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Sample records for intravenous tissue plasminogen

  1. Basilar Artery Thrombosis in a Child Treated With Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator and Endovascular Mechanical Thrombectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsøe, Jakob Fink; Sonnenborg, Laura; Larsen, Line Lunde

    2013-01-01

    Basilar artery occlusion in children is rare. It has a high mortality and morbidity if recanalization is not achieved before extensive brainstem infarction has occurred. An 11-year-old boy presented with a clinical and radiological "top-of-the-basilar" syndrome. Intravenous tissue plasminogen...

  2. Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysm Detected after Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Yoneda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic guidelines of intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA for hyperacute ischemic stroke are very strict. Because of potential higher risk of bleeding complications, the presence of unruptured cerebral aneurysm is a contraindication for systemic thrombolysis with tPA. According to the standard CT criteria, a 66-year-old woman who suddenly developed aphasia and hemiparesis received intravenous tPA within 3 h after ischemic stroke. Magnetic resonance angiography during tPA infusion was performed and the presence of a small unruptured cerebral aneurysm was suspected at the anterior communicating artery. Delayed cerebral angiography confirmed an aneurysm with a size of 7 mm. The patient did not experience any adverse complications associated with the aneurysm. Clinical experiences of this kind of accidental off-label thrombolysis may contribute to modify the current rigid tPA guidelines for stroke.

  3. Factors predicting intracerebral hemorrhage of patients treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Yoichiro; Torihashi, Kouichi; Sadamasa, Nobutake; Narumi, Osamu; Chin, Masaki; Yamagata, Sen; Yoshida, Kazumichi

    2010-01-01

    The use of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) was approved in Japan in October 2005, and has had a marked effect on the treatment of patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke. Since the administration of rt-PA might cause intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and a poor prognosis, it is necessary to identify predictors of ICH after treatment with rt-PA. In this article, we examined 58 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous rt-PA within 3 hours of symptom onset for 45 months, March 2006 to November 2009. In principle, we evaluated patients before and one day after rt-PA with MRI. We made a retrospective comparison of 21 patients with hemorrhagic change on CT and MRI T2* within 36 hours and 37 patients without hemorrhagic change. The rate of ICH with or without symptoms was increased with a higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and infarction range, defined by diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) Alberta Stroke Programme Early CT Score (ASPECTS). Major artery occlusion and reperfusion, including partial recanalization in MR angiography (MRA), were taken as factors in the hemorrhage group. In conclusion, DWI ASPECTS and NIHSS were useful predictors of ICH after rt-PA administration. (author)

  4. Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator Can Be Safely Given without Complete Blood Count Results Back.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Dong

    Full Text Available It is well known that the efficacy of intravenous (i.v. tissue plasminogen activator (tPA is time-dependent when used to treat patients with acute ischemic strokes.Our study examines the safety issue of giving IV tPA without complete blood count (CBC resulted.This is a retrospective observational study by examining the database from Huashan Hospital in China and OSF/INI Comprehensive Stroke Center in United States. Patient data collected included demographics, occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, door to needle intervals, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale scores on admission, CBC results on admission and follow-up modified Rankin Scale scores. Linear regression and multivariable logistic regression analysis were used to identify factors that would have an impact on door-to-needle intervals.Our study included 120 patients from Huashan Hospital and 123 patients from INI. Among them, 36 in Huashan Hospital and 51 in INI received i.v. tPA prior to their CBC resulted. Normal platelet count was found in 98.8% patients after tPA was given. One patient had thrombocytopenia but no hemorrhagic event. A significantly shorter door to needle interval (DTN was found in the group without CBC resulted. There was also a difference in treatment interval between the two hospitals. Door to needle intervals had a strong correlation to onset to treatment intervals and NIHSS scores on admission.In patients presented with acute ischemic stroke, the risk of developing hemorrhagic event is low if i.v. tPA is given before CBC has resulted. The door to needle intervals can be significantly reduced.

  5. Safety of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator administration with computed tomography evidence of prior infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Michael J; Houston, J Thomas; Boehme, Amelia K; Albright, Karen C; Bavarsad Shahripour, Reza; Palazzo, Paola; Alvi, Muhammed; Rawal, Pawan V; Kapoor, Niren; Sisson, April; Alexandrov, Anne W; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2014-07-01

    Prior stroke within 3 months excludes patients from thrombolysis; however, patients may have computed tomography (CT) evidence of prior infarct, often of unknown time of origin. We aimed to determine if the presence of a previous infarct on pretreatment CT is a predictor of hemorrhagic complications and functional outcomes after the administration of intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). We retrospectively analyzed consecutive patients treated with IV tPA at our institution from 2009-2011. Pretreatment CTs were reviewed for evidence of any prior infarct. Further review determined if any hemorrhagic transformation (HT) or symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) were present on repeat CT or magnetic resonance imaging. Outcomes included sICH, any HT, poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale score of 4-6), and discharge disposition. Of 212 IV tPA-treated patients, 84 (40%) had evidence of prior infarct on pretreatment CT. Patients with prior infarcts on CT were older (median age, 72 versus 65 years; P=.001) and had higher pretreatment National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores (median, 10 versus 7; P=.023). Patients with prior infarcts on CT did not experience more sICH (4% versus 2%; P=.221) or any HT (18% versus 14%; P=.471). These patients did have a higher frequency of poor functional outcome at discharge (82% versus 50%; P<.001) and were less often discharged to home or inpatient rehabilitation center (61% versus 73%; P=.065). Visualization of prior infarcts on pretreatment CT did not predict an increased risk of sICH in our study and should not be viewed as a reason to withhold systemic tPA treatment after clinically evident strokes within 3 months were excluded. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Thrombolysis by intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Current status and future direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanahashi, Norio

    2009-01-01

    In Japan, the intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) Alteplase (0.6 mg/kg) administration of the within 3 h of the onset of acute ischemic stroke was approved for therapeutic use in the year 2006. t-PA induces thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke, and this method has gradually gained recognition among physicians and the general population. However, the number of patients who were treated using Alteplase is low (4,000-5,000 patients/year), and this figure accounts for only 2-3% of the annual number of cases of ischemic stroke. There is little doubt that Alteplase treatment is a potentially effective modality for some patients with acute ischemic stroke. The post-marketing surveillance of 4,749 Japanese patients treated using Alteplase showed that 33% of the patients had modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores of 0-1, 17% of patients died and 4.5% presented with symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH); these results were comparable to those from other countries. The expansion of the therapeutic time window has been a matter of concern. The investigators of the European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASS) have reported that there was significant improvement in the clinical outcomes of patients with acute ischemie stroke when Alteplase was administered 3-4.5 h after the onset of the symptoms. Mismatches in perfusion- and diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images have been used for selecting patients 3 h after the onset of symptoms, and the findings from MRI, dwimages (DWI) and MR angiography are practical predictors of t-PA therapy within 3 h of onset. The Middle Cerebral Artery Embolism Local Fibrinolytic Intervention Trial (MELT) Japan study showed that local intra-arterial fibrinolysis is effective in patients with embolic MCA occlusion within 6 h of the onset of symptoms. Combining the initiation of intravenous t-PA administration with further intra-arterial fibrinolysis or mechanical thrombolectomy may improve the

  7. Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: a feasibility and safety study

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    Sadeghi-Hokmabadi E

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Elyar Sadeghi-Hokmabadi, Mehdi Farhoudi, Aliakbar Taheraghdam, Mazyar Hashemilar, Daryous Savadi-Osguei, Reza Rikhtegar, Kaveh Mehrvar, Ehsan Sharifipour, Parisa Youhanaee, Reshad Mirnour Neurosciences Research Center, Neurology Department, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, East Azerbaijan, Iran Background: In developing countries, intravenous thrombolysis (IVT is available at a limited number of centers. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and safety of IVT at Tabriz Imam Reza Hospital. Methods: In a prospective study, over a 55-month period, any patient at the hospital for whom stroke code had been activated was enrolled in the study. Data on demographic characteristics, stroke risk factors, admission blood pressure, blood tests, findings of brain computed tomography (CT scans, time of symtom onset, time of arrival to the emergency department, time of stroke code activation, time of CT scan examination, and the time of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator administration were recorded. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale assessments were performed before IVT bolus, at 36 hours, at either 7 days or discharge (which ever one was earlier, and at 3-month follow-up. Brain CT scans were done for all patients before and 24 hours after the treatment. Results: Stroke code was activated for 407 patients and IVT was done in 168 patients. The rate of functional independence (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] 0–1 at 3 months was 39.2% (62/158. The mortality rate at day 7 was 6% (10/168. Hemorrhagic transformation was noted in 16 patients (9.5%. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 5 (3%, all of which were fatal. One case of severe urinary bleeding and one other fatal case of severe angioedema were observed. Conclusion: During the first 4–5 years of administration of IVT in the hospital, it was found to be feasible and safe, but to increase the efficacy, poststroke care should be more organized and a stroke center

  8. Current status of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator dosage for acute ischaemic stroke: an updated systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; You, Shoujiang; Sato, Shoichiro; Yang, Jie; Carcel, Cheryl; Zheng, Danni; Yoshimura, Sohei; Anderson, Craig S; Sandset, Else Charlotte; Robinson, Thompson; Chalmers, John; Sharma, Vijay K

    2018-03-01

    The optimal dose of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) for acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) remains controversial, especially in Asian countries. We aimed to update the evidence regarding the use of low-dose versus standard-dose rtPA. We performed a systematic literature search across MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PsycINFO and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) from inception to 22 August 2016 to identify all related studies. The outcomes were death or disability (defined by modified Rankin Scale 2-6), death, and symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage (sICH). Where possible, data were pooled for meta-analysis with ORs and corresponding 95% CIs by means of random-effects or fixed-effects meta-analysis. We included 26 observational studies and 1 randomised controlled trial with a total of 23 210 patients. Variable doses of rtPA were used for thrombolysis of AIS in Asia. Meta-analysis shows that low-dose rtPA was not associated with increased risk of death or disability (OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.33), or death (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.01), or decreased risk of sICH (OR 1.06, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.72). The results remained consistent when sensitivity analyses were performed including only low-dose and standard-dose rtPA or only Asian studies. Our review shows small difference between the outcomes or the risk profile in the studies using low-dose and/or standard-dose rtPA for AIS. Low-dose rtPA was not associated with lower risk of death or disability, death alone, or sICH.

  9. Uric acid therapy improves the outcomes of stroke patients treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator and mechanical thrombectomy.

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    Chamorro, Ángel; Amaro, Sergio; Castellanos, Mar; Gomis, Meritxell; Urra, Xabier; Blasco, Jordi; Arenillas, Juan F; Román, Luis S; Muñoz, Roberto; Macho, Juan; Cánovas, David; Marti-Fabregas, Joan; Leira, Enrique C; Planas, Anna M

    2017-06-01

    Background Numerous neuroprotective drugs have failed to show benefit in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, making the search for new treatments imperative. Uric acid is an endogenous antioxidant making it a drug candidate to improve stroke outcomes. Aim To report the effects of uric acid therapy in stroke patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy. Methods Forty-five patients with proximal vessel occlusions enrolled in the URICO-ICTUS trial received intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator within 4.5 h after stroke onset and randomized to intravenous 1000 mg uric acid or placebo (NCT00860366). These patients also received mechanical thrombectomy because a brain computed tomogaphy angiography confirmed the lack of proximal recanalization at the end of systemic thrombolysis. The primary outcome was good functional outcome at 90 days (modified Rankin Score 0-2). Safety outcomes included mortality, symptomatic intracerebral bleeding, and gout attacks. Results The rate of successful revascularization was >80% in the uric acid and the placebo groups but good functional outcome was observed in 16 out of 24 (67%) patients treated with uric acid and 10 out of 21 (48%) treated with placebo (adjusted Odds Ratio, 6.12 (95% CI 1.08-34.56)). Mortality was observed in two out of 24 (8.3%) patients treated with uric acid and one out of 21 (4.8%) treated with placebo (adjusted Odds Ratio, 3.74 (95% CI 0.06-226.29)). Symptomatic cerebral bleeding and gout attacks were similar in both groups. Conclusions Uric acid therapy was safe and improved stroke outcomes in stroke patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis followed by thrombectomy. Validation of this simple strategy in a larger trial is urgent.

  10. Current perspectives on the use of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA for treatment of acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman SN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sherita N Chapman,1 Prachi Mehndiratta,1 Michelle C Johansen,1 Timothy L McMurry,2 Karen C Johnston,1,2 Andrew M Southerland1,2 1Department of Neurology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA; 2Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: In 1995, the NINDS (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke tPA (tissue plasminogen activator Stroke Study Group published the results of a large multicenter clinical trial demonstrating efficacy of intravenous tPA by revealing a 30% relative risk reduction (absolute risk reduction 11%–15% compared with placebo at 90 days in the likelihood of having minimal or no disability. Since approval in 1996, tPA remains the only drug treatment for acute ischemic stroke approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Over the years, an abundance of research and clinical data has supported the safe and efficacious use of intravenous tPA in all eligible patients. Despite such supporting data, it remains substantially underutilized. Challenges to the utilization of tPA include narrow eligibility and treatment windows, risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, perceived lack of efficacy in certain high-risk subgroups, and a limited pool of neurological and stroke expertise in the community. With recent US census data suggesting annual stroke incidence will more than double by 2050, better education and consensus among both the medical and lay public are necessary to optimize the use of tPA for all eligible stroke patients. Ongoing and future research should continue to improve upon the efficacy of tPA through more rapid stroke diagnosis and treatment, refinement of advanced neuroimaging and stroke biomarkers, and successful demonstration of alternative means of reperfusion. Keywords: IV tPA, rtPA, t-PA, rt-PA, cerebrovascular disease, cerebrovascular accident

  11. A Four-Year Experience of Symptomatic Intracranial Hemorrhage Following Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator at a Comprehensive Stroke Center.

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    Orlando, Alessandro; Wagner, Jeffrey C; Fanale, Christopher V; Whaley, Michelle; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bar-Or, David

    2016-04-01

    To describe the 4-year experience of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) rate at a high-volume comprehensive stroke center. All admitted adult (≥18 years) patients presenting with an ischemic stroke from 2010 to 2013 were included in this study. The primary outcome was sICH, defined as any hemorrhage with neurological deterioration (change in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≥4) within 36 hours of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) treatment, or any hemorrhage resulting in death. Secondary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and having a favorable modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score (≤2). A total of 1925 did not receive intravascular (IV) or intra-arterial (IA) therapy; only 451 received IV therapy; and 175 received both IV and IA therapies. In IV-only patients, the overall rate of sICH was 2.2%; in IV and IA patients, the rate was 5.7%; and in patients who received no therapy, the rate was .4%. The IV-only group had an sICH rate of .9% in 2013. There were no differences in the adjusted odds of dying in the hospital between the study groups. IV-only treatment offered significantly better odds of achieving a favorable functional outcome, compared to no therapy, among patients with moderate stroke severity, whereas IV and IA treatments offered significantly better odds among patients with severe strokes. The odds of achieving a favorable functional outcome by discharge were decreased by 97% if patients suffered an sICH (OR = .03, 95%CI = .004, .19). Despite an increased risk of sICH with IV-tPA, treatment with IV-tPA continues to be associated with increased odds of a favorable discharge mRS. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Routine 24-Hour Computed Tomography Brain Scan is not useful in stable patients Post Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator.

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    Guhwe, Mary; Utley-Smith, Queen; Blessing, Robert; Goldstein, Larry B

    2016-03-01

    Obtaining a routine computed tomography (CT) brain scan 24 hours after treatment with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) is included in the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association acute stroke guidelines. The usefulness of the test in stable patients is not known. We hypothesized that the results of routine, 24-hour post-treatment neuroimaging (CT or magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] brain scans) would not alter the management of clinically stable patients. Patients treated with IV-tPA between January 2011 and December 2013 were identified from a single hospital's stroke registry. All patients were closely monitored for changes in stroke severity. Demographics, changes in neurological status, neuroimaging results, and changes in therapy were abstracted from the patients' medical records. Patients having a neuroimaging study because of neurological deterioration were excluded. Of 136 patients treated with IV-tPA, 131 met criteria for inclusion. Of these, 86.7% had moderate to severe neurological deficits (i.e., initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score > 5 points; median 8 points). All patients had routine imaging ~24 hours after treatment (CT brain 62.6%, MRI brain 12.4%, both CT and MRI brain 25%). Asymptomatic hemorrhagic transformation occurred in 6.7% and potentially changed management in a single patient (target systolic blood pressure was lowered from 185 to 180 mmHg). Over a 3-year period, routine neuroimaging ~24-hours after IV-tPA in clinically stable patients was associated with a change in therapy in only 1 (.95%) patient. If confirmed in other cohorts, these results suggest that routine neuroimaging after IV-tPA may be safely avoided in clinically stable patients, eliminating unnecessary radiation exposure in those having CT brain and reducing costs. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Serum creatinine may indicate risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Elisabeth B; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Hillis, Argye E; Urrutia, Victor C; Llinas, Rafael H

    2013-11-01

    Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) is a known complication following administration of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) for acute ischemic stroke. sICH results in high rates of death or long-term disability. Our ability to predict its occurrence is important in clinical decision making and when counseling families. The initial National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) investigators developed a list of relative contraindications to IV tPA meant to decrease the risk of subsequent sICH. To date, the impact of renal impairment has not been well studied. In the current study we evaluate the potential association between renal impairment and post-tPA intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). Admission serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were recorded in 224 patients presenting within 4.5 hours from symptom onset and treated with IV tPA based on NINDS criteria. Neuroimaging was obtained 1 day post-tPA and for any change in neurologic status to evaluate for ICH. Images were retrospectively evaluated for hemorrhage by a board-certified neuroradiologist and 2 reviewers blinded to the patient's neurologic status. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively for evidence of neurologic decline indicating a "symptomatic" hemorrhage. sICH was defined as subjective clinical deterioration (documented by the primary neurology team) and hemorrhage on neuroimaging that was felt to be the most likely cause. Renal impairment was evaluated using both serum creatinine and eGFR in a number of ways: 1) continuous creatinine; 2) any renal impairment by creatinine (serum creatinine >1.0 mg/dL); 3) continuous eGFR; and 4) any renal impairment by eGFR (eGFR serum creatinine >1.0 mg/dL) was not associated with combined symptomatic and asymptomatic intracranial bleeding (p = 0.359); however, there was an adjusted 5.5-fold increased odds of sICH when creatinine was >1.0 mg/dL (95% confidence interval, 1.08-28.39), and the frequency

  14. Multicenter Study of Adverse Events After Intravenous Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Gotico, Hannah; Lightfoot, Tiffany; Meighan, Melissa

    2017-02-01

    The approved treatment by the Food and Drug Administration for acute ischemic stroke is intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV tPA). After IV tPA administration, patients are monitored for adverse events using an American Heart Association/American Stroke Association guideline instituted in 1996. There is limited evidence describing the safest and most efficient method to monitor patients during the first 24 hours after tPA administration. Although the overall rates of adverse events have been reported, the time when patients may be at most risk for an event has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to identify the time of adverse event occurrences in the first 24 hours after IV tPA administration. This was a descriptive, retrospective chart review study of patients admitted to an integrated health system and treated with IV tPA for acute stroke between July 2010 and July 2012. Charts were reviewed for adverse events using the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Global Trigger Tool for Measuring Adverse Events. Possible chart indicators of adverse events or "triggers" included neurological decline, vital signs elevated above specified parameters, and emergent imaging. Adverse events included episodes of neurological decline, angioedema, allergic reactions, bleeding, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The timing of each detected event was determined, and descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Fourteen adverse events (2.8%) were detected in a population of 498 patients. Reactions consisted of allergic reaction (n = 1), angioedema (n = 1), neurological decline without ICH (n = 1), gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 1), bleeding gums (n = 1), and high-risk ICH (n = 9). Thirteen of the 14 adverse events (92.9%) occurred within the first 12 hours after IV tPA administration. Close monitoring during the first 12 hours after IV tPA treatment may be essential. However, close monitoring after 12 hours may not contribute significantly to

  15. Is the Susceptibility Vessel Sign on 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance T2*-Weighted Imaging a Useful Tool to Predict Recanalization in Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator?

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    Yamamoto, N; Satomi, J; Harada, M; Izumi, Y; Nagahiro, S; Kaji, R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization approximately 24 h after intravenous administration of tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV TPA). The previous studies have been conducted using 1.5-Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We studied whether the characteristics of 3-T MRI findings were useful to predict outcome and recanalization after IV tPA. Patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) (horizontal portion, M1; Sylvian portion, M2) occlusion and treated by IV tPA were enrolled. We studied whether the presence of susceptibility vessel sign (SVS) at M1 and low clot burden score on T2*-weighted imaging (T2*-CBS) on 3-T MRI were associated with the absence of recanalization. A total of 49 patients were enrolled (27 men; mean age, 73.9 years). MR angiography obtained approximately 24 h after IV tPA revealed recanalization in 21 (42.9 %) patients. Independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization included ICA or proximal M1 occlusion (odds ratio, 69.6; 95 % confidence interval, 5.05-958.8, p = 0.002). In this study, an independent factor associated with the absence of recanalization may be proximal occlusion of the cerebral arteries rather than SVS in the MCA or low T2*-CBS on 3-T MRI.

  16. Long-Term Impact of Implementation of a Stroke Protocol on Door-to-Needle Time in the Administration of Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillen, Machteld E; He, Wenzhuan; Al-Qudah, Zaid; Wang, Weizhen; Hidalgo, Andrea; Walia, Jessy

    2017-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing a stroke protocol (SP) in improving door-to-needle time (DTNT) and door-to-computed tomography (DTCT) time from 2010 to 2014. Published data from the Get With The Guidelines-Stroke (GWTGS) participating hospitals showed that median DTNT = 75 minutes with 26.6% of the patients achieving the recommended DTNT of 60 minutes or less. Implementation of an SP, which specifies the role of nurses, physicians, and technicians during acute stroke evaluation, can improve DTNT. This longitudinal quality assurance study was designed to compare the DTNT and the DTCT time pre- and post implementation of an SP in our hospital. Patients' data before (2009-2010) and after (2010-2014) the implementation of an SP were collected each year during the same 6-month period and compared using statistical software SPSS 20.0 for Windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). Although our DTNT did not significantly improve over the years, the median DTNT (59 minutes) was much less than the reported 75 minutes of GWTGS hospitals. Our DTCT time diminished from 20.6 minutes in 2009 to 15.9 minutes in 2014. The percentage of patients with a DTNT of 1 hour or less did not differ among all years (P = .296) and was 55.8%. Our study suggests that our performance in evaluating acute ischemic stroke patients within the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association suggested time window is reachable for prolonged periods of time. Continuous monitoring and education of all players involved are crucial to ensure best possible outcomes in the timely administration of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rescue localized intra-arterial thrombolysis for hyperacute MCA ischemic stroke patients after early non-responsive intravenous tissue plasminogen activator therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Joon; Kim, Dong Ik; Kim, Seo Hyun; Lee, Kyung Yeol; Heo, Ji Hoe; Han, Sang Won

    2005-01-01

    The outcome of patients who show no early response to intravenous (i.v.) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) therapy is poor. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of rescue localized intra-arterial thrombolysis (LIT) therapy for acute ischemic stroke patients after an early non-responsive i.v. tPA therapy. Patients with proximal MCA occlusions who were treated by LIT (n=10) after failure of early response [no improvement or improvement of National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores of ≤3] to i.v. tPA therapy (0.9 mg/kg - 10% bolus and 90% i.v. infusion over 60 min) were selected. The recanalization rates, incidence of post-thrombolysis hemorrhage and clinical outcomes [baseline and discharge NIHSS scores, mortality, 3 months Barthel index (BI) and modified Rankin score (mRS)] were evaluated. Rescue LIT therapy was performed on ten MCA occlusion patients (male:female=3:7, mean age 71 years). The mean time between the initiation of i.v. tPA therapy and the initiation of intra-arterial urokinase (i.a. UK) was 117±25.0 min [time to i.v. tPA 137±32 min; time to digital subtraction angiography (DSA) 221±42 min; time to i.a. UK 260±46 min]. The baseline NIHSS scores showed significant improvement at discharge (median from 18 to 6). Symptomatic hemorrhage and, consequent, mortality were noted in 2/10 (20%) patients. Three months good outcome was noted in 4/10 (40%, mRS 0-2) and 3/10 (30%, BI ≥95). In conclusion, rescue LIT therapy can be considered as a treatment option for patients not showing early response to full dose i.v. tPA therapy. Larger scale studies for further validation of this protocol may be necessary. (orig.)

  18. Additional endovascular therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke who are nonresponsive to intravenous tissue plasminogen activator: usefulness of magnetic resonance angiography-diffusion mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembo, Tomohisa; Deguchi, Ichiro; Fukuoka, Takuya; Nagoya, Harumitsu; Maruyama, Hajime; Kato, Yuji; Horiuchi, Yohsuke; Ohe, Yasuko; Tanahashi, Norio

    2013-10-01

    In patients who are not responsive to intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV t-PA), the present study aimed to report recanalization rates, the incidence of hemorrhagic transformation (HT), and clinical outcomes of additional endovascular therapy (AET), and to investigate the usefulness of magnetic resonance angiography-diffusion mismatch (MDM) in a selection of patients eligible for AET. Fifty-eight patients who received IV t-PA therapy because of intracranial major artery occlusion between April 2007 and November 2010 were divided into 2 groups: 18 patients in the AET group and 21 patients in the IV t-PA nonresponders group. The remaining 19 patients were responders to IV t-PA and therefore not eligible for this study. Recanalization rates, HT incidence, and 3-month outcomes were assessed, and the relationship between MDM and clinical outcome was examined. A 3-month modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0 to 3 was seen more frequently in the AET group (72% in the AET group v 29% in the nonresponder group; P = .01). Serious outcomes (3-month mRS of 5-6) were seen significantly less often in the AET group (17%) than in the nonresponder group (57%; P = .019). There were no differences in the incidence of HT. In the AET group, reappraisal considering MDM revealed a significantly higher rate of a 3-month mRS of 0 to 3 in the MDM-positive group compared to the MDM-negative group (86% v 25%, respectively; P = .044). Serious outcomes were observed significantly less frequently in the MDM-positive group compared to the MDM-negative group (0% v 75%, respectively; P = .005). AET for nonresponders to IV t-PA was safe, improved recanalization rates, and led to better prognoses. MDM was a very good predictor of improved prognosis in a selection of eligible patients for AET after IV t-PA. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Recanalization rate and clinical outcome of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator at 0.6 mg/kg and intra-arterial urokinase in acute ischemic stroke with large vessel occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Kazuya; Ohnishi, Hideyuki; Taomoto, Katsushi

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the recanalization rate and clinical outcome of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and intra-arterial urokinase (PTA) in acute ischemic stroke with large vessel occlusion. The recanalization of the occlusion site and the ischemic change were evaluated with pre-and post-treated MRI and MR angiography (MRA). Total recanalization rates after the intravenous (IV) t-PA and the PTA therapy were 35.6 and 21.9%, respectively. These rates were 50.0 and 16.7% in the distal middle cerebral artery (MCA), 52.6 and 25.0% in the proximal MCA, 6.3 and 5.3% in the internal carotid artery (ICA), 25.0 and 26.3% in the basilar artery (BA), respectively. The rates of the symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage after IV t-PA and PTA were 0 and 5.2%, respectively. The proportion of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) of 0 to 1 at 3 months after treatments were 17.4% in IV t-PA and 12.5% in PTA. Our results indicated better recanalization rate and outcome of MCA with t-PA than that of PTA. However, the recanalization rate of ICA and BA were very poor in both t-PA and PTA as yet. It is necessary to investigate newly strategies and/or modality for ICA and BA occlusion. (author)

  20. Arrhenius temperature dependence of in vitro tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, George J; Dhamija, Ashima; Bavani, Nazli; Wagner, Kenneth R; Holland, Christy K

    2007-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease and a leading cause of death and disability. Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the intravenous administration of the thrombolytic medication, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this treatment has many contraindications and can have dangerous side effects such as intra-cerebral hemorrhage. These treatment limitations have led to much interest in potential adjunctive therapies, such as therapeutic hypothermia (T ≤ 35 deg. C) and ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Such interest may lead to combining these therapies with tPA to treat stroke, however little is known about the effects of temperature on the thrombolytic efficacy of tPA. In this work, we measure the temperature dependence of the fractional clot mass loss Δm(T) resulting from tPA exposure in an in vitro human clot model. We find that the temperature dependence is well described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with an effective activation energy E eff of 42.0 ± 0.9 kJ mole -1 . E eff approximates the activation energy of the plasminogen-to-plasmin reaction of 48.9 kJ mole -1 . A model to explain this temperature dependence is proposed. These results will be useful in predicting the effects of temperature in future lytic therapies

  1. Not only the sugar, early infarct sign, hyperDense middle cerebral artery, age, neurologic deficit score but also atrial fibrillation is predictive for symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sombat Muengtaweepongsa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH is the most unwanted adverse event in patients with acute ischemic stroke who received intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (i.v. rt-PA. Many tool scores are available to predict the probability of sICH. Among those scores, the Sugar, Early infarct sign, hyperDense middle cerebral artery, Age, Neurologic deficit (SEDAN gives the highest area under the curve-receiver operating characteristic value. Objective: We aimed to examine any factors other than the SEDAN score to predict the probability of sICH. Methods: Patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with i.v. rt-PA within 4.5 h time window from January 2010 to July 2012 were evaluated. Compiling demographic data, risk factors, and comorbidity (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, atrial fibrillation (AF, ischemic heart disease, valvular heart disease, previous stroke, gout, smoking cigarette, drinking alcoholic beverage, family history of stroke, and family history of ischemic heart disease, computed tomography scan of patients prior to treatment with rt-PA, and assessing the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score for the purpose of calculating SEDAN score were analyzed. Results: Of 314 patients treated with i.v. rt-PA, there were 46 ICH cases (14.6% with 14 sICH (4.4% and 32 asymptomatic intracranial hemorrhage cases (10.2%. The rate of sICH occurrence was increased in accordance with the increase in the SEDAN score and AF. Age over 75 years, early infarction, hyperdense cerebral artery, baseline blood sugar more than 12 mmol/l, NIHSS as 10 or more, and AF were the risk factors to develop sICH after treated with rt-PA at 1.535, 2.501, 1.093, 1.276, 1.253, and 2.492 times, respectively. Conclusions: Rather than the SEDAN score, AF should be a predictor of sICH in patients with acute ischemic stroke after i.v. rt-PA treatment in Thai population.

  2. Acute ischemic stroke after cardiac catheterization: the protamine low-dose recombinant tissue plasminogen activator pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Carlos; Quijada, Alonso; Rosas, Carolina; Bulatova, Katya; Lara, Hugo; Nieto, Elena; Morales, Marcelo

    2017-04-01

    : Intravenous thrombolysis is the preferred treatment for acute ischemic stroke; however, it remains unestablished in the area of cardiac catheterization. We report three patients with acute ischemic stroke after cardiac catheterization. After reversing the anticoagulant effect of unfractionated heparin with protamine, all of the patients were successfully off-label thrombolyzed with reduced doses of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (0.6 mg/kg). This dose was preferred to reduce the risk of symptomatic cerebral or systemic bleeding. The sequential pathway of protamine recombinant tissue plasminogen activator at reduced doses may be safer for reducing intracranial or systemic bleeding events, whereas remaining efficacious for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke after cardiac catheterization.

  3. Association of Geographical Factors With Administration of Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Kunisawa, Susumu; Morishima, Toshitaka; Ukawa, Naoto; Ikai, Hiroshi; Otsubo, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Koichi B.; Yokota, Chiaki; Minematsu, Kazuo; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Background Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an effective treatment for acute ischemic stroke if administered within a few hours of stroke onset. Because of this time restriction, tPA administration remains infrequent. Ambulance use is an effective strategy for increasing tPA administration but may be influenced by geographical factors. The objectives of this study are to investigate the relationship between tPA administration and ambulance use and to examine how patient trave...

  4. Turnover of tissue plasminogen activator in normal and hepatectomized rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, S.; Einarsson, M.; Ekvaern, S.H.; Haeggroth, L.M.; Mattsson, C.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution, and clearance of the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) was studied in rabbits, rats and mice. Following an intravenous injection of I-labelled tPA a large portion of the radioactive dose was rapidly accumulated in the liver. After one hour the radioactivity in the liver was less than 5 per cent of the injected dose. The highest activity was then found in the intestine, stomach and in the blood. Gel filtration of plasma taken one hour after the injection revealed that the major part (60%) of the radioactivity was present as low molecular weight metabolites or free iodine. The remaining activity was present as high molecular weight inhibitor complexes (26%) or as free tPA (15%). In order to study in vivo reactions between tPA and plasma inhibitors without hepatic interference, plasma turnover was also studied in hepatectomized rabbits. High amounts of radioactivity remained in the plasma after one hour. Gel filtration of this plasma revealed that 54 per cent of the radioactivity was bound to inhibitors, 34 per cent circulated as free tPA while a minor portion (12%) was found as free iodine or metabolites. The half-life of fibrinolytically active tPA in hepatectomized rabbits was 40 minutes compared to 2 minutes in intact rabbits. The increase in the half-life of tPA in hepatectomized rabbits also resulted in an improved thrombolytic effect after treatment with 0.5 mg tPA

  5. Agreement with evidence for tissue Plasminogen Activator use among emergency physicians: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Alice M; Bryant, Jamie; Carey, Mariko L; Paul, Christine L; Sanson-Fisher, Rob W; Levi, Christopher R

    2015-06-26

    Emergency department staff play a crucial role in the triage of stroke patients and therefore the capacity to deliver time-dependent treatments such as tissue Plasminogen Activator. This study aimed to identify among emergency physicians, (1) rates of agreement with evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke care; and (2) individual and hospital factors associated with high agreement with evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use. Australian fellows and trainees of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine were invited to complete an online cross-sectional survey assessing perceptions of tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke. Demographic and hospital characteristics were also collected. 429 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine members responded (13% response rate). Almost half (47.2%) did not agree with any statements regarding the benefits of tissue Plasminogen Activator use for acute stroke. Perceived routine administration of tissue Plasminogen Activator by the head of respondents' emergency department was significantly associated with high agreement with the evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke. Agreement with evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke is not high among responding Australian emergency physicians. In order for tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment to become widely accepted and adopted in emergency settings, beliefs and attitudes towards treatment need to be in accordance with clinical practice guidelines.

  6. Pivotal role of tissue plasminogen activator in the mechanism of action of electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoirisch-Clapauch, Silvia; Mezzasalma, Marco A U; Nardi, Antonio E

    2014-02-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy is an important treatment option for major depressive disorders, acute mania, mood disorders with psychotic features, and catatonia. Several hypotheses have been proposed as electroconvulsive therapy's mechanism of action. Our hypothesis involves many converging pathways facilitated by increased synthesis and release of tissue-plasminogen activator. Human and animal experiments have shown that tissue-plasminogen activator participates in many mechanisms of action of electroconvulsive therapy or its animal variant, electroconvulsive stimulus, including improved N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated signaling, activation of both brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor, increased bioavailability of zinc, purinergic release, and increased mobility of dendritic spines. As a result, tissue-plasminogen activator helps promote neurogenesis in limbic structures, modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity, improves cognitive function, and mediates antidepressant effects. Notably, electroconvulsive therapy seems to influence tissue-plasminogen activator metabolism. For example, electroconvulsive stimulus increases the expression of glutamate decarboxylase 65 isoform in γ-aminobutyric acid-releasing neurons, which enhances the release of tissue-plasminogen activator, and the expression of p11, a protein involved in plasminogen and tissue-plasminogen activator assembling. This paper reviews how electroconvulsive therapy correlates with tissue-plasminogen activator. We suggest that interventions aiming at increasing tissue-plasminogen activator levels or its bioavailability - such as daily aerobic exercises together with a carbohydrate-restricted diet, or normalization of homocysteine levels - be evaluated in controlled studies assessing response and remission duration in patients who undergo electroconvulsive therapy.

  7. Tissue-type plasminogen activator protects the postsynaptic density in the ischemic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneret, Valerie; Ospina, Juan P; Diaz, Ariel; Manrique, Luis G; Merino, Paola; Gutierrez, Laura; Torre, Enrique; Wu, Fang; Cheng, Lihong; Yepes, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia causes the presynaptic release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). The postsynaptic density (PSD) is a postsynaptic structure that provides a matrix where signaling transduction of excitatory synapses takes place. The postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) is the most abundant scaffolding protein in the postsynaptic density (PSD), where it modulates the postsynaptic response to the presynaptic release of glutamate by regulating the anchoring of glutamate receptors to the PSD. We found that tPA induces the local translation of PSD-95 mRNA and the subsequent recruitment of PSD-95 protein to the PSD, via plasminogen-independent activation of TrkB receptors. Our data show that PSD-95 is removed from the PSD during the early stages of cerebral ischemia, and that this effect is abrogated by either the release of neuronal tPA, or intravenous administration of recombinant tPA (rtPA). We report that the effect of tPA on PSD-95 is associated with inhibition of the phosphorylation and recruitment of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors to the PSD, known to amplify the effect of the excitotoxic injury, and that this is followed by TrkB-mediated protection of dendritic spines from the harmful effects of the hypoxic insult. These data reveal that tPA is a synaptic protector in the ischemic brain.

  8. Substrate specificity of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, D.C.; Groeneveld, E.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that plasminogen activators not only hydrolyse a specific arginine-valine bond in plasminogen, but may also cleave other proteins such as fibronectin. We studied the substrate specificity, particularly the preference for arginyl over lysyl peptide bonds, of tissue-type

  9. Combined lysis of thrombus with ultrasound and systemic tissue plasminogen activator for emergent revascularization in acute ischemic stroke (CLOTBUST-ER)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellinger, Peter D; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Barreto, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We designed a Phase 3 clinical trial to determine the safety and efficacy of adding transcranial ultrasound using an operator-independent headframe to recombinant tissue-plasminogen-activator for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: Combined lysis of thrombus with ultrasound...... and systemic tissue-plasminogen-activator for emergent revascularization in acute ischemic stroke is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial that will enroll subjects with the following main inclusion criteria: less than 4·5 hours from symptom onset (three-hours in US and Canada), age 18...... events. CONCLUSIONS: Since intravenous recombinant tissue-plasminogen-activator remains the only medical therapy to reverse ischemic stroke applicable in the emergency department, our trial will determine if the additional use of transcranial ultrasound improves functional outcomes in patients...

  10. The interaction of recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator and recombinant plasminogen activator (r-PA/BM 06.022) with human endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, M.; Kohnert, U.; Fischer, S.; Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van; Verheijen, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    The Escherichia coli-expressed recombinant plasminogen activator (r-PA) comprising the kringle 2 and protease domains of human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) has a four-fold longer half-life time in the circulation than t-PA, possibly resulting in an increased opportunity for r-PA to

  11. Tissue-type plasminogen activator in somatostatin cells of rat pancreas and hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P; Larsson, L I; Danø, K

    1987-01-01

    Plasminogen activators (PAs) proteolytically convert plasminogen to plasmin, which, in turn, can degrade most proteins. This system has been implicated in a variety of biological processes. Using immunocytochemical methods, we here describe the localization of tissue-type PA (t-PA) in rat somatos...... of the hypothalamus. No t-PA immunoreactivity could be detected in somatostatin cells of the gastric and intestinal mucosa....

  12. Highly stable plasminogen activator inhibitor type one (VLHL PAI-1) protects fibrin clots from tissue plasminogen activator-mediated fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankun, Jerzy; Aleem, Ansari M; Selman, Steven H; Skrzypczak-Jankun, Ewa; Lysiak-Szydlowska, Wieslawa; Grafos, Nicholas; Fryer, Hugh J L; Greenfield, Robert S

    2007-11-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the major specific inhibitor of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) which mediates fibrin clot lysis through activation of plasminogen. Wild-type-PAI-1 (wPAI-1) is rapidly converted to the latent form (half-life of approximately 2 h) and loses its ability to inhibit tPA. We developed a very long half-life PAI-1 (VLHL PAI-1), a recombinant protein with a half-life >700 h compared with wPAI-1. In this study, VLHL PAI-1 was assessed for its ability to inhibit clot lysis in vitro. Clot formation was initiated in normal plasma supplemented with tPA by the addition of either tissue factor or human recombinant FVIIa. Clot lysis time, monitored turbidimetrically in a microtiter plate reader, was determined at various concentrations of wPAI-1 and VLHL PAI-1. Both wPAI-1 and VLHL PAI-1 caused a significant increase in clot lysis time, although the latter was somewhat less effective at lower concentrations. The VLHL PAI-1, but not wPAI-1, maintained its anti-fibrinolytic activity after preincubation overnight at 37 degrees. These studies demonstrate that VLHL PAI-1 is an effective inhibitor of fibrin clot degradation. Due to the high stability of VLHL PAI-1 compared with wPAI-1, this novel inhibitor of tPA-mediated fibrinolysis may have therapeutic applications for treating surgical and trauma patients when used directly or in conjunction with the procoagulant recombinant FVIIa.

  13. A Novel Approach to the Treatment of Orolingual Angioedema After Tissue Plasminogen Activator Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahs, Lesley; Droege, Chris; Kneale, Hilary; Pancioli, Arthur

    2016-09-01

    Orolingual angioedema is a rare adverse effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), with an incidence of 1% to 5%. There are currently no published reports describing resolution of tPA-induced orolingual angioedema with complement inhibitor therapy. A 72-year-old man receiving home angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy presented to the emergency department with newly developed orolingual angioedema after treatment with tPA for acute ischemic stroke. Therapy was initiated with intravenous methylprednisolone 125 mg, famotidine 20 mg, and diphenhydramine 50 mg, without significant improvement. Because of increased concern for airway protection, plasma-derived C1 esterase inhibitor was administered. Concerns about progressive and airway-threatening orolingual angioedema subsided 2 hours after administration, and invasive airway maneuvers were avoided. Orolingual angioedema is an infrequent, severe adverse effect of tPA for treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Complement inhibitors may be an additional therapeutic option for patients presenting with orolingual angioedema with potential airway compromise that is refractory to standard anaphylactic therapies. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 and Tissue Plasminogen Activator Polymorphisms on Susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes in Malaysian Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid Al-Hamodi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Elevated activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 and decreased tissue plasminogen activator (tPA activity are considered to be important risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and metabolic syndrome (MetS. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the PAI-1 4G/5G and tPA Alu-repeat I/D polymorphisms with T2DM in Malaysian subjects. Serum insulin, coronary risk panel, plasma glucose, and PAI-1 4G/5G and tPA Alu-repeat I/D polymorphisms were studied in 303 T2DM subjects (227 with MetS and 76 without MetS and 131 normal subjects without diabetes and MetS. Statistical analysis showed that the dominant and additive models of PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism showed a weak association with T2DM without MetS (OR=2.35, P=0.045; OR=1.67, P=0.058. On the other hand, the recessive model of the tPA Alu-repeat I/D polymorphism showed an association with T2DM with MetS (OR=3.32, P=0.013 whereas the dominant and additive models of the tPA Alu-repeat I/D polymorphism were not associated with T2DM either with or without MetS.

  15. Central venous catheter associated thrombosis of major veins: thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenhuis, S.; van't Hek, L. G.; Vlasveld, L. T.; Kröger, R.; Dubbelman, R.; van Tol, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Major thromboses can occur in the venous system in association with central venous catheters. This usually necessitates removal of the catheter. The effectiveness of low dose recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in combination with heparin was assessed in patients with central

  16. Statin Use and Functional Outcome after Tissue Plasminogen Activator Treatment in Acute Ischaemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, I; Uyttenboogaart, M; Koopman, K; De Keyser, J; Luijckx, G J

    Background: Preliminary findings suggest that statins may have a neuroprotective effect in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. This study investigated whether patients prior on statin therapy and treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for acute ischaemic stroke have a better functional

  17. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Prescription and Administration Errors within a Regional Stroke System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Lee S; Tkach, Aleksander; Lingenfelter, Erin M; Dehoney, Sarah B; Rollo, Jeannie; de Havenon, Adam; DeWitt, L Dana; Grantz, Matthew R; Wang, Haimei; Wold, Jana J; Hannon, Peter M; Weathered, Natalie R; Majersik, Jennifer J

    2016-03-01

    Intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) utilization in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) requires weight-based dosing and a standardized infusion rate. In our regional network, we have tried to minimize tPA dosing errors. We describe the frequency and types of tPA administration errors made in our comprehensive stroke center (CSC) and at community hospitals (CHs) prior to transfer. Using our stroke quality database, we extracted clinical and pharmacy information on all patients who received IV tPA from 2010-11 at the CSC or CH prior to transfer. All records were analyzed for the presence of inclusion/exclusion criteria deviations or tPA errors in prescription, reconstitution, dispensing, or administration, and for association with outcomes. We identified 131 AIS cases treated with IV tPA: 51% female; mean age 68; 32% treated at the CSC, and 68% at CHs (including 26% by telestroke) from 22 CHs. tPA prescription and administration errors were present in 64% of all patients (41% CSC, 75% CH, P < .001), the most common being incorrect dosage for body weight (19% CSC, 55% CH, P < .001). Of the 27 overdoses, there were 3 deaths due to systemic hemorrhage or ICH. Nonetheless, outcomes (parenchymal hematoma, mortality, modified Rankin Scale score) did not differ between CSC and CH patients nor between those with and without errors. Despite focus on minimization of tPA administration errors in AIS patients, such errors were very common in our regional stroke system. Although an association between tPA errors and stroke outcomes was not demonstrated, quality assurance mechanisms are still necessary to reduce potentially dangerous, avoidable errors. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. All rights reserved.

  18. Central Venous Catheter-directed Tissue Plasminogen Activator in Massive Pulmonary Embolism

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Gulati

    2018-01-01

    We present the case of an 88-year-old female who presented to the emergency department (ED) with suspected massive pulmonary embolism (PE) causing respiratory failure, right heart strain, and shock, who despite early and aggressive resuscitation with vasopressors and continuous peripheral infusion of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), suffered a cardiac arrest in the ED. We describe the approach of a tPA bolus directed through a central venous catheter, resulting in return of spontaneous cir...

  19. Tissue-type plasminogen activator contributes to remodeling of the rat ductus arteriosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Junichi; Nicho, Naoki; Zheng, Yun-Wen; Ichikawa, Yasuhiro; Ito, Satoko; Umemura, Masanari; Fujita, Takayuki; Ito, Shuichi; Taniguchi, Hideki; Asou, Toshihide; Masuda, Munetaka; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2018-01-01

    Aims The ductus arteriosus (DA) closes after birth to adapt to the robust changes in hemodynamics, which require intimal thickening (IT) to occur. The smooth muscle cells of the DA have been reported to play important roles in IT formation. However, the roles of the endothelial cells (ECs) have not been fully investigated. We herein focused on tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), which is a DA EC dominant gene, and investigated its contribution to IT formation in the DA. Methods and results ECs from the DA and aorta were isolated from fetal rats using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. RT-PCR showed that the t-PA mRNA expression level was 2.7-fold higher in DA ECs than in aortic ECs from full-term rat fetuses (gestational day 21). A strong immunoreaction for t-PA was detected in pre-term and full-term rat DA ECs. t-PA-mediated plasminogen-plasmin conversion activates gelatinase matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Gelatin zymography revealed that plasminogen supplementation significantly promoted activation of the elastolytic enzyme MMP-2 in rat DA ECs. In situ zymography demonstrated that marked gelatinase activity was observed at the site of disruption in the internal elastic laminae (IEL) in full-term rat DA. In a three-dimensional vascular model, EC-mediated plasminogen-plasmin conversion augmented the IEL disruption. In vivo administration of plasminogen to pre-term rat fetuses (gestational day 19), in which IT is poorly formed, promoted IEL disruption accompanied by gelatinase activation and enhanced IT formation in the DA. Additionally, experiments using five human DA tissues demonstrated that the t-PA expression level was 3.7-fold higher in the IT area than in the tunica media. t-PA protein expression and gelatinase activity were also detected in the IT area of the human DAs. Conclusion t-PA expressed in ECs may help to form IT of the DA via activation of MMP-2 and disruption of IEL. PMID:29304073

  20. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischaemic stroke: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardlaw, Joanna M; Murray, Veronica; Berge, Eivind; del Zoppo, Gregory; Sandercock, Peter; Lindley, Richard L; Cohen, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA, alteplase) improved functional outcome in patients treated soon after acute ischaemic stroke in randomised trials, but licensing is restrictive and use varies widely. The IST-3 trial adds substantial new data. We therefore assessed all the evidence from randomised trials for rt-PA in acute ischaemic stroke in an updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods We searched for randomised trials of intravenous rt-PA versus control given within 6 h of onset of acute ischaemic stroke up to March 30, 2012. We estimated summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CI in the primary analysis for prespecified outcomes within 7 days and at the final follow-up of all patients treated up to 6 h after stroke. Findings In up to 12 trials (7012 patients), rt-PA given within 6 h of stroke significantly increased the odds of being alive and independent (modified Rankin Scale, mRS 0–2) at final follow-up (1611/3483 [46·3%] vs 1434/3404 [42·1%], OR 1·17, 95% CI 1·06–1·29; p=0·001), absolute increase of 42 (19–66) per 1000 people treated, and favourable outcome (mRS 0–1) absolute increase of 55 (95% CI 33–77) per 1000. The benefit of rt-PA was greatest in patients treated within 3 h (mRS 0–2, 365/896 [40·7%] vs 280/883 [31·7%], 1·53, 1·26–1·86, p<0·0001), absolute benefit of 90 (46–135) per 1000 people treated, and mRS 0–1 (283/896 [31·6%] vs 202/883 [22·9%], 1·61, 1·30–1·90; p<0·0001), absolute benefit 87 (46–128) per 1000 treated. Numbers of deaths within 7 days were increased (250/2807 [8·9%] vs 174/2728 [6·4%], 1·44, 1·18–1·76; p=0·0003), but by final follow-up the excess was no longer significant (679/3548 [19·1%] vs 640/3464 [18·5%], 1·06, 0·94–1·20; p=0·33). Symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (272/3548 [7·7%] vs 63/3463 [1·8%], 3·72, 2·98–4·64; p<0·0001) accounted for most of the early excess deaths. Patients older than 80 years achieved similar

  1. Regulatory T cells ameliorate tissue plasminogen activator-induced brain haemorrhage after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Leilei; Li, Peiying; Zhu, Wen; Cai, Wei; Liu, Zongjian; Wang, Yanling; Luo, Wenli; Stetler, Ruth A; Leak, Rehana K; Yu, Weifeng; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun; Chen, Gang; Hu, Xiaoming

    2017-07-01

    Delayed thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) may exacerbate blood-brain barrier breakdown after ischaemic stroke and lead to lethal haemorrhagic transformation. The immune system is a dynamic modulator of stroke response, and excessive immune cell accumulation in the cerebral vasculature is associated with compromised integrity of the blood-brain barrier. We previously reported that regulatory T cells, which function to suppress excessive immune responses, ameliorated blood-brain barrier damage after cerebral ischaemia. This study assessed the impact of regulatory T cells in the context of tPA-induced brain haemorrhage and investigated the underlying mechanisms of action. The number of circulating regulatory T cells in stroke patients was dramatically reduced soon after stroke onset (84 acute ischaemic stroke patients with or without intravenous tPA treatment, compared to 115 age and gender-matched healthy controls). Although stroke patients without tPA treatment gradually repopulated the numbers of circulating regulatory T cells within the first 7 days after stroke, post-ischaemic tPA treatment led to sustained suppression of regulatory T cells in the blood. We then used the murine suture and embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion models of stroke to investigate the therapeutic potential of adoptive regulatory T cell transfer against tPA-induced haemorrhagic transformation. Delayed administration of tPA (10 mg/kg) resulted in haemorrhagic transformation in the ischaemic territory 1 day after ischaemia. When regulatory T cells (2 × 106/mouse) were intravenously administered immediately after delayed tPA treatment in ischaemic mice, haemorrhagic transformation was significantly decreased, and this was associated with improved sensorimotor functions. Blood-brain barrier disruption and tight junction damages were observed in the presence of delayed tPA after stroke, but were mitigated by regulatory T cell transfer. Mechanistic

  2. Mean transit times and the sites of synthesis and catabolism of tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 in young subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M; Petersen, K.R.; Vinberg, N

    2001-01-01

    Using an invasive technique, we studied the mean transit time, the net quantitative turnover rate, and the sites of synthesis and catabolism of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) in healthy young volunteers in the fasting, steady state. Blood....../min, respectively. The extraction fraction and the mean transit time in the splanchnic circulation were, respectively, 0.63 and 5.6 min for active t-PA and 0.17 and 21 min for t-PA antigen. Active PAI-1 was synthesized in the splanchnic circulation at a rate of 890 IU/min and had a mean transit time of about 9...

  3. Subretinal tissue plasminogen-assisted vitrectomy for posttraumatic full-thickness macular hole with submacular hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Kumar, Vinod; Ravani, Raghav; Agarwal, Sahil

    2018-01-01

    A young male presented with diminution of vision left eye, attributable to full-thickness macular hole, and submacular hemorrhage, following closed globe injury 2 weeks ago. The patient was managed successfully with 25-gauge vitrectomy, subretinal injection of tissue plasminogen activator and aspiration of liquefied blood through the macular hole, internal limiting membrane peeling, short-acting gas tamponade, and prone positioning. This resulted in good visual improvement, type 1 macular hole closure, and restoration of foveal architecture. The outcome and rationale of treatment in this unique scenario is discussed. PMID:29480275

  4. Prevotella intermedia stimulates tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 expression via multiple signaling pathways in human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Su-Min; He, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Ming; Shu, Lei

    2011-06-01

    Prevotella intermedia is an important periodontal pathogen that induces various inflammatory and immune responses. In this study, we investigated the effects of P. intermedia on the plasminogen system in human periodontal ligament (hPDL) cells and explored the signaling pathways involved. Using semi-quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and quantitative real-time RT-qPCR, we demonstrated that P. intermedia challenge increased tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-2 expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, but exerted no influence on urokinase-type plasminogen activator and PAI-1mRNA expression in hPDL cells. Prevotella intermedia stimulation also enhanced tPA protein secretion as confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot results revealed that P. intermedia treatment increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase (p38). ERK, JNK and protein kinase C inhibitors significantly attenuated the P. intermedia-induced tPA and PAI-2 expression. Furthermore, p38 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors markedly decreased PAI-2 expression, whereas they showed no or little inhibition on tPA expression. In contrast, inhibition of protein kinase A greatly enhanced the upregulatory effect of P. intermedia on tPA and PAI-2 expression. Our results suggest that P. intermedia may contribute to periodontal tissue destruction by upregulating tPA and PAI-2 expression in hPDL cells via multiple signaling pathways. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of the MMP9 gene in hemorrhagic transformations after tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cadenas, Israel; Del Río-Espínola, Alberto; Carrera, Caty; Domingues-Montanari, Sophie; Mendióroz, Maite; Delgado, Pilar; Rosell, Anna; Ribó, Marc; Giralt, Dolors; Quintana, Manolo; Castellanos, Mar; Obach, Victor; Martínez, Sergi; Freijo, Mari Mar; Jiménez-Conde, Jordi; Roquer, Jaume; Martí-Fábregas, Joan; Molina, Carlos A; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Montaner, Joan

    2012-05-01

    Despite the benefits of tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment, some stroke patients experience adverse hemorrhagic transformations (HT). Plasma protein levels of MMP9 have been associated with HT occurrence. We aimed to analyze the association of the MMP9 gene with HT occurrence. We analyzed the MMP9 gene in blood samples from 885 stroke patients treated with tissue-type plasminogen activator by tag-SNP, imputed SNP, direct sequencing, and RNA expression. We did not observe any significant association between MMP9 genetic variations or MMP9 expression and HT occurrence. Moreover, no association was found between MMP9 expression and MMP9 polymorphisms. Genetic variations in the MMP9 gene are not associated with HT occurrence in tissue-type plasminogen activator-treated patients.

  6. Purification of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) protein from transplastomic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli Nasab, Maryam; Jalali Javaran, Mokhtar; Cusido, Rosa M; Palazon, Javier

    2016-11-01

    Plants are low cost platforms for the production of recombinant proteins, but their complexity renders the purification of plant recombinant proteins more difficult than proteins expressed in yeast or bacteria. Plastid transformation enables high-level expression of foreign genes and the accumulation of recombinant proteins in plastid organelles. Histidine (His) tags are widely used for affinity purification of recombinant proteins in a nickel column. The human tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is one of the most important pharmaceutical recombinant proteins involved in the breakdown of blood clots in different parts of the body. The truncated form of the tissue plasminogen activator (K2S) has a longer plasma half-life, better diffusion into the clot, and higher fibrinolytic activity. In a construct designed to insert the K2S gene in the tobacco chloroplast, the sequence of six histidines and a factor Xa protease site was fused to the C-terminus of the K2S protein. The presence and amount of tPA recombinant protein in transplastomic tobacco plants was estimated by ELISA analysis using a specific antibody. The protein was purified from total soluble protein, insoluble protein aggregates and the protein was extracted from the isolated chloroplast using nickel resin and a chromatography column. After digestion of the purified protein with factor Xa, the presence of the purified tPA protein was confirmed by western blot analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Polymorphism of the blood clot lysis enzyme tissue-type plasminogen activator is associated with myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bom, J.G. van der; Knijff, P. de; Bots, M.L.; Haverkate, F.; Hofman, A.; Kluft, C.; Grobbee, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Impaired fibrinolysis has been suggested to be associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction. An insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) gene has been described which may be associated with impaired fibrinolysis. We studied the

  8. Does low protein concentration of tissue-type plasminogen activator predict a low risk of spontaneous deep vein thrombosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, J; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen; Jespersen, J

    1995-01-01

    Many reports have demonstrated an abnormal fibrinolysis in a subset of patients with deep vein thrombosis. We have studied systemic global fibrinolytic activity and protein concentrations of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) in plasma of 25...... young patients with a previous instance of spontaneous deep vein thrombosis documented by phlebography and in 50 healthy controls. The two populations were comparable with respect to a number of base-line variables (age, height, weight, etc.), while the patients had significantly lower fibrinolytic...

  9. STUDY OF HEARING OUTCOMES IN SUDDEN SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS TREATED WITH TISSUE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR (TPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Krishna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SSHNL is a clinical condition that requires immediate management. There are many treatment options, which may not always revert the hearing to normal. Not only recording the degree of hearing loss, but also establishing the concurrent dysfunction of saccule by VEMP has facilitated a new approach to treatment strategy. Recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator ((rtPA proved its efficacy in stroke and subsequently considered an option in the management of ISSNHL. The curren t study, conducted at different centres, on 15 patients utilized rtPA. The results showed a promising trend when saccular pathology is also evident by VEMP in association with Hearing loss. We recommend use of rtPA as primary modality in cases of ISSNHL wi th Saccular involvement.

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study for Circulating Tissue Plasminogen Activator Levels and Functional Follow-Up Implicates Endothelial STXBP5 and STX2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Jie; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Yamkauchi, Munekazu; Trompet, Stella; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Chen, Wei-Min; Smith, Nicholas L.; Kleber, Marcus E.; Shin, So-Youn; Becker, Diane M.; Tang, Weihong; Dehghan, Abbas; Johnson, Andrew D.; Vinh Truong, [No Value; Folkersen, Lasse; Yang, Qiong; Oudot-Mellkah, Tiphaine; Buckley, Brendan M.; Moore, Jason H.; Williams, Frances M. K.; Campbell, Harry; Silbernagel, Guenther; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Tofler, Geoffrey H.; Navis, Gerjan J.; DeStefano, Anita; Wright, Alan F.; Chen, Ming-Huei; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Rumley, Ann; Bookman, Ebony B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Chen, Fang; Keene, Keith L.; Franco, Oscar H.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Carter, Angela M.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Sattar, Naveed; Bis, Joshua C.; Ikram, Mohammad A.; Sale, Michele M.; McKnight, Barbara; Fornage, Myriam; Ford, Ian; Taylor, Kent; Slagboom, P. Eline; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Goodall, Alison H.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Furie, Karen L.; Cushman, Mary; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Basu, Saonli; Matijevic, Nena; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Wilson, James F.; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P.; Tracy, Russell P.; Polasek, Ozren; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Grant, Peter J.; Hillege, Hans L.; Cambien, Francois; Stott, David J.; Lowe, Gordon D.; Spector, Timothy D.; Meigs, James B.; Marz, Winfried; Eriksson, Per; Becker, Lewis C.; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Soranzo, Nicole; Williams, Scott M.; Hayward, Caroline; van der Harst, Pim; Hamsten, Anders; Lowenstein, Charles J.; Strachan, David P.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.

    Objective Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease, catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, the major enzyme responsible for endogenous fibrinolysis. In some populations, elevated plasma levels of tPA have been associated with myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular

  11. High-density lipoprotein-based therapy reduces the hemorrhagic complications associated with tissue plasminogen activator treatment in experimental stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapergue, Bertrand; Dang, Bao Quoc; Desilles, Jean-Philippe; Ortiz-Munoz, Guadalupe; Delbosc, Sandrine; Loyau, Stéphane; Louedec, Liliane; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Mazighi, Mikael; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Meilhac, Olivier; Amarenco, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    We have previously reported that intravenous injection of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) was neuroprotective in an embolic stroke model. We hypothesized that HDL vasculoprotective actions on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may decrease hemorrhagic transformation-associated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration in acute stroke. We used tPA alone or in combination with HDLs in vivo in 2 models of focal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) (embolic and 4-hour monofilament MCAO) and in vitro in a model of BBB. Sprague-Dawley rats were submitted to MCAO, n=12 per group. The rats were then randomly injected with tPA (10 mg/kg) or saline with or without human plasma purified-HDL (10 mg/kg). The therapeutic effects of HDL and BBB integrity were assessed blindly 24 hours later. The integrity of the BBB was also tested using an in vitro model of human cerebral endothelial cells under oxygen-glucose deprivation. tPA-treated groups had significantly higher mortality and rate of hemorrhagic transformation at 24 hours in both MCAO models. Cotreatment with HDL significantly reduced stroke-induced mortality versus tPA alone (by 42% in filament MCAO, P=0.009; by 73% in embolic MCAO, P=0.05) and tPA-induced intracerebral parenchymal hematoma (by 92% in filament MCAO, by 100% in embolic MCAO; Phemorrhagic transformation in rat models of MCAO. Both in vivo and in vitro results support the vasculoprotective action of HDLs on BBB under ischemic conditions.

  12. Novel actions of tissue-type plasminogen activator in chronic kidney disease: a paradigm shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kebin; Mars, Wendy M.; Liu, Youhua

    2009-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is traditionally viewed as a simple serine protease whose main function is to convert plasminogen into biologically active plasmin. As a protease, tPA plays a crucial role in regulating blood fibrinolysis, in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular matrix (ECM) and in modulating the post-translational activation of growth factors. However, emerging evidence indicates that tPA may also function as a cytokine that transmits its signal across the cell membrane, initiates a diverse array of intracellular signaling, and dictates gene expression in the nuclei. Structurally, tPA is a kringle-containing protein that shares significant similarity to other classic cytokines such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP). Although there is no dedicated receptor, tPA binds to the cell membrane low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1), triggers LRP-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and activates various intracellular signaling. As a cytokine, tPA plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of renal interstitial fibrosis through diverse mechanisms. It induces matrix matelloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) gene expression in renal interstitial fibroblasts, which causes the destruction of the tubular basement membrane (TBM), thereby facilitating tubular epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). tPA also potentiates myofibroblast activation from quiescent interstitial fibroblasts through LRP-1-mediated recruitment of β1 integrin signaling. Furthermore, tPA acts as a survival factor that protects renal interstitial fibroblasts/myofibroblasts from apoptosis, thereby resulting in an expansion of myofibroblast populations in diseased kidney. Together, a growing body of evidence has implicated tPA as a fibrogenic cytokine that promotes the progression of kidney diseases. These new findings have radically changed our conception of tPA in renal fibrogenesis and represent a paradigm shift towards uncovering

  13. Calcium spirulan as an inducer of tissue-type plasminogen activator in human fetal lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Y; Hayashi, T; Hayashi, K; Ozawa, T; Niiya, K; Sakuragawa, N

    1997-03-01

    Calcium spirulan (Ca-SP), a novel sulfated polysaccharide isolated from the blue-green alga Spirulina platensis, has been found to have antiviral and heparin cofactor II-dependent antithrombin activities. We have obtained evidence that Ca-SP is a potent inducer of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) production. The addition of Ca-SP to a culture of IMR-90 human fetal lung fibroblasts increased t-PA concentrations in the conditioned medium, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but in the cell lysate, t-PA concentrations were unchanged, suggesting that t-PA induced by Ca-SP is easily secreted into the conditioned medium. The amount of newly synthesized t-PA in IMR-90 cells, as measured by labeling with [35S]methionine and subsequent immunoprecipitation of t-PA from conditioned medium, was significantly increased by Ca-SP-stimulation. However, Ca-SP did not increase the t-PA mRNA levels. As previously reported, thrombin stimulated t-PA gene transcription in IMR-90 cells, and the simultaneous treatment with Ca-SP and thrombin caused further enhancement of t-PA production, in a synergistic manner. It would thus appear that Ca-SP increases t-PA production through post-transcriptional processes. IMR-90 cells also produce plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), but Ca-SP showed little effect on the PAI-1 production. H-SP, which was obtained by removing the calcium from Ca-SP, had no effect on the t-PA production. Na-SP, which was prepared by replacement of the calcium with sodium, stimulated the t-PA production similarly to Ca-SP. Thus, Ca-SP specifically induces t-PA production, and the molecular conformation of Ca-SP maintained by Ca or Na may be essential for the stimulation of t-PA synthesis.

  14. Role of plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 in radiation-induced normal tissues injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrahmani, R.

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an essential tool for cancer treatment, but there is a balance between benefits and risks related to the use of ionizing radiation: the objective is to deliver a maximum dose to the tumour to destroy or to sterilize it while protecting surrounding normal tissues. Radio-induced damages to normal tissues are therefore a limiting factor when increasing the dose delivered to the tumour. One of the objectives of this research thesis is to bring to the fore a relationship between the initiation of lesions and the development of late damages, more particularly in the intestine, and to identify the involved molecular actors and their inter-connectivity. After a first part presenting ionizing radiation, describing biological effects of ionizing radiation and their use in radiotherapy, presenting the intestine and the endothelium and discussing the intestine radio-sensitivity, discussing the radio-induced intestine damages and radiotherapy-induced complications, and presenting the plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) and its behaviour in presence of ionizing radiation, two articles are reproduced. The first one addresses the effect of a pharmacological inhibition and of genetic deficiency in PAI-1 on the evolution of radio-induced intestine lesions. The second one discusses the fact that radio-induced PAI-1-related death of endothelial cells determines the severity of early radio-induced intestine lesions

  15. Airway tissue plasminogen activator prevents acute mortality due to lethal sulfur mustard inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veress, Livia A; Anderson, Dana R; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B; Houin, Paul R; Rioux, Jacqueline S; Garlick, Rhonda B; Loader, Joan E; Paradiso, Danielle C; Smith, Russell W; Rancourt, Raymond C; Holmes, Wesley W; White, Carl W

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical weapon stockpiled today in volatile regions of the world. SM inhalation causes a life-threatening airway injury characterized by airway obstruction from fibrin casts, which can lead to respiratory failure and death. Mortality in those requiring intubation is more than 80%. No therapy exists to prevent mortality after SM exposure. Our previous work using the less toxic analog of SM, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, identified tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) an effective rescue therapy for airway cast obstruction (Veress, L. A., Hendry-Hofer, T. B., Loader, J. E., Rioux, J. S., Garlick, R. B., and White, C. W. (2013). Tissue plasminogen activator prevents mortality from sulfur mustard analog-induced airway obstruction. Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 48, 439-447). It is not known if exposure to neat SM vapor, the primary agent used in chemical warfare, will also cause death due to airway casts, and if tPA could be used to improve outcome. Adult rats were exposed to SM, and when oxygen saturation reached less than 85% (median: 6.5 h), intratracheal tPA or placebo was given under isoflurane anesthesia every 4 h for 48 h. Oxygen saturation, clinical distress, and arterial blood gases were assessed. Microdissection was done to assess airway obstruction by casts. Intratracheal tPA treatment eliminated mortality (0% at 48 h) and greatly improved morbidity after lethal SM inhalation (100% death in controls). tPA normalized SM-associated hypoxemia, hypercarbia, and lactic acidosis, and improved respiratory distress. Moreover, tPA treatment resulted in greatly diminished airway casts, preventing respiratory failure from airway obstruction. tPA given via airway more than 6 h after exposure prevented death from lethal SM inhalation, and normalized oxygenation and ventilation defects, thereby rescuing from respiratory distress and failure. Intra-airway tPA should be considered as a life-saving rescue therapy after a significant SM

  16. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D Robinson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available NMDA receptors (NMDARs play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM but not high (50 μM concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-AP. Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and RAP, a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs.

  17. Interactions between iodinated contrast media and tissue plasminogen activator: In vitro comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vörös, Eszter; Deres, László; Halmosi, Róbert; Várady, Edit; Tóth, Kálmán; Battyáni, István

    2017-01-01

    Iodinated contrast media (Xenetix®, Ultravist®, Omnipaque®, Visipaque® and Iomeron®) used for computed tomography (CT) may decrease fibrinolysis by recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). We hypothesized that receiving iodinated contrast media before rt-PA may impair thrombolysis as measured by a new model system. Whole blood from Wistar Kyoto rats (n = 10) was obtained and allowed to form blood clots. Thrombolysis was performed by placing individually the prepared clots into 15 mL tubes and adding 5 mL saline buffer, 100μg rt-PA and a different contrast media; adjusting the quantity of iodine to either 30 mg or 60 mg. The thrombolytic efficacy was quantified by measuring the optical density (OD415) of the supernatant at different time points, namely at 0, 30, 60, and 90 min. There was a significant decrease in clot lysis efficiency observed in presence of iodine containing contrast media comparing to positive control group. Moreover, when the quantity of iodine was increased from 30 mg to 60 mg; the dissolution rate downturned with additional ∼50%. In conclusion, our study suggests that high dose of iodine potentially could negatively affect the efficiency of the thrombolytic therapy performed by rt-PA.

  18. Topical tissue plasminogen activator appears ineffective for the clearance of intraocular fibrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaan, J; Latimer, W B

    1998-06-01

    To determine the efficacy of topical tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for the resolution of postoperative or inflammatory intraocular fibrinous exudates. Each treatment consisted of drops of 1 mg/ml tPA given 9 times 5 minutes apart. Records were reviewed and the results at 24 and 48 hours were recorded. Sixty-two patients had a total of 94 treatments. Fibrin exudates following intraocular surgery in 34 patients were treated 44 times. In 6 patients there was a positive result. Fibrin associated with intraocular infection was treated in 9 patients. None showed clear improvement. Nineteen patients had a total of 34 treatments for poorly controlled intraocular pressure (IOP) after glaucoma surgery. Five patients showed adequate control of the IOP, 12 did not change, and 2 had a questionable improvement. Eleven patients had adequate IOP control after additional treatment. Seven required suture lysis, 2 ab interno bleb revision, and 2 YAG capsulotomy or iridotomy to reduce the IOP to an acceptable level. Within the limits of this retrospective study and taking into account that fibrin may resolve spontaneously, it appears that topical tPA drops are not effective for the liquefaction of intraocular fibrin after surgery or in association with intraocular inflammation. They did not improve IOP control after glaucoma surgery.

  19. Improvement of Psychotic Symptoms and the Role of Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Hoirisch-Clapauch

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA mediates a number of processes that are pivotal for synaptogenesis and remodeling of synapses, including proteolysis of the brain extracellular matrix, degradation of adhesion molecules, activation of neurotrophins, and activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor. Abnormalities in these processes have been consistently described in psychotic disorders. In this paper, we review the physiological roles of tPA, focusing on conditions characterized by low tPA activity, which are prevalent in schizophrenia. We then describe how tPA activity is influenced by lifestyle interventions and nutritional supplements that may ameliorate psychotic symptoms. Next, we analyze the role of tPA in the mechanism of action of hormones and medications effective in mitigating psychotic symptoms, such as pregnenolone, estrogen, oxytocin, dopamine D3 receptor antagonists, retinoic acid, valproic acid, cannabidiol, sodium nitroprusside, N-acetyl cysteine, and warfarin. We also review evidence that tPA participates in the mechanism by which electroconvulsive therapy and cigarette smoking may reduce psychotic symptoms.

  20. Covalent-display of an active chimeric-recombinant tissue plasminogen activator on polyhydroxybutyrate granules surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafizi, Akram; Malboobi, Mohamad Ali; Jalali-Javaran, Mokhtar; Maliga, Pal; Alizadeh, Houshang

    2017-11-01

    To develop a deliberately engineered expression and purification system for an active chimeric-recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (crtPA) using co-expression with polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) operon genes. Fusion of crtPA with PhaC-synthase simplified the purification steps through crtPA sedimentation with PHB particles. Moreover, the covalently immobilized crtPA was biologically active as shown in a chromogenic assay. Upon WELQut-protease activity, the released single-chain crtPA converted to the two-chain form which produced a pattern of bands with approx. MW of 32 and 11 kDa in addition to the full length crtPA. Fusion of crtPA with PhaC-synthase not only simplifies purification from the bacterial host lysate, but also co-expression of PHB operon genes creates an oxidative environment, thereby reducing the inclusion body formation possibility. The isolated crtPA-PHB granules exhibited crtPA serine protease activity. Thus, fusion with the PhaC protein could be used as a scaffold for covalent displaying of functional disulfide-rich proteins.

  1. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Alters Intracellular Sequestration of Zinc through Interaction with the Transporter ZIP4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmetsberger, Jaime; Mirrione, Martine M.; Zhou, Chun; Fernandez-Monreal, Monica; Siddiq, Mustafa M.; Ji, Kyungmin; Tsirka, Stella E. (SBU)

    2010-09-17

    Glutamatergic neurons contain free zinc packaged into neurotransmitter-loaded synaptic vesicles. Upon neuronal activation, the vesicular contents are released into the synaptic space, whereby the zinc modulates activity of postsynaptic neurons though interactions with receptors, transporters and exchangers. However, high extracellular concentrations of zinc trigger seizures and are neurotoxic if substantial amounts of zinc reenter the cells via ion channels and accumulate in the cytoplasm. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a secreted serine protease, is also proepileptic and excitotoxic. However, tPA counters zinc toxicity by promoting zinc import back into the neurons in a sequestered form that is nontoxic. Here, we identify the zinc influx transporter, ZIP4, as the pathway through which tPA mediates the zinc uptake. We show that ZIP4 is upregulated after excitotoxin stimulation of the mouse, male and female, hippocampus. ZIP4 physically interacts with tPA, correlating with an increased intracellular zinc influx and lysosomal sequestration. Changes in prosurvival signals support the idea that this sequestration results in neuroprotection. These experiments identify a mechanism via which neurons use tPA to efficiently neutralize the toxic effects of excessive concentrations of free zinc.

  2. Tissue type plasminogen activator regulates myeloid-cell dependent neoangiogenesis during tissue regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohki, Makiko; Ohki, Yuichi; Ishihara, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    tissue regeneration is not well understood. Bone marrow (BM)-derived myeloid cells facilitate angiogenesis during tissue regeneration. Here, we report that a serpin-resistant form of tPA by activating the extracellular proteases matrix metalloproteinase-9 and plasmin expands the myeloid cell pool...

  3. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Prevents Mortality from Sulfur Mustard Analog–Induced Airway Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Loader, Joan E.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; White, Carl W.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes the rare but life-threatening disorder of plastic bronchitis, characterized by bronchial cast formation, resulting in severe airway obstruction that can lead to respiratory failure and death. Mortality in those requiring intubation is greater than 80%. To date, no antidote exists for SM toxicity. In addition, therapies for plastic bronchitis are solely anecdotal, due to lack of systematic research available to assess drug efficacy in improving mortality and/or morbidity. Adult rats exposed to SM analog were treated with intratracheal tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) (0.15–0.7 mg/kg, 5.5 and 6.5 h), compared with controls (no treatment, isoflurane, and placebo). Respiratory distress and pulse oximetry were assessed (for 12 or 48 h), and arterial blood gases were obtained at study termination (12 h). Microdissection of fixed lungs was done to assess airway obstruction by casts. Optimal intratracheal tPA treatment (0.7 mg/kg) completely eliminated mortality (0% at 48 h), and greatly improved morbidity in this nearly uniformly fatal disease model (90–100% mortality at 48 h). tPA normalized plastic bronchitis–associated hypoxemia, hypercarbia, and lactic acidosis, and improved respiratory distress (i.e., clinical scores) while decreasing airway fibrin casts. Intratracheal tPA diminished airway-obstructive fibrin–containing casts while improving clinical respiratory distress, pulmonary gas exchange, tissue oxygenation, and oxygen utilization in our model of severe chemically induced plastic bronchitis. Most importantly, mortality, which was associated with hypoxemia and clinical respiratory distress, was eliminated. PMID:23258228

  4. Combination Low Dose Tissue Type-Plasminogen Activator plus Annexin A2 for Improving Thrombolytic Stroke Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghua eJiang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Risk of hemorrhagic transformation, incomplete reperfusion, neurotoxicity and a short treatment time window comprise major challenges for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA thrombolytic stroke therapy. Improving tPA therapy has become one of the highest priorities in the stroke field. This mini review article focuses on our recent efforts aimed at evaluating a novel combination approach of low-dose tPA plus recombinant annexin A2 (rA2, a tPA and plasminogen co-receptor, that might enhance tPA thrombolytic efficacy, while reducing its associated complications related to intracerebral hemorrhagic (ICH transformation. Results of our experimental studies using a focal embolic stroke model in rats support the feasibility of the combination approach and suggest the potential for successful clinical translation.

  5. Tissue-type plasminogen activator-binding RNA aptamers inhibiting low-density lipoprotein receptor family-mediated internalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Nils; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A; Helsen, Nicky; Andreasen, Peter A; Dupont, Daniel M

    2015-07-01

    Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA, trade name Alteplase), currently the only drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of cerebral ischaemic stroke, has been implicated in a number of adverse effects reportedly mediated by interactions with the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) family receptors, including neuronal cell death and an increased risk of cerebral haemorrhage. The tissue-type plasminogen activator is the principal initiator of thrombolysis in human physiology, an effect that is mediated directly via localised activation of the plasmin zymogen plasminogen at the surface of fibrin clots in the vascular lumen. Here, we sought to identify a ligand to tPA capable of inhibiting the relevant LDL family receptors without interfering with the fibrinolytic activity of tPA. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) was employed to isolate tPA-binding RNA aptamers, which were characterised in biochemical assays of tPA association to low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1, an LDL receptor family member); tPA-mediated in vitro and ex vivo clot lysis; and tPA-mediated plasminogen activation in the absence and presence of a stimulating soluble fibrin fragment. Two aptamers, K18 and K32, had minimal effects on clot lysis, but were able to efficiently inhibit tPA-LRP-1 association and LDL receptor family-mediated endocytosis in human vascular endothelial cells and astrocytes. These observations suggest that coadministration alongside tPA may be a viable strategy to improve the safety of thrombolytic treatment of cerebral ischaemic stroke by restricting tPA activity to the vascular lumen.

  6. A steady-state template model that describes the kinetics of fibrin-stimulated [Glu1]- and [Lys78]plasminogen activation by native tissue-type plasminogen activator and variants that lack either the finger or kringle-2 domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horrevoets, A. J.; Pannekoek, H.; Nesheim, M. E.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of activation of both [Glu1]- and [Lys78]Plg(S741C-fluorescein by native (recombinant) tissue-type plasminogen activator and its deletion variants lacking either the finger or kringle-2 domain were measured by fluorescence within fully polymerized fibrin clots. The kinetics conform to

  7. Tissue plasminogen activator-assisted vitrectomy for submacular hemorrhage due to age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Gok

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment efficacy of vitrectomy combined with subretinal recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA and factors affecting visual improvement in patients with submacular hemorrhage (SMH due to neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 17 consecutive patients diagnosed with SMH secondary to nAMD were retrospectively reviewed. The initial surgical procedure involved a 23-gauge transconjunctival vitrectomy, subretinal r-tPA application through a self-sealing inferior retinotomy, and sulfur hexafluoride gas for tamponade in all patients. The duration, size, and thickness of the hemorrhage and the pre- and post-operative visual acuity (VA using a Snellen chart were recorded. VA was converted to logMAR for statistical analysis. Results: The average duration and size of the SMH were 12.8 ± 18.2 days and 8.6 ± 5.3 disc areas, respectively. The mean follow-up time was 16.9 ± 4.7 months. A statistically significant visual improvement was found when comparing initial VA with postoperative best-corrected VA (BCVA and final BCVA (Wilcoxon rank test, P ≤ 0.01. There was no significant correlation between the size of the hemorrhage and postoperative BCVA and final BCVA (Spearman's rho test. There was no statistically significant correlation between the initial VA and postoperative BCVA and final BCVA (Spearman's rho test. There was no significant correlation between the duration of hemorrhage and postoperative BCVA and final BCVA (Spearman's rho test. The preoperative thickness of hemorrhage (747.5 ± 30 μm was not correlated with postoperative BCVA or final BCVA (Pearson's test. Conclusions: Vitrectomy combined with subretinal r-tPA injection and gas tamponade is an effective surgical intervention to preserve VA in selected patients with apparent SMH.

  8. Preparation of thermosensitive magnetic liposome encapsulated recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for targeted thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hao-Lung [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Jyh-Ping, E-mail: jpchen@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Craniofacial Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Health Industry and Technology, Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Tai-Shan, New Taipei City 24301, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) was encapsulated in thermosensitive magnetic liposome (TML) prepared from 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, distearolyphosphatidyl ethanolamine-N-poly(ethylene glycol) 2000, cholesterol and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles by solvent evaporation/sonication and freeze-thaw cycles method. Response surface methodology was proved to be a powerful tool to predict the drug encapsulation efficiency and temperature-sensitive drug release. Validation experiments verified the accuracy of the model that provides a simple and effective method for fabricating TML with controllable encapsulation efficiency and predictable temperature-sensitive drug release behavior. The prepared samples were characterized for physico-chemical properties by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. Temperature-sensitive release of rtPA could be confirmed from in vitro thrombolysis experiments. A thrombolytic drug delivery system using TML could be proposed for magnetic targeted delivery of rtPA to the site of thrombus followed by temperature-triggered controlled drug release in an alternating magnetic field. - Highlights: • rtPA and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} MNP were encapsulated in thermosensitive magnetic liposome (TML). • RSM could predict the drug encapsulation efficiency and temperature-sensitive drug release from TML. • Temperature-sensitive release of rtPA was confirmed from in vitro thrombolysis experiments. • TML-rtPA will be useful as a magnetic targeted nanodrug to improve clinical thrombolytic therapy.

  9. NURR1 involvement in recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment complications after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Zamorano, Cristina; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Jullienne, Amandine; Le Béhot, Audrey; Bardou, Isabelle; Parés, Mireia; Fernández-Cadenas, Israel; Giralt, Dolors; Carrera, Caty; Ribó, Marc; Vivien, Denis; Ali, Carine; Rosell, Anna; Montaner, Joan

    2015-02-01

    Despite the effectiveness of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (r-tPA) during the acute phase of ischemic stroke, the therapy remains limited by a narrow time window and the occurrence of occasional vascular side effects, particularly symptomatic hemorrhages. Our aim was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the endothelial damage resulting from r-tPA treatment in ischemic-like conditions. Microarray analyses were performed on cerebral endothelial cells submitted to r-tPA treatment during oxygen and glucose deprivation to identify novel biomarker candidates. Validation was then performed in vivo in a mouse model of thromboembolic stroke and culminated in an analysis in a clinical cohort of patients with ischemic stroke treated with thrombolysis. The transcription factor NURR1 (NR4A2) was identified as a downstream target induced by r-tPA during oxygen and glucose deprivation. Silencing NURR1 expression reversed the endothelial-toxicity induced by the combined stimuli, a protective effect attributable to reduced levels of proinflammatory mediators, such as nuclear factor-kappa-beta 2 (NF-κ-B2), interleukin 1 alpha (IL1α), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), SMAD family member 3 (SMAD3), colony stimulating factor 2 (granulocyte-macrophage; CSF2). The detrimental effect of delayed thrombolysis, in conditions in which NURR1 gene expression was enhanced, was confirmed in the preclinical stroke model. Finally, we determined that patients with stroke who had a symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation after r-tPA treatment exhibited higher baseline serum NURR1 levels than did patients with an asymptomatic or absence of cerebral bleedings. Our results suggest that NURR1 upregulation by r-tPA during ischemic stroke is associated with endothelial dysfunction and inflammation and the enhancement of hemorrhagic complications associated to thrombolysis. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Therapeutic Strategies to Attenuate Hemorrhagic Transformation After Tissue Plasminogen Activator Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Masato; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Shimohata, Takayoshi

    2017-03-01

    This review focuses on the mechanisms and emerging concepts of stroke and therapeutic strategies for attenuating hemorrhagic transformation (HT) after tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The therapeutic time window for tPA treatment has been extended. However, the patients who are eligible for tPA treatment are still <5% of all patients with AIS. The risk of serious or fatal symptomatic hemorrhage increases with delayed initiation of treatment. HT is thought to be caused by 1) ischemia/reperfusion injury; 2) the toxicity of tPA itself; 3) inflammation; and/or 4) remodeling factor-mediated effects. Modulation of these pathophysiologies is the basis of direct therapeutic strategies to attenuate HT after tPA treatment. Several studies have revealed that matrix metalloproteinases and free radicals are potential therapeutic targets. In addition, we have demonstrated that the inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor-signaling pathway and supplemental treatment with a recombinant angiopoietin-1 protein might be a promising therapeutic strategy for attenuating HT after tPA treatment through vascular protection. Moreover, single-target therapies could be insufficient for attenuating HT after tPA treatment and improving the therapeutic outcome of patients with AIS. We recently identified progranulin, which is a growth factor and a novel target molecule with multiple therapeutic effects. Progranulin might be a therapeutic target that protects the brain through suppression of vascular remodeling (vascular protection), neuroinflammation, and/or neuronal death (neuroprotection). Clinical trials which evaluate the effects of anti-VEGF drugs or PGRN-based treatment with tPA will be might worthwhile.

  11. Effect of Regulatory Element DNA Methylation on Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Dunoyer-Geindre

    Full Text Available Expression of the tissue-type plasminogen activator gene (t-PA; gene name PLAT is regulated, in part, by epigenetic mechanisms. We investigated the relationship between PLAT methylation and PLAT expression in five primary human cell types and six transformed cell lines. CpG methylation was analyzed in the proximal PLAT gene promoter and near the multihormone responsive enhancer (MHRE -7.3 kilobase pairs upstream of the PLAT transcriptional start site (TSS, -7.3 kb. In Bowes melanoma cells, the PLAT promoter and the MHRE were fully unmethylated and t-PA secretion was extremely high. In other cell types the region from -647 to -366 was fully methylated, whereas an unmethylated stretch of DNA from -121 to +94 was required but not sufficient for detectable t-PA mRNA and t-PA secretion. DNA methylation near the MHRE was not correlated with t-PA secretion. Specific methylation of the PLAT promoter region -151 to +151, inserted into a firefly luciferase reporter gene, abolished reporter gene activity. The region -121 to + 94 contains two well-described regulatory elements, a PMA-responsive element (CRE near -106 and a GC-rich region containing an Sp1 binding site near +59. Methylation of double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing the CRE or the GC-rich region had little or no effect on transcription factor binding. Methylated CpGs may attract co-repressor complexes that contain histone deacetylases (HDAC. However, reporter gene activity of methylated plasmids was not restored by the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin. In conclusion, efficient PLAT gene expression requires a short stretch of unmethylated CpG sites in the proximal promoter.

  12. Interrelations between blood-brain barrier permeability and matrix metalloproteinases are differently affected by tissue plasminogen activator and hyperoxia in a rat model of embolic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In ischemic stroke, blood-brain barrier (BBB regulations, typically involving matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and inhibitors (TIMPs as mediators, became interesting since tissue plasminogen activator (tPA-related BBB breakdown with risk of secondary hemorrhage was considered to involve these mediators too. Despite high clinical relevance, detailed interactions are purely understood. After a pilot study addressing hyperoxia as potential neuroprotective co-treatment to tPA, we analyzed interrelations between BBB permeability (BBB-P, MMPs and TIMPs. Findings Rats underwent embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion (eMCAO and treatment with normobaric (NBO or hyperbaric oxygen (HBO, tPA, tPA+HBO, or no treatment. BBB-P was assessed by intravenously applied FITC-albumin at 4 or 24 hours. MMP-2/-9 and TIMP-1/-2 serum levels were determined at 5 or 25 hours. Time point-corrected partial correlations were used to explore interrelations of BBB-P in ischemic regions (extra-/intravasal FITC-albumin ratio and related serum markers. BBB-P correlated positively with MMP-2 and MMP-9 in controls, whereas hyperoxia led to an inverse association, most pronounced for HBO/MMP-9 (r = -0.606; P Conclusions HBO was found to reverse the positively directed interrelation of BBB-P and MMPs after eMCAO, but this effect failed to sustain in the expected amount when HBO and tPA were given simultaneously.

  13. The nature of interactions between tissue-type plasminogen activator and platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torr, S.R.; Winters, K.J.; Santoro, S.A.; Sobel, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    To elucidate interactions responsible for inhibition of aggregation of platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) harvested from whole blood preincubated with t-PA, experiments were performed with PRP and washed platelets under diverse conditions of preincubation. Both ADP and collagen induced aggregation were inhibited in PRP unless aprotinin had been added to the preincubated whole blood concomitantly with t-PA. However, in washed platelets prepared after the same exposure aggregation was intact. When washed platelets were supplemented with fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs) in concentrations simulating those in whole blood preincubated with t-PA, aggregation induced with either ADP or collagen was inhibited. Thus, the inhibition in PRP depended on generation of FDPs by activated plasminogen. The functional integrity of surface glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptors in washed platelets was documented by autoradiography after SDS-PAGE of surface labeled GPs and by fibrinogen binding despite preincubation of the whole blood or washed platelets themselves with t-PA and plasminogen as long as exogenous calcium (greater than or equal to 0.1 microM) was present. In contrast, when calcium was absent, the platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptor was rendered susceptible to degradation by plasmin, and aggregation was inhibited by preincubation at 37 degrees C even if aprotinin was present when aggregation was being assayed. These observations reconcile disparate results in the literature from studies in vivo and in vitro by demonstrating that inhibition of aggregation of platelets in PRP and in whole blood reflects indirect effects of plasminogen activation rather than direct effects of t-PA or plasmin on the platelets themselves

  14. Plasminogen Activators and Ischemic Stroke: Conditions for Acute Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate acute treatment with plasminogen activators (PAs) can significantly increase the probability of minimal or no disability in selected ischemic stroke patients. There is a great deal of evidence showing that intravenous recombinant tissue PAs (rt-PA) infusion accomplishes this goal, recanalization with other PAs has also been demonstrated in the development of this treatment. Recanalization of symptomatic, documented carotid or vertebrobasilar arterial territory occlusions have also...

  15. A bio-immuno assay to determine free tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) in Stabilyte® plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, R.; Revet, M.; Nieuwenhuizen, W.

    1994-01-01

    This article describes a two-step bio-immuno assay (BIA), which determines active (free) tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) in (acidified) plasma. Plasma samples, diluted in buffer of pH 6.0, are added to the wells of a microtiter plate containing an immobilised monoclonal antibody which binds

  16. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator and immediate angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction. : One-year follow up. The European Cooperative Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E.R. Arnold (Alfred); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); D.P. de Bono (David); J.G.P. Tijssen (Jan); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M. Verstraete (Marc); J. Lubsen (Jacob); F.J.J. van de Werf (Frans)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND. The European Cooperative Study Group conducted two randomized trials in patients with suspected myocardial infarction to assess the effect of 100 mg single-chain recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA, alteplase) on enzymatic infarct size, left ventricular

  17. Reasons for the lack of benefit of immediate angioplasty during recombinant tissue plasminogen activator therapy for acute myocardial infarction: a regional wall motion analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); W.R. Rutsch (Wolfgang); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); D.P. de Bono (David); J.G.P. Tijssen (Jan); J. Lubsen (Jacob); M. Verstraete (Marc); A.E.R. Arnold (Alfred)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractRegional ventricular wall motion analysis utilizing three different methods was performed on predischarge left ventriculograms from 291 of 367 patients enrolled in a randomized trial of single chain recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA), aspirin and heparin with and

  18. Stimulation of tissue-type plasminogen activator gene expression by sodium butyrate and trichostatin A in human endothelial cells involves histone acetylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, J.; Lansink, T.; Grimbergen, J.; Toet, K.H.; Kooistra, T.

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that the pleiotropic agent sodium butyrate strongly stimulates tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Here we provide the following evidence that the butyrate-induced t-PA expression in HUVEC involves histone H4

  19. Differential effects of tissue plasminogen activator and streptokinase on infarct size and on rate of enzyme release: influence of early infarct related artery patency : The GUSTO Enzyme Substudy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Baardman (Taco); W.T. Hermens (Wim); G.P. Molhoek; G. Grollier (Gilles); M.E. Pfisterer (Matthias); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); T. Lenderink (Timo)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The recent international GUSTO trial of 41,021 patients with acute myocardial infarction demonstrated improved 90-min infarct related artery patency as well as reduced mortality in patients treated with an accelerated regimen of tissue plasminogen activator, compared to

  20. Isolation of a human tissue-type plasminogen-activator genomic DNA clone and its expression in mouse L-cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Brown (Morris); A.W.R. Tyrrell; C.G. Chapman; J.E. Carey (Janet); D.M. Glover; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); I. Dodd; J.H. Robinson

    1985-01-01

    textabstractWe have isolated a cDNA clone corresponding to a substantial portion of the human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) protein. It encodes almost all of the protein B chain and part of the 3' untranslated region. We have used this clone to screen bacteriophage lambda and cosmid

  1. Involvement of calcium and G proteins in the acute release of tissue- type plasminogen activator and von Willebrand factor from cultured human endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijnden-Schrauwen, Y. van den; Atsma, D.E.; Lupu, F.; Vries, R.E.M. de; Kooistra, T.; Emeis, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of Ca2+ and G proteins in thrombin-induced acute release (regulated secretion) of tissue-type plasminogen activator (TPA) and yon Willebrand factor (vWF), using a previously described system of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The acute

  2. A sensitive ELISA for human tissue-type plasminogen activator applicable to the study of acute release from cultured human endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwen, Y.; Emeis, J.J.; Kooistra, T.

    1994-01-01

    The development of a highly sensitive, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is described. The use of a biotin-avidin system resulted in a detection limit of 10 pg of tPA per ml, which is 50 to 150 times more sensitive than commercially-available

  3. Reasons for the lack of benefit of immediate angioplasty during recombinant tissue plasminogen activator therapy for acute myocardial infarction: a regional wall motion analysis. European Cooperative Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, A. E.; Serruys, P. W.; Rutsch, W.; Simoons, M. L.; de Bono, D. P.; Tijssen, J. G.; Lubsen, J.; Verstraete, M.

    1991-01-01

    Regional ventricular wall motion analysis utilizing three different methods was performed on predischarge left ventriculograms from 291 of 367 patients enrolled in a randomized trial of single chain recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA), aspirin and heparin with and without immediate

  4. Increased clearance explains lower plasma levels of tissue-type plasminogen activator by estradiol: Evidence for potently enhanced mannose receptor expression in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansink, M.; Jong, M.; Bijsterbosch, M.; Bekkers, M.; Toet, K.; Havekes, L.; Emeis, J.; Kooistra, T.

    1999-01-01

    Several clinical studies have demonstrated an inverse relationship between circulating levels of estrogen and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA). The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that estrogen lower plasma levels of t-PA by increasing its clearance from the bloodstream.

  5. Obstructive Prosthetic Mitral Valve Thrombosis Successfully Thrombolysed with Low-Dose Ultra-Slow Infusion of Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macit Kalçık

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT is one of the major causes of posthetic heart valve failure. Treatment modalities for this rare but life threatening complication include anticoagulation with heparin, thrombolytic therapy (TT and re-do valve surgery. Guidelines lack definitive class I recommendations due to lack of randomised controlled trials, and usually leave the choice of treatment to the clinician’s experience. Surgery is suggested as a first line strategy in most situations of left sided PVT; however, TT has been recently used with successful outcomes1-3. This report describes a patient with giant thrombus located on the prosthetic mitral valve, which was succesfully treated with ultraslow infusion (25 hours of low dose (25 mg tissue plasminogen activator (tPA under the guidance of two-dimensional (2D and real-time three-dimensional (RT -3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE and fluoroscopy.

  6. Activated protein C analog protects from ischemic stroke and extends the therapeutic window of tissue-type plasminogen activator in aged female mice and hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaoming; Zhao, Zhen; Chow, Nienwen; Rajput, Padmesh S; Griffin, John H; Lyden, Patrick D; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2013-12-01

    3K3A-activated protein C (APC) protects young, healthy male rodents after ischemic stroke. 3K3A-APC is currently under development as a neuroprotectant for acute ischemic stroke in humans. Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable recommends that after initial studies in young, healthy male animals, further studies should be performed in females, aged animals, and animals with comorbid conditions. Here, we studied the effects of delayed 3KA-APC therapy alone and with tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) in aged female mice and spontaneously hypertensive rats. We used Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable recommendations for ensuring good scientific inquiry. Murine recombinant 3K3A-APC (0.2 mg/kg) alone or with recombinant tPA (10 mg/kg) was given intravenously 4 hours after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in aged female mice and rats and after embolic stroke in spontaneously hypertensive rat. 3K3A-APC was additionally administered within 3 to 7 days after stroke. The neuropathological analysis and neurological scores, foot-fault, forelimb asymmetry, and adhesive removal tests were performed within 7 and 28 days of stroke. In all models, tPA alone had no effects on the infarct volume or behavior. 3K3A-APC alone or with tPA reduced the infarct volume 7 days after the middle cerebral artery occlusion in aged female mice and embolic stroke in spontaneously hypertensive rat by 62% to 66% and 50% to 53%, respectively, significantly improved (Pmice, 3K3A-APC was protective within 4 weeks of stroke. 3K3A-APC protects from ischemic stroke and extends the therapeutic window of tPA in aged female mice and in spontaneously hypertensive rat with a comorbid condition.

  7. Early administration of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate extends the therapeutic time window of tissue plasminogen activator in a male rat model of embolic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongxing; Shan, Weiran; Cao, Jiangbei; Wintermark, Max; Huang, Wenqi; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2018-03-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is used in fewer than 4% of patients after ischemic stroke because of its narrow therapeutic time window. We tested whether pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), a drug with multiple mechanisms to provide neuroprotection, can be used to extend the therapeutic time window of tPA. Three-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to embolic stroke in the area supplied by the right middle cerebral artery. tPA at 10 mg/kg was given intravenously 4 h after the onset of stroke. PDTC at 50 mg/kg was given via gastric gavage at 30 min or 4 h after the onset of stroke. Two days after the stroke, neurological outcome was evaluated and the right frontal cortex area 1 (Fr1), an ischemic penumbral region, was harvested for analysis. PDTC given at 30 min after the stroke reduced infarct volumes and improved neurological functions no matter whether the rats received tPA. PDTC also reduced tPA-increased hemorrhagic volumes. Consistent with these results, PDTC in the presence or absence of tPA treatment attenuated the increase of proinflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress and matrix metalloprotease 2 activity in the right Fr1. However, PDTC given at 4 h after the onset of stroke did not improve the neurological outcome of rats treated with or without tPA. Our results suggest that PDTC given at an early time point but not in a delayed phase provides neuroprotection against embolic stroke and may be used to extend the therapeutic time window of tPA. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Urokinase vs Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator for Thrombolytic Evacuation of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Basal Ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqian Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is a devastating form of stroke, which leads to a high rate of mortality and poor neurological outcomes worldwide. Thrombolytic evacuation with urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA or tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA has been showed to be a hopeful treatment for ICH. However, to the best of our knowledge, no clinical trials were reported to compare the efficacy and safety of these two fibrinolytics administrated following minimally invasive stereotactic puncture (MISP in patients with spontaneous basal ganglia ICH. Therefore, the authors intended here to evaluate the differential impact of uPA and tPA in a retrospective study. In the present study, a total of 86 patients with spontaneous ICH in basal ganglia using MISP received either uPA (uPA group, n = 45 or tPA (tPA group, n = 41, respectively. The clinical baseline characteristics prior to the operation were collected. In addition, therapeutic responses were assessed by the short-term outcomes within 30 days postoperation, as well as long-term outcomes at 1 year postoperation. Our findings showed that, in comparison with tPA, uPA was able to better promote hematoma evacuation and ameliorate perihematomal edema, but the differences were not statistically significant. Moreover, the long-term functional outcomes of both groups were similar, with no statistical difference. In conclusion, these results provide evidence supporting that uPA and tPA are similar in the efficacy and safety for thrombolytic evacuation in combination with MISP in patients with spontaneous basal ganglia ICH.

  9. Immunoradiometric quantitation of tissue plasminogen activator-related antigen in human plasma: crypticity phenomenon and relationship to plasma fibrinolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wun, T.C.; Capuano, A.

    1987-01-01

    A two-site immunoradiometric assay for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) antigen has been developed using immunoaffinity purified antibody. Various treatments enhanced the detection of tPA antigen in the plasma samples. Maximum detection was obtained by acidification of plasma to pH 4.8 to 6.5 or addition of 0.5 mol/L of L-lysine or L-arginine. Acidification or addition of lysine to plasma is also required for maximum immunoadsorption of plasma tPA antigen on anti-tPA-Ig-sepharose. These results indicate that plasma tPA antigen is partially cryptic to antibody in untreated plasma. The plasma tPA antigen isolated by immunoadsorption of either untreated plasma or acidified plasma on anti-tPA-Ig-sepharose consists mainly of a 100-kd plasminogen activator species as determined by fibrin-agar zymography. The 100-kd activity is possibly a tPA:inhibitor complex. A standardized sample preparation method was conveniently adopted by mixing 3 vol of plasma and 1 vol of 2 mol/L of L-lysine for the assay. Reconstitution and recovery studies showed that the method is specific and permits full detection of both free tPA and tPA:inhibitor complex. The validity of the assay is further supported by the finding that the spontaneous plasma fibrinolysis previously demonstrated to be dependent on plasma tPA antigen is correlated with tPA antigen content. Using the standardized assay, we found that tPA antigen concentrations in 16 blood bank plasmas are equivalent to 3.7 to 20 ng of 60 kd tPA/mL. In all the plasma tested, more than half of the antigen is undetected unless the plasma is treated as described above

  10. Immunoradiometric quantitation of tissue plasminogen activator-related antigen in human plasma: crypticity phenomenon and relationship to plasma fibrinolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wun, T.C.; Capuano, A.

    1987-05-01

    A two-site immunoradiometric assay for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) antigen has been developed using immunoaffinity purified antibody. Various treatments enhanced the detection of tPA antigen in the plasma samples. Maximum detection was obtained by acidification of plasma to pH 4.8 to 6.5 or addition of 0.5 mol/L of L-lysine or L-arginine. Acidification or addition of lysine to plasma is also required for maximum immunoadsorption of plasma tPA antigen on anti-tPA-Ig-sepharose. These results indicate that plasma tPA antigen is partially cryptic to antibody in untreated plasma. The plasma tPA antigen isolated by immunoadsorption of either untreated plasma or acidified plasma on anti-tPA-Ig-sepharose consists mainly of a 100-kd plasminogen activator species as determined by fibrin-agar zymography. The 100-kd activity is possibly a tPA:inhibitor complex. A standardized sample preparation method was conveniently adopted by mixing 3 vol of plasma and 1 vol of 2 mol/L of L-lysine for the assay. Reconstitution and recovery studies showed that the method is specific and permits full detection of both free tPA and tPA:inhibitor complex. The validity of the assay is further supported by the finding that the spontaneous plasma fibrinolysis previously demonstrated to be dependent on plasma tPA antigen is correlated with tPA antigen content. Using the standardized assay, we found that tPA antigen concentrations in 16 blood bank plasmas are equivalent to 3.7 to 20 ng of 60 kd tPA/mL. In all the plasma tested, more than half of the antigen is undetected unless the plasma is treated as described above.

  11. Time to treatment with intravenous alteplase and outcome in stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lees, Kennedy R; Bluhmki, Erich; von Kummer, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early administration of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) after ischaemic stroke improves outcome. Previous analysis of combined data from individual patients suggested potential benefit beyond 3 h from stroke onset. We re-examined the effect of time to trea...

  12. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator plus heparin compared with heparin alone for patients with acute submassive pulmonary embolism: one-year outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Mi, Yu-Hong; Liang, Ying; Lu, Yan-Hui; Li, Ya-Min; Liu, Wen-Xu; Qian, Wang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the long-term effects of thrombolysis on patients with submassive pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods Data of 136 patients with acute submassive PE and low risk of bleeding were prospectively collected from January 2005 to October 2011 in a single medical center. Patients received recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) plus low molecular weight heparin (LMWH, TT group, n = 79) or LMWH alone (AT group, n = 57), depending on treating physician's recommendation and p...

  13. Inhibition of plasmin, urokinase, tissue plasminogen activator, and C1S by a myxoma virus serine proteinase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, D A; Evans, D L; Upton, C; McFadden, G; Carrell, R W

    1993-01-05

    The myxoma and malignant rabbit fibroma poxviruses are lethal tumorigenic viruses of rabbits whose virulence is modulated by the production of a virus-encoded secreted serine proteinase inhibitor, SERP-1. This viral protein was detected in medium harvested from myxoma and malignant rabbit fibroma virus-infected cells, and its inhibitory profile has been characterized by gel and kinetic analysis. SERP-1 forms complexes with and inhibits the human fibrinolytic enzymes plasmin, urokinase, and two-chain tissue-type plasminogen activator (association rate constants 3.4 x 10(4), 4.3 x 10(4), and 3.6 x 10(4) M-1 s-1 respectively). It is also able to inhibit C1S, the first enzyme in the complement cascade with an association rate constant which was unaffected by the addition of heparin (1.3 x 10(3) M-1 s-1). SERP-1 acts as a substrate for and is cleaved by thrombin, porcine trypsin, human neutrophil elastase, porcine pancreatic elastase, thermolysin, subtilisin, bovine alpha-chymotrypsin, and factor Xa. Incubation with kallikrein and cathepsin G had no effect. The structure of SERP-1 has been modeled on other members of the serpin family which revealed the characteristic serpin architecture apart from the absence of the D-helix. Structural analysis and kinetic assays demonstrate that the absence of this region does not prevent inhibitory activity and furthermore allow the identification of cysteine residues involved in internal and intermolecular disulfide bonding.

  14. Massive Pulmonary Embolism: Treatment with Thrombus Fragmentation and Local Fibrinolysis with Recombinant Human-Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Klaus Wilhelm; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Schnabel, Karl Jakob; Bongartz, Georg; Steinbrich, Wolfgang

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of thrombus fragmentation in combination with local fibrinolysis using recombinant human-tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) in patients with massive pulmonary embolism. Methods: Five patients with massive pulmonary embolism were treated with thrombus fragmentation followed by intrapulmonary injection of rtPA. Clot fragmentation was performed with a guidewire, angiographic catheter, and balloon catheter. Three patients had undergone recent surgery; one of them received a reduced dosage of rtPA. Results: All patients survived and showed clinical improvement with a resultant significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the pulmonary blood pressure (mean systolic pulmonary blood pressure before treatment, 49 mmHg; 4 hr after treatment, 28 mmHg). Angiographic follow-up in three patients revealed a decrease in thrombus material and an increase in pulmonary perfusion. Two patients developed retroperitoneal hematomas requiring transfusion. Conclusion: Clot fragmentation and local fibrinolysis with rtPA was an effective therapy for massive pulmonary embolism. Bleeding at the puncture site was a frequent complication

  15. Combining statins with tissue plasminogen activator treatment after experimental and human stroke: a safety study on hemorrhagic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Mireia; García-Bonilla, Lidia; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Barceló, Verónica; Morancho, Anna; Quintana, Manolo; Rubiera, Marta; Rosell, Anna; Montaner, Joan

    2013-11-01

    Statins may afford neuroprotection against ischemic injury, but it remains controversial whether combined treatment with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) after stroke increases the risk of hemorrhagic transformation (HT), the major tPA-related complication. We evaluated the safety of combining statin with tPA administration during the acute phase of both experimental and human stroke. The occurrence and severity of HT, infarct volume, and neurological outcome were evaluated in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR) subjected to embolic middle cerebral arterial occlusion (MCAO), which received vehicle or simvastatin (20 mg/kg), 15 min after ischemia and tPA (9 mg/kg) 3 h after ischemia. Additionally, HT rate was evaluated in stroke patients who were treated with tPA (0.9 mg/kg) within 3 h after symptom onset, considering whether or not were under statins treatment when the stroke occurred. In the experimental study, no differences in HT rates and severity were found between treatment groups, neither regarding mortality, neurological deficit, infarct volume, or metalloproteinases (MMPs) brain content. In the clinical study, HT rates and hemorrhage type were similar in stroke patients who were or not under statins treatment. This study consistently confirms that the use of statins does not increase HT rates and severity when is combined with tPA administration. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The influence of dehydration on the prognosis of acute ischemic stroke for patients treated with tissue plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei-Fan; Hung, Yen-Chu; Tsai, Y H; Yang, Jen-Tsung; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Liow, Chia-Wei; Lee, Jiann-Der; Lin, Chung-Jen; Peng, Tsung-I; Lin, Leng-Chieh

    2017-06-13

    Many studies have determined that dehydration is an independent predictor of outcome after ischemic stroke (IS); however, none have determined if the use of thrombolytic therapy modifies the negative impact of poor hydration. To inform the stroke registry established at our institution, we conducted a retrospective study to determine if dehydration remains a negative prognostic factor after IS patients treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Between 2007 and 2012, we recruited 382 subjects; 346 had data available and were divided into 2 groups on the basis of their blood urea nitrogen/creatinine (BUN/Cr) ratio. Dehydrated subjects had a BUN/Cr ratio ≥ 15; hydrated subjects had a BUN/Cr dehydration group had a greater mean age; more women; lower mean levels of hemoglobin, triglycerides, and sodium; and higher mean potassium and glucose levels. A favorable outcome as assessed by the mRS (≤2) was significantly less frequent among dehydrated subjects, but a favorable outcome by the BI (≥60) was not. Logistic regression and multivariate models confirmed that dehydration is an independent predictor of poor outcome by both the mRS and the BI; however, it was not predictive when patients were stratified by Trial of Org 10,172 in Acute Stroke Treatment subtype. Our findings indicate that use of thrombolytic therapy does not eliminate the need to closely monitor hydration status in patients with IS.

  17. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; Pmuscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  18. Ultrasound-targeted transfection of tissue-type plasminogen activator gene carried by albumin nanoparticles to dog myocardium to prevent thrombosis after heart mechanical valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ji Jun, Ji Shang-Yi, Yang Jian-An, He Xia, Yang Xiao-Han, Ling Wen-Ping, Chen Xiao-LingDepartment of Pathology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Shenzhen Sun Yat-Sen Cardiovascular Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: There are more than 300,000 prosthetic heart valve replacements each year worldwide. These patients are faced with a higher risk of thromboembolic events after heart valve surgery and long-term or even life-long anticoagulative and antiplatelet therapies are necessary. Some severe complications such as hemorrhaging or rebound thrombosis can occur when the therapy ceases. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA is a thrombolytic agent. One of the best strategies is gene therapy, which offers a local high expression of t-PA over a prolonged time period to avoid both systemic hemorrhaging and local rebound thrombosis. There are some issues with t-PA that need to be addressed: currently, there is no up-to-date report on how the t-PA gene targets the heart in vivo and the gene vector for t-PA needs to be determined.Aims: To fabricate an albumin nano-t-PA gene ultrasound-targeted agent and investigate its targeting effect on prevention of thrombosis after heart mechanic valve replacement under therapeutic ultrasound.Methods: A dog model of mechanical tricuspid valve replacement was constructed. A highly expressive t-PA gene plasmid was constructed and packaged by nanoparticles prepared with bovine serum albumin. This nanopackaged t-PA gene plasmid was further cross-linked to ultrasonic microbubbles prepared with sucrose and bovine serum albumin to form the ultrasonic-targeted agent for t-PA gene transfection. The agent was given intravenously followed by a therapeutic ultrasound treatment (1 MHz, 1.5 w/cm2, 10 minutes of the heart soon after valve replacement had been performed. The expression of t-PA in myocardium was detected with multiclonal antibodies to t-PA by the indirect immunohistochemical method

  19. Need for tissue plasminogen activator for central venous catheter dysfunction is significantly associated with thrombosis in pediatric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Jessica; MacDonald, Tamara; Digout, Carol; Smith, Nadine; Rigby, Krista; Kulkarni, Ketan

    2018-03-14

    Central venous catheter (CVC) dysfunction is a common complication among pediatric cancer patients. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is administered to resolve CVC dysfunction. The present study was designed to determine risk factors associated with requirement of tPA for CVC dysfunction and to assess the clinical impact of CVC dysfunction in terms of CVC loss and venous thrombotic events (VTE). Case records of all pediatric patients with cancer from the Maritimes, Canada were reviewed following ethics approval. Data regarding demographics, clinical diagnosis, CVC dysfunction, characteristics of CVCs, and VTE were pooled from multiple data sources. Seven hundred and forty-one patients required ≥1 CVC. 26.3% of patients required tPA for ≥1 episodes of CVC dysfunction. Requirement of one or more doses of tPA for episodes of CVC dysfunction increased the odds of VTE by two times (95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.6). Patients that required ≥1 doses of tPA required significantly more CVCs (2.05 ± 1.29 per individual patient, 55% of the patients needed >1 CVCs) as compared to the remainder (1.52 ± 0.95 per individual patient, 32% needed >1 CVCs) (P = 0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed age > 10 years, diagnosis of sarcoma, and tunneled line were independently associated with tPA requirement. We determined independent risk factors associated with requirement of tPA for CVC dysfunction. Requirement of tPA for CVC dysfunction was associated with significantly increased risk of VTE and requirement of more CVCs. These observations can assist in identification of patients at increased risk of CVC dysfunction and inform approaches to reduce CVC loss and VTE. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Hyperacute thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator of acute ischemic stroke: Feasibility and effectivity from an Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the constraints of resources, thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke (AIS is under evaluation in developing countries like India, especially in areas such as western Utter Pradesh, where it is overly crowded and there is poor affordability. Aim: This study was done to evaluate recombinant tissue plasminogen activator r-tpa in acute ischemic stroke in hyper acute phase, in selected patients of western Utter Pradesh, in terms of feasibility and effectivity. Design: Open, non randomized study. Materials and Methods: Thirty two patients were classified using Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke treatment (TOAST criteria (large artery atherosclerotic = 8; cardio embolic = 6; small vessel occlusion = 14; other determined etiology = 2; undetermined etiology = 2. The mean time to reach the hospital was 2 h (1.15-3.0, the mean door to CT scan 20 min (10-40 and door to r-tpa injection was 30 min (24-68. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores ranged from 11-22 (mean 15.5 +2.7. The dose of r-tpa administered was 0.9 mg/kg. Results: Twenty one patients (65.6% showed significant improvement on the NIHSS score, at 48 h (4 points. (Mean change = 10; range = 4-17. At one month, 25 (78% recorded improvement on the Barthel index (mean change = 45%. One developed frontal lobe hemorrhage and another developed recurrent stroke; one died of aspiration; and four showed no improvement. Modified Rankin score (m RS was administered at the end of three months to 28 patients (90%; however, the rest could not be directly observed. The average modified Rankin Score was 1.2 (0-2. Conclusions: Hyperacute thrombolysis was found feasible and effective in selected patients with AIS from western Utter Pradesh and who had poor affordability.

  1. Effects of angiopoietin-1 on hemorrhagic transformation and cerebral edema after tissue plasminogen activator treatment for ischemic stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Kunio; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Kanazawa, Masato; Igarashi, Hironaka; Nakada, Tsutomu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Shimohata, Takayoshi

    2014-01-01

    An angiogenesis factor, angiopoietin-1 (Ang1), is associated with the blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption after focal cerebral ischemia. However, whether hemorrhagic transformation and cerebral edema after tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment are related to the decrease in Ang1 expression in the BBB remains unknown. We hypothesized that administering Ang1 might attenuate hemorrhagic transformation and cerebral edema after tPA treatment by stabilizing blood vessels and inhibiting hyperpermeability. Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to thromboembolic focal cerebral ischemia were assigned to a permanent ischemia group (permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion; PMCAO) and groups treated with tPA at 1 h or 4 h after ischemia. Endogenous Ang1 expression was observed in pericytes, astrocytes, and neuronal cells. Western blot analyses revealed that Ang1 expression levels on the ischemic side of the cerebral cortex were decreased in the tPA-1h, tPA-4h, and PMCAO groups as compared to those in the control group (P = 0.014, 0.003, and 0.014, respectively). Ang1-positive vessel densities in the tPA-4h and PMCAO groups were less than that in the control group (p = 0.002 and treatment was given after the therapeutic time window (4 h). Administering Ang1 fused with cartilage oligomeric protein (COMP) to supplement this decrease has the potential to suppress hemorrhagic transformation as measured by hemoglobin content in a whole cerebral homogenate (p = 0.007) and cerebral edema due to BBB damage (p = 0.038), as compared to administering COMP protein alone. In conclusion, Ang1 might be a promising target molecule for developing vasoprotective therapies for controlling hemorrhagic transformation and cerebral edema after tPA treatment.

  2. Evaluation of a weight-adjusted single-bolus plasminogen activator in patients with myocardial infarction - A double-blind, randomized angiographic trial of lanoteplase versus alteplase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Heijer, P; Vermeer, F; Ambrosioni, E; Sadowski, Z; Lopez-Sendon, JL; von Essen, R; Beaufils, P; Thadani, U; Adgey, J; Pierard, L; Brinker, J; Davies, RF; Smalling, RW; Wallentin, L; Caspi, A; Pangerl, A; Trickett, L; Hauck, C; Henry, D; Chew, P

    1998-01-01

    Background-Lanoteplase (nPA) is a rationally designed variant of tissue plasminogen activator with greater fibrinolytic potency and slower plasma clearance than alteplase. Methods and Results-InTIME (Intravenous nPA for Treatment of Infarcting Myocardium Early), a multicenter, double-blind,

  3. Acute, massive pulmonary embolism with right heart strain and hypoxia requiring emergent tissue plasminogen activator (TPA infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Patane

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 63-year-old male presented to the emergency department with shortness of breath. He had a history of prostate cancer and two previous pulmonary embolisms, but was not currently on blood thinners. He had no associated chest pain at the time of presentation, but endorsed hemoptysis. Vital signs were significant for a heart rate of 88, blood pressure 145/89, oxygen saturation in the mid-70’s on room air which increased to mid-80’s on 15L facemask. His exam was significant for clear lung sounds bilaterally. He immediately underwent chest x-ray which showed no acute abnormalities. A bedside ultrasound was performed which showed evidence of right ventricular and atrial dilation, consistent with right heart strain. Given that the patient’s oxygen saturations improved to 88% on 15L facemask, the patient was felt to be stable enough for CT angiography. Significant findings: CT angiogram showed multiple large acute pulmonary emboli, most significantly in the distal right main pulmonary artery (image 1 and 2. Additional pulmonary emboli were noted in the bilateral lobar, segmental, and subsegmental levels of all lobes. There was a peripheral, wedge-shaped consolidation surrounded by groundglass changes in the posterolateral basal right lower lobe that was consistent with a small lung infarction (image 3. Discussion: The patient underwent in the Emergency Department a tissue plasminogen activator (TPA infusion of alteplase 100 mg over 2 hours for his massive acute pulmonary embolisms. Throughout his TPA infusion his oxygen saturations became improved to mid-90’s and his shortness of breath symptoms began improving. His troponin returned at 0.15 ng/mL, suggesting right heart strain. He was admitted to the ICU for continued monitoring and treatment. An acute, massive pulmonary embolism is described as having more than 50% occlusion of pulmonary blood flow.1 The main causes of hypoxia includes ventilation

  4. Plasminogen activation and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danø, Keld; Behrendt, N.; Hoyer-Hansen, G.

    2005-01-01

    , the regulation of extracellular proteolysis in cancer involves a complex interplay between cancer cells and non-malignant stromal cells in the expression of the molecular components involved. For some types of cancer, this cellular interplay mimics that observed in the tissue of ori- gin during non......Breakdown of the extracellular matrix is crucial for cancer invasion and metastasis. It is accomplished by the concerted action of several proteases, including the serine protease plasmin and a number of matrix metalloproteases.The activity of each of these proteases is regulated by an array...... of activators, inhibitors and cellular receptors.Thus, the generation of plasmin involves the pro-enzyme plasminogen, the urokinase type plasminogen activator uPA and its pro-enzyme pro-uPA, the uPA inhibitor PAI-1, the cell surface uPA receptor uPAR, and the plasmin inhibitor a2 -antiplasmin. Furthermore...

  5. Stent-retriever thrombectomy after intravenous t-PA vs. t-PA alone in stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saver, Jeffrey L; Goyal, Mayank; Bonafe, Alain

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among patients with acute ischemic stroke due to occlusions in the proximal anterior intracranial circulation, less than 40% regain functional independence when treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) alone. Thrombectomy with the use of a stent retriever, in addit...

  6. Intravenous iloprost in the combination therapy of vascular disorders in patients with systemic connective tissue diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Vitalyevich Volkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic connective tissue diseases, systemic scleroderma in particular, constitute a group of diseases in which vascular disorders underlying diverse clinical manifestations are one of the pathogenetic components. Raynaud 's syndrome and ulceration are the most common symptoms of these diseases, which influence quality of life in patients and require constant drug therapy. The paper discusses the authors' clinical experience with intravenous iloprost used in the combination therapy of the vascular manifestations of systemic scleroderma and systemic lupus erythematosus.

  7. Does current oral antiplatelet agent or subtherapeutic anticoagulation use have an effect on tissue-plasminogen-activator-mediated recanalization rate in patients with acute ischemic stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Sebastian, Joseph; Hussain, Muhammad; Al-Hussain, Fawaz; Uchino, Ken; Molina, Carlos; Khan, Khurshid; Demchuk, Andrew M; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Saqqur, Maher

    2010-01-01

    Our goal is to assess if current antiplatelet (AP) use has an effect on recanalization rate and outcome in acute stroke patients. We conducted a retrospective analysis of acute stroke patients who received intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and had transcranial Doppler examination within 3 h of symptom onset. The TCD findings were interpreted using the Thrombolysis in Brain Ischemia flow grading system as persistent arterial occlusion, reocclusion or complete recanalization. Complete recanalization was defined as established Thrombolysis in Brain Ischemia 4 or 5 within 2 h of IV rt-PA. The patients were divided based on their current use of AP agents. Comparisons were made between the different groups based on recanalziation rate, reocclusion and good long-term outcome (mRS ≤ 2) using χ(2) test. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify AP use as a predictor for recanalization and outcome including symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after controlling for age, baseline NIHSS score, time to treatment, previous vascular event, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Two hundred and eighty-four patients were included; 154 (54%) males, 130 (46%) females, with a mean age of 69.5 ± 13 years. The median baseline NIHSS score was 16 ± 5. The median time to TCD examination was 131 ± 38 min from symptom onset. The median time to IV rt-PA was 140 ± 34 min. One hundred eighty patients were not on AP prior to their stroke, 76 were on aspirin, 15 were on clopidogrel, 2 were on aspirin-dipyridamole combination, 2 were on both aspirin and clopidogrel, and 9 patients on subtherapeutic coumadin. In patients who were naïve to AP, 68/178 (38.2%) had complete recanalization, whereas in the AP group, 25/91 (28%) had complete recanalization. Patients on aspirin alone had a lower recanalization rate (16/72) as compared to those not on AP (22 vs. 39%) (p = 0.017), while those on clopidogrel had higher rates of complete recanalization (9/19, 60

  8. Selective screening of a large phage display library of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 mutants to localize interaction sites with either thrombin or the variable region 1 of tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meijer, M; Roelofs, Y; Neels, J; Horrevoets, A J; van Zonneveld, A J; Pannekoek, H

    1996-03-29

    Phage display technology has been exploited to study in detail the interaction between plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and either thrombin or an essential positively charged "loop" of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), denoted variable region 1 (VR1). For this purpose, a PAI-1 mutant phage library was used that served as a reservoir of PAI-1 proteins potentially deficient in the interaction with either VR1 or thrombin. A stringent two-step selection procedure was developed. (i) A negative selection was performed by incubating the pComb3/PAI-1 mutant library with an excess of a thrombin mutant with its VR1 domain substituted with that of t-PA (thrombin-VR1). (ii) The remaining phages were complexed with t-PA (positive selection) and selected by panning with an immobilized anti-t-PA monoclonal antibody. Four consecutive panning rounds yielded an enrichment of pComb3/PAI-1 mutant phages of approximately 50-fold. Sequence analysis of 16 different cDNAs, encoding PAI-1 mutants that are hampered in the binding to thrombin-VR1, revealed the following mutations. Four independent variants share a mutation of the P4' residue (Glu350 --> Lys). Nine independent PAI-1 variants share a substitution of P1' (Met347 --> Lys), whereas three others share a P2 substitution (Ala345 --> Asp). Kinetic analysis of representative PAI-1 mutants provides evidence that the P4' residue is essential for the interaction with the VR1 domain, consistent with the data of Madison et al. (Madison, E.L., Goldsmith, E.J., Gething, M.J., Sambrook, J.F., and Gerard, R.D. (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 21423-21426), whereas the P1' and P2 residues confer thrombin specificity. Concordant with the design of the selection procedure, mutants were obtained that inhibit thrombin-VR1 at least 100-fold slower than wild-type PAI-1, identifying residues that are central to the interaction with either thrombin or VR1. This study demonstrates that phage technology can be used to analyze large numbers of

  9. Active Expression of Human Tissue Plasminogen Activator (t-PA) c-DNA from Pulmonary Metastases in the Methylotrophic Yeast Pichia Pastoris KM71H Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Amir Hossein; Soleimani, Mohammad; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Taghinezhad-S, Sedigheh; Keyvani, Hossein

    2017-08-27

    Background: Human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is a key protease of the trypsin family. It catalyzes the activation of zymogen plasminogen to the fibrin-degrading proteinase, plasmin, leading to digestion of fibrin clots. The recombinant enzyme produced by recombinant technology issued to dissolve blood clots in treatment of various human diseases such as coronary artery thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Pichia pastoris expression system is a unique system for the production of high level of recombinant proteins. GS115 and KM71H are two kinds of Pichia pastoris strains whilst production of recombinant proteins in these strains is not predictable. The aim of the study was evaluation of t-PA expression in KM71H strains. Methods: In this study, the cDNA of the t-PA gene was amplified by PCR, sequenced and cloned into Pichia pastoris KM71H host strain using pPICZalphaA expression vector that allows methanol-induced expression and secretion of the protein. Results: Dot blotting results confirmed the presence oft-PA in the cell supernatant. Western blotting test revealed the approximate size of 70 KDa for recombinant t-PA. Quantitative ELISA experiment showed 810 μg/L of t-PA in the supernatant samples. Zymography analysis confirmed the proteolytic activity and biological function of the expressed recombinant t-PA. Conclusions: Correspondingly, Pichia pastoris KM71H is an appropriate strain for production of active recombinant protein. Creative Commons Attribution License

  10. Artificial exon shuffling between tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase (u-PA): a comparative study on the fibrinolytic properties of t-PA/u-PA hybrid proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, C. [=Carlie J. M.; Veerman, H.; Blasi, F.; Pannekoek, H.

    1988-01-01

    We constructed two human tissue-type plasminogen activator/urokinase (t-PA/u-PA) hybrid cDNAs which were expressed by transfection of mouse Ltk- cells. The properties of the secreted proteins were compared with those of recombinant t-PA (rt-PA) and high molecular weight (HMW) u-PA. The hybrid

  11. Increased serum levels of fibrinogen degradation products due to treatment with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator for acute myocardial infarction are related to bleeding complications, but not to coronary patency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Brower (Ronald); D. Collen; G.A. van Es (Gerrit Anne); J. Lubsen (Jacob); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); M. Verstraete (Marc); A.E.R. Arnold (Alfred)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe association of increasing serum levels of fibrinogen degradation products after recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) therapy with bleeding and early coronary patency was assessed in 242 patients with acute myocardial infarction. After administration of 5,000 IU

  12. Cell-type specific DNA-protein interactions at the tissue-type plasminogen activator promoter in human endothelial and HeLa cells in vivo and in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, J.; Herr, I.; Lansink, M.; Angel, P.; Kooistra, T.

    1997-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) gene expression in human endothelial cells and HeLa cells is stimulated by the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) at the level of transcription. To study the mechanism of transcriptional regulation, we have characterized a

  13. Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Induces Neurological Side Effects Independent on Thrombolysis in Mechanical Animal Models of Focal Cerebral Infarction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Xue Dong

    Full Text Available Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA is the only effective drug approved by US FDA to treat ischemic stroke, and it contains pleiotropic effects besides thrombolysis. We performed a meta-analysis to clarify effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA on cerebral infarction besides its thrombolysis property in mechanical animal stroke.Relevant studies were identified by two reviewers after searching online databases, including Pubmed, Embase, and ScienceDirect, from 1979 to 2016. We identified 6, 65, 17, 12, 16, 12 and 13 comparisons reporting effect of endogenous tPA on infarction volume and effects of rtPA on infarction volume, blood-brain barrier, brain edema, intracerebral hemorrhage, neurological function and mortality rate in all 47 included studies. Standardized mean differences for continuous measures and risk ratio for dichotomous measures were calculated to assess the effects of endogenous tPA and rtPA on cerebral infarction in animals. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable score. Subgroup analysis, meta-regression and sensitivity analysis were performed to explore sources of heterogeneity. Funnel plot, Trim and Fill method and Egger's test were obtained to detect publication bias.We found that both endogenous tPA and rtPA had not enlarged infarction volume, or deteriorated neurological function. However, rtPA would disrupt blood-brain barrier, aggravate brain edema, induce intracerebral hemorrhage and increase mortality rate.This meta-analysis reveals rtPA can lead to neurological side effects besides thrombolysis in mechanical animal stroke, which may account for clinical exacerbation for stroke patients that do not achieve vascular recanalization with rtPA.

  14. A milk protein gene promoter directs the expression of human tissue plasminogen activator cDNA to the mammary gland in transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittius, C.W.; Hennighausen, L.; Lee, E.; Westphal, H.; Nicols, E.; Vitale, J.; Gordon, K.

    1988-01-01

    Whey acidic protein (WAP) is a major whey protein in mouse milk. Its gene is expressed in the lactating mammary gland and is inducible by steroid and peptide hormones. A series of transgenic mice containing a hybrid gene in which human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) cDNA is under the control of the murine WAP gene promoter had previously been generated. In this study, 21 tissues from lactating and virgin transgenic female mice containing the WAP-tPA hybrid gene were screened for the distribution of murine WAP and human tPA transcripts. Like the endogenous WAP RNA, WAP-tPA RNA was expressed predominantly in mammary gland tissue and appeared to be inducible by lactation. Whereas WAP transcripts were not detected in 22 tissues of virgin mice, low levels of WAP-tPA RNA, which were not modulated during lactation, were found in tongue, kidney, and sublingual gland. These studies demonstrate that the WAP gene promoter can target the expression of a transgene to the mammary gland and that this expression is inducible during lactation

  15. Absorption and tissue distribution of doxorubicin entrapped in liposomes following intravenous or intraperitoneal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, P; Clementi, F

    1983-01-01

    Absorption and tissue distribution of free doxorubicin (Dxn) and Dxn entrapped into liposomes have been examined after intravenous (i.v.) or intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection into C57/B1/6 mice. Liposomal encapsulation of Dxn altered its plasma kinetics and tissue distribution. After i.v. administration Dxn in liposomes has a half-life longer than that of free Dxn and it is taken up mostly by tissues rich in reticuloendothelial cells, such as liver and spleen. In the heart and kidney liposomal Dxn reaches a lower concentration than free Dxn. After i.p. injection the tissue distribution of liposomal Dxn is drastically changed. We did not observe the first peak of high concentration in the tissues, the Dxn content in liver and spleen is decreased and its concentration in heart is even more reduced. The results of this study suggest that the route of administration of liposome-entrapped drugs may change both the kinetics of absorption and their tissue distribution and this could result in a different pharmacological effect.

  16. The need for a population-based, dose optimization study for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischemic stroke: A study from a tertiary care teaching hospital from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siju V Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The guideline recommended dose of intravenous (i.v recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA for acute ischemic stroke is 0.9 mg/kg in the European and American populations. In Asiatic population, some studies have shown that a lower dose of i.v rt-PA is equally efficacious. Aims: To assess if there is a need for a dose optimization for i.v rt-PA study among Indians. Setting and Design: A prospective, observational database of acute stroke cases that presented to a tertiary care institute over a period of 1 year was made. Methods: The data procured using a prestructured elaborate pro forma. Based on the dose of rt-PA received, the individuals were divided into three groups; Group 1 (0.6–0.7 mg/kg, Group 2 (0.7–0.8 mg/kg, and Group 3 (0.8–0.9 mg/kg. Improvement was assessed in each group and between the thrombolysed and nonthrombolysed individuals. Statistical Analysis Used: The nonparametric Mann–Whitney U-test (Wilcoxon rank-sum test was applied for assessing improvement of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score with significance level of α < 0.05 (P < 0.012 and compliance level at 95%. Results: Between the thrombolysed (n = 46 and nonthrombolysed (n = 113 group, there was a statistically significant neurological improvement in the thrombolysed group. Clinical improvement was noted in 75%, 85.7%, and 66.7% of individuals receiving rt-PA in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Four out of the five who developed a clinically significant intracranial hemorrhage were thrombolysed at a dose of 0.8–0.9 mg/kg rt-PA (Group 3. Conclusion: There is a need for a properly randomized, dose optimization study of i.v rt-PA in the Indian subcontinent.

  17. In vivo distribution of Tc-99m labeled recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator in control and thrombus-bearing rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Eriko

    1992-01-01

    In vivo distribution of Tc-99m labeled recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (Tc-99m-rt-PA) was studied in control rats and thrombus-bearing rats. To compare fibrin binding in vivo with that in vitro, Tc-99m-rt-PA binding to fibrin gel in vitro was also imaged. Rapid blood clearance and accumulation into the liver and kidneys were observed in both control and thrombus-bearing rats. Accumulation in the stomach, which indicates instability of labeled rt-PA in vivo, was very low until two hours after injection. Tc-99m-rt-PA accumulation in the clots was higher than that in skeletal and heart muscles, although it was lower than in blood, liver, and kidneys. Administration of aprotinin, an antifibrinolytic agent, significantly prolonged clot accumulation of Tc-99m-rt-PA at 30 minutes after injection. These results suggest that fibrinolysis is responsible for the low rt-PA concentration in the clots. A scintigram of a thrombus-bearing rat demonstrated increased radioactivity at the clot forming site. On the other hand, Tc-99m-labeled human albumin, which was used as a control, was not accumulated in the clot. Tc-99m-rt-PA binding to fibrin gel in vitro was clearly imaged. By comparison, in vivo fibrin binding of Tc-99m-rt-PA was much lower than in vitro. The reasons for low thrombus uptake in vivo may be: (1) biochemical inactivation of extrinsically administered rt-PA by t-PA inhibitor; (2) fibrinolysis by rt-PA activated plasminogen. Overcoming these limitations will enable Tc-99m-rt-PA to reach the stage of clinical trials. (author)

  18. Tissue distribution and elimination after oral and intravenous administration of different titanium dioxide nanoparticles in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to obtain kinetic data that can be used in human risk assessment of titanium dioxide nanomaterials. Methods Tissue distribution and blood kinetics of various titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NM-100, NM-101, NM-102, NM-103, and NM-104), which differ with respect to primary particle size, crystalline form and hydrophobicity, were investigated in rats up to 90 days post-exposure after oral and intravenous administration of a single or five repeated doses. Results For the oral study, liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes were selected as target tissues for titanium (Ti) analysis. Ti-levels in liver and spleen were above the detection limit only in some rats. Titanium could be detected at low levels in mesenteric lymph nodes. These results indicate that some minor absorption occurs in the gastrointestinal tract, but to a very limited extent. Both after single and repeated intravenous (IV) exposure, titanium rapidly distributed from the systemic circulation to all tissues evaluated (i.e. liver, spleen, kidney, lung, heart, brain, thymus, reproductive organs). Liver was identified as the main target tissue, followed by spleen and lung. Total recovery (expressed as % of nominal dose) for all four tested nanomaterials measured 24 h after single or repeated exposure ranged from 64-95% or 59-108% for male or female animals, respectively. During the 90 days post-exposure period, some decrease in Ti-levels was observed (mainly for NM-100 and NM-102) with a maximum relative decrease of 26%. This was also confirmed by the results of the kinetic analysis which revealed that for each of the investigated tissues the half-lifes were considerable (range 28–650 days, depending on the TiO2-particle and tissue investigated). Minor differences in kinetic profile were observed between the various particles, though these could not be clearly related to differences in primary particle size or hydrophobicity. Some indications were observed for an

  19. ELISA for complexes between urokinase-type plasminogen activator and its receptor in lung cancer tissue extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Witte, H; Pappot, H; Brünner, N

    1997-01-01

    A sandwich-type ELISA has been developed for the assessment of complexes between urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor (uPAR) in extracts of squamous cell lung carcinomas. The assay is based on a combination of rabbit polyclonal anti-uPA antibodies and a biotinylated mouse...... anti-uPAR monoclonal antibody (MAb). The detection limit of the assay is approximately 0.5 fmol/ml. A linear dose-response is obtained with up to 40 fmol/ml of uPA:uPAR complexes, while uPA and uPAR separately do not cause any response in the ELISA. A buffer which has been used previously for optimal...... extraction of uPAR yields the highest amounts of uPA:uPAR complexes. Absorption of tumor extracts with anti-uPA or anti-uPAR MAbs results in a complete disappearance of the ELISA signal, demonstrating the specificity of the ELISA. The recovery of chemically cross-linked uPA:uPAR complexes added to tumor...

  20. Results of phase III clinical trial of 99mTc-labelled recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in the detection of deep venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, S.P.; Boyd, S.J.; Parkes, S.L.; Quinn, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of this new technique against the accepted ''gold standard'' of contrast venography in 79 patients suspected of DVT. A kit formulation has been devised in which 99 mTc is labelled to rt- PA where the plasminogen binding site has been permanently inhibited but the fibrin binding site remained active. Kit preparation takes five minutes. Scintigraphic imaging is performed at four hours post-injection (10 min/scan for thighs and calves). The results of scintigraphic imaging were then compared to those of contrast venography. Mean thrombus age was 5.4 days. 58% patients were receiving intravenous heparin. Mean time interval between contrast venography and scanning was 20 hours. For the purpose of analysis, the leg was divided into proximal and distal segments for both the scintigraphic study and the contrast venography. Of the 14 thrombosed proximal segments, 13 had positive scans; in the 53 non-thrombosed proximal segments, 49 had negative scans. Thus in proximal vein thrombosis, scanning had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 92%. Of the 36 thrombosed calf vein segments, 31 had positive scans; in the 30 non-thrombosed calf segments, 28 had negative scans. Thus in calf vein thrombosis, scanning has a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 93%. Scintigraphic scanning with this new radiopharmaceutical permits accurate detection of thrombus in both proximal and calf veins. The technique detects both fresh and aged thrombi and is unaffected by heparin administration. Further work in different patient groups will need to be performed to define its clinical usefulness

  1. Time to treatment with intravenous alteplase and outcome in stroke: an updated pooled analysis of ECASS, ATLANTIS, NINDS, and EPITHET trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lees, Kennedy R.; Bluhmki, Erich; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Brott, Thomas G.; Toni, Danilo; Grotta, James C.; Albers, Gregory W.; Kaste, Markku; Marler, John R.; Hamilton, Scott A.; Tilley, Barbara C.; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Hacke, Werner; Allen, Kathryn; Mau, Jochen; Meier, Dieter; del Zoppo, Gregory; de Silva, D. A.; Butcher, K. S.; Parsons, M. W.; Barber, P. A.; Levi, C.; Bladin, C.; Byrnes, G.; Klingelhöfer, J.; Krauseneck, P.; Schneider, D.; Hielscher, A.N.; Büttner, Th; Hennen, G.; Marx, P.; Lücking, C. H.; Felgenhaner, K.; Hacke, W.; Müllges, W.; Krieter, G.; Schwartz, A.; Krämer, G.; Diener, H. C.; Busse, O.; Wiersbitzky, M.; Ferbert, A.; Druschky, K.-F.; Lechner, H.; Ladurner, G.; Schmutzhard, W.; Rogousslavsky, J.; Vignolo, A.; Regesta, G.; Re, G.; Pecorari, L.; Lagi, A.; Argentino, C.; Ferrari, G.; Mamoli, A.; Mironi, F.; Erilä, T.; Sivenius, I.; Murros, K.; Liukkonen, H.; Hedman, Ch; Muuronen, A.; Sotaniemi, K.; Thomassen, L.; Rosjo, O.; Brautaset, N.; Indredavik, B.; Sandset, P. M.; Petersson, J.; Radberg, H.; Térent, A.; Carlström, Ch; Kjällman, Lena; Overgaard, K.; Boysen, G.; Enevoldsen, E.; Munck, O.; St Jensen, T.; Campbell, M.; Hawkins, S. A.; Franke, C. L.; Vos, J.; Frenken, W. G. M.; Op de Coul, A. A. W.; Verslegers, W.; Cras, P.; Laloux, P.; Blecic, A.N.; Marchau, M.; Féve, J. -R.; Rancurel, G.; Weber, M.; Mahagne, M.-H.; Larrue, A.N.; Trouillas, A.N.; Blard, J. M.; Caussanel, A.N.; Chollet, A.N.; Orgogozo, J. M.; Arnoud, A.N.; Cunha, L.; Castillo, J.; Tejedor, D.; Chomorro, A.; Sancho, H.; Davalos, A.; Fieschi, Cesare; Verstraete, Marc; Lesaffre, Emmanuel; Feuerer, Werner; Sanset, P. M.; Wahlgren, N. G.; Boysen, Gudrun; Hijdra, Albert H. J.; Bes, André; Hennerici, Michael; Bozzao, Luigi; Manelfe, Calude; Peock, Klaus; Zeumer, Hermann; Lenzi, Gian-Luigi; Crimmins, D.; Donnan, G.; Davis, S.; Gerraty, R.; Hankey, G.; Niederkorn, K.; Brainin, M.; Deisenhammer, E.; Baumhackl, U.; Grisold, W.; Podreka, I.; Alf, C.; Sluga, E.; Brücke, B.; Kristoferitsch, W.; Magnussen, I.; Vorstrup, S.; Olesen, J.; Kaste, M.; Rissanen, A.; Sivenius, J.; Hedman, C.; Numminen, H.; Liukkonen, J.; Kolvisto, K.; Erila, T.; Caussanel, J. P.; Dumas, R.; Trouillas, P.; Feve, J.-R.; Amarenco, P.; Zuber, M.; Chollet, F.; Larrue, V.; Saudeau, D.; Villringer, A.; Buttner, T.; Heiss, W. D.; Gond, M.; Reichmann, H.; Klotz, J.; Prange, H.; Steiner, T.; Kaps, M.; Lowitzsch, K.; Tettenborn, B.; Hamann, G.; Klingelhofer, J.; Bogdahn, U.; Mullgers, W.; Bottacchi, E.; Cappelletti, C.; Solime, F.; Toso, V.; Ricevuti, G.; Stam, J.; de Keijzer, J. H. A.; Koudstaal, P.; de Kort, P. L. M.; Hammond-Tooke, G. D.; Timmings, P.; Thomassen, I.; Rygh, J.; Cunha, I.; Correia, C.; Rubio, F.; Chamorro, A.; Sabin, J. Alvarez; Vilata, J. L. Marti; Zarranz, J. J.; Diez-Tejedor, E.; Egido, A.; Mora, J. Vivancos; Delgado, G.; Gil-Peralta, A.; Lainez, J. M.; Mostacero, E.; Radberg, J.; Prantare, H.; Carlstrom, C.; Costulas, V.; Wahlgren, N.-G.; Malm, J.; Terent, A.; Lyrer, P.; Bogousslavsky, J.; Hawkins, S.; Campbell, M. J.; Ford, G. A.; Mendelow, A. D.; Davalos, Antoni; Donnan, Geoffrey; Larrue, Vincent; Poeck, Klaus; Asplund, Kjell; Lenzi, Gian Luigi; Marler, John; Martinez-Vila, Eduardo; del Zoppo, Gregory J.; Dávalos, A.; von Kummer, R.; Toni, D.; Wahlgren, N.; Lees, K. R.; Lesaffre, E.; Bastianello, S.; Wardlaw, J. M.; Peyrieux, J.-C.; Sauce, C.; Medeghri, Z.; Mazenc, R.; Machnig, T.; Bluhmki, E.; Aichner, F.; Eggers, C.; Gruber, F.; Noistering, G.; Willeit, J.; Vanhooren, G.; Blecic, S.; Bruneel, B.; Caekebeke, J.; Simons, P. J.; Thijs, V.; Bar, M.; Dvorakova, H.; Vaclavik, D.; Andersen, G.; Iversen, H. K.; Traberg-Kristensen, B.; Marttila, R.; Bouillat, J.; Ducrocq, X.; Giroud, M.; Jaillard, A.; Larrieu, J.-M.; Leys, D.; Magne, C.; Milhaud, D.; Sablot, D.; Berrouschot, J.; Faiss, J. H.; Glahn, J.; Görtler, M.; Grau, A.; Grond, M.; Haberl, R.; Hennerici, M.; Koch, H.; Marx, J.; Meves, S.; Meyding-Lamadé, U.; Ringleb, P.; Schwarz, A.; Sobesky, J.; Urban, P.; Karageorgiou, K.; Komnos, A.; Csányi, A.; Csiba, L.; Valikovics, A.; Agnelli, G.; Billo, G.; Bovi, P.; Comi, G.; Gigli, G.; Guidetti, D.; Inzitari, D.; Marcello, N.; Marini, C.; Orlandi, G.; Pratesi, M.; Rasura, M.; Semplicini, A.; Serrati, C.; Tassinari, T.; Brouwers, P. J. A. M.; Naess, H.; Kloster, R.; Czlonkowska, A.; Kuczyńska-Zardzewialy, A.; Nyka, W.; Opala, G.; Romanowicz, S.; Cruz, V.; Pinho e Melo, T.; Brozman, M.; Dvorak, M.; Garay, R.; Krastev, G.; Kurca, E.; Alvarez-Sabin, J.; Guerrero, M. del Mar Freijo; Herrero, J. A. E.; Leira, R.; Martí-Vilalta, J. L.; Vallejo, J. Masjuan; Millán, M.; Molina, C.; Segura, T.; Serena, J.; Danielsson, E.; Cederin, B.; von Zweigberg, E.; Welin, L.; Hungerbühler, H.-J.; Weder, B.; Jenkinson, D.; MacLeod, M. J.; MacWalter, R. S.; Markus, H. S.; Muir, K. W.; Sharma, A. K.; Walters, M. R.; Warburton, E. A.; Albakri, Erfan; Albers, Gregory; Alberts, Mark; Atkinson, Richard; Bell, Rodney; Jefferson, Thomas; Black, Sandra; Blumenfeld, Andrew; Brooks, William; Brott, Thomas; Bruno, Askiel; Buchan, Alastair; Bumgartner, James; Carpenter, David; Castellani, Daniel; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Clark, Wayne; Coccia, Craig; Cohen, Stanley; Comber, John; Coull, Bruce; Culebras, Antonio; Curfman, T.; Curtin, Jeffrey; Dayno, Jeffrey; DeMatteis, James; Desai, Hiren; Dietrich, Dennis; Dissin, Jonathan; Driscoll, Paul; Duke, Robert; Edelsohn, Lanny; Feinberg, William; Ford, Stephen; Gasecki, Andrew; Gilbert, Gordon; Gray, Lenora; Grayum, Brad; Grindal, Alan; Grotta, James; Hachinski, Vladimir; Hakim, Antoine; Hassan, Rizwan; Hess, David; Hidalgo, Andrea; Homer, Daniel; Horowitz, Deborah; Horowitz, Steven; Hsu, Chung; Hughes, Richard; Hurtig, Howard; Huang, Te-Long; Jacoby, Michael; Jhamandas, Jack; Karlsberg, Ronald; Kelley, Roger; Koller, Richard; Kirshner, Howard; Krieger, Derk; LaFranchise, Francis; LaMonte, Marian; Lebrun, Louise-Helene; Levine, Steven; Lyden, Partick; Madden, Kenneth; Mallenbaum, Sidney; Mandelbaum, Mark; Mattio, Thomas; Mirsen, Thomas; Morris, Dexter; Munschauer, Frederick; Murthy, Kolar; Newman, George; Pelligrino, Richard; Pettigrew, Creed; Raps, Eric; Rosa, Louis; Rowe, Vernon; Sauter, Michael; Scott, Phillip; Sergay, Steven; Sheppard, George; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Silliman, Scott; Simard, Denis; Simon, Roger; Sloan, Michael; Smith, Wade; Smith, Richard; Steel, J. Griffith; Stobbe, Gary; Strunk, Brian; Tabbaa, Mutaz; Tarrel, Ronald; Taylor, Lynne; Tolge, Celina; Turel, Anthony; Verro, Piero; Wilterdink, Janet; Wissman, Stanley; Wohlberg, Christopher; Brott, T.; Broderick, J.; Kothari, R.; O'Donoghue, M.; Barsan, W.; Tomsick, T.; Spilker, J.; Miller, R.; Sauerbeck, L.; Farrell, J.; Kelly, J.; Perkins, T.; McDonald, T.; Rorick, M.; Hickey, C.; Armitage, J.; Perry, C.; Thalinger, K.; Rhude, R.; Schill, J.; Becker, P. S.; Heath, R. S.; Adams, D.; Reed, R.; Klei, M.; Hughes, A.; Anthony, J.; Baudendistel, D.; Zadicoff, C.; Rymer, M.; Bettinger, I.; Laubinger, P.; Schmerler, M.; Meirose, G.; Lyden, P.; Rapp, K.; Babcock, T.; Daum, P.; Persona, D.; Brody, M.; Jackson, C.; Lewis, S.; Liss, J.; Mahdavi, Z.; Rothrock, J.; Tom, T.; Zweifler, R.; Dunford, J.; Zivin, J.; Kobayashi, R.; Kunin, J.; Licht, J.; Rowen, R.; Stein, D.; Grisolia, J.; Martin, F.; Chaplin, E.; Kaplitz, N.; Nelson, J.; Neuren, A.; Silver, D.; Chippendale, T.; Diamond, E.; Lobatz, M.; Murphy, D.; Rosenberg, D.; Ruel, T.; Sadoff, M.; Schim, J.; Schleimer, J.; Atkinson, R.; Wentworth, D.; Cummings, R.; Frink, R.; Heublein, P.; Grotta, J. C.; DeGraba, T.; Fisher, M.; Ramirez, A.; Hanson, S.; Morgenstern, L.; Sills, C.; Pasteur, W.; Yatsu, F.; Andrews, K.; Villar-Cordova, C.; Pepe, P.; Bratina, P.; Greenberg, L.; Rozek, S.; Simmons, K.; Kwiatkowski, T. G.; Horowitz, S. H.; Libman, R.; Kanner, R.; Silverman, R.; LaMantia, J.; Mealie, C.; Duarte, R.; Donnarumma, R.; Okola, M.; Cullin, V.; Mitchell, E.; Levine, S. R.; Lewandowski, C. A.; Tokarski, G.; Ramadan, N. M.; Mitsias, P.; Gorman, M.; Zarowitz, B.; Kokkinos, J.; Dayno, J.; Verro, P.; Gymnopoulos, C.; Dafer, R.; D'Olhaberriague, L.; Sawaya, K.; Daley, S.; Mitchell, M.; Frankel, M.; Mackay, B.; Barch, C.; Braimah, J.; Faherty, B.; MacDonald, J.; Sailor, S.; Cook, A.; Karp, H.; Nguyen, B.; Washington, J.; Weissman, J.; Williams, M.; Williamson, T.; Kozinn, M.; Hellwick, L.; Haley, E. C.; Bleck, T. P.; Cail, W. S.; Lindbeck, G. H.; Granner, M. A.; Wolf, S. S.; Gwynn, M. W.; Mettetal, R. W.; Chang, C. W. J.; Solenski, N. J.; Brock, D. G.; Ford, G. F.; Kongable, G. L.; Parks, K. N.; Wilkinson, S. S.; Davis, M. K.; Sheppard, G. L.; Zontine, D. W.; Gustin, K. H.; Crowe, N. M.; Massey, S. L.; Meyer, M.; Gaines, K.; Payne, A.; Bales, C.; Malcolm, J.; Barlow, R.; Wilson, M.; Cape, C.; Bertorini, T.; Misulis, K.; Paulsen, W.; Shepard, D.; Tilley, B. C.; Welch, K. M. A.; Fagan, S. C.; Lu, M.; Patel, S.; Masha, E.; Verter, J.; Boura, J.; Main, J.; Gordon, L.; Maddy, N.; Chociemski, T.; Windham, J.; Zadeh, H. Soltanian; Alves, W.; Keller, M. F.; Wenzel, J. R.; Raman, N.; Cantwell, L.; Warren, A.; Smith, K.; Bailey, E.; Welch, C.; Marler, J. R.; Froehlich, J.; Breed, J.; Easton, J. D.; Hallenbeck, J. F.; Lan, G.; Marsh, J. D.; Walker, M. D.; Davis, S. M.; Donnan, G. A.; Butcher, K.; Peeters, A.; Chalk, J. B.; Fink, J. N.; Kimber, T. E.; Schultz, D.; Hand, P. J.; Frayne, J.; Muir, K.; Tress, B. M.; Attia, J.; D'Este, C.; McNeil, J.; Burns, R.; Johnston, C.; Stark, R.; Desmond, P. M.; Christensen, S.; Ebinger, M.; Jackson, D.; Kimber, T.; Peeteis, A.; Fink, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early administration of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) after ischaemic stroke improves outcome. Previous analysis of combined data from individual patients suggested potential benefit beyond 3 h from stroke onset. We re-examined the effect of time to

  2. Time to treatment with intravenous alteplase and outcome in stroke: an updated pooled analysis of ECASS, ATLANTIS, NINDS, and EPITHET trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lees, Kennedy R; Bluhmki, Erich; von Kummer, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    Early administration of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) after ischaemic stroke improves outcome. Previous analysis of combined data from individual patients suggested potential benefit beyond 3 h from stroke onset. We re-examined the effect of time to treatment with i...

  3. PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR OF YERSINIA PESTIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Evseeva

    2015-01-01

    fibrin clots preventing bacteria dissemination after bites of infected fleas or subcutaneous challenge is believed to be the main Y. pestis factor responsible for generalization of infectious process. Pla-mediated ability of Y. pestis for selective binding with extracellular matrix and basal membranes may promote further hydrolysis of these structures by the host’s plasmin and overcoming tissue barriers by the pathogen. Y. pestis plasminogen activator also hydrolyses C3 complement component, human antimicrobial peptide — cathelicidin LL-37 and such cytokines as tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, interleukin 8 and protein 1 of monocyte chemotaxis. The main endogenic TFPI tissue factor pathway inhibitor also highly susceptible to proteolytic action of Pla, and efficiency of TFPI inactivation is much higher than efficacy of plasminogen activation. The review also debates the possibility of using Pla as a molecular target for prophylaxis and treatment of plague. 

  4. C-Psilocin tissue distribution in pregnant rats after intravenous administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis C.P. Law

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many species of hallucinogenic mushrooms have been found in the genus Psilocybe. The main psychoactive chemicals of Psilocybe mushrooms are psilocin and its phosphoryloxy derivative, psilocybin. In addition to its psychedelic effects, psilocybin is an effective agent to lift the mood of depressed patients with terminal cancers. Objective: To study the dispositional kinetics of 14C-psilocin in pregnant rats after intravenous injection, to calculate tissue dose surrogates i.e., tissue 14C concentration and area under the concentration-time curve using the experimental data, to quantify trans-placental passage of psilocin and/or its metabolites, and to identify new psilocin metabolite(s in rat urine. Methods: A group of 15 pregnant Wistar rats weighing between 0.30-0.36 kg was used in the study. Each rat was given a single dose of 7.5 mg/kg 14C-psilocin i.v. Three rats were randomly selected and sacrificed at 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 8.0 hr post-dosing. The maternal and fetal tissues were quickly removed and the radioactivity in these tissues determined by liquid scintillation counting. In a separate study, urine samples were collected from 6 male Wistar rats after administering 15 mg/kg of unlabeled psilocin i.p. The urine samples were collected and extracted by chloroform-methanol (9:1 v/v and analyzed using a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer. Results: 14C-Psilocin crossed the placental barrier of pregnant rats readily after i.v. administration; maternal tissue 14C concentrations were found to be much higher than those in fetal tissues. The areas under the curve for maternal tissues also were much higher than the fetal tissues. In general, maternal tissues could be divided into the fast eliminating organ group, which included the brain (elimination half-life 13 hr. A new psilocin metabolite tentatively identified as dihydroxyindoleacetic acid was found in the urine. Conclusion: Our study showed that psilocin readily crossed the

  5. Association of serial biochemical markers with acute ischemic stroke: the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke recombinant tissue plasminogen activator Stroke Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Edward C; Lindsell, Christopher; Broderick, Joseph; Fagan, Susan C; Tilley, Barbara C; Levine, Steven R

    2006-10-01

    Biochemical markers of acute neuronal injury may aid in the diagnosis and management of acute ischemic stroke. Serum samples from the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator Stroke Study were analyzed for the presence of 4 biochemical markers of neuronal, glial, and endothelial cell injury. These biochemical markers, myelin basic protein (MBP), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), S100beta, and soluble thrombomodulin, were studied for an association with initial stroke severity, infarct volume, and functional outcome. In the original NINDS study, serum samples were drawn from all patients on presentation to the Emergency Department and at approximately 2 and 24 hours after initiation of study therapy. In this analysis, stored serum samples were available for 359 patients; 107 patients had samples for all 3 time points. Serum marker concentrations were measured by ELISA techniques. We examined the relation between serum concentrations of each marker and the degree of baseline neurological deficit, functional outcome, and infarct size on computed tomography at 24 hours and the effect of fibrinolytic therapy. Higher 24-hour peak concentrations of MBP, NSE, and S100beta were associated with higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale baseline scores (r=0.186, P<0.0001; r=0.117, P=0.032; and r=0.263, P<0.0001, respectively). Higher peak concentrations of MBP and S100beta (r=0.209, P<0.0001; r=0.239, P<0.0001) were associated with larger computed tomography lesion volumes. Patients with favorable outcomes had smaller changes in MBP and S100beta (P<0.05) concentrations in the first 24 hours. Soluble thrombomodulin was not associated with any severity or outcome measure. This study corroborates previous work demonstrating correlations of MBP, NSE, and S100beta with clinical and radiographic features in acute stroke. Despite significantly better outcomes in the tissue plasminogen activator-treated group, we

  6. Time to treatment with intravenous alteplase and outcome in stroke: an updated pooled analysis of ECASS, ATLANTIS, NINDS, and EPITHET trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lees, Kennedy R; Bluhmki, Erich; von Kummer, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    Early administration of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) after ischaemic stroke improves outcome. Previous analysis of combined data from individual patients suggested potential benefit beyond 3 h from stroke onset. We re-examined the effect of time to treatment with i...... with intravenous rt-PA (alteplase) on therapeutic benefit and clinical risk by adding recent trial data to the analysis....

  7. TISSUE INHIBITOR OF METALLOPROTEINASE 1, MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 9, ALPHA-1 ANTITRYPSIN, METALLOTHIONEIN AND UROKINASE TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR RECEPTOR IN SKIN BIOPSIES FROM PATIENTS AFFECTED BY AUTOIMMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors have been described to play a role in autoimmune skin blistering diseases. We studied skin lesional biopsies from patients affected by several autoimmune skin blistering diseases for proteinases and proteinase inhibitors. Methods: We utilized immunohistochemistry to evaluate biopsies for alpha-1-antitrypsin, human matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1, metallothionein and urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR. We tested 30 patients affected by endemic pemphigus, 30 controls from the endemic area, and 15 normal controls. We also tested 30 biopsies from patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus, and 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH. Results: Contrary to findings in the current literature, most autoimmune skin blistering disease biopsies were negative for uPAR and MMP9. Only some chronic patients with El Bagre-EPF were positive to MMP9 in the dermis, in proximity to telocytes. TIMP-1 and metallothionein were positive in half of the biopsies from BP patients at the basement membrane of the skin, within several skin appendices, in areas of dermal blood vessel inflammation and within dermal mesenchymal-epithelial cell junctions.

  8. Xenon-helium gas mixture at equimolar concentration of 37.5% protects against oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced injury and inhibits tissue plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Hélène N; Haelewyn, Benoit; Blatteau, Jean-Éric; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Vallée, Nicolas; Abraini, Jacques H

    2017-01-01

    Xenon (Xe) is considered to be the golden standard neuroprotective gas. However, Xe has a higher molecular weight and lower thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, the main diluent of oxygen in air. These physical characteristics could impair or at least reduce the intrinsic neuroprotective action of Xe by increasing the patient's respiratory workload and body temperature. In contrast, helium (He) is a cost-efficient gas with a lower molecular weight and higher thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, but is far less potent than Xe. In this study, we hypothesized that mixing Xe and He could allow obtaining a neuroprotective gas mixture with advantageously reduced molecular weight and increased thermal conductivity. We found that Xe and He at the equimolar concentration of 37.5% reduced oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced increase in lactate dehydrogenase in brain slices, an ex vivo model of acute ischemic stroke. These results together with the effects of Xe-He on the thrombolytic efficiency of tissue plasminogen activator are discussed.

  9. Xenon-helium gas mixture at equimolar concentration of 37.5% protects against oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced injury and inhibits tissue plasminogen activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène N David

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Xenon (Xe is considered to be the golden standard neuroprotective gas. However, Xe has a higher molecular weight and lower thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, the main diluent of oxygen in air. These physical characteristics could impair or at least reduce the intrinsic neuroprotective action of Xe by increasing the patient's respiratory workload and body temperature. In contrast, helium (He is a cost-efficient gas with a lower molecular weight and higher thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, but is far less potent than Xe. In this study, we hypothesized that mixing Xe and He could allow obtaining a neuroprotective gas mixture with advantageously reduced molecular weight and increased thermal conductivity. We found that Xe and He at the equimolar concentration of 37.5% reduced oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced increase in lactate dehydrogenase in brain slices, an ex vivo model of acute ischemic stroke. These results together with the effects of Xe-He on the thrombolytic efficiency of tissue plasminogen activator are discussed.

  10. HMG CoA reductase inhibitor suppresses the expression of tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 induced by angiotensin II in cultured rat aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunieda, Yasufumi; Nakagawa, Katsumi; Nishimura, Hiromi; Kato, Hisato; Ukimura, Naoki; Yano, Shingo; Kawano, Hidehiko; Kimura, Shinzo; Nakagawa, Masao; Tsuji, Hajime

    2003-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (HRIs) reduce the incidence of acute cardiovascular events in patients with hyperlipidemia. Recent reports have shown that the protective effects of these drugs against cardiovascular events are also observed in patients without hyperlipidemia, but the mechanism of this favorable effect still remains unclear. In this study, the effects of HRIs on the endothelial regulation of thrombus formation were elucidated. The mRNA and protein expression of tissue factor (TF) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) were evaluated in cultured rat aortic endothelial cells. Pretreatment with simvastatin (0.03-3 microg/ml) significantly inhibited TF and PAI-1 induction by Ang II in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These inhibitions were significantly attenuated by mevalonic acid or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. Both Rho inhibitor, C3 exoenzyme, and Rho kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, mimicked the inhibitory effects of simvastatin against TF and PAI-1 induced by Ang II. This result suggested that the Rho/Rho kinase pathway is related to the TF and PAI-1 induction by Ang II. It was indicated that simvastatin maintains endothelial cells to be antithrombotic by inhibiting TF and PAI-1 expression via the Rho/Rho kinase pathways in which AngII induces TF and PAI-1 expression. These observations explain, at least partly, the mechanism of the favorable effects of simvastatin in reducing the thrombotic events.

  11. A new threshold of apparent diffusion coefficient values in white matter after successful tissue plasminogen activator treatment for acute brain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Atsushi; Shimizu, Yusaku; Koyama, Junichi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2017-06-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is effective for the treatment of acute brain ischemia, but may trigger fatal brain edema or hemorrhage if the brain ischemia results in a large infarct. Herein, we attempted to predict the extent of infarcts by determining the optimal threshold of ADC values on DWI that predictively distinguishes between infarct and reversible areas, and by reconstructing color-coded images based on this threshold. The study subjects consisted of 36 patients with acute brain ischemia in whom MRA had confirmed reopening of the occluded arteries in a short time (mean: 99min) after tPA treatment. We measured the apparetnt diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in several small regions of interest over the white matter within high-intensity areas on the initial diffusion weighted image (DWI); then, by comparing the findings to the follow-up images, we obtained the optimal threshold of ADC values using receiver-operating characteristic analysis. The threshold obtained (583×10 -6 m 2 /s) was lower than those previously reported; this threshold could distinguish between infarct and reversible areas with considerable accuracy (sensitivity: 0.87, specificity: 0.94). The threshold obtained and the reconstructed images were predictive of the final radiological result of tPA treatment, and this threshold may be helpful in determining the appropriate management of patients with acute brain ischemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. In vitro and in vivo antiangiogenic activity of a novel deca-peptide derived from human tissue-type plasminogen activator kringle 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Li; Xu, Xun; Zhao, Hui; Gu, Qing [Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, Affiliate of Shanghai Jiaotong University, No. 100 Haining Road, Shanghai 200080 (China); Zou, Haidong, E-mail: zouhaidong@hotmail.com [Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, Affiliate of Shanghai Jiaotong University, No. 100 Haining Road, Shanghai 200080 (China)

    2010-06-11

    A synthetic deca-peptide corresponding to the amino acid sequence Arg{sup 54}-Trp{sup 63} of human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) kringle 2 domain, named TKII-10, is produced and tested for its ability to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation, migration, tube formation in vitro, and angiogenesis in vivo. At the same time, another peptide TKII-10S composed of the same 10 amino acids as TKII-10, but in a different sequence, is also produced and tested. The results show that TKII-10 potently inhibits VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell migration and tube formation in a dose-dependent, as well as sequence-dependent, manner in vitro while it is inactive in inhibiting endothelial cell proliferation. Furthermore, TKII-10 potently inhibits angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane and mouse cornea. The middle four amino acids DGDA in their sequence play an important role in TKII-10 angiogenesis inhibition{sub .} These results suggest that TKII-10 is a novel angiogenesis inhibitor that may serve as a prototype for antiangiogenic drug development.

  13. Genome-wide association study for circulating tissue plasminogen activator levels and functional follow-up implicates endothelial STXBP5 and STX2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Huffman, Jennifer E; Yamakuchi, Munekazu; Yamkauchi, Munekazu; Trompet, Stella; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Chen, Wei-Min; Smith, Nicholas L; Kleber, Marcus E; Shin, So-Youn; Becker, Diane M; Tang, Weihong; Dehghan, Abbas; Johnson, Andrew D; Truong, Vinh; Folkersen, Lasse; Yang, Qiong; Oudot-Mellkah, Tiphaine; Buckley, Brendan M; Moore, Jason H; Williams, Frances M K; Campbell, Harry; Silbernagel, Günther; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Navis, Gerjan J; Destefano, Anita; Wright, Alan F; Chen, Ming-Huei; de Craen, Anton J M; Worrall, Bradford B; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Rumley, Ann; Bookman, Ebony B; Psaty, Bruce M; Chen, Fang; Keene, Keith L; Franco, Oscar H; Böhm, Bernhard O; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Carter, Angela M; Jukema, J Wouter; Sattar, Naveed; Bis, Joshua C; Ikram, Mohammad A; Sale, Michèle M; McKnight, Barbara; Fornage, Myriam; Ford, Ian; Taylor, Kent; Slagboom, P Eline; McArdle, Wendy L; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Goodall, Alison H; Yanek, Lisa R; Furie, Karen L; Cushman, Mary; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Folsom, Aaron R; Basu, Saonli; Matijevic, Nena; van Gilst, Wiek H; Wilson, James F; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P; Tracy, Russell P; Polasek, Ozren; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Grant, Peter J; Hillege, Hans L; Cambien, Francois; Stott, David J; Lowe, Gordon D; Spector, Timothy D; Meigs, James B; Marz, Winfried; Eriksson, Per; Becker, Lewis C; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Soranzo, Nicole; Williams, Scott M; Hayward, Caroline; van der Harst, Pim; Hamsten, Anders; Lowenstein, Charles J; Strachan, David P; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2014-05-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease, catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, the major enzyme responsible for endogenous fibrinolysis. In some populations, elevated plasma levels of tPA have been associated with myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies to identify novel correlates of circulating levels of tPA. Fourteen cohort studies with tPA measures (N=26 929) contributed to the meta-analysis. Three loci were significantly associated with circulating tPA levels (P<5.0×10(-8)). The first locus is on 6q24.3, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs9399599; P=2.9×10(-14)) within STXBP5. The second locus is on 8p11.21. The lead SNP (rs3136739; P=1.3×10(-9)) is intronic to POLB and <200 kb away from the tPA encoding the gene PLAT. We identified a nonsynonymous SNP (rs2020921) in modest linkage disequilibrium with rs3136739 (r(2)=0.50) within exon 5 of PLAT (P=2.0×10(-8)). The third locus is on 12q24.33, with the lead SNP (rs7301826; P=1.0×10(-9)) within intron 7 of STX2. We further found evidence for the association of lead SNPs in STXBP5 and STX2 with expression levels of the respective transcripts. In in vitro cell studies, silencing STXBP5 decreased the release of tPA from vascular endothelial cells, whereas silencing STX2 increased the tPA release. Through an in silico lookup, we found no associations of the 3 lead SNPs with coronary artery disease or stroke. We identified 3 loci associated with circulating tPA levels, the PLAT region, STXBP5, and STX2. Our functional studies implicate a novel role for STXBP5 and STX2 in regulating tPA release.

  14. Genome-Wide Association Study for Circulating Tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA) Levels and Functional Follow-up Implicates Endothelial STXBP5 and STX2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Yamkauchi, Munekazu; Trompet, Stella; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Chen, Wei-Min; Smith, Nicholas L.; Kleber, Marcus E.; Shin, So-Youn; Becker, Diane M.; Tang, Weihong; Dehghan, Abbas; Johnson, Andrew D.; Truong, Vinh; Folkersen, Lasse; Yang, Qiong; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Buckley, Brendan M.; Moore, Jason H.; Williams, Frances M.K.; Campbell, Harry; Silbernagel, Günther; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Tofler, Geoffrey H.; Navis, Gerjan J.; DeStefano, Anita; Wright, Alan F.; Chen, Ming-Huei; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Rumley, Ann; Bookman, Ebony B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Chen, Fang; Keene, Keith L.; Franco, Oscar H.; Böhm, Bernhard O.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Carter, Angela M.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Sattar, Naveed; Bis, Joshua C.; Ikram, Mohammad A.; Sale, Michèle M.; McKnight, Barbara; Fornage, Myriam; Ford, Ian; Taylor, Kent; Slagboom, P. Eline; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Goodall, Alison H.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Furie, Karen L.; Cushman, Mary; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline CM.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Basu, Saonli; Matijevic, Nena; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Wilson, James F.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P.; Tracy, Russell P.; Polasek, Ozren; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Grant, Peter J.; Hillege, Hans L.; Cambien, Francois; Stott, David J.; Lowe, Gordon D.; Spector, Timothy D.; Meigs, James B.; Marz, Winfried; Eriksson, Per; Becker, Lewis C.; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Soranzo, Nicole; Williams, Scott M.; Hayward, Caroline; van der Harst, Pim; Hamsten, Anders; Lowenstein, Charles J.; Strachan, David P.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease, catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, the major enzyme responsible for endogenous fibrinolysis. In some populations, elevated plasma levels of tPA have been associated with myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases (CVD). We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify novel correlates of circulating levels of tPA. Approach and Results Fourteen cohort studies with tPA measures (N=26,929) contributed to the meta-analysis. Three loci were significantly associated with circulating tPA levels (P <5.0×10−8). The first locus is on 6q24.3, with the lead SNP (rs9399599, P=2.9×10−14) within STXBP5. The second locus is on 8p11.21. The lead SNP (rs3136739, P=1.3×10−9) is intronic to POLB and less than 200kb away from the tPA encoding gene PLAT. We identified a non-synonymous SNP (rs2020921) in modest LD with rs3136739 (r2 = 0.50) within exon 5 of PLAT (P=2.0×10−8). The third locus is on 12q24.33, with the lead SNP (rs7301826, P=1.0×10−9) within intron 7 of STX2. We further found evidence for association of lead SNPs in STXBP5 and STX2 with expression levels of the respective transcripts. In in vitro cell studies, silencing STXBP5 decreased release of tPA from vascular endothelial cells, while silencing of STX2 increased tPA release. Through an in-silico lookup, we found no associations of the three lead SNPs with coronary artery disease or stroke. Conclusions We identified three loci associated with circulating tPA levels, the PLAT region, STXBP5 and STX2. Our functional studies implicate a novel role for STXBP5 and STX2 in regulating tPA release. PMID:24578379

  15. The effects of residual platelets in plasma on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-related assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlien Pieters

    Full Text Available Due to controversial evidence in the literature pertaining to the activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in platelets, we examined the effects of residual platelets present in plasma (a potential pre-analytical variable on various plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-related assays. Blood samples were collected from 151 individuals and centrifuged at 352 and 1500 g to obtain plasma with varying numbers of platelet. In a follow-up study, blood samples were collected from an additional 23 individuals, from whom platelet-poor (2000 g, platelet-containing (352 g and platelet-rich plasma (200 g were prepared and analysed as fresh-frozen and after five defrost-refreeze cycles (to determine the contribution of in vitro platelet degradation. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen, tissue plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 complex, plasma clot lysis time, β-thromboglobulin and plasma platelet count were analysed. Platelet α-granule release (plasma β-thromboglobulin showed a significant association with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen levels but weak associations with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and a functional marker of fibrinolysis, clot lysis time. Upon dividing the study population into quartiles based on β-thromboglobulin levels, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen increased significantly across the quartiles while plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and clot lysis time tended to increase in the 4th quartile only. In the follow-up study, plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen was also significantly influenced by platelet count in a concentration-dependent manner. Plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen levels increased further after complete platelet degradation. Residual platelets in plasma significantly influence plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen levels mainly

  16. Expression of urokinase plasminogen activator, its receptor and type-1 inhibitor in malignant and benign prostate tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usher, Pernille Autzen; Thomsen, Ole Frøkjær; Iversen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    RNAs was predominantly seen in cells identified as macrophages, which in most of the carcinomas (approximately 90%) were located in the interstitial tissue between the tumor cell islands, while in most of the benign hyperplasias they were located in the lumen of the glands and were in only a few cases (approximately 30......%) found in the interstitial tissue. uPAR immunoreactivity correlated with the mRNA expression and was, in addition, found in neutrophils. PAI-1 mRNA was detected in 13 of the 16 carcinomas and in 8 of the 9 benign hyperplasias, located in scattered fibroblast-like cells in both groups, in some vascular...... structures and in a few macrophages located in the interstitial tissue of both malignant and benign lesions. A similar expression pattern was found for PAI-1 immunoreactivity. In 8 of the 16 carcinomas, all 3 components were present, and in several areas colocalization was observed in stromal cells in close...

  17. ELISA for complexes between urokinase-type plasminogen activator and its receptor in lung cancer tissue extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Witte, H; Pappot, H; Brünner, N

    1997-01-01

    indicate that de novo complex formation is a major factor to consider and that complexes analyzed in the presence of this antagonist represent original uPA:uPAR complexes present prior to tumor tissue processing. The present ELISA appears suitable for studying the potential prognostic impact of u...

  18. Inhibitory effect of angiostatins on activity of the plasminogen/plasminogen activator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisina, R B; Mukhametova, L I; Gulin, D A; Levashov, M Y; Prisyazhnaya, N V; Gershkovich, K B; Varfolomeyev, S D

    2009-10-01

    Angiostatins, kringle-containing fragments of plasminogen, are potent inhibitors of angiogenesis. Effects of three angiostatin forms, K1-3, K1-4, and K1-4.5 (0-2 microM), on the rate of native Glu-plasminogen activation by its physiological activators in the absence or presence of soluble fibrin were investigated in vitro. Angiostatins did not affect the intrinsic amidolytic activities of plasmin and plasminogen activators of tissue type (tPA) and urokinase type (single-chain scuPA and two-chain tcuPA), but inhibited conversion of plasminogen to plasmin in a dose-dependent manner. All three angiostatins suppressed Glu-plasminogen activation by tcuPA independently of the presence of fibrin, and the inhibitory effect increased in the order: K1-3 < K1-4 < K1-4.5. The inhibitory effects of angiostatins on the scuPA activator activity were lower and further decreased in the presence of fibrin. Angiostatin K1-3 (up to 2 microM) had no effect, while 2 microM angiostatins K1-4 and K1-4.5 inhibited the fibrin-stimulated Glu-plasminogen activation by tPA by 50 and 100%, respectively. The difference in effects of the three angiostatins on the Glu-plasminogen activation by scuPA, tcuPA, and tPA in the absence or presence of fibrin is due to the differences in angiostatin structures, mechanisms of action, and fibrin-specificity of plasminogen activators, as well as due to the influence of fibrin on the Glu-plasminogen conformation. Angiostatins in vivo, which mimic plasminogen-binding activity, can inhibit plasminogen activation stimulated by various proteins (including fibrin) of extracellular matrix, thereby blocking cell migration and angiogenesis. The data of this work indicate that the inhibition of Glu-plasminogen activation under the action of physiological plasminogen activators by angiostatins can be implicated in the complex mechanism of their antiangiogenic and antitumor action.

  19. Freeze-dried plasma enhances clot formation and inhibits fibrinolysis in the presence of tissue plasminogen activator similar to pooled liquid plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Benjamin R; Moore, Ernest E; Moore, Hunter B; Sauaia, Angela; Stettler, Gregory; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C

    2017-08-01

    Systemic hyperfibrinolysis is an integral part of trauma-induced coagulopathy associated with uncontrolled bleeding. Recent data suggest that plasma-first resuscitation attenuates hyperfibrinolysis; however, the availability, transport, storage, and administration of plasma in austere environments remain challenging and have limited its use. Freeze-dried plasma (FDP) is a potential alternative due to ease of storage, longer shelf life, and efficient reconstitution. FDP potentially enhances clot formation and resists breakdown better than normal saline (NS) and albumin and similar to liquid plasma. Healthy volunteers underwent citrated blood draw followed by 50% dilution with NS, albumin, pooled plasma (PP), or pooled freeze-dried plasma (pFDP). Citrated native and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)-challenge (75 ng/mL) thrombelastography were done. Proteins in PP, pFDP, and albumin were analyzed by mass spectroscopy. pFDP and PP had superior clot-formation rates (angle) and clot strength (maximum amplitude) compared with NS and albumin in t-PA-challenge thrombelastographies (angle: pFDP, 67.9 degrees; PP, 67.8 degrees; NS, 40.6 degrees; albumin, 35.8 degrees; maximum amplitude: pFDP, 62.4 mm; PP, 63.5 mm; NS, 44.8 mm; albumin, 41.1 mm). NS and albumin dilution increased susceptibility to t-PA-induced hyperfibrinolysis compared with pFDP and PP (NS, 62.4%; albumin, 62.6%; PP, 8.5%; pFDP, 6.7%). pFDP was similar to PP in the attenuation of t-PA-induced fibrinolysis. Most proteins (97%) were conserved during the freeze-dry process, with higher levels in 12% of pFDP proteins compared with PP. pFDP enhances clot formation and attenuates hyperfibrinolysis better than NS and albumin and is a potential alternative to plasma resuscitation in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock. © 2017 AABB.

  20. Comparison of tissue plasminogen activator administration management between Telestroke Network hospitals and academic stroke centers: the Telemedical Pilot Project for Integrative Stroke Care in Bavaria/Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Heinrich J; Kukla, Christian; Vatankhah, Bijan; Gotzler, Berthold; Schenkel, Johannes; Hofer, Stephan; Fürst, Andrea; Haberl, Roman L

    2006-07-01

    Systemic thrombolysis is the only therapy proven to be effective for ischemic stroke. Telemedicine may help to extend its use. However, concerns remain whether management and safety of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration after telemedical consultation are equivalent in less experienced hospitals compared with tPA administration in academic stroke centers. During the second year of the ongoing Telemedical Pilot Project for Integrative Stroke Care, all systemic thrombolyses in stroke patients of the 12 regional clinics and the 2 stroke centers were recorded prospectively. Patients' demographics, stroke severity (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale), frequency of administration, time management, protocol violations, and safety were included in the analysis. In 2004, 115 of 4727 stroke or transient ischemic attack patients (2.4%) in the community hospitals and 110 of 1889 patients in the stroke centers (5.8%) received systemic thrombolysis. Prehospital latencies were shorter in the regional hospitals despite longer distances. Door to needle times were shorter in the stroke centers. Although blood pressure was controlled more strictly in community hospitals, symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage rate (7.8%) was higher (P=0.14) than in stroke centers (2.7%) but still within the range of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke trial. In-hospital mortality rate was low in community hospitals (3.5%) and in stroke centers (4.5%). Although with a lower rate of systemic thrombolysis, there was no evidence of lower treatment quality in the remote hospitals. With increasing numbers of tPA administration and growing training effects, the telestroke concept promises better coverage of systemic thrombolysis in nonurban areas.

  1. Sex-based differences in response to recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischemic stroke: a pooled analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, David M; Price, Lori Lyn; Ringleb, Peter; Hill, Michael D; Selker, Harry P

    2005-01-01

    Women experience worse outcomes after stroke compared with men. Prior work has suggested sex-based differences in coagulation and fibrinolysis markers in subjects with acute stroke. We explored whether sex might modify the effect of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) on outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Using a combined database including subjects from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), Alteplase Thrombolysis for Acute Noninterventional Therapy in Ischemic Stroke (ATLANTIS) A and B, and the Second European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASS II) trials, we examined 90-day outcomes in patients randomized to rtPA versus placebo by sex. We used logistic regression to control for potential confounders. Among 988 women treated between 0 and 6 hours from symptom onset, patients receiving rtPA were significantly more likely than those receiving placebo to have a modified Rankin Score < or =1 (40.5% versus 30.3%, P<0.0008). Among 1190 men, the trend toward benefit in the overall group did not reach statistical significance (38.5% versus 36.7%, P=0.52). An unadjusted analysis showed that women were significantly more likely to benefit from rtPA compared with men (P=0.04). Controlling for age, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, diabetes, symptom onset to treatment time, prior stroke, systolic blood pressure, extent of hypoattenuation on baseline computed tomography scan and several significant interaction terms (including onset to treatment time-by-treatment and systolic blood pressure-by treatment) did not substantially change the strength of the interaction between gender and rtPA treatment (P=0.04). In this pooled analysis of rtPA in acute ischemic stroke, women benefited more than men, and the usual gender difference in outcome favoring men was not observed in the thrombolytic therapy group. For patients presenting at later time intervals, when the risks and benefits of rtPA are more finely

  2. Platelet derived growth factor-CC isoform is associated with hemorrhagic transformation in ischemic stroke patients treated with tissue plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-González, Raquel; Blanco, Miguel; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; Moldes, Octavio; Castillo, José; Sobrino, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    Platelet derived growth factor-CC (PDGF-CC) isoform is activated by tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) regulating blood brain barrier permeability after ischemia. We aimed to study the association of PDGF isoforms serum levels with hemorrhagic transformation (HT) and edema after thrombolytic treatment in ischemic stroke. We studied 129 patients with ischemic stroke treated with tPA within the first 4.5 h (h) from stroke onset. CT was performed on admission and at 24-36 h. On the 2nd CT, HT was classified according to ECASS II criteria, and severe brain edema was diagnosed if extensive swelling causing any shifting of the structures of the midline was detected. PDGF-AA, PDGF-AB, PDGF-BB and PDGF-CC serum levels were analyzed by ELISA on admission (before tPA bolus), at 24 and 72 h. Patients who developed HT showed only higher levels of PDGF-CC isoform on admission and at 24 h (all p < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, PDGF-CC levels on admission (OR, 1.02; CI 95%, 1.00-1.04) and at 24 h (OR, 1.05; CI 95%, 1.02-1.08) were independently associated with HT after adjustment by confounding factors. On the other hand, patients with severe edema showed also higher levels of PDGF-CC on admission and at 24 h (p < 0.0001), but this statistical association was lost in the logistic regression analysis. PDGF-CC levels ≥ 175 ng/mL at 24 h predict the development of PH with a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 88% (area under the curve 0.936; p < 0.0001). Increased PDGF-CC levels after tPA treatment is associated with HT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A higher body temperature is associated with haemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute stroke untreated with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rtPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leira, Rogelio; Sobrino, Tomás; Blanco, Miguel; Campos, Francisco; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; Castellanos, Mar; Moldes, Octavio; Millán, Mónica; Dávalos, Antoni; Castillo, José

    2012-02-01

    Higher body temperature is a prognostic factor of poor outcome in acute stroke. Our aim was to study the relationship between body temperature, HT (haemorrhagic transformation) and biomarkers of BBB (blood-brain barrier) damage in patients with acute ischaemic stroke untreated with rtPA (recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator). We studied 229 patients with ischaemic stroke <12 h from symptom onset. Body temperature was determined at admission and every 6 h during the first 3 days. HT was evaluated according to ECASS II (second European Co-operative Acute Stroke Study) criteria in a multimodal MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) at 72 h. We found that 55 patients (34.1%) showed HT. HT was associated with cardioembolic stroke (64.2% against 23.0%; P<0.0001), higher body temperature during the first 24 h (36.9°C compared with 36.5°C; P<0.0001), more severe stroke [NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale) score, 14 (9-20) against 10 (7-15); P=0.002], and greater DWI (diffusion-weighted imaging) lesion volume at admission (23.2 cc compared with 13.2 cc; P<0.0001). Plasma MMP-9 (matrix metalloproteinase 9) (187.3 ng/ml compared with 44.2 ng/ml; P<0.0001) and cFn (cellular fibronectin) levels (16.3 μg/ml compared with 7.1 μg/ml; P=0.001) were higher in patients with HT. Body temperature within the first 24 h was independently associated with HT {OR (odds ratio), 7.3 [95% CI (confidence interval), 2.4-22.6]; P<0.0001} after adjustment for cardioembolic stroke subtype, baseline NIHSS score and DWI lesion volume. This effect remained unchanged after controlling for MMP-9 and cFn. In conclusion, high body temperature within the first 24 h after ischaemic stroke is a risk factor for HT in patients untreated with rtPA. This effect is independent of some biological signatures of BBB damage.

  4. Dose De-escalation of Intrapleural Tissue Plasminogen Activator Therapy for Pleural Infection. The Alteplase Dose Assessment for Pleural Infection Therapy Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popowicz, Natalia; Bintcliffe, Oliver; De Fonseka, Duneesha; Blyth, Kevin G; Smith, Nicola A; Piccolo, Francesco; Martin, Geoffrey; Wong, Donny; Edey, Anthony; Maskell, Nick; Lee, Y C Gary

    2017-06-01

    Intrapleural therapy with a combination of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) 10 mg and DNase 5 mg administered twice daily has been shown in randomized and open-label studies to successfully manage over 90% of patients with pleural infection without surgery. Potential bleeding risks associated with intrapleural tPA and its costs remain important concerns. The aim of the ongoing Alteplase Dose Assessment for Pleural infection Therapy (ADAPT) project is to investigate the efficacy and safety of dose de-escalation for intrapleural tPA. The first of several planned studies is presented here. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a reduced starting dose regimen of 5 mg of tPA with 5 mg of DNase administered intrapleurally for pleural infection. Consecutive patients with pleural infection at four participating centers in Australia, the United Kingdom, and New Zealand were included in this observational, open-label study. Treatment was initiated with tPA 5 mg and DNase 5 mg twice daily. Subsequent dose escalation was permitted at the discretion of the attending physician. Data relating to treatment success, radiological and systemic inflammatory changes (blood C-reactive protein), volume of fluid drained, length of hospital stay, and treatment complications were extracted retrospectively from the medical records. We evaluated 61 patients (41 males; age, 57 ± 16 yr). Most patients (n = 58 [93.4%]) were successfully treated without requiring surgery for pleural infection. Treatment success was corroborated by clearance of pleural opacities visualized by chest radiography (from 42% [interquartile range, 22-58] to 16% [8-31] of hemithorax; P < 0.001), increase in pleural fluid drainage (from 175 ml in the 24 h preceding treatment to 2,025 ml [interquartile range, 1,247-2,984] over 72 h of therapy; P <  0.05) and a reduction in blood C-reactive protein (P < 0.05). Seven patients (11.5%) had dose escalation of tPA to 10 mg. Three patients underwent

  5. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism is associated with metabolic syndrome parameters in Malaysian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamodi, Zaid H; Saif-Ali, Riyadh; Ismail, Ikram S; Ahmed, Khaled A; Muniandy, Sekaran

    2012-05-01

    The plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G and tissue plasminogen activator Alu-repeat insertion/deletion polymorphisms might be genetic determinations of increased or decreased of their plasma activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G and tissue plasminogen activator Alu-repeat I/D polymorphisms with metabolic syndrome parameters in normal Malaysian subjects and to assess the impact of these polymorphisms on their plasma activities and antigens. The genetic polymorphisms were genotyped in 130 normal subjects. In addition, the plasma activities and antigens of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator as well as levels of insulin, glucose, and lipid profile at fasting state were investigated. The subjects with homozygous 4G/4G showed association with an increased triglyceride (p = 0.007), body mass index (p = 0.01) and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.03). In addition, the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism modulates plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and antigen and tissue plasminogen activator activity (p = 0.002, 0.014, 0.003) respectively. These results showed that, the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism is associated with metabolic syndrome parameters, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator activities in Malaysian subjects, and may serve to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in Malaysian subjects.

  6. Characterization of a plasminogen activator produced by Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, M M; Alizadeh, H; Gerard, R D; Niederkorn, J Y

    1995-07-01

    Serine proteases play an important role in a diverse array of biological processes, including embryogenesis, metastasis, angiogenesis, thrombolysis and tissue invasion by certain parasites. The latter observation prompted us to explore the possibility that the tissue-invasive ocular parasite Acanthamoeba castellanii elaborates one or more serine proteases. Acanthamoeba sp. are pathogenic free-living amoebae that can produce an invasive, blinding inflammatory disease of the cornea, termed Acanthamoeba keratitis. The present study reports the preliminary purification and characterization of a novel plasminogen activator from an ocular isolate of A. castellanii. The parasite-derived enzyme has a molecular mass of approx. 40 kDa and produces a single band of lysis on fibrinogen-agarose zymographs. Activity of the enzyme is completely inhibited by treatment with diisopropylfluorophosphate, indicating that it is a serine protease. The parasite-derived serine protease is not inhibited by amiloride which is a strong inhibitor of urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Additionally, the enzyme is not inhibited by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 which is the primary physiological inhibitor of both urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator. It does not cross-react with antibodies specific for human urokinase or tissue-type plasminogen activator. The parasite-derived enzyme activates plasminogen from several mammalian species, including human, cow and pig. Thus, it is possible that this parasite-derived serine protease contributes to the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba keratitis.

  7. Treatment of plasminogen deficiency patients with fresh frozen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kızılocak, Hande; Ozdemir, Nihal; Dikme, Gürcan; Koç, Begüm; Atabek, Ayşe Ayzıt; Çokuğraş, Haluk; İskeleli, Güzin; Dönmez-Demir, Buket; Christiansen, Nina Merete; Ziegler, Maike; Ozdağ, Hilal; Schuster, Volker; Celkan, Tiraje

    2018-02-01

    Congenital plasminogen (Plg) deficiency leads to the development of ligneous membranes on mucosal surfaces. Here, we report our experience with local and intravenous fresh frozen plasma (FFP). We retrospectively reviewed medical files of 17 patients and their eight first-degree relatives. Conjunctivitis was the main complaint. Thirteen patients were treated both with intravenous and conjunctival FFP. Venous thrombosis did not develop in any. Genetic evaluation revealed heterogeneous mutations as well as polymorphisms. Diagnosis and treatment of Plg deficiency is challenging; topical and intravenous FFP may be an alternative treatment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Schistosomes Enhance Plasminogen Activation: The Role of Tegumental Enolase.

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara C Figueiredo; Akram A Da'dara; Sergio C Oliveira; Patrick J Skelly

    2015-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is a blood fluke parasite that causes schistosomiasis, a debilitating disease of global public health importance. These relatively large parasites are able to survive prolonged periods in the human vasculature without inducing stable blood clots around them. We show here that the intravascular life stages (schistosomula and adult males and females) can all promote significant plasminogen (PLMG) activation in the presence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). This results ...

  9. Plasminogen Activators and Ischemic Stroke: Conditions for Acute Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate acute treatment with plasminogen activators (PAs) can significantly increase the probability of minimal or no disability in selected ischemic stroke patients. There is a great deal of evidence showing that intravenous recombinant tissue PAs (rt-PA) infusion accomplishes this goal, recanalization with other PAs has also been demonstrated in the development of this treatment. Recanalization of symptomatic, documented carotid or vertebrobasilar arterial territory occlusions have also been achieved by local intra-arterial PA delivery, although only a single prospective double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled study has been reported. The increase in intracerebral hemorrhage with these agents by either delivery approach underscores the need for careful patient selection, dose-appropriate safety and efficacy, proper clinical trial design, and an understanding of the evolution of cerebral tissue injury due to focal ischemia. Principles underlying the evolution of focal ischemia have been expanded by experience with acute PA intervention. Several questions remain open that concern the manner in which PAs can be applied acutely in ischemic stroke and how injury development can be limited. PMID:23539414

  10. Association of PAI-1 4G/5G and -844G/A gene polymorphisms and changes in PAI-1/tissue plasminogen activator levels in myocardial infarction: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Nesrine; Ghazouani, Lakhdar; Saidi, Sarra; Ben-Hadj-Khalifa, Sonia; Addad, Fawzi; Almawi, Wassim Y; Mahjoub, Touhami

    2010-02-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is induced by acquired and inherited risk factors, including the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) -844G/A and -675G/A (4G/5G) gene variants. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between PAI-1-844G/A and 4G/5G polymorphisms and changes in PAI-1 and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) levels in MI in a Tunisian population. This was a case-control study involving 305 patients with MI and 328 unrelated healthy controls. PAI-1 genotyping was done by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) (-844G/A) or by polymerase chain reaction-allele specific amplification. PAI-1 and tPA levels were assayed by serological assays. In contrast to tPA levels, mean plasma PAI-1 antigen levels were higher in cases than in control subjects. The elevation in PAI-1 levels was more pronounced in -844A and 4G allele carriers. Significantly higher frequencies of (mutant) 4G and -844A alleles and 4G/4G and -844A/-844A genotypes, and corresponding lower frequencies of (wild-type) 5G and -844G alleles and 5G/5G and -844G/-844G genotypes were seen in patients than in controls. Increased prevalence of 4G/-844A and decreased prevalence of 5G/-844G haplotypes were seen in patients than in controls, thereby conferring a susceptibility and protective nature to these haplotypes, respectively. Regression analysis confirmed the independent association of 4G/4G and -844A/A with MI, after controlling for a number of covariates. This study indicated that the risk of MI was notably high in 4G and -844A carriers with elevated plasma PAI-1 and were associated with reduced tPA levels.

  11. Pharmacokinetics and Tissue Distribution of Minocycline following Intravenous Administration in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Petraitis, Vidmantas; Petraitiene, Ruta; Maung, Bo Bo Win; Nolan, Tom G; Griffith, David C; Dudley, Michael N; Walsh, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Multidrug-resistant A. baumannii, S. maltophilia, and B. cepacia have been identified as priority organisms of infectious diseases and as important causes of refractory pneumonia. These three pathogens require urgent attention for development of new therapeutic options. However, few if any novel antibacterial antibiotics against these organisms are available. In order to understand the impact of minocycline dose on plasma and tissue distribution, we conducted a detailed ph...

  12. Endogenously generated plasmin at the vascular wall injury site amplifies lysine binding site-dependent plasminogen accumulation in microthrombi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Brzoska

    Full Text Available The fibrinolytic system plays a pivotal role in the regulation of hemostasis; however, it remains unclear how and when the system is triggered to induce thrombolysis. Using intra-vital confocal fluorescence microscopy, we investigated the process of plasminogen binding to laser-induced platelet-rich microthrombi generated in the mesenteric vein of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP. The accumulation of GFP-expressing platelets as well as exogenously infused Alexa Fluor 568-labeled Glu-plasminogen (Glu-plg on the injured vessel wall was assessed by measuring the increase in the corresponding fluorescence intensities. Glu-plg accumulated in a time-dependent manner in the center of the microthrombus, where phosphatidylserine is exposed on platelet surfaces and fibrin formation takes place. The rates of binding of Glu-plg in the presence of ε-aminocaproic acid and carboxypeptidase B, as well as the rates of binding of mini-plasminogen lacking kringle domains 1-4 and lysine binding sites, were significantly lower than that of Glu-plg alone, suggesting that the binding was dependent on lysine binding sites. Furthermore, aprotinin significantly suppressed the accumulation of Glu-plg, suggesting that endogenously generated plasmin activity is a prerequisite for the accumulation. In spite of the endogenous generation of plasmin and accumulation of Glu-plg in the center of microthrombi, the microthrombi did not change in size during the 2-hour observation period. When human tissue plasminogen activator was administered intravenously, Glu-plg further accumulated and the microthrombi were lysed. Glu-plg appeared to accumulate in the center of microthrombi in the early phase of microthrombus formation, and plasmin activity and lysine binding sites were required for this accumulation.

  13. The contact-system dependent plasminogen activator from human plasma: Identification and characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binnema, D.J.; Dooijewaard, G.; Iersel, J.J.L. van; Turion, P.N.C.; Kluft, C.

    1990-01-01

    Apart from tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), a third PA appears to occur in human plasma. Its activity is initiated when appropriate triggers of the contact system are added, and the activation depends on the presence of factor XII and

  14. Physical exercise induces enhancement of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) levels in plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dooijewaard, G.; Boer, A.de; Turion, P.N.C.; Cohen, A.F.; Breimer, D.D.; Kluft, C.

    1991-01-01

    The enhancement of the blood fibrinolytic potential by physical exercise is generally attributed to the release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) from the vessel wall. In this study we have investigated the possible contribution of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA). Six healthy

  15. Bone matrix degradation by the plasminogen activation system; possible mechanism of bone destruction in arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronday, H.K.

    1997-01-01

    The observed increase in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) and its receptor (u-PAR) in synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suggests pathophysiological involvement of the plasminogen activation PA system in inflammatory joint disease. In the present study we

  16. Pharmacokinetics and Tissue Distribution of Minocycline following Intravenous Administration in Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraitis, Vidmantas; Petraitiene, Ruta; Maung, Bo Bo Win; Nolan, Tom G; Griffith, David C; Dudley, Michael N; Walsh, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Multidrug-resistant A. baumannii, S. maltophilia, and B. cepacia have been identified as priority organisms of infectious diseases and as important causes of refractory pneumonia. These three pathogens require urgent attention for development of new therapeutic options. However, few if any novel antibacterial antibiotics against these organisms are available. In order to understand the impact of minocycline dose on plasma and tissue distribution, we conducted a detailed pharmacokinetic study in rabbits. Methods NZW rabbits received a single dose of minocycline as an IV infusion with serial plasma sampling over 24 hours. During the second stage, minocycline was administered Q12h for 6 days at 6, 12, 24, 48, or 96 mg/kg with serial plasma sampling and tissue recovery on day 7. Plasma and tissue concentrations were determined by LC/MS/MS. Minocycline pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using standard non-compartmental methods. Results   Minocycline dose (mg/kg) AUC(0–24) (ug∙hours/mL) Cmax (ug/mL) CL (mL/hours) Vss (mL) 6 26.9 ± 2.0 20.9 ± 2.1 226.3 ± 19.2 378.1 ± 47.3 12 64.5 ± 5.2 44.2 ± 7.3 198.7 ± 16.1 358 6 ± 41.2 24 211.90 ± 21.7 119.7 ± 15.5 116.4 ± 10.8 226.6 ± 27.3 48 660.7 ± 55.9 296.0 ± 33.9 74.2 ± 6.4 170.7 ± 15.4 96 1228.2 ± 106.9 369.7 ± 75.6 78.7 ± 6.6 246.9 ± 33.6 Minocycline Dose (mg/kg) Cerebrum (ug/g) Kidney (ug/g) Liver (ug/g) Spleen (ug/g) Heart (ug/g) Lung (ug/g) 6 1.9 ± 0.1 19.0 ± 2.1 17.0 ± 1.6 3.3 ± 0.5 5.6 ± 0.4 5.3 ± 0.7 12 3.3 ± 0.1 48.7 ± 8.1 33.4 ± 1.8 8.9 ± 1.2 13.0 ± 1.3 19.7 ± 1.9 24 9.6 ± 1.4 151 ± 15.7 110 ± 16.4 32.6 ± 4.4 47.2 ± 2.8 71.8 ± 19.5 48 34.2 ± 3.7 339 ± 40.6 473 ± 81.3 209 ± 46.2 194 ± 19.9 655 ± 140 96 55.5 ± 6.2 439 ± 65.7 1890 ± 231 471 ± 65.3 488 ± 121 866 ± 79.3 The data show that minocycline tissue exposures increased with

  17. Intravenous thrombolysis plus hypothermia for acute treatment of ischemic stroke (ICTuS-L): final results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmen, Thomas M; Raman, Rema; Guluma, Kama Z; Meyer, Brett C; Gomes, Joao A; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Wijman, Christine A; Rapp, Karen S; Grotta, James C; Lyden, Patrick D

    2010-10-01

    Induced hypothermia is a promising neuroprotective therapy. We studied the feasibility and safety of hypothermia and thrombolysis after acute ischemic stroke. Intravenous Thrombolysis Plus Hypothermia for Acute Treatment of Ischemic Stroke (ICTuS-L) was a randomized, multicenter trial of hypothermia and intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in patients treated within 6 hours after ischemic stroke. Enrollment was stratified to the treatment time windows 0 to 3 and 3 to 6 hours. Patients presenting within 3 hours of symptom onset received standard dose intravenous alteplase and were randomized to undergo 24 hours of endovascular cooling to 33°C followed by 12 hours of controlled rewarming or normothermia treatment. Patients presenting between 3 and 6 hours were randomized twice: to receive tissue plasminogen activator or not and to receive hypothermia or not. Results- In total, 59 patients were enrolled. One patient was enrolled but not treated when pneumonia was discovered just before treatment. All 44 patients enrolled within 3 hours and 4 of 14 patients enrolled between 3 to 6 hours received tissue plasminogen activator. Overall, 28 patients randomized to receive hypothermia (HY) and 30 to normothermia (NT). Baseline demographics and risk factors were similar between groups. Mean age was 65.5±12.1 years and baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 14.0±5.0; 32 (55%) were male. Cooling was achieved in all patients except 2 in whom there were technical difficulties. The median time to target temperature after catheter placement was 67 minutes (Quartile 1 57.3 to Quartile 3 99.4). At 3 months, 18% of patients treated with hypothermia had a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1 versus 24% in the normothermia groups (nonsignificant). Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 4 patients (68); all were treated with tissue plasminogen activator <3 hours (1 received hypothermia). Six patients in the hypothermia and 5 in the normothermia

  18. Costs Associated with Intravenous Cancer Therapy Administration in Patients with Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma in a US Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Sheng Duh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The most common chemotherapies in metastatic soft tissue sarcoma (mSTS require intravenous (IV administration. This often requires patients to make multiple outpatient visits per chemotherapy cycle, possibly impeding patients’ daily activities and increasing caregiver burden and medical costs. This study investigated costs associated with IV cancer therapy administration in mSTS from the payer perspective of the health care system. Patients and Methods. From the Experian Healthcare database, 1,228 mSTS patients were selected. Data were analyzed on outpatient visits during 2005–2012 involving IV cancer therapy administration. Costs were estimated on a per patient per visit (PPPV and per patient per month (PPPM basis. Results. The mean (median cost of IV therapy was $2,427 ($1,532 PPPV and $5,468 ($4,310 PPPM, of which approximately 60% was IV drug costs. IV administration costs averaged $399 PPPV and $900 PPPM, representing 16.5% of total visit costs. Anthracycline and alkylating-agents-based therapies had the highest PPPV and PPPM IV administration costs, respectively (mean $479 and $1,336, resp.. Patients with managed care insurance had the highest IV administration costs (mean $504 PPPV; $1,120 PPPM. Conclusions. IV administration costs constitute a considerable proportion of the total costs of receiving an IV cancer therapy to treat mSTS.

  19. Plasma pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of MnDPDP in the rat and dog after intravenous administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hustvedt, S.O.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate distribution and excretion of mangafodipir (MnDPDP, Teslascan) in the rat and dog. Material and Methods: Formulations of either 14 C-MnDPDP or 54 MnDPDP were injected intravenously at near clinical doses in rats and dogs. Results: The manganese (Mn) moeity is rapidly removed from plasma with an elimination half-life of less than 25 min in both species, reflecting a rapid distribution to the tissues and an early excretion. The plasma clearance of the DPDP moeity is slower than that of Mn and it appears to distribute into the extracellular fluid. Mn is distributed largely to the liver, pancreas and kidneys, and in pregnant rats, also to foetal liver and bones. No transplacental passage of DPDP could be detected. The metal is mainly excreted by the faecal route, with a small fraction eliminated early in the urine. DPDP is rapidly and essentially completely excreted in the urine, consistent with the glomerular filtration rate. (orig./AJ)

  20. Ginkgo biloba Extract (EGb 761®) Inhibits Glutamate-induced Up-regulation of Tissue Plasminogen Activator Through Inhibition of c-Fos Translocation in Rat Primary Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyu Suk; Lee, Ian Myungwon; Sim, Seobo; Lee, Eun Joo; Gonzales, Edson Luck; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Shin, Chan Young; Kwon, Kyoung Ja; Han, Seol-Heui

    2016-01-01

    EGb 761(®) , a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves, has antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties in experimental models of neurodegenerative disorders such as stroke and Alzheimer's disease. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) acts a neuromodulator and plays a crucial role in the manifestation of neurotoxicity leading to exaggerated neuronal cell death in neurological insult conditions. In this study, we investigated the effects of EGb 761 on the basal and glutamate-induced activity and expression of tPA in rat primary cortical neurons. Under basal condition, EGb 761 inhibited both secreted and cellular tPA activities, without altering tPA mRNA level, as modulated by the activation of p38. Compared with basal condition, EGb 761 inhibited the glutamate-induced up-regulation of tPA mRNA resulting in the normalization of overt tPA activity and expression. c-Fos is a component of AP-1, which plays a critical role in the modulation of tPA expression. Interestingly, EGb 761 inhibited c-Fos nuclear translocation without affecting c-Fos expression in glutamate-induced rat primary cortical neurons. These results demonstrated that EGb 761 can modulate tPA activity under basal and glutamate-stimulated conditions by both translational and transcriptional mechanisms. Thus, EGb 761 could be a potential and effective therapeutic strategy in tPA-excessive neurotoxic conditions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Tissue plasminogen activator induces microglial inflammation via a noncatalytic molecular mechanism involving activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and Akt signaling pathways and AnnexinA2 and Galectin-1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, David; Ampurdanés, Coral; Medina, Manel G; Serratosa, Joan; Tusell, Josep Maria; Saura, Josep; Planas, Anna M; Navarro, Pilar

    2012-04-01

    Inflammatory responses mediated by glial cells play a critical role in many pathological situations related to neurodegeneration such as Alzheimer's disease. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease which best-known function is fibrinolysis, but it is also involved in many other physiological and pathological events as microglial activation. Here, we found that tPA is required for Aβ-mediated microglial inflammatory response and tumor necrosis factor-α release. We further investigated the molecular mechanism responsible for tPA-mediated microglial activation. We found that tPA induces a catalytic-independent rapid and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Akt, and p38 signaling pathways. Inhibition of ERK1/2 and JNK resulted in a strong inhibition of microglial activation, whereas Akt inhibition led to increased inflammatory response, suggesting specific functions for each signaling pathway in the regulation of microglial activation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AnnexinA2 and Galectin-1 receptors are involved in tPA signaling and inflammatory response in glial cells. This study provides new evidences supporting that tPA plays a cytokine-like role in glial activation by triggering receptor-mediated intracellular signaling circuits and opens new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of neurological disorders in which neuroinflammation plays a pathogenic role. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Plasminogen and angiostatin levels in female benign breast lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Tykhomyrov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It is known that benign breast tissue exhibit relatively low angiogenic capacity. Activation of angiogenesis in mammary pre-malignant lesions could be associated with disease progression and high risk of transformation into the breast cancer. However, insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in angiogenesis regulation in non-cancerous breast pathologies is still poorly defined. The purpose of the present study was to determine levels of plasminogen and its proteolytic fragments (angiostatins in mammary dysplasia (mastopathy and breast cyst and benign neoplasms (fibroadenomas. Plasminogen and angiostatins were analyzed using immunoblotting and quantified by densitometric scanning. The significant increase in plasminogen levels was found in fibrocystic, cysts, and non-proliferatious fibroadenoma masses (4.7-, 3.7-, and 3.5-fold, respectively compared to healthy breast tissues (control. In the same benign lesions, 6.7-, 4-, and 3.7-fold increase in plasminogen 50 kDa fragment (angiostatin levels as compared with control were also observed. Activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9, which was detected using gelatine zymography, could be responsible for plasminogen cleavage and abundance of angiostatin in fibrocystic and cyst masses. In contrast, dramatic decrease of both plasminogen and angiostatin levels (3.8- and 5.3-folds, respectively was shown in tissues of proliferatious form of fibroadenoma in comparison with that of the dormant type of this neoplasm. Based on the obtained results, we concluded that angiostatin, a potent vessel growth inhibitor and anti-inflammatory molecule, can play a crucial role in pathophysiology of non-cancerous breast diseases. Further studies are needed to evaluate potential diagnostic and clinical implications of these proteins for prediction and therapy of benign breast pathologies.

  3. Intravenous Exposure of Pregnant Mice to Silver Nanoparticles: Silver Tissue Distribution and Effects in Maternal and Extra-Embryonic Tissues and Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Carlye Anne

    This research explores the tissue distribution of silver, as well as adverse effects in pregnant mice and embryos, following prenatal silver nanoparticle (AgNP) exposure. Chapter one of this dissertation is a survey of the published literature on the reproductive and/or developmental toxicity of AgNPs. The available data indicate that AgNPs adversely affect sperm count, viability, and/or motility both in vivo and in vitro, and cause apoptosis and necrosis in spermatogonial stem cells and testicular cells. Additionally, AgNP exposure results in mortality and morphological deformities in fish embryos, but produces no adverse effects in chicken embryos. The current published research on in vivo AgNP exposure to mammals during gestation consists of only three studies, one of which is described in chapter two of this dissertation. These studies report results that may suggest a potential for adverse effects on fetal development (e.g. , decreased viability and fetal and placental weights, increased incidence of developmentally young embryos), but additional research is needed. Chapter two of this dissertation investigates the distribution of silver in tissues of pregnant mice and gestation day (GD) 10 embryos following intravenous maternal exposure to 50 nm AgNPs during early organogenesis (GDs 7-9). Examinations of embryo morphology and histology were also performed. Results demonstrated the presence of silver in all organs and tissues examined. Silver concentrations were highest in liver, spleen, and visceral yolk sac, and lowest in embryos. Groups of mice were also treated with soluble silver nitrate, and the pattern of silver tissue distribution following silver nitrate exposure was similar to that which followed AgNP treatment. Transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (TEM-EDS) confirmed the presence of vesicle-bound nanoparticulate silver in visceral yolk sac endoderm, but not mesoderm. This finding, along with the high silver

  4. A systematic review of extravasation and local tissue injury from administration of vasopressors through peripheral intravenous catheters and central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubani, Osama M; Green, Robert S

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to collect and describe all published reports of local tissue injury or extravasation from vasopressor administration via either peripheral intravenous (IV) or central venous catheter. A systematic search of Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases was performed from inception through January 2014 for reports of adults who received vasopressor intravenously via peripheral IV or central venous catheter for a therapeutic purpose. We included primary studies or case reports of vasopressor administration that resulted in local tissue injury or extravasation of vasopressor solution. Eighty-five articles with 270 patients met all inclusion criteria. A total of 325 separate local tissue injury and extravasation events were identified, with 318 events resulting from peripheral vasopressor administration and 7 events resulting from central administration. There were 204 local tissue injury events from peripheral administration of vasopressors, with an average duration of infusion of 55.9 hours (±68.1), median time of 24 hours, and range of 0.08 to 528 hours. In most of these events (174/204, 85.3%), the infusion site was located distal to the antecubital or popliteal fossae. Published data on tissue injury or extravasation from vasopressor administration via peripheral IVs are derived mainly from case reports. Further study is warranted to clarify the safety of vasopressor administration via peripheral IVs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment with intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke is associated with reduced bed day use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Thorkild; Schmitz, Marie Louise; Simonsen, Claus Z.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) on neurological outcome in acute ischemic stroke. It is uncertain whether the improved neurological outcome also translates into less morbidity and lower need for hospi......Introduction: Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) on neurological outcome in acute ischemic stroke. It is uncertain whether the improved neurological outcome also translates into less morbidity and lower need...... for hospital admissions during follow-up. Methods: We conducted a register-based nationwide propensity score-matched follow-up study among ischemic stroke patients in Denmark (2004-2011). IV-tPA-treated patients were propensity-score matched with IV-tPA eligible but non-treated ischemic stroke patients from...... stroke centers not offering tPA. The adjusted Hazard ratio (HR) for first readmission was estimated by multivariable Cox regression among patients who survived the initial stroke admission. Total all-cause bed day use in the first year after stroke admission was determined for patients with a potential...

  6. Heat inactivation of native plasmin, plasminogen and plasminogen activators in bovine milk: a revisited study

    OpenAIRE

    Denis, Thierry; Humbert, Gérard; Gaillard, Jean-Luc

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Thermal inactivation, at temperatures between 60 °C and 140 °C, of native plasmin, plasminogen and plasminogen activators were studied in bovine milk using improved enzymatic assays. While measured heat inactivation kinetic of plasmin and plasminogen were in line with previously reported values, plasminogen activators were, surprisingly, found to be as heat sensitive as plasmin and plasminogen in a milk system containing proteins with free SH groups. Activation energie...

  7. PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY OF THE CANINE PERITONEUM - NORMAL TISSUE-RESPONSE TO INTRAPERITONEAL AND INTRAVENOUS PHOTOFRIN FOLLOWED BY 630NM LIGHT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TOCHNER, Z; MITCHELL, JB; HOEKSTRA, HJ; SMITH, P; DELUCA, AM; BARNES, M; HARRINGTON, F; MANYAK, M; RUSSO, D; RUSSO, A

    1991-01-01

    A toxicity study was performed in a canine model to explore the feasibility of using intraperitoneal photodynamic therapy for patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. Dogs received 1.25 mg/kg Photofrin II both intravenously (48 hours) and intraperitoneally (2 hours) before intraperitoneal light

  8. Zymogen-activation kinetics. Modulatory effects of trans-4-(aminomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid and poly-D-lysine on plasminogen activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, L C; Brender, J; Suenson, E

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of plasminogen activation catalysed by urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator were investigated. Kinetic measurements are performed by means of a specific chromogenic peptide substrate for plasmin, D-valyl-L-leucyl-L-lysine 4-nitroanilide. Two methods are proposed for the analysis of the resulting progress curve of nitroaniline formation in terms of zymogen-activation kinetics: a graphical transformation of the parabolic curve and transformation of the curve for nitroaniline production into a linear progress curve by the addition of a specific inhibitor of plasmin, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. The two methods give similar results, suggesting that the reaction between activator and plasminogen is a simple second-order reaction at least at plasminogen concentrations up to about 10 microM. The kinetics of both Glu1-plasminogen (residues 1-790) and Lys77-plasminogen (residues 77-790) activation were investigated. The results confirm previous observations showing that trans-4-(aminomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid at relatively low concentrations enhances the activation rate of Glu1-plasminogen but not that of Lys77-plasminogen. At higher concentrations both Glu1- and Lys77-plasminogen activation are inhibited. The concentration interval for the inhibition of urokinase-catalysed reactions is shown to be very different from that of the tissue-plasminogen activator system. Evidence is presented indicating that binding to the active site of urokinase (KD = 2.0 mM) is responsible for the inhibition of the urokinase system, binding to the active site of tissue-plasminogen activator is approx. 100-fold weaker, and inhibition of the tissue-plasminogen activator system, when monitored by plasmin activity, is mainly due to plasmin inhibition. Poly-D-lysine (Mr 160 000) causes a marked enhancement of plasminogen activation catalysed by tissue-plasminogen activator but not by urokinase. Bell-shaped curves of enhancement as a function of the

  9. [Mechanism of inhibitory effect of angiostatin on plasminogen activation by its physiologic activators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aĭsina, R B; Mukhametova, L I; Prisiazhnaia, N V; Gulin, D A; Levashov, M Iu; Gershkovich, K B

    2011-01-01

    The influence of angiostatin K1-4.5--a fragment of the heavy chain of plasmin and a powerful inhibitor of angiogenesis--on kinetic parameters (k(Pg) and K(Pg)) of human Glu-plasminogen activation under the action of urokinase (uPA) not having affinity for fibrin and fibrin-specific tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) was investigated. Angiostatin does not affect the k(Pg) value, but increases the value K(Pg) urokinase plasminogen activation. A decrease in the k(Pg) value and an increase in the K(Pg) value were found for fibrin-stimulated plasminogen activation by tPA with increasing concentrations of angiostatin. The obtained results show that angiostatin is competitive inhibitor of the uPA activator activity, while it inhibits the activator activity of tPA by mixed type. Such an influence ofangiostatin on the kinetic constants ofthe urokinase plasminogen activation suggests that angiostatin dose dependent manner replaces plasminogen in the binary enzyme-substrate complex uPA-Pg. In case of fibrin-stimulated plasminogen activation by tPA, both zymogen and tPA are bound to fibrin with formation of the effective triple tPA-Pg-fibrin complex. Angiostatin replaces plasminogen both from the fibrin surface and from the enzyme-substrate tPA-Pg complex that leads to a decrease in k(Pg) and an increase in K(Pg) of plasminogen activation. Inhibition constants by angioststin (Ki) of plasminogen-activator activities of uPA and tPA determined by Dixon method were found to be 0.59 +/- 0.04 and 0.12 +/- 0.05 microM, respectively.

  10. Surface-associated plasminogen binding of Cryptococcus neoformans promotes extracellular matrix invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Stie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is a leading cause of illness and death in persons with predisposing factors, including: malignancies, solid organ transplants, and corticosteroid use. C. neoformans is ubiquitous in the environment and enters into the lungs via inhalation, where it can disseminate through the bloodstream and penetrate the central nervous system (CNS, resulting in a difficult to treat and often-fatal infection of the brain, called meningoencephalitis. Plasminogen is a highly abundant protein found in the plasma component of blood and is necessary for the degradation of fibrin, collagen, and other structural components of tissues. This fibrinolytic system is utilized by cancer cells during metastasis and several pathogenic species of bacteria have been found to manipulate the host plasminogen system to facilitate invasion of tissues during infection by modifying the activation of this process through the binding of plasminogen at their surface.The invasion of the brain and the central nervous system by penetration of the protective blood-brain barrier is a prerequisite to the establishment of meningoencephalitis by the opportunistic fungal pathogen C. neoformans. In this study, we examined the ability of C. neoformans to subvert the host plasminogen system to facilitate tissue barrier invasion. Through a combination of biochemical, cell biology, and proteomic approaches, we have shown that C. neoformans utilizes the host plasminogen system to cross tissue barriers, providing support for the hypothesis that plasminogen-binding may contribute to the invasion of the blood-brain barrier by penetration of the brain endothelial cells and underlying matrix. In addition, we have identified the cell wall-associated proteins that serve as plasminogen receptors and characterized both the plasminogen-binding and plasmin-activation potential for this significant human pathogen.The results of this study provide evidence for the

  11. Cytokine and acute phase protein mRNA expression in liver tissue from pigs with severe sepsis caused by intravenous inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Lerberg; Olsen, Helle Gerda; Iburg, Tine

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to substantiate previous findings of hepatic dysfunction in a porcine model of Staphylococcus aureus induced severe sepsis. Nine pigs were inoculated intravenously once or twice with 108S. aureus per kilogram body weight and killed 12, 24 and 48 h later. Three pigs served as controls....... Blood was sampled for bacteriology, haematology and clinical pathology. Tissues were collected at necropsy for bacteriology, gene expression analysis and histology. Bacterial counts in blood remained low, decreased in the lungs, liver and spleen, but increased in bone. All infected pigs developed sepsis...

  12. Leishmania mexicana: LACK (Leishmania homolog of receptors for activated C-kinase) is a plasminogen binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Arreaza, Amaranta; Acosta, Héctor; Barros-Álvarez, Ximena; Concepción, Juan L; Albericio, Fernando; Avilan, Luisana

    2011-04-01

    Leishmania mexicana is able to interact with the fibrinolytic system through its component plasminogen, the zymogenic form of the protease plasmin. In this study a new plasminogen binding protein of this parasite was identified: LACK, the Leishmania homolog of receptors for activated C-kinase. Plasminogen binds recombinant LACK with a K(d) value of 1.6±0.4 μM, and binding is lysine-dependent since it is inhibited by the lysine analog ε-aminocaproic acid. Inhibition studies with specific peptides and plasminogen binding activity of a mutated recombinant LACK have highlighted the internal motif (260)VYDLESKAV(268), similar to those found in several enolases, as involved in plasminogen binding. Recombinant LACK and secreted proteins, in medium conditioned by parasites, enhance plasminogen activation to plasmin by the tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). In addition to its localization in the cytosol, in the microsomal fraction and as secreted protein in conditioned medium, LACK was also localized on the external surface of the membrane. The results presented here suggest that LACK might bind and enhance plasminogen activation in vivo promoting the formation of plasmin. Plasminogen binding of LACK represents a new function for this protein and might contribute to the invasiveness of the parasite. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The X-ray Crystal Structure of Full-Length Human Plasminogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby H.P. Law

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasminogen is the proenzyme precursor of the primary fibrinolytic protease plasmin. Circulating plasminogen, which comprises a Pan-apple (PAp domain, five kringle domains (KR1-5, and a serine protease (SP domain, adopts a closed, activation-resistant conformation. The kringle domains mediate interactions with fibrin clots and cell-surface receptors. These interactions trigger plasminogen to adopt an open form that can be cleaved and converted to plasmin by tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators. Here, the structure of closed plasminogen reveals that the PAp and SP domains, together with chloride ions, maintain the closed conformation through interactions with the kringle array. Differences in glycosylation alter the position of KR3, although in all structures the loop cleaved by plasminogen activators is inaccessible. The ligand-binding site of KR1 is exposed and likely governs proenzyme recruitment to targets. Furthermore, analysis of our structure suggests that KR5 peeling away from the PAp domain may initiate plasminogen conformational change.

  14. Time to treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and outcome of stroke in clinical practice: retrospective analysis of hospital quality assurance data with comparison with results from randomised clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbinger, Christoph; Reuter, Björn; Stock, Christian; Sauer, Tamara; Wiethölter, Horst; Bruder, Ingo; Rode, Susanne; Kern, Rolf; Ringleb, Peter; Hennerici, Michael G; Hacke, Werner

    2014-05-30

    To study the time dependent effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischaemic stroke in daily clinical practice. A retrospective cohort study using data from a large scale, comprehensive population based state-wide stroke registry in Germany. All 148 hospitals involved in acute stroke care in a large state in southwest Germany with 10.4 million inhabitants. Data from 84,439 patients with acute ischaemic stroke were analysed, 10,263 (12%) were treated with thrombolytic therapy and 74,176 (88%) were not treated. Primary endpoint was the dichotomised score on a modified Rankin scale at discharge ("favourable outcome" score 0 or 1 or "unfavourable outcome" score 2-6) analysed by binary logistic regression. Patients treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) were categorised according to time from onset of stroke to treatment. Analogous analyses were conducted for the association between rtPA treatment of stroke and in-hospital mortality. As a co-primary endpoint the chance of a lower modified Rankin scale score at discharge was analysed by ordinal logistic regression analysis (shift analysis). After adjustment for characteristics of patients, hospitals, and treatment, rtPA was associated with better outcome in a time dependent pattern. The number needed to treat ranged from 4.5 (within first 1.5 hours after onset; odds ratio 2.49) to 18.0 (up to 4.5 hours; odds ratio 1.26), while mortality did not vary up to 4.5 hours. Patients treated with rtPA beyond 4.5 hours (including mismatch based approaches) showed a significantly better outcome only in dichotomised analysis (odds ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.55) but the mortality risk was higher (1.45, 1.08 to 1.92). The effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy in daily clinical practice might be comparable with the effectiveness shown in randomised clinical trials and pooled analysis. Early treatment was associated with favourable outcome in daily clinical practice, which underlines the

  15. Lytic efficacy of apoli protein E2 (ApoE2) and recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) treatment with 120 kHz ultrasound in an in-vitro human clot model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Jason M.; Cheng, Jason Y.; Clark, Joseph F.; Shaw, George J.

    2005-04-01

    Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). However rt-PA has substantial side effects such as hemorrhage. This has led to interest in other potential therapies. For example, ultrasound (US) increases the lytic efficacy of rt-PA. Also, apolipoprotein E2 (ApoE2) increases rt-PA activity. This suggests combining US, ApoE2 and rt-PA to improve thrombolysis, but the efficacy is not known. Here, the lytic efficacy of apoE2, rt-PA and 120 kHz US is measured in a human clot model. Whole blood was obtained from volunteers, after local institutional approval. Clots were formed in 1.7 mm micropipettes, and placed in a water tank that allowed microscopic video imaging during US and thrombolytic exposure. Clots were treated with rt-PA ([rt-PA]=3.15 μg/ml), rt-PA and apoE2 ([apoE2]=9.8 μg/ml), or rt-PA, apoE2 and 120 kHz US (0.35 MPa, PRF=1667 Hz, 80% duty cycle) for 15 min at 37°C in human plasma. Clot lysis was visually recorded and the lysis depth (LD) determined from these data using an image analysis algorithm. LD was linear with time for all treatments (R2>=0.81), allowing the determination of a lytic rate (LR). LR was found to be 0.35+/-0.03, 1.55+/-0.11, and 0.75+/-0.04 μm/min for the rt-PA, rt-PA and apoE2, and US treated groups respectively. The thrombolytic efficacy of rt-PA is enhanced by ApoE2. The interaction of 120 kHz with apoE2 and rt-PA showed a reduced lytic efficacy compared with rt-PA and apoE2 treatment alone. It is possible that US interferes with the ApoE2-mediated activation of rt-PA.

  16. Stereotactic fibrinolysis of spontaneous intracerebral hematoma using infusion of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator Fibrinólise com infusão de rtPA e drenagem estereotáxica de hematoma intracerebral espontâneo profundo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto Nasser

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The authors present a prospective study on 10 patients with stereotactic infusion of tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA intraparenchimal hemorrhage. METHODS: Between 1999 and 2000, 10 patients with deep seated hematomas in the basal ganglia were selected for stereotactic infusion of rtPA and spontaneous clot drainage. RESULTS: All cases had about 80% reduction of the hematoma volume in the CT scan at the third day. The intracranial pressure was normalized by the third day too. There were no local or systemic complications with the use of this trombolitic. The results were shown by the Glasgow Outcome Scale with six patients in V, three in IV and one in III after 3 months. CONCLUSION: Early treatment and drainage with minimally invasive neurosurgery , can make these patients with deep-seated hematomas recover the consciousness and they can be rehabilitated earlier avoiding secondary complications.OBJETIVO: Estudo prospectivo em 10 pacientes com infusão de trombolítico (rtPA dentro do hematoma cerebral profundo supratentorial e drenagem estereotáxica. MÉTODO: Entre 1999 e 2000 10 pacientes com hematomas de profundidade foram selecionados para infusão de rtPA e drenagem do coágulo espontânea. RESULTADO: Todos os casos obtiveram 80% de redução do volume do hematoma medidos por TC no terceiro dia. A pressão intracraniana estava normalizada no terceiro dia. Não houve complicações locais ou sistêmicas relacionadas com o uso deste trombolítico. Os resultados comparados foram mostrados pela Escala de Prognóstico de Glasgow com 6 pacientes em GrauV, 3 pacientes em Grau IV e 1 paciente em Grau III após três meses. CONCLUSÃO: Tratamento precoce e drenagem com técnica neurocirúrgica minimamente invasiva pode fazer estes pacientes terem uma recuperação da consciência mais rápida e assim serem reabilitados mais precocemente evitando complicações secundárias.

  17. Markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress and inflammation in lung tissue of rats exposed to different intravenous iron compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toblli JE

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Jorge E Toblli,1 Gabriel Cao,1 Jorge F Giani,2 Fernando P Dominici,2 Margarita Angerosa1 1Laboratory of Experimental Medicine, Hospital Alemán, School of Medicine, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 2Department of Biochemistry, School of Pharmacy, Institute of Chemistry and Biophysics-Biochemistry (UBA-CONICET, Buenos Aires, Argentina Abstract: Iron deficiency anemia is a frequent complication in clinical conditions such as chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, inflammatory bowel disease, cancer, and excessive blood loss. Given the ability of iron to catalyze redox reactions, iron therapy can be associated with oxidative stress. The lung is uniquely susceptible to oxidative stress, and little is known about the effects of intravenous iron treatment in this organ. This study characterized changes in markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress and inflammation in the lung of non-iron deficient, non-anemic rats treated with five weekly doses (40 mg iron per kg body weight of low molecular weight iron dextran (LMWID, iron sucrose (IS, ferric carboxymaltose (FCM, ferumoxytol (FMX, iron isomaltoside 1000 (IIM, or saline (control. Rats treated with LMWID, FMX, or IIM showed significant changes in most measures of oxidative/nitrosative stress, inflammation, and iron deposition compared to the saline-treated controls, with greatest changes in the LMWID treatment group. Increases in products of lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and protein nitrosation (nitrotyrosine were consistent with increases in the activity of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, Cu,Zn-SOD, GPx, decreases in antioxidative capacity (reduced:oxidized GSH ratio, increased levels of transcription factors involved in the inflammatory pathway (NF-κB, HIF-1α, inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, adhesion molecules (VCAM-1, markers of macrophage infiltration (ED-1, and iron deposition (Prussian blue, ferritin. Since changes in measured

  18. Comparison of the Concentrations of Lidocaine in Different Body Fluids/Tissues after Subarachnoid Space and Intravenous Administration of a Lethal Dose of Lidocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare the concentration of lidocaine in different body fluids/tissues after subarachnoid space and intravenous administrations of a lethal dose of lidocaine. Totally 18 dogs were used in the experiment. Six dogs were given subarachnoid anesthesia, another were given an intravenous injection of a dose of 75 mg/kg weight of lidocaine hydrochloride in 5 min and the last 6 dogs were used as the blank control dogs and given a subarachnoid space injection or a femoral artery injection of the same volume of sodium chloride. As soon as its vital signs disappeared, each dog was dissected and the specimen, such as brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in lateral ventricle, CSF in subarachnoid space, spinal cord (cervical spinal cord, thoracic spinal cord, lumbar spinal cord, and waist spinal cord, heart, lung, liver, spleen, kidney, bile, urine, heart blood, peripheral blood, muscle in injection location, and muscle in no injection location, were collected for analysis of lidocaine immediately. Analysis was performed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. From the maximum to the minimum, the order of lidocaine concentration detected in the subarachnoid space-administered dogs was as follows: CSF in subarachnoid space, waist spinal cord, thoracic spinal cord, CSF in lateral ventricle, lumbar spinal cord, cervical spinal cord, lung, kidney, muscle in injection location, heart, brain, spleen, heart blood, liver, peripheral blood, bile, muscle in no injection location, and urine. The order of lidocaine concentration detected in the intravenously administered dogs was as followed: Kidney, heart, lung, spleen, brain, liver, peripheral blood, bile, heart blood, cervical spinal cord, thoracic spinal cord, muscle in injection location, lumbar spinal cord, muscle in no injection location, CSF in subarachnoid space, urine, and CSF in lateral ventricle. The maximum concentration of lidocaine was detected in the subarachnoid

  19. In vivo X-Ray Computed Tomographic Imaging of Soft Tissue with Native, Intravenous, or Oral Contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathen, Connor A.; Foje, Nathan; van Avermaete, Tony; Miramontes, Bernadette; Chapaman, Sarah E.; Sasser, Todd A.; Kannan, Raghuraman; Gerstler, Steven; Leevy, W. Matthew

    2013-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the most commonly utilized anatomical imaging modalities for both research and clinical purposes. CT combines high-resolution, three-dimensional data with relatively fast acquisition to provide a solid platform for non-invasive human or specimen imaging. The primary limitation of CT is its inability to distinguish many soft tissues based on native contrast. While bone has high contrast within a CT image due to its material density from calcium phosphate, soft tissue is less dense and many are homogenous in density. This presents a challenge in distinguishing one type of soft tissue from another. A couple exceptions include the lungs as well as fat, both of which have unique densities owing to the presence of air or bulk hydrocarbons, respectively. In order to facilitate X-ray CT imaging of other structures, a range of contrast agents have been developed to selectively identify and visualize the anatomical properties of individual tissues. Most agents incorporate atoms like iodine, gold, or barium because of their ability to absorb X-rays, and thus impart contrast to a given organ system. Here we review the strategies available to visualize lung, fat, brain, kidney, liver, spleen, vasculature, gastrointestinal tract, and liver tissues of living mice using either innate contrast, or commercial injectable or ingestible agents with selective perfusion. Further, we demonstrate how each of these approaches will facilitate the non-invasive, longitudinal, in vivo imaging of pre-clinical disease models at each anatomical site. PMID:23711461

  20. GH receptor signaling in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue in human subjects following exposure to an intravenous GH bolus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens O L; Jessen, Niels; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke

    2006-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates muscle and fat metabolism, which impacts on body composition and insulin sensitivity, but the underlying GH signaling pathways have not been studied in vivo in humans. We investigated GH signaling in biopsies from muscle and abdominal fat obtained 30 (n = 3) or 60 (n...... = 3) min after an intravenous bolus of GH (0.5 mg) vs. saline in conjunction with serum sampling in six healthy males after an overnight fast. Expression of the following signal proteins were assayed by Western blotting: STAT5/p-STAT5, MAPK, and Akt/PKB. IRS-1-associated PI 3-kinase activity...... was measured by in vitro phosphorylation of PI. STAT5 DNA binding activity was assessed with EMSA, and the expression of IGF-I and SOCS mRNA was measured by real-time RT-PCR. GH induced a 52% increase in circulating FFA levels with peak values after 155 min (P = 0.03). Tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT5...

  1. Does plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 drive lymphangiogenesis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruyère, Françoise; Melen-Lamalle, Laurence; Blacher, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the function of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) during pathological lymphangiogenesis. PAI-1, the main physiological inhibitor of plasminogen activators is involved in pathological angiogenesis at least by controlling extracellular proteolysis and...

  2. Blood clearance and tissue distribution of PEGylated and non-PEGylated gold nanorods after intravenous administration in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankveld, Daniëlle P K; Rayavarapu, Raja G.; Krystek, Petra; Oomen, Agnes G.; Verharen, Hennie W.; van Leeuwen, Ton G; De Jong, Wim H.; Manohar, Srirang

    Aims: To develop and determine the safety of gold nanorods, whose aspect ratios can be tuned to obtain plasmon peaks between 650 and 850 nm, as contrast enhancing agents for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Materials & methods: In this study we compared the blood clearance and tissue

  3. Blood clearance and tissue distribution of PEGylated and non-PEGylated gold nanorods after intravenous administration in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankveld, Daniëlle Pk; Rayavarapu, Raja G.; Krystek, Petra; Oomen, Agnes G.; Verharen, Hennie W.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; de Jong, Wim H.; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-01-01

    To develop and determine the safety of gold nanorods, whose aspect ratios can be tuned to obtain plasmon peaks between 650 and 850 nm, as contrast enhancing agents for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this study we compared the blood clearance and tissue distribution of cetyl trimethyl

  4. In vivo X-Ray Computed Tomographic Imaging of Soft Tissue with Native, Intravenous, or Oral Contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Matthew Leevy

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available X-ray Computed Tomography (CT is one of the most commonly utilized anatomical imaging modalities for both research and clinical purposes. CT combines high-resolution, three-dimensional data with relatively fast acquisition to provide a solid platform for non-invasive human or specimen imaging. The primary limitation of CT is its inability to distinguish many soft tissues based on native contrast. While bone has high contrast within a CT image due to its material density from calcium phosphate, soft tissue is less dense and many are homogenous in density. This presents a challenge in distinguishing one type of soft tissue from another. A couple exceptions include the lungs as well as fat, both of which have unique densities owing to the presence of air or bulk hydrocarbons, respectively. In order to facilitate X-ray CT imaging of other structures, a range of contrast agents have been developed to selectively identify and visualize the anatomical properties of individual tissues. Most agents incorporate atoms like iodine, gold, or barium because of their ability to absorb X-rays, and thus impart contrast to a given organ system. Here we review the strategies available to visualize lung, fat, brain, kidney, liver, spleen, vasculature, gastrointestinal tract, and liver tissues of living mice using either innate contrast, or commercial injectable or ingestible agents with selective perfusion. Further, we demonstrate how each of these approaches will facilitate the non-invasive, longitudinal, in vivo imaging of pre-clinical disease models at each anatomical site.

  5. Generalized Safety and Efficacy of Simplified Intravenous Thrombolysis Treatment (SMART) Criteria in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sigrid B; Barazangi, Nobl; Chen, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rt-PA) exclusion criteria may substantially limit the use of thrombolysis. Preliminary data have shown that the SMART (Simplified Management of Acute stroke using Revised Treatment) criteria greatly expand patient...... within a regional stroke network was performed. Patients were divided into those receiving thrombolysis locally versus at an outside hospital. The primary outcome was modified Rankin Scale score (≤1) at discharge and the main safety outcome was symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) rate. RESULTS...... eligibility by reducing thrombolysis exclusions, but they have not been assessed on a large scale. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of general adoption of SMART thrombolysis criteria to a large regional stroke network. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who received IV thrombolysis...

  6. Elucidation of Arctigenin Pharmacokinetics and Tissue Distribution after Intravenous, Oral, Hypodermic and Sublingual Administration in Rats and Beagle Dogs: Integration of In Vitro and In Vivo Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although arctigenin (AG has diverse bioactivities, such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, immunoregulatory and neuroprotective activities, its pharmacokinetics have not been systematically evaluated. The purpose of this work was to identify the pharmacokinetic properties of AG via various experiments in vivo and in vitro. In this research, rats and beagle dogs were used to investigate the PK (pharmacokinetics, PK profiles of AG with different drug-delivery manners, including intravenous (i.v, hypodermic injection (i.h, and sublingual (s.l administration. The data shows that AG exhibited a strong absorption capacity in both rats and beagle dogs (absorption rate < 1 h, a high absorption degree (absolute bioavailability > 100%, and a strong elimination ability (t1/2 < 2 h. The tissue distributions of AG at different time points after i.h showed that the distribution of AG in rat tissues is rapid (2.5 h to reach the peak and wide (detectable in almost all tissues and organs. The AG concentration in the intestine was the highest, followed by that in the heart, liver, pancreas, and kidney. In vitro, AG were incubated with human, monkey, beagle dog and rat liver microsomes. The concentrations of AG were detected by UPLC-MS/MS at different time points (from 0 min to 90 min. The percentages of AG remaining in four species’ liver microsomes were human (62 ± 6.36% > beagle dog (25.9 ± 3.24% > rat (15.7 ± 9% > monkey (3.69 ± 0.12%. This systematic investigation of pharmacokinetic profiles of arctigenin (AG in vivo and in vitro is worthy of further exploration.

  7. Intravenous Leiomyomatosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hemostasis was well achieved. The tumor weighed 6.7 kg. The postoperative course. Intravenous Leiomyomatosis. Narayanaswamy Mariyappa, Uday Kumar Manikyam1, Dinesh Krishnamurthy2, Preeti K,. Yamini Agarwal, Prakar U. Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 1Pathology and 2Anaesthesia, Sri Devaraj ...

  8. Correction: Correction to 'Clinical Policy: Use of Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator for the Management of Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Emergency Department' [Annals of Emergency Medicine 66 (2015) 322-333.e31].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael D; Burton, John H; Nazarian, Devorah J; Promes, Susan B

    2017-11-01

    Due to a miscommunication during the process of transferring this manuscript from our editorial team to Production, the Members of the American College of Emergency Physicians Clinical Policies Committee (Oversight Committee) were not properly indexed in PubMed. This has now been corrected online. The publisher would like to apologize for any inconvenience caused. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitation of the receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, E; Behrendt, N; Ploug, M

    1994-01-01

    Binding of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) to a specific cell surface receptor (uPAR) plays a crucial role in proteolysis during tissue remodelling and cancer invasion. An immunosorbent assay for the quantitation of uPAR has now been developed. This assay is based on two monoclonal anti...

  10. Assessment of plasminogen synthesis in vitro by mouse tumor cells using a competition radioimmunoassay for mouse plasminogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roblin, R.O.; Bell, T.E.; Young, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    A sensitive, specific competition radioimmunoassay for mouse plasmin(ogen) has been developed in order to determine whether mouse tumor cells can synthesize plasminogen in vitro. The rabbit anti-BALB/c mouse plasminogen antibodies used in the assay react with the plasminogen present in serum from BALB/c, C3H, AKR and C57BL/6 mice, and also recognized mouse plasmin. The competition radiommunoassay can detect as little as 50 ng of mouse plasminogen. No competition was observed with preparations of fetal calf, human and rabbit plasminogens. A variety of virus-transformed and mouse tumor cell lines were all found to contain less than 100 ng mouse plasminogen/mg of cell extract protein. Thus, if the plasminogen activator/plasmin system is important in the growth or movement of this group of tumor cells, the cells will be dependent upon the circulatory system of the host for their plasminogen supply. (Auth.)

  11. Mhp182 (P102) binds fibronectin and contributes to the recruitment of plasmin(ogen) to the Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Lisa M; Jenkins, Cheryl; Deutscher, Ania T; Raymond, Benjamin B A; Padula, Matthew P; Tacchi, Jessica L; Bogema, Daniel R; Eamens, Graeme J; Woolley, Lauren K; Dixon, Nicholas E; Walker, Mark J; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a major, economically damaging respiratory pathogen. Although M. hyopneumoniae cells bind plasminogen, the identification of plasminogen-binding surface proteins and the biological ramifications of acquiring plasminogen requires further investigation. mhp182 encodes a highly expressed 102 kDa protein (P102) that undergoes proteolytic processing to generate surface-located N-terminal 60 kDa (P60) and C-terminal 42 kDa (P42) proteins of unknown function. We show that recombinant P102 (rP102) binds plasminogen at physiologically relevant concentrations (K(D) ~ 76 nM) increasing the susceptibility of plasmin(ogen) to activation by tissue-specific plasminogen activator (tPA). Recombinant proteins constructed to mimic P60 (rP60) and P42 (rP42) also bound plasminogen at physiologically significant levels. M. hyopneumoniae surface-bound plasminogen was activated by tPA and is able to degrade fibrinogen, demonstrating the biological functionality of M. hyopneumoniae-bound plasmin(ogen) upon activation. Plasmin(ogen) was readily detected in porcine ciliated airways and plasmin levels were consistently higher in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from M. hyopneumoniae-infected animals. Additionally, rP102 and rP42 bind fibronectin with K(D) s of 26 and 33 nM respectively and recombinant P102 proteins promote adherence to porcine kidney epithelial-like cells. The multifunctional binding ability of P102 and activation of M. hyopneumoniae-sequestered plasmin(ogen) by an exogenous activator suggests P102 plays an important role in virulence. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H; Nielsen, B B

    1997-01-01

    The recombinant human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin (TN) and the C-type lectin CRD of this protein (TN3) have been crystallized. TN3 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4(2)2(1)2 with cell dimensions a = b = 64.0, c = 75.7 A and with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals...... to at least 2.5 A. A full data set has been collected to 3.0 A. The asymmetric unit contains one monomer of TN. Molecular replacement solutions for TN3 and TN have been obtained using the structure of the C-type lectin CRD of rat mannose-binding protein as search model. The rhombohedral space group indicates...... diffract X-rays to at least 2.0 A resolution. A complete diffraction data set has been collected to 2.7 A resolution. The crystals of TN, obtained by the vapour-diffusion reverse salting-in method at 280 K, are rhombohedral, space group R3, with the hexagonal axes a = b = 89.1, c = 75.8 A, and diffract...

  13. Repeated Intra-Arterial Thrombectomy within 72 Hours in a Patient with a Clear Contraindication for Intravenous Thrombolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Laible

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Treating patients with acute ischemic stroke, proximal arterial vessel occlusion, and absolute contraindication for administering intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA poses a therapeutic challenge. Intra-arterial thrombectomy constitutes an alternative treatment option. Materials and Methods. We report a case of a 57-year-old patient with concomitant gastric adenocarcinoma, who received three intra-arterial thrombectomies in 72 hours due to repeated occlusion of the left medial cerebral artery (MCA. Findings. Intra-arterial recanalization of the left medial cerebral artery was performed three times with initially good success. However, two days later, the right medial cerebral artery became occluded. Owing to the overall poor prognosis at that time and knowing the wishes of the patient, we decided not to perform another intra-arterial recanalization procedure. Conclusion. To our knowledge, this is the first case illustrating the use of repeated intra-arterial recanalization in early reocclusion of intracranial vessels.

  14. Analyses of the Turkish National Intravenous Thrombolysis Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutluk, Kursad; Kaya, Dilaver; Afsar, Nazire; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Ozturk, Vesile; Uzuner, Nevzat; Giray, Semih; Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Gungor, Levent; Sirin, Hadiye; Yaka, Erdem; Ozdemir, Ozcan; Dalkara, Turgay

    2016-05-01

    The relatively late approval of use of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) for acute ischemic stroke in Turkey has resulted in obvious underuse of this treatment. Here we present the analyses of the nationwide registry, which was created to prompt wider use of intravenous thrombolysis, as well as to monitor safe implementation of the treatment in our country. Patients were registered prospectively in our database between 2006 and 2013. Admission and 24-hour National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and 3-month modified Rankin Scale scores were recorded. A "high-volume center" was defined as a center treating 10 or more patients with rt-PA per year. A total of 1133 patients were enrolled into the registry by 38 centers in 18 cities. A nearly 4-fold increase in the study population and in the number of participating centers was observed over the 6 years of the study. The mean baseline NIHSS score was 14.5 ± 5.7, and the prevalence of symptomatic hemorrhage was 4.9%. Mortality at 3 months decreased from 22% to 11% in the 6 years of enrollment, and 65% of cases were functionally independent. Age older than 70 years, an NIHSS score higher than 14 upon hospital admission, and intracranial hemorrhage were independently associated with mortality, and being treated in a high-volume center was related to good outcome. We observed a decreasing trend in mortality and an acceptable prevalence of symptomatic hemorrhage over 6 years with continuous addition of new centers to the registry. The first results of this prospective study are encouraging and will stimulate our efforts at increasing the use of intravenous thrombolysis in Turkey. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ligand binding modulates the structural dynamics and activity of urokinase-type plasminogen activator: A possible mechanism of plasminogen activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Kromann-Hansen

    Full Text Available The catalytic activity of trypsin-like serine proteases is in many cases regulated by conformational changes initiated by binding of physiological modulators to exosites located distantly from the active site. A trypsin-like serine protease of particular interest is urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA, which is involved in extracellular tissue remodeling processes. Herein, we used hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS to study regulation of activity in the catalytic domain of the murine version of uPA (muPA by two muPA specific monoclonal antibodies. Using a truncated muPA variant (muPA16-243, containing the catalytic domain only, we show that the two monoclonal antibodies, despite binding to an overlapping epitope in the 37s and 70s loops of muPA16-243, stabilize distinct muPA16-243 conformations. Whereas the inhibitory antibody, mU1 was found to increase the conformational flexibility of muPA16-243, the stimulatory antibody, mU3, decreased muPA16-243 conformational flexibility. Furthermore, the HDXMS data unveil the existence of a pathway connecting the 70s loop to the active site region. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis, we further identify the 70s loop as an important exosite for the activation of the physiological uPA substrate plasminogen. Thus, the data presented here reveal important information about dynamics in uPA by demonstrating how various ligands can modulate uPA activity by mediating long-range conformational changes. Moreover, the results provide a possible mechanism of plasminogen activation.

  16. The effects of residual platelets in plasma on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-related assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pieters (Marlien); S.A. Barnard (Sunelle A.); D.T. Loots (Du Toit); D.C. Rijken (Dingeman)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractDue to controversial evidence in the literature pertaining to the activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in platelets, we examined the effects of residual platelets present in plasma (a potential pre-analytical variable) on various plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and plasminogen

  17. Plasminogen-dependent and -independent proteolytic activity of murine endothelioma cells with targeted inactivation of fibrinolytic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijnen, H R; Wagner, E F; Collen, D

    1997-02-01

    Plasminogen-dependent and -independent proteolytic activity of marine endothelioma (End) cells that were derived from mice with targeted inactivation of the tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA-/-), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA-/-) or plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1-/-) genes was studied with the use of fibrin and extracellular matrix degradation assays. In a buffer milieu, the activation rate of plasminogen (final concentration 0.25 microM) with wild-type and t-PA-/- End cells (3 x 10(4) to 4 x 10(6) cells/ml) was comparable, but it was about 4-fold reduced with u-PA-/- End cells and 3-fold enhanced with PAI-1-/- End cells. Plasminogen activation was markedly reduced by addition of amiloride or of anti-murine u-PA antibodies but not by addition of anti-murine t-PA antibodies, and it was not stimulated by addition of fibrin. Lysis of 125I-fibrin labeled matrix in the presence of plasminogen was comparable with wild-type, t-PA-/- and PAI-1-/- End cells (50% lysis in 3 h with 0.7 to 1.5 x 10(6) cells/ml), but was significantly reduced with u-PA-/- End cells (50% lysis in 20 h with 0.87 x 10(6) cells/ml). Lysis of 3H-proline labeled extracellular matrix in the presence of plasminogen with wild-type, t-PA-/- and PAI-1-/- End cells (20% lysis in 48 h with 3 to 5 x 10(6) cells/ml) was comparable, but it was virtually abolished with u-PA-/- End cells. In the absence of plasminogen, lysis of both the fibrin and the extracellular matrix by all four cell types was drastically reduced and was virtually abolished by addition of phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride or 1,10 phenanthroline. These data indicate that the proteolytic activity of the transformed murine endothelioma cells, measured in plasminogen activation or matrix degradation assays, is essentially u-PA-related and largely plasminogen-dependent.

  18. Acute Intravenous Calcium Antagonist for Suspected Hemiplegic Migraine – A Case Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Lützhøft Rath

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke mimics, like attacks of hemiplegic migraine, are challenging in acute stroke evaluation. We present a 28-year-old woman with a suspected hemiplegic migraine attack with left-sided hemiparalysis. Brain CT with perfusion imaging 1 h 54 min after symptom onset revealed hypoperfusion in the right hemisphere. The patient was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA with no effect. After a subsequent intravenous verapamil infusion, the patient gained full motor function within 10 min. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI performed 5 h 46 min after symptom onset revealed diffusion restriction in the same area as the hypoperfusion on CT. There were no notable changes on T2 images. The patient stayed clinically in remission, except for reduced sensation for all modalities on the extremities on the left side. Although brain CT 24 h after symptom onset revealed an edema in the same area, an MRI performed 17 days later showed no new infarctions. Young patients with a history of migraine with aura admitted with symptoms of acute ischemic stroke are at risk of insufficient treatment. Calcium antagonists might be considered if there is no effect of first-line treatment with rtPA.

  19. Acute Intravenous Calcium Antagonist for Suspected Hemiplegic Migraine - A Case Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Charlotte Lützhøft; He, Jun; Nordling, Mette Maria; Wienecke, Troels

    2017-01-01

    Stroke mimics, like attacks of hemiplegic migraine, are challenging in acute stroke evaluation. We present a 28-year-old woman with a suspected hemiplegic migraine attack with left-sided hemiparalysis. Brain CT with perfusion imaging 1 h 54 min after symptom onset revealed hypoperfusion in the right hemisphere. The patient was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) with no effect. After a subsequent intravenous verapamil infusion, the patient gained full motor function within 10 min. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 5 h 46 min after symptom onset revealed diffusion restriction in the same area as the hypoperfusion on CT. There were no notable changes on T2 images. The patient stayed clinically in remission, except for reduced sensation for all modalities on the extremities on the left side. Although brain CT 24 h after symptom onset revealed an edema in the same area, an MRI performed 17 days later showed no new infarctions. Young patients with a history of migraine with aura admitted with symptoms of acute ischemic stroke are at risk of insufficient treatment. Calcium antagonists might be considered if there is no effect of first-line treatment with rtPA.

  20. Clinical efficacy of oral linezolid compared with intravenous vancomycin for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-complicated skin and soft tissue infections: a retrospective, propensity score-matched, case-control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itani, Kamal M F; Biswas, Pinaki; Reisman, Arlene; Bhattacharyya, Helen; Baruch, Alice M

    2012-08-01

    Linezolid is 100% bioavailable in oral and intravenous formulations. In a recent prospective, randomized, open-label, comparator-controlled, multicenter, phase 4 clinical trial in adults with complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), linezolid achieved clinical and microbiologic success comparable to appropriately dosed intravenous vancomycin. Although patients were randomly assigned to receive linezolid or vancomycin, the protocol allowed patients to start therapy using oral or intravenous linezolid on the basis of investigator discretion and patient ability to tolerate oral medication. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of linezolid when administered orally in adults with cSSTI caused by MRSA. In this retrospective analysis, we examined data collected from the aforementioned trial to compare outcomes in patients who received either oral linezolid or intravenous vancomycin therapy. This study analyzed outcomes in patients who received treatment for 7 to 14 days with either oral linezolid (600 mg q12h; n = 95) or intravenous vancomycin (15 mg/kg q12h, adjusted for creatinine clearance and trough concentration; n = 210). By design, these groups were not randomized. Propensity score matching on baseline variables was used to balance these groups by identifying a comparable group of patients who received vancomycin therapy and comparing them with patients who received oral linezolid therapy. Clinical and microbiologic success rates at the end of treatment and the end of the study (EOS) were then directly compared between the groups using matched-pair logistic regression. The tolerability of the 2 treatments (within this matched group) was also described. Ninety-two patients with well-matched baseline characteristics were included in each treatment group. At EOS, the odds ratio for clinical success of oral linezolid therapy vs intravenous vancomycin therapy was

  1. Affinity purification of recombinant human plasminogen activator ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop processes for effective isolation and purification of recombinant human plasminogen activator (rhPA) from transgenic rabbit milk. Methods: Immunoaffinity chromatography was selected and improved by a special polyol-responsive monoclonal antibody (PR-mAb). Alteplase was used as immunogen ...

  2. The Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Christensen, Anni

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) has three potential sites for N-linked glycosylation, including Asn209Tyr210Thr211, Asn265Met266Thr267, and Asn329Glu330Ser331. Using a HEK293 expression system, we have made mutants with Asp or Gln substitutions of the Asn residue in each of these s...

  3. Presence of urokinase plasminogen activator, its inhibitor and receptor in small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pappot, H.; Pfeiffer, P.; Grøndahl Hansen, J.

    1997-01-01

    Spreading of cancer cells is dependent on the combined action of several proteolytic enzymes, such as serine proteases, comprising the urokinase pathway of plasminogen activation. Previous studies of lung cancer indicate that expression, localization and prognostic impact of the components...... of the plasminogen activation system differ in the different non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) types, whereas the expression of the components in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has only sparingly been investigated. In the present study we investigate the presence of the components of the plasminogen activation...... and the clinical parameters. This is the first report of a study using a quantitative method to compare levels of the components of the plasminogen activation system in tissue extracts from the two major lung cancer groups. The study shows that uPA, PAI-1 and uPAR are present in SCLC-tissue, suggesting...

  4. Screening and confirmatory analyses of flunixin in tissues and bodily fluids after intravenous or intramuscular administration to cull dairy cows with or without lipopolysaccharide challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty cull dairy cows (645 ± 83 kg) were treated with 2.2 mg/kg bw flunixin by intravenous (IV) or intramuscular (IM) administration with, or without, exposure to lipopolysaccharide in a two factor balanced design. The usefulness of screening assays to identify violative flunixin levels in a varie...

  5. Plasminogen deficiency causes reduced corticospinal axonal plasticity and functional recovery after stroke in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwu Liu

    Full Text Available Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA has been implicated in neurite outgrowth and neurological recovery post stroke. tPA converts the zymogen plasminogen (Plg into plasmin. In this study, using plasminogen knockout (Plg-/- mice and their Plg-native littermates (Plg+/+, we investigated the role of Plg in axonal remodeling and neurological recovery after stroke. Plg+/+ and Plg-/- mice (n = 10/group were subjected to permanent intraluminal monofilament middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo. A foot-fault test and a single pellet reaching test were performed prior to and on day 3 after stroke, and weekly thereafter to monitor functional deficit and recovery. Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA was injected into the left motor cortex to anterogradely label the corticospinal tract (CST. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after stroke. Neurite outgrowth was also measured in primary cultured cortical neurons harvested from Plg+/+ and Plg-/- embryos. In Plg+/+ mice, the motor functional deficiency after stroke progressively recovered with time. In contrast, recovery in Plg-/- mice was significantly impaired compared to Plg+/+ mice (p0.82, p<0.01. Plg-/- neurons exhibited significantly reduced neurite outgrowth. Our data suggest that plasminogen-dependent proteolysis has a beneficial effect during neurological recovery after stroke, at least in part, by promoting axonal remodeling in the denervated spinal cord.

  6. Activity and expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinases in human colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-Dong; Song, Kyoung-Sub; Li, Ge; Choi, Hoon; Park, Hae-Duck; Lim, Kyu; Hwang, Byung-Doo; Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2006-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) are involved in colorectal cancer invasion and metastasis. There is still debate whether the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 differs between tumors located in the colon and rectum. We designed this study to determine any differences in the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9 and uPA system between colon and rectal cancer tissues. Cancer tissue samples were obtained from colon carcinoma (n = 12) and rectal carcinomas (n = 10). MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels were examined using gelatin zymography and Western blotting; their endogenous inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), were assessed by Western blotting. uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 were examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The activity of uPA was assessed by casein-plasminogen zymography. In both colon and rectal tumors, MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 protein levels were higher than in corresponding paired normal mucosa, while TIMP-2 level in tumors was significantly lower than in normal mucosa. The enzyme activities or protein levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and their endogenous inhibitors did not reach a statistically significant difference between colon and rectal cancer compared with their normal mucosa. In rectal tumors, there was an increased activity of uPA compared with the activity in colon tumors (P = 0.0266), however urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) showed no significant difference between colon and rectal cancer tissues. These findings suggest that uPA may be expressed differentially in colon and rectal cancers, however, the activities or protein levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, PAI-1 and uPAR are not affected by tumor location in the colon or the rectum

  7. Intravenous Thrombolysis for Stroke and Presumed Stroke in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults: A Retrospective, Multicenter US Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbdelRazek, Mahmoud A; Gutierrez, Jose; Mampre, David; Cervantes-Arslanian, Anna; Ormseth, Cora; Haussen, Diogo; Thakur, Kiran T; Lyons, Jennifer L; Smith, Bryan R; O'Connor, Owen; Willey, Joshua Z; Mateen, Farrah J

    2018-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been shown to increase both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke risks, but there are limited data on the safety and outcomes of intravenous thrombolysis with tPA (tissue-type plasminogen activator) for acute ischemic stroke in HIV-infected patients. A retrospective chart review of intravenous tPA-treated HIV patients who presented with acute stroke symptoms was performed in 7 large inner-city US academic centers (various search years between 2000 and 2017). We collected data on HIV, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, ischemic stroke risk factors, opportunistic infections, intravenous drug abuse, neuroimaging findings, and modified Rankin Scale score at last follow-up. We identified 33 HIV-infected patients treated with intravenous tPA (mean age, 51 years; 24 men), 10 of whom were stroke mimics. Sixteen of 33 (48%) patients had an HIV viral load less than the limit of detection while 10 of 33 (30%) had a CD4 count Stroke Scale score at presentation was 9, and mean time from symptom onset to tPA was 144 minutes (median, 159). The median modified Rankin Scale score for the 33-patient cohort was 1 and for the 23-patient actual stroke cohort was 2, measured at a median of 90 days poststroke symptom onset. Two patients had nonfatal hemorrhagic transformation (6%; 95% confidence interval, 1%-20%), both in the actual stroke group. Two patients had varicella zoster virus vasculitis of the central nervous system, 1 had meningovascular syphilis, and 7 other patients were actively using intravenous drugs (3 cocaine, 1 heroin, and 3 unspecified), none of whom had hemorrhagic transformation. Most HIV-infected patients treated with intravenous tPA for presumed and actual acute ischemic stroke had no complications, and we observed no fatalities. Stroke mimics were common, and thrombolysis seems safe in this group. We found no data to suggest an increased risk of intravenous tPA-related complications because of concomitant

  8. Plasminogen-independent initiation of the pro-urokinase activation cascade in vivo. Activation of pro-urokinase by glandular kallikrein (mGK-6) in plasminogen-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, K; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Bugge, T H

    2000-01-01

    The plasminogen activation (PA) system is involved in the degradation of fibrin and various extracellular matrix proteins, taking part in a number of physiological and pathological tissue remodeling processes including cancer invasion. This system is organized as a classical proteolytic cascade......, and as for other cascade systems, understanding the physiological initiation mechanism is of central importance. The attempts to identify initiation routes for activation of the proform of the key enzyme urokinase-type plasminogen activator (pro-uPA) in vivo have been hampered by the strong activator potency...

  9. Plasminogen alleles influence susceptibility to invasive aspergillosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee K Zaas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA is a common and life-threatening infection in immunocompromised individuals. A number of environmental and epidemiologic risk factors for developing IA have been identified. However, genetic factors that affect risk for developing IA have not been clearly identified. We report that host genetic differences influence outcome following establishment of pulmonary aspergillosis in an exogenously immune suppressed mouse model. Computational haplotype-based genetic analysis indicated that genetic variation within the biologically plausible positional candidate gene plasminogen (Plg; Gene ID 18855 correlated with murine outcome. There was a single nonsynonymous coding change (Gly110Ser where the minor allele was found in all of the susceptible strains, but not in the resistant strains. A nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (Asp472Asn was also identified in the human homolog (PLG; Gene ID 5340. An association study within a cohort of 236 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients revealed that alleles at this SNP significantly affected the risk of developing IA after HSCT. Furthermore, we demonstrated that plasminogen directly binds to Aspergillus fumigatus. We propose that genetic variation within the plasminogen pathway influences the pathogenesis of this invasive fungal infection.

  10. Clinical Outcomes of Intravenous rt-PA Thrombolysis Therapy for Advance-Aged Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Multi-Center Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-feng LAI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA thrombolysis therapy has been regarded as a promising therapeutic measure for acute ischemic stroke (AIS. But its effectiveness and safety are unclear because of the lack of large, long-term, prospective and multi-center clinical studies in China. Objective: This study was to explore the efficacy of the therapy, and hypothesize some baseline clinical variables that might affect clinical outcomes.Methods: All patients with AIS were treated by intravenous rt-PA thrombolysis within 4.5 h from stroke onset. The clinical records and laboratory data of pre- and post-treatment were statistically analyzed to testify the efficacy and safety of this treatment and to find out the independent prognostic factors.Results: A total of 1 067 patients were selected in this study and divided into group A (<80 years old, n=769 and group B (≥80 years old, n=298. A favorable outcome was observed in 261 patients in group A and 81 patients in group B, respectively. A total of 6 factors were identified as independent prognostic factors for intravenous rt-PA thrombolysis therapy.Conclusion: rt-PA thrombolysis therapy is effective in treating AIS patients, but there are multiple risk factors that affect prognosis.

  11. Platelets retain high levels of active plasminogen activator inhibitor 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helén Brogren

    Full Text Available The vascular fibrinolytic system is crucial for spontaneous lysis of blood clots. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1, the principal inhibitor of the key fibrinolytic enzyme tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA, is present in platelets at high concentrations. However, the majority of PAI-1 stored in platelets has been considered to be inactive. Our recent finding (Brogren H, et al. Blood 2004 that PAI-1 de novo synthesized in platelets remained active for over 24 h, suggested that PAI-1 stored in the α-granules might be active to a larger extent than previously reported. To re-evaluate this issue, we performed experiments where the fraction of active PAI-1 was estimated by analyzing the tPA-PAI-1 complex formation. In these experiments platelets were lysed with Triton X-100 in the presence of serial dilutions of tPA and subsequently the tPA-PAI-1 complex was evaluated by Western blot. Also, using a non-immunologic assay, tPA was labeled with (125I, and (125I-tPA and (125I-tPA-PAI-1 was quantified by scintigraphy. Interestingly, both methods demonstrated that the majority (>50% of platelet PAI-1 is active. Further analyses suggested that pre-analytical procedures used in previous studies (sonication or freezing/thawing may have substantially reduced the activity of platelet PAI-1, which has lead to an underestimation of the proportion of active PAI-1. Our in vitro results are more compatible with the role of PAI-1 in clot stabilization as demonstrated in physiological and pathophysiological studies.

  12. Schistosomes Enhance Plasminogen Activation: The Role of Tegumental Enolase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara C Figueiredo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni is a blood fluke parasite that causes schistosomiasis, a debilitating disease of global public health importance. These relatively large parasites are able to survive prolonged periods in the human vasculature without inducing stable blood clots around them. We show here that the intravascular life stages (schistosomula and adult males and females can all promote significant plasminogen (PLMG activation in the presence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA. This results in the generation of the potent fibrinolytic agent plasmin which could degrade blood clots forming around the worms in vivo. We demonstrate that S. mansoni enolase (SmEno is a host-interactive tegumental enzyme that, in recombinant form, can bind PLMG and promote its activation. Like classical members of the enolase protein family, SmEno can catalyze the interconversion of 2-phospho-D-glycerate (2-PGA and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP. The enzyme has maximal activity at pH 7.5, requires Mg2+ for optimal activity and can be inhibited by NaF but not mefloquin. Suppressing expression of the SmEno gene significantly diminishes enolase mRNA levels, protein levels and surface enzyme activity but, surprisingly, does not affect the ability of the worms to promote PLMG activation. Thus, while SmEno can enhance PLMG activation, our analysis suggests that it is not the only contributor to the parasite's ability to perform this function. We show that the worms possess several other PLMG-binding proteins in addition to SmEno and these may have a greater importance in schistosome-driven PLMG activation.

  13. Variable Resistance to Plasminogen Activator Initiated Fibrinolysis for Intermediate-Risk Pulmonary Embolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B Stubblefield

    Full Text Available We examine the clinical significance and biomarkers of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA-catalyzed clot lysis time (CLT in patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism (PE.Platelet-poor, citrated plasma was obtained from patients with PE. Healthy age- and sex-matched patients served as disease-negative controls. Fibrinogen, α2-antiplasmin, plasminogen, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI, plasminogen activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1, thrombin time and D-dimer were quantified. Clotting was induced using CaCl2, tissue factor, and phospholipid. Lysis was induced using 60 ng/mL tPA. Time to 50% clot lysis (CLT was assessed by both thromboelastography (TEG and turbidimetry (A405.Compared with disease-negative controls, patients with PE exhibited significantly longer mean CLT on TEG (+2,580 seconds, 95% CI 1,380 to 3,720 sec. Patients with PE and a short CLT who were treated with tenecteplase had increased risk of bleeding, whereas those with long CLT had significantly worse exercise tolerance and psychometric testing for quality of life at 3 months. A multivariate stepwise removal regression model selected PAI-1 and TAFI as predictive biomarkers of CLT.The CLT from TEG predicted increased risk of bleeding and clinical failure with tenecteplase treatment for intermediate-risk PE. Plasmatic PAI-1 and TAFI were independent predictors of CLT.

  14. Variable Resistance to Plasminogen Activator Initiated Fibrinolysis for Intermediate-Risk Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubblefield, William B; Alves, Nathan J; Rondina, Matthew T; Kline, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    We examine the clinical significance and biomarkers of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-catalyzed clot lysis time (CLT) in patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism (PE). Platelet-poor, citrated plasma was obtained from patients with PE. Healthy age- and sex-matched patients served as disease-negative controls. Fibrinogen, α2-antiplasmin, plasminogen, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), plasminogen activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), thrombin time and D-dimer were quantified. Clotting was induced using CaCl2, tissue factor, and phospholipid. Lysis was induced using 60 ng/mL tPA. Time to 50% clot lysis (CLT) was assessed by both thromboelastography (TEG) and turbidimetry (A405). Compared with disease-negative controls, patients with PE exhibited significantly longer mean CLT on TEG (+2,580 seconds, 95% CI 1,380 to 3,720 sec). Patients with PE and a short CLT who were treated with tenecteplase had increased risk of bleeding, whereas those with long CLT had significantly worse exercise tolerance and psychometric testing for quality of life at 3 months. A multivariate stepwise removal regression model selected PAI-1 and TAFI as predictive biomarkers of CLT. The CLT from TEG predicted increased risk of bleeding and clinical failure with tenecteplase treatment for intermediate-risk PE. Plasmatic PAI-1 and TAFI were independent predictors of CLT.

  15. Quality Indicators of Intravenous Thrombolysis from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William, Akanksha Grace; Pannu, Aman; Kate, Mahesh Pundlik; Jaison, Vineeth; Gupta, Leenu; Bose, Smrithi; Sahonta, Rajeshwar; Sebastian, Ivy; Pandian, Jeyaraj Durai

    2017-01-01

    Data on intravenous (IV) thrombolysis using tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) are limited from low- and middle-income countries. We aimed to assess the quality indicators of IV thrombolysis in our stroke unit. All stroke patients admitted in our hospital from October 2008 to April 2017 were included in this study. Data were collected prospectively by trained research staff in a detailed case record form. Outcome was assessed using modified Rankin Scale (mRS, 0-1 good outcome). Of the total 4720 stroke patients seen, 944 (20%) came within window period (<4.5 h). Of these, 214 (4.5%) were eligible for thrombolysis and 170 (3.6%) were thrombolysed, relatives of 23 (23/214, 10.7%) patients denied consent, and 21 (9.8%) patients could not afford tPA. The mean age of thrombolysed patients was 58.4 (range 19-95) years. Median NIHSS at admission was 12 (interquartile range 2-24). Average onset-to-door (O-D) time was 76.8 (5-219) min, door-to-examination (D-E) time was 17.8 (5-105) min, door-to-CT (D-CT) time was 48 (1-205) min, and door-to-needle (D-N) time was 90 (20-285) min. At 6 months, 110 (64.7%) patients were contactable and 82 (74.5%) patients had good outcome (mRS 0-1). Thrombolysis rate has steadily increased at the center without undue adverse effects even in the elderly. D-E and D-CT times have reduced, but O-D and D-N times need further improvement. More patients could be thrombolysed if the cost of tPA is reduced and the consent process is waived.

  16. Tetranectin, a plasminogen kringle 4-binding protein. Cloning and gene expression pattern in human colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R

    1992-01-01

    signal peptide. This protein is produced locally by cells of the stromal compartment of tumors and is deposited into the extracellular matrix. Since tetranectin binds to plasminogen we hypothesize that it could function as an anchor and/or reservoir for plasminogen and similar substances that regulate......(r) = 20,169). The 3' noncoding region contained a single polyadenylation signal and a 26-residue poly A tail. The predicted amino acid sequence of the mature tetranectin chain showed, except for one amino acid, complete identity to that obtained by sequencing of the native protein (Fuhlendorff J...... colon tissues revealed a strong and distinct hybridization signal of stromal cells in colon carcinomas but not in tumor cells. Only a few stromal cells were labeled in the normal colon. Immunohistochemically, tetranectin was found in a fibrillar-like pattern in the extracellular matrix around the tumor...

  17. Elucidation of Arctigenin Pharmacokinetics and Tissue Distribution after Intravenous, Oral, Hypodermic and Sublingual Administration in Rats and Beagle Dogs: Integration of In Vitro and In Vivo Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Li, Xin; Ren, Yu-Shan; Lv, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Jun-Sheng; Xu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Xian-Zhen; Yao, Jing-Chun; Zhang, Gui-Min; Liu, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Although arctigenin ( AG ) has diverse bioactivities, such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, immunoregulatory and neuroprotective activities, its pharmacokinetics have not been systematically evaluated. The purpose of this work was to identify the pharmacokinetic properties of AG via various experiments in vivo and in vitro . In this research, rats and beagle dogs were used to investigate the PK (pharmacokinetics, PK) profiles of AG with different drug-delivery manners, including intravenous (i.v), hypodermic injection (i.h), and sublingual (s.l) administration. The data shows that AG exhibited a strong absorption capacity in both rats and beagle dogs (absorption rate 100%), and a strong elimination ability ( t 1/2 beagle dog (25.9 ± 3.24%) > rat (15.7 ± 9%) > monkey (3.69 ± 0.12%). This systematic investigation of pharmacokinetic profiles of arctigenin (AG) in vivo and in vitro is worthy of further exploration.

  18. Components of the plasminogen activation system promote engraftment of porous polyethylene biomaterial via common and distinct effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Christoph A; Hessenauer, Maximilian E T; Pflieger, Kerstin; Rehberg, Markus; Kanse, Sandip M; Zahler, Stefan; Krombach, Fritz; Berghaus, Alexander; Strieth, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Rapid fibrovascularization is a prerequisite for successful biomaterial engraftment. In addition to their well-known roles in fibrinolysis, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or their inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have recently been implicated as individual mediators in non-fibrinolytic processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Since these events are critical for fibrovascularization of biomaterial, we hypothesized that the components of the plasminogen activation system contribute to biomaterial engraftment. Employing in vivo and ex vivo microscopy techniques, vessel and collagen network formation within porous polyethylene (PPE) implants engrafted into dorsal skinfold chambers were found to be significantly impaired in uPA-, tPA-, or PAI-1-deficient mice. Consequently, the force required for mechanical disintegration of the implants out of the host tissue was significantly lower in the mutant mice than in wild-type controls. Conversely, surface coating with recombinant uPA, tPA, non-catalytic uPA, or PAI-1, but not with non-catalytic tPA, accelerated implant vascularization in wild-type mice. Thus, uPA, tPA, and PAI-1 contribute to the fibrovascularization of PPE implants through common and distinct effects. As clinical perspective, surface coating with recombinant uPA, tPA, or PAI-1 might provide a novel strategy for accelerating the vascularization of this biomaterial.

  19. Plasminogen activators in inflammation and sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechlaner, Ch

    2002-01-01

    Mortality of severe sepsis remains at 40% to 50%. Intensive efforts over the past two decades have only marginally improved outcome. Improving outcome in sepsis depends on understanding its pathophysiology, which involves triggers, responses of the organism, and dysfunction. Stress, injury, or infection trigger host responses, including local and systemic orchestrated mechanisms. Dysfunction and outcome depend on both trigger and response. Blood coagulation, inflammation, immunity, and fibrinolysis are critical components of the organism's responses. Understanding their role in sepsis pathophysiology is the key to effective treatment. Relevant studies were identified by a systematic literature search, complemented by manual search of individual citations. Using PubMed, 'sepsis' yields more than 62,000 references, 'plasminogen activators' more than 21,000. The selection of citations was guided by preference for reviews that expand important threads of argumentation. Single original studies were included when relevant to critical points. This analytical review describes the essential elements of pathophysiology and the current status of sepsis treatment. Based on this context, an emerging therapeutic option will be discussed: plasminogen activators.

  20. A novel serine protease secreted by medicinal maggots enhances plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Plas, Mariena J A; Andersen, Anders S; Nazir, Sheresma

    2014-01-01

    . Recombinant Sericase degraded plasminogen leading amongst others to the formation of the mini-plasminogen like fragment Val454-plasminogen. In addition, the presence of a non-proteolytic cofactor in secretions was discovered, which plays a role in the enhancement of plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis...

  1. Half-life of single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator (scu-PA) and two-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator (tcu-PA) in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, M; Sen, S; Miyashita, C; Hermes, R; Pindur, G; Heiden, M; Berg, G; Mörsdorf, S; Leipnitz, G; Zeppezauer, M

    1991-04-01

    The pharmacokinetics of urokinase (two-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator, tcu-PA) and single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator (scu-PA) were studied in 20 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Ten consecutive patients received 2.5 million units tcu-PA by bolus injection within 5 min during the first 6 h after AMI (group I). Ten further consecutive patients received 250,000 U tcu-PA within 5 min, followed by 4.5 million U scu-PA by intravenous infusion over 40 min (group II). An enzyme immunoassay was developed for urokinase antigen determinations, and a fibrin plate assay for determinations of fibrinolytic activity was applied. Using a 3-compartment model, in group I 98% of urokinase antigen were cleared with a half-life of 60.8 min. After scu-PA, urokinase antigen was cleared with half-lives (area under the curve in parentheses) of 6.9 min (74.8%), 26.5 min (23.6%), and 329.7 min (2.2%). The half-disappearance times of fibrinolytic activity were 18 and 8 min in group I and II, respectively. A more pronounced decrease of plasminogen was observed after tcu-PA.

  2. Determination of plasminogen/plasmin system components and indicators of lipoproteins oxidative modification under arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Yusova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was investigated of levels of oxidative modification of lipoproteins and content of plasminogen/plasmin system components – tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA and plasminogen activators inhibitor-1 (PAI-I, in patients with stage II arterial hypertension (AHT and resistant form. It was established that t-PA level in blood plasma of the patients is 2 times lower under stage II hypertension than normal and 2.5 times lower under resistant AHT. The inhibitor activity is 1.5 and 2 times higher consequently. It is concluded that patients with AHT have a decreased fibrinolytic potential, which can cause thrombotic states. Our evaluation showed a significant accumulation of products of lipid and protein oxidation, decrease of activity of antioxidant enzymes and changes of the activity of high density-lipoproteins-associated enzymes (decrease of paraoxonase-1 activity, increase of myeloperoxidase activity. Oxidized lipoproteins, t-PA and PAI-1 can be used as prognostic markers of development of complications and for evaluating the efficacy of therapy in patients with arterial hypertension.

  3. Ativador do Plasminogênio Tecidual (tPA/ Fator Neurotrófico Derivado do Cérebro (BDNF e a Consolidação da Memória/ Tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA/ Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF and the Consolidation of Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Souza de Faria

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available O Fator Neurotrófico Derivado do Cérebro (BDNF participa de processos de plasticidade sináptica subjacentes à aprendizagem e memória. Esta proteína possui diversas isoformas, sendo a isoforma BDNF-maduro envolvida nas mudanças neuronais da memória. Além disso, foi demonstrado que a consolidação da memória aversiva depende do Ativador do Plasminogênio Tecidual (tPA, enzima que estabelece a formação do BDND-maduro na fenda sináptica garantindo os processos neuroplásticos da aprendizagem. Para esta revisão de literatura, foram selecionados 37 trabalhos, dentre eles 36 artigos científicos e 1 livro. A consolidação da memória requer a ativação gênica para síntese de novas proteínas, sendo a tPA e o BDNF algumas das principais moléculas neuronais expressas no hipocampo, amigdala, córtex frontal em diferentes momentos após o início da aprendizagem, ativando uma série de eventos moleculares que levam ao aumento da expressão de outras proteínas, garantindo assim a regulação fina da plasticidade neuronal necessária para a memória. The Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF participates in synaptic plasticity processes underlying learning and memory. This protein has several isoforms, mature-BDNF one isoform involved in neuronal memory changes. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the consolidation of aversive memory depends on the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA, an enzyme that establishes the formation of the mature BDND-synaptic cleft, guaranteeing neuroplastic learning processes. For this literature review, we selected 37 works, including 36 scientific articles and one book. The consolidation of memory for gene activation requires new protein synthesis, tPA and BDNF and some of the major neuronal molecules expressed in the hippocampus, amygdala, frontal cortex at different times after the start of learning, activating a series of molecular events leading the increased expression of other proteins, thereby

  4. Intravenous administration of high-dose Paclitaxel reduces gut-associated lymphoid tissue cell number and respiratory immunoglobulin A concentrations in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Tomoyuki; Fukatsu, Kazuhiko; Noguchi, Midori; Okamoto, Koichi; Murakoshi, Satoshi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Miyazaki, Masaru; Hase, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Junji

    2014-02-01

    Chemotherapy remains a mainstay of treatment for cancer patients. However, anti-cancer drugs frequently cause a wide range of side effects, including leukopenia and gastrointestinal toxicity. These adverse effects can lead to treatment delays or necessitate temporary dose reductions. Although chemotherapy-related changes in gut morphology have been demonstrated, the influences of chemotherapeutic regimens on gut immunity are understood poorly. This study aimed to examine whether the anti-cancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) impairs gut immunity in mice. Male ICR mice were randomized into three groups: Control, low-dose PTX (low PTX; 2 mg/kg), or high-dose PTX (high PTX; 4 mg/kg). A single intravenous dose was given. On day seven after the injection, lymphocytes from Peyer patches (PP), intraepithelial (IE) spaces, and the lamina propria (LP) were counted and analyzed by flow cytometry (CD4(+), CD8(+), αβTCR(+), γδTCR(+), B220(+)). Immunoglobulin A (IgA) concentrations were measured in small intestinal and respiratory tract washings. Total, CD4(+) and γδTCR(+) lymphocyte numbers in PPs were significantly lower in the high PTX than in the control group. The CD4(+) lymphocyte numbers in the IE spaces were significantly lower in both PTX groups than in the control group. Respiratory tract IgA concentrations were lower in the high PTX than in the control group. The present data suggest high-dose PTX impairs mucosal immunity, possibly rendering patients more vulnerable to infection. Careful dose selection and new therapies may be important for maintaining mucosal immunity during PTX chemotherapy.

  5. The Plasminogen Receptor, Plg-RKT, and Macrophage Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey A. Miles

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When plasminogen binds to cells its activation to plasmin is markedly enhanced compared to the reaction in solution. Thus, cells become armed with the broad spectrum proteolytic activity of plasmin. Cell-surface plasmin plays a key role in macrophage recruitment during the inflammatory response. Proteins exposing basic residues on the cell surface promote plasminogen activation on eukaryotic cells. We have used a proteomics approach combining targeted proteolysis with carboxypeptidase B and multidimensional protein identification technology, MudPIT, and a monocyte progenitor cell line to identify a novel transmembrane protein, the plasminogen receptor, Plg-RKT. Plg-RKT exposes a C-terminal lysine on the cell surface in an orientation to bind plasminogen and promote plasminogen activation. Here we review the characteristics of this new protein, with regard to membrane topology, conservation of sequence across species, the role of its C-terminus in plasminogen binding, its function in plasminogen activation, cell migration, and its role in macrophage recruitment in the inflammatory response.

  6. Escherichia coli lipoprotein binds human plasminogen via an intramolecular domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy eGonzalez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli lipoprotein (Lpp is a major cellular component that exists in two distinct states, bound-form and free-form. Bound-form Lpp is known to interact with the periplasmic bacterial cell wall, while free-form Lpp is localized to the bacterial cell surface. A function for surface-exposed Lpp has yet to be determined. We hypothesized that the presence of C-terminal lysines in the surface-exposed region of Lpp would facilitate binding to the host zymogen plasminogen, a protease commandeered by a number of clinically important bacteria. Recombinant Lpp was synthesized and the binding of Lpp to plasminogen, the effect of various inhibitors on this binding, and the effects of various mutations of Lpp on Lpp-plasminogen interactions were examined. Additionally, the ability of Lpp-bound plasminogen to be converted to active plasmin was analyzed. We determined that Lpp binds plasminogen via an atypical domain located near the center of mature Lpp that may not be exposed on the surface of intact E. coli according to the current localization model. Finally, we found that plasminogen bound by Lpp can be converted to active plasmin. While the consequences of Lpp binding plasminogen are unclear, these results prompt further investigation of the ability of surface exposed Lpp to interact with host molecules such as extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, and the role of these interactions in infections caused by E. coli and other bacteria.

  7. Plasminogen: A cellular protein cofactor for PrPSc propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Charles E; Ryou, Chongsuk

    2011-01-01

    The biochemical essence of prion replication is the molecular multiplication of the disease-associated misfolded isoform of prion protein (PrP), termed PrPSc, in a nucleic acid-free manner. PrP(Sc) is generated by the protein misfolding process facilitated by conformational conversion of the host-encoded cellular PrP to PrP(Sc). Evidence suggests that an auxiliary factor may play a role in PrP(Sc) propagation. We and others previously discovered that plasminogen interacts with PrP, while its functional role for PrPSc propagation remained undetermined. In our recent in vitro PrP conversion study, we showed that plasminogen substantially stimulates PrP(Sc) propagation in a concentration-dependent manner by accelerating the rate of PrP(Sc) generation, while depletion of plasminogen, destabilization of its structure, and interference with the PrP-plasminogen interaction hinder PrP(Sc) propagation. Further investigation in cell culture models confirmed an increase of PrP(Sc) formation by plasminogen. Although molecular basis of the observed activity for plasminogen remain to be addressed, our results demonstrate that plasminogen is the first cellular protein auxiliary factor proven to stimulate PrP(Sc) propagation.

  8. Plasminogen and angiostatin interact with heat shock proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudani, Anil K; Mehic, Jelica; Martyres, Anthony

    2007-06-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory have demonstrated that plasminogen and angiostatin bind to endothelial cell (EC) surface-associated actin via their kringles in a specific manner. Heat shock proteins (hsps) like hsp 27 are constitutively expressed by vascular ECs and regulate actin polymerization, cell growth, and migration. Since many hsps have also been found to be highly abundant on cell surfaces and there is evidence that bacterial surface hsps may interact with human plasminogen, the purpose of this study was to determine whether human plasminogen and angiostatin would interact with human hsps. ELISAs were developed in our laboratory to assess these interactions. It was observed that plasminogen bound to hsps 27, 60, and 70. In all cases, binding was inhibited (85-90%) by excess (50 mM) lysine indicating kringle involvement. Angiostatin predominantly bound to hsp 27 and to hsp 70 in a concentration- and kringle-dependent manner. As observed previously for actin, there was concentration-dependent inhibition of angiostatin's interaction with hsp 27 by plasminogen. In addition, 30-fold molar excess actin inhibited (up to 50%), the interaction of plasminogen with all hsps. However, 30-fold molar excess actin could only inhibit the interaction of angiostatin with hsp 27 by 15-20%. Collectively, these data indicate that (i) while plasminogen interacts specifically with hsp 27, 60, and 70, angiostatin interacts predominantly with hsp 27 and to some extent with hsp 70; (ii) plasminogen only partially displaces angiostatin's binding to hsp 27 and (iii) actin only partially displaces plasminogen/angiostatin binding to hsps. It is conceivable therefore that surface-associated hsps could mediate the binding of these ligands to cells like ECs.

  9. Randomized assessment of imatinib in patients with acute ischaemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, N; Thorén, M; Höjeberg, B; Käll, T-B; Laska, A-C; Sjöstrand, C; Höijer, J; Almqvist, H; Holmin, S; Lilja, A; Fredriksson, L; Lawrence, D; Eriksson, U; Ahmed, N

    2017-03-01

    Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been shown to restore blood-brain barrier integrity and reduce infarct size, haemorrhagic transformation and cerebral oedema in stroke models treated with tissue plasminogen activator. We evaluated the safety of imatinib, based on clinical and neuroradiological data, and its potential influence on neurological and functional outcomes. A phase II randomized trial was performed in patients with acute ischaemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis. A total of 60 patients were randomly assigned to four groups [3 (active): 1 (control)]; the active treatment groups received oral imatinib for 6 days at three dose levels (400, 600 and 800 mg). Primary outcome was any adverse event; secondary outcomes were haemorrhagic transformation, cerebral oedema, neurological severity on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at 7 days and at 3 months and functional outcomes on the modified Rankin scale (mRS). Four serious adverse events were reported, which resulted in three deaths (one in the control group and two in the 400-mg dose group; one patient in the latter group did not receive active treatment and the other received two doses). Nonserious adverse events were mostly mild, resulting in full recovery. Imatinib ameliorated neurological outcomes with an improvement of 0.6 NIHSS points per 100 mg imatinib (P = 0.02). For the 800-mg group, the mean unadjusted and adjusted NIHSS improvements were 4 (P = 0.037) and 5 points (P = 0.012), respectively, versus controls. Functional independence (mRS 0-2) increased by 18% versus controls (61 vs. 79; P = 0.296). This phase II study showed that imatinib is safe and tolerable and may reduce neurological disability in patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis after ischaemic stroke. A confirmatory randomized trial is currently underway. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Internal Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Publication of The

  10. Aberrant glomerular filtration of urokinase-plasminogen activator in nephrotic syndrome leads to amiloride-sensitive plasminogen activation in urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Mette; Buhl, Kristian Bergholt; Andersen, René F

    2015-01-01

    In nephrotic syndrome, aberrant glomerular filtration of plasminogen and conversion to active plasmin in pre-urine is thought to activate proteolytically ENaC and contribute to sodium retention and edema. The ENaC blocker amiloride is an off-target inhibitor of urokinase-type plasminogen activator...... with aberrant filtration of uPA across the injured glomerular barrier. Amiloride inhibits urine uPA activity which attenuates plasminogen activation and urine protease activity in vivo. Urine uPA is a relevant target for amiloride in vivo....

  11. Well-defined hydroxyethyl starch-10-hydroxy camptothecin super macromolecule conjugate: cytotoxicity, pharmacodynamics research, tissue distribution test and intravenous injection safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guofei; Zhao, Mingming; Zhao, Limei

    2016-10-01

    10-Hydroxy camptothecin (10-HCPT) is an antitumor agent effective in the treatment of several solid tumors but its use is hampered by poor water solubility, low lactone stability, short plasma half-life and dose-limiting toxicity. These limits of 10-HCPT had been overcome by our group through preparing super macromolecule prodrug: 10-HCPT-hydroxyethyl starch (HES) conjugate. In this study, we mainly evaluated in vitro and in vivo behavior of the prodrug, containing cytotoxicity assay, pharmacodynamics study, vascular irritation test, hemolysis experiment and tissue distribution test of rats. The irritation test results achieved much lower irritation than the commercial injection. The tissue distribution results showed that HES-10-HCPT conjugate increased significantly the 10-HCPT concentration in the tumor, liver and spleen site, whereas decreased the drug concentration in the heart and kidney. The hemolysis effect of the prepared conjugate was not obvious. The pharmacodynamics results indicated that HES-10-HCPT prodrug had a better antitumor efficiency against mice with H22 tumor than the commercial injection, and the inhibition ratio of tumor was 85.2% and 31.1%, respectively at the same dosage. These findings suggest that HES-10-HCPT prodrug is a promising drug delivery system providing improved good injection safety, greater tolerance and antitumor effect.

  12. A STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS OF SOLUTIONS OF PANCREATIC TISSUE; WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE CAUSE OF COLLAPSE IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egdahl, Anfin

    1907-01-01

    From these results it is permissible to draw the following conclusions which may be used to explain certain phenomena associated especially with the onset of acute pancreatitis. 1. The sudden marked collapse of acute pancreatitis has as its most important cause a toxin or toxins derived from broken down pancreatic tissue. This toxin or toxins seem to be most powerful in the stage of degradation just after the disappearance of the biuret reaction and are probably of the nature of aromatic and amino-compounds. 2. There are various contributing factors of toxic action as peptone and trypsin, but these are to be regarded as of secondary importance. 3. Mechanical irritation as stretching of the peritoneum and irritation of the caeliac plexus is a secondary cause. 4. The glycerine produced through the action of steapsin cannot be regarded as an important cause of collapse. PMID:19867098

  13. Intentional intravenous mercury injection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this case report, intravenous complications, treatment strategies and possible ... Mercury toxicity is commonly associated with vapour inhalation or oral ingestion, for which there exist definite treatment options. Intravenous mercury ... personality, anxiousness, irritability, insomnia, depression and drowsi- ness.[1] However ...

  14. Proteolysis of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 by Yersinia pestis remodulates the host environment to promote virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, J L; Schroeder, J A; Zimbler, D L; Caulfield, A J; Lathem, W W

    2016-09-01

    Essentials Effect of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 on plague and its Y. pestis cleavage is unknown. An intranasal mouse model of infection was used to determine the role of PAI-1 in pneumonic plague. PAI-1 is cleaved and inactivated by the Pla protease of Y. pestis in the lung airspace. PAI-1 impacts both bacterial outgrowth and the immune response to respiratory Y. pestis infection. Click to hear Dr Bock discuss pathogen activators of plasminogen. Background The hemostatic regulator plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) inactivates endogenous plasminogen activators and aids in the immune response to bacterial infection. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, produces the Pla protease, a virulence factor that is required during plague. However, the specific hemostatic proteins cleaved by Pla in vivo that contribute to pathogenesis have not yet been fully elucidated. Objectives To determine whether PAI-1 is cleaved by the Pla protease during pneumonic plague, and to define the impact of PAI-1 on Y. pestis respiratory infection in the presence or absence of Pla. Methods An intranasal mouse model of pneumonic plague was used to assess the levels of total and active PAI-1 in the lung airspace, and the impact of PAI-1 deficiency on bacterial pathogenesis, the host immune response and plasmin generation following infection with wild-type or ∆pla Y. pestis. Results We found that Y. pestis cleaves and inactivates PAI-1 in the lungs in a Pla-dependent manner. The loss of PAI-1 enhances Y. pestis outgrowth in the absence of Pla, and is associated with increased conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. Furthermore, we found that PAI-1 regulates immune cell recruitment, cytokine production and tissue permeability during pneumonic plague. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that PAI-1 is an in vivo target of the Pla protease in the lungs, and that PAI-1 is a key regulator of the pulmonary innate immune response. We conclude that the inactivation of PAI-1 by Y

  15. Prognostic value of plasma soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) in Danish patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (REOC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Begum, Farah Diba; Høgdall, Estrid V S; Riisbo, Rikke

    2006-01-01

    The level of the soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is elevated in tumour tissue from several types of cancer. This is the first study aiming to predict the prognosis for survival by the use of a pre-chemotherapeutic plasma suPAR value in 71 patients with recurrent epithelial...

  16. Sialic acid content of plasminogen 2 glycoforms as a regulator of fibrinolytic activity. Isolation, carbohydrate analysis, and kinetic characterization of six glycoforms of plasminogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirie-Shepherd, S R; Jett, E A; Andon, N L; Pizzo, S V

    1995-03-17

    Six glycoforms of plasminogen 2 were isolated using a combination of lectin affinity chromatography and chromatofocussing, and the sialic acid content of each glycoform was determined. The kinetics of activation of each glycoform by tissue-type plasminogen activator were analyzed on a fibrin surface and in solution. The second-order rate constant (measured on a fibrin surface) decreased from 1.65 x 10(6) M-1 s-1 to 3.77 x 10(4) M-1 s-1 as the sialic acid content of the glycoforms increased from 1.3 mol/mol of protein to 13.65 mol/mol of protein. A similar correlation was noted for activation in solution. Each glycoform was converted to plasmin, and the inhibition constants for the reaction between alpha 2-antiplasmin and plasmin glycoforms were determined. All overall Ki values, reflecting the final essentially irreversible complex, were in the picomolar range. Sialic acid does not affect inhibition of plasmin by alpha 2-antiplasmin; however, hypersialylated plasmin does not appear to have a kringle-dependent component to inhibition.

  17. Plasminogen activation independent of uPA and tPA maintains wound healing in gene-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Leif R; Green, Kirsty A; Stoop, Allart A

    2006-01-01

    to a degree indistinguishable from that observed in Plg-deficient mice, and completely blocks the activity of pKal, but not uPA and tPA in wound extracts. These findings demonstrate that an additional plasminogen activator provides sufficient plasmin activity to sustain the healing process albeit at decreased......Simultaneous ablation of the two known activators of plasminogen (Plg), urokinase-type (uPA) and the tissue-type (tPA), results in a substantial delay in skin wound healing. However, wound closure and epidermal re-epithelialization are significantly less impaired in uPA;tPA double-deficient mice...... than in Plg-deficient mice. Skin wounds in uPA;tPA-deficient mice treated with the broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor galardin (N-[(2R)-2-(hydroxamido-carbonylmethyl)-4-methylpentanoyl]-L-tryptophan methylamide) eventually heal, whereas skin wounds in galardin-treated Plg...

  18. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 regulates microglial motility and phagocytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon Hyejin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 is the primary inhibitor of urokinase type plasminogen activators (uPA and tissue type plasminogen activators (tPA, which mediate fibrinolysis. PAI-1 is also involved in the innate immunity by regulating cell migration and phagocytosis. However, little is known about the role of PAI-1 in the central nervous system. Methods In this study, we identified PAI-1 in the culture medium of mouse mixed glial cells by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Secretion of PAI-1 from glial cultures was detected by ELISA and western blotting analysis. Cell migration was evaluated by in vitro scratch-wound healing assay or Boyden chamber assay and an in vivo stab wound injury model. Phagocytic activity was measured by uptake of zymosan particles. Results The levels of PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression were increased by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ stimulation in both microglia and astrocytes. PAI-1 promoted the migration of microglial cells in culture via the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP 1/Janus kinase (JAK/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1 axis. PAI-1 also increased microglial migration in vivo when injected into mouse brain. PAI-1-mediated microglial migration was independent of protease inhibition, because an R346A mutant of PAI-1 with impaired PA inhibitory activity also promoted microglial migration. Moreover, PAI-1 was able to modulate microglial phagocytic activity. PAI-1 inhibited microglial engulfment of zymosan particles in a vitronectin- and Toll-like receptor 2/6-dependent manner. Conclusion Our results indicate that glia-derived PAI-1 may regulate microglial migration and phagocytosis in an autocrine or paracrine manner. This may have important implications in the regulation of brain microglial activities in health and disease.

  19. Elevated levels of plasminogen activators in the pathogenesis of delayed radiation damage in rat cervical spinal cord in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawaya, R.; Rayford, A.; Kono, S.; Rao, J.S.; Ang, K.K.; Feng, Y.; Stephens, L.C.

    1994-01-01

    The pathophysiology of the cellular basis of radiation-induced demyelination and white-matter necrosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is poorly understood. Preliminary data suggest that tissue damage is partly mediated through changes in the proteolytic enzymes. In this study, we irradiated rat cervical spinal cords with single doses of 24 Gy of 18 MV photons or 20 MeV electrons and measured the levels of plasminogen activators at days 2, 7, 30, 60, 90, 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation, using appropriate controls at each time. Fibrin zymography revealed fibrinolytic bands representing molecular weights of 68,000 and 48,000 in controls and irradiated samples; these bands increased significantly at days 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation. Inhibition of these enzymatic bands with specific antibodies against tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and amiloride, an inhibitor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), confirmed that these bands were tPA and uPA. Enzymatic levels quantified by densitometry showed a twofold elevation in the levels of tPA and more than a tenfold increase in uPA after 120 days' irradiation. Activity of uPA was increased threefold by day 2 and increased steadily with time compared to nonirradiated control samples. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) also showed a threefold increase in the tPA content in the extracts of irradiated rat cervical spinal cords at days 120, 130 and 145. This study adds additional information to the proposed role of plasminogen activators in the pathogenic pathways of radiation damage in the CNS. 38 refs., 6 figs

  20. Elevated levels of plasminogen activators in the pathogenesis of delayed radiation damage in rat cervical spinal cord in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawaya, R.; Rayford, A.; Kono, S.; Rao, J.S.; Ang, K.K.; Feng, Y.; Stephens, L.C. [Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The pathophysiology of the cellular basis of radiation-induced demyelination and white-matter necrosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is poorly understood. Preliminary data suggest that tissue damage is partly mediated through changes in the proteolytic enzymes. In this study, we irradiated rat cervical spinal cords with single doses of 24 Gy of 18 MV photons or 20 MeV electrons and measured the levels of plasminogen activators at days 2, 7, 30, 60, 90, 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation, using appropriate controls at each time. Fibrin zymography revealed fibrinolytic bands representing molecular weights of 68,000 and 48,000 in controls and irradiated samples; these bands increased significantly at days 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation. Inhibition of these enzymatic bands with specific antibodies against tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and amiloride, an inhibitor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), confirmed that these bands were tPA and uPA. Enzymatic levels quantified by densitometry showed a twofold elevation in the levels of tPA and more than a tenfold increase in uPA after 120 days` irradiation. Activity of uPA was increased threefold by day 2 and increased steadily with time compared to nonirradiated control samples. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) also showed a threefold increase in the tPA content in the extracts of irradiated rat cervical spinal cords at days 120, 130 and 145. This study adds additional information to the proposed role of plasminogen activators in the pathogenic pathways of radiation damage in the CNS. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Autoantibodies to plasminogen and their role in tumor diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goufman, E I; Yakovlev, V N; Tikhonova, N B; Aisina, R B; Yarygin, K N; Mukhametova, L I; Gershkovich, K B; Gulin, D A

    2015-02-01

    Plasma level of IgG autoantibodies to plasminogen was measured by ELISA in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (n=25), prostatic cancer (n=17), lung cancer (n=15), and healthy volunteers (n=44). High levels of IgG to plasminogen were found in 2 (12%) of 17 healthy women, in 1 (3.6%) of 27 specimens in a healthy man, in 17 (68%) of 25 specimens in prostatic cancer, in 10 (59%) of 17 specimens in lung cancer, and in 5 (30%) of 15 specimens in benign prostatic hyperplasia. Comparison of plasma levels of anti-plasminogen IgG by affinity chromatography showed 3-fold higher levels in patients with prostatic cancer vs. healthy men.

  2. [Intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke. A four years’ experience in a Chilean public hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto V, Álvaro; Morales I, Gladys; Grandjean B, Marcela; Pollak W, Débora; Del Castillo C, Carolina; García F, Pía; Von Johnn A, Alexis; Riquelme G, Alfonso

    2017-04-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) with alteplase (tissue plasminogen activator) is the standard pharmacological treatment in acute ischemic stroke (AIS), reducing disability in patients. To report the results a thrombolysis protocol during four years in a regional public hospital. Data from 106 consecutive patients aged 68 ± 13 years (57% men) who were treated with IVT, from May 2012 until April 2016, was analyzed. The median door-to-needle time was 80 minutes (interquartile range = 57-113). The median National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores on admission and at discharge were was 11.5 and 5 points respectively. At discharge, 27% of hospitalized patients had a favorable outcome (n = 99), defined as having 0 to 1 points in the modified Rankin scale. Symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage and mortality rates were 5.7 and 13.1%, respectively. The thrombolysis rate rose from 0.7% in 2012 to 6% in 2016. The implementation of 24/7 neurology shifts in the Emergency Department allowed us to increase the amount and quality of IVT in our hospital, as measured by the rate of thrombolysis and by process indicators such as door-to-needle time.

  3. [Signifiance of brush sign on susceptibility-weighted imaging predicts hemorrhagic transformation after intravenous thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chao; Chen, Zhi-cai; Tang, Huan; Xu, Meng-jun; Zhang, Sheng; Sun, Jian-zhong; Lou, Min

    2015-11-01

    To assess brush sign (BS) on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) in prediction of hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) after intravenous thrombolysis(IVT). Patients with acute cerebral ischemic stroke, who had major cerebral artery occlusion (internal carotid artery, middle cerebral artery M1 and M2), treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) from August 2009 to October 2014 in the Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent SWI scanning. The asymmetry index (AI) was defined as the difference of intensity between ischemic and normal hemispheres on the SWI phase map; according to AI values patients were divided into 3 groups: BS=0(n=9), BS=1 (n=39) and BS=2 (n=18). The relationships between BS and HT and the clinical outcome among the 3 groups were analyzed. Sixty-six patients aged 68 ± 13 years were included in the study, including 44 males (67%) and 22 females (33%), and 44 (67%) with acute ischemic stroke. The mean pre-treatment National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score was 13 (6-17), and the onset to needle time was (252 ± 88) min. Twenty-six (39.4%) patients had HT, including 18 cases (27.3%) with HI and 8 cases (12.1%) with PH; BS was observed more frequently in HT group than non-HT group. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that BS was independently associated with HT of patients with acute ischemic stroke following IVT (OR=2.589, 95% CI: 1.080-6.210, P=0.033). In those without reperfusion after IVT, patients with higher BS grade had higher HT rate (P=0.023). Brush sign on SWI can be used for predicting hemorrhagic transformation after intravenous thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  4. Predictors of functional outcome and hemorrhagic complications in acute ischemic stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis - A retrospective analysis
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinqin; Shan, Wenya; Liu, Li; Fu, Xuchun; Liu, Ping; Hu, Yunzhen

    2017-12-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) within 4.5 hours is an effective and routine therapy for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The purpose of the study was to identify predictors of functional outcome at 3 months and hemorrhagic complications after IVT. A total of 123 AIS patients treated with intravenous alteplase within 4.5 hours after stroke were enrolled. Baseline clinical characteristics, medication and disease history, radiographic and laboratory data were collected. The clinical functional outcome at 3 months was measured by the modified Rankin Scale dichotomized at 0 - 1 (favorable) vs. 2 - 6 (unfavorable). Hemorrhagic complications were measured within 36 hours after IVT. Univariate and multivariate analysis was applied in the study, and the logistic regression identified the predictors for functional outcome at 3 months and hemorrhagic complications within 36 hours. In univariate analysis, the favorable outcome was significantly associated with short hospitalization, low initial National Institute of Health Stroke Scale scores, previous smoking, previous statin use, and absence of post-stroke cerebral edema or pneumonia. Hemorrhagic complications were significantly associated with high initial NIHSS scores, low platelet count, high D-dimer level, previous atrial fibrillation, and onset seasons (except summer). Multivariate regression analyses identified that seasons (spring and summer), short hospital stays, and absence of post-stroke cerebral edema or pneumonia were the predictors of a favorable functional outcome. Meanwhile, seasons (except summer), low platelet count, and high D-dimer levels were correlation factors for prognosis of high hemorrhagic complications.
.

  5. Pain management in emergency department: intravenous morphine vs. intravenous acetaminophen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Talebi Doluee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is the most common complaint in emergency department and there are several methods for its control. Among them, pharmaceutical methods are the most effective. Although intravenous morphine has been the most common choice for several years, it has some adverse effects. There are many researches about intravenous acetaminophen as an analgesic agent and it appears that it has good analgesic effects for various types of pain. We searched some electronic resources for clinical trials comparing analgesic effects of intravenous acetaminophen vs. intravenous morphine for acute pain treatment in emergency setting.In two clinical trials, the analgesic effect of intravenous acetaminophen has been compared with intravenous morphine for renal colic. The results revealed no significant difference between analgesic effects of two medications. Another clinical trial revealed that intravenous acetaminophen has acceptable analgesic effects on the post-cesarean section pain when combined with other analgesic medications. One study revealed that administration of intravenous acetaminophen compared to placebo before hysterectomy decreased consumption of morphine via patient-controlled analgesia pump and decreased the side effects. Similarly, another study revealed that the infusion of intravenous acetaminophen vs. placebo after orthopedic surgery decreased the consumption of morphine after the surgery. A clinical trial revealed intravenous acetaminophen provided a level of analgesia comparable to intravenous morphine in isolated limb trauma, while causing less side effects than morphine.It appears that intravenous acetaminophen has good analgesic effects for visceral, traumatic and postoperative pains compare with intravenous morphine.

  6. Contribution of plasminogen activation towards the pathogenic potential of oral streptococci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Itzek

    Full Text Available Oral streptococci are a heterogeneous group of human commensals, with a potential to cause serious infections. Activation of plasminogen has been shown to increase the virulence of typical human pathogenic streptococci such as S. pneumoniae. One important factor for plasminogen activation is the streptococcal α-enolase. Here we report that plasminogen activation is also common in oral streptococci species involved in clinical infection and that it depends on the action of human plasminogen activators. The ability to activate plasminogen did not require full conservation of the internal plasminogen binding sequence motif FYDKERKVY of α-enolase that was previously described as crucial for increased plasminogen binding, activation and virulence. Instead, experiments with recombinant α-enolase variants indicate that the naturally occurring variations do not impair plasminogen binding. In spite of these variations in the internal plasminogen binding motif oral streptococci showed similar activation of plasminogen. We conclude that the pathomechanism of plasminogen activation is conserved in oral streptococci that cause infections in human. This may contribute to their opportunistic pathogenic character that is unfurled in certain niches.

  7. Ligneous Periodontitis in a Child with Plasminogen Deficiency

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... abnormal wound healing is the main pathogenesis of this rare disease and should be considered different from other mucosal systemic disorders. In this case report, we describe the management of ligneous periodontitis and ligneous conjunctivitis developing secondary to plasminogen deficiency in a ...

  8. Ligneous Periodontitis in a Child with Plasminogen Deficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Defective fibrinolysis and abnormal wound healing is the main pathogenesis of this rare disease and should be considered different from other mucosal systemic disorders. In this case report, we describe the management of ligneous periodontitis and ligneous conjunctivitis developing secondary to plasminogen deficiency ...

  9. Photonic Activation of Plasminogen induced by low dose UVB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Correia, Manuel Guiherme L.P. Marins; Snabe, Torben; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam

    2015-01-01

    ). Such proximity makes its disruption very likely, which may occur upon electron transfer from excited Trp761. Reduction of Cys737-Cys765 will result in likely conformational changes in the catalytic site. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that reduction of Cys737-Cys765 in plasminogen leads to an increase...

  10. Infarct volume predicts critical care needs in stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faigle, Roland; Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Urrutia, Victor C. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wozniak, Amy W. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-10-26

    Patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IVT) for ischemic stroke are monitored in an intensive care unit (ICU) or a comparable unit capable of ICU interventions due to the high frequency of standardized neurological exams and vital sign checks. The present study evaluates quantitative infarct volume on early post-IVT MRI as a predictor of critical care needs and aims to identify patients who may not require resource intense monitoring. We identified 46 patients who underwent MRI within 6 h of IVT. Infarct volume was measured using semiautomated software. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis were used to determine factors associated with ICU needs. Infarct volume was an independent predictor of ICU need after adjusting for age, sex, race, systolic blood pressure, NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and coronary artery disease (odds ratio 1.031 per cm{sup 3} increase in volume, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.004-1.058, p = 0.024). The ROC curve with infarct volume alone achieved an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.766 (95 % CI 0.605-0.927), while the AUC was 0.906 (95 % CI 0.814-0.998) after adjusting for race, systolic blood pressure, and NIHSS. Maximum Youden index calculations identified an optimal infarct volume cut point of 6.8 cm{sup 3} (sensitivity 75.0 %, specificity 76.7 %). Infarct volume greater than 3 cm{sup 3} predicted need for critical care interventions with 81.3 % sensitivity and 66.7 % specificity. Infarct volume may predict needs for ICU monitoring and interventions in stroke patients treated with IVT. (orig.)

  11. High-permeability region size on perfusion CT predicts hemorrhagic transformation after intravenous thrombolysis in stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Puig

    Full Text Available Blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability has been proposed as a predictor of hemorrhagic transformation (HT after tissue plasminogen activator (tPA administration; however, the reliability of perfusion computed tomography (PCT permeability imaging for predicting HT is uncertain. We aimed to determine the performance of high-permeability region size on PCT (HPrs-PCT in predicting HT after intravenous tPA administration in patients with acute stroke.We performed a multimodal CT protocol (non-contrast CT, PCT, CT angiography to prospectively study patients with middle cerebral artery occlusion treated with tPA within 4.5 hours of symptom onset. HT was graded at 24 hours using the European-Australasian Acute Stroke Study II criteria. ROC curves selected optimal volume threshold, and multivariate logistic regression analysis identified predictors of HT.The study included 156 patients (50% male, median age 75.5 years. Thirty-seven (23,7% developed HT [12 (7,7%, parenchymal hematoma type 2 (PH-2]. At admission, patients with HT had lower platelet values, higher NIHSS scores, increased ischemic lesion volumes, larger HPrs-PCT, and poorer collateral status. The negative predictive value of HPrs-PCT at a threshold of 7mL/100g/min was 0.84 for HT and 0.93 for PH-2. The multiple regression analysis selected HPrs-PCT at 7mL/100g/min combined with platelets and baseline NIHSS score as the best model for predicting HT (AUC 0.77. HPrs-PCT at 7mL/100g/min was the only independent predictor of PH-2 (OR 1, AUC 0.68, p = 0.045.HPrs-PCT can help predict HT after tPA, and is particularly useful in identifying patients at low risk of developing HT.

  12. [Polymorphism of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene, plasminogen level and thrombosis in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aĭsina, R B; Mukhametova, L I; Ostriakova, E V; Seredavkina, N V; Patrushev, L I; Patrusheva, N L; Reshetniak, T M; Gulin, D A; Gershkovich, K B; Nasonov, E L; Varfolomeev, S D

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of venous and arterial thromboses and plasminogen level were investigated in 78 patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), 35 of whom with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE+APS) and 43 - with primary APS (PAPS). The levels and genotype of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) were determined in 45 patients with APS, of whom 21 patients with SLE + APS and 24 patients with PAPS. A control group included 10 healthy individuals without autoimmune disease signs and thromboses on period of investigation and in past history. It was shown for the first time that for one third of 67 patients with APS and thromboses high positive levels of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are associated with low plasminogen levels. The levels of PAI-1 antigen measured by ELIZA method, which detects active, latent and bound with plasminogen activator PAI-1, were opposed with frequency of thromboses in APS patients. Correlation between the high and increased levels of PAI-1 and high positive aPL levels was found for one third of 43 patients with APS and thrombosis. One of the possible mechanisms of this interconnection was considered. It was shown that arterial and, to a more extent, venous thromboses are associated with the 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene and high plasma level of the inhibitor in 79% of APS patients. At the presence of the 4G allele patients with SLE+APS had higher PAI-1 levels than patients with PAPS. The obtained results show that measuring the levels of plasminogen and PAI-1 as well as the 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene which is associated with thromboses may have the practical significance for identification of high risk of thrombosis in APS patients.

  13. Activity of Nanobins Targeted to the Urokinase Plasminogen Activator System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankins, Patrick Leon

    While innovations in nanotechnology have resulted in numerous medical advancements for the treatment of cancer, there remains an urgent unmet need for safe and efficient molecular platforms that facilitate the delivery of potent therapeutics to solid tumors. Nanoscale formulations help to overcome the poor bioavailability and systemic organ toxicity associated with many small molecule drugs. Of these nanoparticle drug delivery systems, the greatest clinical successes to date have employed simple nanoscale lipid bilayer assemblies which encase large payloads of chemotherapeutic. While the nanobin platform we have developed has seen initial success through the passive accumulation into tumors, actively targeting nanobins to tumor specific antigens has the potential to increase the therapeutic index of these nanoparticle drugs. We have identified the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and its cell surface bound receptor (uPAR) as ideal targets for drug delivery due to their selective overexpression in metastatic cancers and their important role in tumor progression. From a panel of monoclonal antibodies targeted to uPA and uPAR, we have selected ATN291 and ATN658 as lead candidates for nanobin targeting based on their tumor cell binding and ability to be internalized by cells. A novel method of conjugating antibodies to liposomes was developed for our nanobin platform that preserves the high binding affinity and specificity of these antibodies. We evaluated these uPA- and uPAR-targeted nanobins in several xenograft tumor models and found that they were well-tolerated over a wide range of doses and demonstrated significantly increased antitumor efficacy over untargeted nanobins in multiple tumor types. Preliminary studies suggest that uPA-targeted nanobins are readily internalized by tumor cells, and we believe this is the mechanism for their increased antitumor effect. A method for radiolabeling nanobins with gallium-67 was developed, and preliminary SPECT

  14. Glu- and Lys-forms of plasminogen differentially affect phosphatidylserine exposure on the platelet surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Zhernossekov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasminogen/plasmin system is known for its ability to support hemostatic balance of blood. However, plasminogen may be considered as an adhesive ligand and in this way could affect the functioning of blood cells. We showed that exogenous Lys-plasminogen, but not its Glu-form, inhibited platelet aggregation and suppressed platelet α-granule secretion. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of Glu- and Lys-form of plasminogen on the formation of platelet procoagulant surface using phosphatidylserine exposure as a marker. Human platelets were obtained from human platelet-rich plasma (donors were healthy volunteers, men aged 30-40 years by gel-filtration on Sepharose 2B. Phosphatidylserine exposure on the platelet surface was evaluated by flow cytometry with FITC-conjugated annexin A5. Glu- and Lys-plasminogen have different impact on the platelet functioning. Exogenous Lys-plasminogen has no significant effect on phosphatidylserine exposure, while Glu-plasminogen increases phosphatidylserine exposure on the surface of thrombin- and collagen-activated human platelets. Glu-plasminogen can be considered as a co-stimulator of agonist-induced platelet secretion and procoagulant surface formation. Meanwhile effects of Lys-plasminogen are probably directed at platelet-platelet interactions and not related to agonist-stimulated pro-apoptotic changes. The observed different effects of Glu- and Lys-plasminogen on phosphatidylserine exposure can be explained by their structural peculiarities.

  15. Computed tomography intravenous cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, S.; Murray, W.; Wilson, P.

    1997-01-01

    Indications for direct visualization of the bile ducts include bile duct dilatation demonstrated by ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) scanning, where the cause of the bile duct dilatation is uncertain or where the anatomy of bile duct obstruction needs further clarification. Another indication is right upper quadrant pain, particularly in a post-cholecystectomy patient, where choledocholithiasis is suspected. A possible new indication is pre-operative evaluation prior to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The bile ducts are usually studied by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), or, less commonly, trans-hepatic cholangiography. The old technique of intravenous cholangiography has fallen into disrepute because of inconsistent bile-duct opacification. The advent of spiral CT scanning has renewed interest in intravenous cholangiography. The CT technique is very sensitive to the contrast agent in the bile ducts, and angiographic and three-dimensional reconstructions of the biliary tree can readily be obtained using the CT intravenous cholangiogram technique (CT IVC). Seven patients have been studied using this CT IVC technique, between February 1995 and June 1996, and are the subject of the present report. Eight further studies have since been performed. The results suggest that CT IVC could replace ERCP as the primary means of direct cholangiography, where pancreatic duct visualization is not required. (authors)

  16. Computed tomography intravenous cholangiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, S.; Murray, W.; Wilson, P. [Pittwater Radiology, Dee Why, NSW, (Australia)

    1997-08-01

    Indications for direct visualization of the bile ducts include bile duct dilatation demonstrated by ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) scanning, where the cause of the bile duct dilatation is uncertain or where the anatomy of bile duct obstruction needs further clarification. Another indication is right upper quadrant pain, particularly in a post-cholecystectomy patient, where choledocholithiasis is suspected. A possible new indication is pre-operative evaluation prior to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The bile ducts are usually studied by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), or, less commonly, trans-hepatic cholangiography. The old technique of intravenous cholangiography has fallen into disrepute because of inconsistent bile-duct opacification. The advent of spiral CT scanning has renewed interest in intravenous cholangiography. The CT technique is very sensitive to the contrast agent in the bile ducts, and angiographic and three-dimensional reconstructions of the biliary tree can readily be obtained using the CT intravenous cholangiogram technique (CT IVC). Seven patients have been studied using this CT IVC technique, between February 1995 and June 1996, and are the subject of the present report. Eight further studies have since been performed. The results suggest that CT IVC could replace ERCP as the primary means of direct cholangiography, where pancreatic duct visualization is not required. (authors). 11 refs., 6 figs.

  17. The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein/endo180 is coexpressed with its interaction partners urokinase plasminogen activator receptor and matrix metalloprotease-13 during osteogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, L H; Nielsen, B S; Netzel-Arnett, Sarah

    2001-01-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein/Endo180 (uPARAP/Endo180) is a newly discovered member of the macrophage mannose receptor family that was reported to interact with ligand-bound urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), matrix metalloprotease-13 (MMP-13), and ...

  18. Targeting of peptide conjugated magnetic nanoparticles to urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expressing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Line; Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Nielsen, Erik Holm

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are currently being used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vivo, mainly by their passive accumulation in tissues of interest. However, a higher specificity can ideally be achieved when the nanoparticles are targeted...... towards cell specific receptors and this may also facilitate specific drug delivery by an enhanced target-mediated endocytosis. We report efficient peptide-mediated targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to cells expressing the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a surface biomarker for poor...... patient prognosis shared by several cancers including breast, colorectal, and gastric cancers. Conjugation of a uPAR specific targeting peptide onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated USPIO nanoparticles by click chemistry resulted in a five times higher uptake in vitro in a uPAR positive cell line compared...

  19. Detection of deep vein thrombosis with I-123 plasminogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smal, F.; Schonne, E.; Mahieu, P.; Verhas, M.; Schoutens, A.

    1982-01-01

    An experience with I-123 plasminogen used to investigate patients with clinically suspected deep vein thrombosis is reported. The test is efficient, not invasive and produces no discomfort on the contrary to venography. The test is not sensitive to heparine therapy since 5 thrombosis were detected in patients under heparine. Certain false positive results such as those due to Erysipelas can be foreseen by careful clinical investigation. False negative cases were due to very old thrombi or superficial thrombosis without clinical consequences

  20. Proteases induce secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werb, Z.; Aggeler, J.

    1978-04-01

    We have observed that treatment of rabbit synovial fibroblasts with proteolytic enzymes can induce secretion of collagenase (EC 3.4.24.7) and plasminogen activator (EC 3.4.21.-). Cells treated for 2 to 24 hr with plasmin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, papain, bromelain, thermolysin, or ..cap alpha..-protease but not with thrombin or neuraminidase secreted detectable amounts of collagenase within 16 to 48 hr. Treatment of fibroblasts with trypsin also induced secretion of plasminogen activator. Proteases initiated secretion of collagenase (up to 20 units per 10/sup 6/ cells per 24 hr) only when treatment produced decreased cell adhesion. Collagenase production did not depend on continued presence of proteolytic activity or on subsequent cell adhesion, spreading, or proliferation. Routine subculturing with crude trypsin also induced collagenase secretion by cells. Secretion of collagenase was prevented and normal spreading was obtained if the trypsinized cells were placed into medium containing fetal calf serum. Soybean trypsin inhibitor, ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin, bovine serum albumin, collagen, and fibronectin did not inhibit collagenase production. Although proteases that induced collagenase secretion also removed surface glycoprotein, the kinetics of induction of cell protease secretion were different from those for removal of fibronectin. Physiological inducers of secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by cells have not been identified. These results suggest that extracellular proteases in conjunction with plasma proteins may govern protease secretion by cells.

  1. Thrombin-specific inactivation of endothelial cell derived plasminogen activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highsmith, R.F.; Gallaher, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Although thrombin (T) has diverse functions in the overall hemostatic mechanism, relatively little is known about its direct effect on components of the fibrinolytic enzyme system. The authors have investigated the interaction of T with plasminogen activators (PA) derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells (EC) in culture (2-5th passage, preconfluent monolayers). Varying concentrations of purified bovine or human thrombin were added to EC-conditioned media (CM). CM + T mixtures were assayed at various times for PA activity using purified plasminogen and a sensitive 125 I-fibrinogenolytic or caseinolytic assay. T (5 nM), but not plasmin or trypsin at equivalent concentrations, resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of the PA activity in CM. T had no effect on the PA activity of urokinase, streptokinase or preformed plasmin. The ability of T to inactivate the EC-derived PA was abolished by prior treatment of T with active site-directed reagents. SDS-PAGE and zymography with copolymerized fibrinogen and plasminogen revealed further specificity in that only one of the multiple-molecular weight forms of PA present in EC-CM was inactivated by T. The authors conclude that in a highly specific fashion, T inactivates the predominant PA present in EC-CM by limited proteolysis. Thus, another potentially important function of T is suggested which may have particular significance in the temporal regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis at the blood-endothelium interface

  2. Thrombin-specific inactivation of endothelial cell derived plasminogen activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Highsmith, R.F.; Gallaher, M.J.

    1986-03-05

    Although thrombin (T) has diverse functions in the overall hemostatic mechanism, relatively little is known about its direct effect on components of the fibrinolytic enzyme system. The authors have investigated the interaction of T with plasminogen activators (PA) derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells (EC) in culture (2-5th passage, preconfluent monolayers). Varying concentrations of purified bovine or human thrombin were added to EC-conditioned media (CM). CM + T mixtures were assayed at various times for PA activity using purified plasminogen and a sensitive /sup 125/I-fibrinogenolytic or caseinolytic assay. T (5 nM), but not plasmin or trypsin at equivalent concentrations, resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of the PA activity in CM. T had no effect on the PA activity of urokinase, streptokinase or preformed plasmin. The ability of T to inactivate the EC-derived PA was abolished by prior treatment of T with active site-directed reagents. SDS-PAGE and zymography with copolymerized fibrinogen and plasminogen revealed further specificity in that only one of the multiple-molecular weight forms of PA present in EC-CM was inactivated by T. The authors conclude that in a highly specific fashion, T inactivates the predominant PA present in EC-CM by limited proteolysis. Thus, another potentially important function of T is suggested which may have particular significance in the temporal regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis at the blood-endothelium interface.

  3. Amiloride lowers blood pressure and attenuates urine plasminogen activation in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolzenburg Oxlund, Christina; Buhl, Kristian Bergholt; Jacobsen, Ib A

    2014-01-01

    In conditions with albuminuria, plasminogen is aberrantly filtered across the glomerular barrier and activated along the tubular system to plasmin. In the collecting duct, plasmin activates epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) proteolytically. Hyperactivity of ENaC could link microalbuminuria....../proteinuria to resistant hypertension. Amiloride, an ENaC inhibitor, inhibits urokinase-type plasminogen activator. We hypothesized that amiloride (1) reduces blood pressure (BP); (2) attenuates plasminogen-to-plasmin activation; and (3) inhibits urine urokinase-type plasminogen activator in patients with resistant...

  4. Intravenous lidocaine infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, G; Naranjo González, M; Calero, F

    2018-02-26

    Systemic lidocaine used in continuous infusion during the peri-operative period has analgesic, anti-hyperalgesic, as well as anti-inflammatory properties. This makes it capable of reducing the use of opioids and inhalational anaesthetics, and the early return of bowel function, and patient hospital stay. The aim of this narrative review was to highlight the pharmacology and indications for clinical application, along with new and interesting research areas. The clinical applications of peri-operative lidocaine infusion have been reviewed in several recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses in patients undergoing open and laparoscopic abdominal procedures, ambulatory procedures, and other types of surgery. Peri-operative lidocaine infusion may be a useful analgesic adjunct in enhanced recovery protocols. Potential benefits of intravenous lidocaine in chronic post-surgical pain, post-operative cognitive dysfunction, and cancer recurrence are under investigation. Due to its immunomodulation properties over surgical stress, current evidence suggests that intravenous lidocaine could be used in the context of multimodal analgesia. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Intravenous Thrombolysis in Unknown-Onset Stroke: Results From the Safe Implementation of Treatment in Stroke-International Stroke Thrombolysis Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorado, Laura; Ahmed, Niaz; Thomalla, Götz; Lozano, Manuel; Malojcic, Branko; Wani, Mushtaq; Millán, Mònica; Tomek, Ales; Dávalos, Antoni

    2017-03-01

    Stroke patients with unknown onset (UKO) are excluded from thrombolytic therapy. We aim to study the safety and efficacy of intravenous alteplase in ischemic stroke patients with UKO of symptoms compared with those treated within 4.5 hours in a large cohort. Data were analyzed from 47 237 patients with acute ischemic stroke receiving intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator in hospitals participating in the Safe Implementation of Treatment in Stroke-International Stroke Thrombolysis Registry between 2010 and 2014. Two groups were defined: (1) patients with UKO (n=502) and (2) patients treated within 4.5 hours of stroke onset (n=44 875). Outcome measures were symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage per Safe Implementation of Treatment in Stroke on the 22 to 36 hours post-treatment neuroimaging and mortality and functional outcome assessed by the modified Rankin Scale at 3 months. Patients in UKO group were significantly older, had more severe stroke at baseline, and longer door-to-needle times than patients in the ≤4.5 hours group. Logistic regression showed similar risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (adjusted odds ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.44-2.67) and no significant differences in functional independency (modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2; adjusted odds ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.56-1.10), but higher mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-2.41) in the UKO group compared with the ≤4.5 hours group. Patients treated within 4.5 hours showed reduced disability over the entire range of modified Rankin Scale compared with the UKO group (common adjusted odds ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.65). Our data suggest no excess risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage but increased mortality and reduced favorable outcome in patients with UKO stroke compared with patients treated within the approved time window. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Intravenous fluids: balancing solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorn, Ewout J

    2017-08-01

    The topic of intravenous (IV) fluids may be regarded as "reverse nephrology", because nephrologists usually treat to remove fluids rather than to infuse them. However, because nephrology is deeply rooted in fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base balance, IV fluids belong in the realm of our specialty. The field of IV fluid therapy is in motion due to the increasing use of balanced crystalloids, partly fueled by the advent of new solutions. This review aims to capture these recent developments by critically evaluating the current evidence base. It will review both indications and complications of IV fluid therapy, including the characteristics of the currently available solutions. It will also cover the use of IV fluids in specific settings such as kidney transplantation and pediatrics. Finally, this review will address the pathogenesis of saline-induced hyperchloremic acidosis, its potential effect on outcomes, and the question if this should lead to a definitive switch to balanced solutions.

  7. Intravenous versus oral etoposide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Abir Salwa; Grönberg, Malin; Langer, Seppo W.

    2018-01-01

    High-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs, G3) are aggressive cancers of the digestive system with poor prognosis and survival. Platinum-based chemotherapy (cisplatin/carboplatin + etoposide) is considered the first-line palliative treatment. Etoposide is frequently...... administered intravenously; however, oral etoposide may be used as an alternative. Concerns for oral etoposide include decreased bioavailability, inter- and intra-patient variability and patient compliance. We aimed to evaluate possible differences in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS......) in patients treated with oral etoposide compared to etoposide given as infusion. Patients (n = 236) from the Nordic NEC study were divided into three groups receiving etoposide as a long infusion (24 h, n = 170), short infusion (≤ 5 h, n = 33) or oral etoposide (n = 33) according to hospital tradition. PFS...

  8. Evidence for a novel O-linked sialylated trisaccharide on Ser-248 of human plasminogen 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirie-Shepherd, S R; Stevens, R D; Andon, N L; Enghild, J J; Pizzo, S V

    1997-03-14

    Human plasminogen, the inactive precursor of plasmin, exists in two major glycoforms. Plasminogen 1 contains an N-linked oligosaccharide at Asn-289 and an O-linked oligosaccharide at Thr-345. Plasminogen 2 is known to contain only an O-linked oligosaccharide at Thr-345. However, plasminogen 2 displays a further well documented microheterogeneity dependent on the N-acetylneuraminic acid content, which has functional consequences with regard to activation of plasminogen. The proposed structure and number of known oligosaccharide linkages in plasminogen 2 is insufficient to account for this microheterogeneity. In the present study, a combination of trypsin digestion, lectin affinity chromatography, Edman degradation amino acid sequence analysis, carbohydrate composition analysis, and mass spectrometry revealed the existence of a novel site for O-linked glycosylation on plasminogen 2 at Ser-248. Direct evidence for the structure of the carbohydrate was obtained from a combination of lectin affinity chromatography, desialylation experiments, and mass spectrometry analysis. These findings provide a structural basis for some of the observed microheterogeneity, and have implications with regard to the known functional consequences of the extent of sialylation of plasminogen.

  9. Angiostatin generating capacity and anti-tumour effects of D-penicillamine and plasminogen activators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot-Besseling, R. de; Ruers, T.J.M.; Lamers-Elemans, I.L.; Maass, C.N.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Westphal, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Upregulation of endogenous angiostatin levels may constitute a novel anti-angiogenic, and therefore anti-tumor therapy. In vitro, angiostatin generation is a two-step process, starting with the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin by plasminogen activators (PAs). Next, plasmin excises

  10. Plasma soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in children with urinary tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittenhagen, Per; Andersen, Jesper Brandt; Hansen, Anita

    2011-01-01

    In this prospective study we investigated the role of plasma levels of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) in children with urinary tract infection.......In this prospective study we investigated the role of plasma levels of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) in children with urinary tract infection....

  11. Stability of the Octameric Structure Affects Plasminogen-Binding Capacity of Streptococcal Enolase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ruby H. P.; Casey, Lachlan W.; Valkov, Eugene; Bertozzi, Carlo; Stamp, Anna; Jovcevski, Blagojce; Aquilina, J. Andrew; Whisstock, James C.; Walker, Mark J.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen). Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN) is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen) on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen) binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen) to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen) binding and activation. PMID:25807546

  12. Urokinase plasminogen activator cleaves its cell surface receptor releasing the ligand-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E; Solberg, H.

    1992-01-01

    The cellular receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) is a glycolipid-anchored three-domain membrane protein playing a central role in pericellular plasminogen activation. We have found that urokinase (uPA) can cleave its receptor between domains 1 and 2 generating a cell-associat...

  13. Stability of the octameric structure affects plasminogen-binding capacity of streptococcal enolase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Cork

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen. Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen binding and activation.

  14. Immunohistochemical analysis of the gingiva with periodontitis of type I plasminogen deficiency compared to gingiva with gingivitis and periodontitis and healthy gingiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulus Waschulewski, Idil; Gökbuget, Aslan Y; Christiansen, Nina M; Ziegler, Maike; Schuster, Volker; Wahl, Gerhard; Götz, Werner

    2016-12-01

    Type I plasminogen deficiency (Plgdef) is an uncommon chronic inflammation of mucous membranes. Gingival enlargements usually proceed with progressive periodontal destruction and tooth-loss. Plasmin(ogen)-independent enzymatic mechanisms for fibrin clearance have already been discussed in the literature. Our primary objective was to verify, immunohistochemically, the occurrence of different enzymatic factors involved in tissue breakdown of inflamed compared to healthy gingiva. Secondly, we tried to find out, if these patients have a similar microbiological profile to the patients with known gingivitis and periodontitis. Immunohistochemical analysis of enzymes elastase, plasminogen (plg), cathepsin G, matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 and MMP-7 and of glycoprotein fibrinogen were performed with gingival tissues from 3 healthy controls, 8 patients with Plgdef and 3 patients with gingivitis and periodontitis. Furthermore, plaque from 5 patients with plasminogen deficiency were also obtained to determine the microbiological profile. Significantly high numbers of elastase positive leukocytes were detected in all samples. Staining for MMP-3 and MMP-7 was seen in samples with gingivitis and periodontitis with a stronger staining in samples with periodontitis by Plgdef. Fibrinogen was detectable in all samples. Staining for plg was stronger in samples with periodontitis than in other samples. Staining for cathepsin G was weak in gingivitis and periodontitis. Subgingival microbial flora showed elevated colony forming units of Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens, Fusobacterium spp., Eikenella corrodens, Porphyromonas gingivalis and viridans streptococci. Strong staining of elastase, MMP-3 and MMP-7 and weak staining of plg in Plgdef samples supports the plasmin(ogen) - independent fibrin clearance. Similar subgingival microbiological flora was observed in periodontitis with Plgdef as in other periodontal diseases. Further investigations should determine the exact pathomechanism

  15. Plasminogen: A cellular protein cofactor for PrPSc propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Mays, Charles E; Ryou, Chongsuk

    2011-01-01

    The biochemical essence of prion replication is the molecular multiplication of the disease-associated misfolded isoform of prion protein (PrP), termed PrPSc, in a nucleic acid-free manner. PrPSc is generated by the protein misfolding process facilitated by conformational conversion of the host-encoded cellular PrP to PrPSc. Evidence suggests that an auxiliary factor may play a role in PrPSc propagation. We and others previously discovered that plasminogen interacts with PrP, while its functi...

  16. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor during allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haastrup, E; Andersen, J; Ostrowski, S R

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have found that soluble urokinase plasminogen activation receptor (suPAR) increases during inflammatory and malignant illness and elevated suPAR levels may be associated with poor clinical outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate plasma levels of suPAR during...... to pretreatment levels. High suPAR levels at day 0 were associated with increased mortality (P = 0.011). The present study found increased suPAR levels during the conditioning in SCT patients. Further, the data indicated that increased suPAR levels may be associated with increased mortality, suggesting su...

  17. Plasminogen controls inflammation and pathogenesis of influenza virus infections via fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berri, Fatma; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Hanss, Michel; Albina, Emmanuel; Foucault-Grunenwald, Marie-Laure; Lê, Vuong B; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E; Gil, Patrica; Camerer, Eric; Martinez, Dominique; Lina, Bruno; Lijnen, Roger; Carmeliet, Peter; Riteau, Béatrice

    2013-03-01

    Detrimental inflammation of the lungs is a hallmark of severe influenza virus infections. Endothelial cells are the source of cytokine amplification, although mechanisms underlying this process are unknown. Here, using combined pharmacological and gene-deletion approaches, we show that plasminogen controls lung inflammation and pathogenesis of infections with influenza A/PR/8/34, highly pathogenic H5N1 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Reduction of virus replication was not responsible for the observed effect. However, pharmacological depletion of fibrinogen, the main target of plasminogen reversed disease resistance of plasminogen-deficient mice or mice treated with an inhibitor of plasminogen-mediated fibrinolysis. Therefore, plasminogen contributes to the deleterious inflammation of the lungs and local fibrin clot formation may be implicated in host defense against influenza virus infections. Our studies suggest that the hemostatic system might be explored for novel treatments against influenza.

  18. Plasminogen controls inflammation and pathogenesis of influenza virus infections via fibrinolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Berri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Detrimental inflammation of the lungs is a hallmark of severe influenza virus infections. Endothelial cells are the source of cytokine amplification, although mechanisms underlying this process are unknown. Here, using combined pharmacological and gene-deletion approaches, we show that plasminogen controls lung inflammation and pathogenesis of infections with influenza A/PR/8/34, highly pathogenic H5N1 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Reduction of virus replication was not responsible for the observed effect. However, pharmacological depletion of fibrinogen, the main target of plasminogen reversed disease resistance of plasminogen-deficient mice or mice treated with an inhibitor of plasminogen-mediated fibrinolysis. Therefore, plasminogen contributes to the deleterious inflammation of the lungs and local fibrin clot formation may be implicated in host defense against influenza virus infections. Our studies suggest that the hemostatic system might be explored for novel treatments against influenza.

  19. Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1 in breast cancer - correlation with traditional prognostic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lampelj Maja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1 play a key role in tumour invasion and metastasis. High levels of both proteolytic enzymes are associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between traditional prognostic factors and uPA and PAI-1 expression in primary tumour of breast cancer patients.

  20. Ultrasonography versus intravenous urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslaksen, A.

    1991-01-01

    The present study was performed to compare the clinical value of urography and ultrasonography in a non-selected group of patients referred for urography to a university hospital. The conslusions and clinical implications of the study are as follows: Intravenous urography remains the cornerstone imaging examination in the evaluation of ureteral calculi. Ultrasonography is a valuable adjunct in cases of non- visualization of the kidneys, in distal obstruction and known contrast media allergy. When women with recurrent urinary tract infection are referred for imaging of the urinary tract, ultrasonography should be used. Ultrasonography should replace urography for screening of non-acute hydronephrosis like in female genital cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia. There is good correlation between urography and ultrasonography in assessing the degree of hydronephrosis. However, more researh on the relationship between hydronephrosis and obstruction is necessary. Ultrasonography should be used as the only imaging method of the upper urinary tract in patients with microscopic hematuria. In patients less than 50 years with macroscopic hematuria, ultrasonography should be used as the only imaging of the upper urinary tract, and an examination of the urinary bladder should be included. In patients over 50 years, urography supplied with ultrasonography should be used, but more research is necessary on the subject of imaging method and age. 158 refs

  1. Biochemical Importance of Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gils, Ann; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Skottrup, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a potential target for anti-thrombotic and anti-cancer therapy. PAI-1 has 3 potential sites for N-linked glycosylation. We demonstrate here that PAI-1 expressed recombinantly or naturally by human cell lines display a heterogeneous glycosyla......The serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a potential target for anti-thrombotic and anti-cancer therapy. PAI-1 has 3 potential sites for N-linked glycosylation. We demonstrate here that PAI-1 expressed recombinantly or naturally by human cell lines display a heterogeneous...... with the glycosylation sites could be excluded as explanation for the differential reactivity. The latency transition of non-glycosylated, but not of glycosylated PAI-1, was strongly accelerated by a non-ionic detergent. The different biochemical properties of glycosylated and non-glycosylated PAI-1 depended...... specifically on glycosylation of either one or the other of the utilised sites. The PAI-1-binding protein vitronectin reversed the changes associated with the lack of glycosylation at one of the sites. Our results stress the importance of the source of PAI-1 when studying the mechanisms of action of PAI-1...

  2. Two distinct expression patterns of urokinase, urokinase receptor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in colon cancer liver metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illemann, Martin; Bird, Nigel; Majeed, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Metastatic growth and invasion by colon cancer cells in the liver requires the ability of the cancer cells to interact with the new tissue environment. Plasmin(ogen) is activated on cell surfaces by urokinase-type PA (uPA), and is regulated by uPAR and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1......). To compare the expression patterns of uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 in colon cancer with that in their liver metastases, we analysed matched samples from 14 patients. In all 14 primary colon cancers, we found upregulation of uPAR, uPA mRNA and PAI-1 in primarily stromal cells at the invasive front. In 5 of the 14......, whereas 8 of the remaining 9 showed direct contact between the cancer cells and the liver parenchyma. We conclude that there are 2 distinct patterns of expression of uPAR, uPA and PAI-1 in colon cancer liver metastases and that these correlate closely with 2 morphological growth patterns. These findings...

  3. Antibody-mediated Targeting of the Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Proteolytic Function Neutralizes Fibrinolysis in Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ida K.; Jögi, Annika; Rono, Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    models, we have now developed murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against murine uPA by immunization of uPA-deficient mice with the recombinant protein. Guided by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blotting, surface plasmon resonance, and enzyme kinetic analyses, we have selected two...... highly potent and inhibitory anti-uPA mAbs (mU1 and mU3). Both mAbs recognize epitopes located on the B-chain of uPA that encompasses the catalytic site. In enzyme activity assays in vitro, mU1 blocked uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation as well as plasmin-mediated pro-uPA activation, whereas mU3 only...... fibrinolysis in tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA)-deficient mice, resulting in a phenotype mimicking that of uPA;tPA double deficient mice. Importantly, this is the first report demonstrating specific antagonist-directed targeting of mouse uPA at the enzyme activity level in a normal physiological...

  4. Plasminogen Deficiency Delays the Onset and Protects from Demyelination and Paralysis in Autoimmune Neuroinflammatory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Maureen A; Gao, Zhen; McElhinney, Kathryn E; Thornton, Sherry; Flick, Matthew J; Lane, Adam; Degen, Jay L; Ryu, Jae Kyu; Akassoglou, Katerina; Mullins, Eric S

    2017-04-05

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neuroinflammatory, demyelinating disease of the CNS. Fibrinogen deposition at sites of blood-brain barrier breakdown is a prominent feature of neuroinflammatory disease and contributes to disease severity. Plasminogen, the primary fibrinolytic enzyme, also modifies inflammatory processes. We used a murine model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), to evaluate the hypothesis that the loss of plasminogen would exacerbate neuroinflammatory disease. However, contrary to initial expectations, EAE-challenged plasminogen-deficient (Plg - ) mice developed significantly delayed disease onset and reduced disease severity compared with wild-type (Plg + ) mice. Similarly, pharmacologic inhibition of plasmin activation with tranexamic acid also delayed disease onset. The T-cell response to immunization was similar between genotypes, suggesting that the contribution of plasminogen was downstream of the T-cell response. Spinal cords from EAE-challenged Plg - mice demonstrated significantly decreased demyelination and microglial/macrophage accumulation compared with Plg + mice. Although fibrinogen-deficient mice or mice with combined deficiencies of plasminogen and fibrinogen had decreased EAE severity, they did not exhibit the delay in EAE disease onset, as seen in mice with plasminogen deficiency alone. Together, these data suggest that plasminogen and plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis is a key modifier of the onset of neuroinflammatory demyelination. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Multiple sclerosis is a severe, chronic, demyelinating disease. Understanding the pathobiology related to the autoreactive T-cell and microglial/macrophage demyelinating response is critical to effectively target therapeutics. We describe for the first time that deficiency of plasminogen, the key fibrinolytic enzyme, delays disease onset and protects from the development of the paralysis associated with a murine model of multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune

  5. Intravenous pyogenic granuloma or intravenous lobular capillary hemangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghekiere, Olivier; Galant, Christine; Berg, Bruno Vande [Cliniques Universitaires St. Luc, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-06-01

    Lobular capillary hemangioma is a vascular neoplasm that commonly occurs as a cutaneous tumor. When it involves the skin and mucosal surfaces, ulceration and suppuration may occur, hence the classic term of pyogenic granuloma. Intravenous pyogenic granuloma is a rare solitary form of lobular capillary hemangioma that usually occurs in the veins of the neck and upper extremities. We report the ultrasonographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a pyogenic intravenous granuloma localized in the right cephalic vein. The imaging and pathological findings and the differential diagnoses are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Components of the Plasminogen-Plasmin System as Biologic Markers for Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Brandon J; Kwaan, Hau C

    2015-01-01

    Members of the plasminogen-plasmin (PP) system participate in many physiologic functions. In particular, uPA, its receptor (uPAR) and its inhibitor PAI-1 play an important role in cell migration, cell proliferation and tissue remodeling. Through a number of interactions, these components of the PP system are also involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In cancer, they modulate the essential processes of tumor development, growth, invasion and metastasis as well as angiogenesis and fibrosis. Thus, quantification of uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 in tumors and, in some cases in the circulating blood, became of potential value in the prognostication of many types of cancer. These include cancer of the breast, stomach, colon and rectum, esophagus, pancreas, glioma, lung, kidney, prostate, uterine cervix, ovary, liver and bone. Published data are reviewed in this chapter. Clinical validation of the prognostic value has also been made, particularly in cancer of the breast. Inclusion of these biomarkers in the risk assessment of cancer patients is now considered in the risk-adapted management in carcinoma of the breast. Factors limiting its broader use are discussed with suggestions how these can be overcome. Hopefully the use of these biomarkers will be applied to other types of cancer in the near future.

  7. Isolation and characterization of the rat plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzdzinski, C J; Riordan-Johnson, M; Nordby, E C; Suter, S M; Gelehrter, T D

    1990-02-05

    We have reported that glucocorticoids and cyclic nucleotides regulate tissue-type plasminogen activator activity in HTC rat hepatoma cells primarily by modulating plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) gene expression. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying this hormonal regulation, we have cloned the rat PAI-1 gene from an HTC genomic library. The gene is approximately 10.5 kilobases (kb) in size and is comprised of nine exons and eight introns. Comparison of this gene with the human PAI-1 gene (Bosma, P. J., van den Berg, E., Kooistra, T., Siemieniak, D. R., and Slightom, J. L. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 9129-9141) revealed strict conservation of the exon-intron structure. The start site of transcription is identical to that in the human PAI-1 gene. The complete nucleotide sequence of the rat PAI-1 gene, including 2.4 kb of 5'- and 1 kb of 3'-flanking DNA, has been determined. Two regions in the 5'-flanking sequence of the rat PAI-1 gene show a high degree of similarity to sequences in the upstream region of the human PAI-1 gene: a 60-base pair region from -90 to the TATA box (90% identical), and a more distal sequence located at -753 to -510 (greater than 80% identical). Both of these regions have been shown to be involved in the glucocorticoid regulation of expression of the human PAI-1 gene (van Zonneveld, A.-J., Curriden, S. A., and Loskutoff, D. J. (1988) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 85, 5525-5529), although neither region contains the hexamer consensus sequence for glucocorticoid response elements. Five putative glucocofticoid response elements, 100% identical to the hexamer consensus sequence, were identified in the 5'-flanking region of the rat gene, none of which is present in the regions of sequence similarity. Seven putative cyclic AMP response elements that are 75% identical to the octamer consensus sequence are located upstream of the rat gene. There is only one such sequence within the 5'-flanking region of the human gene; however

  8. Simvastatin suppresses dexamethasone-induced secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in human bone marrow adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baba Hideo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a common complication of high-dose glucocorticoid treatment. Intravascular thrombosis is thought to be associated with the ischemic state of the femoral head. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 is an adipokine, which are physiologically active substances secreted from visceral and subcutaneous adipocytes. PAI-1 suppresses fibrinolysis by binding tissue-type plasminogen activator. Several reports have described the relationship between PAI-1 and steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head, and the preventive effects of lipid-lowering agents (statins against steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head. We previously reported that adipokines and dexamethasone induced PAI-1 secretion from bone marrow adipocytes. The purpose of the present study is to examine the effects of simvastatin on PAI-1 secretion from human bone marrow adipocytes in vitro. Methods Primary bone marrow adipocytes were extracted from collagenase-treated bone marrow fluid obtained from the femoral necks of 40 patients (6 men, 34 women; age range, 52-81 years undergoing hip joint replacement surgery. After suspended culture with or without dexamethasone or simvastatin, PAI-1 mRNA expression was assessed by real-time RT-PCR. Total PAI-1 protein secretion in culture medium was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results PAI-1 mRNA expression was up-regulated by 388% (P = 0.002 with dexamethasone, and down-regulated by 45% (P = 0.002 with simvastatin, as compared to control levels. Dexamethasone increased total PAI-1 secretion by 166% (P = 0.001 and simvastatin decreased total PAI-1 secretion by 64% (P = 0.002. No significant changes were observed in adiponectin mRNA expression and secretion by dexamethasone and simvastatin, while pre-treatment with simvastatin reversed dexamethasone induced PAI-1 secretion by 89%, as compared to control levels. Conclusion The present study confirmed the suppressive

  9. Ceftaroline fosamil: just another intravenous antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Various antibiotics, especially cephalosporins, are used for empirical treatment of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalisation and intravenous treatment, and for serious infections of the skin and soft tissues. When the infection is caused by bacteria that are resistant to common antibiotics, some antibiotics such as vancomycin are available. Ceftaroline (Zinforo, AstraZeneca) is a new cephalosporin intended for intravenous administration (as ceftaroline fosamil). It is authorised for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and for serious infections of the skin and soft tissues. In two double-blind, randomised trials of ceftaroline versus ceftriaxone (a cephalosporin), ceftaroline showed no advantage in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Note that the results of these trials are undermined by the use of a suboptimal dose of ceftriaxone. Ceftaroline has not been evaluated versus a first-line treatment for serious skin infections. It has been compared with second-line antibiotics in patients with serious skin infections in four randomised trials. None of these trials showed that ceftaroline has superior efficacy. The known adverse effect profile of ceftaroline is similar to that of all cephalosporins, and comprises hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis) and gastrointestinal disorders (including rare cases of pseudomembranous colitis). A possible excess of haematological and renal adverse effects has also been raised. Given the absence of relevant data, it is best to avoid using ceftaroline during pregnancy. In practice, there is no proof that ceftaroline represents a therapeutic advance for patients with community-acquired pneumonia warranting hospitalisation or with serious skin or soft-tissue infections. It is best to stick with better-known antibiotics.

  10. Expression and activity of the urokinase plasminogen activator system in canine primary brain tumors

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    Rossmeisl JH

    2017-04-01

    -time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses, and by the assay of the activity of uPA using casein–plasminogen zymography.Results: Expression of uPAR was observed in multiple tumoral microenvironmental niches, including neoplastic cells, stroma, and the vasculature of canine brain tumors. Relative to normal brain tissues, uPAR protein and mRNA expression were significantly greater in canine meningiomas, gliomas, and choroid plexus tumors. Increased activity of uPA was documented in all tumor types.Conclusions: uPAR is overexpressed and uPA activity increased in canine meningiomas, gliomas, and choroid plexus tumors. This study illustrates the potential of uPAR/uPA molecularly targeted approaches for canine brain tumor therapeutics and reinforces the translational significance of canines with spontaneous brain tumors as models for human disease. Keywords: brain tumor, neuro-oncology, dog, animal model, protease, meningioma, glioma

  11. Effect of panax notoginseng saponins on efficacy and hemorrhagic transformation of rt-PA intravenous thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke

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    Chun-sheng LI

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the effect of panax notoginseng saponins (PNS on the efficacy and hemorrhagic transformation (HT of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA intravenous thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke.  Methods A total of 200 patients with early acute ischemic stroke (the length of time between attack and hospital admission < 4.50 h were divided into 2 groups according to random number table method: treatment group (N = 100 and control group (N = 100. The control group was treated with routine rt-PA intravenous thrombolysis treatment, and the treatment group was treated with rt-PA intravenous thrombolysis plus PNS injection. The ischemia-reperfusion injury index [malondialdehyde (MDA and superoxide dismutase (SOD], hemorrhagic transformation prediction index [matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 and fibronectin (FN] and nerve function index [National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS and Barthel Index (BI] were measured and compared before treatment, 24 h after thrombolysis and 14 d after thrombolysis. Adverse drug reactions and hemorrhagic transformation rate were observed 14 d after thrombolysis, and the prognosis (mortality and BI was evaluated 12 months after thrombolysis.  Results Compared with control group, serum SOD (P = 0.000 and BI (P = 0.000 in treatment group were significantly higher, while serum MDA (P = 0.001, MMP-9 (P = 0.001, plasma FN (P = 0.000 and NIHSS score (P = 0.006 were significantly lower. In treatment group, 24 h after rt-PA intravenous thrombolysis plus PNS injection, serum MDA (P = 0.000, MMP-9 (P = 0.000 and BI (P = 0.000 were significantly increased, while NIHSS score (P = 0.000 was significantly decreased; 14 d after treatment, serum MDA (P = 0.000 and MMP-9 (P = 0.000 were decreased, serum SOD (P = 0.000 and BI (P = 0.000 were continuously increased, plasma FN (P = 0.000 and NIHSS score (P = 0.000 were continuously decreased. On the 14th day after thrombolysis

  12. Orthostatic stability with intravenous levodopa

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    Shan H. Siddiqi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous levodopa has been used in a multitude of research studies due to its more predictable pharmacokinetics compared to the oral form, which is used frequently as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD. Levodopa is the precursor for dopamine, and intravenous dopamine would strongly affect vascular tone, but peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors are intended to block such effects. Pulse and blood pressure, with orthostatic changes, were recorded before and after intravenous levodopa or placebo—after oral carbidopa—in 13 adults with a chronic tic disorder and 16 tic-free adult control subjects. Levodopa caused no statistically or clinically significant changes in blood pressure or pulse. These data add to previous data that support the safety of i.v. levodopa when given with adequate peripheral inhibition of DOPA decarboxylase.

  13. Relationship between plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms and osteoporosis in Turkish women

    OpenAIRE

    Ozgen, Merih; Cosan, Didem Turgut; Doganer, Fulya; Soyocak, Ahu; Armagan, Onur; Gunes, Hasan Veysi; Degirmenci, Irfan; Ozkara, Gulsah Ogutler; Mutlu, Fezan Sahin

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The development of osteoporosis is associated with several risk factors, such as genetic structures that affect bone turnover and bone mass. The impact of genetic structures on osteoporosis is not known. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 regulates the bone matrix and bone balance. This study assessed the correlation between plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 gene 4G/5G polymorphisms and osteoporosis in a population of Turkish women. METHODS: A total of 195 postmenopausal f...

  14. Overexpression of SERBP1 (Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 RNA binding protein in human breast cancer is correlated with favourable prognosis

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    Serce Nuran Bektas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1 overexpression is an important prognostic and predictive biomarker in human breast cancer. SERBP1, a protein that is supposed to regulate the stability of PAI-1 mRNA, may play a role in gynaecological cancers as well, since upregulation of SERBP1 was described in ovarian cancer recently. This is the first study to present a systematic characterisation of SERBP1 expression in human breast cancer and normal breast tissue at both the mRNA and the protein level. Methods Using semiquantitative realtime PCR we analysed SERBP1 expression in different normal human tissues (n = 25, and in matched pairs of normal (n = 7 and cancerous breast tissues (n = 7. SERBP1 protein expression was analysed in two independent cohorts on tissue microarrays (TMAs, an initial evaluation set, consisting of 193 breast carcinomas and 48 normal breast tissues, and a second large validation set, consisting of 605 breast carcinomas. In addition, a collection of benign (n = 2 and malignant (n = 6 mammary cell lines as well as breast carcinoma lysates (n = 16 were investigated for SERBP1 expression by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, applying non-radioisotopic in situ hybridisation a subset of normal (n = 10 and cancerous (n = 10 breast tissue specimens from the initial TMA were analysed for SERBP1 mRNA expression. Results SERBP1 is not differentially expressed in breast carcinoma compared to normal breast tissue, both at the RNA and protein level. However, recurrence-free survival analysis showed a significant correlation (P = 0.008 between abundant SERBP1 expression in breast carcinoma and favourable prognosis. Interestingly, overall survival analysis also displayed a tendency (P = 0.09 towards favourable prognosis when SERBP1 was overexpressed in breast cancer. Conclusions The RNA-binding protein SERBP1 is abundantly expressed in human breast cancer and may represent a

  15. Acute Forefoot Phlegmon - A Complication of Intravenous Heroin-Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, Uwe; Lotti, Torello; Tchernev, Georgi

    2018-01-25

    Infections of the skin and soft tissues (SSTI) are clinical entities with variable presentations, causes, and levels of clinical severity. They are frequent in emergency departments. The most common pathogen in the Western World is Staphylococcus aureus . SSTI may provide a hint to underlying pathologies such as diabetes and other states of immune compromise. Here we present a 41-year-old non-diabetic male patient with pain and swelling of the left forefoot but not any recent trauma. Microbiology identified streptococci. The medical history was positive for intravenous heroin abuse. The diagnosis of forefoot phlegm due to drug addition was confirmed. Treatment was realised by a combination of intravenous antibiosis and drainage. Intravenous drug addiction is a significant risk factor for SSTI.

  16. Intravenous urography and childhood trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Okorie, N. M.; MacKinnon, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Results of intravenous urography (IVU) in 33 patients suspected of suffering from renal trauma were reviewed. It was concluded that when haematuria is only detected microscopically and clears within 24 hr then an IVU is not necessary, in the absence of other evidence of significant urinary tract injury.

  17. Studies on the distribution of radioactivity in the organism during constant intravenous infusion of tracer amino acids and on the calculation of the rate of tissue protein synthesis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, O.; Bergner, H.; Wolf, E.

    1978-01-01

    Male wistar rats (100 p body weight) were infused into the tail vein with 14 C-leucine and 14 C-lysine simultaneously for 0.5; 1.0; 2.0; 3.0; 4.5; 6.0 and 7.0 hours. At the end of the infusion the specific radioactivity was determined of the free leucine and lysine in the blood plasma, liver, M. gastrocnemius, small intestine, and colon as well as of the protein-bound leucine and lysine. In all the tissues tested the specific radioactivity of the free amino acids attained a plateau during the 6-hour and 7-hour infusions. The rate constants for the increase were calculated for each organ tested. The two amino acids used are suitable for calculating the fractional rate of protein synthesis in tissues. The values of the fractional rate of protein synthesis calculated on the basis of the 6-hour and 7-hour infusions were: 54+-7.7%/day for the liver, 9.4+-1.2%/day for the muscles, 89+-12.2%/day for the small intestine, and 42+-5.9%/day for the colon. The simultaneous application of two tracer amino acids is recommendable for estimating the precursor pool of the protein synthesis and the more accurate calculation of the rate of protein synthesis. (author)

  18. Determining Human Clot Lysis Time (in vitro with Plasminogen/Plasmin from Four Species (Human, Bovine, Goat, and Swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omaira Cañas Bermúdez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, including failures in the plasminogen/plasmin system which is an important factor in poor lysis of blood clots. This article studies the fibrinolytic system in four species of mammals, and it identifies human plasminogen with highest thrombolysis efficiency. It examines plasminogen from four species (human, bovine, goat, and swine and identifies the most efficient one in human clot lysis in vitro. All plasminogens were identically purified by affinity chromatography. Human fibrinogen was purified by fractionation with ethanol. The purification of both plasminogen and fibrinogen was characterized by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE (10%. Human clot formation in vitro and its dissolution by plasminogen/plasmin consisted of determining lysis time from clot formation to its dilution. Purification of proteins showed greater than 95% purity, human plasminogen showed greater ability to lyse clot than animal plasminogen. The article concludes that human plasminogen/plasmin has the greatest catalysis and efficiency, as it dissolves human clot up to three times faster than that of irrational species.

  19. The role of the plasminogen activating system in the proteolytic and phagocytic clearance of non-viable cells

    OpenAIRE

    Borg, Rachael Jade

    2017-01-01

    The plasminogen activator (PA) system is an enzymatic cascade involved in the breakdown of fibrin, the structural component of a blood clot. tPA co-localises with plasminogen on the fibrin surface via C-terminal lysine residues, leading to the generation of plasmin and subsequent fibrin removal. In this thesis, both tPA and plasminogen were shown to interact with proteins in non-viable cells. Analogous to fibrinolysis, plasminogen binding, but not tPA binding was lysine dependent. Hence, t...

  20. Role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in senescence and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Mesut; Boe, Amanda E; Klyachko, Ekaterina A; Vaughan, Douglas E

    2014-09-01

    The average age of the US population continues to increase. Age is the most important determinant of disease and disability in humans, but the fundamental mechanisms of aging remain largely unknown. Many age-related diseases are associated with an impaired fibrinolytic system. Elevated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels are reported in age-associated clinical conditions including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, obesity and inflammation. PAI-1 levels are also elevated in animal models of aging. While the association of PAI-1 with physiological aging is well documented, it is only recently that its critical role in the regulation of aging and senescence has become evident. PAI-1 is synthesized and secreted in senescent cells and contributes directly to the development of senescence by acting downstream of p53 and upstream of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3. Pharmacologic inhibition or genetic deficiency of PAI-1 was shown to be protective against senescence and the aging-like phenotypes in kl/kl and N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester-treated wild-type mice. Further investigation into PAI-1's role in senescence and aging will likely contribute to the prevention and treatment of aging-related pathologies. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. [Studies on the metabolic fate of isepamicin sulfate (HAPA-B). III. Intramuscular, intravenous and drip intravenous administration of HAPA-B in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T; Somiya, Y; Shirai, M; Sakai, A; Iwasaki, M; Morishita, M

    1987-01-01

    Absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of isepamicin sulfate (HAPA-B) were studied following intramuscular, intravenous and drip intravenous administration at doses of 6.25, 25 and 100 mg/kg to rabbits. Plasma concentrations of HAPA-B following intramuscular, intravenous and drip intravenous administration depended on dose levels. Biological half-lives (T1/2), body clearance (Clt) and areas under plasma concentration-time curves (AUC) for different routes of administration were similar in all 3 routes. A theoretical curve for drug concentrations vs. time was obtained using pharmacokinetic parameters calculated from drug concentrations in plasma following a 45-minute drip intravenous administration. From the curve, it was estimated that 60 to 90 minutes would be required to achieve a similar maximum drug concentration in plasma by drip intravenous administration to that obtained by intramuscular administration. Thus, drug concentration patterns obtained following intramuscular administration could be duplicated in drip intravenous administration by regulating the length of time for infusion. The concentration of HAPA-B in tissues obtained following a 15-minute drip intravenous administration reached maximum after 15 minutes at a level higher than that achieved by intramuscular administration, but an hour later, concentrations in tissues including the kidney decreased to similar levels obtained following intramuscular administration and patterns of concentration decrease for drip intravenous administration and intramuscular administration were quite similar to each other thereafter. The drug was rapidly excreted into the urine following any of the 3 routes, and urinary recoveries in 24 hours were 75 approximately 92% of dose amounts for all dose levels tested. Bioautograms on thin-layer chromatographs of 0 approximately 6 hours urine samples obtained following an intramuscular administration of the drug showed a single biologically active bands with

  2. Studies on the distribution of radioactivity in the organism and rate of incorporation of radioactivity into the tissue proteins of monogastric animals after intravenous injection of tracer amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, O.; Muenchmeyer, R.; Bergner, H.; Zebrowska, T.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive amino acids ( 14 C leucine and 3 H lysine) were administrated to pigs by means of a catheter tube into the jugular vein. Subsequently, the time pattern of the distribution of the specific amino acid radioactivity was followed in the TCE soluble and TCE precipitable fractions of the blood plasma (TCE = trichloroacetic acid). Rats were injected 14 C into the portal vein. The animals were killed after incorporation periods of 2 to 60 minutes, and the levels of specific radioactivity were estimated in the TCE soluble and TCE precipitable fractions of the blood plasma, in the liver and in the skeletal muscles. The experimental results indicated that the specific radioactivity of the tracer amino acids and the rate of incorporation of radioactivity into tissue proteins were influenced by the size of the free amino acid pool within the range of distribution of the tracer. An estimation of the magnitude of the pool of free amino acids within the distribution range of the tracer can be obtained from the curve pattern for the decline of specific radioactivity of the corresponding free amino acid in the blood plasma. This pool exhibits a high rate of turnover. In all studies made to evaluate in vivo processes of protein synthesis using radioactive tracer amino acids it will be particularly important that consideration is given to the specific radioactivity of the amino acid in the precursor pool for protein synthesis. (author)

  3. Laminin and estradiol regulation of the plasminogen-activator system in MCF-7 breast-carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonohara, S; Mira-y-Lopez, R; Brentani, M M

    1998-03-30

    We have investigated the effects of laminin, on the plasminogen-activator system of MCF-7 breast-carcinoma cells. MCF-7 cells were incubated on plastic or laminin-coated wells, and medium and cell lysate aliquots were assayed for tissue-type (tPA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) by a chromogenic assay in combination with anti-uPA antibodies. Cells cultured on laminin displayed a 5-fold increase in tPA activity and a 2-fold decrease in uPA activity relative to cells on plastic. These effects could be mimicked by laminin fragment P1 but not by collagen I or fibronectin. tPA activity of cells treated with estradiol (10 nM) was 3-fold higher, that of cells on laminin treated with estradiol was 15-fold higher, than that of control. Northern-blot analysis showed that tPA mRNA levels were up-regulated by estradiol and laminin, whereas PAI-1 mRNA levels were down-regulated by laminin and not affected by E2. Concomitant treatment with laminin and estradiol, decreased PAI-1 mRNA and increased tPA mRNA levels, accounting for the synergistic increase in tPA activity. Laminin exerted only a modest (approx. 2-fold) inhibitory effect on uPA mRNA levels. In the breast-carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231, down-regulation of PAI-1 and uPA mRNA by laminin was not observed. Adhesion assays indicated that alpha2beta1 is the predominant receptor for laminin in MCF-7 cells. MDA-MB-231 cells expressed alpha2 (54%) but this integrin is not used as a laminin receptor. These results support a role for alpha2beta1 in mediating interactions of MCF-7 with LN.

  4. Myocardial Production of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 is Associated with Coronary Endothelial and Ventricular Dysfunction after Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takuya; Uematsu, Manabu; Yoshizaki, Toru; Obata, Jun-Ei; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Fujioka, Daisuke; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Yosuke; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2016-05-02

    Although plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is abundantly expressed in infarcted myocardium, the pathogenic role of myocardial PAI-1 remains unknown. This study examined whether PAI-1 in the infarcted lesion contributes to coronary endothelial dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Plasma levels of PAI-1 activity and tissue-plasminogen activator (tPA) antigen were measured 2 weeks and 6 months after MI by ELISA in plasma obtained from the aortic root (AO) and anterior interventricular vein (AIV) in 28 patients with a first AMI due to occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Coronary blood flow responses in LAD to intracoronary infusion of acetylcholine (ACh) and left ventriculography were measured at the same time points: 2 weeks and 6 months after MI. The trans-myocardial gradient of PAI-1 from AO to AIV, reflecting production/release of PAI-1 in the infarcted lesion, was inversely correlated with the coronary blood flow response to ACh 6 months after MI (r=-0.43, p=0.02) and with the percentage change in LV regional motion in the LAD territory from 2 weeks to 6 months after MI (r=-0.38, p=0.04). The trans-myocardial gradient of tPA level showed no significant correlations. PAI-1 produced in the infarcted myocardium and released into the coronary circulation is associated with endothelial dysfunction in resistance vessels of the infarct-related coronary arteries and with progressive dysfunction of the infarcted region of the left ventricle in AMI survivors.

  5. Intravenous Antiepileptic Drugs in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Vlasov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Launching four intravenous antiepileptic drugs: valproate (Depakene and Convulex, lacosamide (Vimpat, and levetiracetam (Keppra – into the Russian market has significantly broadened the possibilities of rendering care to patients in seizure emergency situations. The chemi- cal structure, mechanisms of action, indications/contraindications, clinical effectiveness and tolerability, advantages/disadvantages, and adverse events of using these drugs in urgent and elective neurology are discussed. 

  6. Muscle power during intravenous sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Matsuura

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous sedation is effective to reduce fear and anxiety in dental treatment. It also has been used for behavior modification technique in dental patients with special needs. Midazolam and propofol are commonly used for intravenous sedation. Although there have been many researches on the effects of midazolam and propofol on vital function and the recovery profile, little is known about muscle power. This review discusses the effects of intravenous sedation using midazolam and propofol on both grip strength and bite force. During light propofol sedation, grip strength increases slightly and bite force increases in a dose-dependent manner. Grip strength decreases while bite force increases during light midazolam sedation, and also during light sedation using a combination of midazolam and propofol. Flumazenil did not antagonise the increase in bite force by midazolam. These results may suggest following possibilities; (1 Activation of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors located within the temporomandibular joint region and masticatory muscles may be the cause of increasing bite force. (2 Propofol limited the long-latency exteroceptive suppression (ES2 period during jaw-opening reflex. Thus, control of masticatory muscle contraction, which is thought to have a negative feedback effect on excessive bite force, may be depressed by propofol.

  7. The plasminogen activation system modulates differently adipogenesis and myogenesis of embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Hadadeh

    Full Text Available Regulation of the extracellular matrix (ECM plays an important functional role either in physiological or pathological conditions. The plasminogen activation (PA system, comprising the uPA and tPA proteases and their inhibitor PAI-1, is one of the main suppliers of extracellular proteolytic activity contributing to tissue remodeling. Although its function in development is well documented, its precise role in mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation in vitro is unknown. We found that the PA system components are expressed at very low levels in undifferentiated ESCs and that upon differentiation uPA activity is detected mainly transiently, whereas tPA activity and PAI-1 protein are maximum in well differentiated cells. Adipocyte formation by ESCs is inhibited by amiloride treatment, a specific uPA inhibitor. Likewise, ESCs expressing ectopic PAI-1 under the control of an inducible expression system display reduced adipogenic capacities after induction of the gene. Furthermore, the adipogenic differentiation capacities of PAI-1(-/- induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are augmented as compared to wt iPSCs. Our results demonstrate that the control of ESC adipogenesis by the PA system correspond to different successive steps from undifferentiated to well differentiated ESCs. Similarly, skeletal myogenesis is decreased by uPA inhibition or PAI-1 overexpression during the terminal step of differentiation. However, interfering with uPA during days 0 to 3 of the differentiation process augments ESC myotube formation. Neither neurogenesis, cardiomyogenesis, endothelial cell nor smooth muscle formation are affected by amiloride or PAI-1 induction. Our results show that the PA system is capable to specifically modulate adipogenesis and skeletal myogenesis of ESCs by successive different molecular mechanisms.

  8. The plasminogen activation system modulates differently adipogenesis and myogenesis of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadeh, Ola; Barruet, Emilie; Peiretti, Franck; Verdier, Monique; Bernot, Denis; Hadjal, Yasmine; Yazidi, Claire El; Robaglia-Schlupp, Andrée; De Paula, Andre Maues; Nègre, Didier; Iacovino, Michelina; Kyba, Michael; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Binétruy, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important functional role either in physiological or pathological conditions. The plasminogen activation (PA) system, comprising the uPA and tPA proteases and their inhibitor PAI-1, is one of the main suppliers of extracellular proteolytic activity contributing to tissue remodeling. Although its function in development is well documented, its precise role in mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation in vitro is unknown. We found that the PA system components are expressed at very low levels in undifferentiated ESCs and that upon differentiation uPA activity is detected mainly transiently, whereas tPA activity and PAI-1 protein are maximum in well differentiated cells. Adipocyte formation by ESCs is inhibited by amiloride treatment, a specific uPA inhibitor. Likewise, ESCs expressing ectopic PAI-1 under the control of an inducible expression system display reduced adipogenic capacities after induction of the gene. Furthermore, the adipogenic differentiation capacities of PAI-1(-/-) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are augmented as compared to wt iPSCs. Our results demonstrate that the control of ESC adipogenesis by the PA system correspond to different successive steps from undifferentiated to well differentiated ESCs. Similarly, skeletal myogenesis is decreased by uPA inhibition or PAI-1 overexpression during the terminal step of differentiation. However, interfering with uPA during days 0 to 3 of the differentiation process augments ESC myotube formation. Neither neurogenesis, cardiomyogenesis, endothelial cell nor smooth muscle formation are affected by amiloride or PAI-1 induction. Our results show that the PA system is capable to specifically modulate adipogenesis and skeletal myogenesis of ESCs by successive different molecular mechanisms.

  9. Plasmid Transfer of Plasminogen K1-5 Reduces Subcutaneous Hepatoma Growth by Affecting Inflammatory Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea A. Koch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that plasminogen K1-5 (PlgK1-5 directly affects tumour cells and inflammation. Therefore, we analysed if PlgK1-5 has immediate effects on hepatoma cells and inflammatory factors in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, effects of plasmid encoding PlgK1-5 (pK1-5 on Hepa129, Hepa1-6, and HuH7 cell viability, apoptosis, and proliferation as well as VEGF and TNF-alpha expression and STAT3-phosphorylation were investigated. In vivo, tumour growth, proliferation, vessel density, and effects on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha expression were examined following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, pK1-5 halved cell viability; cell death was increased by up to 15% compared to the corresponding controls. Proliferation was not affected. VEGF, TNF-alpha, and STAT3-phosphorylation were affected following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, ten days after treatment initiation, pK1-5 reduced subcutaneous tumour growth by 32% and mitosis by up to 77% compared to the controls. Vessel density was reduced by 50%. TNF-alpha levels in tumour and liver tissue were increased, whereas VEGF levels in tumours and livers were reduced after pK1-5 treatment. Taken together, plasmid gene transfer of PlgK1-5 inhibits hepatoma (cell growth not only by reducing vessel density but also by inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, and triggering inflammation.

  10. DNA repair and induction of plasminogen activator in human fetal cells treated with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Sharon, R.; Rothman, M.; Miskin, R.

    1984-01-01

    We have tested human fetal fibroblasts for development associated changes in DNA repair by utilizing nucleoid sedimentation as an assay for excision repair. Among skin fibroblasts the rate of excision repair was significantly higher in non-fetal cells than in fibroblasts derived from an 8 week fetus; this was evident by a delay in both the relaxation and the restoration of DNA supercoiling in nucleoids after irradiation. Skin fibroblasts derived at 12 week gestation were more repair proficient than those derived at 8 week gestation. However, they exhibited a somewhat lower rate of repair than non-fetal cells. The same fetal and non-fetal cells were also tested for induction of the protease plasminogen activator (PA) after u.v. irradiation. Enhancement of PA was higher in skin fibroblasts derived at 8 week than in those derived at 12 week gestation and was absent in non-fetal skin fibroblasts. These results are consistent with our previous findings that in human cells u.v. light-induced PA synthesis is correlated with reduced DNA repair capacity. Excision repair and PA inducibility were found to depend on tissue of origin in addition to gestational stage, as shown for skin and lung fibroblasts from the same 12 week fetus. Lung compared to skin fibroblasts exhibited lower repair rates and produced higher levels of PA after irradiation. The sedimentation velocity of nucleoids, prepared from unirradiated fibroblasts, in neutral sucrose gradients with or without ethidium bromide, indicated the presence of DNA strand breaks in fetal cells. It is proposed that reduced DNA repair in fetal cells may result from alterations in DNA supercoiling, and that persistent DNA strand breaks enhance transcription of PA gene(s)

  11. Analysis of Plasminogen Genetic Variants in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnick, A. Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony L.; Bernales, Cecily Q.; Ross, Jay P.; Forwell, Amanda L.; Yee, Irene M.; Guillot-Noel, Lena; Fontaine, Bertrand; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Hilven, Kelly; Dubois, Bénédicte; Goris, An; Astobiza, Ianire; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Akkad, Denis A.; Aktas, Orhan; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Epplen, Joerg T.; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Lohse, Peter; Rieckmann, Peter; Zettl, Uwe K.; Zipp, Frauke; Bertram, Lars; Lill, Christina M; Fernandez, Oscar; Urbaneja, Patricia; Leyva, Laura; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Arroyo, Rafael; Garagorri, Aroa M.; García-Martínez, Angel; Villar, Luisa M.; Urcelay, Elena; Malhotra, Sunny; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel; Berger, Thomas; Fazekas, Franz; Reindl, Markus; Schmied, Mascha C.; Zimprich, Alexander; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a prevalent neurological disease of complex etiology. Here, we describe the characterization of a multi-incident MS family that nominated a rare missense variant (p.G420D) in plasminogen (PLG) as a putative genetic risk factor for MS. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D (rs139071351) in 2160 MS patients, and 886 controls from Canada, identified 10 additional probands, two sporadic patients and one control with the variant. Segregation in families harboring the rs139071351 variant, identified p.G420D in 26 out of 30 family members diagnosed with MS, 14 unaffected parents, and 12 out of 30 family members not diagnosed with disease. Despite considerably reduced penetrance, linkage analysis supports cosegregation of PLG p.G420D and disease. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D in 14446 patients, and 8797 controls from Canada, France, Spain, Germany, Belgium, and Austria failed to identify significant association with disease (P = 0.117), despite an overall higher prevalence in patients (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 0.93–1.87). To assess whether additional rare variants have an effect on MS risk, we sequenced PLG in 293 probands, and genotyped all rare variants in cases and controls. This analysis identified nine rare missense variants, and although three of them were exclusively observed in MS patients, segregation does not support pathogenicity. PLG is a plausible biological candidate for MS owing to its involvement in immune system response, blood-brain barrier permeability, and myelin degradation. Moreover, components of its activation cascade have been shown to present increased activity or expression in MS patients compared to controls; further studies are needed to clarify whether PLG is involved in MS susceptibility. PMID:27194806

  12. Plasminogen activator activity and plasma-coagulum lysis measured by use of optimized fibrin gel structure preformed in microtiter plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen; Jespersen, J; Gram, J

    1995-01-01

    We introduce a new fibrin plate assay performed in microtiter plates. By means of spectroscopic studies we optimized the structure of the fibrin gel and then used the optimized fibrin gel to determine plasminogen activator activity. Plasminogen activator solutions were applied on top of the fibri...

  13. A sensitive bioimmunoassay for thrombin-cleaved two-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator in human body fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat, E.A.M.; Nauland, U.; Dooijewaard, G.; Rijken, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    Thrombin cleaves single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator (scu-PA) into a two-chain form (tcu-PA/T), which is virtually inactive in plasminogen activator assays. Little is known about the physiological importance of tcu-PA/T. To examine the occurrence of tcu-PA/T in vivo, we developed a

  14. Ultrastructural Changes in the Liver of Intravenous Heroin Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Ilić

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructural research has a decisive role in gathering the knowledge on the liver’s response to the influence of some drugs. The aim of the study was to perform an ultrastructurai analysis of the liver in chronic intravenous heroin addicts.The study involved the autopsy conducted on 40 bodies of intravenous heroin addicts and 10 control autopsies. The liver tissue was fixed in glutaraldehyde and moulded with epon for investigation purposes of ultrastructural changes. The analysis was performed using the method of transmission electron microscopy.In the group of intravenous heroin addicts, the liver autopsy samples showed degenerative vesicular and fat changes, chronic active and persistent hepatitis, cirrhosis, reduction in the amount of glycogen in hepatocytes, as well as the Kupffer cell’s dominant hypertrophy. Various changes occur in organelles, plasma membrane of hepatocytes and biliary channels as well as in the nucleus.The most important ultrastructural findings include: hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum, which is histologically proven vesicular degeneration of hepatocyte occurring as a result of the increased synthesis of enzymes of smooth endoplasmic reticulum due to chronic intravenous heroin intake, and the presence of continuous basal membrane followed by transformation of the sinusoids into capillaries (in the cases of chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis which leads to a disorder of microcirculation and further progress of cirrhosis.

  15. Reduction of canine plasminogen leads to an expanded molecule which precipitates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack A Kornblatt

    Full Text Available Canine plasminogen is made up of seven domains. In each domain there are several cysteines that are linked by disulfide bonds. Reduction of a limited number of the cystines destabilizes the protein such that it precipitates. The bond or bonds that are broken provide about 14 kcal of stabilization energy. Circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering indicate that there is probably an intermediate that is formed prior to precipitation and that the intermediate is somewhat larger than the compact form of plasminogen.

  16. Phenotypic overlap between MMP-13 and the plasminogen activation system during wound healing in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker-Jensen, Anna; Lund, Leif R

    2011-01-01

    Proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix is a crucial step in the healing of incisional skin wounds. Thus, healing of skin wounds is delayed by either plasminogen-deficiency or by treatment with the broad-spectrum metalloproteinase (MP) inhibitor Galardin alone, while the two perturbations...... combined completely prevent wound healing. Both urokinase-type plasminogen activator and several matrix metallo proteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-3, -9 and -13, are expressed in the leading-edge keratinocytes of skin wounds, which may account for this phenotypic overlap between these classes of proteases....

  17. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA in sputum of allergic asthma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Zukowski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA and its inhibitor (PAI-1 have been associated with asthma. The aim of this study was to evaluate concentration of uPA and PAI-1 in induced sputum of house dust mite allergic asthmatics (HDM-AAs. The study was performed on 19 HDM-AAs and 8 healthy nonatopic controls (HCs. Concentration of uPA and PAI-1 was evaluated in induced sputum supernatants using ELISA method. In HDM-AAs the median sputum concentration of uPA (128 pg/ml; 95% CI 99 to 183 pg/ml and PAI-1 (4063 pg/ml; 95%CI 3319 to 4784 pg/ml were significantly greater than in HCs (17 pg/ml; 95%CI 12 to 32 pg/ml; p<0.001 and 626 pg/ml; 95%CI 357 to 961 pg/ml; p<0.001 for uPA and PAI-1 respectively. The sputum concentration of uPA correlated with sputum total cell count (r=0.781; p=0.0001 and with logarithmically transformed exhaled nitric oxide concentration (eNO (r=0.486; p=0.035 but not with FEV1 or bronchial reactivity to histamine. On the contrary, the sputum PAI-1 concentration correlated with FEV1 (r=-0,718; p=0.0005 and bronchial reactivity to histamine expressed as log(PC20 (r=-0.824; p<0.0001 but did not correlate with sputum total cell count or eNO. The results of this study support previous observations linking PAI-1 with airway remodeling and uPA with cellular inflammation. Moreover, the observed effect of uPA seems to be independent of its fibrynolytic activity.

  18. EFFECT OF RECOMBINANT TISSUE-PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR ON INTRAABDOMINAL ABSCESS FORMATION IN RATS WITH GENERALIZED PERITONITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Harry; de Graaf, JS; Kooi, K; Sluiter, WJ; Bom, VJJ; van der Meer, J; Bleichrodt, RP

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During generalized peritonitis, intraabdominal fibrin deposition is stimulated whereas fibrinolytic activity is reduced, which predisposes intra-abdominal abscess formation. We investigated the effects of increasing the intra-abdominal fibrinolytic activity on abscess formation by

  19. Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Transcriptionally Controlled Adenoviruses Eradicate Pancreatic Tumors and Liver Metastasis in Mouse Models12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huch, Meritxell; Gros, Alena; José, Anabel; González, Juan Ramon; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Treatment options for pancreatic cancer have shown limited success mainly owing to poor selectivity for pancreatic tumor tissue and to a lack of activity in the tumor. In this study, we describe the ability of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) promoter to efficiently and selectively target pancreatic tumors and metastases, which enables the successful management of pancreatic cancer. We have generated a replication-defective reporter adenovirus, AduPARLuc, and a conditionally replicating adenovirus, AduPARE1A, and we have studied the selectivity and antitumoral efficacy in pancreatic tumors and metastases. Toxicity was studied on intravascular delivery. We demonstrate that the uPAR promoter is highly active in pancreatic tumors but very weak in normal tissues. Tumor specificity is evidenced by a 100-fold increase in the tumor-to-liver ratio and by selective targeting of liver metastases (P < .001). Importantly, the AduPARE1A maintains the oncolytic activity of the wild-type virus, with reduced toxicity, and exhibits significant antitumoral activity (25% tumor eradication) and prolonged survival in pancreatic xenograft models (P < .0001). Furthermore, upon intravascular delivery, we demonstrate complete eradication of liver metastasis in 33% of mice, improving median survival (P = 5.43 x 10-5). The antitumoral selective activity of AduPARE1A shows the potential of uPAR promoter-based therapies in pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:19484141

  20. Ketogenic diet disrupts the circadian clock and increases hypofibrinolytic risk by inducing expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Ohkura, Naoki; Doi, Ryosuke; Ishida, Norio; Kadota, Koji; Horie, Shuichi

    2009-10-01

    Metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity are considered risk factors for cardiovascular diseases by increasing levels of blood plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Ketogenic diets (KDs) have been used as an approach to weight loss in both obese and nonobese individuals. We examined circadian changes in plasma PAI-1 and its mRNA expression levels in tissues from mice fed with a KD (KD mice), to evaluate its effects on fibrinolytic functions. Two weeks on the kDa increased plasma levels of free fatty acids and ketones accompanied by hypoglycemia in mice. Plasma PAI-1 concentrations were extremely elevated in accordance with mRNA expression levels in the heart and liver, but not in the kidneys of KD mice. Circadian expression of PAI-1 mRNA was phase-advanced for 4.7, 7.9, and 7.8 hours in the heart, kidney, and adipose tissues, respectively, as well as that of circadian genes mPer2 and DBP in KD mice, suggesting that peripheral clocks were phase-advanced by ketosis despite feeding ad libitum under a periodic light-dark cycle. The circadian clock that regulates behavioral activity rhythms was also phase-advanced, and its free-running period was significantly shortened in KD mice. Our findings suggest that ketogenic status increases hypofibrinolytic risk by inducing abnormal circadian expression of PAI-1.

  1. Recombinant Human Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Accelerates Odontoblastic Differentiation of Human Stem Cells from Apical Papilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bin; Choung, Pill-Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Dental caries, the most prevalent oral disease in dental patients, involves the phases of demineralization and destruction of tooth hard tissues like enamel, dentin, and cementum. Dentin is a major component of the root and is also the innermost layer that protects the tooth nerve, exposure of which results in pain. In this study, we used human stem cells from apical papilla (hSCAP), which are early progenitor cells, to examine the effects of recombinant human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (rhPAI-1) on odontogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that rhPAI-1 promoted the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of hSCAP and increased the expression levels of odontoblast-associated markers. We also observed that rhPAI-1 upregulated the expression of Smad4, nuclear factor I-C (NFI-C), Runx2, and osterix (OSX) during odontogenic differentiation. Notably, transplantation of rhPAI-1-treated hSCAP effectively induced odontoblastic differentiation and dentinal formation. And the differentiated odontoblast-like cells showed numerous odontoblast processes inserted in dentin tubules and arranged collagen fibers. Furthermore, odontoblast-associated markers were more highly expressed in the rhPAI-1-induced differentiated odontoblast-like cells compared with the control group. These markers were also more highly expressed in the newly formed dentin-like tissue of the rhPAI-1-treated group compared with the control group. Consistent with our in vitro results, the expression levels of Smad4, NFI-C, and OSX were also increased in the rhPAI-1-treated group compared with the control group. Taken together, these results suggest that rhPAI-1 promotes odontoblast differentiation and dentin formation of hSCAP, and Smad4/NFI-C/OSX may play critical roles in the rhPAI-1-induced odontogenic differentiation. Thus, dental stem cells from apical papilla combined with rhPAI-1 could lead to dentin regeneration in clinical implications.

  2. Inhibitory effect of berberine on the invasion of human lung cancer cells via decreased productions of urokinase-plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, P.-L.; Hsieh, Y.-S.; Wang, C.-J.; Hsu, J.-L.; Chou, F.-P.

    2006-01-01

    Berberine, a compound isolated from medicinal herbs, has been reported with many pharmacological effects related to anti-cancer and anti-inflammation capabilities. In this study, we observed that berberine exerted a dose- and time-dependent inhibitory effect on the motility and invasion ability of a highly metastatic A549 cells under non-cytotoxic concentrations. In cancer cell migration and invasion process, matrix-degrading proteinases are required. A549 cell treated with berberine at various concentrations showed reduced ECM proteinases including matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) and urokinase-plasminogen activator (u-PA) by gelatin and casein zymography analysis. The inhibitory effect is likely to be at the transcriptional level, since the reduction in the transcripts levels was corresponding to the proteins. Moreover, berberine also exerted its action via regulating tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and urokinase-plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI). The upstream mediators of the effect involved c-jun, c-fos and NF-κB, as evidenced by reduced phosphorylation of the proteins. These findings suggest that berberine possesses an anti-metastatic effect in non-small lung cancer cell and may, therefore, be helpful in clinical treatment

  3. The Association of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 (PAI-1) Level and PAI-1 4G/5G Gene Polymorphism with the Formation and the Grade of Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, Malik Ejder; Karakuş, Savas; Kurtulgan, Hande Küçük; Kılıçgün, Hasan; Erşan, Serpil; Bakır, Sevtap

    2017-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a serine protease inhibitor (Serpine 1), and it inhibits both tissue plasminogen activator and urokinase plasminogen activator which are important in fibrinolysis. We aimed to find whether there is a possible association between PAI-1 level, PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism, and endometrial cancer. PAI-1 levels in peripheral blood were determined in 82 patients with endometrial carcinoma and 76 female healthy controls using an enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). Then, the genomic DNA was extracted and screened by reverse hybridization procedure (Strip assay) to detect PAI 1 4G/5G polymorphism. The levels of PAI-1 in the patients were higher statistically in comparison to controls (P 5G polymorphism was quite different between patients and controls (P = 0.008), and 4G allelic frequency was significantly higher in the patients of endometrial cancer than in controls (P = 0.026). We found significant difference between Grade 1 and Grade 2+3 patients in terms of the PAI-1 levels (P = 0.047). There was no association between PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism and the grades of endometrial cancer (P = 0.993). Our data suggest that the level of PAI-1 and PAI-1 4G/5G gene polymorphism are effective in the formation of endometrial cancer. PAI-1 levels are also associated with the grades of endometrial cancer.

  4. The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor and its fragments in venous ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Anwar; Saha, Prakash; Evans, Colin

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Activation of proteolytic mechanisms at the cell surface through the activity of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) bound to its receptor, uPAR, is an important process in wound healing. The soluble forms of uPAR (suPAR and its fragments I, II, and III) have nonproteolytic...

  5. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Levels in Patients With Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Røge, Rasmus; Pristed, Sofie Gry

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The etiology of schizophrenia remains largely unknown but alterations in the immune system may be involved. In addition to the psychiatric symptoms, schizophrenia is also associated with up to 20 years reduction in life span. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPA...

  6. A sensitive bioimmunoassay for thrombin-cleaved two-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat, E.A.M.; Nauland, U.; Dooijewaard, G.; Rijken, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    Thrombin cleaves single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator (scu-PA) into a virtually inactive two-chain form (tcu-PA/T). Little is known about the physiological importance of tcu-PA/T. To examine the occurrence of tcu-PA/T in vivo, we developed a sensitive and specific bioimmunoassay (BIA)

  7. Tumor necrosis factor induces the production of urokinase-type plasminogen activator by human endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van; Berg, E.A. van den; Fiers, W.; Dooijewaard, G.

    1990-01-01

    Endothelial cells play an important role in the regulation of fibrinolysis by the production of several key regulatory proteins. The cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF), lymphotoxin, and interleukin-1 (IL-1), but not interleukin-6, increase the production of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1

  8. Pharmacological modulation of the endotoxin-induced increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor activity in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emeis, J.J.; Hoogen, C.M. van den

    1992-01-01

    Pharmacological modulation of the in vivo induction of plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) synthesis was studied in rats using the induction of PAI-1 by endotoxin as a model system. Both the cyclooxygenase inhibitors acetylsalicylic acid and indomethacin enhanced PAI-1 induction. The

  9. Inactivation of single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator by thrombin in human subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat, E. A.; Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Bos, R.; Haverkate, F.; Lassen, M. R.; de Maat, M. P.; Rijken, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    Thrombin cleaves single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator (scu-PA) into a virtually inactive two-chain form (tcu-PA/T), a process that may protect a blood clot from early fibrinolysis. It is not known under what circumstances tcu-PA/T can be generated in vivo. We have studied the occurrence

  10. Characterization of human endothelial cell urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor protein and messenger RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnathan, E S; Kuo, A; Karikó, K

    1990-01-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture (HUVEC) express receptors for urokinase-type plasminogen activators (u-PA). The immunochemical nature of this receptor and its relationship to u-PA receptors expressed by other cell types is unknown. Cross-linking active site-blocked u-PA to HUVEC...

  11. The plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (pai-1) gene locus 4g/5g ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Activation of inflammation and coagulation are closely related and mutually interdependent in myocardial infarction (MI). The acute-phase protein, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), is a key element in the inhibition of fibrinolysis. Elevated levels of PAI-1 have been related to. MI. There are controversial data regarding ...

  12. Relationships between activators and inhibitors of plasminogen, and the progression of small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Jørgensen, B; Shi, G-P

    2003-01-01

    plasmin is a common activator of the known proteolytic systems involved in the aneurysmal degradation, and is reported to be associated with the expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). The aim of this study was to study the activating pathways of plasminogen as predictors of the progression...

  13. Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor for Risk Prediction in Patients Admitted with Acute Chest Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbæk, Stig; Andersson, Charlotte; Marott, Jacob L

    2013-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) predict mortality in several clinical settings, but the long-term prognostic importance of suPAR in chest pain patients admitted on suspicion of non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTEACS) is uncertain....

  14. Causal effect of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 on coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Ci; Burgess, Stephen; Eicher, John D.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Huang, Jie; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Shin, So Youn; Ding, Jingzhong; Baumert, Jens; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Folkersen, Lasse; Smith, Nicholas L.; Williams, Scott M; Ikram, Mohammad Arfan; Kleber, Marcus E.; Becker, Diane M.; Truong, Vinh; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Tang, Weihong; Yang, Qiong; Sennblad, Bengt; Moore, Jason H; Williams, Frances M.K.; Dehghan, Abbas; Silbernagel, Günther; Schrijvers, Elisabeth M.C.; Smith, Shelly; Karakas, Mahir; Tofler, Geoffrey H.; Silveira, Angela; Navis, Gerjan J.; Lohman, Kurt; Chen, Ming Huei; Peters, Annette; Goel, Anuj; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Chambers, John C.; Saleheen, Danish; Lundmark, Per; Psaty, Bruce M.; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Carter, Angela M.; Meisinger, Christa; Peden, John F.; Bis, Joshua C.; McKnight, Barbara; Öhrvik, John; Taylor, Kent D.; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Seedorf, Udo; Collins, Rory; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Goodall, Alison H.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Cushman, Mary; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Folsom, Aaron R.; Basu, Saonli; Matijevic, Nena; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Danesh, John; Clarke, Robert; Meigs, James B; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P; Klopp, Norman; Harris, Tamara B.; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Grant, Peter J.; Hillege, Hans L.; Watkins, Hugh; Spector, Timothy D; Becker, Lewis C; Tracy, Russell P.; März, Winfried; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Eriksson, Per; Cambien, Francois; Morange, Pierre Emmanuel; Koenig, Wolfgang; Soranzo, Nicole; van der Harst, Pim; Liu, Yongmei; Hamsten, Anders; Ehret, Georg B.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Bochud, Murielle; Chasman, Daniel I.; Smith, Albert V.; Tobin, Martin D; Verwoert, Germaine C; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L.; Launer, Lenore J.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A.; Jackson, Anne U.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H.; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N.; Fava, Cristiano; Fox, Ervin R.; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; Linda Kao, Wen Hong; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D. G.; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H.; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Cooper, Matthew N.; Platou, Carl G P; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S.P.M.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter R.; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen Pei C.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Steinle, Nanette I.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Arking, Dan E.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Beilby, John P.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W; Li, Yali; Young, J. Hunter; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adair, Linda S.; Lee, Nanette R.; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Hoffman Bolton, Judith A.; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M.; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif C.; Voight, Benjamin F; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay Tee; Weder, Alan B.; Hunt, Steven C.; Sun, Yan V.; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Scott, Laura J; Stringham, Heather M.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan Martin; Staessen, Jan A.; Wang, Thomas J.; Burton, Paul R.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt; Rudock, Megan E.; Heckbert, Susan R; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A.; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S.; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter M.; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J.; Yao, Jie; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Arfan Ikram, M.; Longstreth, W.T. jr.; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R.G.; Wain, Louise V.; Morken, Mario A.; Swift, Amy J.; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Rasheed, Asif; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Mani, K. Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U.S.; Oostra, Ben A.; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M. V.Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Charchar, Fadi J; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles N.; Bots, Michiel L.; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J.; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Casas, Juan P.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli T.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Wong, Tien-Yin; Shyong Tai, E.; Cooper, Richard S.; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Morris, Richard W.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G.; Miki, Tetsuro; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan J.; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wright, Alan F.; Wilson, James F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Elosua, Roberto; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P.; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J.; Johnson, Toby; van der Lugt, Aad; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Hofman, Albert; Kraja, Aldi T.; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Ziegler, Andreas; Newman, Anne B; Schillert, Arne; Oostra, Ben A.; Thorsson, Bolli; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Fox, Caroline S.; White, Charles C.; Ballantyne, Christie; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Herrington, David M.; O'Leary, Daniel H.; Siscovick, David S.; Couper, David J; Halperin, Eran; Stoegerer, Eva Maria; Ernst, Florian; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Homuth, Georg; Heiss, Gerardo; Usala, Gianluca; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Shen, Haiqing; Erich Wichmann, H.; Schmidt, Helena; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Markus, Hugh S.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Lüdemann, Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Thiery, Joachim; Seissler, Jochen; Massaro, Joseph M.; Polak, Joseph F.; Cunningham, Julie; North, Kari E.; Petrovic, Katja E; Rice, Kenneth M.; Adrienne Cupples, L.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Launer, Lenore J.; de Andrade, Mariza; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sitzer, Matthias; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Province, Michael A.; Nalls, Michael A.; Franceschini, Nora; Peyser, Patricia A.; Wolf, Philip A.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Wild, Philipp S; Schnabel, Renate B.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Chilukoti, Ravi Kumar; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sanna, Serena; Demissie, Serkalem; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Blankenberg, Stefan; Bevan, Steve; Elias-Smale, Suzette E.; Zeller, Tanja; Illig, Thomas; Münzel, Thomas; Howard, Timothy D.; Hoffmann, Udo; Schminke, Ulf; Nambi, Vijay; Post, Wendy S.; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Li, Xia; Cheng, Yu Ching

    2017-01-01

    Background--Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) plays an essential role in the fibrinolysis system and thrombosis. Population studies have reported that blood PAI-1 levels are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, it is unclear whether the association

  15. Activation of pro-urokinase and plasminogen on human sarcoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephens, R W; Pöllänen, J; Tapiovaara, H

    1989-01-01

    by an anticatalytic monoclonal antibody to u-PA, indicating that this enzyme was responsible for the activation. Preincubation of the cells with diisopropyl fluorophosphate-inhibited u-PA led to a decrease in surface-bound plasmin, indicating that a large part, if not all, of the cell surface plasminogen activation...

  16. Tissue disposition of bifenthrin in the rat

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Tissue disposition of bifenthrin in the rat and oral and intravenous administration. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Hughes , M., D. Ross...

  17. Antibiotic modulation of the plasminogen binding ability of viridans group streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Cristina; Smith, Andrew; Lang, Sue

    2012-01-01

    The ability of viridans group streptococci to bind human plasminogen and its subsequent activation into plasmin may contribute to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis (IE) by leading to a decreased stability of the streptococcal vegetation and facilitating dehiscence of emboli. At levels greater than or equal to their MICs, penicillin, vancomycin, and linezolid are efficacious in the treatment of streptococcal endocarditis. However, at sub-MICs, antibiotics can modulate the expression of bacterial genes, including virulence-associated genes, which can have counterproductive effects on the treatment of endocarditis. The effects of 1/8× and 1/4× MICs of penicillin, vancomycin, and linezolid on the plasminogen binding ability of IE isolates Streptococcus mitis 881/956, Streptococcus oralis 12601, and Streptococcus sanguinis 12403 were assessed phenotypically and the expression of plasminogen receptors α-enolase and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase of S. oralis 12601 when exposed to 1/4× MIC of penicillin, was analyzed through quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR. The plasminogen binding ability of S. mitis 881/956 and S. sanguinis 12403 remained unaffected by exposure to sub-MICs of all of the antibiotics tested, while that of S. oralis 12601 was significantly enhanced by all of the antibiotics tested at sub-MICs. qRT-PCR analysis of S. oralis 12601 demonstrated an upregulation of the eno and gapdh genes, indicating an overexpression of plasminogen receptors. These findings suggest that for some endocarditis isolates, the effect of antibiotic sub-MICs, in addition to a reduced antibacterial effect, may influence the clinical response to nonsurgical therapy. It remains difficult to accurately predict isolate responses to sub-MIC antimicrobials since there appears to be interspecies variation.

  18. Preclinical evaluation of a urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-targeted nanoprobe in rhesus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Y

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yushu Chen,1 Li Gong,2 Ning Gao,3 Jichun Liao,1 Jiayu Sun,1 Yuqing Wang,1 Lei Wang,1 Pengjin Zhu,1 Qing Fan,1 Yongqiang Andrew Wang,4 Wen Zeng,2 Hui Mao,3 Lily Yang,5 Fabao Gao11Molecular Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 2Sichuan Primed Bio-Tech Group Co, Ltd, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 4Ocean NanoTech, LLC, San Diego, CA, 5Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USAPurpose: To translate a recombinant peptide containing the amino-terminal fragment (ATF of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-targeted magnetic iron oxide (IO nanoparticles (uPAR-targeted human ATF-IONPs into clinical applications, we conducted a pilot study to evaluate the toxicity and pharmacokinetics of this nanoparticle in normal rhesus monkeys.Methods: We assessed the changes in the following: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI signals from pretreatment stage to 14 days posttreatment, serum iron concentrations from 5 minutes posttreatment to 12 weeks posttreatment, routine blood examination and serum chemistry analysis results from pretreatment stage to 12 weeks after administration, and results of staining of the liver with Perls’ Prussian Blue and hematoxylin–eosin at 24 hours and 3 months posttreatment in two rhesus monkeys following an intravenous administration of the targeted nanoparticles either with a polyethylene glycol (ATF-PEG-IONP or without a PEG (ATF-IONP coating.Results: The levels of alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, and direct bilirubin in the two monkeys increased immediately after the administration of the IONPs but returned to normal within 20 days and stayed within the normal reference range 3 months after the injection. The creatinine levels of the two monkeys stayed within the normal range during the study. In addition, red blood cells

  19. The pro-urokinase plasminogen-activation system in the presence of serpin-type inhibitors and the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, Niels; List, Karin; Andreasen, Peter A

    2003-01-01

    The reciprocal pro-enzyme activation system of plasmin, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and their respective zymogens is a potent mechanism in the generation of extracellular proteolytic activity. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) acts as a negative regulator. This system...... is complicated by a poorly understood intrinsic reactivity of the uPA pro-enzyme (pro-uPA) before proteolytic activation, directed against both plasminogen and PAI-1. We have studied the integrated activation mechanism under the repression of PAI-1 in a purified system. A covalent reaction between pro...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: complete plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or soft tissues after even a minor injury. Internal bleeding after an injury, especially bleeding around the ... of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  1. Intravenous Therapy: Hazards, Complications and Their Prevention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this review article, the local and systemic complications of intravenous therapy are highlighted and their preventive measures are discussed. Intravenous therapy exposes the patient to numerous hazards and many of them are avoidable, if the health care provider understands the risks involved and acts appropriately and ...

  2. Intentional intravenous mercury injection | Yudelowitz | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intravenous mercury injection is rarely seen, with few documented cases. Treatment strategies are not clearly defined for such cases, although a few options do show benefit. This case report describes a 29-year-old man suffering from bipolar disorder, who presented following self-inflicted intravenous injection of mercury.

  3. Intravenous immunoglobulin prophylaxis in neonates on artificial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficacy of the prophylactic use of intravenous immunoglobulin (Ig) was evaluated in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial of 21 pairs of ventilated neonates weighing more than 1 500 g, Each infant received 0.4 g/kglday of intravenous Ig or a similar volume of placebo daily for 5 days. Criteria used to assess the ...

  4. Intravenous and Intramuscular Formulations of Antiseizure Drugs in the Treatment of Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sima I; Birnbaum, Angela K; Cloyd, James C; Leppik, Ilo E

    2015-12-01

    Intravenous and intramuscular antiseizure drugs (ASDs) are essential in the treatment of clinical seizure emergencies as well as in replacement therapy when oral administration is not possible. The parenteral formulations provide rapid delivery and complete (intravenous) or nearly complete (intramuscular) bioavailability. Controlled administration of the ASD is feasible with intravenous but not intramuscular formulations. This article reviews the literature and discusses the chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and clinical use of currently available intravenous and intramuscular ASD formulations as well as the development of new formulations and agents. Intravenous or intramuscular formulations of lorazepam, diazepam, midazolam, and clonazepam are typically used as the initial treatment agents in seizure emergencies. Recent studies also support the use of intramuscular midazolam as easier than the intravenous delivery of lorazepam in the pre-hospital setting. However, benzodiazepines may be associated with hypotension and respiratory depression. Although loading with intravenous phenytoin was an early approach to treatment, it is associated with cardiac arrhythmias, hypotension, and tissue injury at the injection site. This has made it less favored than fosphenytoin, a water-soluble, phosphorylated phenytoin molecule. Other drugs being used for acute seizure emergencies are intravenous formulations of valproic acid, levetiracetam, and lacosamide. However, the comparative effectiveness of these for status epilepticus (SE) has not been evaluated adequately. Consequently, guidelines for the medical management of SE continue to recommend lorazepam followed by fosphenytoin, or phenytoin if fosphenytoin is not available. Intravenous solutions for carbamazepine, lamotrigine, and topiramate have been developed but remain investigational. The current ASDs were not developed for use in emergency situations, but were adapted from ASDs approved for chronic oral use. New

  5. Evaluation of 12-Lipoxygenase (12-LOX and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1 as Prognostic Markers in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Gondek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In carcinoma of prostate, a causative role of platelet 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1 for tumor progression has been firmly established in tumor and/or adjacent tissue. Our goal was to investigate if 12-LOX and/or PAI-1 in patient’s plasma could be used to predict outcome of the disease. The study comprised 149 patients (age 70±9 divided into two groups: a study group with carcinoma confirmed by positive biopsy of prostate (n=116 and a reference group (n=33 with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. The following parameters were determined by the laboratory test in plasma or platelet-rich plasma: protein level of 12-LOX, PAI-1, thromboglobulin (TGB, prostate specific antigen (PSA, C-reactive protein (CRP, hemoglobin (HGB, and hematocrit (HCT, as well as red (RBC and white blood cells (WBC, number of platelets (PLT, international normalized ratio of blood clotting (INR, and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT. The only difference of significance was noticed in the concentration of 12-LOX in platelet rich plasma, which was lower in cancer than in BPH group. Standardization to TGB and platelet count increases the sensitivity of the test that might be used as a biomarker to assess risk for prostate cancer in periodically monitored patients.

  6. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) facilitates retinal angiogenesis in a model of oxygen-induced retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anupam; Menicucci, Gina; Maestas, Joann; Das, Arup; McGuire, Paul

    2009-10-01

    Angiogenesis, or the formation of new retinal blood vessels, is a key feature of many proliferative retinal diseases including diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, and retinopathy of prematurity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the serine proteinase inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor -1 (PAI-1) in facilitating retinal angiogenesis. The temporal expression of PAI-1 was examined by real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry in retinal tissues from mice with oxygen-induced retinopathy. The requirement for PAI-1 in facilitating the retinal angiogenic response in this model was examined by quantitating the angiogenic response with wild-type and PAI-1 null mice. The mechanism by which PAI-1 mediates angiogenesis was further investigated with isolated human retinal vascular endothelial cells. PAI-1 expression was upregulated in the retinas of mice with oxygen-induced retinopathy, which coincided with a significant increase in the expression of vitronectin in the retina of the experimental mice. There was significant reduction in the angiogenic response of PAI-1(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. PAI-1 promotes endothelial cell migration in vitro and facilitates the migration of cells on a vitronectin substrate by regulating alpha v integrin cell surface expression. These observations suggest a role for PAI-1 during retinal angiogenesis and point to a potential new therapeutic target in the prevention or treatment of retinal neovascularization seen in many ocular diseases.

  7. Pentoxifylline Regulates Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Expression and Protein Kinase A Phosphorylation in Radiation-Induced Lung Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Geol Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Radiation-induced lung fibrosis (RILF is a serious late complication of radiotherapy. In vitro studies have demonstrated that pentoxifylline (PTX has suppressing effects in extracellular matrix production in fibroblasts, while the antifibrotic action of PTX alone using clinical dose is yet unexplored. Materials and Methods. We used micro-computed tomography (micro-CT and histopathological analysis to evaluate the antifibrotic effects of PTX in a rat model of RILF. Results. Micro-CT findings showed that lung density, volume loss, and mediastinal shift are significantly increased at 16 weeks after irradiation. Simultaneously, histological analysis demonstrated thickening of alveolar walls, destruction of alveolar structures, and excessive collagen deposition in the irradiated lung. PTX treatment effectively attenuated the fibrotic changes based on both micro-CT and histopathological analyses. Western analysis also revealed increased levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor- (PAI- 1 and fibronectin (FN and PTX treatment reduced expression of PAI-1 and FN by restoring protein kinase A (PKA phosphorylation but not TGF-β/Smad in both irradiated lung tissues and epithelial cells. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate the antifibrotic effect of PTX on radiation-induced lung fibrosis and its effect on modulation of PKA and PAI-1 expression as possible antifibrotic mechanisms.

  8. Total intravenous hyperalimentation (TIH) complications in childhood: A radiological survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellini, F.; Beluffi, G.; Principi, N.

    1984-01-01

    In a series of 60, consecutive patients from 1 day to 12 months of age (except for one seven-year-old) received total intravenous hyperalimentation (TIH). It was possible to observe non-pathological catheter malpositions and, in 14 patients, other complications. The most serious complications observed included the following: thrombus and pericatheter thrombus calcification; superior vena cava thrombotic occlusion; hydrothorax; mediastinal effusion; generalized septic arthritis; venous transfixion with flooding of the soft tissues of the neck; vein wall lesions; collateral vertebral circulation; and a catheter tip blocked in vein. A brief comment is given on the use of this procedure and what may happen. (orig.)

  9. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, free fatty acids, and insulin resistance in patients with myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruzdeva O

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Olga Gruzdeva, Evgenya Uchasova, Yulia Dyleva, Ekaterina Belik, Ekaterina Shurygina, Olga Barbarash Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases under the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Kemerovo, Russian Federation Background: Insulin resistance is known to be a common feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus and is regarded as an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of this disease. The key pathogenetic mechanisms of insulin resistance progression are free fatty acids metabolism impairment and enhanced activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Both free fatty acids and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 are recognized as risk factors for coronary heart disease. Methods: The patients were divided into two groups: group 1 included 65 non-diabetic myocardial infarction patients and group 2 enrolled 60 diabetic myocardial infarction patients. The control group consisted of 30 sex- and age-matched volunteers. The concentration of serum free fatty acids, glucose, C-peptide, and insulin were measured on the 1st and 12th days of the study. All the patients had their postprandial glycemia, insulin, and C-peptide concentrations measured 2 hours after a standard carbohydrate breakfast containing 360 kcal (protein 20 g, carbohydrate 57 g, and fat 9 g. Results: Free fatty acids levels in group 1 and in group 2 exceeded the control group values by 7-fold and 11-fold, respectively. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 concentration was 2.5-fold higher in group 1 and 4.6-fold higher in group 2 compared to the control group on the 1st day from the myocardial infarction onset. In addition, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 concentration was significantly reduced in both groups on the 12th day from the myocardial infarction onset; however, it did not achieve the control group values. Conclusion: Increased postprandial glucose level, insulinemia, and elevated levels of free fatty acids and plasminogen activator

  10. A 55,000-60,000 Mr receptor protein for urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Identification in human tumor cell lines and partial purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L S; Kellerman, G M; Behrendt, N

    1988-01-01

    -PA-R consists of one polypeptide chain. Two forms of u-PA-R, which differed with respect to affinity to concanavalin A, were identified. u-PA-R retained its ability to bind to ATF after cell lysis, and it was purified approximately 2,200-fold from biosynthetically labeled U937 cells by affinity chromatography...... protein (u-PA-R). In the human monocyte cell line U937 cultivated in the presence of phorbol ester, the amount of complex was strongly increased, and a fraction of the complex had a slower electrophoretic mobility. Comparison between autoradiograms of reduced and unreduced samples suggests that u...... with proenzyme u-PA coupled to Sepharose. The purified Mr 55,000-60,000 protein was specifically bound and cross-linked to u-PA, proenzyme u-PA, and ATF, but not to tissue-type plasminogen activator or other unrelated proteins....

  11. Intravenous adenosine SPECT thallium imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyce, J.M.; Grossman, S.J.; Garrett, J.S.; Sharma, B.; Geller, M.; Sweeney, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper determines the safety and efficacy of intravenous (IV) adenosine in females for the evaluation of coronary artery disease, since only limited data are available. Eighty consecutive studies of 78 female subjects (aged 43-83 years) using IV adenosine (0.14 mg/kg per minute) with T1-201 SPECT imaging were reviewed. Fifty-eight (73%) had mild symptoms; mild dyspnea (24%), flushing (23%), chest pain (23%), headache (11%), dizziness (11%), weakness (9%), nausea (8%), abdominal pain (8%), arm pain (6%), chest tightness (4%), neck tightness (4%), dry mouth (4%), and dropped P waves (4%). Four had moderate symptoms: dyspnea requiring Proventil or aminophylline (2%), significant hypotension (1%), and third-degree atrioventicular heart block (1%). Two had severe symptoms (ventricular tachycardia requiring cardioversion (1%) and severe dyspnea requiring epinephrine (1%). Twenty-two (28%) underwent cardiac catheterization that demonstrated coronary artery disease or postangioplasty results. The thallium SPECT images were 94% sensitive and 100% specific in detecting significant disease. The one false-negative result was in a subject who experienced no symptoms for ECG changes during adenosine infusion. Ischemic ECG changes were 35% sensitive and 100% specific. Chest pain was 53% sensitive and 60% specific

  12. Metastasis of transgenic breast cancer in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almholt, Kasper; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Frandsen, Thomas Leth

    2003-01-01

    of metastasizing breast cancer. In these tumors, the expression pattern of uPA and PAI-1 resembles that of human ductal breast cancer and plasminogen is required for efficient metastasis. In a cohort of 63 transgenic mice that were either PAI-1-deficient or wild-type sibling controls, primary tumor growth......, high levels of PAI-1 as well as uPA are equally associated with poor prognosis in cancer patients. PAI-1 is thought to play a vital role for the controlled extracellular proteolysis during tumor neovascularization. We have studied the effect of PAI-1 deficiency in a transgenic mouse model...... and vascular density were unaffected by PAI-1 status. PAI-1 deficiency also did not significantly affect the lung metastatic burden. These results agree with the virtual lack of spontaneous phenotype in PAI-1-deficient mice and humans and may reflect that the plasminogen activation reaction is not rate...

  13. Effect of purified, soluble urokinase receptor on the plasminogen-prourokinase activation system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Danø, K

    1996-01-01

    The extracellular proteolytic pathway mediated by the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is a cascade system, initiated by activation of the zymogen, pro-uPA. Pro-uPA as well as uPA binds to the cellular uPA receptor (uPAR) which has a central function in cell-dependent acceleration of the cas......The extracellular proteolytic pathway mediated by the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is a cascade system, initiated by activation of the zymogen, pro-uPA. Pro-uPA as well as uPA binds to the cellular uPA receptor (uPAR) which has a central function in cell-dependent acceleration...

  14. Colonic lesions, cytokine profiles, and gut microbiota in plasminogen-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Bill; Krych, Lukasz; Lund, Leif R.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen-deficient (FVB/NPan-plg(tm1Jld), plg(tm1Jld)) mice, which are widely used as a wound-healing model, are prone to spontaneous rectal prolapses. The aims of this study were 1) to evaluate the fecal microbiome of plg(tm1Jld) mice for features that might contribute to the development of r...... the composition of the gut microbiota, and none of the clinical or biochemical parameters correlated with the gut microbiota composition....

  15. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 polymers, induced by inactivating amphipathic organochemical ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Katrine E; Einholm, Anja P; Christensen, Anni

    2003-01-01

    Negatively charged organochemical inactivators of the anti-proteolytic activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) convert it to inactive polymers. As investigated by native gel electrophoresis, the size of the PAI-1 polymers ranged from dimers to multimers of more than 20 units...... to beta-sheet A in another molecule. Induction of serpin polymerization by small organochemical ligands is a novel finding and is of protein chemical interest in relation to pathological protein polymerization in general. Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Jun-15...

  16. INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS IN INTRAVENOUS DRUGS ABUSED PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Y. Ponomareva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-year observation of acute tricuspid infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abused patient: diagnosis, clinical features, visceral lesions, the possibility of cardiac surgery and conservative treatment, outcome.

  17. Intravenous immunoglobulin for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eftimov, Filip; Winer, John B.; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob; van Schaik, Ivo N.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) causes progressive or relapsing weakness and numbness of the limbs, developing over at least two months. Uncontrolled studies suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) helps. This review was first published in 2002 and has since

  18. Intravenous immunoglobulin for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eftimov, Filip; Winer, John B.; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob; van Schaik, Ivo N.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) causes progressive or relapsing weakness and numbness of the limbs, developing over at least two months. Uncontrolled studies suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) helps. Objectives To review systematically the

  19. Acute toxicity of intravenously administered titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaying Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With a wide range of applications, titanium dioxide (TiO₂ nanoparticles (NPs are manufactured worldwide in large quantities. Recently, in the field of nanomedicine, intravenous injection of TiO₂ nanoparticulate carriers directly into the bloodstream has raised public concerns on their toxicity to humans. METHODS: In this study, mice were injected intravenously with a single dose of TiO₂ NPs at varying dose levels (0, 140, 300, 645, or 1387 mg/kg. Animal mortality, blood biochemistry, hematology, genotoxicity and histopathology were investigated 14 days after treatment. RESULTS: Death of mice in the highest dose (1387 mg/kg group was observed at day two after TiO₂ NPs injection. At day 7, acute toxicity symptoms, such as decreased physical activity and decreased intake of food and water, were observed in the highest dose group. Hematological analysis and the micronucleus test showed no significant acute hematological or genetic toxicity except an increase in the white blood cell (WBC count among mice 645 mg/kg dose group. However, the spleen of the mice showed significantly higher tissue weight/body weight (BW coefficients, and lower liver and kidney coefficients in the TiO₂ NPs treated mice compared to control. The biochemical parameters and histological tissue sections indicated that TiO₂ NPs treatment could induce different degrees of damage in the brain, lung, spleen, liver and kidneys. However, no pathological effects were observed in the heart in TiO₂ NPs treated mice. CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous injection of TiO₂ NPs at high doses in mice could cause acute toxicity effects in the brain, lung, spleen, liver, and kidney. No significant hematological or genetic toxicity was observed.

  20. Maternal intravenous fluids and postpartum breast changes: a pilot observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawa-Myles, Sonya; Noel-Weiss, Joy; Dunn, Sandra; Peterson, Wendy E; Cotterman, Kermaline Jean

    2015-01-01

    The current breastfeeding initiation rate in Canada is approximately 87%. By one month, about 21% of women have stopped breastfeeding. Engorgement and edema in breast tissue can lead to breastfeeding challenges which may contribute to early weaning. The aims of this pilot research study were to explore the relationship between intrapartum intravenous fluids given to mothers and postpartum breast swelling in the first 10 days postpartum and to determine if a larger study was warranted and feasible. A prospective, longitudinal, observational cohort pilot study with repeated measures and a within-subjects design was completed. Participants were first time mothers who have a single, healthy newborn and had a spontaneous vaginal birth. Daily data collection from admission into the study until postpartum day 10 took place. Descriptive statistics are reported and linear regression analysis was used to model the relationship between IV therapy and postpartum breast edema. Women who received intravenous fluids during labour had higher levels of breast edema postpartum and rated their breasts as firmer and more tender than women who did not receive intravenous fluids. Participants who had intravenous fluids described patterns of fullness that appeared to be related to edema as opposed to fullness associated with engorgement and lactogenesis II. The findings demonstrate that mothers in this pilot study who received intravenous fluids in labour and postpartum had higher levels of breast edema. These results suggest a larger study is warranted to more fully examine the effects of intravenous fluids on postpartum breast swelling.

  1. The Biochemistry and Regulation of S100A10: A Multifunctional Plasminogen Receptor Involved in Oncogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A. Madureira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasminogen receptors mediate the production and localization to the cell surface of the broad spectrum proteinase, plasmin. S100A10 is a key regulator of cellular plasmin production and may account for as much as 50% of cellular plasmin generation. In parallel to plasminogen, the plasminogen-binding site on S100A10 is highly conserved from mammals to fish. S100A10 is constitutively expressed in many cells and is also induced by many diverse factors and physiological stimuli including dexamethasone, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-α, interferon-γ, nerve growth factor, keratinocyte growth factor, retinoic acid, and thrombin. Therefore, S100A10 is utilized by cells to regulate plasmin proteolytic activity in response to a wide diversity of physiological stimuli. The expression of the oncogenes, PML-RARα and KRas, also stimulates the levels of S100A10, suggesting a role for S100A10 in pathophysiological processes such as in the oncogenic-mediated increases in plasmin production. The S100A10-null mouse model system has established the critical role that S100A10 plays as a regulator of fibrinolysis and oncogenesis. S100A10 plays two major roles in oncogenesis, first as a regulator of cancer cell invasion and metastasis and secondly as a regulator of the recruitment of tumor-associated cells, such as macrophages, to the tumor site.

  2. Inhibition of receptor-bound urokinase by plasminogen-activator inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellis, Vincent John; Wun, T C; Behrendt, N

    1990-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) binds to a specific receptor on various cell types, the bound molecule retaining its enzymatic activity against plasminogen. We have now investigated whether receptor-bound uPA also retains the ability to react with and be inhibited by plasminogen...... activator inhibitors (PAI-1 and PAI-2). uPA bound to its receptor on human U937 monocyte-like cells was inhibited by PAI-1 (in its active form in the presence of vitronectin fragments) with an association rate constant of 4.5 x 10(6) M-1 s-1, which was 40% lower than that obtained for uPA in solution (7.9 x...... 10(6) M-1 s-1). The inhibition of uPA by PAI-2 was decreased to a similar extent by receptor binding, falling from 5.3 x 10(5) to 3.3 x 10(5) M-1 s-1. Stimulation of U937 cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was accompanied by a further reduction in receptor-bound uPA inhibition by PAI-1...

  3. CipA of Acinetobacter baumannii Is a Novel Plasminogen Binding and Complement Inhibitory Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenigs, Arno; Stahl, Julia; Averhoff, Beate; Göttig, Stephan; Wichelhaus, Thomas A; Wallich, Reinhard; Zipfel, Peter F; Kraiczy, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging opportunistic pathogen, responsible for up to 10% of gram-negative, nosocomial infections. The global increase of multidrug-resistant and pan-resistant Acinetobacter isolates presents clinicians with formidable challenges. To establish a persistent infection,A. baumannii must overcome the detrimental effects of complement as the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. However, the immune evasion principles underlying serum resistance inA. baumannii remain elusive. Here, we identified a novel plasminogen-binding protein, termed CipA. Bound plasminogen, upon conversion to active plasmin, degraded fibrinogen and complement C3b and contributed to serum resistance. Furthermore, CipA directly inhibited the alternative pathway of complement in vitro, irrespective of its ability to bind plasminogen. A CipA-deficient mutant was efficiently killed by human serum and showed a defect in the penetration of endothelial monolayers, demonstrating that CipA is a novel multifunctional protein that contributes to the pathogenesis ofA. baumannii. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Time to treatment with intravenous alteplase and outcome in stroke: an updated pooled analysis of ECASS, ATLANTIS, NINDS, and EPITHET trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Kennedy R; Bluhmki, Erich; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Brott, Thomas G; Toni, Danilo; Grotta, James C; Albers, Gregory W; Kaste, Markku; Marler, John R; Hamilton, Scott A; Tilley, Barbara C; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Hacke, Werner; Allen, Kathryn; Mau, Jochen; Meier, Dieter; del Zoppo, Gregory; De Silva, D A; Butcher, K S; Parsons, M W; Barber, P A; Levi, C; Bladin, C; Byrnes, G

    2010-05-15

    Early administration of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) after ischaemic stroke improves outcome. Previous analysis of combined data from individual patients suggested potential benefit beyond 3 h from stroke onset. We re-examined the effect of time to treatment with intravenous rt-PA (alteplase) on therapeutic benefit and clinical risk by adding recent trial data to the analysis. We added data from ECASS III (821 patients) and EPITHET (100 patients) to a pool of common data elements from six other trials of alteplase for acute stroke (2775 patients). We used multivariate logistic regression to assess the relation of stroke onset to start of treatment (OTT) with treatment on favourable 3-month outcome (defined as modified Rankin score 0-1), mortality, and occurrence and outcome of clinically relevant parenchymal haemorrhage. The presence of an arterial occlusion was inferred from the patient's symptoms and absence of haemorrhage or other causes of ischaemic stroke. Vascular imaging was not a requirement in the trials. All patients with confirmed OTT within 360 min were included in the analysis. Treatment was started within 360 min of stroke onset in 3670 patients randomly allocated to alteplase (n=1850) or to placebo (n=1820). Odds of a favourable 3-month outcome increased as OTT decreased (p=0.0269) and no benefit of alteplase treatment was seen after around 270 min. Adjusted odds of a favourable 3-month outcome were 2.55 (95% CI 1.44-4.52) for 0-90 min, 1.64 (1.12-2.40) for 91-180 min, 1.34 (1.06-1.68) for 181-270 min, and 1.22 (0.92-1.61) for 271-360 min in favour of the alteplase group. Large parenchymal haemorrhage was seen in 96 (5.2%) of 1850 patients assigned to alteplase and 18 (1.0%) of 1820 controls, with no clear relation to OTT (p=0.4140). Adjusted odds of mortality increased with OTT (p=0.0444) and were 0.78 (0.41-1.48) for 0-90 min, 1.13 (0.70-1.82) for 91-180 min, 1.22 (0.87-1.71) for 181-270 min, and 1.49 (1.00-2.21) for

  5. Prognostic value analysis of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in oral squamous cell carcinoma: an immunohistochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacchiocchi, Roberta; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Fazioli, Francesca; Rubini, Corrado; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Borghetti, Giulia; Procacci, Pasquale; Nocini, Pier Francesco; Santarelli, Andrea; Rocchetti, Romina; Ciavarella, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents the most common oral malignancy. Despite recent advances in therapy, up to 50% of the cases have relapse and/or metastasis. There is therefore a strong need for the identification of new biological markers able to predict the clinical behaviour of these lesions in order to improve quality of life and overall survival. Among tumour progression biomarkers, already known for their involvement in other neoplasia, a crucial role is ascribed to the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), which plays a multiple role in extracellular proteolysis, cell migration and tissue remodelling not only as a receptor for the zymogen pro-uPA but also as a component for cell adhesion and as a chemoattractant. The purpose of this study was to gain information on the expression of uPAR in OSCC and to verify whether this molecule can have a role as a prognostic/predictive marker for this neoplasia. In a retrospective study, a cohort of 189 OSCC patients was investigated for uPAR expression and its cellular localization by immunohistochemistry. As standard controls, 8 normal oral mucosal tissues free of malignancy, obtained from patients with no evidence or history of oral cavity tumours, were similarly investigated. After grouping for uPAR expression, OSCCs were statistically analyzed for the variables age, gender, histological grading (G), tumour size, recurrence, TNM staging and overall survival rate. In our immunohistochemical study, 74 cases (39.1%) of OSCC showed a mostly cytoplasmic positivity for uPAR, whereas 115 were negative. uPAR expression correlated with tumour differentiation grade and prognosis: percentage of positive cases was the greatest in G3 (70.4%) and patients positives for uPAR expression had an expectation of life lower than those for uPAR negatives. The results obtained in this study suggest a role of uPAR as a potential biomarker useful to identify higher risk subgroups of OSCC patients

  6. Intravenous iron-containing products: EMA procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    A European reassessment has led to identical changes in the summaries of product characteristics (SPCs) for all intravenous iron-containing products: the risk of serious adverse effects is now highlighted, underlining the fact that intravenous iron-containing products should only be used when the benefits clearly outweigh the harms. Unfortunately, iron dextran still remains on the market despite a higher risk of hypersensitivity reactions than with iron sucrose.

  7. Contrast medium extravasation in intravenous urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, U.; Becker-Gaab, C.; Hahn, D.

    1984-01-01

    Aetiology and diagnostic procedure of calyceal fornix rupture during intravenous urography are discussed. In the literature the fornix rupture is discribed as a spontaneous event - not so in the four cases presented. In two cases a sudden increase in intrapelvic pressure was due to an ureteric calculus, in the other cases an obstruction of the ureter was secondary to neoplasm. It is recommended to perform a CT as soon as a contrastmedium extravasation in intravenous urography is diagnosed. (orig.) [de

  8. Contrast medium extravasation in intravenous urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosch, U.; Becker-Gaab, C.; Hahn, D.

    1984-09-01

    Aetiology and diagnostic procedure of calyceal fornix rupture during intravenous urography are discussed. In the literature the fornix rupture is discribed as a spontaneous event - not so in the four cases presented. In two cases a sudden increase in intrapelvic pressure was due to an ureteric calculus, in the other cases an obstruction of the ureter was secondary to neoplasm. It is recommended to perform a CT as soon as a contrast medium extravasation in intravenous urography is diagnosed.

  9. Tumour microenvironments induce expression of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR and concomitant activation of gelatinolytic enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Synnøve Magnussen

    Full Text Available The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR is associated with poor prognosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, and increased expression of uPAR is often found at the invasive tumour front. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the role of uPAR in invasion and metastasis of OSCC, and the effects of various tumour microenvironments in these processes. Furthermore, we wanted to study whether the cells' expression level of uPAR affected the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes.The Plaur gene was both overexpressed and knocked-down in the murine OSCC cell line AT84. Tongue and skin tumours were established in syngeneic mice, and cells were also studied in an ex vivo leiomyoma invasion model. Soluble factors derived from leiomyoma tissue, as well as purified extracellular matrix (ECM proteins, were assessed for their ability to affect uPAR expression, glycosylation and cleavage. Activity of gelatinolytic enzymes in the tissues were assessed by in situ zymography.We found that increased levels of uPAR did not induce tumour invasion or metastasis. However, cells expressing low endogenous levels of uPAR in vitro up-regulated uPAR expression both in tongue, skin and leiomyoma tissue. Various ECM proteins had no effect on uPAR expression, while soluble factors originating from the leiomyoma tissue increased both the expression and glycosylation of uPAR, and possibly also affected the proteolytic processing of uPAR. Tumours with high levels of uPAR, as well as cells invading leiomyoma tissue with up-regulated uPAR expression, all displayed enhanced activity of gelatinolytic enzymes.Although high levels of uPAR are not sufficient to induce invasion and metastasis, the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes was increased. Furthermore, several tumour microenvironments have the capacity to induce up-regulation of uPAR expression, and soluble factors in the tumour microenvironment may have an important role in the regulation of posttranslational

  10. Tumour Microenvironments Induce Expression of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR) and Concomitant Activation of Gelatinolytic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Synnøve; Hadler-Olsen, Elin; Latysheva, Nadezhda; Pirila, Emma; Steigen, Sonja E.; Hanes, Robert; Salo, Tuula; Winberg, Jan-Olof; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Svineng, Gunbjørg

    2014-01-01

    Background The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is associated with poor prognosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and increased expression of uPAR is often found at the invasive tumour front. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the role of uPAR in invasion and metastasis of OSCC, and the effects of various tumour microenvironments in these processes. Furthermore, we wanted to study whether the cells’ expression level of uPAR affected the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes. Methods The Plaur gene was both overexpressed and knocked-down in the murine OSCC cell line AT84. Tongue and skin tumours were established in syngeneic mice, and cells were also studied in an ex vivo leiomyoma invasion model. Soluble factors derived from leiomyoma tissue, as well as purified extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, were assessed for their ability to affect uPAR expression, glycosylation and cleavage. Activity of gelatinolytic enzymes in the tissues were assessed by in situ zymography. Results We found that increased levels of uPAR did not induce tumour invasion or metastasis. However, cells expressing low endogenous levels of uPAR in vitro up-regulated uPAR expression both in tongue, skin and leiomyoma tissue. Various ECM proteins had no effect on uPAR expression, while soluble factors originating from the leiomyoma tissue increased both the expression and glycosylation of uPAR, and possibly also affected the proteolytic processing of uPAR. Tumours with high levels of uPAR, as well as cells invading leiomyoma tissue with up-regulated uPAR expression, all displayed enhanced activity of gelatinolytic enzymes. Conclusions Although high levels of uPAR are not sufficient to induce invasion and metastasis, the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes was increased. Furthermore, several tumour microenvironments have the capacity to induce up-regulation of uPAR expression, and soluble factors in the tumour microenvironment may have an important role in the

  11. Scientific Rationale for the Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria for Intravenous Alteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaerschalk, Bart M; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Adeoye, Opeolu M; Demchuk, Andrew M; Fugate, Jennifer E; Grotta, James C; Khalessi, Alexander A; Levy, Elad I; Palesch, Yuko Y; Prabhakaran, Shyam; Saposnik, Gustavo; Saver, Jeffrey L; Smith, Eric E

    2016-02-01

    To critically review and evaluate the science behind individual eligibility criteria (indication/inclusion and contraindications/exclusion criteria) for intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (alteplase) treatment in acute ischemic stroke. This will allow us to better inform stroke providers of quantitative and qualitative risks associated with alteplase administration under selected commonly and uncommonly encountered clinical circumstances and to identify future research priorities concerning these eligibility criteria, which could potentially expand the safe and judicious use of alteplase and improve outcomes after stroke. Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the American Heart Association's Manuscript Oversight Committee. The writers used systematic literature reviews, references to published clinical and epidemiology studies, morbidity and mortality reports, clinical and public health guidelines, authoritative statements, personal files, and expert opinion to summarize existing evidence and to indicate gaps in current knowledge and, when appropriate, formulated recommendations using standard American Heart Association criteria. All members of the writing group had the opportunity to comment on and approved the final version of this document. The document underwent extensive American Heart Association internal peer review, Stroke Council Leadership review, and Scientific Statements Oversight Committee review before consideration and approval by the American Heart Association Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. After a review of the current literature, it was clearly evident that the levels of evidence supporting individual exclusion criteria for intravenous alteplase vary widely. Several exclusionary criteria have already undergone

  12. Gender affects skin wound healing in plasminogen deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte Rønø

    Full Text Available The fibrinolytic activity of plasmin plays a fundamental role in resolution of blood clots and clearance of extravascular deposited fibrin in damaged tissues. These vital functions of plasmin are exploited by malignant cells to accelerate tumor growth and facilitate metastases. Mice lacking functional plasmin thus display decreased tumor growth in a variety of cancer models. Interestingly, this role of plasmin has, in regard to skin cancer, been shown to be restricted to male mice. It remains to be clarified whether gender also affects other phenotypic characteristics of plasmin deficiency or if this gender effect is restricted to skin cancer. To investigate this, we tested the effect of gender on plasmin dependent immune cell migration, accumulation of hepatic fibrin depositions, skin composition, and skin wound healing. Gender did not affect immune cell migration or hepatic fibrin accumulation in neither wildtype nor plasmin deficient mice, and the existing differences in skin composition between males and females were unaffected by plasmin deficiency. In contrast, gender had a marked effect on the ability of plasmin deficient mice to heal skin wounds, which was seen as an accelerated wound closure in female versus male plasmin deficient mice. Further studies showed that this gender effect could not be reversed by ovariectomy, suggesting that female sex-hormones did not mediate the accelerated skin wound healing in plasmin deficient female mice. Histological examination of healed wounds revealed larger amounts of fibrotic scars in the provisional matrix of plasmin deficient male mice compared to female mice. These fibrotic scars correlated to an obstruction of cell infiltration of the granulation tissue, which is a prerequisite for wound healing. In conclusion, the presented data show that the gender dependent effect of plasmin deficiency is tissue specific and may be secondary to already established differences between genders, such as skin

  13. Intravenous fluids in acute decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikdeli, Behnood; Strait, Kelly M; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Li, Shu-Xia; Mody, Purav; Partovian, Chohreh; Coca, Steven G; Kim, Nancy; Horwitz, Leora I; Testani, Jeffrey M; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-02-01

    This study sought to determine the use of intravenous fluids in the early care of patients with acute decompensated heart failure (HF) who are treated with loop diuretics. Intravenous fluids are routinely provided to many hospitalized patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted with HF to 346 hospitals from 2009 to 2010. We assessed the use of intravenous fluids during the first 2 days of hospitalization. We determined the frequency of adverse in-hospital outcomes. We assessed variation in the use of intravenous fluids across hospitals and patient groups. Among 131,430 hospitalizations for HF, 13,806 (11%) were in patients treated with intravenous fluids during the first 2 days. The median volume of administered fluid was 1,000 ml (interquartile range: 1,000 to 2,000 ml), and the most commonly used fluids were normal saline (80%) and half-normal saline (12%). Demographic characteristics and comorbidities were similar in hospitalizations in which patients did and did not receive fluids. Patients who were treated with intravenous fluids had higher rates of subsequent critical care admission (5.7% vs. 3.8%; p fluid treatment varied widely across hospitals (range: 0% to 71%; median: 12.5%). Many patients who are hospitalized with HF and receive diuretics also receive intravenous fluids during their early inpatient care, and the proportion varies among hospitals. Such practice is associated with worse outcomes and warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Gender affects skin wound healing in plasminogen deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønø, Birgitte; Engelholm, Lars Henning; Lund, Leif Røge

    2013-01-01

    or if this gender effect is restricted to skin cancer. To investigate this, we tested the effect of gender on plasmin dependent immune cell migration, accumulation of hepatic fibrin depositions, skin composition, and skin wound healing. Gender did not affect immune cell migration or hepatic fibrin accumulation......The fibrinolytic activity of plasmin plays a fundamental role in resolution of blood clots and clearance of extravascular deposited fibrin in damaged tissues. These vital functions of plasmin are exploited by malignant cells to accelerate tumor growth and facilitate metastases. Mice lacking...... functional plasmin thus display decreased tumor growth in a variety of cancer models. Interestingly, this role of plasmin has, in regard to skin cancer, been shown to be restricted to male mice. It remains to be clarified whether gender also affects other phenotypic characteristics of plasmin deficiency...

  15. Prognostic significance of urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 mRNA expression in lymph node- and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krause Alexander

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most thoroughly studied systems in relation to its prognostic relevance in patients with breast cancer, is the plasminogen activation system that comprises of, among others, the urokinase Plasminogen Activator (uPA and its main inhibitor, the Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1. In this study, we investigated the prognostic value of uPA and PAI-1 at the mRNA level in lymph node- and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Methods The study included a retrospective series of 87 patients with hormone-receptor positive and axillary lymph node-positive breast cancer. All patients received radiotherapy, adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy and five years of tamoxifen treatment. The median patient age was 54 and the median follow-up time was 79 months. Distant relapse occurred in 30 patients and 22 patients died from breast cancer during follow-up. We investigated the prognostic value of uPA and PAI-1 at the mRNA level as measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Results uPA and PAI-1 gene expression was not found to be correlated with any of the established clinical and pathological factors. Metastasis-free Survival (MFS and Breast Cancer specific Survival (BCS were significantly shorter in patients expressing high levels of PAI-1 mRNA (p PAI-1 mRNA appeared to be the strongest prognostic factor for MFS (Hazard Ratio (HR = 10.12; p = 0.0002 and for BCS (HR = 13.17; p = 0.0003. Furthermore, uPA gene expression was not significantly associated neither with MFS (p = 0.41 nor with BCS (p = 0.19. In a Cox-multivariate regression analysis, uPA expression did not demonstrate significant independent prognostic value. Conclusion These findings indicate that high PAI-1 mRNA expression represents a strong and independent unfavorable prognostic factor for the development of metastases and for breast cancer specific survival in a population of hormone receptor- and lymph node-positive breast cancer patients.

  16. Prognostic significance of urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 mRNA expression in lymph node- and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leissner, Philippe; Verjat, Thibault; Bachelot, Thomas; Paye, Malick; Krause, Alexander; Puisieux, Alain; Mougin, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    One of the most thoroughly studied systems in relation to its prognostic relevance in patients with breast cancer, is the plasminogen activation system that comprises of, among others, the urokinase Plasminogen Activator (uPA) and its main inhibitor, the Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). In this study, we investigated the prognostic value of uPA and PAI-1 at the mRNA level in lymph node- and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. The study included a retrospective series of 87 patients with hormone-receptor positive and axillary lymph node-positive breast cancer. All patients received radiotherapy, adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy and five years of tamoxifen treatment. The median patient age was 54 and the median follow-up time was 79 months. Distant relapse occurred in 30 patients and 22 patients died from breast cancer during follow-up. We investigated the prognostic value of uPA and PAI-1 at the mRNA level as measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. uPA and PAI-1 gene expression was not found to be correlated with any of the established clinical and pathological factors. Metastasis-free Survival (MFS) and Breast Cancer specific Survival (BCS) were significantly shorter in patients expressing high levels of PAI-1 mRNA (p < 0.0001; p < 0.0001; respectively). In Cox multivariate analysis, the level of PAI-1 mRNA appeared to be the strongest prognostic factor for MFS (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 10.12; p = 0.0002) and for BCS (HR = 13.17; p = 0.0003). Furthermore, uPA gene expression was not significantly associated neither with MFS (p = 0.41) nor with BCS (p = 0.19). In a Cox-multivariate regression analysis, uPA expression did not demonstrate significant independent prognostic value. These findings indicate that high PAI-1 mRNA expression represents a strong and independent unfavorable prognostic factor for the development of metastases and for breast cancer specific survival in a population of hormone receptor- and lymph node-positive breast cancer

  17. Aspirin Inhibits IKK-β-mediated Prostate Cancer Cell Invasion by Targeting Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 and Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chongjun; Zhang, Nini; Feng, Yang; Cao, Jiewei; Chen, Xuyi; Liu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin has been demonstrated to possess potent chemopreventive and anticancer effects on prostate cancer. However, the more detailed molecular mechanisms of aspirin to suppress prostate cancer cell invasion have not been clearly elucidated. Transwell assays were performed to evaluate the effects of aspirin on cell invasion. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and serine proteinases activities in cell media were examined by gelatin zymography and ELISA. In addition, inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase-β (IKK-β) phosphorylation and IKK-β kinase activity were measured to assess the effects of aspirin on IKK-β activation. We found that aspirin suppressed the invasion and attachment in human prostate cancer cells. Aspirin treatment significantly resulted in reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and upregulation of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) activity, which are the proteolytic enzymes contributing to the degradation of extracellular matrix and basement membrane in cell invasion and metastasis. Our data further showed that aspirin was able to inhibit both urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression in the cells. In addition, aspirin treatment caused a strong decrease in nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation, inhibitor of κB (IκB)-α phosphorylation together with translocation of NF-κB p65 to nucleus and IκB kinase (IKK)- β activation. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of aspirin on cell invasion were reversed by IKK-β overexpression, while the IKK inhibitor sensitizes the anti-invasive effect of aspirin in prostate cancer cells. The present research concluded that aspirin suppressed prostate cancer cell invasion by reducing MMP-9 activity and uPA expression through decreasing of IKK-β-mediated NF-κB activation, indicating that the ability of aspirin to inhibit cell invasion might be useful in the chemoprevention of metastatic prostate cancer. © 2017 The Author(s)Published by

  18. Aspirin Inhibits IKK-β-mediated Prostate Cancer Cell Invasion by Targeting Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 and Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongjun Shi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Aspirin has been demonstrated to possess potent chemopreventive and anticancer effects on prostate cancer. However, the more detailed molecular mechanisms of aspirin to suppress prostate cancer cell invasion have not been clearly elucidated. Methods: Transwell assays were performed to evaluate the effects of aspirin on cell invasion. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and serine proteinases activities in cell media were examined by gelatin zymography and ELISA. In addition, inhibitor of κB (IκB kinase-β (IKK-β phosphorylation and IKK-β kinase activity were measured to assess the effects of aspirin on IKK-β activation. Results: We found that aspirin suppressed the invasion and attachment in human prostate cancer cells. Aspirin treatment significantly resulted in reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 and upregulation of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1 activity, which are the proteolytic enzymes contributing to the degradation of extracellular matrix and basement membrane in cell invasion and metastasis. Our data further showed that aspirin was able to inhibit both urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 expression in the cells. In addition, aspirin treatment caused a strong decrease in nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB activation, inhibitor of κB (IκB-α phosphorylation together with translocation of NF-κB p65 to nucleus and IκB kinase (IKK- β activation. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of aspirin on cell invasion were reversed by IKK-β overexpression, while the IKK inhibitor sensitizes the anti-invasive effect of aspirin in prostate cancer cells. Conclusion: The present research concluded that aspirin suppressed prostate cancer cell invasion by reducing MMP-9 activity and uPA expression through decreasing of IKK-β-mediated NF-κB activation, indicating that the ability of aspirin to inhibit cell invasion might be useful in the chemoprevention of

  19. [Pharmacokinetics of α-asarone after intranasal and intravenous administration with PLA-α-asarone nanoparticles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jin; Guo, Li-Wei; Fu, Ting-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Long; Dai, Zhen-Nan; Zhan, Guan-Jun; Chen, Li-Li

    2017-06-01

    PLA-α-asarone nanoparticles were prepared by using organic solvent evaporation method, and their in vivo distribution and brain targeting after intranasal administration were studied as compared with intravenous administration. The results showed that brain targeting coefficient of PLA-α-asarone nanoparticles after intranasal and intravenous administration was 1.65 and 1.16 respectively. The absolute bioavailability, brain-targeting efficiency and the percentage of nasal-brain delivery of PLA-α-asarone nanoparticles were 74.2%, 142.24 and 29.83%, respectively after intranasal administration. The results of fluorescence labeling showed that the fluorescent intensity of coumarin-6 in the brain tissue was the highest after intranasal administration of PLA-α-asarone fluorescent nanoparticles, achieving the purpose of brain-targeted drug delivery. The fluorescent intensity of coumarin-6 in liver tissue after intravenous administration of PLA-α-asarone nanoparticles was much higher than that after intranasal administration, indicating that intranasal administration of PLA-α-asarone nanoparticles could decrease drug-induced hepatotoxicity. In addition, the fluorescent intensity of coumarin-6 in lung tissue was weaker after intranasal administration, which solved the shortcomings of intranasal administration of α-asarone dry powder prepared by airflow pulverization method. In vivo studies indicated that PLA-α-asarone nanoparticles after intranasal administration had a stronger brain targeting as compared with intravenous administration. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  20. What´s cheapest, intravenous iron sucrose- or intravenous iron carboxymaltose treatment in IBD patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Palle; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik

      What´s cheapest, intravenous iron sucrose- or intravenous iron carboxymaltose treatment in IBD patients? It dependent on the economic evaluation perspective!   Aim: To evaluate the health care cost for intravenous iron sucrose (Venofer®, Vifor) and intravenous iron carboxymaltose (Ferinject......-cost per mg iron is for iron carboxymaltose approximately double the cost of iron sucrose.   Patients and Methods: Data related to 111 IBD-patients treated with intravenous iron at Aarhus University Hospital from August 2005 until October 2009 was used for the economic evaluation. Analysis included......, utensils and ½ hour spend by a nurse per visit; showed approximately 150€ extra cost per 1000 mg Fe++ administrated, if iron carboxymaltose was chosen. In contrast the CEA including both BIA-values and patient-related costs (transportation and lost income) showed iron carboxymaltose to be more cost...

  1. Acute Forefoot Phlegmon – A Complication of Intravenous Heroin-Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections of the skin and soft tissues (SSTI are clinical entities with variable presentations, causes, and levels of clinical severity. They are frequent in emergency departments. The most common pathogen in the Western World is Staphylococcus aureus. SSTI may provide a hint to underlying pathologies such as diabetes and other states of immune compromise. Here we present a 41-year-old non-diabetic male patient with pain and swelling of the left forefoot but not any recent trauma. Microbiology identified streptococci. The medical history was positive for intravenous heroin abuse. The diagnosis of forefoot phlegm due to drug addition was confirmed. Treatment was realised by a combination of intravenous antibiosis and drainage. Intravenous drug addiction is a significant risk factor for SSTI.

  2. SERPINE2, an inhibitor of plasminogen activators, is highly expressed in the human endometrium during the secretory phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwu Yuh-Ming

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SERPINE2, also known as protease nexin-1, belongs to the serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN superfamily. It is one of the potent SERPINs that modulates the activity of plasminogen activators (PAs. PAs and their SERPIN inhibitors, such as SERPINB2 and SERPINE1, were expressed in the human endometrium and were implicated in implantation. However, expression data about SERPINE2 in the human endometrium is still unknown. Thus, we conducted an investigation to reveal the spatiotemporal and cellular expression of SERPINE2 in the human uterus during the menstrual cycle. Methods Seven patients who underwent a hysterectomy and samples of 120 archived patients' endometrial curettage or parts of the uterus that were formalin-fixed and embedded in paraffin. Western blotting was performed to evaluate the specificity and sensitivity of the antibody. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to localize the SERPINE2 expression site. Quantitative analysis was conducted to evaluate expression levels of SERPINE2 in various sub-phases of the menstrual cycle. Results The SERPINE2 protein was primarily detected in the uterine fluid during the mid- and late-secretory phases of the menstrual cycle. It was predominantly expressed in the luminal and glandular epithelium, less in the myometrium, and only dispersedly in certain stromal cells throughout the menstrual cycle. A quantitative analysis of expression levels of SERPINE2 in the glandular epithelium revealed that it was highly expressed in the endometrium during the secretory phase compared to the proliferative phase. Conclusions The SERPINE2 protein is highly expressed in the endometrium during the secretory phase, indicating that it may participate in tissue remodeling involved in implantation.

  3. Truncated Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Protein Protects From Pulmonary Fibrosis Mediated by Irradiation in a Murine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eun Joo; McKay-Corkum, Grace; Chung, Su; White, Ayla; Scroggins, Bradley T. [Radiation Oncology, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branches, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Mulligan-Kehoe, Mary Jo [Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Citrin, Deborah, E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Oncology, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the delivery of recombinant truncated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) protein (rPAI-1{sub 23}) would protect from the development of radiation-induced lung injury. Methods and Materials: C57Bl/6 mice received intraperitoneal injections of rPAI-1{sub 23} (5.4 μg/kg/d) or vehicle for 18 weeks, beginning 2 days before irradiation (IR) (5 daily fractions of 6 Gy). Cohorts of mice were followed for survival (n=8 per treatment) and tissue collection (n=3 per treatment and time point). Fibrosis in lung was assessed with Masson-Trichrome staining and measurement of hydroxyproline content. Senescence was assessed with staining for β-galactosidase activity in lung and primary pneumocytes. Results: Hydroxyproline content in irradiated lung was significantly reduced in mice that received rPAI-1{sub 23} compared with mice that received vehicle (IR+vehicle: 84.97 μg/lung; IR+rPAI-1{sub 23}: 56.2 μg/lung, P=.001). C57Bl/6 mice exposed to IR+vehicle had dense foci of subpleural fibrosis at 19 weeks, whereas the lungs of mice exposed to IR+rPAI-1{sub 23} were largely devoid of fibrotic foci. Cellular senescence was significantly decreased by rPAI-1{sub 23} treatment in primary pneumocyte cultures and in lung at multiple time points after IR. Conclusions: These studies identify that rPAI-1{sub 23} is capable of preventing radiation-induced fibrosis in murine lungs. These antifibrotic effects are associated with increased fibrin metabolism, enhanced matrix metalloproteinase-3 expression, and reduced senescence in type 2 pneumocytes. Thus, rPAI-1{sub 23} is a novel therapeutic option for radiation-induced fibrosis.

  4. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene 4G/5G polymorphism in Turkish children with asthma and allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Ozlem Yilmaz; Ataç, F Belgin; Ogus, Ersin; Ozbek, Namik

    2009-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) has an essential role in tissue remodeling after inflammation. Recent literature revealed only one study evaluating PAI-1 4G/5G gene polymorphism in children with asthma and none in children with allergic rhinitis. We aimed to investigate distribution of PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism in a group of Turkish children with asthma and allergic rhinitis and compare these findings with those obtained in normal peers. Patients with physician-diagnosed asthma (n = 106) and allergic rhinitis (n = 99) and 83 healthy peers were included in this study. We evaluated PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism genotype as well as the possible association between PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism and pulmonary function tests, serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE), total eosinophil count, and skin-prick test positivity in our study. The prevalence of the 4G allele significantly exceeded the values found in the controls both in patients with asthma (p = 0.001) and in patients with allergic rhinitis (p = 0.002). Interestingly, comparison of asthmatic patients revealed that mean baseline percent forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity were significantly higher in patients who bear 5G/5G genotype than in those who have 4G/4G or 4G/5G genotypes. No statistically significant relationship were found between PAI-1 polymorphism and total serum IgE levels, total eosinophil count, or selected skin test responses to aeroallergens. Our study suggests that Turkish children with asthma or allergic rhinitis have a higher prevalence of PAI-1 4G allele compared with their healthy peers.

  5. A phase I trial of intravenous catumaxomab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mau-Sørensen, Morten; Dittrich, Christian; Dienstmann, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    design in epithelial cancers with known EpCAM expression. The dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) period consisted of 4 weeks, with weekly intravenous administration of catumaxomab. Key DLTs were ≥grade 3 optimally treated non-hematological toxicity; ≥grade 3 infusion-related reactions refractory to supportive....... A reversible decrease in liver function test (prothrombin time) at the 7-µg dose level was considered a DLT. The first patient at 10 µg experienced a fatal hepatic failure related to catumaxomab that led to the termination of the study. CONCLUSIONS: The MTD of weekly intravenous catumaxomab was 7 µg. Major...

  6. Intravenous polyclonal human immunoglobulins in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2008-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established therapy for demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. IVIG exerts a number of effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). Four double-blind IVIG trials have been performed in relapsing-remitting MS. A meta-analysis ......Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established therapy for demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. IVIG exerts a number of effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). Four double-blind IVIG trials have been performed in relapsing-remitting MS. A meta...

  7. Comparison of the inhibition of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) activity by monoclonal antibodies specific for u-PA as assessed by different assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boheemen, P.A. van; Hoogen, N.M. van den; Koolwijk, N.

    1995-01-01

    Six murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) were tested for their ability to inhibit u-PA activity in three different assays with respect to amidolytic activity, plasminogen activation and fibrinolytic activity. Two of the MAbs were able to

  8. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of saruplase, an unglycosylated single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator, in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, R. W.; Cohen, A. F.; Hopkins, G. R.; Beier, H.; Günzler, W. A.; van der Wouw, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    We examined in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) the pharmacokinetics of saruplase, an unglycosylated, single chain, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (rscu-PA) by measuring urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) antigen and total u-PA activity, its conversion to active

  9. Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel-1, a Possible Ligand of Plasminogen Kringle 5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Ku Liang

    Full Text Available Kringle 5, the fifth fragment of plasminogen, is known to be important for inhibiting the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cell (VEC, while not having any effects on normal endothelial cells. Therefore, it may be a potential tumor therapy candidate. However, the ligand of the Kringle 5 in VEC has not yet been identified. In this study, the possible ligand of Kringle 5 in vitro was screened and validated using Ph.D.-7 phage display peptide library with molecular docking, along with surface plasma resonance (SPR. After four rounds of panning, the specific clones of Kringle 5 were confirmed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The gene sequence analysis showed that they expressed the common amino sequence IGNSNTL. Then, using a NCBI BLAST, 103 matching sequences were found. Following the molecular docking evaluation and considering the acting function and pathway of the plasminogen Kringle 5 in the human body, the most promising candidate was determined to be voltage-dependent anion channel-1 (VDAC-1, which was able to bind to Kringle 5 at -822.65 J·mol-1 of the binding energy at the residues of Lys12, Thr19, Ser57, Thr188, Arg139, Asn214, Ser240 and Lys274. A strong dose-dependent interaction occurred between the VDAC-1 and Kringle 5 (binding constant 2.43 × 103 L·mol-1 in SPR observation. Therefore, this study proposed that VDAC-1 was a potential ligand of plasminogen Kringle 5, and also demonstrated that the screening and validation of protein ligand using phage display peptide library with the molecular docking, along with SPR, was a practicable application.

  10. Development of a plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) assay and comparison of plasma PAI-1 activity in hyperlipidemic/dyslipidemic dogs with either hyperadrenocorticism or diabetes mellitus, and healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Cheryl J; Koch, Michael; Behling-Kelly, Erica L

    2017-04-01

    Thrombosis is a serious complication of many canine diseases and may be related to decreased fibrinolytic potential. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the key regulator of fibrinolysis with increased levels demonstrated in states of pro-thrombosis and abnormal lipid metabolism. Our objective was to develop and validate a canine PAI-1 activity assay and test whether dogs with hyperadrenocorticism or diabetes mellitus that are hyperlipidemic/dyslipidemic have increased plasma PAI-1 activity. Functionally active PAI-1 in the plasma sample was incubated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), allowing the formation of a 1:1 stoichiometric inactive complex. Residual unbound tPA was then reacted with excess plasminogen in the presence of a colorimetric plasmin substrate. Plasmin production is quantified by computing the area under the curve of time (x) vs optical density (y) plot and converted to tPA IU/mL by comparison to a calibration curve of tPA standards. PAI-1 activity was determined by calculating the proportion of exogeneous tPA suppressed by PAI-1 in plasma. Assay verification included assessment of linearity, specificity, precision, sensitivity, and stability. PAI-1 activity was increased in hyperlipidemic compared to healthy dogs, but there was no significant difference between dogs with hyperadrenocorticism and diabetes mellitus. A near significant decrease in activity was detected in thawed plasma stored for 20h at 4°C. Our successfully validated assay offers a new tool for investigating fibrinolysis in dogs. Investigation of PAI-1 activity in dogs with other diseases associated with an increased risk of thrombosis would be valuable. Future studies of PAI-1 activity should consider its lability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cardiovascular effects of intravenous ghrelin infusion in healthy young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Esben Thyssen; Andersen, Niels Holmark; Hansen, Troels Krarup

    2007-01-01

    Ghrelin infusion improves cardiac function in patients suffering from cardiac failure, and bolus administration of ghrelin increases cardiac output in healthy subjects. The cardiovascular effects of more continuous intravenous ghrelin exposure remain to be studied. We therefore studied the cardio......Ghrelin infusion improves cardiac function in patients suffering from cardiac failure, and bolus administration of ghrelin increases cardiac output in healthy subjects. The cardiovascular effects of more continuous intravenous ghrelin exposure remain to be studied. We therefore studied...... the cardiovascular effects of a constant infusion of human ghrelin at a rate of 5 pmol/kg per minute for 180 min. Fifteen healthy, young (aged 23.2 ± 0.5 yr), normal-weight (23.0 ± 0.4 kg/m2) men volunteered in a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. With the subjects remaining fasting, peak...... myocardial systolic velocity S′, tissue tracking TT, left ventricular ejection fraction EF, and endothelium-dependent flow-mediated vasodilatation were measured. Ghrelin infusion increased S′ 9% (P = 0.002) and TT 10% (P

  12. Clinical experience with intravenous radiosensitizers in unresectable sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, T.J.; Glatstein, E.

    1987-01-01

    Traditionally, adult bone and soft tissue sarcomas have been considered to be ''radioresistant.'' Because of this philosophy, patients who present with locally advanced, unresectable sarcomas often are treated in a palliative fashion, usually with low-dose radiotherapy. Over the last 6 years, 29 patients with unresectable primary or metastatic sarcomas were treated using a combination of intravenous chemical radiosensitizers and high-dose irradiation. Twenty-two of 29 patients achieved clinical local control, with six patients having a complete clinical response. The time to tumor response is often several months or longer, which is in contrast to other tumor histologies (carcinomas, lymphomas), where tumor response usually occurs over several weeks. Several large tumors have shown only a minimal tumor response, yet were found to be sterilized in posttreatment biopsy or autopsy examination. Of 15 patients with primary sarcomas without metastases, 11 patients (73%) remain free of local tumor progression from 12 to 83 months. Adult high-grade sarcomas can be controlled with high-dose radiotherapy and intravenous radiosensitizers, although the precise role of these agents is unclear

  13. Plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 predicts myocardial infarction in HIV-1-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Katzenstein, Terese L; Benfield, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    of antiretroviral therapy, sex, smoking and no known cardiovascular disease. Levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, soluble endothelial selectin, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule, matrix metalloprotease 9, myeloperoxidase, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1...... levels of PAI-1 were associated with risk of first-time MI in HIV-1-infected individuals independently of cardiovascular risk factors, HIV parameters and antiretroviral therapy. Therefore PAI-1 may be used for risk stratification and prediction of CHD, but further studies are needed....

  14. Analysis of five streptokinase formulations using the euglobulin lysis test and the plasminogen activation assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couto L.T.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptokinase, a 47-kDa protein isolated and secreted by most group A, C and G ß-hemolytic streptococci, interacts with and activates human protein plasminogen to form an active complex capable of converting other plasminogen molecules to plasmin. Our objective was to compare five streptokinase formulations commercially available in Brazil in terms of their activity in the in vitro tests of euglobulin clot formation and of the hydrolysis of the plasmin-specific substrate S-2251(TM. Euglobulin lysis time was determined using a 96-well microtiter plate. Initially, human thrombin (10 IU/ml and streptokinase were placed in individual wells, clot formation was initiated by the addition of plasma euglobulin, and turbidity was measured at 340 nm every 30 s. In the second assay, plasminogen activation was measured using the plasmin-specific substrate S-2251(TM. Streptase(TM was used as the reference formulation because it presented the strongest fibrinolytic activity in the euglobulin lysis test. The Unitinase(TM and Solustrep(TM formulations were the weakest, showing about 50% activity compared to the reference formulation. All streptokinases tested activated plasminogen but significant differences were observed. In terms of total S-2251(TM activity per vial, Streptase(TM (75.7 ± 5.0 units and Streptonase(TM (94.7 ± 4.6 units had the highest activity, while Unitinase(TM (31.0 ± 2.4 units and Strek(TM (32.9 ± 3.3 units had the weakest activity. Solustrep(TM (53.3 ± 2.7 units presented intermediate activity. The variations among the different formulations for both euglobulin lysis test and chromogenic substrate hydrolysis correlated with the SDS-PAGE densitometric results for the amount of 47-kDa protein. These data show that the commercially available clinical streptokinase formulations vary significantly in their in vitro activity. Whether these differences have clinical implications needs to be investigated.

  15. Biochemical mechanism of action of a diketopiperazine inactivator of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einholm, Anja P; Pedersen, Katrine E; Wind, Troels

    2003-01-01

    XR5118 [(3 Z,6 Z )-6-benzylidine-3-(5-(2-dimethylaminoethyl-thio-))-2-(thienyl)methylene-2,5-dipiperazinedione hydrochloride] can inactivate the anti-proteolytic activity of the serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a potential therapeutic target in cancer and cardiovascular diseases......, situated above beta-sheet A, and is in agreement with the hypothesis that XR5118 binds laterally to beta-sheet A. These results improve our understanding of the unique conformational flexibility of serpins and the biochemical basis for using PAI-1 as a therapeutic target. Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Aug-1...

  16. The ligand-binding domain of the cell surface receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Ploug, M; Patthy, L

    1991-01-01

    The purified urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) was cleaved into two fragments by mild chymotrypsin treatment. The smaller fragment (apparent Mr 16,000) possessed the ligand-binding capability, as shown by chemical cross-linking analysis. This fragment constituted the NH2-terminal...... part of the intact receptor, probably including the whole sequence 1-87, and contained N-linked carbohydrate. After detergent phase separation in the Triton X-114 system, the fragment was present in the water phase where its binding activity could be demonstrated in the absence of the rest...

  17. Jet and ultrasonic nebulization of single chain urokinase plasminogen activator (scu-PA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münster, Anna-Marie; Bendstrup, E; Jensen, J.I.

    2000-01-01

    locally by nebulization in a recombinant zymogen form as single chain urokinase plasminogen activator (scu-PA). We aimed to characterize the particle size distribution, drug output, and enzymatic activity of scu-PA after nebulization with a Ventstream jet nebulizer (Medic-Aid, Bognor Regis, UK) and a Syst......'AM DP-100 ultrasonic nebulizer (Pulmolink, Kent, UK). The particle size distribution was measured with a laser diffraction method and the drug output was determined by collection on filters. The amount of protein on the filters was determined with the Lowry method, and the enzymatic activity after...... in terms of particle size distribution and preservation of fibrinolytic activity....

  18. Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor as a Marker for Use of Antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haastrup, Eva; Grau, Katrine; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of depression. A few cross-sectional population-based studies have found that depression is associated with increased levels of inflammatory markers. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activation receptor (suPAR) is known to be a stable marker...... for inflammation. We investigated the bidirectional association between suPAR levels and use of antidepressants. METHODS: suPAR level was measured in 9305 blood donors and analysed in relation to 5-years follow-up data on purchase of antidepressants and hospital diagnoses of depression from a nationwide Danish...

  19. Presence of urokinase plasminogen activator, its inhibitor and receptor in small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pappot, H.; Pfeiffer, P.; Grøndahl Hansen, J.

    1997-01-01

    Spreading of cancer cells is dependent on the combined action of several proteolytic enzymes, such as serine proteases, comprising the urokinase pathway of plasminogen activation. Previous studies of lung cancer indicate that expression, localization and prognostic impact of the components...... of the plasminogen activation system differ in the different non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) types, whereas the expression of the components in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has only sparingly been investigated. In the present study we investigate the presence of the components of the plasminogen activation...... that the plasminogen activation system could play a role in this type of cancer during invasion. In addition a difference in the levels of the components of the plasminogen activation system in NSCLC and SCLC is found, which could contribute to the differences in biology....

  20. INDUCTION AND/OR MAINTENANCE OF TUMOR DORMANCY BY DISRUPTION OF UROKINASE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR RECEPTOR-INTEGRIN INTERACTION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of inducing cancer cells into dormancy and treating cancer in a subject. This method involves administering to a subject an effective amount of a compound that disrupts interaction between urokinase plasminogen activator receptor and integrin, thereby...... including cancer cells into dormancy and treating cancer in the subject. Also disclosed is a method of disrupting interaction between integrin and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor on cancer cells. The present invention also relates to a method of screening for compounds effective in inducing tumor...... dormancy and treating cancer in a subject....

  1. Administration and monitoring of intravenous anesthetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahinovic, Marko M.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The importance of accuracy in controlling the dose-response relation for intravenous anesthetics is directly related to the importance of optimizing the efficacy and quality of anesthesia while minimizing adverse drug effects. Therefore, it is important to measure and control all

  2. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for secondary recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, O B; Larsen, E C; Egerup, P

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether infusions with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) during early pregnancy increase live birth rate in women with secondary recurrent miscarriage compared with placebo. DESIGN: A single-centre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. SETTING: A tertiary...

  3. Intravenous iron supplementation in children on hemodialysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijn, E.; Monnens, L.A.H.; Cornelissen, E.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis (HD) are often absolute or functional iron deficient. There is little experience in treating these children with intravenous (i.v.) iron-sucrose. In this prospective study, different i.v. iron-sucrose doses were tested in

  4. Intravenous and intramuscular magnesium sulphate regimens in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1993-09-03

    Sep 3, 1993 ... parenterally, usually according to one of two popular regimens: the intramuscular (IM) regimen introduced by. Pritchard' and a continuous intravenous (IV) infusion described by Zuspan! Sibai et a/.3 have reported that lower serum magnesium values are achieved with Zuspan's regimen (maintenance dose ...

  5. Clinical Evaluation of Ciprofloxacin Intravenous Preparation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common site of bacteria infection in humans is the urinary tract. For nosocomial infections it is the catheterized urinary tract. Compromised immune responses in hospitalized patients contribute to the difficulties encountered in treating their infections. In these patients, administration of intravenous antibiotic is ...

  6. A Comparison of Prophylactic Intravenous Glycopyrrolate and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ephedrine is gradually falling out of favour because of the associated tachyarrhythmia and foetal acidosis. This study compared the effect of preoperative administration of intravenous glycopyrrolate and ephedrine on spinal induced maternal hypotension. Patients and Methods: Fifty patients scheduled for elective C/S were ...

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Ultrasonography and Intravenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Renal ultrasonography an easily available procedure was compared to intravenous urogram (IVU) to determine its suitability as an alternative to the latter, which is a relatively invasive test for demonstrating hydronephrosis/ or ureteric obstruction in cervical cancer staging. Study design: Thirty five histologically ...

  8. Intravenous voriconazole after toxic oral administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alffenaar, J.W.C.; Van Assen, S.; De Monchy, J.G.R.; Uges, D.R.A.; Kosterink, J.G.W.; Van Der Werf, T.S.

    In a male patient with rhinocerebral invasive aspergillosis, prolonged high-dosage oral administration of voriconazole led to hepatotoxicity combined with a severe cutaneous reaction while intravenous administration in the same patient did not. High concentrations in the portal blood precipitate

  9. Intravenous paracetamol overdose in a paediatric patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeks, Ilse J.; Van Roon, Eric N.; Van Pinxteren-Nagler, Evelyn; De Vries, Tjalling W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paracetamol is a widely used drug in children. In therapeutic doses, paracetamol has an excellent safety profile. Since the introduction of the intravenous form in 2004, only three reports of accidental overdose in children have been published. The low number probably is due to

  10. Intramuscular compared to intravenous midazolam for paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sedation in children remains a controversial issue in emergency departments (ED). Midazolam, as a benzodiazepine is widely used for procedural sedation among paediatrics. We compared the effectiveness and safety of two forms of midazolam prescription; intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV). Patients ...

  11. Intravenous platelet blockade with cangrelor during PCI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhatt, Deepak L.; Lincoff, A. Michael; Gibson, C. Michael; Stone, Gregg W.; McNulty, Steven; Montalescot, Gilles; Kleiman, Neal S.; Goodman, Shaun G.; White, Harvey D.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Pollack, Charles V.; Manoukian, Steven V.; Widimsky, Petr; Chew, Derek P.; Cura, Fernando; Manukov, Ivan; Tousek, Frantisek; Jafar, M. Zubair; Arneja, Jaspal; Skerjanec, Simona; Harrington, Robert A.; Bhatt, D. L.; Harrington, R. A.; Lincoff, A. M.; Pollack, C. V.; Gibson, C. M.; Stone, G. W.; Mahaffey, K. W.; Kleiman, N. S.; Montalescot, G.; White, H. D.; Goodman, S. G.; Greenbaum, A.; Simon, D.; Lee, D.; Feit, F.; Dauerman, H.; Gurbel, P.; Berger, P.; Makkar, R.; Becker, R. C.; Manoukian, S.; Jorgova, J.; Chew, D. P.; Storey, R.; Desmet, W.; Cura, F.; Herrmann, H.; Rizik, D.; DeServi, S.; Huber, K.; Jukema, W. J.; Knopf, W.; Steg, P. G.; Schunkert, H.; Widimsky, P.; Betriu, A.; Aylward, P.; Polonestsky, L.; Lima, V.; Kobulia, B.; Navickas, R.; Gasior, Z.; Vasilieva, E.; Bennett, J. M.; Kraiz, I.; Van de Werf, F.; Faxon, D.; Ohman, E. M.; Tijssen, J. G. P.; Verheugt, F.; Weaver, W. D.; Califf, R. M.; Mehta, C.; Hamm, C. W.; Pepine, C. J.; Ware, J.; Wilson, M.; Gorham, C.; Maran, A.; McNulty, S.; Fasteson, D.; Ryan, G.; Bradsher, J.; Connolly, P.; Mehta, R.; Leonardi, S.; Brennan, M.; Patel, M.; Petersen, J.; Bushnel, C.; Jolicoeur, M.; Chan, M.; Dowd, L.; Skinner, P.; Lawrence, G.; Jordon, M.; Dickerson, S.; Meyer, M.; Hartford, S.; Garcia Escudero, Alejandro; Poy, Carlos; Miceli, Miguel; Pocovi, Antonio; Londero, Hugo; Baccaro, Jorge; Polonetsky, Leonid; Karotkin, Aliaksey; Shubau, Leanid; Maffini, Eduardo; Machado, Bruno; Airton, José; Lima, Valter; Martinez Filho, Eulogio; Herdy, Arthur; Tumelero, Rogerio; Precoma, Dalton; Botelho, Roberto; Saad, Jamil; Jatene, Jose; Vilas-Boas, Fabio; Godinho, Antonio; Perin, Marco; Caramori, Paulo; Castro, Iran; Grigorov, Mladen; Milkov, Plamen; Jorgova, Julia; Georgiev, Svetoslav; Rifai, Nizar; Doganov, Alexander; Petrov, Ivo; Hui, William; Lazzam, Charles; Reeves, Francois; Tanguay, Jean-Francois; Richter, Marek; Klimsa, Zdenek; Padour, Michal; Mrozek, Jan; Branny, Marian; Coufal, Zdenek; Simek, Stanislav; Rozsival, Vladimir; Pleva, Leos; Stasek, Josef; Kala, Petr; Groch, Ladislav; Kocka, Viktor; Shaburishvili, Tamaz; Khintibidze, Irakli; Chapidze, Gulnara; Mamatsashvili, Merab; Mohanan, Padinhare; Jain, Rajesh; Parikh, Keyur; Patel, Tejas; Kumar, Sampath; Mehta, Ashwani; Banker, Darshan; Krishna, Lanka; Gadkari, Milind; Joshi, Hasit; Hiremath, Shirish; Grinius, Virgilijus; Norkiene, Sigute; Petrauskiene, Birute; Michels, Rolf; Tjon, Melvin; de Swart, Hans; de Winter, Robbert; White, Harvey; Devlin, Gerard; Abernethey, Malcolm; Osiev, Alexander; Linev, Kirill; Kalinina, Svetlana; Baum, Svetlana; Kosmachova, Elena; Shogenov, Zaur; Markov, Valentin; Boldueva, Svetlana; Barbarash, Olga; Kostenko, Victor; Vasilieva, Elena; Gruzdev, Aleksey; Lusov, Victor; Dovgalevsky, Pavel; Azarin, Oleg; Chernov, Sergey; Smolenskaya, Olga; Duda, Alexey; Fridrich, Viliam; Hranai, Marian; Studencan, Martin; Kurray, Peter; Bennett, John; Blomerus, Pieter; Disler, Laurence; Engelbrecht, Johannes; Klug, Eric; Routier, Robert; Venter, Tjaart; van der Merwe, Nico; Becker, Anthony; Cha, Kwang-Soo; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Han, Sang-Jin; Youn, Tae Jin; Hur, Seung-Ho; Seo, Hong Seog; Park, Hun-Sik; Rhim, Chong-Yun; Pyun, Wook-Bum; Choe, Hyunmin; Jeong, Myung-Ho; Park, Jong-Seon; Shin, Eak-Kyun; Hernández, Felipe; Figueras, Jaume; Hernández, Rosana; López-Minguez, José Ramón; González Juanatey, José Ramón; Palop, Ramón López; Galeote, Guillermo; Chamnarnphol, Noppadol; Buddhari, Wacin; Sansanayudh, Nakarin; Kuanprasert, Srun; Penny, William; Lui, Charles; Grimmett, Garfield; Srinivasan, Venkatraman; Ariani, Kevin; Khan, Waqor; Blankenship, James; Cannon, Louis; Eisenberg, Steven; McLaurin, Brent; Mahoney, Paul; Greenberg, Jerry; Breall, Jeffrey; Chandna, Harish; Hockstad, Eric; Tolerico, Paul; Kao, John; Shroff, Adhir; Nseir, Georges; Greenbaum, Adam; Cohn, Joel; Gogia, Harinder; Nahhas, Ahed; Istfan, Pierre; Orlow, Steve; Spriggs, Douglas; Sklar, Joel; Paulus, Richard; Cochran, David; Smith, Robert; Ferrier, L. Norman; Scott, J. Christopher; Xenopoulos, Nicholaos; Mulumudi, Mahesh; Hoback, James; Ginete, Wilson; Ballard, William; Stella, Joseph; Voeltz, Michele; Staniloae, Cezar; Eaton, Gregory; Griffin, John; Kumar, Krishna; Ebrahimi, Ramin; O'Shaughnessy, Charles; Lundstrom, Lundstrom; Temizer, Dogan; Tam, Kenneth; Suarez, Jose; Raval, Amish; Kaufman, Jay; Brilakis, Emmanouil; Stillabower, Michael; Quealy, Kathleen; Nunez, Boris; Pow, Thomas; Samuels, Bruce; Argenal, Agustin; Srinivas, Vankeepuram; Rosenthal, Andrew; Tummala, Pradyumna; Myers, Paul; LaMarche, Nelson; Chan, Michael; Bach, Richard; Simon, Daniel; Kettelkamp, Richard; Helmy, Tarek; Schaer, Gary; Kosinski, Edward; Buchbinder, Maurice; Sharma, Mukesh; Goodwin, Mark; Horwitz, Phillip; Mann, J. Tift; Holmes, David; Angiolillo, Dominick; Rao, Sunil; Azrin, Michael; Gammon, Roger; Mavromatis, Kreton; Ahmed, Abdel; Kent, Kenneth; Zughaib, Marcel; Westcott, R. Jeffrey; Jain, Ash; Gruberg, Luis; LeGalley, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intravenous cangrelor, a rapid-acting, reversible adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonist, might reduce ischemic events during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). METHODS: In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we randomly assigned 5362 patients who had not been

  12. Effect of intravenous dexmedetomidine infusion on some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study was designed to evaluate the effect of intravenous dexmedetomidine infusion in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery on stress response markers as plasma interleukin-6, cortisol and blood glucose level. It also assessed its effect on recovery profile and postoperative pain. Methods: Thirty ...

  13. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 polymers, induced by inactivating amphipathic organochemical ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Katrine E; Einholm, Anja P; Christensen, Anni; Schack, Lotte; Wind, Troels; Kenney, John M; Andreasen, Peter A

    2003-06-15

    Negatively charged organochemical inactivators of the anti-proteolytic activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) convert it to inactive polymers. As investigated by native gel electrophoresis, the size of the PAI-1 polymers ranged from dimers to multimers of more than 20 units. As compared with native PAI-1, the polymers exhibited an increased resistance to temperature-induced unfolding. Polymerization was associated with specific changes in patterns of digestion with non-target proteases. During incubation with urokinase-type plasminogen activator, the polymers were slowly converted to reactive centre-cleaved monomers, indicating substrate behaviour of the terminal PAI-1 molecules in the polymers. A quadruple mutant of PAI-1 with a retarded rate of latency transition also had a retarded rate of polymerization. Studying a number of serpins by native gel electrophoresis, ligand-induced polymerization was observed only with PAI-1 and heparin cofactor II, which were also able to copolymerize. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the binding of ligands in a specific region of PAI-1 leads to so-called loop-sheet polymerization, in which the reactive centre loop of one molecule binds to beta-sheet A in another molecule. Induction of serpin polymerization by small organochemical ligands is a novel finding and is of protein chemical interest in relation to pathological protein polymerization in general.

  14. E2F1-mediated transcriptional inhibition of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koziczak, M; Müller, H; Helin, K

    2001-01-01

    Gene expression of the plasminogen activation system is cell-cycle dependent. Previously, we showed that ectopic expression of E2F1 repressed the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) promoter in a manner dependent on the presence of DNA-binding and transactivation domains of E2F1....... These results all indicate that endogenous E2F can directly repress the PAI-1 gene. DNase I hypersensitive-site analysis of the PAI-1 promoter suggested the involvement of conformation changes in chromatin structure of the PAI-1 promoter. 5' deletion analysis of the PAI-1 promoter showed that multiple sites......-regulation of PAI-1 gene expression correlates with an increase in endogenous E2F activity. When cells were treated with a cdk2/4-specific inhibitor, which maintains E2F in an inactive state, the decline of serum-induced PAI-1 mRNA levels was suppressed. In mutant U2OS cells expressing a temperature...

  15. Glycosaminoglycans affect the interaction of human plasma kallikrein with plasminogen, factor XII and inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozzo A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Human plasma kallikrein, a serine proteinase, plays a key role in intrinsic blood clotting, in the kallikrein-kinin system, and in fibrinolysis. The proteolytic enzymes involved in these processes are usually controlled by specific inhibitors and may be influenced by several factors including glycosaminoglycans, as recently demonstrated by our group. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of glycosaminoglycans (30 to 250 µg/ml on kallikrein activity on plasminogen and factor XII and on the inhibition of kallikrein by the plasma proteins C1-inhibitor and antithrombin. Almost all available glycosaminoglycans (heparin, heparan sulfate, bovine and tuna dermatan sulfate, chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfates reduced (1.2 to 3.0 times the catalytic efficiency of kallikrein (in a nanomolar range on the hydrolysis of plasminogen (0.3 to 1.8 µM and increased (1.9 to 7.7 times the enzyme efficiency in factor XII (0.1 to 10 µM activation. On the other hand, heparin, heparan sulfate, and bovine and tuna dermatan sulfate improved (1.2 to 3.4 times kallikrein inhibition by antithrombin (1.4 µM, while chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfates reduced it (1.3 times. Heparin and heparan sulfate increased (1.4 times the enzyme inhibition by the C1-inhibitor (150 nM.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of oral phenytoin, intravenous phenytoin, and intravenous fosphenytoin in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudis, Maria I; Touchette, Daniel R; Swadron, Stuart P; Chiu, Amy P; Orlinsky, Michael

    2004-03-01

    Oral phenytoin, intravenous phenytoin, and intravenous fosphenytoin are all commonly used for loading phenytoin in the emergency department (ED). The cost-effectiveness of each was compared for patients presenting with seizures and subtherapeutic phenytoin concentrations. A simple decision tree was developed to determine the treatment costs associated with each of 3 loading techniques. We determined effectiveness by comparing adverse event rates and by calculating the time to safe ED discharge. Time to safe ED discharge was defined as the time at which therapeutic concentrations of phenytoin (>or=10 mg/L) were achieved with an absence of any adverse events that precluded discharge. The comparative cost-effectiveness of alternatives to oral phenytoin was determined by combining net costs and number of adverse events, expressed as cost per adverse events avoided. Cost-effectiveness was also determined by comparing the net costs of each loading technique required to achieve the time to safe ED discharge, expressed as cost per hour of ED time saved. The outcomes and costs were primarily derived from a prospective, randomized controlled trial, augmented by time-motion studies and alternate-cost sources. Costs included the cost of drugs, supplies, and personnel. Analyses were also performed in scenarios incorporating labor costs and savings from using a lower-urgency area of the ED. The mean number of adverse events per patient for oral phenytoin, intravenous phenytoin, and intravenous fosphenytoin was 1.06, 1.93, and 2.13, respectively. Mean time to safe ED discharge in the 3 groups was 6.4 hours, 1.7 hours, and 1.3 hours. Cost per patient was 2.83 dollars, 21.16 dollars, and 175.19 dollars, respectively, and did not differ substantially in the Labor and Triage (lower-urgency area of ED) scenarios. When the measure of effectiveness was adverse events, oral phenytoin dominated intravenous phenytoin and intravenous fosphenytoin, with a lower cost and number of adverse

  17. Extracellular collagenases and the endocytic receptor, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein/Endo180, cooperate in fibroblast-mediated collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H; Engelholm, Lars H; Ingvarsen, Signe

    2007-01-01

    The collagens of the extracellular matrix are the most abundant structural proteins in the mammalian body. In tissue remodeling and in the invasive growth of malignant tumors, collagens constitute an important barrier, and consequently, the turnover of collagen is a rate-limiting process in these......The collagens of the extracellular matrix are the most abundant structural proteins in the mammalian body. In tissue remodeling and in the invasive growth of malignant tumors, collagens constitute an important barrier, and consequently, the turnover of collagen is a rate-limiting process...... in these events. A recently discovered turnover route with importance for tumor growth involves intracellular collagen degradation and is governed by the collagen receptor, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP or Endo180). The interplay between this mechanism and extracellular...... of large collagen fragments. First, we show that collagen that has been pre-cleaved by a mammalian collagenase is taken up much more efficiently than intact, native collagen by uPARAP/Endo180-positive cells. Second, we demonstrate that this preference is governed by the acquisition of a gelatin...

  18. Intravenous/oral ciprofloxacin therapy versus intravenous ceftazidime therapy for selected bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaut, P L; Carron, W C; Ching, W T; Meyer, R D

    1989-11-30

    The efficacy and toxicity of sequential intravenous and oral ciprofloxacin therapy was compared with intravenously administered ceftazidime in a prospective, randomized, controlled, non-blinded trial. Thirty-two patients (16 patients receiving ciprofloxacin and 16 patients receiving ceftazidime) with 38 infections caused by susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa, enteric gram-negative rods, Salmonella group B, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas cepacia, and Xanthomonas maltophilia at various sites were evaluable for determination of efficacy. Length of therapy varied from seven to 25 days. Concomitant antimicrobials included intravenously administered beta-lactams for gram-positive organisms, intravenous/oral metronidazole and clindamycin for anaerobes, and intravenous/local amphotericin B for Candida albicans. Intravenous administration of 200 mg ciprofloxacin every 12 hours to 11 patients produced peak serum levels between 1.15 and 3.12 micrograms/ml; trough levels ranged between 0.08 and 0.86 micrograms/ml. Overall response rates were similar for patients receiving ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime. Emergence of resistance was similar in both groups--one Enterobacter cloacae and two P. aeruginosa became resistant after ciprofloxacin therapy and two P. aeruginosa became resistant after ceftazidime therapy. The frequency of superinfection with a variety of organisms was also similar in both groups. Adverse events related to ciprofloxacin included transient pruritus at the infusion site and generalized rash leading to drug discontinuation (one patient each), and with ceftazidime adverse effects included pain at the site of infusion and the development of allergic interstitial nephritis (one patient each). Overall, intravenous/oral ciprofloxin therapy appears to be as safe and effective as intravenous ceftazidime therapy in the treatment of a variety of infections due to susceptible aerobic gram-negative organisms.

  19. Evaluation of the effects of intravenous anaesthesia using a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medetomidine for total intravenous anaesthesia were evaluated in six sahel goats. The goats were administered a combination of ketamine (5mg/kg) and medetomidine (0.01mg/kg) intravenously. Baseline measurements of heart rate, respiratory ...

  20. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy, safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic effects of a targeted exposure of intravenous repinotan in patients with acute ischemic stroke: modified Randomized Exposure Controlled Trial (mRECT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teal, Philip; Davis, Stephen; Hacke, Werner; Kaste, Markku; Lyden, Patrick D; Fierus, Monika

    2009-11-01

    Repinotan hydrochloride is a serotonin (5-HT)(1A) receptor full agonist with evidence of neuroprotection in animal models of permanent and transient focal ischemia. The purpose of this Phase IIb study was to investigate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of a targeted exposure to repinotan in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multicenter study of 681 patients stratified according to whether or not tissue plasminogen activator was administered and then randomly assigned to treatment with repinotan or placebo. A continuous 72-hour intravenous infusion of repinotan or placebo was to be started within 4.5 hours from the onset of ischemic symptoms. A Point-of-Care test was used to adjust the infusion rate if appropriate. The goal of Modified Randomized Exposure Controlled Trial (mRECT) was to show whether repinotan is statistically superior to placebo (alpha or=85) at 3 months, using a Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test. For the intention-to-treat population at 3 months, the response rate on the Barthel Index was 37.1% (127 of 342) for patients on repinotan and 42.4% (143 of 337) for patients taking the placebo (Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel probability value=0.149). No apparent safety concerns were identified. mRECT demonstrated the feasibility of conducting a rigorous trial using a short therapeutic window demanding clinical and radiographic criteria to optimize patient selection and a Point-of-Care test to achieve a targeted exposure to repinotan. The study failed to demonstrate a clinical benefit of repinotan. The development of repinotan in acute ischemic stroke was discontinued.

  1. Optimal timing for intravenous administration set replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, D; O'Riordan, L; Wallen, M; Morrison, A; Rankin, K; Nagy, S

    2005-10-19

    Administration of intravenous therapy is a common occurrence within the hospital setting. Routine replacement of administration sets has been advocated to reduce intravenous infusion contamination. If decreasing the frequency of changing intravenous administration sets does not increase infection rates, a change in practice could result in considerable cost savings. The objective of this review was to identify the optimal interval for the routine replacement of intravenous administration sets when infusate or parenteral nutrition (lipid and non-lipid) solutions are administered to people in hospital via central or peripheral venous catheters. We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE: all from inception to February 2004; reference lists of identified trials, and bibliographies of published reviews. We also contacted researchers in the field. We did not have a language restriction. We included all randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials addressing the frequency of replacing intravenous administration sets when parenteral nutrition (lipid and non-lipid containing solutions) or infusions (excluding blood) were administered to people in hospital via a central or peripheral catheter. Two authors assessed all potentially relevant studies. We resolved disagreements between the two authors by discussion with a third author. We collected data for the outcomes; infusate contamination; infusate-related bloodstream infection; catheter contamination; catheter-related bloodstream infection; all-cause bloodstream infection and all-cause mortality. We identified 23 references for review. We excluded eight of these studies; five because they did not fit the inclusion criteria and three because of inadequate data. We extracted data from the remaining 15 references (13 studies) with 4783 participants. We conclude that there is no evidence that changing intravenous administration sets more often than every 96 hours

  2. Plasma Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor Levels in Angiographically Defined Coronary Artery Disease Among Saudis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shahid Habib

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was aimed to determine plasma levels of total (TFPI-T and free (TFPI-F tissue factor pathway inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA in a cohort of Saudi patients with chronic stable angiographically defined coronary artery disease (CAD and to determine its correlation with its severity.Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in the department of physiology and department of cardiology, College of Medicine, and King Khalid University Hospital and King Saud University, Riyadh. Sixty known cases of CAD who had undergone angiography (35 males and 25 females were selected. A control group included 39 (20 males and 19 females healthy subjects. Fasting venous blood samples were analyzed for total (TFPI-T and free (TFPI-F tissue factor pathway inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA. Gensini scores and vessel scores were determined for assessing CAD severity.Results: There were non-significant differences between age, body mass index (BMI and Blood pressure between the controls and CAD subjects. A comparison of hemostatic markers between control and CAD patients showed significantly higher levels of Fibrinogen, PAI-1, TFPI-T and TFPI-F in CAD patients compared to control subjects. But there was no difference in plasma t-PA levels. TFPI-T had a significant positive correlation with severity of disease determined by Gensini Scores (r=0.344; p=0.006 and vessel scores (r=0.338; p=0.015.Conclusion: Plasma levels of total tissue factor pathway inhibitor are significantly related with the presence and severity of CAD. Elevated levels of TFPI-T may be considered as useful diagnostic and prognostic markers in patients with CAD.

  3. Urine albumin is a superior predictor of preeclampsia compared to urine plasminogen in type I diabetes patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lise Hald; Jensen, Boye L; Fuglsang, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Pregnant women with type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM) are at increased risk of developing preeclampsia (PE). Plasminogen is aberrantly filtrated from plasma into tubular fluid in PE patients and activated to plasmin. Plasmin activates the epithelial sodium channel in the collecting ducts potentially...

  4. Different effects of lipopolysaccharide on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 production in aortic media in vivo and in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, R.T.J. van; Quax, P.H.A.; Tippins, J.R.; Antoniw, J.W.; Andreotti, F.; Maseri, A.; Kluft, C.; Sperti, G.

    1996-01-01

    Background: Lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) has been shown to increase the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) in the vessel wall. Endotoxin is known to increase PAI-1 production in endothelial cells, but its action on smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is presently not clear. In

  5. Interactions of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 with vitronectin involve an extensive binding surface and induce mutual conformational rearrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blouse, Grant E; Dupont, Daniel Miotto; Schar, Christine R

    2009-01-01

    In order to explore early events during the association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) with its cofactor vitronectin, we have applied a robust strategy that combines protein engineering, fluorescence spectroscopy, and rapid reaction kinetics. Fluorescence stopped-flow experiments...

  6. Serum levels of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor is associated with parasitemia in children with acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perch, M; Kofoed, P; Fischer, TK

    2004-01-01

    Serum levels of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) are significantly elevated and of prognostic value in patients suffering from serious infectious diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis. Our objective was to investigate suPAR levels during symptomatic malaria infection and 7...... an important association between suPAR and acute malaria infection in humans....

  7. High-fat diet enhances and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency attenuates bone loss in mice with Lewis Lung carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study determined the effects of a high-fat diet and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency (PAI-1-/-) on bone structure in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in lungs. Reduction in bone volume fraction (BV/TV) by 22% and 21%, trabecular number (Tb.N) by 8% and 4% and bone mineral de...

  8. Studies on functional and structural role of urokinase receptor and other components of the plasminogen activation system in malignancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weidle, U H; Wöllisch, E; Rønne, E

    1994-01-01

    Using immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization, we studied the expression of the components of the plasminogen activation system during progression to malignant melanoma with fresh melanocytic lesions. Expression of these components is confined to late stages of melanoma. t-PA expression...

  9. The inactivation of single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator by thrombin in a plasma milieu : effect of thrombomodulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat, E.A.M.; Los, P.; Rijken, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    Thrombin cleaves single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator (scu- PA) into a virtually inactive two-chain form (tcu-PA/T), a process which may contribute to the maintenance of a fresh blood clot. We have examined the inactivation of scu-PA by thrombin in a plasma milieu to get more insight in

  10. The suicide substrate reaction between plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 acid thrombin is regulated by the cofactors vitronectin and heparin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meijer, M.; Smilde, A.; Tans, G.; Nesheim, M. E.; Pannekoek, H.; Horrevoets, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    The interaction of thrombin with plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is shown to result in the simultaneous formation of both cleaved PAI-1 and a sodium dodecyl sulfate-stable thrombin-PAI-1 complex. The kinetics of this reaction can be described by a ''suicide substrate'' mechanism that

  11. TGF-beta-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells mediated by M6P/IGFII-R and mini-plasminogen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Leksa, V.; Godar, S.; Schiller, H.B.; Fuertbauer, E.; Muhammad, A.; Slezakova, K.; Hořejší, Václav; Steinlein, P.; Weidle, U.H.; Binder, B.R.; Stockinger, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 19 (2005), s. 4577-4586 ISSN 0021-9533 Grant - others:Austrian Science Fund(AT) 005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : apoptosis * TGF-beta * mini-plasminogen Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.543, year: 2005

  12. The liberated domain I of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor--a new tumour marker in small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almasi, Charlotte E; Drivsholm, Lars; Pappot, Helle

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) remains poor with a 5-year survival rate of 4-6%. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), high levels of intact and cleaved forms of the receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) are significantly associated with short overall survival. Our...

  13. Low plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels in thyroid carcinoma: uPA/PAI-1 paradox in cancer proggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Ucan

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Serum PAI-1 levels were lower in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma. Our results might support the thesis of PAI-1 is expected to suppress cancer progression due to its ability to inhibit urokinase plasminogen activator activity. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(2.000: 121-125

  14. SCM, a novel M-like protein from Streptococcus canis, binds (mini)-plasminogen with high affinity and facilitates bacterial transmigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulde, Marcus; Rohde, Manfred; Hitzmann, Angela; Preissner, Klaus T; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric; Nerlich, Andreas; Chhatwal, Gursharan Singh; Bergmann, Simone

    2011-03-15

    Streptococcus canis is an important zoonotic pathogen capable of causing serious invasive diseases in domestic animals and humans. In the present paper we report the binding of human plasminogen to S. canis and the recruitment of proteolytically active plasmin on its surface. The binding receptor for plasminogen was identified as a novel M-like protein designated SCM (S. canis M-like protein). SPR (surface plasmon resonance) analyses, radioactive dot-blot analyses and heterologous expression on the surface of Streptococcus gordonii confirmed the plasminogen-binding capability of SCM. The binding domain was located within the N-terminus of SCM, which specifically bound to the C-terminal part of plasminogen (mini-plasminogen) comprising kringle domain 5 and the catalytic domain. In the presence of urokinase, SCM mediated plasminogen activation on the bacterial surface that was inhibited by serine protease inhibitors and lysine amino acid analogues. Surface-bound plasmin effectively degraded purified fibrinogen as well as fibrin clots, resulting in the dissolution of fibrin thrombi. Electron microscopic illustration and time-lapse imaging demonstrated bacterial transmigration through fibrinous thrombi. The present study has led, for the first time, to the identification of SCM as a novel receptor for (mini)-plasminogen mediating the fibrinolytic activity of S. canis.

  15. Cefodizime in serum and skin blister fluid after single intravenous and intramuscular doses in healthy volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Korting, H C; Schäfer-Korting, M; Maass, L; Klesel, N; Mutschler, E

    1987-01-01

    In gonorrhea therapy, cephalosporins are conventionally administered by intramuscular (i.m.) injection, which rather frequently leads to local side effects. To investigate whether the well-tolerated intravenous (i.v.) injection of cephalosporins may be of comparable gonocidal effect, levels of cefodizime, a new broad-spectrum cephalosporin, in serum and tissue fluid (suction blister and cantharides blister fluid) were determined in six healthy men. Single doses of 1 g of cefodizime were injec...

  16. A metabolomic analysis of two intravenous lipid emulsions in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T Kalish

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition (PN, including intravenous lipid administration, is a life-saving therapy but can be complicated by cholestasis and liver disease. The administration of intravenous soy bean oil (SO has been associated with the development of liver disease, while the administration of intravenous fish oil (FO has been associated with the resolution of liver disease. The biochemical mechanism of this differential effect is unclear. This study compares SO and FO lipid emulsions in a murine model of hepatic steatosis, one of the first hits in PN-associated liver disease.We established a murine model of hepatic steatosis in which liver injury is induced by orally feeding mice a PN solution. C57BL/6J mice were randomized to receive PN alone (a high carbohydrate diet (HCD, PN plus intravenous FO (Omegaven®; Fresenius Kabi AG, Bad Homburg VDH, Germany, PN plus intravenous SO (Intralipid®; Fresenius Kabi AG, Bad Homburg v.d.H., Germany, for Baxter Healthcare, Deerfield, IL, or a chow diet. After 19 days, liver tissue was harvested from all animals and subjected to metabolomic profiling.The administration of an oral HCD without lipid induced profound hepatic steatosis. SO was associated with macro- and microvesicular hepatic steatosis, while FO largely prevented the development of steatosis. 321 detectable compounds were identified in the metabolomic analysis. HCD induced de novo fatty acid synthesis and oxidative stress. Both FO and SO relieved some of the metabolic shift towards de novo lipogenesis, but FO offered additional advantages in terms of lipid peroxidation and the generation of inflammatory precursors.Improved lipid metabolism combined with reduced oxidative stress may explain the protective effect offered by intravenous FO in vivo.

  17. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for refractory recurrent pericarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Fresno, M Rosa; Peralta, Julio E; Granados, Miguel Ángel; Enríquez, Eugenia; Domínguez-Pinilla, Nerea; de Inocencio, Jaime

    2014-11-01

    Recurrent pericarditis is a troublesome complication of idiopathic acute pericarditis and occurs more frequently in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery (postpericardiotomy syndrome). Conventional treatment with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and colchicine is not always effective or may cause serious adverse effects. There is no consensus, however, on how to proceed in those patients whose disease is refractory to conventional therapy. In such cases, human intravenous immunoglobulin, immunosuppressive drugs, and biological agents have been used. In this report we describe 2 patients with refractory recurrent pericarditis after cardiac surgery who were successfully treated with 3 and 5 monthly high-dose (2 g/kg) intravenous immunoglobulin until resolution of the effusion. Our experience supports the effectiveness and safety of this therapy. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. In vitro activity of probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri against gastric cancer progression by downregulation of urokinase plasminogen activator/urokinase plasminogen activator receptor gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Bahareh Sadat; Ghadimi-Darsajini, Ali; Nekouian, Reza; Iragian, Gholam-Reza

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the third leading cause of cancer death, and most patients represent metastatic phenotype at the time of diagnosis. Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) system is well known for its critical roles in cancer cells invasion since uPA/uPA receptor (uPAR) overexpresses in several cancers. Subsequently, suppression of uPA/uPAR gene expression improves patients overall survival and prevents cancer progression. The aim of the current study was to investigate possible effects of live Lactobacillus reuteri as a probiotic in inhibition of GC cells proliferation and invasion. Human gastric adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (AGS) cells were treated with different ratios of live L. reuteri and were incubated for 24, 48, and 72 h. Viability of cancer cells was measured with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and the effects of L. reuteri on uPA/uPAR gene expression were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Our results showed that L. reuteri inhibits cell proliferation significantly in dose-dependent manner. Expressions of uPA and uPAR were downregulated followed by co-incubation of AGS cells and live L. reuteri compared to untreated-based line level. This study provides strong support in the role of L. reuteri in suppression of GC cell invasion by downregulation of pathways which is involved in extracellular matrix degradation such as uPA and uPAR.

  19. Retroperitoneal fibrosis with normal intravenous urogram.

    OpenAIRE

    Creagh, F. M.; Stone, T.; Stephenson, T. P.; Lazarus, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    A 58 year old male presented with a two week history of low back pain and malaise. The intravenous urogram (IVU) at presentation was normal but within three months he had developed renal failure with bilateral ureteric obstruction on repeat IVU. Primary retroperitoneal fibrosis was confirmed at operation. This case demonstrates that retroperitoneal fibrosis may progress rapidly to renal failure within a few months of the first symptoms. In addition, the IVU may be normal in the early stages o...

  20. Total intravenous anesthesia for major burn surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Cancio, Leopoldo C; Cuenca, Phillip B; Walker, Stephen C; Shepherd, John M

    2013-01-01

    Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) is frequently used for major operations requiring general anesthesia in critically ill burn patients. We reviewed our experience with this approach. Methods: During a 22-month period, 547 major burn surgeries were performed in this center’s operating room and were staffed by full-time burn anesthesiologists. The records of all 123 TIVA cases were reviewed; 112 records were complete and were included. For comparison, 75 cases were selected at random from a t...

  1. Contrast agent choice for intravenous coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, H.D.; Siddons, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with monochromatic synchrotron radiation x-rays and an iodine containing contrast agent at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an adequately intense monochromatic x-ray source. Because of the size and cost of synchrotron radiation facilities it would be desirable to make the most efficient use of the intensity available, while reducing as much as possible the radiation dose experienced by the patient. By choosing contrast agents containing elements with a higher atomic number than iodine, it is possible to both improve the image quality and reduce the patient radiation dose, while using the same synchrotron source. By using Si monochromator crystals with a small mosaic spread, it is possible to increase the x-ray flux available for imaging by over an order of magnitude, without any changes in the storage ring or wiggler magnet. The most critical imaging task for intravenous coronary angiography utilizing synchrotron radiation x-rays is visualizing a coronary artery through the left ventricle or aorta which also contains a contrast agent. Calculations have been made of the signal to noise ratio expected for this imaging task for various contrast agents with atomic numbers between that of iodine and bismuth

  2. Intravenous Lipids for Preterm Infants: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan S. A. Salama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extremely low birth weight infants (ELBW are born at a time when the fetus is undergoing rapid intrauterine brain and body growth. Continuation of this growth in the first several weeks postnatally during the time these infants are on ventilator support and receiving critical care is often a challenge. These infants are usually highly stressed and at risk for catabolism. Parenteral nutrition is needed in these infants because most cannot meet the majority of their nutritional needs using the enteral route. Despite adoption of a more aggressive approach with amino acid infusions, there still appears to be a reluctance to use early intravenous lipids. This is based on several dogmas that suggest that lipid infusions may be associated with the development or exacerbation of lung disease, displace bilirubin from albumin, exacerbate sepsis, and cause CNS injury and thrombocytopena. Several recent reviews have focused on intravenous nutrition for premature neonate, but very little exists that provides a comprehensive review of intravenous lipid for very low birth and other critically ill neonates. Here, we would like to provide a brief basic overview, of lipid biochemistry and metabolism of lipids, especially as they pertain to the preterm infant, discuss the origin of some of the current clinical practices, and provide a review of the literature, that can be used as a basis for revising clinical care, and provide some clarity in this controversial area, where clinical care is often based more on tradition and dogma than science.

  3. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor forms in plasma as markers of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olson, Fredrik J; Thurison, Tine; Ryndel, Mikael

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:: To test if circulating forms of the soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) are potential biomarkers of plaque vulnerability. DESIGN AND METHODS:: Plasma concentrations of suPAR(I-III), suPAR(II-III) and uPAR(I) were measured by time-resolved fluorescence...... immunoassays in Caucasian patients operated for symptomatic carotid atherosclerosis (n=255). Local suPAR release from plaques into the circulation was assessed in plasma passing retrogradely over the plaque in the carotid artery, collected during surgery (n=7). RESULTS:: The suPAR(I-III) (P=0.03) and su......PAR(II-III) (P=0.006) concentrations were higher after ischemic strokes and transient ischemic attacks, i.e., clinical subgroups associated with poorer prognosis and a less stable plaque phenotype, than after amaurosis fugax. Slightly elevated suPAR(I-III) levels were found in plasma from the carotid lesion...

  4. Profibrinolytic effects of metalloproteinases during skin wound healing in the absence of plasminogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Kirsty A; Almholt, Kasper; Ploug, Michael

    2008-01-01

    , but not the exclusive, requirement for healing of wounds in these mice. In addition, we observe that lack of fibrin reduces Plg activation significantly during wound healing. The profibrinolytic role of metalloproteinases is revealed by the finding that lack of fibrin partially restores the otherwise arrested healing......Genetic ablation of plasminogen (Plg) and pharmacological inhibition of metalloproteinase activity by galardin delay skin wound healing in mice, whereas the combined inhibition of these two enzyme systems completely prevents healing. In this study, the impact of plasmin and metalloproteinases...... as profibrinolytic enzymes has been investigated by comparing skin wound healing in the absence and presence of fibrin. Plg deficiency impairs skin wound healing kinetics, but this delay is only partially restored in the absence of fibrin. This suggests that plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis is the primary...

  5. Tetranectin, a plasminogen kringle 4-binding protein. Cloning and gene expression pattern in human colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tetranectin is a recently discovered protein that binds to kringle 4 region of plasminogen (Clemmensen I, Petersen LC, Kluft C. Eur J Biochem 1986; 156:327. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The mRNA encoding human tetranectin was cloned by using degenerate primers in a reverse transcriptase...... reaction followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification. The resulting polymerase chain reaction product was examined by DNA sequencing and subsequently used as probe for screening a human placental cDNA library. A full length cDNA clone (TET-1) was isolated, characterized, and used for Northern blot......(r) = 20,169). The 3' noncoding region contained a single polyadenylation signal and a 26-residue poly A tail. The predicted amino acid sequence of the mature tetranectin chain showed, except for one amino acid, complete identity to that obtained by sequencing of the native protein (Fuhlendorff J...

  6. Targeting the autolysis loop of urokinase-type plasminogen activator with conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botkjaer, Kenneth A; Fogh, Sarah; Bekes, Erin C; Chen, Zhuo; Blouse, Grant E; Jensen, Janni M; Mortensen, Kim K; Huang, Mingdong; Deryugina, Elena; Quigley, James P; Declerck, Paul J; Andreasen, Peter A

    2011-08-15

    Tight regulation of serine proteases is essential for their physiological function, and unbalanced states of protease activity have been implicated in a variety of human diseases. One key example is the presence of uPA (urokinase-type plasminogen activator) in different human cancer types, with high levels correlating with a poor prognosis. This observation has stimulated efforts into finding new principles for intervening with uPA's activity. In the present study we characterize the so-called autolysis loop in the catalytic domain of uPA as a potential inhibitory target. This loop was found to harbour the epitopes for three conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies, two with a preference for the zymogen form pro-uPA, and one with a preference for active uPA. All three antibodies were shown to have overlapping epitopes, with three common residues being crucial for all three antibodies, demonstrating a direct link between conformational changes of the autolysis loop and the creation of a catalytically mature active site. All three antibodies are potent inhibitors of uPA activity, the two pro-uPA-specific ones by inhibiting conversion of pro-uPA to active uPA and the active uPA-specific antibody by shielding the access of plasminogen to the active site. Furthermore, using immunofluorescence, the conformation-specific antibodies mAb-112 and mAb-12E6B10 enabled us to selectively stain pro-uPA or active uPA on the surface of cultured cells. Moreover, in various independent model systems, the antibodies inhibited tumour cell invasion and dissemination, providing evidence for the feasibility of pharmaceutical intervention with serine protease activity by targeting surface loops that undergo conformational changes during zymogen activation. © The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 Biochemical Society

  7. Mycotic aneurysms in intravenous drug abusers: the utility of intravenous digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, P.C.; Krasicky, G.A.; Sharma, R.P.; Vemuri, B.R.; Burke, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Two-hundred thirteen intravenous digital subtraction angiographic (DSA) examinations were performed on 195 intravenous drug abusers to rule out the possibility of a mycotic aneurysm in a groin, neck, or upper extremity infection. Twenty-three surgically proved cases of mycotic aneurysm were correctly identified with no false positive results. In addition, six cases of major venous occlusion were documented. The authors present the results of their experience and conclude that DSA is an effective and cost-efficient method of examining this high risk patient population

  8. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type I may contribute to transient, non-specific changes in immunity in the subacute phase of murine tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kager, Liesbeth M.; van der Windt, Gerritje J. W.; Wieland, Catharina W.; Florquin, Sandrine; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis, is a devastating infectious disease causing many deaths worldwide. Non-specific host defense mechanisms such as the coagulation and fibrinolytic system may give insight in possible new therapeutic targets. Plasminogen activator inhibitor

  9. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type I may contribute to transient, non-specific changes in immunity in the subacute phase of murine tuberculosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kager, L.M.; Windt, G.J. van der; Wieland, C.W.; Florquin, S.; Veer, C. van't; Poll, T. van der

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis, is a devastating infectious disease causing many deaths worldwide. Non-specific host defense mechanisms such as the coagulation and fibrinolytic system may give insight in possible new therapeutic targets. Plasminogen activator inhibitor

  10. Intravenous drugs infusion safety through smart pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gómez-Baraza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the role of smart infusion pumps in reducing errors related with the administration of intravenous medications. Method: Retrospective, observational study analyzing the implementation of a system with smart intravenous infusion pumps (Hospira MedNetTM and the role of the safety system for the detection of errors during the administration of drugs, sera, and blood. We included infusions administered at the day-care hospitals of hematology, oncology, rheumatology, and oncopediatrics. We analyzed adherence to the safety system, the number of programming errors detected, the commonly implicated drugs in these errors, and improvement actions. Results: During the study period, 120 smart pumps were implemented and data on 70,028 infusions were gathered. The rate of adherence to the safety program was 62.30% in hematology (6,887 infusions, 60,30% in oncology (28,127 infusions, 46,50% in rheumatology (1,950 infusions and 1.8% in oncopediatrics (139 infusions. 3,481 out of the established limits programming alerts were generated by the pumps: 2,716 of relative limit and 765 of absolute limit. En 807 infusions (2.17%, errors that could have had consequences for the patients could be prevented. These findings allowed implementing a series of strategies aimed at minimizing these errors in the future. Conclusions: The Hospira MedNetTM system detects deviations from the established protocols of intravenous infusion, preventing in this way potential adverse events for the patients. It also allows establishing correction measures and implementing the improvement strategies.

  11. [Streptokinase and Staphylokinase: Differences in the Kinetics and Mechanism of Their Interaction with Plasminogen, Inhibitors and Fibrin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisina, R B; Mukhametova, L I; Gulin, D A; Gershkovich, K B; Varfolomeyev, S D

    2015-01-01

    Comparative in vitro study of the kinetics of various reactions involved in the process of thrombolysis initiated by streptokinase (SK) and staphylokinase (STA) was carried out. It was shown that at the interaction of an equimolar ratio of plasminogen (Pg) with SK or STA the rate of formation and the specific esterase activity of the complex plasmin (Pm) · SK are higher than those of the complex Pm · STA. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of hydrolysis of the chromogenic plasmin substrates by Pm · SK complex was 2 times higher than by Pm · STA complex. In the absence of fibrin catalytic efficiency (kPg/K(Pg)) of activation of Glu-plasminogen and Lys-plasminogen glycoform II by Pm · SK complex was higher than by Pm · STA complex, but the pres- ence of fibrin increased kPg/K(Pg)) activation of both plasminogens by Pm · STA complex significantly stronger than by Pm · SK complex due to the decrease in K(Pg)). In contrast to STA (15.5 kDa), SK molecule (47 kDa) creates significant steric hindrances for the interaction of plasmin in Pm · SK complex with protein inhibi- tors. In addition, SK caused greater fibrinogen degradation than STA. It is shown that Pm · SK and Pm · STA complexes lyse fibrin clots in buffer with similar rates, while the rate of lysis of plasma clots, immersed in plas- ma, by Pm · STA complex are significantly higher than those by Pm · SK complex. It was revealed that the species specificity of STA and S K is determined mainly by the rate of formation and the efficiency of Pm · SK and Pm · STA complexes in the activation of autologous plasminogen. The lysis efficiency of plasma clots of mammals fell in the series: human > dog > rabbit for SK and the dog > human > rabbit for STA. The results show that in the purified system SK is a more effective activator of plasminogen than STA. In the system con- taining fibrin and α2-AP, the activator and fibrinolytic activities of STA are higher than those of SK, due to the increased stability in

  12. Effect of intravenous lipid on human pancreatic secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, K; Valenzuela, J E

    1983-11-01

    Parenteral alimentation, including intravenous fat, is sometimes used in the treatment of patients with pancreatitis, although the effect of intravenous fat on human pancreatic secretion has not been systematically studied. Intravenous fat, however, has been shown to stimulate pancreatic protein secretion in the dog. The purpose of these studies was to clarify the effect of intravenous fat on human pancreatic secretion. Pancreatic secretion was assessed by measurement of enzymes and bicarbonate in duodenal aspirate collected via a double-lumen tube from 6 healthy volunteers. Four studies were randomly conducted on different days. On day 1, graded concentrations of Intralipid (5%, 10%, and 20%) were given intravenously for 1 h each, while secretin (8.2 pmol . kg-1 . h-1) was given as a background. On day 2, the same doses of Intralipid were infused intravenously without secretin. On day 3, the same doses of Intralipid were perfused into the intestine, and, finally, on day 4, 20% Intralipid was given by intestinal infusion for 2 h while 10% Intralipid was infused intravenously during the second hour. Significant stimulation of enzyme secretion was observed only during the infusion of fat into the intestine, not after intravenous infusion at any concentration. Pancreatic enzyme secretion, stimulated by intraintestinal fat, was not significantly modified by simultaneous intravenous lipid infusion. We conclude that since intravenous fat does not stimulate pancreatic secretion, its use in conditions where pancreatic stimulation is undesirable appears safe.

  13. Retroperitoneal fibrosis with normal intravenous urogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creagh, F. M.; Stone, T.; Stephenson, T. P.; Lazarus, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    A 58 year old male presented with a two week history of low back pain and malaise. The intravenous urogram (IVU) at presentation was normal but within three months he had developed renal failure with bilateral ureteric obstruction on repeat IVU. Primary retroperitoneal fibrosis was confirmed at operation. This case demonstrates that retroperitoneal fibrosis may progress rapidly to renal failure within a few months of the first symptoms. In addition, the IVU may be normal in the early stages of the illness. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3983053

  14. Pyeloureteral visualization using glucagon during intravenous urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nepper-Rasmussen, J.; Nielsen, P.H.; Kruse, V.

    1983-01-01

    194 adult patients were subjected to intravenous urography. In order to study the effect of glucagon on the visualization of the pyeloureteral system, IVU's were performed in four different ways: I. with abdominal compression, II. with glucagon 1 mg.i.v., III. without abdominal compression and without glucagon, and IV. with abdominal compression and glucagon 1 mg.i.v. Coded objective and subjective analyses showed significant worsened visualization of the pyelocalyceal systems, when IVU was performed with glucagon alone. Ureteral visualization was equal in all four groups. Glucagon fails as a pharmacological alternative to abdominal compression in adult human subjects. (orig.) [de

  15. Switching between intravenous and subcutaneous trastuzumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gligorov, Joseph; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Müller, Volkmar

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To assess the safety and tolerability of switching between subcutaneous (SC) and intravenous (IV) trastuzumab in the PrefHer study (NCT01401166). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with HER2-positive early breast cancer completed (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy and were randomised to receive four....... Rates of clinically important events, including grade ≥3 AEs, serious AEs, AEs leading to study drug discontinuation and cardiac AEs, were low and similar between treatment arms (safety signals for trastuzumab were observed. CONCLUSIONS: PrefHer revealed...... that switching from IV to SC trastuzumab (hand-held syringe or SID) or vice versa did not impact the known safety profile of trastuzumab....

  16. Targeted thrombolysis of tissue plasminogen activator and streptokinase with extracellular biosynthesis nanoparticles using optimized Streptococcus equi supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayon, Ateke; Jamshidi, Reza; Esmaeili, Akbar

    2016-03-30

    Extracellular biosynthesis of nanoparticles have many important advantages such as well dispersed in aqueous solutions, low energy requirements, ecofriendly, non-toxic, low-costs and non-flocculate. This technique have shown significant promise as targeted drug delivery applications. In this investigation, for the first time, we examine the efficacy of targeted therapeutic delivery with t-PA and SK immobilized to biosynthesis of nanoparticles (CuNP) by using Streptococcus equi strains isolated from the horses of Iran and their ability to produce metallic nanoparticles. Also we compared them with their chemical synthesis. The S. equi was screened for its ability to produce MNPs. The minimum size and shapes (23-89 nm) are presented in the formation with good dispersion and high stability. Response Surface methodology was applied for the optimized production of biological CuNPs. The growth factors like pH, temperature and incubation time was changed. The optimum conditions to obtain CuNPs were found with the culture conditions of pH 7.5 in 120 h at 35 °C. To determine some of MNPs structural properties UV-vis absorption spectrophotometer, FTIR, XRD and SEM has characterized. The results provided some parameters may impact on the formation of biological MNPs. Lastly, these MNPs were conjugated with t-PA and SK, as a drug carrier. In addition, effective thrombolysis with magnet-guided SiO2CuNPs-tPA-SK is demonstrated in rat embolism model where 18.6% of the regular t-PA dose and 15.78% of SK dose restored and 15-25 min reductions in blood clot lysis time were observed compared with runs with free t-PA and without magnet-guided and using the same drug dosage. The comparison between CuNPs with MNPs shows that thrombolysis had not been directed to the type of magnetic carrier under the magnetic guide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Wood Bark Smoke Induces Lung and Pleural Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 and Stabilizes Its mRNA in Porcine Lung Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    in situ. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 was measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids by Western blotting. Induction of PAI-1 was determined at the...APRV Airway-pressure-release ventilation; ATII Alveolar type II cells; AU Arbitrary fluorescence emission units; BAL Bronchoalveolar lavage ; BALF BAL...As measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, this defect in fibrinolysis is mainly attributable to overexpression of plasminogen activator

  18. Immunoglobulin for necrotising soft tissue infections (INSTINCT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Martin Bruun; Lange, Theis; Hjortrup, Peter Buhl

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Necrotising soft tissue infections (NSTI) are aggressive infections that can result in severe disability or death. Intravenous polyspecific immunoglobulin G (IVIG) is used as supplementary treatment for patients with NSTIs. The level of evidence is very low, but suggests that IVIG may...

  19. Ultrasonography-guided peripheral intravenous access versus traditional approaches in patients with difficult intravenous access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Thomas G; Parikh, Aman K; Satz, Wayne A; Fojtik, John P

    2005-11-01

    We assess the success rate of emergency physicians in placing peripheral intravenous catheters in difficult-access patients who were unsuccessfully cannulated by emergency nurses. A technique using real-time ultrasonographic guidance by 2 physicians was compared with traditional approaches using palpation and landmark guidance. This was a prospective, systematically allocated study of all patients requiring intravenous access who presented to 2 university hospitals between October 2003 and March 2004. Inclusion criterion was the inability of any available nurse to obtain intravenous access after at least 3 attempts on a subgroup of patients who had a history of difficult intravenous access because of obesity, history of intravenous drug abuse, or chronic medical problems. Exclusion criterion was the need for central venous access. Patients presenting on odd days were allocated to the ultrasonographic-guided group, and those presenting on even days were allocated to the traditional-approach group. Endpoints were successful cannulation, number of sticks, time, and patient satisfaction. Sixty patients were enrolled, 39 on odd days and 21 on even days. Success rate was greater for the ultrasonographic group (97%) versus control (33%), difference in proportions of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI] 39% to 71%). The ultrasonographic group required less overall time (13 minutes versus 30 minutes, for a difference of 17 [95% CI 0.8 to 25.6]), less time to successful cannulation from first percutaneous puncture (4 minutes versus 15 minutes, for a difference of 11 [95% CI 8.2 to 19.4]), and fewer percutaneous punctures (1.7 versus 3.7, for a difference of 2.0 [95% CI 1.27 to 2.82]) and had greater patient satisfaction (8.7 versus 5.7, for a difference of 3.0 [95% CI 1.82 to 4.29]) than the traditional landmark approach. Ultrasonographic-guided peripheral intravenous access is more successful than traditional "blind" techniques, requires less time, decreases the number of

  20. Intravenous Carbamazepine for Adults With Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, P Brittany; Tillery, Erika E; DeFalco, Alicia Potter

    2018-03-01

    To review the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety, dosage and administration, potential drug-drug interactions, and place in therapy of the intravenous (IV) formulation of carbamazepine (Carnexiv) for the treatment of seizures in adult patients. A comprehensive PubMed and EBSCOhost search (1945 to August 2017) was performed utilizing the keywords carbamazepine, Carnexiv, carbamazepine intravenous, IV carbamazepine, seizures, epilepsy, and seizure disorder. Additional data were obtained from literature review citations, manufacturer's product labeling, and Lundbeck website as well as Clinicaltrials.gov and governmental sources. All English-language trials evaluating IV carbamazepine were analyzed for this review. IV carbamazepine is FDA approved as temporary replacement therapy for treatment of adult seizures. Based on a phase I trial and pooled data from 2 open-label bioavailability studies comparing oral with IV dosing, there was no noted indication of loss of seizure control in patients switched to short-term replacement antiepileptic drug therapy with IV carbamazepine. The recommended dose of IV carbamazepine is 70% of the patient's oral dose, given every 6 hours via 30-minute infusions. The adverse effect profile of IV carbamazepine is similar to that of the oral formulation, with the exception of added infusion-site reactions. IV carbamazepine is a reasonable option for adults with generalized tonic-clonic or focal seizures, previously stabilized on oral carbamazepine, who are unable to tolerate oral medications for up to 7 days. Unknown acquisition cost and lack of availability in the United States limit its use currently.

  1. The human experience with intravenous levodopa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan H Siddiqi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compile a comprehensive summary of published human experience with levodopa given intravenously, with a focus on information required by regulatory agencies.Background: While safe intravenous (IV use of levodopa has been documented for over 50 years, regulatory supervision for pharmaceuticals given by a route other than that approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA has become increasingly cautious. If delivering a drug by an alternate route raises the risk of adverse events, an investigational new drug (IND application is required, including a comprehensive review of toxicity data.Methods: Over 200 articles referring to IV levodopa were examined for details of administration, pharmacokinetics, benefit and side effects.Results: We identified 142 original reports describing IVLD use in humans, beginning with psychiatric research in 1959-1960 before the development of peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors. Over 2750 subjects have received IV levodopa, and reported outcomes include parkinsonian signs, sleep variables, hormone levels, hemodynamics, CSF amino acid composition, regional cerebral blood flow, cognition, perception and complex behavior. Mean pharmacokinetic variables were summarized for 49 healthy subjects and 190 with Parkinson’s disease. Side effects were those expected from clinical experience with oral levodopa and dopamine agonists. No articles reported deaths or induction of psychosis.Conclusion: Over 2750 patients have received IV levodopa with a safety profile comparable to that seen with oral administration.

  2. Flank pain: is Intravenous Urogram necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, H S; Lin, M B; Khoo, T K

    2001-09-01

    To determine the diagnostic yield of Intravenous Urogram (IVU) and the values of plain radiograph of kidney, ureter and bladder (KUB) and urinalysis as screening tests, with the objective to improve the cost effectiveness, in the management of patients presenting with flank pain due to urinary lithiasis. All Intravenous Urogram (IVU) request forms and reports for the month of February 1998 were audited. The case notes, urinalysis, KUB and IVU films were traced and reviewed. There were 110 patients investigated, 61.8% (68) had normal IVU, 38.2% (42) had abnormal IVU. The sensitivity and specificity of KUB alone was 79.4% and 90%. The sensitivity using urinalysis alone was 90.9% and its specificity 33.8%. The sensitivity of combined KUB and urinalysis was 100% and its specificity 26%, with a negative predictive value of 100%. All the patients with both negative KUB and urinalysis in our study were found to have negative IVU. Our study shows that in patients with both negative KUB and urinalysis, the yield of IVU is very low and may not be necessary. This is important, as an IVU examination is not without risk. A combination of KUB with urinary analysis and careful evaluation of clinical symptoms will improve the cost-effectiveness of patient management.

  3. Intravenous dynamic nucleography of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthall, L.

    1972-01-01

    The advent of stationary imaging devices has created interest in studying cerebral blood flows and transits with diffusible and nondiffusible radioactive indicators. Much of this has disclosed interesting pathophysiology, but not necessarily of significant diagnostic import to include in routine patient workup. The conventional static brain scan is one of the more useful tests in the nuclear medicine armamentarium for uncovering and localizing intracranial disease. Unfortunately, it does not as a rule clearly distinguish cerebral vascular accidents, neoplasms, arteriovenous malformations, and so forth, which is important from the standpoint of patient management. Aside from clinical impressions a diagnosis is often based on the appearance of the radiocontrast angiogram, which is not always desirable because of the implicit hazards. Thus it is incumbent upon investigators to search for innocuous intravenous methods of identifying the various intracranial afflictions. Intravenous 99 /sup m/Tc-pertechnetate comparisons of brain hemisphere perfusion as a routine complement to static brain imaging are useful. Estimations of disparate radioactive transits are made qualitatively from serial 4 to 5 sec exposure scintiphotographs. (U.S.)

  4. Intravenous polyclonal human immunoglobulins in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2008-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established therapy for demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. IVIG exerts a number of effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). Four double-blind IVIG trials have been performed in relapsing-remitting MS. A meta-analysis ......Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established therapy for demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. IVIG exerts a number of effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). Four double-blind IVIG trials have been performed in relapsing-remitting MS. A meta......-analysis of the four trials has shown that IVIG reduces the relapse rate and, possibly, disease progression. In patients with a first episode of demyelinating disease, IVIG delays the time to the second relapse and thereby to the diagnosis of definite MS. In patients with an acute MS relapse, IVIG as add-on therapy...... to methylprednisolone does not make remission of symptoms faster or more complete. IVIG does not seem to be of any benefit to chronic visual or motor symptoms in MS. In secondary progressive MS, IVIG has not shown any effect on disease progression, relapses or new magnetic resonance imaging lesions. Experimental...

  5. Adverse reactions to iotroxate at intravenous cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, U.

    1987-01-01

    The number and type of adverse reactions to meglumine iotroxate at intravenous infusion cholangiography, performed one day prior to elective cholecystectomy, were recorded in a prospective investigation of 196 asymptomatic, anicteric patients. One hundred ml (50 mg I/ml) of contrast medium was infused over a period of 30 minutes. Only 2 minor (1%) and no severe or fatal reactions were noted. A review of the literature on the use of iotroxate in 2492 patients, including those in the present investigation, revealed a complication rate of 3.5% (3.0% minor, 0.3% moderate and 0.2% severe reactions) at infusion of iotroxate (5.0-8.0 g I) over a period of 30 to 120 minutes. This compared favourably with the 5% complication rate (4% minor, 0.5% moderate and 0.5% severe reactions) at infusion of iodoxamate and the 9% complication rate (5% minor, 1% moderate and 3% severe reactions) at infusion of ioglycamide. Irrespective of the contrast agent used, the frequency of adverse reactions at infusion was found to be 3 times lower than when equal amounts (5.0-5.6 g I) of the same medium were injected. It is concluded that, at present, infusion of iotroxate in an amount which approximates to the transportation maximum of the liver is the least toxic way of performing intravenous cholangiography with an optimum filling of the bile ducts. (orig.)

  6. A tomographic approach to intravenous coronary arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritman, E.L.; Bove, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Coronary artery anatomy can be visualized using high speed, volume scanning X-ray CT. A single scan during a bolus injection of contrast medium provides image data for display of all angles of view of the opacified coronary arterial tree. Due to the tomographic nature of volume image data the superposition of contrast filled cardiac chambers, such as would occur in the levophase of an intravenous injection of contrast agent, can be eliminated. Data are presented which support these statements. The Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (DSR) was used to scan a life-like radiologic phantom of an adult human thorax in which the left atrial and ventricular chambers and the major epicardial coronary arteries were opacified so as to simulate the levophase of an intravenous injection of contrast agent. A catheter filled with diluted contrast agent and with regions of luminal narrowing (i.e. 'stenoses') was advanced along a tract equivalent to a right ventricular catheterization. Ease of visualization of the catheter 'stenoses' and the accuracy with which they can be measured are presented. (Auth.)

  7. Panlobular emphysema in young intravenous Ritalin abusers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.A.; Glenny, R.W.; Godwin, J.D.; Hampson, N.B.; Cantino, M.E.; Reichenbach, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    We studied a distinctive group of young intravenous Ritalin abusers with profound obstructive lung disease. Clinically, they seemed to have severe emphysema, but the pathologic basis of their symptoms had not been investigated previously. Seven patients have died and been autopsied: in four, the lungs were fixed, inflated, dried, and examined in detail radiologically, grossly, microscopically, and by electron probe X-ray microanalysis. All seven patients had severe panlobular (panacinar) emphysema that tended to be more severe in the lower lung zones and that was associated with microscopic talc granulomas. Vascular involvement by talc granulomas was variable, but significant interstitial fibrosis was not present. Five patients were tested for alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and found to be normal, as were six similar living patients. These findings indicate that some intravenous drug abusers develop emphysema that clinically, radiologically, and pathologically resembles that caused by alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency but which must have a different pathogenesis. Talc from the Ritalin tablets may be important, but the mechanism remains to be elucidated

  8. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Levy, Yair; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2005-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease with diverse manifestations. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy may be beneficial and safe for various manifestations in SLE. A structured literature search of articles published on the efficacy of IVIg in the treatment of SLE between 1983 and 2005 was conducted. We searched the terms "IVIg," "intravenous immunoglobulin," "lupus," "SLE," and "systemic lupus erythematosus." The various clinical manifestations of SLE that were reported to be successfully treated by IVIg in case reports include autoimmune hemolytic anemia, acquired factor VIII inhibitors, acquired von Willebrand disease, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, myelofibrosis, pneumonitis, pleural effusion, pericarditis, myocarditis, cardiogenic shock, nephritis, end-stage renal disease, encephalitis, neuropsychiatric lupus, psychosis, peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, and vasculitis. The most extensive experience is with lupus nephritis. There are only a few case series of IVIg use in patients with SLE with various manifestations, in which the response rate to IVIg therapy ranged from 33 to 100%. We suggest that IVIg devoid of sucrose, at a dose of 2 g/kg over a 5-d period given uniformly and at a slow infusion rate in patients without an increased risk for thromboembolic events or renal failure, is a safe and beneficial adjunct therapy for cases of SLE that are resistant to or refuse conventional treatment. The duration of therapy is yet to be established. Controlled trials are warranted.

  9. Plasminogen activation by receptor-bound urokinase. A kinetic study with both cell-associated and isolated receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellis, V; Behrendt, N; Danø, K

    1991-01-01

    importance for the efficient activation of Plg by receptor-bound uPA. Plasmin generated in the cell-surface Plg activation system described here was also observed to be protected from its principal physiological inhibitor alpha-2-antiplasmin. Together, these data demonstrate that the cell surface constitutes......The specific cellular receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is found on a variety of cell types and has been postulated to play a central role in the mediation of pericellular proteolytic activity. We have studied the kinetics of plasminogen (Plg) activation catalyzed by u.......67 microM, below the physiological Plg concentration of 2 microM. A concomitant 6-fold reduction in kcat resulted in an increase in the overall catalytic efficiency, kcat/Km, of 5.7-fold. This high affinity Plg activation was abolished in the presence of a Plg-binding antagonist. In contrast to intact...

  10. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor is a marker of dysmetabolism in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Kofoed, Kristian

    2008-01-01

    Circulating soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) reflects the immune and pro-inflammatory status of the HIV-infected patient. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses suPAR. Independent of the immune response to HAART, suPAR remains elevated in some HIV-infected......Circulating soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) reflects the immune and pro-inflammatory status of the HIV-infected patient. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses suPAR. Independent of the immune response to HAART, suPAR remains elevated in some HIV...... fluctuate. In conclusion, suPAR may reflect the metabolic status of the HIV-infected patient on HAART, thus linking low-grade inflammation, immune constitution, lipid and glucose metabolism, and fat redistribution. Circadian suPAR concentration appeared stable, suggesting that sampling schedule does...

  11. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor as a prognostic marker of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in a black population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botha, Shani; Fourie, Carla M T; Schutte, Rudolph

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are well-known risk factors for cardiovascular mortality. The less familiar marker, soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), is known to predict cancer, infections and all-cause mo......BACKGROUND: Elevated inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are well-known risk factors for cardiovascular mortality. The less familiar marker, soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), is known to predict cancer, infections and all......-cause mortality. We determined whether suPAR, CRP and IL-6 are predictive of both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in a black population, highly burdened by cardiovascular disease and HIV infection. METHODS: We included 1425 black South Africans, of which 208 died within five years after baseline data...

  12. Binding of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator to its cell surface receptor is inhibited by low doses of suramin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Rønne, E; Danø, K

    1993-01-01

    micrograms/ml when using U937 cells and a ligand concentration of 0.3 nM. This concentration of the drug is well below the serum levels found in suramin-treated patients. Inhibition of binding was also demonstrated at the molecular level, using chemical cross-linking or an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay...... to the anti-invasive properties of suramin by destroying the cellular potential for localized plasminogen activation and proteolytic matrix degradation....

  13. Quantitative PET of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor with 64Cu-DOTA-AE105

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; Madsen, Jacob; Østergaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Expression levels of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) represent an established biomarker for poor prognosis in a variety of human cancers. The objective of the present study was to explore whether noninvasive PET can be used to perform a quantitative assessment of expressi...... levels of uPAR across different human cancer xenograft models in mice and to illustrate the clinical potential of uPAR PET in future settings for individualized therapy....

  14. Effects of intravenous diclofenac on postoperative sore throat in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of intravenous diclofenac on postoperative sore throat in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery at Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi: A prospective, randomized, double blind controlled trial.

  15. Intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy for children with epileptic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Pera, Maria Carmela; Randazzo, Giovanna; Masnada, Silvia; Dontin, Serena Donetti; De Giorgis, Valentina; Balottin, Umberto; Veggiotti, Pierangelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study of children affected by epileptic encephalopathy was to evaluate seizure frequency, electroencephalographic pattern and neuropsychological status, before and after intravenous methylprednisolone therapy.

  16. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is elevated in patients with COPD independent of metabolic and cardiovascular function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waschki B

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Benjamin Waschki,1–3 Henrik Watz,2,3 Olaf Holz,4,5 Helgo Magnussen,2,3 Beata Olejnicka,6 Tobias Welte,5,7 Klaus F Rabe,1,3 Sabina Janciauskiene5,7 1Pneumology, LungenClinic Grosshansdorf, Grosshansdorf, Germany; 2Pulmonary Research Institute at LungenClinic Grosshansdorf, Grosshansdorf, Germany; 3Airway Research Center North (ARCN, German Center for Lung Research (DZL, Grosshansdorf, Germany; 4Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Hannover, Germany; 5Biomedical Research in Endstage and Obstructive Lung Disease Hannover (BREATH, German Center for Lung Research (DZL, Hannover, Germany; 6Department of Medicine, Trelleborg Hospital, Trelleborg, Sweden; 7Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany Introduction: Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, a major inhibitor of fibrinolysis, is associated with thrombosis, obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and premature aging, which all are coexisting conditions of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The role of PAI-1 in COPD with respect to metabolic and cardiovascular functions is unclear. Methods: In this study, which was nested within a prospective cohort study, the serum levels of PAI-1 were cross-sectionally measured in 74 stable COPD patients (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] Stages I–IV and 18 controls without lung disease. In addition, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, waist circumference, blood pressure, smoking status, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, adiponectin, ankle–brachial index, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, and history of comorbidities were also determined. Results: The serum levels of PAI-1 were significantly higher in COPD patients than in controls, independent of a broad spectrum of possible confounders including metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunction. A multivariate regression analysis revealed

  17. Pharmacokinetics of florfenicol after intravenous and intramuscular dosing in llamas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentecost, Rebecca L; Niehaus, Andrew J; Werle, Nick A; Lakritz, Jeffrey

    2013-10-01

    Florfenicol, is a broad spectrum antimicrobial agent with wide tissue distribution commonly used to treat camelids. To address the lack of drug disposition data for florfenicol in llamas, we evaluated the pharmacokinetics after 20mg/kg intravenous (i.v.) and intramuscular (i.m.) dosing. Serum concentrations were determined using a HPLC-UV assay and pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using non-compartmental analysis. Following i.v. injection, systemic clearance and Vdss in llamas were 4.6 mL/min/kg and 737 mL/kg, respectively. Mean residence time after i.v. dosing was 3h. After i.m. injection, florfenicol was rapidly absorbed, with Cmax concentrations being 3.2 μg/mL at 0.5h, mean residence time was 15 h, mean absorption time was 12h and absolute bioavailability of florfenicol after i.m. injection was 63%. The prolonged absorption of florfenicol after i.m. administration suggests the apparent HL_λz reflects the absorption process rather than elimination of the drug. Florfenicol administration was not associated with adverse reactions after dosing by either route. Serum florfenicol concentrations remained >1.0 μg/mL for 12h after i.m. administration. For susceptible pathogens, once daily dosing of 20mg/kg body weight appears appropriate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Anaphylaxis after intravenous infusion of dexketoprofen trometamol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Guler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dexketoprofen trometamol (DT, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is a highly water-soluble salt and active enantiomer of rac-ketoprofen. Its parenteral form is commonly used for acute pain management in emergency departments of our country. Side effects such as diarrhea, indigestion, nausea, stomach pain, and vomiting may be seen after the use of DT. Anaphylactic shock (AS secondary to infusion of DT is very rare and, to our knowledge, it is the first case report describing this side effect. This case report was presented to emphasize that AS may be seen after the use of DT. Keywords: Anaphylactic shock, Dexketoprofen trometamol, Intravenous infusion (MeSH database

  19. Intravenous urography in children and youth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, H.K.; Gudmundsen, T.E.; Oestensen, H.; Pape, J.F.

    1987-10-01

    This report derives from Tromsoe in northern Norway. In a retrospective study of the indications for intravenous urography (IU) and the findings at IU in 740 patients (451 girls and 289 boys) aged 0-19 years, we found that urinary tract infections accounted for 69.4% of the IU in females and 30.1% of the IU in males, most often seen in the youngest patients. The pathological findings most frequently seen were anomalies (17 females and 10 males) and urinary tract obstruction (3 females and 15 males). The present study indicates the following: first, that the yield of IU in the primary investigation of children and youth suffering from enuresis and non-specific abdominal disturbancies is small; and second, that the use of IU in children and youth with urinary tract infection and haematuria should be questioned and reconsidered.

  20. Renal trauma and the intravenous urogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakland, C D; Britton, J M; Charlton, C A

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of all patients with blunt abdominal trauma associated with haematuria admitted to one hospital (Royal United, Bath) in a 10-year period was conducted to establish the contribution of the intravenous urogram (IVU) in their management. Eighty-one case records were analysed. Of 35 IVUs performed in patients with microscopic (reagentstrip positive) haematuria, only one was abnormal. In contrast, 27 IVUs performed in patients with macroscopic (naked eye) haematuria revealed 17 major injuries and 5 previously unrecognized congenital abnormalities. It is concluded that an IVU is an unnecessary and non-contributory investigation in patients with microscopic haematuria and guidelines are suggested for the role of IVU in patients with blunt abdominal trauma associated with haematuria. PMID:3560121

  1. Retrocaval ureter: the importance of intravenous urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Radhiana; Aziz, Azian Abd; Mohamed, Siti Kamariah Che

    2011-10-01

    Retrocaval ureter is a rare cause of hydronephrosis. Its rarity and non-specific presentation pose a challenge to surgeons and radiologists in making the correct diagnosis. Differentiation from other causes of urinary tract obstruction, especially the more common urolithiasis, is important for successful surgical management. Current practice has seen multislice computed tomography (MSCT) rapidly replaces intravenous urography (IVU) in the assessment of patients with hydronephrosis due to suspected urolithiasis, especially ureterolithiasis. However, MSCT, without adequate opacification of the entire ureter, may allow the physician to overlook a retrocaval ureter as the cause of hydronephrosis. High-resolution IVU images can demonstrate the typical appearance that leads to the accurate diagnosis of a retrocaval ureter. We reported a case that illustrates this scenario and highlights the importance of IVU in the assessment of a complex congenital disorder involving the urinary tract.

  2. Intravenous immunoglobulin, pharmacogenomics, and Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ho-Chang; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Wu, Mei-Shin; Chien, Shu-Chen; Liu, Shih-Feng; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2016-02-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology and it is therefore worth examining the multifactorial interaction of genes and environmental factors. Targeted genetic association and genome-wide association studies have helped to provide a better understanding of KD from infection to the immune-related response. Findings in the past decade have contributed to a major breakthrough in the genetics of KD, with the identification of several genomic regions linked to the pathogenesis of KD, including ITPKC, CD40, BLK, and FCGR2A. This review focuses on the factors associated with the genetic polymorphisms of KD and the pharmacogenomics of the response to treatment in patients with intravenous immunoglobulin resistance. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. [Use of intravenous immunoglobulins in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duse, M; Plebani, A; Crispino, P; Ugazio, A G

    1991-01-01

    Intramuscular Immunoglobulin (IMIG) have been used for 40 years in substitution therapy for antibody deficiencies and as prophylaxis for and treatment of several infectious diseases. Modified and intact intravenous immunoglobulin preparations (IVIG) have now been available for more than 10 years: only the intact product express full Fc- mediated functions with a biological half-life of IgG (3-4 weeks). These preparations have constituted an important achievement in the treatment of humoral immunodeficiencies also resulting in a dramatic improvement of the prognosis. The use of IVIG has also modified the therapeutic approach to several secondary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Treatment with IVIG for immune modulation in several diseases is investigated: substantial data indicate a useful role in selected cases of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, Kawasaky disease and in some neurologic diseases. IVIG are substantially safe and severe side effects have been rarely reported.

  4. Intravenous urography in children and youth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, H.K.; Gudmundsen, T.E.; Oestensen, H.; Pape, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    This report derives from Tromsoe in northern Norway. In a retrospective study of the indications for intravenous urography (IU) and the findings at IU in 740 patients (451 girls and 289 boys) aged 0-19 years, we found that urinary tract infections accounted for 69.4% of the IU in females and 30.1% of the IU in males, most often seen in the youngest patients. The pathological findings most frequently seen were anomalies (17 females and 10 males) and urinary tract obstruction (3 females and 15 males). The present study indicates the following: first, that the yield of IU in the primary investigation of children and youth suffering from enuresis and non-specific abdominal disturbancies is small; and second, that the use of IU in children and youth with urinary tract infection and haematuria should be questioned and reconsidered. (orig.)

  5. Solar urticaria successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, R

    2012-02-01

    Idiopathic solar urticaria (SU) is a rare, debilitating photodermatosis, which may be difficult to treat. First-line treatment with antihistamines is effective in mild cases, but remission after phototherapeutic induction of tolerance is often short-lived. Other treatment options include plasma exchange, photopheresis and cyclosporin. We present two cases of severe, idiopathic SU, which were resistant to conventional treatment. Both patients achieved remission after administration of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and have remained in remission at 13 months and 4 years, respectively. There are only two case reports of successful treatment of solar urticaria with IVIg. In our experience IVIg given at a total dose of 2 g\\/kg over several 5-day courses about a month apart is an effective treatment option for severe idiopathic SU. It is also generally safe, even if certainly subject to significant theoretical risks, such as induction of viral infection or anaphylaxis.

  6. Phytonadione Content in Branded Intravenous Fat Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forchielli, Maria Luisa; Conti, Matteo; Motta, Roberto; Puggioli, Cristina; Bersani, Germana

    2017-03-01

    Intravenous fat emulsions (IVFE) with different fatty acid compositions contain vitamin E as a by-product of vegetable and animal oil during the refining processes. Likewise, other lipid-soluble vitamins may be present in IVFE. No data, however, exist about phytonadione (vitamin K1) concentration in IVFE information leaflets. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the phytonadione content in different IVFE. Analyses were carried out in triplicate on 6 branded IVFE as follows: 30% soybean oil (100%), 20% olive-soybean oil (80%-20%), 20% soybean-medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) coconut oil (50%-50%), 20% soybean-olive-MCT-fish oil (30%-25%-30%-15%), 20% soybean-MCT-fish oil (40%-50%-10%), and 10% pure fish oil (100%). Phytonadione was analyzed and quantified by a quali-quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method after its extraction from the IVFE by an isopropyl alcohol-hexane mixture, reverse phase-liquid chromatography, and specific multiple-reaction monitoring for phytonadione and vitamin d3 (as internal standard). This method was validated through specificity, linearity, and accuracy. Average vitamin K1 content was 500, 100, 90, 100, 95, and 70 µg/L in soybean oil, olive-soybean oil, soybean-MCT coconut oil, soybean-olive-MCT-fish oil, soybean-MCT-fish oil, and pure fish oil intravenous lipid emulsions (ILEs), respectively. The analytical LC-MS method was extremely effective in terms of specificity, linearity ( r = 0.99), and accuracy (coefficient of variation <5%). Phytonadione is present in IVFE, and its intake varies according to IVFE type and the volume administered. It can contribute to daily requirements and become clinically relevant when simultaneously infused with multivitamins during long-term parenteral nutrition. LC-MS seems adequate in assessing vitamin K1 intake in IVFE.

  7. Intravenous volume tomographic pulmonary angiography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Ruola; Strang, John G.; Chen, Biao; Conover, David L.; Yu, Rongfeng

    1999-05-01

    This study presents a new intravenous (IV) tomographic angiography imaging technique, called intravenous volume tomographic digital angiography (VTDA) for cross sectional pulmonary angiography. While the advantages of IV-VTDA over spiral CT in terms of volume scanning time and resolution have been validated and reported in our previous papers for head and neck vascular imaging, the superiority of IV-VTDA over spiral CT for cross sectional pulmonary angiography has not been explored yet. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the advantage of isotropic resolution of IV-VTDA in the x, y and z directions through phantom and animal studies, and to explore its clinical application for detecting clots in pulmonary angiography. A prototype image intensifier-based VTDA imaging system has been designed and constructed by modifying a GE 8800 CT scanner. This system was used for a series of phantom and dog studies. A pulmonary vascular phantom was designed and constructed. The phantom was scanned using the prototype VTDA system for direct 3D reconstruction. Then the same phantom was scanned using a GE CT/i spiral CT scanner using the routine pulmonary CT angiography protocols. IV contrast injection and volume scanning protocols were developed during the dog studies. Both VTDA reconstructed images and spiral CT images of the specially designed phantom were analyzed and compared. The detectability of simulated vessels and clots was assessed as the function of iodine concentration levels, oriented angles, and diameters of the vessels and clots. A set of 3D VTDA reconstruction images of dog pulmonary arteries was obtained with different IV injection rates and isotropic resolution in the x, y and z directions. The results of clot detection studies in dog pulmonary arteries have also been shown. This study presents a new tomographic IV angiography imaging technique for cross sectional pulmonary angiography. The results of phantom and animal studies indicate that IV-VTDA is

  8. Studies on the prevention of respiratory distress syndrome of infants due to hyaline membrane disease with plasminogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrus, C M; Choi, T S; Weintraub, D H; Eisenberg, B; Staub, H P; Courey, N G; Foote, R J; Goplerud, D; Moesch, R V; Ray, M; Bross, I D; Jung, O S; Mink, I B; Ambrus, J L

    1975-07-01

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD) is leading single cause of death of newborn, premature infants. The "hyaline membranes" consist chiefly of fibrin. The clinical manifestation of HMD is the respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Infants with RDS were treated with urokinase-activated human plasmin in a previous clinical trial. Survival rate was increased in the plasmin treated group as compared to the placebo recipients. However, cost and difficulty in the preparation of the enzyme made this treatment impractical. We, as well as others, have shown the premature infants lack serum plasminogen; thus they are unable to develop effective fibrinolysis and are defenseless against pulmonary fibrin deposition. Therefore, plamsinogen was tested as a possible preventive agent in RDS due to HMD. In a double blind, randomized study, infants between 1 and 2.5 kg birth weight received plasminogen or placebo shortly after birth, and were then followed for development of RDS. After 100 infants were entered into the study, the code was broken and results were evaluated to assure safety of the procedure. Among the 100 infants, 51 received placebo, 49 received plasminogen. Among the infants who received placebo, seven developed mild, and ten developed severe respiratory distress; of these ten, five died with histopathologically documented HMD. Two infants died from causes other than HMD. Among the 49 infants treated with plasminogen, 13 developed mild and three developed severe respiratory distress. There was no death due to HMD. Two deaths were due to other causes. Factors placing the infant at risk from HMD (degree of prematurity, sex, cesarean section, bleeding episodes during pregnancy, maternal diabetes) were found to be evenly distributed between control and treated groups. Since completing the first phase of the study, data of an additional 277 infants has become available. Although the code was not broken in this series, a preliminary look at mortality data in comparison with

  9. Skin and soft tissue infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S; Verma, K K

    2001-07-01

    Abstract. Normal skin is heavily colonized by bacterial flora. The most common are the various nonpathogenic gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus epidermidis (coagulase-negative). Skin and soft tissue infections are usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Streptococcus pyogenes. This article discusses common and some not so common bacterial skin infections, including impetigo, folliculitis, furncles and carbuncles, cellulitis and erysipelas, gangrenous cellulitis, staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome and scarlet fever. Impetigo and ecthyma are common bacterial infections of the skin commonly caused by S. aureus and / or Group A streptoccus. In mild and localized impetigo topical antibiotics whereas in widespread or severe one and in ecthyma systemic antibiotics like, cloxacillin, erythromycin, azithromycin or cephalexin should be used. Folliculitis, furunculosis and carbuncle are folliculocentric infections caused by S. aureus involving the variable depth and extent of the follicle(s) and surrounding tissue. These conditions can be treated with topical or systemic antibiotics like cloxacillin, cephalexin, erythromycin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid or vancomycin. Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome is a toxin mediated exfoliative dermatosis caused by S. aureus of phase group II. Intravenous penicillinase-resistant anti-staphylococcal antibiotics like methicillin, cloxacillin, cephalosporin or erythromycin are required. Erysipelas and cellulitis are acute infections of dermal and subcutaneous tissues caused most frequently by Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (erysipelas) or S. aureus requiring systemic antibiotics like oral or intravenous penicillin, erythromycin, cephalexin, cloxacillin, vacomycin, minocycline or ciprofloxacin depending upon the severity, suspected causative organism and culture/sensitivity results. Gangrenous cellulitis is characterized by infection with necrosis of skin and underlying subcutaneous tissue due to various

  10. Identification and characterization of the murine cell surface receptor for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solberg, H; Løber, D; Eriksen, J

    1992-01-01

    Cell-binding experiments have indicated that murine cells on their surface have specific binding sites for mouse urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA). In contrast to the human system, chemical cross-linking studies with an iodinated ligand did not yield any covalent adducts in the murine...... system, but in ligand-blotting analysis, two mouse u-PA-binding proteins could be visualized. To confirm that these proteins are the murine counterpart of the human u-PA receptor (u-PAR), a peptide was derived from the murine cDNA clone assigned to represent the murine u-PAR due to cross......-blotting analysis. Binding of mouse u-PA to its receptor showed species specificity in ligand-blotting analysis, since mouse u-PA did not bind to human u-PAR and human u-PA did not bind to mouse u-PAR. The apparent M(r) of mouse u-PAR varied between different mouse cell lines and ranged over M(r) 45...

  11. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator: a new target for male contraception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ying; Han, Yan; Xiong, Cheng-Liang; Li, Hong-Gang; Hu, Lian; Zhang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is closely related to male reproduction. With the aim of investigating the possibility for uPA as a potential contraceptive target, in the present work, Kunming male mice were immunized by human uPA subcutaneous injection at three separate doses for 3 times. Then the potency of the anti-human uPA antibody in serum was analyzed, and mouse fertility was evaluated. Serum antibody titers for human uPA in immunized groups all reached 1:10,240 or higher levels by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, and mating experiments revealed that pregnancy rates and the mean number of embryos implanted after mating declined obviously (P male mice. Sperm function tests suggested that the sperm concentration, sperm viability, sperm motility, and in vitro fertilization rate for the cauda epididymis sperm in uPA-immunized groups were lower than those in the controls (P male mice could effectively reduce their fertility, and uPA could become a new target for immunocontraception in male contraceptive development.

  12. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids induce plasminogen activator activity and DNA damage in rabbit spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokoli, A N; Lavrentiadou, S N; Zervos, I A; Tsantarliotou, M P; Georgiadis, M P; Nikolaidis, E A; Botsoglou, N; Boscos, C M; Taitzoglou, I A

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect(s) of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) on rabbit semen. Adult rabbit bucks were assigned to two groups that were given two diets, a standard diet (control) and a diet supplemented with ω-3 PUFA. Sperm samples were collected from all bucks with the use of an artificial vagina in 20-day intervals, for a total period of 120 days. The enrichment of membranes in ω-3 PUFA was manifested by the elevation of the 22:5 ω-3 (docosapentaenoic acid [DPA]) levels within 40 days. This increase in DPA content did not affect semen characteristics (i.e., concentration, motility and viability). However, it was associated with the induction of lipid peroxidation in spermatozoa, as determined on the basis of the malondialdehyde content. Lipid peroxidation was associated with DNA fragmentation in ω-3 PUFA-enriched spermatozoa and a concomitant increase in plasminogen activator (PA) activity. The effects of ω-3 PUFA on sperm cells were evident within 40 days of ω-3 PUFA dietary intake and exhibited peack values on day 120. Our findings suggest that an ω-3 PUFA-rich diet may not affect semen characteristics; however, it may have a negative impact on the oxidative status and DNA integrity of the spermatozoa, which was associated with an induction of PAs activity. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 by olfactory ensheathing glia promotes axonal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón, Diana; Martín-Bermejo, Maria Jesús; Gallego-Hernández, Maria Teresa; Pastrana, Erika; García-Escudero, Vega; García-Gómez, Ana; Lim, Filip; Díaz-Nido, Javier; Avila, Jesús; Moreno-Flores, Maria Teresa

    2011-10-01

    Olfactory ensheathing glia (OEG) cells are known to facilitate repair following axotomy of adult neurons, although the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. We previously identified plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), and thrombomodulin (TM) as candidates to regulate rat OEG-dependent axonal regeneration. In this study, we have validated the involvement of these proteins in promoting axonal regeneration by immortalized human OEGs. We studied the effect of silencing these proteins in OEGs on their capacity to promote the regeneration of severed adult retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) axons. Our results support the role of glial PAI-1 as a downstream effector of PAR-1 in promoting axon regeneration. In contrast, we found that TM inhibits OEG induced-axonal regeneration. We also assessed the signaling pathways downstream of PAR-1 that might modulate PAI-1 expression, observing that specifically inhibiting Gα(i), Rho kinase, or PLC and PKC downregulated the expression of PAI-1 in OEGs, with a concomitant reduction in OEG-dependent axon regeneration in adult RGCs. Our findings support an important role for the thrombin system in regulating adult axonal regeneration by OEGs. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Type I plasminogen activator inhibitor 4G allele frequency is associated with chronic venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrancioglu, N; Manduz, S; Ozen, F; Yilmaz, M Birhan; Karahan, O; Ozdemir, O; Berkan, O

    2010-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is a common disease associated with poor quality of life. Genetic polymorphisms causing coagulation abnormalities may account for some of the CVI pathogenesis. Type I plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) is responsible for fibrinolytic system regulation, and plasma levels of PAI-1 are strongly correlated with PAI-1 4G/5G gene polymorphism. The association between PAI-1 4G/5G gene polymorphism and CVI was investigated. In 34 consecutive patients with clinically overt CVI, the PAI-1 4G/4G polymorphism was detected in three cases (8.8%); the 4G/5G polymorphism was detected in 28 (82.4%). In 34 age- and sex-matched controls, the PAI-1 4G/4G polymorphism was detected in one case (2.9%) and the 4G/5G polymorphism was detected in 14 cases (41.2%). The PAI-1 4G allele was found significantly more frequently in CVI patients than in controls. The 4G allele was associated with a 3.25-fold increase in CVI risk. Thus, a relationship between CVI and the PAI-1 4G allele is apparent.

  15. Terminalia catappa attenuates urokinase-type plasminogen activator expression through Erk pathways in Hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chao-Bin; Yu, Yung-Luen; Lin, Chiao-Wen; Chiou, Hui-Ling; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2014-04-30

    The survival rate of malignant tumors, and especially hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), has not improved primarily because of uncontrolled metastasis. In our previous studies, we have reported that Terminalia catappa leaf extract (TCE) exerts antimetastasis effects on HCC cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) in HCC metastasis have not been thoroughly investigated, and remain poorly understood. The activities and protein levels of u-PA were determined by casein zymography and western blotting. Transcriptional levels of u-PA were detected by real-time PCR and promoter assays. We found that treatment of Huh7 cells with TCE significantly reduced the activities, protein levels and mRNA levels of u-PA. A chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed that TCE inhibited the transcription protein of nuclear factors SP-1 and NF-κB. TCE also did inhibit the effects of u-PA by reducing the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 pathway. These results show that u-PA expression may be a potent therapeutic target in the TCE-mediated suppression of HCC metastasis.

  16. Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor as a Marker for Use of Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haastrup, Eva; Grau, Katrine; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Thorball, Christian; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Ullum, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of depression. A few cross-sectional population-based studies have found that depression is associated with increased levels of inflammatory markers. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activation receptor (suPAR) is known to be a stable marker for inflammation. We investigated the bidirectional association between suPAR levels and use of antidepressants. Methods suPAR level was measured in 9305 blood donors and analysed in relation to 5-years follow-up data on purchase of antidepressants and hospital diagnoses of depression from a nationwide Danish register. Results For men and women without prior use of antidepressants we found a significantly higher risk for incident use of antidepressants with higher suPAR values. For men, the risk of first use of antidepressants increased by 72% from the 1st to the 4th quartile (HR = 1.72, 95% CI: 1.11–2.69). For women, it increased by 108% from the 1st to the 4th quartile (HR = 2.08, 95% CI: 1.45–2.98). Previous use of antidepressants was also significantly associated with higher suPAR levels (p = 0.002). Conclusions High suPAR levels are associated with an increased risk for both previous and future use of antidepressants in healthy men and women. High suPAR are also associated with increased risk for a hospital diagnosis of depression. PMID:25329298

  17. The interaction of streptococcal enolase with canine plasminogen: the role of surfaces in complex formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Balhara

    Full Text Available The enolase from Streptococcus pyogenes (Str enolase F137L/E363G is a homo-octamer shaped like a donut. Plasminogen (Pgn is a monomeric protein composed of seven discrete separated domains organized into a lock washer. The enolase is known to bind Pgn. In past work we searched for conditions in which the two proteins would bind to one another. The two native proteins in solution would not bind under any of the tried conditions. We found that if the structures were perturbed binding would occur. We stated that only the non-native Str enolase or Pgn would interact such that we could detect binding. We report here the results of a series of dual polarization interferometry (DPI experiments coupled with atomic force microscopy (AFM, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, dynamic light scattering (DLS, and fluorescence. We show that the critical condition for forming stable complexes of the two native proteins involves Str enolase binding to a surface. Surfaces that attract Str eno