypoxia. EC-SOD Transgenic mice, were exposed to hypoxia (FiO2.1%) for 10 days (H-KI) and compared to transgenic animals housed in room air (RA-KI), wild type animals exposed to hypoxia (H-WT or wild type mice housed in room air (RA-WT). Overall brain metabolism evaluated by positron emission tomography (PET) showed that H-WT mice had significantly higher uptake of 18FDG in the brain particularly the hippocampus, hypothalamus, and cerebellum. H-KI mice had comparable uptake to the RA-KI and RA-WT groups. To investigate the functional state of the hippocampus, electrophysiological techniques in ex vivo hippocampal slices were performed and showed that H-KI had normal synaptic plasticity, whereas H-WT were severely affected. Markers of oxidative stress, GFAP, IBA1, MIF, and pAMPK showed similar values in the H-KI and RA-WT groups, but were significantly increased in the H-WT group. Caspase-3 assay and histopathological studies showed significant apoptosis/cell damage in the H-WT group, but no significant difference in the H-KI group compared to the RA groups. The data suggest that EC-SOD has potential prophylactic and therapeutic roles in diseases with compromised brain oxygenation. PMID:25268361

  6. Effects of Hypoxia on the Immunomodulatory properties of Adipose tissue-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M eRoemeling-Van Rhijn

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC are of great interest as a cellular therapeutic agent for regenerative and immunomodulatory purposes. The function of ASC adapts to environmental conditions, such as oxygen tension. Oxygen levels within tissues are typically much lower than under standard culture conditions and ASC used for therapy therefore encounter a change from normoxic to hypoxic conditions. The effect of hypoxia on the regenerative potential of ASC has been investigated in a number of studies. The effect of hypoxia on the immunomodulatory function of ASC, however, remains to be determined. In the present study the effect of hypoxic (1% oxygen culture conditions on human ASC was examined. ASC showed no signs of toxicity under low oxygen levels and no major immunophenotypical changes were observed, apart from a down regulation of the marker CD105. Oxygen tension had no effect on the proliferation of ASC and colony forming unit (CFU efficiency remained the same under 1% and 20% oxygen. Under both oxygen levels ASC were capable of strong upregulation of the immunomodulatory molecules indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO and programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1 upon stimulation with IFN- and TNF-, and, in addition, IDO activity as measured by the accumulation of L-kynurenine was not affected under hypoxia. The ability of ASC to inhibit anti-CD3/CD28 stimulated CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation was enhanced under hypoxic conditions.The results of the present study demonstrate that the immunosuppressive capacity of ASC is maintained under hypoxic conditions. These findings are important for the therapeutic use of ASC and may be applied for the in vitro generation of ASC with improved functionality for therapeutic use.

  7. Hypoxia response in Arabidopsis roots infected by Plasmodiophora brassicae supports the development of clubroot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravot, Antoine; Richard, Gautier; Lime, Tanguy; Lemarié, Séverine; Jubault, Mélanie; Lariagon, Christine; Lemoine, Jocelyne; Vicente, Jorge; Robert-Seilaniantz, Alexandre; Holdsworth, Michael J; Manzanares-Dauleux, Maria J

    2016-11-11

    The induction of alcohol fermentation in roots is a plant adaptive response to flooding stress and oxygen deprivation. Available transcriptomic data suggest that fermentation-related genes are also frequently induced in roots infected with gall forming pathogens, but the biological significance of this induction is unclear. In this study, we addressed the role of hypoxia responses in Arabidopsis roots during infection by the clubroot agent Plasmodiophora brassicae. The hypoxia-related gene markers PYRUVATE DECARBOXYLASE 1 (PDC1), PYRUVATE DECARBOXYLASE 2 (PDC2) and ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE 1 (ADH1) were induced during secondary infection by two isolates of P. brassicae, eH and e2. PDC2 was highly induced as soon as 7 days post inoculation (dpi), i.e., before the development of gall symptoms, and GUS staining revealed that ADH1 induction was localised in infected cortical cells of root galls at 21 dpi. Clubroot symptoms were significantly milder in the pdc1 and pdc2 mutants compared with Col-0, but a null T-DNA insertional mutation of ADH1 did not affect clubroot susceptibility. The Arg/N-end rule pathway of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis controls oxygen sensing in plants. Mutants of components of this pathway, ate1 ate2 and prt6, that both exhibit constitutive hypoxia responses, showed enhanced clubroot symptoms. In contrast, gall development was reduced in quintuple and sextuple mutants where the activity of all oxygen-sensing Group VII Ethylene Response Factor transcription factors (ERFVIIs) is absent (erfVII and prt6 erfVII). Our data demonstrate that the induction of PDC1 and PDC2 during the secondary infection of roots by P. brassicae contributes positively to clubroot development, and that this is controlled by oxygen-sensing through ERFVIIs. The absence of any major role of ADH1 in symptom development may also suggest that PDC activity could contribute to the formation of galls through the activation of a PDH bypass.

  8. Target tumor hypoxia with 2-nitroimidazole-ICG dye conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Zanganeh, Saeid; Mohammad, Innus; Aguirre, Andres; Wang, Tianheng; Yang, Yi; Kuhn, Liisa; Smith, Michael; Zhu, Quing

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we have synthesized a second generation tumor hypoxia targeted 2-nitroimidazole-ICG conjugate using piperazine linker (2-nitro-ICG-p) and validated its performance in in vivo tumor targeting. The results have shown that tumor hypoxia can be targeted with twice higher signal strength beyond three hours post-injection while the un-targeted ICG has completely washed out. The improvement of the second generation 2-nitro-ICG-p dyes is 1.2-1.3 times over the first generation 2-nitro-ICG dyes using ethanol linker beyond 3 hours post-injection which is the optimal time-window for evaluating tumor hypoxia.

  9. Unexpected reductions in regional cerebral perfusion during prolonged hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Justin S; Macdonald, Jamie H; Oliver, Samuel J; Mullins, Paul G

    2017-02-01

    Cognitive performance is impaired by hypoxia despite global cerebral oxygen delivery and metabolism being maintained. Using arterial spin labelled (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging, this is the first study to show regional reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in response to decreased oxygen supply (hypoxia) at 2 h that increased in area and became more pronounced at 10 h. Reductions in CBF were seen in brain regions typically associated with the 'default mode' or 'task negative' network. Regional reductions in CBF, and associated vasoconstriction, within the default mode network in hypoxia is supported by increased vasodilatation in these regions to a subsequent hypercapnic (5% CO 2 ) challenge. These results suggest an anatomical mechanism through which hypoxia may cause previously reported deficits in cognitive performance. Hypoxia causes an increase in global cerebral blood flow, which maintains global cerebral oxygen delivery and metabolism. However, neurological deficits are abundant under hypoxic conditions. We investigated regional cerebral microvascular responses to acute (2 h) and prolonged (10 h) poikilocapnic normobaric hypoxia. We found that 2 h of hypoxia caused an expected increase in frontal cortical grey matter perfusion but unexpected perfusion decreases in regions of the brain normally associated with the 'default mode' or 'task negative' network. After 10 h in hypoxia, decreased blood flow to the major nodes of the default mode network became more pronounced and widespread. The use of a hypercapnic challenge (5% CO 2 ) confirmed that these reductions in cerebral blood flow from hypoxia were related to vasoconstriction. Our findings demonstrate steady-state deactivation of the default network under acute hypoxia, which become more pronounced over time. Moreover, these data provide a unique insight into the nuanced localized cerebrovascular response to hypoxia that is not attainable through traditional methods. The observation of reduced

  10. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 3 Is an Oxygen-Dependent Transcription Activator and Regulates a Distinct Transcriptional Response to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs play key roles in the cellular response to hypoxia. It is widely accepted that whereas HIF-1 and HIF-2 function as transcriptional activators, HIF-3 inhibits HIF-1/2α action. Contrary to this idea, we show that zebrafish Hif-3α has strong transactivation activity. Hif-3α is degraded under normoxia. Mutation of P393, P493, and L503 inhibits this oxygen-dependent degradation. Transcriptomics and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identify genes that are regulated by Hif-3α, Hif-1α, or both. Under hypoxia or when overexpressed, Hif-3α binds to its target gene promoters and upregulates their expression. Dominant-negative inhibition and knockdown of Hif-3α abolish hypoxia-induced Hif-3α-promoter binding and gene expression. Hif-3α not only mediates hypoxia-induced growth and developmental retardation but also possesses hypoxia-independent activities. Importantly, transactivation activity is conserved and human HIF-3α upregulates similar genes in human cells. These findings suggest that Hif-3 is an oxygen-dependent transcription factor and activates a distinct transcriptional response to hypoxia.

  11. Nrf2-AKT interactions regulate heme oxygenase 1 expression in kidney epithelia during hypoxia and hypoxia-reoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potteti, Haranatha R; Tamatam, Chandramohan R; Marreddy, Rakesh; Reddy, Narsa M; Noel, Sanjeev; Rabb, Hamid; Reddy, Sekhar P

    2016-11-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced kidney injury is a major clinical problem, but its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The transcription factor known as nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2 or Nrf2) is crucial for protection against oxidative stress generated by pro-oxidant insults. We have previously shown that Nrf2 deficiency enhances susceptibility to IR-induced kidney injury in mice and that its upregulation is protective. Here, we examined Nrf2 target antioxidant gene expression and the mechanisms of its activation in both human and murine kidney epithelia following acute (2 h) and chronic (12 h) hypoxia and reoxygenation conditions. We found that acute hypoxia modestly stimulates and chronic hypoxia strongly stimulates Nrf2 putative target HMOX1 expression, but not that of other antioxidant genes. Inhibition of AKT1/2 or ERK1/2 signaling blocked this induction; AKT1/2 but not ERK1/2 inhibition affected Nrf2 levels in basal and acute hypoxia-reoxygenation states. Unexpectedly, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed reduced levels of Nrf2 binding at the distal AB1 and SX2 enhancers and proximal promoter of HMOX1 in acute hypoxia, accompanied by diminished levels of nuclear Nrf2. In contrast, Nrf2 binding at the AB1 and SX2 enhancers significantly but differentially increased during chronic hypoxia and reoxygenation, with reaccumulation of nuclear Nrf2 levels. Small interfering-RNA-mediated Nrf2 depletion attenuated acute and chronic hypoxia-inducible HMOX1 expression, and primary Nrf2-null kidney epithelia showed reduced levels of HMOX1 induction in response to both acute and chronic hypoxia. Collectively, our data demonstrate that Nrf2 upregulates HMOX1 expression in kidney epithelia through a distinct mechanism during acute and chronic hypoxia reoxygenation, and that both AKT1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling are required for this process. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Unsupervised clustering of gene expression data points at hypoxia as possible trigger for metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    York David

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classification of large volumes of data produced in a microarray experiment allows for the extraction of important clues as to the nature of a disease. Results Using multi-dimensional unsupervised FOREL (FORmal ELement algorithm we have re-analyzed three public datasets of skeletal muscle gene expression in connection with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (DM2. Our analysis revealed the major line of variation between expression profiles of normal, insulin resistant, and diabetic skeletal muscle. A cluster of most "metabolically sound" samples occupied one end of this line. The distance along this line coincided with the classic markers of diabetes risk, namely obesity and insulin resistance, but did not follow the accepted clinical diagnosis of DM2 as defined by the presence or absence of hyperglycemia. Genes implicated in this expression pattern are those controlling skeletal muscle fiber type and glycolytic metabolism. Additionally myoglobin and hemoglobin were upregulated and ribosomal genes deregulated in insulin resistant patients. Conclusion Our findings are concordant with the changes seen in skeletal muscle with altitude hypoxia. This suggests that hypoxia and shift to glycolytic metabolism may also drive insulin resistance.

  13. Bisecting N-Acetylglucosamine Structures Inhibit Hypoxia-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengqi Tan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT process plays a key role in many biological processes, including tissue fibrosis, metastatic diseases, and cancer progression. EMT can be induced by certain factors, notably hypoxia, in the tumor microenvironment. Aberrant levels of certain N-glycans is associated with cancer progression. We used an integrated strategy (mass spectrometry in combination with lectin microarray analysis to elucidate aberrant glycosylation in a hypoxia-induced EMT model using breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and MDA-MB-231. The model showed reduced levels of bisecting GlcNAc structures, and downregulated expression of the corresponding glycosyltransferase MGAT3. MGAT3 overexpression in MCF7 suppressed cell migration, proliferation, colony formation, expression of EMT markers, and AKT signaling pathway, whereas MGAT3 knockdown (shRNA silencing had opposite effects. Our findings clearly demonstrate the functional role (and effects of dysregulation of bisecting GlcNAc structures in hypoxia-induced EMT, and provide a useful basis for further detailed studies of physiological functions of these structures in breast cancer.

  14. Tumor microenvironment conditions alter Akt and Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 expression in endothelial cells more than hypoxia alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anna-Kathrine; Mendes Lopes de Melo, Joana; Mørup, Nina

    2017-01-01

    -ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage consistent with inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. NHE1 knockdown, mimicking the effect of TME on NHE1 expression, reduced Ea.hy926 migration. TME effects on HIF-1α, VEGF, Akt, translation, proliferation or apoptosis markers were unaffected by NHE1 knockdown...... conditions. Here, we compared the effects of hypoxia and TME conditions on regulation of the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1, Ser/Thr kinases Akt1–3, and downstream effectors in endothelial cells. Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and Ea.hy926 endothelial cells were exposed to simulated TME (1......% hypoxia, low serum, glucose, pH, high lactate) or 1% hypoxia for 24 or 48 h, with or without NHE1 inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown. mRNA and protein levels of NHE1, Akt1–3, and downstream effectors were assessed by qPCR and Western blotting, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release by ELISA...

  15. Assessment of intratumor hypoxia by integrated 18F-FDG PET / perfusion CT in a liver tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in solid tumors occurs when metabolic demands in tumor cells surpass the delivery of oxygenated blood. We hypothesize that the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG metabolism and tumor blood flow mismatch would correlate with tumor hypoxia.Liver perfusion computed tomography (CT and 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET imaging were performed in twelve rabbit livers implanted with VX2 carcinoma. Under CT guidance, a fiber optic probe was inserted into the tumor to measure the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2. Tumor blood flow (BF and standardized uptake value (SUV were measured to calculate flow-metabolism ratio (FMR. Tumor hypoxia was further identified using pimonidazole immunohistochemical staining. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the correlation between the imaging parameters and pO2 and pimonidazole staining.Weak correlations were found between blood volume (BV and pO2 level (r = 0.425, P = 0.004, SUV and pO2 (r = -0.394, P = 0.007, FMR and pimonidazole staining score (r = -0.388, P = 0.031. However, there was stronger correlation between tumor FMR and pO2 level (r = 0.557, P < 0.001.FMR correlated with tumor oxygenation and pimonidazole staining suggesting it may be a potential hypoxic imaging marker in liver tumor.

  16. Identifying the neural substrates of intrinsic motivation during task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woogul; Reeve, Johnmarshall

    2017-10-01

    Intrinsic motivation is the inherent tendency to seek out novelty and challenge, to explore and investigate, and to stretch and extend one's capacities. When people imagine performing intrinsically motivating tasks, they show heightened anterior insular cortex (AIC) activity. To fully explain the neural system of intrinsic motivation, however, requires assessing neural activity while people actually perform intrinsically motivating tasks (i.e., while answering curiosity-inducing questions or solving competence-enabling anagrams). Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that the neural system of intrinsic motivation involves not only AIC activity, but also striatum activity and, further, AIC-striatum functional interactions. These findings suggest that subjective feelings of intrinsic satisfaction (associated with AIC activations), reward processing (associated with striatum activations), and their interactions underlie the actual experience of intrinsic motivation. These neural findings are consistent with the conceptualization of intrinsic motivation as the pursuit and satisfaction of subjective feelings (interest and enjoyment) as intrinsic rewards.

  17. Integrative Analysis of DCE-MRI and Gene Expression Profiles in Construction of a Gene Classifier for Assessment of Hypoxia-Related Risk of Chemoradiotherapy Failure in Cervical Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjeldbo, Christina S; Julin, Cathinka H; Lando, Malin

    2016-01-01

    -gene classifier was identified. The classifier separated the patients into two groups with different progression-free survival probability. The robustness of the classifier was demonstrated by successful validation of hypoxia association and prognostic value across cohorts, array generations, and assay...... platforms. The prognostic value was independent of existing clinical markers, regardless of clinical endpoints. CONCLUSIONS: A robust DCE-MRI-associated gene classifier has been constructed that may be used to achieve an early indication of patients' risk of hypoxia-related chemoradiotherapy failure....

  18. Hypoxia promotes tumor growth in linking angiogenesis to immune escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem eCHOUAIB

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the impressive progress over the past decade, in the field of tumor immunology, such as the identification of tumor antigens and antigenic peptides as potential targets, there are still many obstacles in eliciting an effective immune response to eradicate cancer. It has become increasingly clear that tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role in the control of immune protection and contains many overlapping mechanisms to evade antigen specific immunotherapy. Obviously, tumors have evolved to utilize hypoxic stress to their own advantage by activating key biochemical and cellular pathways that are important in progression, survival and metastasis. Among the hypoxia-induced genes, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF play a determinant role in promoting tumor cell growth and survival. In this regard, hypoxia is emerging as an attractive target for cancer therapy. How the microenvironmental hypoxia poses both obstacles and opportunities for new therapeutic immune interventions will be discussed.

  19. Exercise performed at hypoxia influences mood state and anxiety symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Fernando Tavares de Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available During hypoxia conditions, psychological states can be worsened. However, little information is available regarding the effect of physical exercise performed in hypoxia conditions on mood state and anxiety symptoms. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the acute effect of moderate physical exercise performed at hypoxia on mood states and anxiety symptoms in healthy young subjects. Ten volunteers were subjected to the following conditions: a normoxic condition (NC and a hypoxic condition (HC. They performed 45 min of physical exercise. Their anxiety symptoms and mood states were evaluated at the initial time point as well as immediately following and 30 and 60 min after the exercise session. Our results showed a significant increase in post-exercise anxiety symptoms and a significant decrease in mood scores immediately after and 30 min after exercise performed in the HC. Moderate physical activity performed at hypoxia condition increased post-exercise anxiety and worsened mood state.

  20. An insight into tumoral hypoxia: the radiomarkers and clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Margarida Abrantes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumoral hypoxia is related to severe structural abnormalities of tumor microvessels, leading to deteriorated O2 diffusion. This decreased O2 concentration in cancer cells compromises cellular functions, besides being responsible for resistance to radiation therapy. Consequently, it is very important to know the hypoxic status of a tumor. In this review, the different methodologies available for evaluating cellular hypoxia in vivo are discussed, particularly those in which the hypoxia information is obtained through imaging. Among these the nuclear medicine approach uses ligands to complex with radionuclides. The resulting radioactive complexes which may be single photon or positron emitters, are very useful as imaging probes. The nature of ligands and their corresponding complexes, with application or potential application as hypoxia detectors, will be described. A summary of the most significant results so far obtained in clinical or preclinical applications will also be discussed.

  1. Qidantongmai Protects Endothelial Cells Against Hypoxia-Induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    induced damage. The ability of QDTM to modulate the serum VEGF-A level may play an important role in its effects on endothelial cells. Key words: Traditional Chinese Medicine, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, hypoxia, VEGF ...

  2. 2012 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  3. Acute fetal hypoxia: the modulating effect of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, G; Peebles, D

    2005-01-01

    The fetal brain is protected from the effects of acute hypoxia by a range of haemodynamic and metabolic compensations. Hypoxia alone is therefore an unusual cause of perinatal brain injury in either preterm or term infants. More recently, materno-fetal infection has been implicated as a causative factor in cases of cerebral palsy associated with preterm and term birth. This paper explores the concept that exposure to infection, and in particular pro-inflammatory cytokines, may reduce the threshold at which hypoxia becomes neurotoxic, so making the brain much more vulnerable to even mild hypoxic insults. The hypothesis is supported by an increasing body of evidence from animal studies that also demonstrate the importance of duration between exposure to infection and subsequent hypoxia. There are a number of clinical and research implications that centre around the role of antibiotics, mode and timing of delivery, maternal cooling during labour and the role of immune-modulating drugs.

  4. Modern history of hypoxia in Narragansett Bay: the geochemical record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased inputs of nitrogen and other nutrients to estuarine and marine ecosystems from agricultural runoff, urbanization and suburbanization have resulted in degradation of water quality, including increased frequency and severity of hypoxia. While much work has been conducted ...

  5. ROE Long Island Sound Hypoxia Data Web Service 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point data of collection sites overlayed on raster of hypoxia water data. The raster is broken out into 5 color-coded categories of oxygen level. This map is an...

  6. 2008 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  7. 2013 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  8. 2009 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  9. 2015 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  10. 2010 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  11. 2011 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  12. Relationship between intrinsic radiation sensitivity and metastatic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Anne M.; Mei, Su; Doty, Jay; Chen Yi; Pardo, Francisco S.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Prior studies emphasized genetic modulation of tumorigenicity, and experimental metastatic potential in cells transfected with oncogenes. Whether the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of cells might correlate with parallel changes in metastatic potential is unknown. Methods and Materials: Rat embryo cells (REC) were transfected with the following oncogenes, and where appropriate, with corresponding selection markers: pCMV neopEJ6.6ras, pEJ6.6ras/v-myc, pE1a, and pEJ6-.6ras/E1a. Individual transfectant clones and corresponding pooled cellular populations were propagated in selective medium. In vitro cellular radiation sensitivity was determined via clonogenic assays, a minimum of three, by standard techniques and individual SF 2 and MID parameters determined. Tumorigenicity was defined as the number of tumors forming following the injection of 1 x 10 5 - 1 x 10 6 cells into the axillary pouch of three different strains of immune-deficient mice. Animals were killed once resultant tumors reached a maximum size of 1.5-2.0 cm in maximum diameter. For determination of experimental metastatic potential, between 1 x 10 5 -1 x 10 6 cells were injected into the tail veins of litter-matched sibling mice in parallel to the tumorigenicity studies. Results: Radiobiologic studies indicate similar levels of radiation sensitivity among REC, mock-transfected REC, E1a, and combined E1a/ras transfectants. pEJ6.6ras, and combined ras/myc transfected pooled cellular populations demonstrated increases in radiation resistance when compared to the pooled radiobiologic data from untransfected and mock-transfected corresponding pooled cellular populations (p 2 , MID). Rat embryo cells, E1a, and mock-transfectants were relatively radiation sensitive and nontumorigenic. pE1a/ras was tumorigenic but demonstrated relatively low experimental metastatic potential. Ras, and ras/myc transfectants, demonstrated similar levels of experimental metastatic potential on lung colonization assays

  13. High expression of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase and proinflammatory markers in human ischemic heart tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, Lisa U.; Lundqvist, Annika [Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Asp, Julia [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Synnergren, Jane [Systems Biology Research Center, School of Life Sciences, University of Skoevde, Skoevde (Sweden); Johansson, Cecilia Thalen [Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Palmqvist, Lars [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Jeppsson, Anders [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Hulten, Lillemor Mattsson, E-mail: Lillemor.Mattsson@wlab.gu.se [Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 in the ischemic heart. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incubation of human muscle cells in hypoxia showed a 22-fold upregulation of ALOX15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observed increased levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggesting a link between ischemia and inflammation in ischemic heart biopsies. -- Abstract: A common feature of the ischemic heart and atherosclerotic plaques is the presence of hypoxia (insufficient levels of oxygen in the tissue). Hypoxia has pronounced effects on almost every aspect of cell physiology, and the nuclear transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) regulates adaptive responses to low concentrations of oxygen in mammalian cells. In our recent work, we observed that hypoxia increases the proinflammatory enzyme arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (ALOX15B) in human carotid plaques. ALOX15 has recently been shown to be present in the human myocardium, but the effect of ischemia on its expression has not been investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that ischemia of the heart leads to increased expression of ALOX15, and found an almost 2-fold increase in HIF-1{alpha} mRNA expression and a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 mRNA expression in the ischemic heart biopsies from patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery compared with non ischemic heart tissue. To investigate the effect of low oxygen concentration on ALOX15 we incubated human vascular muscle cells in hypoxia and showed that expression of ALOX15 increased 22-fold compared with cells incubated in normoxic conditions. We also observed increased mRNA levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue compared with non-ischemic controls. In summary, we demonstrate increased ALOX15 in human ischemic heart biopsies. Furthermore we demonstrate that hypoxia increases ALOX15 in human muscle cells. Our results yield

  14. Management of renal dysfunction following term perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, Deirdre U

    2013-03-01

    Acute kidney injury frequently develops following the term perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia. Quantifying the degree of acute kidney injury is difficult, however, as the methods currently in use are suboptimal. Acute kidney injury management is largely supportive with little evidence basis for many interventions. This review discusses management strategies and novel biomarkers that may improve diagnosis and management of renal injury following perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia.

  15. Upregulated copper transporters in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana M Zimnicka

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vascular remodeling and increased arterial wall stiffness are two major causes for the elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure in patients and animals with pulmonary hypertension. Cellular copper (Cu plays an important role in angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling; increased Cu in vascular smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated to be associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal experiments. In this study, we show that the Cu-uptake transporter 1, CTR1, and the Cu-efflux pump, ATP7A, were both upregulated in the lung tissues and pulmonary arteries of mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Hypoxia also significantly increased expression and activity of lysyl oxidase (LOX, a Cu-dependent enzyme that causes crosslinks of collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix. In vitro experiments show that exposure to hypoxia or treatment with cobalt (CoCl2 also increased protein expression of CTR1, ATP7A, and LOX in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC. In PASMC exposed to hypoxia or treated with CoCl2, we also confirmed that the Cu transport is increased using 64Cu uptake assays. Furthermore, hypoxia increased both cell migration and proliferation in a Cu-dependent manner. Downregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α with siRNA significantly attenuated hypoxia-mediated upregulation of CTR1 mRNA. In summary, the data from this study indicate that increased Cu transportation due to upregulated CTR1 and ATP7A in pulmonary arteries and PASMC contributes to the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. The increased Cu uptake and elevated ATP7A also facilitate the increase in LOX activity and thus the increase in crosslink of extracellular matrix, and eventually leading to the increase in pulmonary arterial stiffness.

  16. Brain adaptation to hypoxia and hyperoxia in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Terraneo, L.; Paroni, R.; Bianciardi, P.; Giallongo, T.; Carelli, S.; Gorio, A.; Samaja, M.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Hyperoxic breathing might lead to redox imbalance and signaling changes that affect cerebral function. Paradoxically, hypoxic breathing is also believed to cause oxidative stress. Our aim is to dissect the cerebral tissue responses to altered O2 fractions in breathed air by assessing the redox imbalance and the recruitment of the hypoxia signaling pathways. Results: Mice were exposed to mild hypoxia (10%O2), normoxia (21%O2) or mild hyperoxia (30%O2) for 28 days, sacrificed and brain...

  17. Physiological factors associated with declining repeated sprint performance in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatterer, Hannes; Menz, Verena; Untersteiner, Christian; Klarod, Kultida; Burtscher, Martin

    2017-03-08

    Performance loss in hypoxia might not only be caused by reduced oxygen availability, but might also be influenced by other factors, as for example oxidative stress, perceived exertion or breathing patterns. This study aimed to investigate the influence of these factors on running performance during hypoxic and normoxic shuttle-run sprinting. Eight male amateur soccer players performed shuttle-run sprints in hypoxia (FiO2∼14.8%) and normoxia (random order). Each session comprised 3-sets of 5x10s back and forth sprints (4.5m) with recovery times between repetitions and sets of 20s and 5min, respectively. Sprinting distance, acceleration patterns, heart rate (HR) and breathing frequency were measured during each session (Zephyr-PSM Training System). Redox state and lactate concentration ([La]) were determined before and after each session, whereas rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was assessed after the sprint sessions. Overall distance covered was similar during hypoxia and normoxia sprinting (Δ -8.3±14.3m, 95% CI -20.2 to 3.6, p>0.05). During the 3 set, distance tended to be reduced in hypoxia compared to normoxia (169±6m, 95% CI 164 to 174 vs. 175±4m, 95% CI 171 to 178, p=0.070). Differences in breathing frequency during sprinting in hypoxia and normoxia were associated with individual reductions in sprinting distance (r=-0.792, p=0.019). Despite a somewhat lower running distance during the 3 set and similar [La], RPE, HR, and redox responses, the preserved overall running distance indicates that the training stimulus might be enhanced in hypoxia compared to normoxia. Alteration of the respiratory patterns during repeated sprinting in hypoxia might be one factor, beside others, responsible for a potential performance loss. It could be hypothesized that respiratory pattern adaptations are involved in potential performance improvements after hypoxia repeated sprint training.

  18. Hypoxia Silences Retrotrapezoid Nucleus Respiratory Chemoreceptors via Alkalosis

    OpenAIRE

    Basting, Tyler M.; Burke, Peter G.R.; Kanbar, Roy; Viar, Kenneth E.; Stornetta, Daniel S.; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Guyenet, Patrice G.

    2015-01-01

    In conscious mammals, hypoxia or hypercapnia stimulates breathing while theoretically exerting opposite effects on central respiratory chemoreceptors (CRCs). We tested this theory by examining how hypoxia and hypercapnia change the activity of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a putative CRC and chemoreflex integrator. Archaerhodopsin-(Arch)-transduced RTN neurons were reversibly silenced by light in anesthetized rats. We bilaterally transduced RTN and nearby C1 neurons with Arch (PRSx8-ArchT...

  19. [Effects of hypoxia inducible factor-1α on P311 and its influence on the migration of murine epidermal stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z D; Li, H S; Wang, S; He, W F; Wu, J; Luo, G X

    2017-05-20

    Objective: To explore the effects of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) on P311 and its influence on the migration of murine epidermal stem cells (ESCs) under hypoxia in vitro. Methods: Two kinds of murine ESCs were isolated and obtained from 15 neonatal wild-type C57BL/6J mice and 5 congeneric source P311 gene knock-out mice, respectively. The first passage of cells were used in the following experiments after morphologic observation and detection of expression of cell surface markers CD71 and CD49f with flow cytometer. (1) After cell scratch assay, according to the random number table (the same dividing method below), ESCs of P311 gene knock-out mice were divided into normoxia group (cells were cultured with complete medium in normoxic carbon dioxide incubator, and the subsequent normoxic treatments were the same) and hypoxia group (cells were cultured in hypoxic carbon dioxide incubator containing 1% oxygen, and the subsequent hypoxic treatments were the same), with 12 inserts in each group. ESCs of wild-type mice were divided into normoxia group, pure hypoxia group, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) control group (2 μL DMSO solvent was added for 1 h of normoxia treatment before hypoxia treatment), HIF-1α inhibitor group (cells were treated with 11 μmol/L HIF-1 inhibitor of 2 μL under normoxia condition for 1 h before hypoxia treatment), HIF-1α stabilizer group (the cells were treated with 2 μmol/L FG-4592 of 2 μL under normoxia condition for 1 h before hypoxia treatment), with 12 inserts in each group. Three inserts of each time point in each group were adopted respectively to measure the residual width of scratch under inverted phase contrast microscope at post scratch hour (PSH) 0 (immediately), 12, 24, and 48. (2) After hypoxia treatment, the protein level of HIF-1α in ESCs of wild-type mice was detected by Western blotting at post hypoxia hour (PHH) 0, 12, 24, and 48. (3) ESCs of wild-type mice were divided into pure hypoxia group, DMSO control group

  20. Intrinsic Motivation in Open Source Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitzer, J.; W., Schrettl,; Schröder, Philipp

    2004-01-01

    This papers sheds light on the puzzling evidence that even though open source software (OSS) is a public good, it is developed for free by highly qualified, young and motivated individuals, and evolves at a rapid pace. We show that once OSS development is understood as the private provision...... of a public good, these features emerge quite naturally. We adapt a dynamic private-provision-of-public-goods model to reflects key aspects of the OSS phenomenon. In particular, instead of relying on extrinsic motives for programmers (e.g. signaling) the present model is driven by intrinsic motives of OSS...... programmers, such as user-programmers, play value or \\emph{homo ludens} payoff, and gift culture benefits. Such intrinsic motives feature extensively in the wider OSS literature and turn out to add new insights to the economic analysis....

  1. Does Aerobic Exercise Influence Intrinsic Brain Activity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flodin, Pär; Jonasson, Lars S; Riklund, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that aerobic exercise could reduce age related decline in cognition and brain functioning. Here we investigated the effects of aerobic exercise on intrinsic brain activity. Sixty sedentary healthy males and females (64-78 years) were randomized into either an aerobic...... exercise group or an active control group. Both groups recieved supervised training, 3 days a week for 6 months. Multimodal brain imaging data was acquired before and after the intervention, including 10 min of resting state brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and arterial spin labeling...... group improved more. Contrary to our hypothesis, we did not observe any significant group by time interactions with regard to any measure of intrinsic activity. To further probe putative relationships between fitness and brain activity, we performed post hoc analyses disregarding group belongings...

  2. Documentation Requirements, Intrinsic Motivation, and Worker Absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Kristensen, Nicolai; Pedersen, Lene Holm

    2015-01-01

    Command systems are widely used to monitor public service provision, but little is known about unintended effects on individual workers’ motivation and work effort. Using insights from motivation crowding theory, we estimate a SEM model that captures how Danish childcare assistants and social...... and higher sickness absence. The association is statistically significant, but very small in substantive terms. The result is nevertheless consistent with the expectation in motivation crowding theory and contributes to the literature by including a new, reliable behavioral variable—sickness absence....../healthcare assistants perceive documentation requirements. We analyze how this perception relates to intrinsic motivation measured in a survey and sickness absence as reported in administrative registers, and find that individuals who perceive documentation requirements as controlling have lower intrinsic motivation...

  3. Extrinsic and intrinsic determinants of nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby A. Ferguson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After central nervous system (CNS injury axons fail to regenerate often leading to persistent neurologic deficit although injured peripheral nervous system (PNS axons mount a robust regenerative response that may lead to functional recovery. Some of the failures of CNS regeneration arise from the many glial-based inhibitory molecules found in the injured CNS, whereas the intrinsic regenerative potential of some CNS neurons is actively curtailed during CNS maturation and limited after injury. In this review, the molecular basis for extrinsic and intrinsic modulation of axon regeneration within the nervous system is evaluated. A more complete understanding of the factors limiting axonal regeneration will provide a rational basis, which is used to develop improved treatments for nervous system injury.

  4. Neurosis of acquired helplessness and role of hypoxia in the formation of this disorder in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vvedenskaya, O Yu; Avrushchenko, M A; Bol'shakova, T D; Khitrov, N K; Moroz, V V

    2003-04-01

    Acquisition of instrumental defense response with pain reinforcement uncertainty (25% reinforcement) induced the development of acquired helplessness in 50% rats. Acquired helplessness is characterized by the absence of responses to conditioned (light) and unconditioned stimuli (pain), minor response of plasma corticosterone to learning, gas markers of circulatory cerebral hypoxia (Delta A/V pO2 carotid artery/jugular vein), low sensitivity to severe hypobaric conditions, and high resistance of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. Piracetam improved learning and prevented the development of acquired helplessness. Local changes in cerebral blood flow and energy deficit in neurons responsible for emotional stress during acquired helplessness impair adaptive capacity, but reduce energy consumption and protect neuronal structures.

  5. Proteomic Alterations in Response to Hypoxia Inducible Factor 2α in Normoxic Neuroblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimmino, Flora; Pezone, Lucia; Avitabile, Marianna; Persano, Luca; Vitale, Monica; Sassi, Mauro; Bresolin, Silvia; Serafin, Valentina; Zambrano, Nicola; Scaloni, Andrea; Basso, Giuseppe; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-10-07

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-2α protein expression in solid tumors promotes stem-like phenotype in cancer stem cells and increases tumorigenic potential in nonstem cancer cells. Recently, we have shown that HIF-1/2α gene expression is correlated to neuroblastoma (NB) poor survival and to undifferentiated tumor state; HIF-2α protein was demonstrated to enhance aggressive features of the disease. In this study, we used proteomic experiments on NB cells to investigate HIF-2α downstream-regulated proteins or pathways with the aim of providing novel therapeutic targets or bad prognosis markers. We verified that pathways mostly altered by HIF-2α perturbation are involved in tumor progression. In particular, HIF-2α induces alteration of central metabolism and splicing control pathways. Simultaneously, WNT, RAS/MAPK, and PI3K/AKT activity or expression are affected and may impact the sensitivity and the intensity of HIF-2α-regulated pathways. Furthermore, genes coding the identified HIF-2α-related markers built a signature able to stratify NB patients with unfavorable outcome. Taken together, our findings underline the relevance of dissecting the downstream effects of a poor survival marker in developing targeted therapy and improving patient stratification. Future prospective studies are needed to translate the use of these data into the clinical practice.

  6. Intrinsic point defects in aluminum antimonide

    OpenAIRE

    Åberg, Daniel; Erhart, Paul; Williamson, Andrew J.; Lordi, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Calculations within density functional theory on the basis of the local density approximation are carried out to study the properties of intrinsic point defects in aluminum antimonide. Special care is taken to address finite-size effects, band gap error, and symmetry reduction in the defect structures. The correction of the band gap is based on a set of GW calculations. The most important defects are identified to be the aluminum interstitial $Al_{i,Al}^{1+}$, the antimony antisites $Sb_{Al}^...

  7. Intrinsic luminescence of alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbuzov, V.I.; Grabovskis, V.Y.; Tolstoi, M.N.; Vitol, I.K.

    1986-09-01

    This study obtains additional information on L centers and their role in electron excitation and intrinsic luminescence of a whole series. (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) of alkali silicate glasses. The authors compare the features of the interaction with radiation of specimens of glass and crystal of a similar chemical composition, since silicates of alkali metals can be obtained in both the glassy and crystalline states.

  8. Intrinsic work motivation and pension reform acceptance

    OpenAIRE

    Heinemann, Friedrich; Hennighausen, Tanja; Moessinger, Marc-Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Although demographic change leaves pay-as-you-go pension systems unsustainable, reforms, such as a higher pension age, are highly unpopular. This contribution looks into the role of intrinsic motivation as a driver for pension reform acceptance. Theoretical reasoning suggests that this driver should be relevant: The choice among different pension reform options (increasing pension age, increasing contributions, cutting pensions) can be analyzed within the framework of an optimal job separatio...

  9. A structural model of intrinsic motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar, Javier; González, Daniel; Aguilar, Amira

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this research was to develop and test a structural model of intrinsic motivation among students of the University of Sonora to the curriculum of their careers. A secondary objective was to overcome the limitations of the model developed among students of the UNAM. Eight psychometric scales developed by the authors in previous studies were used, which showed satisfactory reliability and validity values. The model tested was similar to the sample of the UNAM, except for the ...

  10. Hypoxia tolerance in coral-reef triggerfishes (Balistidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Corrie C.; Drazen, Jeffrey C.; Callan, Chatham K.; Korsmeyer, Keith E.

    2018-03-01

    Despite high rates of photosynthetic oxygen production during the day, the warm waters of coral reefs are susceptible to hypoxia at night due to elevated respiration rates at higher temperatures that also reduce the solubility of oxygen. Hypoxia may be a challenge for coral-reef fish that hide in the reef to avoid predators at night. Triggerfishes (Balistidae) are found in a variety of reef habitats, but they also are known to find refuge in reef crevices and holes at night, which may expose them to hypoxic conditions. The critical oxygen tension ( P crit) was determined as the point below which oxygen uptake could not be maintained to support standard metabolic rate (SMR) for five species of triggerfish. The triggerfishes exhibited similar levels of hypoxia tolerance as other coral-reef and coastal marine fishes that encounter low oxygen levels in their environment. Two species, Rhinecanthus rectangulus and R. aculeatus, had the lowest P crit ( 3.0 kPa O2), comparable to the most hypoxia-tolerant obligate coral-dwelling gobies, while Odonus niger and Sufflamen bursa were moderately tolerant to hypoxia ( P crit 4.5 kPa), and Xanthichthys auromarginatus was intermediate ( P crit 3.7 kPa). These differences in P crit were not due to differences in oxygen demand, as all the species had a similar SMR once mass differences were taken into account. The results suggest that triggerfish species are adapted for different levels of hypoxia exposure during nocturnal sheltering within the reef.

  11. Periodic breathing in healthy humans at exercise in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermand, Eric; Pichon, Aurélien; Lhuissier, François J; Richalet, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Periodic breathing is frequent in heart failure or ventilatory disorders during sleep, and common during sleep at high altitude, but has been rarely studied in wakefulness and during exercise. A retrospective analysis of ventilation from hypoxia exercise tests was realized in 82 healthy subjects separated into two groups with either high or low ventilatory response to hypoxia at exercise (HVRe). A fast Fourier transform spectral analysis of the breath-by-breath ventilation (V̇e) signal, O2 saturation, and end-tidal PCO2 evidenced a periodic pattern with a period of 11.1 to 12.0 s. The peak power of the V̇e spectrum was higher in the high HVRe group (P hypoxia (0 to 4,000 m altitude). The period of V̇e was shorter at exercise (vs. rest, P hypoxia (vs. normoxia, P hypoxia (P hypoxia was positively related with the ventilatory response to CO2 (HCVR). This novel observation suggests that healthy subjects demonstrate a spontaneous periodic breathing, not clearly observable at rest and in normoxia, but triggered by hypoxic exercise. The periodic pattern is enhanced in subjects with high HVRe and high HCVR, suggesting that oxygen and CO2 play synergistic roles in the modulation of these oscillations. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Mild hypoxia affects synaptic connectivity in cultured neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Mulder, Alex T B; Farinha, Ana C; van Putten, Michel J A M; le Feber, Joost

    2014-04-04

    Eighty percent of patients with chronic mild cerebral ischemia/hypoxia resulting from chronic heart failure or pulmonary disease have cognitive impairment. Overt structural neuronal damage is lacking and the precise cause of neuronal damage is unclear. As almost half of the cerebral energy consumption is used for synaptic transmission, and synaptic failure is the first abrupt consequence of acute complete anoxia, synaptic dysfunction is a candidate mechanism for the cognitive deterioration in chronic mild ischemia/hypoxia. Because measurement of synaptic functioning in patients is problematic, we use cultured networks of cortical neurons from new born rats, grown over a multi-electrode array, as a model system. These were exposed to partial hypoxia (partial oxygen pressure of 150Torr lowered to 40-50Torr) during 3 (n=14) or 6 (n=8) hours. Synaptic functioning was assessed before, during, and after hypoxia by assessment of spontaneous network activity, functional connectivity, and synaptically driven network responses to electrical stimulation. Action potential heights and shapes and non-synaptic stimulus responses were used as measures of individual neuronal integrity. During hypoxia of 3 and 6h, there was a statistically significant decrease of spontaneous network activity, functional connectivity, and synaptically driven network responses, whereas direct responses and action potentials remained unchanged. These changes were largely reversible. Our results indicate that in cultured neuronal networks, partial hypoxia during 3 or 6h causes isolated disturbances of synaptic connectivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitric oxide interferes with hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caria, Cintia Rabelo e Paiva; Moscato, Camila Henrique; Tomé, Renata Bortolin Guerra; Pedrazzoli, José; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; Gambero, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation can induce a local reduction in oxygen levels that triggers an adaptive response centered on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Nitric oxide, a well-described inflammatory mediator, may interfere with hypoxia signaling. We aimed to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation. Colitis was induced by single (acute) or repeated (reactivated colitis) trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid administration in rats. In addition, one group of rats with reactivated colitis was also treated with Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride to block nitric oxide synthase. Colitis was assessed by macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity in the colon samples. Hypoxia was determined using the oxygen-dependent probe, pimonidazole. The expression of HIF-1α and HIF-induced factors (vascular endothelial growth factor - VEGF and apelin) was assessed using Western blotting. The single or repeated administration of trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid to rats induced colitis which was characterized by a high macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity. Hypoxia was observed with both protocols. During acute colitis, HIF-1α expression was not increased, but VEGF and apelin were increased. HIF-1α expression was inhibited during reactivated colitis, and VEGF and apelin were not increased. Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride blockade during reactivated colitis restored HIF-1α, VEGF and apelin expression. Nitric oxide could interfere with hypoxia signaling during reactivated colitis inflammation modifying the expression of proteins regulated by HIF-1α.

  14. Macrophage-mediated response to hypoxia in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tazzyman S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Simon Tazzyman,1 Craig Murdoch,2 James Yeomans,1 Jack Harrison,1 Munitta Muthana3 1Department of Oncology, 2School of Clinical Dentistry, 3Department of Infection and Immunity, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Abstract: Hypoxia plays a critical role in the pathobiology of various inflamed, diseased tissues, including malignant tumors, atherosclerotic plaques, myocardial infarcts, the synovia of rheumatoid arthritic joints, healing wounds, and sites of bacterial infection. These areas of hypoxia form when the blood supply is occluded and/or the oxygen supply is unable to keep pace with cell growth and/or infiltration of inflammatory cells. Macrophages are ubiquitous in all tissues of the body and exhibit great plasticity, allowing them to perform divergent functions, including, among others, patrolling tissue, combating invading pathogens and tumor cells, orchestrating wound healing, and restoring homeostasis after an inflammatory response. The number of tissue macrophages increases markedly with the onset and progression of many pathological states, with many macrophages accumulating in avascular and necrotic areas, where they are exposed to hypoxia. Recent studies show that these highly versatile cells then respond rapidly to the hypoxia present by altering their expression of a wide array of genes. Here we review the evidence for hypoxia-driven macrophage inflammatory responses in various disease states, and how this influences disease progression and treatment. Keywords: macrophage, hypoxia, inflammation, cytokine

  15. Diaphragmatic fatigue during inspiratory muscle loading in normoxia and hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David Johannes; Farquharson, Franziska; Klenze, Hannes; Walterspacher, Stephan; Storz, Lucia; Duerschmied, Daniel; Roecker, Kai; Kabitz, Hans-Joachim

    2016-06-15

    Diaphragmatic fatigue (DF) occurs during strenuous loading of respiratory muscles (e.g., heavy-intensity whole-body exercise, normocapnic hyperpnea, inspiratory resistive breathing). DF develops early on during normoxia, without further decline toward task failure; however, its progression during inspiratory muscle loading in during hypoxia remains unclear. Therefore, the present study used volume-corrected transdiaphragmatic pressures during supramaximal magnetic phrenic nerve stimulation (Pdi,twc) to investigate the effect of hypoxia on the progression of diaphragmatic fatigue during inspiratory muscle loading. Seventeen subjects completed two standardized rounds of inspiratory muscle loading (blinded, randomized) under the following conditions: (i) normoxia, and (ii) normobaric hypoxia (SpO2 80%), with Pdi,twc assessment every 45 s. In fatiguers (i.e., Pdi,twc reduction >10%, n=10), biometric approximation during normoxia is best represented by Pdi,twc=4.06+0.83 exp(-0.19 × x), in contrast to Pdi,twc=4.38-(0.05 × x) during hypoxia. Progression of diaphragmatic fatigue during inspiratory muscle loading assessed by Pdi,tw differs between normoxia and normobaric hypoxia: in the former, Pdi,tw follows an exponential decay, whereas during hypoxia, Pdi,tw follows a linear decline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. NITRIC OXIDE INTERFERES WITH HYPOXIA SIGNALING DURING COLONIC INFLAMMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Rabelo e Paiva CARIA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Intestinal inflammation can induce a local reduction in oxygen levels that triggers an adaptive response centered on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs. Nitric oxide, a well-described inflammatory mediator, may interfere with hypoxia signaling. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation. Methods Colitis was induced by single (acute or repeated (reactivated colitis trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid administration in rats. In addition, one group of rats with reactivated colitis was also treated with Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride to block nitric oxide synthase. Colitis was assessed by macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity in the colon samples. Hypoxia was determined using the oxygen-dependent probe, pimonidazole. The expression of HIF-1α and HIF-induced factors (vascular endothelial growth factor - VEGF and apelin was assessed using Western blotting. Results The single or repeated administration of trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid to rats induced colitis which was characterized by a high macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity. Hypoxia was observed with both protocols. During acute colitis, HIF-1α expression was not increased, but VEGF and apelin were increased. HIF-1α expression was inhibited during reactivated colitis, and VEGF and apelin were not increased. Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride blockade during reactivated colitis restored HIF-1α, VEGF and apelin expression. Conclusions Nitric oxide could interfere with hypoxia signaling during reactivated colitis inflammation modifying the expression of proteins regulated by HIF-1α.

  17. Hypoxia inhibits colonic ion transport via activation of AMP kinase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mucosal hypoxia is a common endpoint for many pathological processes including ischemic colitis, colonic obstruction and anastomotic failure. Previous studies suggest that hypoxia modulates colonic mucosal function through inhibition of chloride secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this observation are poorly understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic energy regulator found in a wide variety of cells and has been linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mediated chloride secretion in several different tissues. We hypothesized that AMPK mediates many of the acute effects of hypoxia on human and rat colonic electrolyte transport. METHODS: The fluorescent chloride indicator dye N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide was used to measure changes in intracellular chloride concentrations in isolated single rat colonic crypts. Ussing chamber experiments in human colonic mucosa were conducted to evaluate net epithelial ion transport. RESULTS: This study demonstrates that acute hypoxia inhibits electrogenic chloride secretion via AMPK mediated inhibition of CFTR. Pre-treatment of tissues with the AMPK inhibitor 6-[4-(2-piperidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-phenyl)]-3-pyridin-4-yl-pyyrazolo [1,5-a] pyrimidine (compound C) in part reversed the effects of acute hypoxia on chloride secretion. CONCLUSION: We therefore suggest that AMPK is a key component of the adaptive cellular response to mucosal hypoxia in the colon. Furthermore, AMPK may represent a potential therapeutic target in diseased states or in prevention of ischemic intestinal injury.

  18. Moral Distress, Workplace Health, and Intrinsic Harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Elijah

    2016-05-01

    Moral distress is now being recognized as a frequent experience for many health care providers, and there's good evidence that it has a negative impact on the health care work environment. However, contemporary discussions of moral distress have several problems. First, they tend to rely on inadequate characterizations of moral distress. As a result, subsequent investigations regarding the frequency and consequences of moral distress often proceed without a clear understanding of the phenomenon being discussed, and thereby risk substantially misrepresenting the nature, frequency, and possible consequences of moral distress. These discussions also minimize the intrinsically harmful aspects of moral distress. This is a serious omission. Moral distress doesn't just have a negative impact on the health care work environment; it also directly harms the one who experiences it. In this paper, I claim that these problems can be addressed by first clarifying our understanding of moral distress, and then identifying what makes moral distress intrinsically harmful. I begin by identifying three common mistakes that characterizations of moral distress tend to make, and explaining why these mistakes are problematic. Next, I offer an account of moral distress that avoids these mistakes. Then, I defend the claim that moral distress is intrinsically harmful to the subject who experiences it. I conclude by explaining how acknowledging this aspect of moral distress should reshape our discussions about how best to deal with this phenomenon. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Intrinsic electron trapping in amorphous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Jack; Kaviani, Moloud; Afanas’ev, Valeri V.; Lisoni, Judit G.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate that electron trapping at intrinsic precursor sites is endemic in non-glass-forming amorphous oxide films. The energy distributions of trapped electron states in ultra-pure prototype amorphous (a)-HfO2 insulator obtained from exhaustive photo-depopulation experiments demonstrate electron states in the energy range of 2–3 eV below the oxide conduction band. These energy distributions are compared to the results of density functional calculations of a-HfO2 models of realistic density. The experimental results can be explained by the presence of intrinsic charge trapping sites formed by under-coordinated Hf cations and elongated Hf–O bonds in a-HfO2. These charge trapping states can capture up to two electrons, forming polarons and bi-polarons. The corresponding trapping sites are different from the dangling-bond type defects responsible for trapping in glass-forming oxides, such as SiO2, in that the traps are formed without bonds being broken. Furthermore, introduction of hydrogen causes formation of somewhat energetically deeper electron traps when a proton is immobilized next to the trapped electron bi-polaron. The proposed novel mechanism of intrinsic charge trapping in a-HfO2 represents a new paradigm for charge trapping in a broad class of non-glass-forming amorphous insulators.

  20. Learning intrinsic excitability in medium spiny neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    We present an unsupervised, local activation-dependent learning rule for intrinsic plasticity (IP) which affects the composition of ion channel conductances for single neurons in a use-dependent way. We use a single-compartment conductance-based model for medium spiny striatal neurons in order to show the effects of parameterization of individual ion channels on the neuronal membrane potential-curent relationship (activation function). We show that parameter changes within the physiological ranges are sufficient to create an ensemble of neurons with significantly different activation functions. We emphasize that the effects of intrinsic neuronal modulation on spiking behavior require a distributed mode of synaptic input and can be eliminated by strongly correlated input. We show how modulation and adaptivity in ion channel conductances can be utilized to store patterns without an additional contribution by synaptic plasticity (SP). The adaptation of the spike response may result in either "positive" or "negative" pattern learning. However, read-out of stored information depends on a distributed pattern of synaptic activity to let intrinsic modulation determine spike response. We briefly discuss the implications of this conditional memory on learning and addiction.

  1. Micro Regional Heterogeneity of 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FDG Uptake in Canine Soft Tissue Sarcomas: Relation to Cell Proliferation, Hypoxia and Glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zornhagen, Kamilla Westarp; Hansen, Anders E; Oxboel, Jytte; Clemmensen, Andreas E; El Ali, Henrik H; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Tumour microenvironment heterogeneity is believed to play a key role in cancer progression and therapy resistance. However, little is known about micro regional distribution of hypoxia, glycolysis and proliferation in spontaneous solid tumours. The overall aim was simultaneous investigation of micro regional heterogeneity of 64Cu-ATSM (hypoxia) and 18F-FDG (glycolysis) uptake and correlation to endogenous markers of hypoxia, glycolysis, proliferation and angiogenesis to better therapeutically target aggressive tumour regions and prognosticate outcome. Exploiting the different half-lives of 64Cu-ATSM (13 h) and 18F-FDG (2 h) enabled simultaneous investigation of micro regional distribution of hypoxia and glycolysis in 145 tumour pieces from four spontaneous canine soft tissue sarcomas. Pairwise measurements of radioactivity and gene expression of endogenous markers of hypoxia (HIF-1α, CAIX), glycolysis (HK2, GLUT1 and GLUT3), proliferation (Ki-67) and angiogenesis (VEGFA and TF) were performed. Dual tracer autoradiography was compared with Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Micro regional heterogeneity in hypoxia and glycolysis within and between tumour sections of each tumour piece was observed. The spatial distribution of 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FDG was rather similar within each tumour section as reflected in moderate positive significant correlations between the two tracers (ρ = 0.3920-0.7807; p = 0.0180 -pixel-to-pixel comparisons of autoradiographies and gamma counting of tumour pieces. 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FDG correlated positively with gene expression of GLUT1 and GLUT3, but negatively with HIF-1α and CAIX. Significant positive correlations were seen between Ki-67 gene expression and 64Cu-ATSM (ρ = 0.5578, p = 0.0004) and 18F-FDG (ρ = 0.4629-0.7001, p = 0.0001-0.0151). Ki-67 gene expression more consistently correlated with 18F-FDG than with 64Cu-ATSM. Micro regional heterogeneity of hypoxia and glycolysis was documented in spontaneous canine soft tissue sarcomas. 64Cu

  2. Micro Regional Heterogeneity of 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FDG Uptake in Canine Soft Tissue Sarcomas: Relation to Cell Proliferation, Hypoxia and Glycolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamilla Westarp Zornhagen

    Full Text Available Tumour microenvironment heterogeneity is believed to play a key role in cancer progression and therapy resistance. However, little is known about micro regional distribution of hypoxia, glycolysis and proliferation in spontaneous solid tumours. The overall aim was simultaneous investigation of micro regional heterogeneity of 64Cu-ATSM (hypoxia and 18F-FDG (glycolysis uptake and correlation to endogenous markers of hypoxia, glycolysis, proliferation and angiogenesis to better therapeutically target aggressive tumour regions and prognosticate outcome.Exploiting the different half-lives of 64Cu-ATSM (13 h and 18F-FDG (2 h enabled simultaneous investigation of micro regional distribution of hypoxia and glycolysis in 145 tumour pieces from four spontaneous canine soft tissue sarcomas. Pairwise measurements of radioactivity and gene expression of endogenous markers of hypoxia (HIF-1α, CAIX, glycolysis (HK2, GLUT1 and GLUT3, proliferation (Ki-67 and angiogenesis (VEGFA and TF were performed. Dual tracer autoradiography was compared with Ki-67 immunohistochemistry.Micro regional heterogeneity in hypoxia and glycolysis within and between tumour sections of each tumour piece was observed. The spatial distribution of 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FDG was rather similar within each tumour section as reflected in moderate positive significant correlations between the two tracers (ρ = 0.3920-0.7807; p = 0.0180 -<0.0001 based on pixel-to-pixel comparisons of autoradiographies and gamma counting of tumour pieces. 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FDG correlated positively with gene expression of GLUT1 and GLUT3, but negatively with HIF-1α and CAIX. Significant positive correlations were seen between Ki-67 gene expression and 64Cu-ATSM (ρ = 0.5578, p = 0.0004 and 18F-FDG (ρ = 0.4629-0.7001, p = 0.0001-0.0151. Ki-67 gene expression more consistently correlated with 18F-FDG than with 64Cu-ATSM.Micro regional heterogeneity of hypoxia and glycolysis was documented in spontaneous canine

  3. Survival of cancer stem cells under hypoxia and serum depletion via decrease in PP2A activity and activation of p38-MAPKAPK2-Hsp27.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Pei Lin

    Full Text Available Hypoxia and serum depletion are common features of solid tumors that occur upon antiangiogenesis, irradiation and chemotherapy across a wide variety of malignancies. Here we show that tumor cells expressing CD133, a marker for colorectal cancer initiating or stem cells, are enriched and survive under hypoxia and serum depletion conditions, whereas CD133- cells undergo apoptosis. CD133+ tumor cells increase cancer stem cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transition properties. Moreover, via screening a panel of tyrosine and serine/threonine kinase pathways, we identified Hsp27 is constitutively activated in CD133+ cells rather than CD133- cell under hypoxia and serum depletion conditions. However, there was no difference in Hsp27 activation between CD133+ and CD133- cells under normal growth condition. Hsp27 activation, which was mediated by the p38MAPK-MAPKAPK2-Hsp27 pathway, is required for CD133+ cells to inhibit caspase 9 and 3 cleavage. In addition, inhibition of Hsp27 signaling sensitizes CD133+ cells to hypoxia and serum depletion -induced apoptosis. Moreover, the antiapoptotic pathway is also activated in spheroid culture-enriched CD133+ cancer stem cells from a variety of solid tumor cells including lung, brain and oral cancer, suggesting it is a common pathway activated in cancer stem cells from multiple tumor types. Thus, activation of PP2A or inactivation of the p38MAPK-MAPKAPK2-Hsp27 pathway may develop new strategies for cancer therapy by suppression of their TIC population.

  4. Tantalum markers in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronson, A.S.; Jonsson, N.; Alberius, P.

    1985-01-01

    The biocompatibility of two types of radiopaque tantalum markers was evaluated histologically. Reactions to pin markers (99.9% purity) and spherical markers (95.2% purity) were investigated after 3-6 weeks in rabbits and 5-48 weeks in children with abnormal growth. Both marker types were firmly attached to bone trabeculae; this was most pronounced in rabbit bone, and no adverse macroscopic reactions were observed. Microscopically, no reactions or only slight fibrosis of bone tissue were detected, while soft tissues only demonstrated a minor inflammatory reaction. Nevertheless, the need for careful preparation and execution of marker implantations is stressed, and particularly avoidance iof the use of emery in sharpening of cannulae. The bioinertness of tantalum was reconfirmed as was its suitability for use as skeletal and soft tissue radiographic markers. (orig.)

  5. Glycogen synthesis is induced in hypoxia by the hypoxia-inducible factor and promotes cancer cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joffrey ePelletier

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1, in addition to genetic and epigenetic changes, is largely responsible for alterations in cell metabolism in hypoxic tumor cells. This transcription factor not only favors cell proliferation through the metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis and lactic acid production but also stimulates nutrient supply by mediating adaptive survival mechanisms. In this study we showed that glycogen synthesis is enhanced in non-cancer and cancer cells when exposed to hypoxia, resulting in a large increase in glycogen stores. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mRNA and protein levels of the first enzyme of glycogenesis, phosphoglucomutase1 (PGM1, were increased in hypoxia. We showed that induction of glycogen storage as well as PGM1 expression were dependent on HIF-1 and HIF-2. We established that hypoxia-induced glycogen stores are rapidly mobilized in cells that are starved of glucose. Glycogenolysis allows these hypoxia-preconditioned cells to confront and survive glucose deprivation. In contrast normoxic control cells exhibit a high rate of cell death following glucose removal. These findings point to the important role of hypoxia and HIF in inducing mechanisms of rapid adaptation and survival in response to a decrease in oxygen tension. We propose that a decrease in pO2 acts as an alarm that prepares the cells to face subsequent nutrient depletion and to survive.

  6. Protein S-glutathionylation induced by hypoxia increases hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Daun; Park, Heon Joo; Kim, Hong Seok

    2018-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of many types of solid tumors. Intratumoral hypoxia selects for tumor cells that survive in a low oxygen environment, undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition, are more motile and invasive, and show gene expression changes driven by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. Therefore, targeting HIF-1α is an attractive strategy for disrupting multiple pathways crucial for tumor growth. In the present study, we demonstrated that hypoxia increases the S-glutathionylation of HIF-1α and its protein levels in colon cancer cells. This effect is significantly prevented by decreasing oxidized glutathione as well as glutathione depletion, indicating that S-glutathionylation and the formation of protein-glutathione mixed disulfides is related to HIF-1α protein levels. Moreover, colon cancer cells expressing glutaredoxin 1 are resistant to inducing HIF-1α and expressing hypoxia-responsive genes under hypoxic conditions. Therefore, S-glutathionylation of HIF-1α induced by tumor hypoxia may be a novel therapeutic target for the development of new drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Quercetin suppresses hypoxia-induced accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) through inhibiting protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Yong J

    2008-10-01

    Quercetin, a ubiquitous bioactive plant flavonoid, has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells and induce the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) in normoxia. In this study, under hypoxic conditions (1% O(2)), we examined the effect of quercetin on the intracellular level of HIF-1alpha and extracellular level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in a variety of human cancer cell lines. Surprisingly, we observed that quercetin suppressed the HIF-1alpha accumulation during hypoxia in human prostate cancer LNCaP, colon cancer CX-1, and breast cancer SkBr3 cells. Quercetin treatment also significantly reduced hypoxia-induced secretion of VEGF. Suppression of HIF-1alpha accumulation during treatment with quercetin in hypoxia was not prevented by treatment with 26S proteasome inhibitor MG132 or PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Interestingly, hypoxia (1% O(2)) in the presence of 100 microM quercetin inhibited protein synthesis by 94% during incubation for 8 h. Significant quercetin concentration-dependent inhibition of protein synthesis and suppression of HIF-1alpha accumulation were observed under hypoxic conditions. Treatment with 100 microM cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, replicated the effect of quercetin by inhibiting HIF-1alpha accumulation during hypoxia. These results suggest that suppression of HIF-1alpha accumulation during treatment with quercetin under hypoxic conditions is due to inhibition of protein synthesis. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Hypoxia in tumors: pathogenesis-related classification, characterization of hypoxia subtypes, and associated biological and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaupel, Peter; Mayer, Arnulf

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of tumors leading to (mal-)adaptive processes, development of aggressive phenotypes and treatment resistance. Based on underlying mechanisms and their duration, two main types of hypoxia have been identified, coexisting with complex spatial and temporal heterogeneities. Chronic hypoxia is mainly caused by diffusion limitations due to enlarged diffusion distances and adverse diffusion geometries (e.g., concurrent vs. countercurrent microvessels, Krogh- vs. Hill-type diffusion geometry) and, to a lesser extent, by hypoxemia (e.g., in anemic patients, HbCO formation in heavy smokers), and a compromised perfusion or flow stop (e.g., due to disturbed Starling forces or intratumor solid stress). Acute hypoxia mainly results from transient disruptions in perfusion (e.g., vascular occlusion by cell aggregates), fluctuating red blood cell fluxes or short-term contractions of the interstitial matrix. In each of these hypoxia subtypes oxygen supply is critically reduced, but perfusion-dependent nutrient supply, waste removal, delivery of anticancer or diagnostic agents, and repair competence can be impaired or may not be affected. This detailed differentiation of tumor hypoxia may impact on our understanding of tumor biology and may aid in the development of novel treatment strategies, tumor detection by imaging and tumor targeting, and is thus of great clinical relevance.

  9. High-intensity interval training in hypoxia does not affect muscle HIF responses to acute hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Stefan; D'Hulst, Gommaar; Poffé, Chiel; Van Thienen, Ruud; Berardi, Emanuele; Hespel, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The myocellular response to hypoxia is primarily regulated by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). HIFs thus conceivably are implicated in muscular adaptation to altitude training. Therefore, we investigated the effect of hypoxic versus normoxic training during a period of prolonged hypoxia ('living high') on muscle HIF activation during acute ischaemia. Ten young male volunteers lived in normobaric hypoxia for 5 weeks (5 days per week, ~ 15.5 h per day, F i O 2 : 16.4-14.0%). One leg was trained in hypoxia (TR HYP , 12.3% F i O 2 ) whilst the other leg was trained in normoxia (TR NOR , 20.9% F i O 2 ). Training sessions (3 per week) consisted of intermittent unilateral knee extensions at 20-25% of the 1-repetition maximum. Before and after the intervention, a 10-min arterial occlusion and reperfusion of the leg was performed. Muscle oxygenation status was continuously measured by near-infrared spectroscopy. Biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis before and at the end of the occlusion. Irrespective of training, occlusion elevated the fraction of HIF-1α expressing myonuclei from ~ 54 to ~ 64% (P Training in both TR NOR and TR HYP raised muscular oxygen extraction rate upon occlusion by ~ 30%, whilst muscle hyperperfusion immediately following the occlusion increased by ~ 25% in either group (P training during 'living high' altered muscle HIF translocation, stabilisation, or transcription in response to acute hypoxia induced by arterial occlusion.

  10. Mechanisms of microglial activation in models of inflammation and hypoxia: Implications for chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Elizabeth A; Smith, Stephanie M C; Mitchell, Gordon S; Watters, Jyoti J

    2016-03-15

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a hallmark of sleep apnoea, a condition associated with diverse clinical disorders. CIH and sleep apnoea are characterized by increased reactive oxygen species formation, peripheral and CNS inflammation, neuronal death and neurocognitive deficits. Few studies have examined the role of microglia, the resident CNS immune cells, in models of CIH. Thus, little is known concerning their direct contributions to neuropathology or the cellular mechanisms regulating their activities during or following pathological CIH. In this review, we identify gaps in knowledge regarding CIH-induced microglial activation, and propose mechanisms based on data from related models of hypoxia and/or hypoxia-reoxygenation. CIH may directly affect microglia, or may have indirect effects via the periphery or other CNS cells. Peripheral inflammation may indirectly activate microglia via entry of pro-inflammatory molecules into the CNS, and/or activation of vagal afferents that trigger CNS inflammation. CIH-induced release of damage-associated molecular patterns from injured CNS cells may also activate microglia via interactions with pattern recognition receptors expressed on microglia. For example, Toll-like receptors activate mitogen-activated protein kinase/transcription factor pathways required for microglial inflammatory gene expression. Although epigenetic effects from CIH have not yet been studied in microglia, potential epigenetic mechanisms in microglial regulation are discussed, including microRNAs, histone modifications and DNA methylation. Epigenetic effects can occur during CIH, or long after it has ended. A better understanding of CIH effects on microglial activities may be important to reverse CIH-induced neuropathology in patients with sleep disordered breathing. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  11. DNA methylation supports intrinsic epigenetic memory in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the role of DNA methylation in the initiation and maintenance of silenced chromatin in somatic mammalian cells. We found that a mutated transgene, in which all the CpG dinucleotides have been eliminated, underwent transcriptional silencing to the same extent as the unmodified transgene. These observations demonstrate that DNA methylation is not required for silencing. The silenced CpG-free transgene exhibited all the features of heterochromatin, including silencing of transcriptional activity, delayed DNA replication, lack of histone H3 and H4 acetylation, lack of H3-K4 methylation, and enrichment in tri-methyl-H3-K9. In contrast, when we tested for transgene reactivation using a Cre recombinase-mediated inversion assay, we observed a marked difference between a CpG-free and an unmodified transgene: the CpG-free transgene resumed transcription and did not exhibit markers of heterochromatin whereas the unmodified transgene remained silenced. These data indicate that methylation of CpG residues conferred epigenetic memory in this system. These results also suggest that replication delay, lack of histone H3 and H4 acetylation, H3-K4 methylation, and enrichment in tri-methyl-H3-K9 are not sufficient to confer epigenetic memory. We propose that DNA methylation within transgenes serves as an intrinsic epigenetic memory to permanently silence transgenes and prevent their reactivation.

  12. Importance and challenges of measuring intrinsic foot muscle strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Intrinsic foot muscle weakness has been implicated in a range of foot deformities and disorders. However, to establish a relationship between intrinsic muscle weakness and foot pathology, an objective measure of intrinsic muscle strength is needed. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the anatomy and role of intrinsic foot muscles, implications of intrinsic weakness and evaluate the different methods used to measure intrinsic foot muscle strength. Method Literature was sourced from database searches of MEDLINE, PubMed, SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PEDro and CINAHL up to June 2012. Results There is no widely accepted method of measuring intrinsic foot muscle strength. Methods to estimate toe flexor muscle strength include the paper grip test, plantar pressure, toe dynamometry, and the intrinsic positive test. Hand-held dynamometry has excellent interrater and intrarater reliability and limits toe curling, which is an action hypothesised to activate extrinsic toe flexor muscles. However, it is unclear whether any method can actually isolate intrinsic muscle strength. Also most methods measure only toe flexor strength and other actions such as toe extension and abduction have not been adequately assessed. Indirect methods to investigate intrinsic muscle structure and performance include CT, ultrasonography, MRI, EMG, and muscle biopsy. Indirect methods often discriminate between intrinsic and extrinsic muscles, but lack the ability to measure muscle force. Conclusions There are many challenges to accurately measure intrinsic muscle strength in isolation. Most studies have measured toe flexor strength as a surrogate measure of intrinsic muscle strength. Hand-held dynamometry appears to be a promising method of estimating intrinsic muscle strength. However, the contribution of extrinsic muscles cannot be excluded from toe flexor strength measurement. Future research should clarify the relative contribution of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles

  13. "Coveting thy neighbour's legs": a qualitative study of exercisers' experiences of intrinsic and extrinsic goal pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebire, Simon J; Standage, Martyn; Gillison, Fiona B; Vansteenkiste, Maarten

    2013-06-01

    Goals are central to exercise motivation, although not all goals (e.g., health vs. appearance goals) are equally psychologically or behaviorally adaptive. Within goal content theory (Vansteenkiste, Niemiec, & Soenens, 2010), goals are adaptive to the extent to which they satisfy psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. However, little is known about what exercisers pursuing different goals are feeling, doing, thinking, and paying attention to that may help to explain the association between goal contents and need satisfaction. Using semistructured interviews and interpretative phenomenological analysis, we explored experiences of exercise among 11 adult exercisers who reported pursuing either predominantly intrinsic or extrinsic goals. Four themes emerged: (a) observation of others and resulting emotions, (b) goal expectations and time perspective, (c) markers of progress and (d) reactions to (lack of) goal achievement. Intrinsic and extrinsic goal pursuers reported divergent experiences within these four domains. The findings illuminate potential mechanisms by which different goals may influence psychological and behavioral outcomes in the exercise context.

  14. Evidence from intrinsic activity that asymmetry of the human brain is controlled by multiple factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hesheng; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Sepulcre, Jorge; Hedden, Trey; Buckner, Randy L

    2009-12-01

    Cerebral lateralization is a fundamental property of the human brain and a marker of successful development. Here we provide evidence that multiple mechanisms control asymmetry for distinct brain systems. Using intrinsic activity to measure asymmetry in 300 adults, we mapped the most strongly lateralized brain regions. Both men and women showed strong asymmetries with a significant, but small, group difference. Factor analysis on the asymmetric regions revealed 4 separate factors that each accounted for significant variation across subjects. The factors were associated with brain systems involved in vision, internal thought (the default network), attention, and language. An independent sample of right- and left-handed individuals showed that hand dominance affects brain asymmetry but differentially across the 4 factors supporting their independence. These findings show the feasibility of measuring brain asymmetry using intrinsic activity fluctuations and suggest that multiple genetic or environmental mechanisms control cerebral lateralization.

  15. Hypoxia precondition promotes adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells based repair of diabetic erectile dysfunction via augmenting angiogenesis and neuroprotection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XiYou Wang

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine whether hypoxia preconditioning could improve therapeutic effects of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs for diabetes induced erectile dysfunction (DED. AMSCs were pretreated with normoxia (20% O2, N-AMSCs or sub-lethal hypoxia (1% O2, H-AMSCs. The hypoxia exposure up-regulated the expression of several angiogenesis and neuroprotection related cytokines in AMSCs, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and its receptor FIK-1, angiotensin (Ang-1, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and its CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4. DED rats were induced via intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg and were randomly divided into three groups-Saline group: intracavernous injection with phosphate buffer saline; N-AMSCs group: N-AMSCs injection; H-AMSCs group: H-AMSCs injection. Ten rats without any treatment were used as normal control. Four weeks after injection, the mean arterial pressure (MAP and intracavernosal pressure (ICP were measured. The contents of endothelial, smooth muscle, dorsal nerve in cavernoursal tissue were assessed. Compared with N-AMSCs and saline, intracavernosum injection of H-AMSCs significantly raised ICP and ICP/MAP (p<0.05. Immunofluorescent staining analysis demonstrated that improved erectile function by MSCs was significantly associated with increased expression of endothelial markers (CD31 and vWF (p<0.01 and smooth muscle markers (α-SMA (p<0.01. Meanwhile, the expression of nNOS was also significantly higher in rats receiving H-AMSCs injection than those receiving N-AMSCs or saline injection. The results suggested that hypoxic preconditioning of MSCs was an effective approach to enhance their therapeutic effect for DED, which may be due to their augmented angiogenesis and neuroprotection.

  16. Lactate dehydrogenase 5 expression in Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is associated with the induced hypoxia regulated protein and poor prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renquan Lu

    Full Text Available Lactate dehydrogenase 5 (LDH-5 is one of the major isoenzymes catalyzing the biochemical process of pyruvate to lactate. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of serum LDH-5 and test whether this enzyme is regulated by tumor hypoxia and represents a prognostic marker in patients with Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL. In this study, LDH-5 levels were detected using agarose gel electrophoresis in NHL patients (n = 266 and non-NHL controls including benign lymphadenectasis (n = 30 and healthy cohorts (n = 233. We also explored the expression of LDH-5 and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF 1α in NHL and benign controls by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining, respectively. Moreover, the role of LDH-5 in the progression of NHL was assessed by multivariate Cox analyses and Kaplan-Meier survival estimates. Serum concentrations of LDH-5 were significantly higher in NHL patients (9.3% than in benign patients and healthy controls (7.5% and 7.2%, respectively, P<0.01. Application of LDH-5 detection increased the sensitivity of NHL detection, identifying 53.4% of NHL patients as positive, compared with the measurement of total LDH levels (36.5% sensitivity. LDH-5 concentrations increased with clinical stage, extra-nodal site involvement, and WHO performance status of patients with NHL. Exposure to a hypoxic environment induced the expression of LDH-5 and its overexpression correlated with HIF1α cytoplasmic accumulation in NHL cells. In multivariate analyses, LDH-5 was an independent marker for progression-free survival in patients with NHL (P<0.001. Overall, the expression of LDH-5 was elevated in NHL, showing an association with tumor hypoxia and unfavorable prognosis. Thus, LDH-5 emerges as a promising prognostic predictor for NHL patients.

  17. Positive consequences of intrinsically rewarding work: A model to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to empirically test a theoretical model outlining the relationships between intrinsic rewards, intrinsic motivation, work engagement and intention to quit, in an attempt to empirically assess whether intrinsic rewards result in improved levels of motivation, engagement and retention. Using a sample of 587 ...

  18. The value of nature: Economic, intrinsic, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been a long standing argument that ecosystems have intrinsic value and therefore there is no need to put a price tag on Mother Nature. The concept of intrinsic value reflects the perspective that nature has value in its own right, independent of human uses. Intrinsic va...

  19. Personalizing Sample Databases with Facebook Information to Increase Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, Asier; Ardaiz, Oscar; Sanz de Acedo, María Teresa; Sanz de Acedo, María Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Motivation is fundamental for students to achieve successful and complete learning. Motivation can be extrinsic, i.e., driven by external rewards, or intrinsic, i.e., driven by internal factors. Intrinsic motivation is the most effective and must be inspired by the task at hand. Here, a novel strategy is presented to increase intrinsic motivation…

  20. Intrinsic Motivation: An Overlooked Component for Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, Robert A.; Ables, Adrienne Z.; Guilford, Philip; Lujan, Heidi L.; Cortright, Ronald N.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsic motivation to learn involves engaging in learning opportunities because they are seen as enjoyable, interesting, or relevant to meeting one's core psychological needs. As a result, intrinsic motivation is associated with high levels of effort and task performance. Students with greater levels of intrinsic motivation demonstrate strong…

  1. The Development of Intrinsic Motivation for Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The Development of Intrinsic Motivation for Physical Activity by James Dunigan Beaty Bachelor of Science Central Washington...2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Development of Intrinsic Motivation for Physical Activity 5a. CONTRACT...Government." 3 ABSTRACT The Development of Intrinsic Motivation for Physical Activity by James Dunigan Beaty Cynthia Carruthers, Ph.D

  2. Elements of the Competitive Situation That Affect Intrinsic Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Johnmarshall; Deci, Edward L.

    1996-01-01

    Explores the effects of three elements of the competitive situation (competitive set, competitive outcome, and interpersonal context) on intrinsic motivation in a sample of college students (n=100). Competitive outcome and interpersonal context affected intrinsic motivation: winning increased intrinsic motivation, while pressured interpersonal…

  3. Hypoxia-induced tau phosphorylation and memory deficit in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chang-E; Yang, Xifei; Li, Lingyun; Sui, Xiaojing; Tian, Qing; Wei, Wei; Wang, Jianzhi; Liu, Gongping

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia was shown to be associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The effects of hypoxia on the development of AD pathology and spatial memory ability and the possible molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that rats exposed to a hypoxic condition (10% oxygen concentration) for 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks (6 h each day) displayed spatial memory impairment and increased tau phosphorylation at Ser198/199/202, Thr205, Ser262, Ser396 and Ser404 in the hippocampus. Concomitantly, the levels of Tyr216-phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β (activated form of GSK-3β) and Tyr307-phosphorylated protein phosphatase 2A (inactivated form of PP2A) were significantly increased in the hippocampus of the rats with 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks of hypoxia exposure, while the levels of methylated PP2A (activated form of PP2A) were significantly decreased in the hippocampus of the rats with 4 and 8 weeks of hypoxia exposure. In addition, the content of malondialdehyde, an indicator of oxidative stress, was elevated, whereas the activity of superoxide dismutase was not significantly changed in the hippocampus of the rats exposed to hypoxia. Taken together, these data demonstrated that hypoxia induced tau hyperphosphorylation and memory impairment in rats, and that the increased tau phosphorylation could be attributed to activation of GSK-3β and inactivation of PP2A. These data suggest that interventions to improve hypoxia may be helpful to prevent the development of AD pathology and cognitive impairment. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Brain adaptation to hypoxia and hyperoxia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terraneo, Laura; Paroni, Rita; Bianciardi, Paola; Giallongo, Toniella; Carelli, Stephana; Gorio, Alfredo; Samaja, Michele

    2017-04-01

    Hyperoxic breathing might lead to redox imbalance and signaling changes that affect cerebral function. Paradoxically, hypoxic breathing is also believed to cause oxidative stress. Our aim is to dissect the cerebral tissue responses to altered O 2 fractions in breathed air by assessing the redox imbalance and the recruitment of the hypoxia signaling pathways. Mice were exposed to mild hypoxia (10%O 2 ), normoxia (21%O 2 ) or mild hyperoxia (30%O 2 ) for 28 days, sacrificed and brain tissue excised and analyzed. Although one might expect linear responses to %O 2 , only few of the examined variables exhibited this pattern, including neuroprotective phospho- protein kinase B and the erythropoietin receptor. The major reactive oxygen species (ROS) source in brain, NADPH oxidase subunit 4 increased in hypoxia but not in hyperoxia, whereas neither affected nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, a transcription factor that regulates the expression of antioxidant proteins. As a result of the delicate equilibrium between ROS generation and antioxidant defense, neuron apoptosis and cerebral tissue hydroperoxides increased in both 10%O 2 and 30%O 2 , as compared with 21%O 2 . Remarkably, the expression level of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α (but not HIF-1α) was higher in both 10%O 2 and 30%O 2 with respect to 21%O 2 INNOVATION: Comparing the in vivo effects driven by mild hypoxia with those driven by mild hyperoxia helps addressing whether clinically relevant situations of O 2 excess and scarcity are toxic for the organism. Prolonged mild hyperoxia leads to persistent cerebral damage, comparable to that inferred by prolonged mild hypoxia. The underlying mechanism appears related to a model whereby the imbalance between ROS generation and anti-ROS defense is similar, but occurs at higher levels in hypoxia than in hyperoxia. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Relationship of hypoxia to metallothionein expression in murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raleigh, James A.; Chou, S.-C.; Tables, Lakesha; Suchindran, Sunil; Varia, Mahesh A.; Horsman, Michael R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate if metallothionein, an endogenous chemo- and radioprotectant, is expressed in hypoxic cells in mouse C3H mammary carcinomas and if that expression responds to acute changes in tumor hypoxia. Methods and Materials: C3H mammary tumors were established in the hind legs of female CDF 1 mice. The mice were then subjected to air breathing (chronic hypoxia), carbogen breathing (acute decrease in hypoxia), or hydralazine injection (acute increase in hypoxia). Ninety minutes after the start of the experiment, tumors were excised, fixed in formalin, and sectioned. Hypoxic cells and metallothionein-containing cells were quantitated by image analysis. Pimonidazole hydrochloride and an IgG 1 mouse monoclonal antibody were used to detect hypoxia, and a mouse antimetallothionein monoclonal antibody (DAKO) was used to detect Type I and II metallothionein in sets of contiguous tissue sections. Results: The distribution of immunostaining intensity for metallothionein was the same in all three groups--heavy in hypoxic cells and light in other regions of the tumors. The acute increase in hypoxia caused by hydralazine injection was accompanied by an increase in metallothionein expression (p = 0.04). Carbogen breathing largely eliminated pimonidazole binding, but metallothionein expression persisted in the tumors of carbogen-breathing mice. Conclusions: Hypoxic cells in C3H mammary carcinomas strongly express metallothionein. Metallothionein expression is responsive to acute increases in hypoxia brought about by hydralazine injection. The effectiveness of hydralazine in enhancing the activation of bioreductive cytotoxins might be offset by the increased expression of metallothionein. The persistence of metallothionein in tumors of carbogen-breathing mice might contribute to a residual radioresistance in the tumors

  7. Nutritional status in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: role of hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguso, Comasia A; Luthy, Christophe

    2011-02-01

    In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), malnutrition and limited physical activity are very common and contribute to disease prognosis, whereas a balance between caloric intake and exercise allows body weight stability and muscle mass preservation. The goal of this review is to analyze the implications of chronic hypoxia on three key elements involved in energy homeostasis and its role in COPD cachexia. The first one is energy intake. Body weight loss, often observed in patients with COPD, is related to lack of appetite. Inflammatory cytokines are known to be involved in anorexia and to be correlated to arterial partial pressure of oxygen. Recent studies in animals have investigated the role of hypoxia in peptides involved in food consumption such as leptin, ghrelin, and adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase. The second element is muscle function, which is strongly related to energy use. In COPD, muscle atrophy and muscle fiber shift to the glycolytic type might be an adaptation to chronic hypoxia to preserve the muscle from oxidative stress. Muscle atrophy could be the result of a marked activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway as found in muscle of patients with COPD. Hypoxia, via hypoxia inducible factor-1, is implicated in mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy. Third, hormonal control of energy balance seems to be affected in patients with COPD. Insulin resistance has been described in this group of patients as well as a sort of "growth hormone resistance." Hypoxia, by hypoxia inducible factor-1, accelerates the degradation of tri-iodothyronine and thyroxine, decreasing cellular oxygen consumption, suggesting an adaptive mechanism rather than a primary cause of COPD cachexia. COPD rehabilitation aimed at maintaining function and quality of life needs to address body weight stabilization and, in particular, muscle mass preservation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypoxia Adjacent to the Mississippi River Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabalais, N. N.; Turner, R. E.

    2005-05-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico receives the freshwater and constituent flux from the Mississippi River, which integrates 40% of the lower 48 United States. In the last half of the 20th century, the flux of nitrogen tripled, phosphorus concentration appears to have increased, and silicate concentration decreased. These changes result from landscape alterations over two centuries with an intensification of human activities that increased the flux of nitrogen and phosphorus particularly in the 1960s to 1980s. Evidence for eutrophication in the coastal ecosystem includes an increase in algal biomass, carbon accumulation from nutrient-enhanced production, worsening oxygen deficiency in the lower water column, and shifts in food web structure. The extent of the oxygen deficiency reaches 20,000 km2 of the inner continental shelf over long periods in summer with the potential for affecting commercially important fisheries in the Gulf. There is daily, weekly and seasonal variability in currents and stratification on the shelf and, therefore, no simple description of the couplings between nutrient delivery, carbon production in surface waters and delivery to and cycling in bottom waters. There are, however, multiple lines of evidence to implicate changes in riverine nutrient loads with overall primary and secondary production, carbon accumulation at the seabed, and low oxygen conditions on the shelf. The change in nutrient loads and responses of the northern Gulf coastal ecosystem, including widespread, severe seasonal hypoxia, parallel similar conditions in the coastal ocean on a global scale.

  9. Innate and intrinsic antiviral immunity in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Tatsuyoshi; Ogawa, Youichi; Aoki, Rui; Shimada, Shinji

    2014-09-01

    As the body's most exposed interface with the environment, the skin is constantly challenged by potentially pathogenic microbes, including viruses. To sense the invading viruses, various types of cells resident in the skin express many different pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) such as C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) and cytosolic DNA sensors, that can detect the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) of the viruses. The detection of viral PAMPs initiates two major innate immune signaling cascades: the first involves the activation of the downstream transcription factors, such as interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein 1 (AP-1), which cooperate to induce the transcription of type I interferons and pro-inflammatory cytokines. The second signaling pathway involves the caspase-1-mediated processing of IL-1β and IL-18 through the formation of an inflammasome complex. Cutaneous innate immunity including the production of the innate cytokines constitutes the first line of host defence that limits the virus dissemination from the skin, and also plays an important role in the activation of adaptive immune response, which represents the second line of defence. More recently, the third immunity "intrinsic immunity" has emerged, that provides an immediate and direct antiviral defense mediated by host intrinsic restriction factors. This review focuses on the recent advances regarding the antiviral immune systems, highlighting the innate and intrinsic immunity against the viral infections in the skin, and describes how viral components are recognized by cutaneous immune systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by modulation of E-cadherin and β-catenin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Rui; Huang, Chen; Bi, Qian; Zhai, Ying; Xia, Lin; Liu, Jie; Sun, Shiren; Fan, Daiming

    2010-01-01

    Upregulated gene 11 (URG11), recently identified as a new HBx-upregulated gene that may activate β-catenin and Wnt signaling, was found to be upregulated in a human tubule cell line under low oxygen. Here, we investigated the potential role of URG11 in hypoxia-induced renal tubular epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT). Overexpression of URG11 in a human proximal tubule cell line (HK2) promoted a mesenchymal phenotype accompanied by reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased expression of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and α-SMA, while URG11 knockdown by siRNA effectively reversed hypoxia-induced EMT. URG11 promoted the expression of β-catenin and increased its nuclear accumulation under normoxic conditions through transactivation of the β-catenin promoter. This in turn upregulated β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) and its downstream effector genes, vimentin, and α-SMA. In vivo, strong expression of URG11 was observed in the tubular epithelia of 5/6-nephrectomized rats, and a Western blot analysis demonstrated a close correlation between HIF-1α and URG11 protein levels. Altogether, our results indicate that URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced EMT through the suppression of E-cadherin and the activation of the β-catenin/TCF pathway.

  11. Metacognitive mastery and intrinsic motivation in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohs, Jenifer L; Lysaker, Paul H

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in intrinsic motivation (IM) have been linked to poorer outcome in schizophrenia, but its proximal mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study examined whether metacognitive mastery, or the capacity to use knowledge of self, others, and context to identify and cope with psychological difficulties, predicted levels of IM for 6 months among 75 participants with prolonged schizophrenia. Repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed that high metacognitive mastery predicted consistently higher levels of IM; however, intermediate and low mastery did not produce unique IM profiles. The findings suggest that metacognitive mastery may have an important role in IM over time and could be a meaningful treatment target.

  12. Symplectic Structure of Intrinsic Time Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyo Eyo Ita

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Poisson structure of intrinsic time gravity is analysed. With the starting point comprising a unimodular three-metric with traceless momentum, a trace-induced anomaly results upon quantization. This leads to a revision of the choice of momentum variable to the (mixed index traceless momentric. This latter choice unitarily implements the fundamental commutation relations, which now take on the form of an affine algebra with SU(3 Lie algebra amongst the momentric variables. The resulting relations unitarily implement tracelessness upon quantization. The associated Poisson brackets and Hamiltonian dynamics are studied.

  13. Intrinsically conductive polymer thin film piezoresistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillemose, Michael; Spieser, Martin; Christiansen, N.O.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the piezoresistive effect in the intrinsically conductive polymer, polyaniline. A process recipe for indirect patterning of thin film polyaniline has been developed. Using a specially designed chip, the polyaniline thin films have been characterised with respect to resistivity...... and strain sensitivity using two- and four-point measurement method. We have found that polyaniline has a negative gauge factor of K = -4.9, which makes it a candidate for piezoresistive read-out in polymer based MEMS-devices. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  14. Intrinsic chirp of single-cycle pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Qiang; Zheng Jian; Dai Jianming; Ho, I-Chen; Zhang, X.-C.

    2010-01-01

    The Fourier transform-limited electromagnetic pulse has been regarded to be free of chirps for a long time. This is no longer true if the pulse duration goes down to or less than one optical cycle. We report the experimental observation of intrinsic chirps in such pulses with the sub-single-cycle terahertz (THz) waveforms obtained with a standard THz time-domain spectroscopy system. The results confirm the break down of the carrier-envelope (CE) expression for single-cycle optical pulses, and may influence the experimental measurements and theoretical modeling with single-cycle pulses.

  15. (DArT) markers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    age groups of both maternal and paternal maps. The segre- gating markers were classified into two classes; for DArT class 1 consensus marker the selection criterion were of very high stringency parameters with clustering settings; Q >. 70; P > 75; call rate > 90, 100% reproducibility, no dis- cordance, and probability > 0.001 ...

  16. Radiopaque anastomosis marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, D.P.; Halseth, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to split ring markers fabricated in whole or in part from a radiopaque material, usually metal, having the terminal ends thereof and a medial portion formed to define eyelets by means of which said marker can be sutured to the tissue at the site of an anastomosis to provide a visual indication of its location when examined fluoroscopically

  17. Modulation of radioprotective effects of respiratory hypoxia by changing the duration of hypoxia before irradiation and by combining hypoxia and administration of hemopoiesis-stimulating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, A.; Hofer, M.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: Analysis of radioprotective effect of respiratory hypoxia on hemopoietic tissue and enhancement of this effect by hemopoietic activation. Material and methods: In mice breathing hypoxic gas mixture during total body gamma irradiation the recovery of pluripotent and committed granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells and animal lethality were determined. Results: In mice forced to breathe 10% O 2 and 8% O 2 during irradiation, the oxygen tension in the spleen decreased to 40% and 20%, respectively, of control values. Hypoxia mitigated the lethal effect of gamma-rays and improved the recovery of hemopoiesis in compartments of pluripotent and committed progenitor cells. Enhancement of the proliferative activity in hemopoietic tissue by a cytokine (rmGM-CSF) or an immunomodulator (dextran sulfate) increased the effect of hypoxic radioprotection, while elimination of proliferative cells by hydroxyurea decreased the radioprotective effect. Adaptation of experimental animals to hypoxic conditions was found to reduce the radioprotective effect without influencing tissue partial oxygen pressure lowered by hypoxic conditions. Conclusion: The data presented confirm the radioprotective effect of 10% and 8% O 2 respiratory hypoxia on hemopoiesis. These findings may represent a way out for further experimental and clinical research aimed at considering differential protection of various tissues by hypoxia. (orig.) [de

  18. Hypoxia Stress Modifies Na+/K+-ATPase, H+/K+-ATPase, [Formula: see text], and nkaα1 Isoform Expression in the Brain of Immune-Challenged Air-Breathing Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Mc Subhash; Simi, Satheesan

    2017-01-01

    Fishes are equipped to sense stressful stimuli and are able to respond to environmental stressor such as hypoxia with varying pattern of stress response. The functional attributes of brain to hypoxia stress in relation to ion transport and its interaction during immune challenge have not yet delineated in fish. We, therefore, explored the pattern of ion transporter functions and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of α1-subunit isoforms of Na + /K + -ATPase (NKA) in the brain segments, namely, prosencephalon (PC), mesencephalon (MC), and metencephalon (MeC) in an obligate air-breathing fish exposed either to hypoxia stress (30 minutes forced immersion in water) or challenged with zymosan treatment (25-200 ng g -1 for 24 hours) or both. Zymosan that produced nonspecific immune responses evoked differential regulation of NKA, H + /K + -ATPase (HKA), and [Formula: see text] (NNA) in the varied brain segments. On the contrary, hypoxia stress that demanded activation of NKA in PC and MeC showed a reversed NKA activity pattern in MeC of immune-challenged fish. A compromised HKA and NNA regulation during hypoxia stress was found in immune-challenged fish, indicating the role of these brain ion transporters to hypoxia stress and immune challenges. The differential mRNA expression of α1-subunit isoforms of NKA, nkaα1a , nkaα1b , and nkaα1c , in hypoxia-stressed brain showed a shift in its expression pattern during hypoxia stress-immune interaction in PC and MC. Evidence is thus presented for the first time that ion transporters such as HKA and NNA along with NKA act as functional brain markers which respond differentially to both hypoxia stress and immune challenges. Taken together, the data further provide evidence for a differential Na + , K + , H + , and [Formula: see text] ion signaling that exists in brain neuronal clusters during hypoxia stress-immune interaction as a result of modified regulations of NKA, HKA, and NNA transporter functions and nkaα1 isoform

  19. The Linkage between Breast Cancer, Hypoxia, and Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda K. Rausch

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe development of breast cancer cells is linked to hypoxia. The hypoxia-induced factor HIF-1α influences metastasis through neovascularization. Hypoxia seems to decrease the responsiveness to hormonal treatment due to loss of estrogen receptors (ERs. Obesity is discussed to increase hypoxia in adipocytes, which promotes a favorable environment for tumor cells in mammary fat tissue, whereas, tumor cells profit from good oxygen supply and are influenced by its deprivation as target regions within tumors show. This review gives an overview of the current state on research of hypoxia and breast cancer in human adipose tissue.MethodsA systematic literature search was conducted on PubMed (2000–2016 by applying hypoxia and/or adipocytes and breast cancer as keywords. Review articles were excluded as well as languages other than English or German. There was no restriction regarding the study design or type of breast cancer. A total of 35 papers were found. Eight studies were excluded due to missing at least two of the three keywords. One paper was removed due to Russian language, and one was dismissed due to lack of adherence. Seven papers were identified as reviews. After applying exclusion criteria, 18 articles were eligible for inclusion.ResultsTwo articles describe the impairment of mammary epithelial cell polarization through hypoxic preconditioning. A high amount of adipocytes enhances cancer progression due to the increased expression of HIF-1α which causes the loss of ER α protein as stated in four articles. Four articles analyzed that increased activation of HIF’s induces a series of transcriptions resulting in tumor angiogenesis. HIF inhibition, especially when combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy, holds strong potential for tumor suppression as stated in further four articles. In two articles there is evidence of a strong connection between hypoxia, oxidative stress and a poor prognosis for breast cancer via HIF regulated

  20. Hypoxia-induced force increase (HIFI) is a novel mechanism underlying the strengthening of labor contractions, produced by hypoxic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed; Arrowsmith, Sarah; Wray, Susan

    2015-08-04

    For successful birth, contractions need to become progressively stronger. The underlying mechanisms are unknown, however. We have found that a novel mechanism, hypoxia-induced force increase (HIFI), is switched on selectively, at term, and is essential to strengthening contractions. HIFI is initiated as contractions cyclically reduce blood flow and produce repeated hypoxic stresses, with associated metabolic and transcriptomic changes. The increases in contractility are a long-lasting, oxytocin-independent, intrinsic mechanism present only in the full-term pregnant uterus. HIFI is inhibited by adenosine receptor antagonism and blockade of cyclooxygenase-2 signaling, and partially reproduced by brief episodes of acidic (but not alkalotic) pH. HIFI explains how labor can progress despite paradoxical metabolic challenge, and provides a new mechanistic target for the 1 in 10 women suffering dysfunctional labor because of poor contractions.

  1. Hypoxia upregulates neutrophil degranulation and potential for tissue injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenderdos, Kim; Lodge, Katharine M; Hirst, Robert A; Chen, Cheng; Palazzo, Stefano G C; Emerenciana, Annette; Summers, Charlotte; Angyal, Adri; Porter, Linsey; Juss, Jatinder K; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Chilvers, Edwin R

    2016-01-01

    Background The inflamed bronchial mucosal surface is a profoundly hypoxic environment. Neutrophilic airway inflammation and neutrophil-derived proteases have been linked to disease progression in conditions such as COPD and cystic fibrosis, but the effects of hypoxia on potentially harmful neutrophil functional responses such as degranulation are unknown. Methods and results Following exposure to hypoxia (0.8% oxygen, 3 kPa for 4 h), neutrophils stimulated with inflammatory agonists (granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor or platelet-activating factor and formylated peptide) displayed a markedly augmented (twofold to sixfold) release of azurophilic (neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase), specific (lactoferrin) and gelatinase (matrix metalloproteinase-9) granule contents. Neutrophil supernatants derived under hypoxic but not normoxic conditions induced extensive airway epithelial cell detachment and death, which was prevented by coincubation with the antiprotease α-1 antitrypsin; both normoxic and hypoxic supernatants impaired ciliary function. Surprisingly, the hypoxic upregulation of neutrophil degranulation was not dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), nor was it fully reversed by inhibition of phospholipase C signalling. Hypoxia augmented the resting and cytokine-stimulated phosphorylation of AKT, and inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)γ (but not other PI3K isoforms) prevented the hypoxic upregulation of neutrophil elastase release. Conclusion Hypoxia augments neutrophil degranulation and confers enhanced potential for damage to respiratory airway epithelial cells in a HIF-independent but PI3Kγ-dependent fashion. PMID:27581620

  2. Structural and functional analysis of coral Hypoxia Inducible Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccola, Didier; Morain, Jonas; Pagès, Gilles; Caminiti-Segonds, Natacha; Giuliano, Sandy; Tambutté, Sylvie; Allemand, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Tissues of symbiotic Cnidarians are exposed to wide, rapid and daily variations of oxygen concentration. Indeed, during daytime, intracellular O2 concentration increases due to symbiont photosynthesis, while during night, respiration of both host cells and symbionts leads to intra-tissue hypoxia. The Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimeric transcription factor used for maintenance of oxygen homeostasis and adaptation to hypoxia. Here, we carried out a mechanistic study of the response to variations of O2 concentrations of the coral model Stylophora pistillata. In silico analysis showed that homologs of HIF-1 α (SpiHIF-1α) and HIF-1β (SpiHIF-1β) exist in coral. A specific SpiHIF-1 DNA binding on mammalian Hypoxia Response Element (HRE) sequences was shown in extracts from coral exposed to dark conditions. Then, we cloned the coral HIF-1α and β genes and determined their expression and transcriptional activity. Although HIF-1α has an incomplete Oxygen-dependent Degradation Domain (ODD) relative to its human homolog, its protein level is increased under hypoxia when tested in mammalian cells. Moreover, co-transfection of SpiHIF-1α and β in mammalian cells stimulated an artificial promoter containing HRE only in hypoxic conditions. This study shows the strong conservation of molecular mechanisms involved in adaptation to O2 concentration between Cnidarians and Mammals whose ancestors diverged about 1,200-1,500 million years ago.

  3. Intermittent hypoxia induces functional recovery following cervical spinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinit, Stéphane; Lovett-Barr, Mary Rachael; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2009-11-30

    Respiratory-related complications are the leading cause of death in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Few effective SCI treatments are available after therapeutic interventions are performed in the period shortly after injury (e.g. spine stabilization and prevention of further spinal damage). In this review we explore the capacity to harness endogenous spinal plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia to optimize function of surviving (spared) neural pathways associated with breathing. Two primary questions are addressed: (1) does intermittent hypoxia induce plasticity in spinal synaptic pathways to respiratory motor neurons following experimental SCI? and (2) can this plasticity improve respiratory function? In normal rats, intermittent hypoxia induces serotonin-dependent plasticity in spinal pathways to respiratory motor neurons. Early experiments suggest that intermittent hypoxia also enhances respiratory motor output in experimental models of cervical SCI (cervical hemisection) and that the capacity to induce functional recovery is greater with longer durations post-injury. Available evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia-induced spinal plasticity has considerable therapeutic potential to treat respiratory insufficiency following chronic cervical spinal injury.

  4. A genetically encoded biosensor for visualising hypoxia responses in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tvisha Misra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cells experience different oxygen concentrations depending on location, organismal developmental stage, and physiological or pathological conditions. Responses to reduced oxygen levels (hypoxia rely on the conserved hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1. Understanding the developmental and tissue-specific responses to changing oxygen levels has been limited by the lack of adequate tools for monitoring HIF-1 in vivo. To visualise and analyse HIF-1 dynamics in Drosophila, we used a hypoxia biosensor consisting of GFP fused to the oxygen-dependent degradation domain (ODD of the HIF-1 homologue Sima. GFP-ODD responds to changing oxygen levels and to genetic manipulations of the hypoxia pathway, reflecting oxygen-dependent regulation of HIF-1 at the single-cell level. Ratiometric imaging of GFP-ODD and a red-fluorescent reference protein reveals tissue-specific differences in the cellular hypoxic status at ambient normoxia. Strikingly, cells in the larval brain show distinct hypoxic states that correlate with the distribution and relative densities of respiratory tubes. We present a set of genetic and image analysis tools that enable new approaches to map hypoxic microenvironments, to probe effects of perturbations on hypoxic signalling, and to identify new regulators of the hypoxia response.

  5. Role of the AMPKgamma3 isoform in hypoxia-stimulated glucose transport in glycolytic skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul S; Glund, Stephan; Tom, Robby Z

    2009-01-01

    in hypoxia-mediated energy status signaling and glucose transport in fast-twitch glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle from AMPKgamma3-knockout (KO) mice and wild-type mice. Although hypoxia increased glucose transport (P

  6. Lutein Attenuates Both Apoptosis and Autophagy upon Cobalt (II) Chloride-Induced Hypoxia in Rat Műller Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Frederic K C; Law, Betty Y K; Lo, Amy C Y

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury is a common feature of various retinal diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. Lutein, a potent anti-oxidant, is used to improve visual function in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Lutein attenuates apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in animal models of acute retinal ischemia/hypoxia. Here, we further show that lutein improved Műller cell viability and enhanced cell survival upon hypoxia-induced cell death through regulation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Moreover, autophagy was activated upon treatment of cobalt (II) chloride, indicating that hypoxic injury not only triggered apoptosis but also autophagy in our in vitro model. Most importantly, we report for the first time that lutein treatment suppressed autophagosome formation after hypoxic insult and lutein administration could inhibit autophagic event after activation of autophagy by a pharmacological approach (rapamycin). Taken together, lutein may have a beneficial role in enhancing glial cell survival after hypoxic injury through regulating both apoptosis and autophagy.

  7. The Neglected Intrinsic Resistome of Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Alicia; Martínez-Martín, Nadia; Mercadillo, María; Galán, Juan C.; Ghysels, Bart; Matthijs, Sandra; Cornelis, Pierre; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard; Baquero, Fernando; Martínez, José L.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria with intrinsic resistance to antibiotics are a worrisome health problem. It is widely believed that intrinsic antibiotic resistance of bacterial pathogens is mainly the consequence of cellular impermeability and activity of efflux pumps. However, the analysis of transposon-tagged Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants presented in this article shows that this phenotype emerges from the action of numerous proteins from all functional categories. Mutations in some genes make P. aeruginosa more susceptible to antibiotics and thereby represent new targets. Mutations in other genes make P. aeruginosa more resistant and therefore define novel mechanisms for mutation-driven acquisition of antibiotic resistance, opening a new research field based in the prediction of resistance before it emerges in clinical environments. Antibiotics are not just weapons against bacterial competitors, but also natural signalling molecules. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes are not merely protective shields and offer a more comprehensive view of the role of antibiotic resistance genes in the clinic and in nature. PMID:18286176

  8. A tonoplast intrinsic protein in Gardenia jasminoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lan; Li, Hao-Ming

    2017-08-01

    Physiological and molecular studies proved that plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) and tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) subfamily of aquaporins play key functions in plant water homeostasis. Five specialized subgroups (TIP1-5) of TIPs have been found in higher plants, in which the TIP1 and TIP2 isoforms are the largest arbitrary groups. TIPs have high water-transport activity than PIPs, some TIPs can transport other small molecule such as urea, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, and carbon dioxide. In this work, the structure of the putative tonoplast aquaporin from Gardenia jasminoides (GjTIP) was analyzed. Its transcript level has increased during fruit maturation. A phylogenetic analysis indicates that the protein belongs to TIP1 subfamily. A three-dimensional model structure of GjTIP was built based on crystal structure of an ammonia-permeable AtTIP2-1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. The model structure displayed as a homo-tetramer, each monomer has six trans-membrane and two half-membrane-spanning α helices. The data suggests that the GjTIP has tendency to be a mixed function aquaporin, might involve in water, urea and hydrogen peroxide transport, and the gating machanism founded in some AQPs involving pH and phosphorylation response have not been proved in GjTIP.

  9. Intrinsic regulation of enteroendocrine fate by Numb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallé, Jérémy; Gervais, Louis; Boumard, Benjamin; Stefanutti, Marine; Siudeja, Katarzyna; Bardin, Allison J

    2017-07-03

    How terminal cell fates are specified in dynamically renewing adult tissues is not well understood. Here we explore terminal cell fate establishment during homeostasis using the enteroendocrine cells (EEs) of the adult Drosophila midgut as a paradigm. Our data argue against the existence of local feedback signals, and we identify Numb as an intrinsic regulator of EE fate. Our data further indicate that Numb, with alpha-adaptin, acts upstream or in parallel of known regulators of EE fate to limit Notch signaling, thereby facilitating EE fate acquisition. We find that Numb is regulated in part through its asymmetric and symmetric distribution during stem cell divisions; however, its de novo synthesis is also required during the differentiation of the EE cell. Thus, this work identifies Numb as a crucial factor for cell fate choice in the adult Drosophila intestine. Furthermore, our findings demonstrate that cell-intrinsic control mechanisms of terminal cell fate acquisition can result in a balanced tissue-wide production of terminally differentiated cell types. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. Intrinsic position uncertainty impairs overt search performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semizer, Yelda; Michel, Melchi M

    2017-08-01

    Uncertainty regarding the position of the search target is a fundamental component of visual search. However, due to perceptual limitations of the human visual system, this uncertainty can arise from intrinsic, as well as extrinsic, sources. The current study sought to characterize the role of intrinsic position uncertainty (IPU) in overt visual search and to determine whether it significantly limits human search performance. After completing a preliminary detection experiment to characterize sensitivity as a function of visual field position, observers completed a search task that required localizing a Gabor target within a field of synthetic luminance noise. The search experiment included two clutter conditions designed to modulate the effect of IPU across search displays of varying set size. In the Cluttered condition, the display was tiled uniformly with feature clutter to maximize the effects of IPU. In the Uncluttered condition, the clutter at irrelevant locations was removed to attenuate the effects of IPU. Finally, we derived an IPU-constrained ideal searcher model, limited by the IPU measured in human observers. Ideal searchers were simulated based on the detection sensitivity and fixation sequences measured for individual human observers. The IPU-constrained ideal searcher predicted performance trends similar to those exhibited by the human observers. In the Uncluttered condition, performance decreased steeply as a function of increasing set size. However, in the Cluttered condition, the effect of IPU dominated and performance was approximately constant as a function of set size. Our findings suggest that IPU substantially limits overt search performance, especially in crowded displays.

  11. The neglected intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Fajardo

    Full Text Available Bacteria with intrinsic resistance to antibiotics are a worrisome health problem. It is widely believed that intrinsic antibiotic resistance of bacterial pathogens is mainly the consequence of cellular impermeability and activity of efflux pumps. However, the analysis of transposon-tagged Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants presented in this article shows that this phenotype emerges from the action of numerous proteins from all functional categories. Mutations in some genes make P. aeruginosa more susceptible to antibiotics and thereby represent new targets. Mutations in other genes make P. aeruginosa more resistant and therefore define novel mechanisms for mutation-driven acquisition of antibiotic resistance, opening a new research field based in the prediction of resistance before it emerges in clinical environments. Antibiotics are not just weapons against bacterial competitors, but also natural signalling molecules. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes are not merely protective shields and offer a more comprehensive view of the role of antibiotic resistance genes in the clinic and in nature.

  12. Intrinsic terminators in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Tiago Ebert; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2015-04-08

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, an important pathogen of swine, exhibits a low guanine and cytosine (GC) content genome. M. hyopneumoniae genome is organised in long transcriptional units and promoter sequences have been mapped upstream of all transcription units. These analysis provided insights into the gene organisation and transcription initiation at the genome scale. However, the presence of transcriptional terminator sequences in the M. hyopneumoniae genome is poorly understood. In silico analyses demonstrated the presence of putative terminators in 82% of the 33 monocistronic units (mCs) and in 74% of the 116 polycistronic units (pCs) considering different classes of terminators. The functional activity of 23 intrinsic terminators was confirmed by RT-PCR and qPCR. Analysis of all terminators found by three software algorithms, combined with experimental results, allowed us to propose a pattern of RNA hairpin formation during the termination process and to predict the location of terminators in the M. hyopneumoniae genome sequence. The stem-loop structures of intrinsic terminators of mycoplasma diverge from the pattern of terminators found in other bacteria due the low content of guanine and cytosine. In M. hyopneumoniae, transcription can end after a transcriptional unit and before its terminator sequence and can also continue past the terminator sequence with RNA polymerases gradually releasing the RNA.

  13. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, David J; Houser, Justin R; Hayden, Carl C; Sherman, Michael B; Lafer, Eileen M; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2015-07-24

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures.

  14. Intrinsically secure fast reactors with dense cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slessarev, Igor

    2007-01-01

    Secure safety, resistance to weapons material proliferation and problems of long-lived wastes remain the most important 'painful points' of nuclear power. Many innovative reactor concepts have been developed aimed at a radical enhancement of safety. The promising potential of innovative nuclear reactors allows for shifting accents in current reactor safety 'strategy' to reveal this worth. Such strategy is elaborated focusing on the priority for intrinsically secure safety features as well as on sure protection being provided by the first barrier of defence. Concerning the potential of fast reactors (i.e. sodium cooled, lead-cooled, etc.), there are no doubts that they are able to possess many favourable intrinsically secure safety features and to lay the proper foundation for a new reactor generation. However, some of their neutronic characteristics have to be radically improved. Among intrinsically secure safety properties, the following core parameters are significantly important: reactivity margin values, reactivity feed-back and coolant void effects. Ways of designing intrinsically secure safety features in fast reactors (titled hereafter as Intrinsically Secure Fast Reactors - ISFR) can be found in the frame of current reactor technologies by radical enhancement of core neutron economy and by optimization of core compositions. Simultaneously, respecting resistance to proliferation, by using non-enriched fuel feed as well as a core breeding gain close to zero, are considered as the important features (long-lived waste problems will be considered in a separate paper). This implies using the following reactor design options as well as closed fuel cycles with natural U as the reactor feed: ·Ultra-plate 'dense cores' of the ordinary (monolithic) type with negative total coolant void effects. ·Modular type cores. Multiple dense modules can be embedded in the common reflector for achieving the desired NPP total power. The modules can be used also independently (as

  15. The Neuroscience of Growth Mindset and Intrinsic Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Betsy

    2018-01-26

    Our actions can be triggered by intentions, incentives or intrinsic values. Recent neuroscientific research has yielded some results about the growth mindset and intrinsic motivation. With the advances in neuroscience and motivational studies, there is a global need to utilize this information to inform educational practice and research. Yet, little is known about the neuroscientific interplay between growth mindset and intrinsic motivation. This paper attempts to draw on the theories of growth mindset and intrinsic motivation, together with contemporary ideas in neuroscience, outline the potential for neuroscientific research in education. It aims to shed light on the relationship between growth mindset and intrinsic motivation in terms of supporting a growth mindset to facilitate intrinsic motivation through neural responses. Recent empirical research from the educational neuroscience perspective that provides insights into the interplay between growth mindset and intrinsic motivation will also be discussed.

  16. Effect of transplants of retinal pigment epithelial cells from adult human eye on degenerative processes in the brain of rats with experimental acute hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, M A; Kuznetsova, A V; Verdiev, B I; Milyushina-Rzhanova, L A; Sukhinich, K K

    2014-05-01

    Stimulation of cell regeneration in the brain and eye retina in various degenerative processes is a pressing problem in neurobiology. A promising approach is transplantation of somatic cells reprogrammed towards neural lineage. We studied the effect of transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells from adult human eye transdifferentiated in culture on degenerative processes in the brain of rats subjected to acute hypoxia. Immunohistochemical and molecular genetic analysis suggests that retinal pigment epithelial cells transdifferentiate in vitro and express markers of low-differentiated neural cells. The cells transplanted into rat brain survive for at least 20 days. During this period, they stimulate compensatory and reparative processes that protected cortical neurons in the recipients from hypoxia-induced degeneration.