WorldWideScience

Sample records for intraspecific epitopic variation

  1. The ecological importance of intraspecific variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Roches, Simone; Post, David M; Turley, Nash E; Bailey, Joseph K; Hendry, Andrew P; Kinnison, Michael T; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Palkovacs, Eric P

    2018-01-01

    Human activity is causing wild populations to experience rapid trait change and local extirpation. The resulting effects on intraspecific variation could have substantial consequences for ecological processes and ecosystem services. Although researchers have long acknowledged that variation among species influences the surrounding environment, only recently has evidence accumulated for the ecological importance of variation within species. We conducted a meta-analysis comparing the ecological effects of variation within a species (intraspecific effects) with the effects of replacement or removal of that species (species effects). We evaluated direct and indirect ecological responses, including changes in abundance (or biomass), rates of ecological processes and changes in community composition. Our results show that intraspecific effects are often comparable to, and sometimes stronger than, species effects. Species effects tend to be larger for direct ecological responses (for example, through consumption), whereas intraspecific effects and species effects tend to be similar for indirect responses (for example, through trophic cascades). Intraspecific effects are especially strong when indirect interactions alter community composition. Our results summarize data from the first generation of studies examining the relative ecological effects of intraspecific variation. Our conclusions can help inform the design of future experiments and the formulation of strategies to quantify and conserve biodiversity.

  2. Characterization and intraspecific variation of Fusarium semitectum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 79 isolates of Fusarium semitectum were characterized by morphological and IGS-RFLP analysis to assess its intraspecific variation. Based on morphological characteristics, the isolates of F. semitectum were classified into 2 distinct groups, morphotypes I and II. Morphotype I was characterized by longer ...

  3. Intraspecific variation in aerobic and anaerobic locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jon Christian; Tirsgård, Bjørn; Cordero, Gerardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and trade-off in aerobic and anaerobic traits remain poorly understood in aquatic locomotion. Using gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), both axial swimmers, this study tested four hypotheses: (1) gait transition from steady...... to unsteady (i.e., burst-assisted) swimming is associated with anaerobic metabolism evidenced as excess post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC); (2) variation in swimming performance (critical swimming speed; U crit) correlates with metabolic scope (MS) or anaerobic capacity (i.e., maximum EPOC); (3...

  4. Variation in the relative magnitude of intraspecific and interspecific ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While there was considerable variation in the relative magnitude of intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects over generations, among both populations and environments, there was no clear evidence supporting the genetic feedback hypothesis. Intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects on population growth ...

  5. Intraspecific genetic variation and species coexistence in plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Bodil K; Damgaard, Christian F; Laroche, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Many studies report that intraspecific genetic variation in plants can affect community composition and coexistence. However, less is known about which traits are responsible and the mechanisms by which variation in these traits affect the associated community. Focusing on plant-plant interactions, we review empirical studies exemplifying how intraspecific genetic variation in functional traits impacts plant coexistence. Intraspecific variation in chemical and architectural traits promotes species coexistence, by both increasing habitat heterogeneity and altering competitive hierarchies. Decomposing species interactions into interactions between genotypes shows that genotype × genotype interactions are often intransitive. The outcome of plant-plant interactions varies with local adaptation to the environment and with dominant neighbour genotypes, and some plants can recognize the genetic identity of neighbour plants if they have a common history of coexistence. Taken together, this reveals a very dynamic nature of coexistence. We outline how more traits mediating plant-plant interactions may be identified, and how future studies could use population genetic surveys of genotype distribution in nature and methods from trait-based ecology to better quantify the impact of intraspecific genetic variation on plant coexistence. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Intraspecific genetic variation and competition interact to influence niche expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agashe, Deepa; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2010-10-07

    Theory and empirical evidence show that intraspecific competition can drive selection favouring the use of novel resources (i.e. niche expansion). The evolutionary response to such selection depends on genetic variation for resource use. However, while genetic variation might facilitate niche expansion, genetically diverse groups may also experience weaker competition, reducing density-dependent selection on resource use. Therefore, genetic variation for fitness on different resources could directly facilitate, or indirectly retard, niche expansion. To test these alternatives, we factorially manipulated both the degree of genetic variation and population density in flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum) exposed to both novel and familiar food resources. Using stable carbon isotope analysis, we measured temporal change and individual variation in beetle diet across eight generations. Intraspecific competition and genetic variation acted on different components of niche evolution: competition facilitated niche expansion, while genetic variation increased individual variation in niche use. In addition, genetic variation and competition together facilitated niche expansion, but all these impacts were temporally variable. Thus, we show that the interaction between genetic variation and competition can also determine niche evolution at different time scales.

  7. Effects of intraspecific variation in white cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. Capitata) on soil ogranisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabouw, P.; Putten, van der W.H.; Dam, van N.M.; Biere, A.

    2010-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in plants can affect soil organisms. However, little is known about whether the magnitude of the effect depends on the degree of interaction with the roots. We analyzed effects of plant intraspecific variation on root herbivores and other soil organisms that interact directly

  8. Does intraspecific competition promote variation? A test via synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew W; Post, David M

    2016-03-01

    Competitive diversification, that is, when increasing intraspecific competition promotes population niche expansion, is commonly invoked in evolutionary studies and currently plays a central role in how we conceptualize the process of adaptive diversification. Despite the frequency with which this idea is cited, the empirical evidence for the process is somewhat limited, and the findings of these studies have yet to be weighed objectively through synthesis. Here, we sought to fill this gap by reviewing the existing literature and collecting the data necessary to assess the evidence for competition as a diversifying force. Additionally, we sought to test a more recent hypothesis, which suggests that competition can act to both promote and inhibit dietary diversification depending on the degree to which a consumer depletes its resources. The surprising result of this synthesis was that increasing competition did not have a mean positive effect on population-level diet breadth or the degree of individual specialization. Instead, we found that increasing intraspecific competition had a restricting effect on population-level diet breadth in as many cases as it had a diversifying effect. This wide disparity in the effect of competition on consumer diet variation was negatively related to a metric for consumer resource depletion. Altogether, these findings call into question a long-standing assumption of basic evolutionary models and lend some support to recent theoretical predictions. Specifically, these findings support the idea that competition is primarily diversifying for species with a small effect (per unit biomass) on their resources and that resource depletion limits the diversifying effect of competition for consumers with larger ecological effects.

  9. Intraspecific variation of the interparietal suture closure in Siberian roe deer Capreolus pygargus from Jeju Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jinwoo; Oh, Hong-Shik; Kimura, Junpei; Koyabu, Daisuke

    2017-12-22

    The sequence of cranial suture closure among cervids is reported to be generally species-specific and highly conservative within species. On the other hand, it is known that intraspecific variation often exists to some extent in other mammalian taxa. Here we studied the cranial suture closures of Capreolus pygargus from Jeju Island and compared it with other cervid species. We found that the timing of the interparietal suture closure is highly variable within C. pygargus. Capreolus capreolus similarly shows intraspecific variation of the interparietal suture closure, whereas other cervid species studied to date do not show any intraspecific variation in the sequence of cranial suture closure. Such high intraspecific variation of the interparietal suture may be a derived character for Capreolus.

  10. Variation in the relative magnitude of intraspecific and interspecific ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Models of competitor coevolution, especially the genetic feedback hypothesis, suggest that a negative correlation be- tween intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects may be important in sustaining competitor coexistence, and can give rise to oscillatory dynamics with repeated reversals of competitive superiority.

  11. Y-Chromosome variation in hominids: intraspecific variation is limited to the polygamous chimpanzee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Greve

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated that the Y-specific ampliconic fertility genes DAZ (deleted in azoospermia and CDY (chromodomain protein Y varied with respect to copy number and position among chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes. In comparison, seven Y-chromosomal lineages of the bonobo (Pan paniscus, the chimpanzee's closest living relative, showed no variation. We extend our earlier comparative investigation to include an analysis of the intraspecific variation of these genes in gorillas (Gorilla gorilla and orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus, and examine the resulting patterns in the light of the species' markedly different social and mating behaviors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH of DAZ and CDY in 12 Y-chromosomal lineages of western lowland gorilla (G. gorilla gorilla and a single lineage of the eastern lowland gorilla (G. beringei graueri showed no variation among lineages. Similar findings were noted for the 10 Y-chromosomal lineages examined in the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus, and 11 Y-chromosomal lineages of the Sumatran orangutan (P. abelii. We validated the contrasting DAZ and CDY patterns using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR in chimpanzee and bonobo. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: High intraspecific variation in copy number and position of the DAZ and CDY genes is seen only in the chimpanzee. We hypothesize that this is best explained by sperm competition that results in the variant DAZ and CDY haplotypes detected in this species. In contrast, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans-species that are not subject to sperm competition-showed no intraspecific variation in DAZ and CDY suggesting that monoandry in gorillas, and preferential female mate choice in bonobos and orangutans, probably permitted the fixation of a single Y variant in each taxon. These data support the notion that the evolutionary history of a primate Y chromosome is not simply encrypted in its DNA

  12. Intra-specific pelage color variation in a South American small rodent species

    OpenAIRE

    Sandoval Salinas,M. L.; Barquez,R. M.; Colombo,E. M.; Sandoval,J. D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Intra-specific color variation is often underestimated by researchers, and among mammals, intra-specific differences in coloration are poorly documented for most species. The main goal of this study was to apply an objective color measurement methodology to the study of a specific problem: the detection, if any, of patterns of changes in the fur color of specimens of Akodon budini in relation to biological (i.e., sex) and environmental (i.e., season) variables. We hypothesize that co...

  13. Intra-specific pelage color variation in a South American small rodent species

    OpenAIRE

    Sandoval Salinas, M. L.; Barquez, R. M.; Colombo, E. M.; Sandoval, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intra-specific color variation is often underestimated by researchers, and among mammals, intra-specific differences in coloration are poorly documented for most species. The main goal of this study was to apply an objective color measurement methodology to the study of a specific problem: the detection, if any, of patterns of changes in the fur color of specimens of Akodon budini in relation to biological (i.e., sex) and environmental (i.e., season) variables. We hypothesize that co...

  14. Inter- and intraspecific variations of cadmium accumulation of 13 leafy vegetable species in a greenhouse experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junli; Fang, Wei; Yang, Zhongyi; Yuan, Jiangang; Zhu, Yun; Yu, Hui

    2007-10-31

    Leafy vegetables are among the crop species that are most vulnerable to heavy metal pollution. This study investigated inter- and intraspecific variations of cadmium accumulation in 13 species with a total of 39 cultivars of leafy vegetables under two levels of soil Cd stress (1.5 and 7.7 mg kg (-1)). Intraspecific variations of shoot biomass and Cd concentration of the tested leafy vegetables were significantly larger than interspecific variations under both Cd treatments and were also more significantly correlated between two Cd stress levels when grouped by cultivar than grouped by species. These results indicate that cultivar is a more reliable taxa level for screening pollutant-safe leafy vegetables than species. Any screening for pollutant hypoaccumulator species, or other similar species-based concepts, without considering intraspecific variation should be avoided.

  15. Consequences of intraspecific seed-size variation in Sparganium emersum for dispersal by fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollux, B.J.A.; Ouborg, J.; Van Groenendael, J.M.; Klaassen, M.R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for seed dispersal by fish (ichthyochory) is likely to vary within aquatic plant species, depending on intraspecific variation in phenotypic seed traits. 2. We studied the effect of seed size variation within the unbranched burreed (Sparganium emersum) on the potential for internal

  16. The reciprocal relationship between competition and intraspecific trait variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A Bennett, Jonathan; Riibak, Kersti; Tamme, Riin

    2016-01-01

    with larger leaves and lower specific leaf area than their neighbours. Switching to more stress tolerant strategies by increasing root diameter and leaf tissue density also reduced competition. However, dissimilarity in root tissue density also minimized competition, consistent with limiting similarity...... outcomes, we grew 15 species alone, in monoculture, and in mixture. We measured traits relating to leaf and root tissue morphology as well as biomass allocation and related competition induced changes in these traits to intra- and interspecific competition using multi-model inference. Additionally, we...... to both intra- and interspecific competition, frequently affecting competitive hierarchies. Intraspecific competition was lower for species that limited competition-induced increases in root allocation and had less variability in this trait overall. Interspecific competition was lower for species...

  17. Inter- and intraspecific variation in leaf economic traits in wheat and maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam R; Hale, Christine E; Cerabolini, Bruno E L; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Craine, Joseph; Gough, William A; Kattge, Jens; Tirona, Cairan K F

    2018-02-01

    Leaf Economics Spectrum (LES) trait variation underpins multiple agroecological processes and many prominent crop yield models. While there are numerous independent studies assessing trait variation in crops, to date there have been no comprehensive assessments of intraspecific trait variation (ITV) in LES traits for wheat and maize: the world's most widespread crops. Using trait databases and peer-reviewed literature, we compiled over 700 records of specific leaf area (SLA), maximum photosynthetic rates ( A max ) and leaf nitrogen (N) concentrations, for wheat and maize. We evaluated intraspecific LES trait variation, and intraspecific trait-environment relationships. While wheat and maize occupy the upper 90th percentile of LES trait values observed across a global species pool, ITV ranged widely across the LES in wheat and maize. Fertilization treatments had strong impacts on leaf N, while plant developmental stage (here standardized as the number of days since planting) had strong impacts on A max ; days since planting, N fertilization and irrigation all influenced SLA. When controlling for these factors, intraspecific responses to temperature and precipitation explained 39.4 and 43.7 % of the variation in A max and SLA, respectively, but only 5.4 % of the variation in leaf N. Despite a long history of domestication in these species, ITV in wheat and maize among and within cultivars remains large. Intraspecific trait variation is a critical consideration to refine regional to global models of agroecosystem structure, function and food security. Considerable opportunities and benefits exist for consolidating a crop trait database for a wider range of domesticated plant species.

  18. Intraspecific Trait Variation and Coordination: Root and Leaf Economics Spectra in Coffee across Environmental Gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Marney E; Martin, Adam R; de Melo Virginio Filho, Elias; Rapidel, Bruno; Roupsard, Olivier; Van den Meersche, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Hypotheses on the existence of a universal "Root Economics Spectrum" (RES) have received arguably the least attention of all trait spectra, despite the key role root trait variation plays in resource acquisition potential. There is growing interest in quantifying intraspecific trait variation (ITV) in plants, but there are few studies evaluating (i) the existence of an intraspecific RES within a plant species, or (ii) how a RES may be coordinated with other trait spectra within species, such as a leaf economics spectrum (LES). Using Coffea arabica (Rubiaceae) as a model species, we measured seven morphological and chemical traits of intact lateral roots, which were paired with information on four key LES traits. Field collections were completed across four nested levels of biological organization. The intraspecific trait coefficient of variation (cv) ranged from 25 to 87% with root diameter and specific root tip density showing the lowest and highest cv, respectively. Between 27 and 68% of root ITV was explained by site identity alone for five of the seven traits measured. A single principal component explained 56.2% of root trait covariation, with plants falling along a RES from resource acquiring to conserving traits. Multiple factor analysis revealed significant orthogonal relationships between root and leaf spectra. RES traits were strongly orthogonal with respect to LES traits, suggesting these traits vary independently from one another in response to environmental cues. This study provides among the first evidence that plants from the same species differentiate from one another along an intraspecific RES. We find that in one of the world's most widely cultivated crops, an intraspecific RES is orthogonal to an intraspecific LES, indicating that above and belowground responses of plants to managed (or natural) environmental gradients are likely to occur independently from one another.

  19. Isolation and identification of 4-a-rhamnosyloxy benzyl glucosinolate in Noccaea caerulescens showing intraspecific variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, de R.M.; Krosse, S.; Swolfs, A.E.M.; Brinke, te E.; Prill, N.; Leimu, R.; Galen, van P.M.; Wang, Y.; Aarts, M.G.M.; Dam, van N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Glucosinolates are secondary plant compounds typically found in members of the Brassicaceae and a few other plant families. Usually each plant species contains a specific subset of the ~130 different glucosinolates identified to date. However, intraspecific variation in glucosinolate profiles is

  20. Sizing ocean giants: patterns of intraspecific size variation in marine megafauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Craig R; Balk, Meghan A; Benfield, Mark C; Branch, Trevor A; Chen, Catherine; Cosgrove, James; Dove, Alistair D M; Gaskins, Lindsay C; Helm, Rebecca R; Hochberg, Frederick G; Lee, Frank B; Marshall, Andrea; McMurray, Steven E; Schanche, Caroline; Stone, Shane N; Thaler, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    What are the greatest sizes that the largest marine megafauna obtain? This is a simple question with a difficult and complex answer. Many of the largest-sized species occur in the world's oceans. For many of these, rarity, remoteness, and quite simply the logistics of measuring these giants has made obtaining accurate size measurements difficult. Inaccurate reports of maximum sizes run rampant through the scientific literature and popular media. Moreover, how intraspecific variation in the body sizes of these animals relates to sex, population structure, the environment, and interactions with humans remains underappreciated. Here, we review and analyze body size for 25 ocean giants ranging across the animal kingdom. For each taxon we document body size for the largest known marine species of several clades. We also analyze intraspecific variation and identify the largest known individuals for each species. Where data allows, we analyze spatial and temporal intraspecific size variation. We also provide allometric scaling equations between different size measurements as resources to other researchers. In some cases, the lack of data prevents us from fully examining these topics and instead we specifically highlight these deficiencies and the barriers that exist for data collection. Overall, we found considerable variability in intraspecific size distributions from strongly left- to strongly right-skewed. We provide several allometric equations that allow for estimation of total lengths and weights from more easily obtained measurements. In several cases, we also quantify considerable geographic variation and decreases in size likely attributed to humans.

  1. Intraspecific variation of seed floating ability in Sparganium emersum suggests a bimodal dispersal strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollux, B.J.A.; Verbruggen, E.; Van Groenendael, J.M.; Ouborg, N.J.

    2009-01-01

    Water-mediated spread of seeds (hydrochory) plays an important role in the dispersal of aquatic plants. In this study we investigate intraspecific variation in floating ability and germination capacity of Sparganium emersum seeds in relation to seed mass, within three natural populations along the

  2. Utilizing intraspecific variation in phenotypic plasticity to bolster agricultural and forest productivity under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinwall, Michael J; Loik, Michael E; Resco de Dios, Victor; Tjoelker, Mark G; Payton, Paxton R; Tissue, David T

    2015-09-01

    Climate change threatens the ability of agriculture and forestry to meet growing global demands for food, fibre and wood products. Information gathered from genotype-by-environment interactions (G × E), which demonstrate intraspecific variation in phenotypic plasticity (the ability of a genotype to alter its phenotype in response to environmental change), may prove important for bolstering agricultural and forest productivity under climate change. Nonetheless, very few studies have explicitly quantified genotype plasticity-productivity relationships in agriculture or forestry. Here, we conceptualize the importance of intraspecific variation in agricultural and forest species plasticity, and discuss the physiological and genetic factors contributing to intraspecific variation in phenotypic plasticity. Our discussion highlights the need for an integrated understanding of the mechanisms of G × E, more extensive assessments of genotypic responses to climate change under field conditions, and explicit testing of genotype plasticity-productivity relationships. Ultimately, further investigation of intraspecific variation in phenotypic plasticity in agriculture and forestry may prove important for identifying genotypes capable of increasing or sustaining productivity under more extreme climatic conditions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Intraspecific variation in sperm length is negatively related to sperm competition in passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleven, Oddmund; Laskemoen, Terje; Fossøy, Frode; Robertson, Raleigh J; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2008-02-01

    Spermatozoa are among the most diversified cells in the animal kingdom, but the underlying evolutionary forces affecting intraspecific variation in sperm morphology are poorly understood. It has been hypothesized that sperm competition is a potent selection pressure on sperm variation within species. Here, we examine intraspecific variation in total sperm length of 22 wild passerine bird species (21 genera, 11 families) in relation to the risk of sperm competition, as expressed by the frequency of extrapair paternity and relative testis size. We demonstrate, by using phylogenetic comparative methods, that between-male variation in sperm length within species is closely and negatively linked to the risk of sperm competition. This relationship was even stronger when only considering species in which data on sperm length and extrapair paternity originated from the same populations. Intramale variation in sperm length within species was also negatively, although nonsignificantly, related to sperm competition risk. Our findings suggest that postcopulatory sexual selection is a powerful evolutionary force reducing the intraspecific phenotypic variation in sperm-size traits, potentially driving the diversification of sperm morphology across populations and species.

  4. The role of intraspecific variation in the ecological and evolutionary success of diatoms in changing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godhe, Anna; Rynearson, Tatiana

    2017-09-05

    Intraspecific variation in diatoms has been shown to play a key role in species' responses to several important environmental factors such as light, salinity, temperature and nutrients. Furthermore, modelling efforts indicate that this variation within species extends bloom periods, and likely provides sufficient variability in competitive interactions between species under hydrographically variable conditions. The intraspecific variation most likely corresponds to optimal fitness in temporary microhabitats and may help to explain the paradox of the plankton. Here, we examine the implications of intraspecific variation for the ecology and success of diatoms in general and emphasize the potential implications for our understanding of carbon metabolism in these important organisms. Additionally, data from palaeoecological studies have the potential for evaluating genetic variation through past climate changes, going thousands of years back in time. We suggest pathways for future research including the adoption of multiple strains of individual species into studies of diatom carbon metabolism, to refine our understanding of the variation within and between species, and the inclusion of experimental evolution as a tool for understanding potential evolutionary responses of diatom carbon metabolism to climate change.This article is part of the themed issue 'The peculiar carbon metabolism in diatoms'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Intraspecific trait variation and the leaf economics spectrum across resource gradients and levels of organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Alex; Siefert, Andrew

    2018-03-30

    Understanding patterns of functional trait variation across environmental gradients offers an opportunity to increase inference in the mechanistic causes of plant community assembly. The leaf economics spectrum (LES) predicts global tradeoffs in leaf traits and trait-environment relationships, but few studies have examined whether these predictions hold across different levels of organization, particularly within species. Here, we asked (1) whether the main assumptions of the LES (expected trait relationships and shifts in trait values across resource gradients) hold at the intraspecific level, and (2) how within-species trait correlations scale up to interspecific or among-community levels. We worked with leaf traits of saplings of woody species growing across light and soil N and P availability gradients in temperate rainforests of southern Chile. We found that ITV accounted for a large proportion of community-level variation in leaf traits (e.g., LMA and leaf P) and played an important role in driving community-level shifts in leaf traits across environmental gradients. Additionally, intraspecific leaf trait relationships were generally consistent with interspecific and community-level trait relationships and with LES predictions-e.g., a strong negative intraspecific LMA-leaf N correlation-although, most trait relationships varied significantly among species, suggesting idiosyncrasies in the LES at the intraspecific level. © 2018 by the Ecological Society of America.

  6. Hierarchical analysis of taxonomic variation in intraspecific competition across fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss-Grant, Andrew P; Zipkin, Elise F; Thorson, James T; Jensen, Olaf P; Fagan, William F

    2016-07-01

    The nature and intensity of intraspecific competition can vary greatly among taxa, yet similarities in these interactions can lead to similar population dynamics among related organisms. Variation along the spectrum of intraspecific competition, with contest and scramble competition as endpoints, leads to vastly different responses to population density. Here we investigated the diversity of intraspecific competition among fish species, predicting that functional forms of density-dependent reproduction would be conserved in related taxa. Using a hierarchical model that links stock-recruitment parameters among populations, species, and orders, we found that the strength of overcompensation, and therefore the type of intraspecific competition, is tightly clustered within taxonomic groupings, as species within an order share similar degrees of compensation. Specifically, species within the orders Salmoniformes and Pleuronectiformes exhibited density dependence indicative of scramble competition (overcompensation) while the orders Clupeiformes, Gadiformes, Perciformes, and Scorpaeniformes exhibited dynamics consistent with contest competition (compensation). Maximum potential recruitment also varied among orders, but with less clustering across species. We also tested whether stock-recruitment parameters correlated with maximum body length among species, but found no strong relationship. Our results suggest that much of the variation in the form of density-dependent reproduction among fish species may be predicted taxonomically due to evolved life history traits and reproductive behaviors. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  7. Determinants of intra-specific variation in basal metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konarzewski, Marek; Książek, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    Basal metabolic rate (BMR) provides a widely accepted benchmark of metabolic expenditure for endotherms under laboratory and natural conditions. While most studies examining BMR have concentrated on inter-specific variation, relatively less attention has been paid to the determinants of within-species variation. Even fewer studies have analysed the determinants of within-species BMR variation corrected for the strong influence of body mass by appropriate means (e.g. ANCOVA). Here, we review recent advancements in studies on the quantitative genetics of BMR and organ mass variation, along with their molecular genetics. Next, we decompose BMR variation at the organ, tissue and molecular level. We conclude that within-species variation in BMR and its components have a clear genetic signature, and are functionally linked to key metabolic process at all levels of biological organization. We highlight the need to integrate molecular genetics with conventional metabolic field studies to reveal the adaptive significance of metabolic variation. Since comparing gene expressions inter-specifically is problematic, within-species studies are more likely to inform us about the genetic underpinnings of BMR. We also urge for better integration of animal and medical research on BMR; the latter is quickly advancing thanks to the application of imaging technologies and 'omics' studies. We also suggest that much insight on the biochemical and molecular underpinnings of BMR variation can be gained from integrating studies on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which appears to be the major regulatory pathway influencing the key molecular components of BMR.

  8. Intraspecific Variation in Armillaria Species from Shrubs and Trees in Northwestern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Aguín

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the identification of Armillaria species relied upon morphological characteristics and mating tests, but now molecular techniques based on polymorphisms in the IGS region of the fungal rDNA are more commonly used, since these are more rapid and reliable. Differences found in RFLP patterns identifying Armillaria species have suggested the existence of intraspecific variation. In this work, 185 Armillaria isolates from different plant species (including fruit trees, broadleaf and coniferous trees, ornamental shrubs, kiwifruit and grapevine affected by white root rot were analyzed by RFLP-PCR, in order to study intraspecific variation in Armillaria and the relationship with the plant host. Armillaria mellea was found in the majority of samples (71%, and was the most frequent Armillaria species in symptomatic ornamental shrubs, kiwifruit, grapevine, fruit trees and broadleaf trees. In conifers however white root rot was generally caused by Armillaria ostoyae. Armillaria gallica was identified, although with low incidence, in ornamental, coniferous, broadleaf and fruit hosts. Intraspecies variation was recorded only in A. mellea, for which RFLP patterns mel 1 and mel 2 were found. Most plants infected with A. mellea showed the mel 2 pattern. Further research is needed to study whether Armillaria RFLP patterns are specific to certain plant hosts, and whether intraspecific variation is related to differences in pathogenicity.

  9. Planning tiger recovery: Understanding intraspecific variation for effective conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilting, Andreas; Courtiol, Alexandre; Christiansen, Per; Niedballa, Jürgen; Scharf, Anne K.; Orlando, Ludovic; Balkenhol, Niko; Hofer, Heribert; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Fickel, Jörns; Kitchener, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Although significantly more money is spent on the conservation of tigers than on any other threatened species, today only 3200 to 3600 tigers roam the forests of Asia, occupying only 7% of their historical range. Despite the global significance of and interest in tiger conservation, global approaches to plan tiger recovery are partly impeded by the lack of a consensus on the number of tiger subspecies or management units, because a comprehensive analysis of tiger variation is lacking. We analyzed variation among all nine putative tiger subspecies, using extensive data sets of several traits [morphological (craniodental and pelage), ecological, molecular]. Our analyses revealed little variation and large overlaps in each trait among putative subspecies, and molecular data showed extremely low diversity because of a severe Late Pleistocene population decline. Our results support recognition of only two subspecies: the Sunda tiger, Panthera tigris sondaica, and the continental tiger, Panthera tigris tigris, which consists of two (northern and southern) management units. Conservation management programs, such as captive breeding, reintroduction initiatives, or trans-boundary projects, rely on a durable, consistent characterization of subspecies as taxonomic units, defined by robust multiple lines of scientific evidence rather than single traits or ad hoc descriptions of one or few specimens. Our multiple-trait data set supports a fundamental rethinking of the conventional tiger taxonomy paradigm, which will have profound implications for the management of in situ and ex situ tiger populations and boost conservation efforts by facilitating a pragmatic approach to tiger conservation management worldwide. PMID:26601191

  10. Intraspecific Variation in Maximum Ingested Food Size and Body Mass in Varecia rubra and Propithecus coquereli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartstone-Rose, Adam; Perry, Jonathan M G

    2011-01-01

    In a recent study, we quantified the scaling of ingested food size (V(b))-the maximum size at which an animal consistently ingests food whole-and found that V(b) scaled isometrically between species of captive strepsirrhines. The current study examines the relationship between V(b) and body size within species with a focus on the frugivorous Varecia rubra and the folivorous Propithecus coquereli. We found no overlap in V(b) between the species (all V. rubra ingested larger pieces of food relative to those eaten by P. coquereli), and least-squares regression of V(b) and three different measures of body mass showed no scaling relationship within each species. We believe that this lack of relationship results from the relatively narrow intraspecific body size variation and seemingly patternless individual variation in V(b) within species and take this study as further evidence that general scaling questions are best examined interspecifically rather than intraspecifically.

  11. Intraspecific variation of body size in a gamasid mite Laelaps clethrionomydis: environment, geography and host dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korallo-Vinarskaya, Natalia P; Vinarski, Maxim V; Khokhlova, Irina S; Shenbrot, Georgy I; Krasnov, Boris R

    2015-10-01

    We investigated intraspecific variation in body size of an ectoparasitic gamasid mite, Laelaps clethrionomydis, across 12 localities in the Palearctic. We asked whether mites collected from the same host species in different localities or from different host species in the same locality vary in body size. Within host species, mites collected in different localities differed significantly in body size, tending to be larger in northern than in southern localities. In addition, mite body size correlated negatively with mean annual temperature in a locality. Mites collected from different hosts in the same locality differed significantly in body size when hosts belonged to different genera but did not differ when collected from congeneric hosts. We conclude that intraspecific variation in mite body size is caused by interplay of environmental and host-related factors.

  12. Intraspecific Variation in Maximum Ingested Food Size and Body Mass in Varecia rubra and Propithecus coquereli

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    Adam Hartstone-Rose

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent study, we quantified the scaling of ingested food size (Vb—the maximum size at which an animal consistently ingests food whole—and found that Vb scaled isometrically between species of captive strepsirrhines. The current study examines the relationship between Vb and body size within species with a focus on the frugivorous Varecia rubra and the folivorous Propithecus coquereli. We found no overlap in Vb between the species (all V. rubra ingested larger pieces of food relative to those eaten by P. coquereli, and least-squares regression of Vb and three different measures of body mass showed no scaling relationship within each species. We believe that this lack of relationship results from the relatively narrow intraspecific body size variation and seemingly patternless individual variation in Vb within species and take this study as further evidence that general scaling questions are best examined interspecifically rather than intraspecifically.

  13. [Intraspecific genetic and morphological variation of earthworm Eisenia foetida (Sav.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotetskiĭ, N M; Kodolova, O P

    2005-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to study the allelic frequency distribution of four polymorphic loci (Pox, Lap, Pgm, and Odh) in 22 samples of Eisenia foetida (Sav.) from distant parts of the range: European Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan. A hierarchical population structure was demonstrated for this species: local populations are integrated into spatial groups. Statistical analysis of morphological variation demonstrated that recognition of the spatial groups on the basis of biochemical and genetic characters as individual taxa of any rank is not justified.

  14. Intraspecific diversity among partners drives functional variation in coral symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, John Everett; Banaszak, Anastazia T; Altman, Naomi S; LaJeunesse, Todd C; Baums, Iliana B

    2015-10-26

    The capacity of coral-dinoflagellate mutualisms to adapt to a changing climate relies in part on standing variation in host and symbiont populations, but rarely have the interactions between symbiotic partners been considered at the level of individuals. Here, we tested the importance of inter-individual variation with respect to the physiology of coral holobionts. We identified six genetically distinct Acropora palmata coral colonies that all shared the same isoclonal Symbiodinium 'fitti' dinoflagellate strain. No other Symbiodinium could be detected in host tissues. We exposed fragments of each colony to extreme cold and found that the stress-induced change in symbiont photochemical efficiency varied up to 3.6-fold depending on host genetic background. The S. 'fitti' strain was least stressed when associating with hosts that significantly altered the expression of 184 genes under cold shock; it was most stressed in hosts that only adjusted 14 genes. Key expression differences among hosts were related to redox signaling and iron availability pathways. Fine-scale interactions among unique host colonies and symbiont strains provide an underappreciated source of raw material for natural selection in coral symbioses.

  15. Intraspecific variation in fruit-frugivore interactions: effects of fruiting neighborhood and consequences for seed dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Tadeu J; Dayrell, Roberta L C; Arruda, André J; Dáttilo, Wesley; Teixido, Alberto L; Messeder, João V S; Silveira, Fernando A O

    2017-10-01

    The extent of specialization/generalization continuum in fruit-frugivore interactions at the individual level remains poorly explored. Here, we investigated the interactions between the Neotropical treelet Miconia irwinii (Melastomataceae) and its avian seed dispersers in Brazilian campo rupestre. We built an individual-based network to derive plant degree of interaction specialization regarding disperser species. Then, we explored how intraspecific variation in interaction niche breadth relates to fruit availability on individual plants in varying densities of fruiting conspecific neighbors, and how these factors affect the quantity of viable seeds dispersed. We predicted broader interaction niche breadths for individuals with larger fruit crops in denser fruiting neighborhoods. The downscaled network included nine bird species and 15 plants, which varied nearly five-fold in their degree of interaction specialization. We found positive effects of crop size on visitation and fruit removal rates, but not on degree of interaction specialization. Conversely, we found that an increase in the density of conspecific fruiting neighbors both increased visitation rate and reduced plant degree of interaction specialization. We suggest that tracking fruit-rich patches by avian frugivore species is the main driver of density-dependent intraspecific variation in plants' interaction niche breadth. Our study shed some light on the overlooked fitness consequences of intraspecific variation in interaction niches by showing that individuals along the specialization/generalization continuum may have their seed dispersed with similar effectiveness. Our study exemplifies how individual-based networks linking plants to frugivore species that differ in their seed dispersal effectiveness can advance our understanding of intraspecific variation in the outcomes of fruit-frugivore interactions.

  16. Scandinavian Oncophorus (Bryopsida, Oncophoraceae: species, cryptic species, and intraspecific variation

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    Lars Hedenäs

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Scandinavian members of the acrocarpous moss genus Oncophorus were revised after field observations had suggested unrecognized diversity. Based on molecular (nuclear: internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, ITS; plastid: trnGUCC G2 intron, trnG, rps4 gene + trnS-rps4 spacer, rps4 and morphological evidence, four morphologically distinguishable species are recognized, Oncophorus elongatus (I.Hagen Hedenäs, O. integerrimus Hedenäs sp. nov. (syn. O. virens var. elongatus Limpr., O. virens (Hedw. Brid., and O. wahlenbergii Brid. (O. sardous Herzog, syn. nov.. Oncophorus elongatus was earlier recognized, but much of its variation was hidden within O. wahlenbergii. Its circumscription is here expanded to include plants with long leaves having mostly denticulate or sharply denticulate upper margins and with long and narrow marginal cells in the basal portion of the sheathing leaf lamina. The new species O. integerrimus sp. nov. differs from O. virens in having more loosely incurved leaves and entire or almost entire upper leaf margins. Besides these characters, the species in the respective pairs differ in quantitative features of the leaf lamina cells. Several cryptic entities were found, in several cases as molecularly distinct as some of the morphologically recognizable species, and phylogeographic structure is present within O. elongatus and O. virens.

  17. Intraspecific Variation in Female Sex Pheromone of the Codling Moth Cydia pomonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duménil, Claire; Judd, Gary J R; Bosch, Dolors; Baldessari, Mario; Gemeno, César; Groot, Astrid T

    2014-09-26

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae), is a major pest of apple, pear and walnut orchards worldwide. This pest is often controlled using the biologically friendly control method known as pheromone-based mating disruption. Mating disruption likely exerts selection on the sexual communication system of codling moth, as male and female moths will persist in their attempt to meet and mate. Surprisingly little is known on the intraspecific variation of sexual communication in this species. We started an investigation to determine the level of individual variation in the female sex pheromone composition of this moth and whether variation among different populations might be correlated with use of mating disruption against those populations. By extracting pheromone glands of individual females from a laboratory population in Canada and from populations from apple orchards in Spain and Italy, we found significant between- and within-population variation. Comparing females that had been exposed to mating disruption, or not, revealed a significant difference in sex pheromone composition for two of the minor components. Overall, the intraspecific variation observed shows the potential for a shift in female sexual signal when selection pressure is high, as is the case with continuous use of mating disruption.

  18. Intraspecific Variation in Female Sex Pheromone of the Codling Moth Cydia pomonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Duménil

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The codling moth, Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae, is a major pest of apple, pear and walnut orchards worldwide. This pest is often controlled using the biologically friendly control method known as pheromone-based mating disruption. Mating disruption likely exerts selection on the sexual communication system of codling moth, as male and female moths will persist in their attempt to meet and mate. Surprisingly little is known on the intraspecific variation of sexual communication in this species. We started an investigation to determine the level of individual variation in the female sex pheromone composition of this moth and whether variation among different populations might be correlated with use of mating disruption against those populations. By extracting pheromone glands of individual females from a laboratory population in Canada and from populations from apple orchards in Spain and Italy, we found significant between- and within-population variation. Comparing females that had been exposed to mating disruption, or not, revealed a significant difference in sex pheromone composition for two of the minor components. Overall, the intraspecific variation observed shows the potential for a shift in female sexual signal when selection pressure is high, as is the case with continuous use of mating disruption.

  19. Intraspecific morphological and genetic variation of common species predicts ranges of threatened ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Trevon L.; Thomassen, Henri A.; Peralvo, Manuel; Buermann, Wolfgang; Milá, Borja; Kieswetter, Charles M.; Jarrín-V, Pablo; Devitt, Susan E. Cameron; Mason, Eliza; Schweizer, Rena M.; Schlunegger, Jasmin; Chan, Janice; Wang, Ophelia; Schneider, Christopher J.; Pollinger, John P.; Saatchi, Sassan; Graham, Catherine H.; Wayne, Robert K.; Smith, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting where threatened species occur is useful for making informed conservation decisions. However, because they are usually rare, surveying threatened species is often expensive and time intensive. Here, we show how regions where common species exhibit high genetic and morphological divergence among populations can be used to predict the occurrence of species of conservation concern. Intraspecific variation of common species of birds, bats and frogs from Ecuador were found to be a significantly better predictor for the occurrence of threatened species than suites of environmental variables or the occurrence of amphibians and birds. Fully 93 per cent of the threatened species analysed had their range adequately represented by the geographical distribution of the morphological and genetic variation found in seven common species. Both higher numbers of threatened species and greater genetic and morphological variation of common species occurred along elevation gradients. Higher levels of intraspecific divergence may be the result of disruptive selection and/or introgression along gradients. We suggest that collecting data on genetic and morphological variation in common species can be a cost effective tool for conservation planning, and that future biodiversity inventories include surveying genetic and morphological data of common species whenever feasible. PMID:23595273

  20. Intraspecific variation in Trichogramma bruni Nagaraja, 1983 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) associated with different hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querino, R B; Zucchi, R A

    2002-11-01

    Trichogramma bruni is an insufficiently studied South American species whose limits are still not well defined. Thus, the objective of the present study was to characterize T. bruni taxonomically and to determine the association between morphological variations as well as host and habitat, based on morphological and biological studies. Specimens from the Escola Superior de Agricultura "Luiz de Queiroz" (ESALQ) collection, and from the University of California Riverside (UCR) and specimens collected from the vegetation of forest parks with native areas planted with eucalyptus in Piracicaba and Itatinga, State of São Paulo, were also analyzed. The holotype deposited at Univeridade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG) collection was also examined. The variability in the genital capsule of T. bruni observed both among individuals of the same progeny and among specimens from different hosts is remarkable and is mainly related to the dorsal lamina. Therefore, an association of diagnostic characters rather than the dorsal lamina alone should be used for the identification of T. bruni and intraspecific variations should be considered. The intraspecific variation observed for T. bruni is a factor that should be considered for its identification, since the influence of the environment (habitat + host) and the variation among individuals itself is responsible for the plasticity observed in the genital capsule. Heliconius erato phyllis, Hamadryas feronia, Erosina hyberniata and Mechanitis lysiminia are new hosts of T. bruni.

  1. Causes and Consequences of Intraspecific Variation in Nesting Behaviors: Insights from Blue Tits and Great Tits

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    Mark C. Mainwaring

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nest building is an important and yet under-studied stage of the reproductive cycle in many taxa, including birds, and whilst we have a decent understanding of interspecific variation in avian nesting behaviors, our understanding of intraspecific variation in nesting behaviors is much less developed. This is largely because an insufficient number of studies have been performed on any one species to draw robust conclusions. Fortunately, though, the amount of research on the nesting behaviors of nestbox-breeding blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus and great tits (Parus major has increased dramatically in recent years and their nesting behaviors are now sufficiently well-studied to offer useful insights into intraspecific variation in avian nesting behaviors. Studies show that individuals of both species select nest sites based on the presence and/or absence of conspecifics and heterospecifics and whilst neighbors were assumed to adversely affect focal individuals by competing for resources, they are now considered beneficial as they provide information about habitat quality and contribute to anti-predator defenses. Nest-building females accurately gauge local weather conditions and respond to predictable variation in environmental conditions by building nests with variable amounts of cup lining material to create suitable nest microclimates for nestlings. Meanwhile, both species vary the amount of aromatic plant materials in their nests in relation to the abundance of nest-dwelling parasites and pathogens and as aromatic plant materials also play a role in sexual selection then nest materials can have multiple functions. The height of nests is negatively correlated with the local risk of predation but whilst predator avoidance favors lower nests, sexual selection favors taller nests. In fact, higher quality females build taller nests that contain more green plant material which in turn influences the amount of care provided by males. This suggests

  2. Concordance between stabilizing sexual selection, intraspecific variation, and interspecific divergence inPhymata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punzalan, David; Rowe, Locke

    2016-11-01

    Empirical studies show that lineages typically exhibit long periods of evolutionary stasis and that relative levels of within-species trait covariance often correlate with the extent of between-species trait divergence. These observations have been interpreted by some as evidence of genetic constraints persisting for long periods of time. However, an alternative explanation is that both intra- and interspecific variation are shaped by the features of the adaptive landscape (e.g., stabilizing selection). Employing a genus of insects that are diverse with respect to a suite of secondary sex traits, we related data describing nonlinear phenotypic (sexual) selection to intraspecific trait covariances and macroevolutionary divergence. We found support for two key predictions (1) that intraspecific trait covariation would be aligned with stabilizing selection and (2) that there would be restricted macroevolutionary divergence in the direction of stabilizing selection. The observed alignment of all three matrices offers a point of caution in interpreting standing variability as metrics of evolutionary constraint. Our results also illustrate the power of sexual selection for determining variation observed at both short and long timescales and account for the apparently slow evolution of some secondary sex characters in this lineage.

  3. Intraspecific variation in alkaline phosphatase activity in Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Bacillariophyceae, Bohlin

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    Domênica Teixeira de Lima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT To describe potential intraspecific variation in phosphorus incorporation in two strains of Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Bohlin, Ub3 and Ub7, alkaline phosphatase (AP activity was evaluated via enzyme-labeled fluorescence assay. Analysis using the probe ELF-97(r provides individual evaluation, and therefore can determine the nutritional status of inorganic phosphorus in phytoplanktonic cells. Bioassays compared the control treatment to both phosphate-enriched and phosphate-depleted treatments by varying only the phosphate concentration in the media. The P. tricornutum strains exhibited differences in their development when incubated in the phosphate-enriched media. The development of the Ub7 strain differed by exhibiting "luxury uptake" and utilization of organic phosphorus, and the alkaline phosphatase analysis indicated limitations of this clone under such conditions. The Ub7 strain showed higher AP activity, when compared to Ub3, in the P-enriched condition. P. tricornutum presented increases in AP activity and low variation in Surface/Volume ratio, by increasing biovolume and its maximum linear dimension, as strategies for phosphate incorporation. Our results highlight intraspecific differences in alkaline phosphatase activity, and hence differences in the incorporation of organic phosphorus, as the tested species regulated enzymatic activity under different external phosphate concentrations.

  4. The Orphan Gene dauerless Regulates Dauer Development and Intraspecific Competition in Nematodes by Copy Number Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melanie G; Rödelsperger, Christian; Witte, Hanh; Riebesell, Metta; Sommer, Ralf J

    2015-06-01

    Many nematodes form dauer larvae when exposed to unfavorable conditions, representing an example of phenotypic plasticity and a major survival and dispersal strategy. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the regulation of dauer induction is a model for pheromone, insulin, and steroid-hormone signaling. Recent studies in Pristionchus pacificus revealed substantial natural variation in various aspects of dauer development, i.e. pheromone production and sensing and dauer longevity and fitness. One intriguing example is a strain from Ohio, having extremely long-lived dauers associated with very high fitness and often forming the most dauers in response to other strains' pheromones, including the reference strain from California. While such examples have been suggested to represent intraspecific competition among strains, the molecular mechanisms underlying these dauer-associated patterns are currently unknown. We generated recombinant-inbred-lines between the Californian and Ohioan strains and used quantitative-trait-loci analysis to investigate the molecular mechanism determining natural variation in dauer development. Surprisingly, we discovered that the orphan gene dauerless controls dauer formation by copy number variation. The Ohioan strain has one dauerless copy causing high dauer formation, whereas the Californian strain has two copies, resulting in strongly reduced dauer formation. Transgenic animals expressing multiple copies do not form dauers. dauerless is exclusively expressed in CAN neurons, and both CAN ablation and dauerless mutations increase dauer formation. Strikingly, dauerless underwent several duplications and acts in parallel or downstream of steroid-hormone signaling but upstream of the nuclear-hormone-receptor daf-12. We identified the novel or fast-evolving gene dauerless as inhibitor of dauer development. Our findings reveal the importance of gene duplications and copy number variations for orphan gene function and suggest daf-12 as major target for

  5. Epigenetic variation predicts regional and local intraspecific functional diversity in a perennial herb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Mónica; Herrera, Carlos M; Bazaga, Pilar

    2014-10-01

    The ecological significance of epigenetic variation has been generally inferred from studies on model plants under artificial conditions, but the importance of epigenetic differences between individuals as a source of intraspecific diversity in natural plant populations remains essentially unknown. This study investigates the relationship between epigenetic variation and functional plant diversity by conducting epigenetic (methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphisms, MSAP) and genetic (amplified fragment length polymorphisms, AFLP) marker-trait association analyses for 20 whole-plant, leaf and regenerative functional traits in a large sample of wild-growing plants of the perennial herb Helleborus foetidus from ten sampling sites in south-eastern Spain. Plants differed widely in functional characteristics, and exhibited greater epigenetic than genetic diversity, as shown by per cent polymorphism of MSAP fragments (92%) or markers (69%) greatly exceeding that for AFLP ones (41%). After controlling for genetic structuring and possible cryptic relatedness, every functional trait considered exhibited a significant association with at least one AFLP or MSAP marker. A total of 27 MSAP (13.0% of total) and 12 AFLP (4.4%) markers were involved in significant associations, which explained on average 8.2% and 8.0% of trait variance, respectively. Individual MSAP markers were more likely to be associated with functional traits than AFLP markers. Between-site differences in multivariate functional diversity were directly related to variation in multilocus epigenetic diversity after multilocus genetic diversity was statistically accounted for. Results suggest that epigenetic variation can be an important source of intraspecific functional diversity in H. foetidus, possibly endowing this species with the capacity to exploit a broad range of ecological conditions despite its modest genetic diversity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Intra-specific pelage color variation in a South American small rodent species

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    M. L. Sandoval Salinas

    Full Text Available Abstract Intra-specific color variation is often underestimated by researchers, and among mammals, intra-specific differences in coloration are poorly documented for most species. The main goal of this study was to apply an objective color measurement methodology to the study of a specific problem: the detection, if any, of patterns of changes in the fur color of specimens of Akodon budini in relation to biological (i.e., sex and environmental (i.e., season variables. We hypothesize that coat color will be more homogeneous in males than in females and that coat color will be darker in winter than in summer, the latter being orange. We measured the pelage color on five points over the dorsal surface of 26 A. budini museum specimens using a spectroradiometer and a diffuse illumination cabin. We used Principal Component Analysis to describe the association between the color variables, sex and season, and each of the observations. We then used general linear models of Analysis of Variance to examine relationships between color data, season, and sex. The results clearly confirm the hypothesis related to seasonal coat color change but do not directly confirm the hypothesis related to changes in coat color in relation to sex, and we show the complexity of the studied pattern. In conclusion, undoubtedly, the studied variables should accordingly be considered when studying the coloration of specimens for characterization, identification and discrimination of different taxonomic units based on color.

  7. Intra-specific pelage color variation in a South American small rodent species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval Salinas, M L; Barquez, R M; Colombo, E M; Sandoval, J D

    2017-03-01

    Intra-specific color variation is often underestimated by researchers, and among mammals, intra-specific differences in coloration are poorly documented for most species. The main goal of this study was to apply an objective color measurement methodology to the study of a specific problem: the detection, if any, of patterns of changes in the fur color of specimens of Akodon budini in relation to biological (i.e., sex) and environmental (i.e., season) variables. We hypothesize that coat color will be more homogeneous in males than in females and that coat color will be darker in winter than in summer, the latter being orange. We measured the pelage color on five points over the dorsal surface of 26 A. budini museum specimens using a spectroradiometer and a diffuse illumination cabin. We used Principal Component Analysis to describe the association between the color variables, sex and season, and each of the observations. We then used general linear models of Analysis of Variance to examine relationships between color data, season, and sex. The results clearly confirm the hypothesis related to seasonal coat color change but do not directly confirm the hypothesis related to changes in coat color in relation to sex, and we show the complexity of the studied pattern. In conclusion, undoubtedly, the studied variables should accordingly be considered when studying the coloration of specimens for characterization, identification and discrimination of different taxonomic units based on color.

  8. The use and limits of ITS data in the analysis of intraspecific variation in Passiflora L. (Passifloraceae

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    Geraldo Mäder

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and characterization of informative intraspecific genetic markers is fundamental for evolutionary and conservation genetics studies. Here, we used nuclear ribosomal ITS sequences to access intraspecific genetic diversity in 23 species of the genus Passiflora L. Some degree of variation was detected in 21 of these. The Passiflora and Decaloba (DC. Rchb. subgenera showed significant differences in the sizes of the two ITS regions and in GC content, which can be related to reproductive characteristics of species in these subgenera. Furthermore, clear geographical patterns in the spatial distribution of sequence types were identified in six species. The results indicate that ITS may be a useful tool for the evaluation of intraspecific genetic variation in Passiflora.

  9. The use and limits of ITS data in the analysis of intraspecific variation in Passiflora L. (Passifloraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäder, Geraldo; Zamberlan, Priscilla M; Fagundes, Nelson J R; Magnus, Tielli; Salzano, Francisco M; Bonatto, Sandro L; Freitas, Loreta B

    2010-01-01

    The discovery and characterization of informative intraspecific genetic markers is fundamental for evolutionary and conservation genetics studies. Here, we used nuclear ribosomal ITS sequences to access intraspecific genetic diversity in 23 species of the genus Passiflora L. Some degree of variation was detected in 21 of these. The Passiflora and Decaloba (DC.) Rchb. subgenera showed significant differences in the sizes of the two ITS regions and in GC content, which can be related to reproductive characteristics of species in these subgenera. Furthermore, clear geographical patterns in the spatial distribution of sequence types were identified in six species. The results indicate that ITS may be a useful tool for the evaluation of intraspecific genetic variation in Passiflora.

  10. Intraspecific variation in 137Cs activity concentration in sporocarps of Suillus variegatus in seven Swedish populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlberg, Anders; Nikolova, Ivanka; Johanson, K.-J.

    1997-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident in 1986, sporocarps of Suillus variegatus in Sweden showed a large amount of individual variation in concentration of 137 Cs activity. Our aim was to determine the degrees to which this variability in sporocarp 137 Cs levels could be explained by differences between (i) local populations, (ii) fungal genets and (iii) locations within genets. Five populations in a 100-yr-old Scots pine forest, located within a 1 km 2 area, and two populations in Scots pine/Norway spruce forest, located 40 km north-west of Uppsala, were investigated. In total, 154 sporocarps were analysed to determine their 137 Cs content. Of these, the genetic affiliations of 86 were successfully characterized using somatic incompatibility reactions. Twenty-six genets were found which, on average, consisted of 6.5 sporocarps. The genets averaged 7.5 m in size, measured as the length between the most distant sporocarps. The mean sporocarp 137 Cs level was 67.1 ± 2.8 kBq kgsup(-1) D.W. (range between 13.6 and 182). According to analyses of variance, within-population variation accounted for 60% of the total variation in 137 Cs levels, while 40% was ascribed to variation among populations. Within a population, 137 Cs levels did not generally differ significantly between genets. Plausible reasons for intraspecific variation in radiocaesium content in sporocarps are discussed. (author)

  11. Intraspecific Variation in and Environment-Dependent Resource Allocation to Embryonic Development Time in Common Terns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedder, Oscar; Kürten, Nathalie; Bouwhuis, Sandra

    Embryonic development time is thought to impact life histories through trade-offs against life-history traits later in life, yet the inference is based on interspecific comparative analyses only. It is largely unclear whether intraspecific variation in embryonic development time that is not caused by environmental differences occurs, which would be required to detect life-history trade-offs. Here we performed a classical common-garden experiment by incubating fresh eggs of free-living common terns (Sterna hirundo) in a controlled incubation environment at two different temperatures. Hatching success was high but was slightly lower at the lower temperature. While correcting for effects of year, incubation temperature, and laying order, we found significant variation in the incubation time embryos required until hatching and in their heart rate. Embryonic heart rate was significantly positively correlated within clutches, and a similar tendency was found for incubation time, suggesting that intrinsic differences in embryonic development rate between offspring of different parents exist. Incubation time and embryonic heart rate were strongly correlated: embryos with faster heart rates required shorter incubation time. However, after correction for heart rate, embryos still required more time for development at the lower incubation temperature. This suggests that processes other than development require a greater share of resources in a suboptimal environment and that relative resource allocation to development is, therefore, environment dependent. We conclude that there is opportunity to detect intraspecific life-history trade-offs with embryonic development time and that the resolution of trade-offs may differ between embryonic environments.

  12. Intraspecific variation in the diet of the Mexican garter snake Thamnophis eques

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    Javier Manjarrez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Mexican Garter Snake (Thamnophis eques is a terrestrial-aquatic generalist that feeds on both aquatic and terrestrial prey. We describe size-related variation and sexual variation in the diet of T. eques through analysis of 262 samples of identifiable stomach contents in snakes from 23 locations on the Mexican Plateau. The snake T. eques we studied consumed mostly fish, followed in lesser amounts by leeches, earthworms, frogs, and tadpoles. Correspondence analysis suggested that the frequency of consumption of various prey items differed between the categories of age but not between sex of snakes, and the general pattern was a reduction of prey item diversity with size of snake. Snake length was correlated positively with mass of ingested prey. Large snakes consumed large prey and continued to consume smaller prey. In general, no differences were found between the prey taxa of male and female snakes, although males ate two times more tadpoles than females. Males and females did not differ in the mass of leeches, earthworms, fishes, frogs and tadpoles that they ate, and males and females that ate each prey taxon were similar in length. We discuss proximate and functional determinants of diet and suggest that the observed intraspecific variation in T. eques could be explored by temporal variation in prey availability, proportions of snake size classes and possible sexual dimorphism in head traits and prey dimensions to assess the role of intersexual resource competition.

  13. The importance of intraspecific variation in tree responses to elevated [CO2]: breeding and management of future forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    One strategy for managing forests to sustain or increase productivity under global climate change is to initiate breeding programs which maximize responses to elevated [CO2] within species. The basis for any breeding program is intraspecific variation in the traits of interest, and for forests, grow...

  14. Biomechanical implications of intraspecific shape variation in chimpanzee crania: moving towards an integration of geometric morphometrics and finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amanda L.; Benazzi, Stefano; Ledogar, Justin A.; Tamvada, Kelli; Smith, Leslie C. Pryor; Weber, Gerhard W.; Spencer, Mark A.; Dechow, Paul C.; Grosse, Ian R.; Ross, Callum F.; Richmond, Brian G.; Wright, Barth W.; Wang, Qian; Byron, Craig; Slice, Dennis E.; Strait, David S.

    2014-01-01

    In a broad range of evolutionary studies, an understanding of intraspecific variation is needed in order to contextualize and interpret the meaning of variation between species. However, mechanical analyses of primate crania using experimental or modeling methods typically encounter logistical constraints that force them to rely on data gathered from only one or a few individuals. This results in a lack of knowledge concerning the mechanical significance of intraspecific shape variation that limits our ability to infer the significance of interspecific differences. This study uses geometric morphometric methods (GM) and finite element analysis (FEA) to examine the biomechanical implications of shape variation in chimpanzee crania, thereby providing a comparative context in which to interpret shape-related mechanical variation between hominin species. Six finite element models (FEMs) of chimpanzee crania were constructed from CT scans following shape-space Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of a matrix of 709 Procrustes coordinates (digitized onto 21 specimens) to identify the individuals at the extremes of the first three principal components. The FEMs were assigned the material properties of bone and were loaded and constrained to simulate maximal bites on the P3 and M2. Resulting strains indicate that intraspecific cranial variation in morphology is associated with quantitatively high levels of variation in strain magnitudes, but qualitatively little variation in the distribution of strain concentrations. Thus, interspecific comparisons should include considerations of the spatial patterning of strains rather than focus only their magnitude. PMID:25529239

  15. Variation in Streptococcus pneumoniae susceptibility to human antimicrobial peptides may mediate intraspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habets, Michelle G J L; Rozen, Daniel E; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2012-09-22

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a facultative pathogen inhabiting the nasopharynx of humans where it is exposed to a range of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immune response. It is possible therefore that the susceptibility of strains to AMPs plays a role in determining their ability to colonize, and furthermore, that AMPs could mediate competitive interactions between co-colonizing genotypes. However, little is known about patterns of natural variation in AMP susceptibility of S. pneumoniae, and it is unclear whether the susceptibilities of an isolate to multiple human AMPs are correlated. We tested this by characterizing the susceptibility of 31 S. pneumoniae natural isolates to human neutrophil peptide (HNP-1) (α-defensin) and LL-37 (cathelicidin). We observed significant variation in susceptibility between isolates to both AMPs, and in the majority of isolates, susceptibilities to HNP-1 and LL-37 were uncorrelated. Clinical isolates were more susceptible to AMPs than were carriage isolates. The polysaccharide capsule of S. pneumoniae is thought to protect cells against AMPs. However, serotype alone could not explain the observed variation in susceptibility suggesting that genetic background plays an equally important role. We tested directly whether AMPs could mediate competition between isolates using competition experiments in the presence and absence of AMPs. These experiments demonstrated that AMPs could indeed reverse the outcome of competition between selected isolates. AMP-mediated competition could therefore contribute to the maintenance of intraspecific genetic diversity in S. pneumoniae.

  16. Large intraspecific genetic variation within the Saffron-Crocus group (Crocus L., Series Crocus; Iridaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarne; Orabi, Jihad; Pedersen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    generally were grouped with C. sativus samples. Pollination and maintenance of genetic variation are discussed. The large intraspecific variation found within the three specifically studied species reflects dynamic population structures with potential to meet future ecological fluctuations. It emphasises...

  17. Intraspecific variations in responses to ocean acidification in two branching coral species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekizawa, Ayami; Uechi, Hikaru; Iguchi, Akira; Nakamura, Takashi; Kumagai, Naoki H; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sakai, Kazuhiko; Nojiri, Yukihiro

    2017-09-15

    Ocean acidification is widely recognised to have a negative impact on marine calcifying organisms by reducing calcifications, but controversy remains over whether such organisms could cope with ocean acidification within a range of phenotypic plasticity and/or adapt to future acidifying ocean. We performed a laboratory rearing experiment using clonal fragments of the common branching corals Montipora digitata and Porites cylindrica under control and acidified seawater (lower pH) conditions (approximately 400 and 900μatm pCO 2 , respectively) and evaluated the intraspecific variations in their responses to ocean acidification. Intra- and interspecific variations in calcification and photosynthetic efficiency were evident according to both pCO 2 conditions and colony, indicating that responses to acidification may be individually variable at the colony level. Our results suggest that some corals may cope with ocean acidification within their present genotypic composition by adaptation through phenotypic plasticity, while others may be placed under selective pressures resulting in population alteration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Intraspecific variation in erythrocyte sizes among populations of Hypsiboas cordobas (Anura: Hylidae

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    Mariana Baraquet

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the morphology and size of erythrocytes of H. cordobae, and analysed the geographic variation of this character along the distribution of the species, in relation to the latitudinal and altitudinal distances. Erythrocyte shape of the H. cordobae is ellipsoidal and the nuclei are also ellipsoidal and centrally oriented. Erythrocyte and nuclear size showed significant differences among populations, with the highest mean size corresponding to the population of Achiras (low altitude site and the lowest mean size to Los Linderos (high altitude site. There was no significant relationship between the latitude of each population and the both erythrocyte and nuclear size. The altitudinal variation in erythrocyte cell size may be attributable to the surface available for gas exchange; a small erythrocyte offers a possibility of greater rate of exchange than a larger one. Our results are consistent with studies of other amphibians, where intraspecific comparisons of populations at different altitudes show that individuals at higher altitudes are characterized by smaller erythrocytes.

  19. Intraspecific variation in thermal acclimation of photosynthesis across a range of temperatures in a perennial crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaka, Serge; Frak, Ela; Julier, Bernadette; Gastal, François; Louarn, Gaëtan

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the thermal acclimation of photosynthesis has been stimulated by the increasing relevance of climate change. However, little is known about intra-specific variations in thermal acclimation and its potential for breeding. In this article, we examined the difference in thermal acclimation between alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cultivars originating from contrasting origins, and sought to analyze the mechanisms in play. A series of experiments was carried out at seven growth temperatures between 5 and 35 °C using four cultivars from temperate and Mediterranean origin. Leaf traits, the photosynthetic rate at 25 °C (A400 (25)), the photosynthetic rate at optimal temperature (A400 (opt)), the thermal optimum of photosynthesis (Topt), and the photosynthetic parameters from the Farqhuar model were determined. Irrespective of cultivar origin, a clear shift in the temperature responses of photosynthesis was observed as a function of growth temperature, affecting thermal optimum of photosynthesis, photosynthetic rate at optimal temperature and photosynthetic rate at 25 °C. For both cultivars, Topt values increased linearly in leaves grown between 5 and 35 °C. Relative homeostasis of A400 (25) and A400 (opt) was found between 10 °C and 30 °C growth temperatures, but sharp declines were recorded at 5 and 35 °C. This homeostasis was achieved in part through modifications to leaf nitrogen content, which increased at extreme temperatures. Significant changes were also recorded regarding nitrogen partitioning in the photosynthetic apparatus and in the temperature dependence of photosynthetic parameters. The cultivars differed only in terms of the temperature response of photosynthetic parameters, with Mediterranean genotypes displaying a greater sensitivity of the maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation to elevated temperatures. It was concluded that intra-specific variations in the temperature acclimation of photosynthesis exist among alfalfa cultivars

  20. Intraspecific variation in feeding strategies of Galapagos sea lions: A case of trophic specialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Amtmann, Stella; Costa, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The trophic behavior of marine predators varies according to the level of competition to which they are exposed. In general, populations that inhabit lower productivity systems face a strong intraspecific competition, which contributes to the development of different foraging strategies to maximize nutritional efficiency. Given the high trophic flexibility of Zalophus wollebaeki, this species is considered appropriate for the analysis of such behavior. Furthermore, this trophic flexibility has allowed them to persist in a seemingly marginal ecosystem. In this study, we used a comparative analysis of variables (diet and dive behavior) related to Z. wollebaeki trophic niche plasticity to better understand their foraging ecology, using techniques such scat analysis, satellite telemetry and complementarily an isotopic analysis. Scat analysis revealed intra-population variation in their diet, represented by prey from different environments (epipelagic and benthic). These results are supported by the animals’ locations at sea and diving profiles. Global Positioning System (GPS) and time-depth recorder (TDR) records showed the existence of two groups, with differing feeding areas and diving behavior. Also the δ15N values showed differences in the trophic level at which the species fed. These results constitute a relevant finding in the evolutionary behavior of the species, showing that Z. wollebaeki has developed a high degree of foraging flexibility, thus increasing its survival rate in an ecosystem that is highly demanding in terms of resource availability. PMID:29059188

  1. Intraspecific variation in feeding strategies of Galapagos sea lions: A case of trophic specialization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Páez-Rosas

    Full Text Available The trophic behavior of marine predators varies according to the level of competition to which they are exposed. In general, populations that inhabit lower productivity systems face a strong intraspecific competition, which contributes to the development of different foraging strategies to maximize nutritional efficiency. Given the high trophic flexibility of Zalophus wollebaeki, this species is considered appropriate for the analysis of such behavior. Furthermore, this trophic flexibility has allowed them to persist in a seemingly marginal ecosystem. In this study, we used a comparative analysis of variables (diet and dive behavior related to Z. wollebaeki trophic niche plasticity to better understand their foraging ecology, using techniques such scat analysis, satellite telemetry and complementarily an isotopic analysis. Scat analysis revealed intra-population variation in their diet, represented by prey from different environments (epipelagic and benthic. These results are supported by the animals' locations at sea and diving profiles. Global Positioning System (GPS and time-depth recorder (TDR records showed the existence of two groups, with differing feeding areas and diving behavior. Also the δ15N values showed differences in the trophic level at which the species fed. These results constitute a relevant finding in the evolutionary behavior of the species, showing that Z. wollebaeki has developed a high degree of foraging flexibility, thus increasing its survival rate in an ecosystem that is highly demanding in terms of resource availability.

  2. Intraspecific variation in feeding strategies of Galapagos sea lions: A case of trophic specialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez-Rosas, Diego; Villegas-Amtmann, Stella; Costa, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The trophic behavior of marine predators varies according to the level of competition to which they are exposed. In general, populations that inhabit lower productivity systems face a strong intraspecific competition, which contributes to the development of different foraging strategies to maximize nutritional efficiency. Given the high trophic flexibility of Zalophus wollebaeki, this species is considered appropriate for the analysis of such behavior. Furthermore, this trophic flexibility has allowed them to persist in a seemingly marginal ecosystem. In this study, we used a comparative analysis of variables (diet and dive behavior) related to Z. wollebaeki trophic niche plasticity to better understand their foraging ecology, using techniques such scat analysis, satellite telemetry and complementarily an isotopic analysis. Scat analysis revealed intra-population variation in their diet, represented by prey from different environments (epipelagic and benthic). These results are supported by the animals' locations at sea and diving profiles. Global Positioning System (GPS) and time-depth recorder (TDR) records showed the existence of two groups, with differing feeding areas and diving behavior. Also the δ15N values showed differences in the trophic level at which the species fed. These results constitute a relevant finding in the evolutionary behavior of the species, showing that Z. wollebaeki has developed a high degree of foraging flexibility, thus increasing its survival rate in an ecosystem that is highly demanding in terms of resource availability.

  3. Plant movements and climate warming: intraspecific variation in growth responses to nonlocal soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Frenne, P.; Coomes, D. A.; De Schrijver, A.; Staelens, J.; Alexander, J. M.; Bernhardt-Römermann, M.; Brunet, J.; Chabrerie, O.; Chiarucci, A.; den Ouden, J.; Eckstein, R. L.; Graae, B. J.; Gruwez, R.; Hédl, Radim; Hermy, M.; Kolb, A.; Marell, A.; Mullender, S. M.; Olsen, S. L.; Orczewska, A.; Peterken, G.; Petřík, Petr; Plue, J.; Simonson, W. D.; Tomescu, C. V.; Vangansbeke, P.; Verstraeten, G.; Vesterdal, L.; Wulf, M.; Verheyen, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 202, č. 2 (2014), s. 431-441 ISSN 0028-646X Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : climate change * intraspecific variability * soil chemism Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 7.672, year: 2014

  4. Intraspecific variation in cellular and biochemical heat response strategies of Mediterranean Xeropicta derbentina [Pulmonata, Hygromiidae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troschinski, Sandra; Di Lellis, Maddalena A; Sereda, Sergej; Hauffe, Torsten; Wilke, Thomas; Triebskorn, Rita; Köhler, Heinz-R

    2014-01-01

    Dry and hot environments challenge the survival of terrestrial snails. To minimize overheating and desiccation, physiological and biochemical adaptations are of high importance for these animals. In the present study, seven populations of the Mediterranean land snail species Xeropicta derbentina were sampled from their natural habitat in order to investigate the intraspecific variation of cellular and biochemical mechanisms, which are assigned to contribute to heat resistance. Furthermore, we tested whether genetic parameters are correlated with these physiological heat stress response patterns. Specimens of each population were individually exposed to elevated temperatures (25 to 52°C) for 8 h in the laboratory. After exposure, the health condition of the snails' hepatopancreas was examined by means of qualitative description and semi-quantitative assessment of histopathological effects. In addition, the heat-shock protein 70 level (Hsp70) was determined. Generally, calcium cells of the hepatopancreas were more heat resistant than digestive cells - this phenomenon was associated with elevated Hsp70 levels at 40°C.We observed considerable variation in the snails' heat response strategy: Individuals from three populations invested much energy in producing a highly elevated Hsp70 level, whereas three other populations invested energy in moderate stress protein levels - both strategies were in association with cellular functionality. Furthermore, one population kept cellular condition stable despite a low Hsp70 level until 40°C exposure, whereas prominent cellular reactions were observed above this thermal limit. Genetic diversity (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene) within populations was low. Nevertheless, when using genetic indices as explanatory variables in a multivariate regression tree (MRT) analysis, population structure explained mean differences in cellular and biochemical heat stress responses, especially in the group exposed to 40°C. Our

  5. Intraspecific variation in cellular and biochemical heat response strategies of Mediterranean Xeropicta derbentina [Pulmonata, Hygromiidae].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Troschinski

    Full Text Available Dry and hot environments challenge the survival of terrestrial snails. To minimize overheating and desiccation, physiological and biochemical adaptations are of high importance for these animals. In the present study, seven populations of the Mediterranean land snail species Xeropicta derbentina were sampled from their natural habitat in order to investigate the intraspecific variation of cellular and biochemical mechanisms, which are assigned to contribute to heat resistance. Furthermore, we tested whether genetic parameters are correlated with these physiological heat stress response patterns. Specimens of each population were individually exposed to elevated temperatures (25 to 52°C for 8 h in the laboratory. After exposure, the health condition of the snails' hepatopancreas was examined by means of qualitative description and semi-quantitative assessment of histopathological effects. In addition, the heat-shock protein 70 level (Hsp70 was determined. Generally, calcium cells of the hepatopancreas were more heat resistant than digestive cells - this phenomenon was associated with elevated Hsp70 levels at 40°C.We observed considerable variation in the snails' heat response strategy: Individuals from three populations invested much energy in producing a highly elevated Hsp70 level, whereas three other populations invested energy in moderate stress protein levels - both strategies were in association with cellular functionality. Furthermore, one population kept cellular condition stable despite a low Hsp70 level until 40°C exposure, whereas prominent cellular reactions were observed above this thermal limit. Genetic diversity (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene within populations was low. Nevertheless, when using genetic indices as explanatory variables in a multivariate regression tree (MRT analysis, population structure explained mean differences in cellular and biochemical heat stress responses, especially in the group

  6. Does intraspecific behavioural variation of pollinator species influence pollination? A quantitative study with hummingbirds and a Neotropical shrub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, P K; Justino, D G; Oliveira, P E

    2016-11-01

    Floral visitors differ in their efficacy as pollinators, and the impact of different pollinator species on pollen flow and plant reproduction has been frequently evaluated. In contrast, the impact of intraspecific behavioural changes on their efficacy as pollinators has seldom been quantified. We studied a self-incompatible shrub Palicourea rigida (Rubiaceae) and its hummingbird pollinators, which adjust their behaviour according to floral resource availability. Fluorescence microscopy was used to access pollen tube growth and incompatibility reaction in pistils after a single visit of territorial or intruder hummingbirds in two populations. To characterise the plant populations and possible differences in resource availability between areas we used a three-term quadrat variance method to detect clusters of floral resources. Within-species variation in foraging behaviour, but not species identity, affected pollinator efficacy. Effectively, hummingbirds intruding into territories deposited more compatible pollen grains on P. rigida stigmas than territory holders in both study areas. Additionally, territory holders deposited more incompatible than compatible pollen grains. Our results imply that intraspecific foraging behaviour variation has consequences for pollination success. Quantifying such variation and addressing the implications of intraspecific variability contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics and consequences of plant-pollinator interactions. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  7. Assessing intraspecific variation in effective dispersal along an altitudinal gradient: a test in two Mediterranean high-mountain plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Lara-Romero

    Full Text Available Plant recruitment depends among other factors on environmental conditions and their variation at different spatial scales. Characterizing dispersal in contrasting environments may thus be necessary to understand natural intraspecific variation in the processes underlying recruitment. Silene ciliata and Armeria caespitosa are two representative species of cryophilic pastures above the tree line in Mediterranean high mountains. No explicit estimations of dispersal kernels have been made so far for these or other high-mountain plants. Such data could help to predict their dispersal and recruitment patterns in a context of changing environments under ongoing global warming.We used an inverse modelling approach to analyse effective seed dispersal patterns in five populations of both Silene ciliata and Armeria caespitosa along an altitudinal gradient in Sierra de Guadarrama (Madrid, Spain. We considered four commonly employed two-dimensional seedling dispersal kernels exponential-power, 2Dt, WALD and log-normal.No single kernel function provided the best fit across all populations, although estimated mean dispersal distances were short (<1 m in all cases. S. ciliata did not exhibit significant among-population variation in mean dispersal distance, whereas significant differences in mean dispersal distance were found in A. caespitosa. Both S. ciliata and A. caespitosa exhibited among-population variation in the fecundity parameter and lacked significant variation in kernel shape.This study illustrates the complexity of intraspecific variation in the processes underlying recruitment, showing that effective dispersal kernels can remain relatively invariant across populations within particular species, even if there are strong variations in demographic structure and/or physical environment among populations, while the invariant dispersal assumption may not hold for other species in the same environment. Our results call for a case-by-case analysis in a

  8. Growth, inter- and intraspecific variation, palaeobiogeography, taphonomy and systematics of the Cenozoic ghost shrimp Glypturus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klompmaker, Adiël A.; Hyžný, Matúš; Portell, Roger W.; Kowalewski, Michał

    2015-01-01

    Studies in systematic palaeontology are greatly aided when numerous, well-preserved specimens are available so that quantitative methods can be used to substantiate qualitative observations. This is often not the case for fossil decapod crustaceans due to their relatively low preservation potential. Here, we examined primarily two large collections of the well-preserved ghost shrimp Glypturus from the Holo-Pleistocene of Panama and the late Miocene of Florida. Using descriptive, bivariate, multivariate and geometric morphometric methods, two new species are described based on appendage material: Glypturus panamacanalensis sp. nov. and G. sikesi sp. nov. New characters are identified, and size-related and intraspecific variation are assessed for these taxa and modern G. acanthochirus. Taxonomic placement of single specimens from other localities was confirmed by multivariate methods. Furthermore, Glypturus is revised, especially with regard to Western Atlantic species that inhabited both carbonate and siliciclastic environments. Callianassa anguillensis, C. latidigata, and Neocallichirus? quisquellanus are referred to as Glypturus sp. until more material is available to determine the validity of these species. Diversity within Glypturus may thus be underestimated, thereby also impacting the assessment of phylogenetic relationships. Minor propodi appear under-represented relative to major propodi, suggesting a taphonomic bias. Single specimens of interest include a specimen of G. panamacanalensis sp. nov. exhibiting a peculiar swelling in the fixed finger and another showing damage on the propodal upper margin, suggesting failed predation or antagonistic behaviour. Glypturus is first found in the Oligocene in the Western Atlantic and may have expanded its palaeobiogeographical range since the Miocene. The genus was still present on the Pacific side of the Isthmus of Panama in the Holo-Pleistocene, but is only known from the Western Atlantic today, suggesting a

  9. Redescription of Atractus albuquerquei (Serpentes: Colubridae: Dipsadinae, with comments on geographical distribution and intraspecific variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussam Zaher

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Atractus albuquerquei Cunha and Nascimento, 1983 was previously known from a holotype from eastern Pará, and 15 specimens from Rondônia and Acre, all in Brazil. We report on 23 additional specimens from the Brazilian states of Rondônia, Goiás, Mato Grosso, and Mato Grosso do Sul. These specimens extend the known range of A. albuquerquei substantially, and beyond the southern limits of the Amazon basin. The holotype of A. albuquerquei is redescribed and intraspecific variation in external morphology, hemipenes, and colour is documented. Sexual dimorphism exists in total length, and number of ventral (significantly greater in females and subcaudal scales (greater in males. There is a significant correlation between number of subcaudal scales and longitude (decreasing from East to West for both males and females.Atractus albuquerquei Cunha & Nascimento, 1983 era conhecida apenas do holótipo procedente do leste do estado do Pará e de 15 espécimes dos estados de Rondônia e Acre, no Brasil. Registramos aqui 23 espécimes adicionais provenientes dos estados de Rondônia, Goiás, Mato Grosso e Mato Grosso do Sul. Estes exemplares ampliam a área de distribuição conhecida de A. albuquerquei, para além do limite sul da bacia amazônica. O holótipo de A. albuquerquei é redescrito e a variação intraespecífica da morfologia externa, dos hemipenis e da coloração dos exemplares estudados é analizada. Foi detectado dimorfismo sexual no comprimento total do corpo bem como no número de ventrais (maior nas fêmeas e de subcaudais (maior nos machos. Foi notada uma correlação significativa entre o número de escamas subcaudais e a longitude (que diminuem de leste para oeste em ambos os sexos.

  10. Limited Variation in BK Virus T-Cell Epitopes Revealed by Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Malaya K.; Tan, Susanna K.; Chen, Sharon F.; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Concepcion, Katherine R.; Kjelson, Lynn; Mallempati, Kalyan; Farina, Heidi M.; Fernández-Viña, Marcelo; Tyan, Dolly; Grimm, Paul C.; Anderson, Matthew W.; Concepcion, Waldo

    2015-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) infection causing end-organ disease remains a formidable challenge to the hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) and kidney transplant fields. As BKV-specific treatments are limited, immunologic-based therapies may be a promising and novel therapeutic option for transplant recipients with persistent BKV infection. Here, we describe a whole-genome, deep-sequencing methodology and bioinformatics pipeline that identify BKV variants across the genome and at BKV-specific HLA-A2-, HLA-B0702-, and HLA-B08-restricted CD8 T-cell epitopes. BKV whole genomes were amplified using long-range PCR with four inverse primer sets, and fragmentation libraries were sequenced on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM). An error model and variant-calling algorithm were developed to accurately identify rare variants. A total of 65 samples from 18 pediatric HCT and kidney recipients with quantifiable BKV DNAemia underwent whole-genome sequencing. Limited genetic variation was observed. The median number of amino acid variants identified per sample was 8 (range, 2 to 37; interquartile range, 10), with the majority of variants (77%) detected at a frequency of <5%. When normalized for length, there was no statistical difference in the median number of variants across all genes. Similarly, the predominant virus population within samples harbored T-cell epitopes similar to the reference BKV strain that was matched for the BKV genotype. Despite the conservation of epitopes, low-level variants in T-cell epitopes were detected in 77.7% (14/18) of patients. Understanding epitope variation across the whole genome provides insight into the virus-immune interface and may help guide the development of protocols for novel immunologic-based therapies. PMID:26202116

  11. Intra-specific variation in social organization of gorillas: implications for their social evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagiwa, Juichi; Kahekwa, John; Basabose, Augustin Kanyunyi

    2003-10-01

    We analysed intra-specific variation in the social organization of gorillas and ecological and social factors influencing them, based on recent data on diet, day journey length, home range size, group size and proportion of multi-male groups in three subspecies [western lowland gorillas (WLG); eastern lowland gorillas (ELG); mountain gorillas (MG)]. Median group size was similar across subspecies and across habitats, but the extraordinarily large group including >30 gorillas was only found in habitat with dense terrestrial herbaceous vegetation. Within-group competition may determine the upper limit of group size in frugivorous WLGs and ELGs in lowland habitats with scarce undergrowth. A frugivorous diet may be a causal factor of subgrouping in multi-male groups of WLGs and ELGs, while a folivorous diet may prevent subgrouping in multi-male groups of MGs. Social factors, rather than ecological factors, may play an important role in the formation of multi-male groups and their cohesiveness in MGs. High gregariousness of female gorillas and their prolonged association with a protector male are explained by their vulnerability to both infanticide (MGs) and predators (ELGs). Comparison of long-term changes in group composition and individual movements between ELGs in Kahuzi and MGs in the Virungas suggest that the occurrence of infanticide may promote kin-male association within a group. Threat of infanticide may stimulate MG females to transfer into multi-male groups to seek reliable protection and maturing MG males to stay in their natal groups after maturity. By contrast, the absence of infanticide may facilitate ELG females to associate with infants and other females at transfer and ELG males to establish large groups in a short period by taking females from their natal groups, by luring females from neighbouring groups, or by takeover of a widow group after the death of its leading male. These conditions may prevent ELG and WLG maturing males from remaining to

  12. Intraspecific variation in aerobic metabolic rate of fish: relations with organ size and enzyme activity in brown trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norin, Tommy; Malte, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Highly active animals require a high aerobic capacity (i.e., a high maximum metabolic rate [MMR]) to sustain such activity, and it has been speculated that a greater capacity for aerobic performance is reflected in larger organs, which serve as energy processors but are also expensive to maintain and which increase the minimal cost of living (i.e., the basal or standard metabolic rate [SMR]). In this study, we assessed the extent of intraspecific variation in metabolic rate within a group of brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) and tested whether the observed variation in residual (body-mass-corrected) SMR, MMR, and absolute aerobic scope could be explained by variations in the residual size (mass) of metabolically active internal organs. Residual SMR was found to correlate positively with residual MMR, indicating a link between these two metabolic parameters, but no relationship between organ mass and metabolic rate was found for liver, heart, spleen, intestine, or stomach. Instead, activity in the liver of two aerobic mitochondrial enzymes, cytochrome c oxidase and, to a lesser extent, citrate synthase, was found to correlate with whole-animal metabolic rate, indicating that causes for intraspecific variation in the metabolic rate of fish can be found at a lower organizational level than organ size.

  13. Demographic History and Reproductive Output Correlates with Intraspecific Genetic Variation in Seven Species of Indo-Pacific Mangrove Crabs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Fratini

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution and the amount of intraspecific genetic variation of marine organisms are strongly influenced by many biotic and abiotic factors. Comparing biological and genetic data characterizing species living in the same habitat can help to elucidate the processes driving these variation patterns. Here, we present a comparative multispecies population genetic study on seven mangrove crabs co-occurring in the West Indian Ocean characterized by planktotrophic larvae with similar pelagic larval duration. Our main aim was to investigate whether a suite of biological, behavioural and ecological traits could affect genetic diversities of the study species in combination with historical demographic parameters. As possible current explanatory factors, we used the intertidal micro-habitat colonised by adult populations, various parameters of individual and population fecundity, and the timing of larval release. As the genetic marker, we used partial sequences of cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene. Genetic and ecological data were collected by the authors and/or gathered from primary literature. Permutational multiple regression models and ANOVA tests showed that species density and their reproductive output in combination with historical demographic parameters could explain the intraspecific genetic variation indexes across the seven species. In particular, species producing consistently less eggs per spawning event showed higher values of haplotype diversity. Moreover, Tajima's D parameters well explained the recorded values for haplotype diversity and average γst. We concluded that current intraspecific gene diversities in crabs inhabiting mangrove forests were affected by population fecundity as well as past demographic history. The results were also discussed in terms of management and conservation of fauna in the Western Indian Ocean mangroves.

  14. The genetic architecture of ecological adaptation: intraspecific variation in host plant use by the lepidopteran crop pest Chloridea virescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, Sara J; Gould, Fred; Hopper, Keith R

    2018-03-01

    Intraspecific variation in ecologically important traits is a cornerstone of Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection. The evolution and maintenance of this variation depends on genetic architecture, which in turn determines responses to natural selection. Some models suggest that traits with complex architectures are less likely to respond to selection than those with simple architectures, yet rapid divergence has been observed in such traits. The simultaneous evolutionary lability and genetic complexity of host plant use in the Lepidopteran subfamily Heliothinae suggest that architecture may not constrain ecological adaptation in this group. Here we investigate the response of Chloridea virescens, a generalist that feeds on diverse plant species, to selection for performance on a novel host, Physalis angulata (Solanaceae). P. angulata is the preferred host of Chloridea subflexa, a narrow specialist on the genus Physalis. In previous experiments, we found that the performance of C. subflexa on P. angulata depends on many loci of small effect distributed throughout the genome, but whether the same architecture would be involved in the generalist's adoption of P. angulata was unknown. Here we report a rapid response to selection in C. virescens for performance on P. angulata, and establish that the genetic architecture of intraspecific variation is quite similar to that of the interspecific differences in terms of the number, distribution, and effect sizes of the QTL involved. We discuss the impact of genetic architecture on the ability of Heliothine moths to respond to varying ecological selection pressures.

  15. On the intraspecific variation in morphometry and shape of sagittal otoliths of common sardine, Strangomera bentincki, off central-southern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Curin-Osorio

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Size and shape of fish otoliths are species-specific, but some species also display intraspecific variations. The common sardine, Strangomera bentincki, is a small pelagic fish inhabiting a seasonal upwelling ecosystem off central-southern Chile, having two discrete spawning sites along its latitudinal distribution. Otoliths of specimens were collected from commercial catches in Talcahuano and Corral, representing the central and south spawning zones. On the basis of otolith images, size-based shape descriptors were used to detect ontogenetic variation, and morphometric variables (length, breadth, area, perimeter and weight were used to detect geographical differences in size and shape of otoliths. Outline analysis was studied on the basis of elliptic Fourier descriptors through multivariate statistical procedures. Size-based shape descriptors showed that otolith shape starts to be stable for fish larger than 12 cm total length, which keep an elliptical form. Morphometric variables for fish larger than 12 cm revealed intraspecific variation between central and south zones, which were associated with otolith weight and breadth. Outline analysis did not reveal significant spatial differences, but extreme intraspecific variation was due to the antirostrum, excisure, and posterior part of otoliths. Intraspecific variation in otolith size could be linked to differences in each spawning habitat and related to geographical origin, whose differences are not clearly identified. It is concluded that intraspecific variability in morphometric variables of sardine otoliths revealed geographic differences in size that are not attributable to allometric effects, and that otolith shape was similar between specimens from different geographic origin.

  16. Intraspecific variation among clones of a naïve rare grass affects competition with a nonnative, invasive forb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David J; Dewey, Justin; Goossens, Hélène; Dodd, Misty M

    2014-01-01

    Intraspecific variation can have a major impact on plant community composition yet there is little information available on the extent that such variation by an already established species affects interspecific interactions of an invading species. The current research examined the competitiveness of clones of a globally rare but locally common native grass, Calamagrostis porteri ssp. insperata to invasion by Alliaria petiolata, a non-native invasive species. A greenhouse experiment was conducted twice over consecutive years in which 15 clones from three populations of Calamagrostis were paired with rosettes of Alliaria in pots containing native forest soil previously uninvaded by Alliaria. Both species showed a negative response to the presence of the other species, although Alliaria more so than Calamagrostis. Moreover, the effect of Calamagrostis depended upon population, and, to a lesser extent, the individual clone paired with Alliaria. Competitive effects were stronger in the first experiment compared with when the experiment was repeated in the second year. The influence of Calamagrostis clones on the outcome of the experiment varied among populations and among clones, but also between years. Clones from one of the three populations were more influential than clones from the other two populations. Only one of 15 clones, both from the same population, was influential in both experiments. This research supports a growing literature indicating that intraspecific variability among clones of a dominant species can affect interspecific interactions and that such variability in a native species can affect performance of an invading species.

  17. Inter-and intraspecific variation in fern mating systems after long-distance colonization: the importance of selfing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Groot G Arjen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies on the reproductive biology of ferns showed that mating strategies vary among species, and that polyploid species often show higher capacity for self-fertilization than diploid species. However, the amount of intraspecific variation in mating strategy and selfing capacity has only been assessed for a few species. Yet, such variation may have important consequences during colonization, as the establishment of any selfing genotypes may be favoured after long-distance dispersal (an idea known as Baker's law. Results We examined intra-and interspecific variation in potential for self-fertilization among four rare fern species, of which two were diploids and two were tetraploids: Asplenium scolopendrium (2n, Asplenium trichomanes subsp. quadrivalens (4n, Polystichum setiferum (2n and Polystichum aculeatum (4n. Sporophyte production was tested at different levels of inbreeding, by culturing gametophytes in isolation, as well as in paired cultures with a genetically different gametophyte. We tested gametophytes derived from various genetically different sporophytes from populations in a recently planted forest colonized through long-distance dispersal (Kuinderbos, the Netherlands, as well as from older, less disjunct populations. Sporophyte production in isolation was high for Kuinderbos genotypes of all four species. Selfing capacity did not differ significantly between diploids and polyploids, nor between species in general. Rather selfing capacity differed between genotypes within species. Intraspecific variation in mating system was found in all four species. In two species one genotype from the Kuinderbos showed enhanced sporophyte production in paired cultures. For the other species, including a renowned out crosser, selfing capacity was consistently high. Conclusions Our results for four different species suggest that intraspecific variation in mating system may be common, at least among temperate calcicole

  18. Natural variation in dauer pheromone production and sensing supports intraspecific competition in nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Neelanjan; Meyer, Jan M; Yim, Joshua J; Mayer, Melanie G; Markov, Gabriel V; Ogawa, Akira; Schroeder, Frank C; Sommer, Ralf J

    2014-07-07

    Dauer formation, a major nematode survival strategy, represents a model for small-molecule regulation of metazoan development [1-10]. Free-living nematodes excrete dauer-inducing pheromones that have been assumed to target conspecifics of the same genotype [9, 11]. However, recent studies in Pristionchus pacificus revealed that the dauer pheromone of some strains affects conspecifics of other genotypes more strongly than individuals of the same genotype [12]. To elucidate the mechanistic basis for this intriguing cross-preference, we compared six P. pacificus wild isolates to determine the chemical composition of their dauer-inducing metabolomes and responses to individual pheromone components. We found that these isolates produce dauer pheromone blends of different composition and respond differently to individual pheromone components. Strikingly, there is no correlation between production of and dauer response to a specific compound in individual strains. Specifically, pheromone components that are abundantly produced by one genotype induce dauer formation in other genotypes, but not necessarily in the abundant producer. Furthermore, some genotypes respond to pheromone components they do not produce themselves. These results support a model of intraspecific competition in nematode dauer formation. Indeed, we observed intraspecific competition among sympatric strains in a novel experimental assay, suggesting a new role of small molecules in nematode ecology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Intraspecific variation in vertical habitat use by tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) in the western North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudo, Jeremy J; Wetherbee, Bradley M; Harvey, Guy; Nemeth, Richard S; Aming, Choy; Burnie, Neil; Howey-Jordan, Lucy A; Shivji, Mahmood S

    2014-01-01

    Tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) are a wide ranging, potentially keystone predator species that display a variety of horizontal movement patterns, making use of coastal and pelagic waters. Far less, however, is known about their vertical movements and use of the water column. We used pop-up satellite archival tags with two data sampling rates (high rate and standard rate tags) to investigate the vertical habitat use and diving behavior of tiger sharks tagged on the Puerto Rico–Virgin Islands platform and off Bermuda between 2008 and 2009. Useable data were received from nine of 14 sharks tagged, tracked over a total of 529 days. Sharks spent the majority of their time making yo-yo dives within the upper 50 m of the water column and considerable time within the upper 5 m of the water column. As a result, sharks typically occupied a narrow daily temperature range (∼2°C). Dives to greater than 200 m were common, and all sharks made dives to at least 250 m, with one shark reaching a depth of 828 m. Despite some similarities among individuals, a great deal of intraspecific variability in vertical habit use was observed. Four distinct depth distributions that were not related to tagging location, horizontal movements, sex, or size were detected. In addition, similar depth distributions did not necessitate similar dive patterns among sharks. Recognition of intraspecific variability in habitat use of top predators can be crucial for effective management of these species and for understanding their influence on ecosystem dynamics. PMID:24963376

  20. Intraspecific variation in {sup 137}Cs activity concentration in sporocarps of Suillus variegatus in seven Swedish populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, Anders [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Forest Mycology and Pathology Dept., Uppsala (Sweden); Nikolova, Ivanka; Johanson, K.-J. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Radioecology Dept., Uppsala (Sweden)

    1997-05-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident in 1986, sporocarps of Suillus variegatus in Sweden showed a large amount of individual variation in concentration of {sup 137}Cs activity. Our aim was to determine the degrees to which this variability in sporocarp {sup 137}Cs levels could be explained by differences between (i) local populations, (ii) fungal genets and (iii) locations within genets. Five populations in a 100-yr-old Scots pine forest, located within a 1 km{sup 2} area, and two populations in Scots pine/Norway spruce forest, located 40 km north-west of Uppsala, were investigated. In total, 154 sporocarps were analysed to determine their {sup 137}Cs content. Of these, the genetic affiliations of 86 were successfully characterized using somatic incompatibility reactions. Twenty-six genets were found which, on average, consisted of 6.5 sporocarps. The genets averaged 7.5 m in size, measured as the length between the most distant sporocarps. The mean sporocarp {sup 137}Cs level was 67.1 {+-} 2.8 kBq kgsup(-1) D.W. (range between 13.6 and 182). According to analyses of variance, within-population variation accounted for 60% of the total variation in {sup 137}Cs levels, while 40% was ascribed to variation among populations. Within a population, {sup 137}Cs levels did not generally differ significantly between genets. Plausible reasons for intraspecific variation in radiocaesium content in sporocarps are discussed. (author).

  1. The Venom of the Spine-Bellied Sea Snake (Hydrophis curtus): Proteome, Toxin Diversity and Intraspecific Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Vanessa; Sotillo, Javier; Seymour, Jamie E; Wilson, David

    2017-12-12

    The spine-bellied sea snake ( Hydrophis curtus ) is known to cause human deaths, yet its venom composition has not yet been proteomically characterised. An indepth proteomic analysis was performed on H. curtus venom from two different seasons, January and June, corresponding to adults and subadults, respectively. Venoms from adult and subadult H. curtus individuals were compared using reversedphase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) to detect intraspecific variation, and the molecular weight data obtained with ESIMS were used to assess toxin diversity. RPHPLC and LCESIMS/MS were used to characterise the venom proteome and estimate the relative abundances of protein families present. The most abundant protein family in January and June venoms is phospholipase A₂ (PLA₂: January 66.7%; June 54.5%), followed by threefinger toxins (3FTx: January 30.4%; June 40.4%) and a minor component of cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISP: January 2.5%; June 5%). Trace amounts of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMP), C-type lectins and housekeeping and regulatory proteins were also found. Although the complexity of the venom is low by number of families present, each family contained a more diverse set of isoforms than previously reported, a finding that may have implications for the development of next-generation sea snake antivenoms. Intraspecific variability was shown to be minor with one obvious exception of a 14,157-Da protein that was present in some January (adult) venoms, but not at all in June (subadult) venoms. There is also a greater abundance of short-chain neurotoxins in June (subadult) venom compared with January (adult) venom. These differences potentially indicate the presence of seasonal, ontogenetic or sexual variation in H. curtus venom.

  2. Intraspecific variation in body size and shape in an andean highland anole species, Anolis ventrimaculatus (Squamata: Dactyloidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Espinosa, Martha L; Ortega-León, Angela M; Zamora-Abrego, Joan G

    2013-03-01

    Variation in body characteristics related to lizard locomotion has been poorly studied at the intraspecific level in Anolis species. Local adaptation due to habitat heterogeneity has been reported in some island species. However, studies of mainland species are particularly scarce and suggest different patterns: high variability among highland lizards and poorly differentiated populations in one Amazonian species. We characterized inter population variation of body size and shape in the highland Andean Anolis ventrimaculatus, an endemic species from Western Colombia. A total of 15 morphometric variables were measured in specimens from the reptile collection of the Instituto de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional, Colombia. The study included individuals from seven different highland localities. We found size and shape sexual dimorphism, both of which varied among localities. Patterns of variation in body proportions among populations were different in both males and females, suggesting that either sexual or natural selective factors are different in each locality and between sexes. Since this species exhibits a fragmented distribution in highlands, genetic divergence may also be a causal factor of the observed variation. Ecological, behavioral, additional morphological as well as phylogenetic data, may help to understand the evolutionary processes behind the geographic patterns found in this species.

  3. Intraspecific variation in flight metabolic rate in the bumblebee Bombus impatiens: repeatability and functional determinants in workers and drones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darveau, Charles-A; Billardon, Fannie; Bélanger, Kasandra

    2014-02-15

    The evolution of flight energetics requires that phenotypes be variable, repeatable and heritable. We studied intraspecific variation in flight energetics in order to assess the repeatability of flight metabolic rate and wingbeat frequency, as well as the functional basis of phenotypic variation in workers and drones of the bumblebee species Bombus impatiens. We showed that flight metabolic rate and wingbeat frequency were highly repeatable in workers, even when controlling for body mass variation using residual analysis. We did not detect significant repeatability in drones, but a smaller range of variation might have prevented us from finding significant values in our sample. Based on our results and previous findings, we associated the high repeatability of flight phenotypes in workers to the functional links between body mass, thorax mass, wing size, wingbeat frequency and metabolic rate. Moreover, differences between workers and drones were as predicted from these functional associations, where drones had larger wings for their size, lower wingbeat frequency and lower flight metabolic rate. We also investigated thoracic muscle metabolic phenotypes by measuring the activity of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes, and we found positive correlations between mass-independent metabolic rate and the activity of all enzymes measured, but in workers only. When comparing workers and drones that differ in flight metabolic rate, only the activity of the enzymes hexokinase and trehalase showed the predicted differences. Overall, our study indicates that there should be correlated evolution among physiological phenotypes at multiple levels of organization and morphological traits associated with flight.

  4. Macroscale intraspecific variation and environmental heterogeneity: analysis of cold and warm zone abundance, mortality, and regeneration distributions of four eastern US tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantha M. Prasad

    2015-01-01

    I test for macroscale intraspecific variation of abundance, mortality, and regeneration of four eastern US tree species (Tsuga canadensis, Betula lenta, Liriodendron tulipifera, and Quercus prinus) by splitting them into three climatic zones based on plant hardiness zones (PHZs). The primary goals of the analysis are to assess the...

  5. Size does matter - Intraspecific variation of feeding mechanics in the crested newt Triturus dobrogicus (Kiritzescu, 1903)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Florian; Beisser, Christian J.; Lemell, Patrick

    2018-03-01

    Many studies have yet been conducted on suction feeding in aquatic salamander species. Within the Salamandridae, the crested newt Triturus dobrogicus (Kiritzescu, 1903), occurring from the Austrian Danube floodplains to the Danube Delta, was not subject of investigations so far. The present study examines the kinematics of aquatic suction feeding in this species by means of high-speed videography. Recordings of five individuals of different size and sex while feeding on bloodworms were conducted, in order to identify potential discrepancies among individuals and sizes. Five coordinate points were digitized from recordings of prey capture and twelve time- and velocity-determined variables were evaluated. All specimens follow a typical inertial suction feeding process, where rapid hyoid depression expands the buccal cavity. Generated negative pressure within the buccal cavity causes influx of water along with the prey item into the mouth. Results demonstrate higher distance values and angles for gape in individuals with smaller size. In addition, hyoid depression is maximized in smaller individuals. While Triturus dobrogicus resembles a typical inertial suction feeder in its functional morphology, intraspecific differences could be found regarding the correlation of different feeding patterns and body size.

  6. Inter- and intraspecific genetic variation in Hippophae (Elaeagnaceae) investigated by RAPD markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartish, Igor; Jeppsson, N.; Bartish, G.; Lu, R.; Nybom, H.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 225, - (2000), s. 85-101 ISSN 0378-2697 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : Elaeagnaceae * sea buckthorn * genetic variation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.408, year: 2000

  7. Intraspecific phytochemical variation shapes community and population structure for specialist caterpillars

    OpenAIRE

    Glassmire, Andrea E.; Jeffrey, Christopher S.; Forister, Matthew L.; Parchman, Thomas L.; Nice, Chris C.; Jahner, Joshua P.; Wilson, Joseph S.; Walla, Thomas R.; Richards, Lora A.; Smilanich, Angela M.; Leonard, Michael D.; Morrison, Colin R.; Simba?a, Wilmer; Salagaje, Luis A.; Dodson, Craig D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chemically mediated plant?herbivore interactions contribute to the diversity of terrestrial communities and the diversification of plants and insects. While our understanding of the processes affecting community structure and evolutionary diversification has grown, few studies have investigated how trait variation shapes genetic and species diversity simultaneously in a tropical ecosystem. We investigated secondary metabolite variation among subpopulations of a single plant species, P...

  8. Intraspecific variation in the diet of the Mexican garter snake Thamnophis eques

    OpenAIRE

    Manjarrez, Javier; Pacheco-Tinoco, Martha; Venegas-Barrera, Crystian S.

    2017-01-01

    The Mexican Garter Snake (Thamnophis eques) is a terrestrial-aquatic generalist that feeds on both aquatic and terrestrial prey. We describe size-related variation and sexual variation in the diet of T. eques through analysis of 262 samples of identifiable stomach contents in snakes from 23 locations on the Mexican Plateau. The snake T. eques we studied consumed mostly fish, followed in lesser amounts by leeches, earthworms, frogs, and tadpoles. Correspondence analysis suggested that the freq...

  9. Species characteristics and intraspecific variation in growth and photosynthesis of Cryptomeria japonica under elevated O3 and CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, Yuichiro; Iki, Taiichi; Nose, Mine; Tobita, Hiroyuki; Yazaki, Kenichi; Watanabe, Atsushi; Fujisawa, Yoshitake; Kitao, Mitsutoshi

    2017-06-01

    In order to predict the effects of future atmospheric conditions on forest productivity, it is necessary to clarify the physiological responses of major forest tree species to high concentrations of ozone (O3) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Furthermore, intraspecific variation of these responses should also be examined in order to predict productivity gains through tree improvements in the future. We investigated intraspecific variation in growth and photosynthesis of Cryptomeria japonica D. Don, a major silviculture species in Japan, in response to elevated concentrations of O3 (eO3) and CO2 (eCO2), separately and in combination. Cuttings of C. japonica were grown and exposed to two levels of O3 (ambient and twice-ambient levels) in combination with two levels of CO2 (ambient and 550 µmol mol-1 in the daytime) for two growing seasons in a free-air CO2 enrichment experiment. There was no obvious negative effect of eO3 on growth or photosynthetic traits of the C. japonica clones, but a positive effect was observed for annual height increments in the first growing season. Dry mass production and the photosynthetic rate increased under eCO2 conditions, while the maximum carboxylation rate decreased. Significant interaction effects of eO3 and eCO2 on growth and photosynthetic traits were not observed. Clonal effects on growth and photosynthetic traits were significant, but the interactions between clones and O3 and/or CO2 treatments were not. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients between growth traits under ambient conditions and for each treatment were significantly positive, implying that clonal ranking in growth abilities might not be affected by either eO3 or eCO2. The knowledge obtained from this study will be helpful for species selection in afforestation programs, to continue and to improve current programs involving this species, and to accurately predict the CO2 fixation capacity of Japanese forests. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All

  10. Intra-specific variation of sperm length in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae: males with shorter sperm have higher reproductive success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voordouw Maarten J

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intra-specific variation in sperm length influences male reproductive success in several species of insects. In males of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, sperm length is highly variable but the significance of this variation is unknown. Understanding what determines the reproductive success of male mosquitoes is critical for controlling malaria, and in particular for replacing natural populations with transgenic, malaria-resistant mosquitoes. Methods A laboratory population of A. gambiae males was tested for intra-specific variation in sperm length. A full-sib quantitative genetic design was used to test for a genetic component of sperm length in A. gambiae males and estimate its heritability. This study also tested for a relationship between sperm length and male reproductive success in A. gambiae. Male reproductive success was measured as the proportions of inseminated and ovipositing females. Results There was intra-specific variation of sperm length in A. gambiae. There was no significant genetic variation in sperm length and its heritability was low (h2 = 0.18 compared to other insects. Sperm length was correlated with male body size (measured as wing length. Males with short sperm had significantly higher reproductive success than males with long sperm and this was independent of body size. Conclusion This is the first study to demonstrate intra-specific variation in sperm length in A. gambiae and that males with short sperm have higher reproductive success. That sperm length influences female oviposition is important for any strategy considering the release of transgenic males.

  11. INTRASPECIFIC VARIATION IN ACOUSTIC TRAITS AND BODY SIZE, AND NEW DISTRIBUTIONAL RECORDS FOR PSEUDOPALUDICOLA GIARETTAI CARVALHO, 2012 (ANURA, LEPTODACTYLIDAE, LEIUPERINAE: IMPLICATIONS FOR ITS CONGENERIC DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THIAGO RIBEIRO DE CARVALHO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we provide an updated diagnosis for Pseudopaludicola giarettai based on the morphometric and acoustic variation observed with the assessment of new populations, plus an expansion of its distribution range. Our results support that all acoustic variation observed might be attributed to intraspecific variation. The variation in body size and dorsal stripe patterns observed for Pseudopaludicola giarettai reinforces that the distinctive whistling advertisement call pattern is the most reliable evidence line to diagnose it from its congeners, whereas morphological (robust body, glandular dorsum and morphometric (body size features vary considerably within and among populations so that they should no longer be employed as diagnostic features of Pseudopaludicola giarettai.

  12. Intraspecific phytochemical variation shapes community and population structure for specialist caterpillars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassmire, Andrea E; Jeffrey, Christopher S; Forister, Matthew L; Parchman, Thomas L; Nice, Chris C; Jahner, Joshua P; Wilson, Joseph S; Walla, Thomas R; Richards, Lora A; Smilanich, Angela M; Leonard, Michael D; Morrison, Colin R; Simbaña, Wilmer; Salagaje, Luis A; Dodson, Craig D; Miller, Jim S; Tepe, Eric J; Villamarin-Cortez, Santiago; Dyer, Lee A

    2016-10-01

    Chemically mediated plant-herbivore interactions contribute to the diversity of terrestrial communities and the diversification of plants and insects. While our understanding of the processes affecting community structure and evolutionary diversification has grown, few studies have investigated how trait variation shapes genetic and species diversity simultaneously in a tropical ecosystem. We investigated secondary metabolite variation among subpopulations of a single plant species, Piper kelleyi (Piperaceae), using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), to understand associations between plant phytochemistry and host-specialized caterpillars in the genus Eois (Geometridae: Larentiinae) and associated parasitoid wasps and flies. In addition, we used a genotyping-by-sequencing approach to examine the genetic structure of one abundant caterpillar species, Eois encina, in relation to host phytochemical variation. We found substantive concentration differences among three major secondary metabolites, and these differences in chemistry predicted caterpillar and parasitoid community structure among host plant populations. Furthermore, E. encina populations located at high elevations were genetically different from other populations. They fed on plants containing high concentrations of prenylated benzoic acid. Thus, phytochemistry potentially shapes caterpillar and wasp community composition and geographic variation in species interactions, both of which can contribute to diversification of plants and insects. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. A global meta-analysis of the relative extent of intraspecific trait variation in plant communities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Siefert, A.; Violle, C.; Chalmandrier, L.; Albert, C. H.; Taudiere, A.; Fajardo, A.; Aarssen, L. W.; Baraloto, Ch.; Carlucci, M. B.; Cianciaruso, M. V.; de L. Dantas, V.; de Bello, Francesco; Duarte, L. D. S.; Fonseca, C. R.; Freschet, G. T.; Gaucherand, S.; Gross, N.; Hikosaka, K.; Jackson, B.; Jung, V.; Kamiyama, Ch.; Katabuchi, M.; Kembel, S. W.; Kichenin, E.; Kraft, N. J. B.; Lagerström, A.; Bagousse-Pinguet, Y. L.; Li, Y.; Mason, N.; Messier, J.; Nakashizuka, T.; Overton, J. McC.; Peltzer, D. A.; Pérez-Ramos, I. M.; Pillar, V. D.; Prentice, H. C.; Richardson, S.; Sasaki, T.; Schamp, B. S.; Schöb, C.; Shipley, B.; Sundqvist, M.; Sykes, M. T.; Vandewalle, M.; Wardle, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 12 (2015), s. 1406-1419 ISSN 1461-023X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP505/12/1296 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : community ecology * functional diversity * interspecific variation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 10.772, year: 2015

  14. Extinction risks forced by climatic change and intraspecific variation in the thermal physiology of a tropical lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes-da-Silva, Emerson; Magnusson, William E; Sinervo, Barry; Caetano, Gabriel H; Miles, Donald B; Colli, Guarino R; Diele-Viegas, Luisa M; Fenker, Jessica; Santos, Juan C; Werneck, Fernanda P

    2018-04-01

    Temperature increases can impact biodiversity and predicting their effects is one of the main challenges facing global climate-change research. Ectotherms are sensitive to temperature change and, although predictions indicate that tropical species are highly vulnerable to global warming, they remain one of the least studied groups with respect to the extent of physiological variation and local extinction risks. We model the extinction risks for a tropical heliothermic teiid lizard (Kentropyx calcarata) integrating previously obtained information on intraspecific phylogeographic structure, eco-physiological traits and contemporary species distributions in the Amazon rainforest and its ecotone to the Cerrado savannah. We also investigated how thermal-biology traits vary throughout the species' geographic range and the consequences of such variation for lineage vulnerability. We show substantial variation in thermal tolerance of individuals among thermally distinct sites. Thermal critical limits were highly correlated with operative environmental temperatures. Our physiological/climatic model predicted relative extinction risks for local populations within clades of K. calcarata for 2050 ranging between 26.1% and 70.8%, while for 2070, extinction risks ranged from 52.8% to 92.8%. Our results support the hypothesis that tropical-lizard taxa are at high risk of local extinction caused by increasing temperatures. However, the thermo-physiological differences found across the species' distribution suggest that local adaptation may allow persistence of this tropical ectotherm in global warming scenarios. These results will serve as basis to further research to investigate the strength of local adaptation to climate change. Persistence of Kentropyx calcarata also depends on forest preservation, but the Amazon rainforest is currently under high deforestation rates. We argue that higher conservation priority is necessary so the Amazon rainforest can fulfill its capacity to

  15. Variation in ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA sequences demonstrates the existence of intraspecific groups in Paramecium multimicronucleatum (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarcz, Sebastian; Potekhin, Alexey; Rautian, Maria; Przyboś, Ewa

    2012-05-01

    This is the first phylogenetic study of the intraspecific variability within Paramecium multimicronucleatum with the application of two-loci analysis (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-5'LSU rDNA and COI mtDNA) carried out on numerous strains originated from different continents. The species has been shown to have a complex structure of several sibling species within taxonomic species. Our analysis revealed the existence of 10 haplotypes for the rDNA fragment and 15 haplotypes for the COI fragment in the studied material. The mean distance for all of the studied P. multimicronucleatum sequence pairs was p=0.025/0.082 (rDNA/COI). Despite the greater variation of the COI fragment, the COI-derived tree topology is similar to the tree topology constructed on the basis of the rDNA fragment. P. multimicronucleatum strains are divided into three main clades. The tree based on COI fragment analysis presents a greater resolution of the studied P. multimicronucleatum strains. Our results indicate that the strains of P. multimicronucleatum that appear in different clades on the trees could belong to different syngens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Osteology of Physalaemus nattereri (Anura: Leptodactylidae) with comments on intraspecific variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratani, Jéssica; Woitovicz-Cardoso, Manoela; Lourenço, Ana Carolina Calijorne

    2017-02-02

    The cranium, postcranium, and osteological variation of Physalaemus nattereri (Steindachner) are described. The main sources of variation involve the degree of mineralization of the nasal capsule and the lengths of dermal skull bones (e.g., vomer, sphenethmoid, and neopalatine). Osteologically, P. nattereri differs from its congeners by the anterior placement of the jaw articulation (which lies anterior to the intersection between the alae and cultriform process of parasphenoid), and by the separation of the frontoparietals from the anterior margins of exoccipitals. Descriptions of the nasal capsule, the auditory apparatus, and the iliosacral articulation are presented for the first time for this species. One putative morphological synapomorphy is presented for the P. signifer Clade.

  17. Intraspecific variation between the ITS sequences of Toxocara canis, Toxocara cati and Toxascaris leonina from different host species in south-western Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogt-Wyrwas, R; Mizgajska-Wiktor, H; Pacoń, J; Jarosz, W

    2013-12-01

    Some parasitic nematodes can inhabit different definitive hosts, which raises the question of the intraspecific variability of the nematode genotype affecting their preferences to choose particular species as hosts. Additionally, the issue of a possible intraspecific DNA microheterogeneity in specimens from different parts of the world seems to be interesting, especially from the evolutionary point of view. The problem was analysed in three related species - Toxocara canis, Toxocara cati and Toxascaris leonina - specimens originating from Central Europe (Poland). Using specific primers for species identification, internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-1 and ITS-2 regions were amplified and then sequenced. The sequences obtained were compared with sequences previously described for specimens originating from other geographical locations. No differences in nucleotide sequences were established in T. canis isolated from two different hosts (dogs and foxes). A comparison of ITS sequences of T. canis from Poland with sequences deposited in GenBank showed that the scope of intraspecific variability of the species did not exceed 0.4%, while in T. cati the differences did not exceed 2%. Significant differences were found in T. leonina, where ITS-1 differed by 3% and ITS-2 by as much as 7.4% in specimens collected from foxes in Poland and dogs in Australia. Such scope of differences in the nucleotide sequence seems to exceed the intraspecific variation of the species.

  18. Variations and classification of toxic epitopes related to celiac disease among α-gliadin genes from four Aegilops genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Wang, Shunli; Li, Shanshan; Ge, Pei; Li, Xiaohui; Ma, Wujun; Zeller, F J; Hsam, Sai L K; Yan, Yueming

    2012-07-01

    The α-gliadins are associated with human celiac disease. A total of 23 noninterrupted full open reading frame α-gliadin genes and 19 pseudogenes were cloned and sequenced from C, M, N, and U genomes of four diploid Aegilops species. Sequence comparison of α-gliadin genes from Aegilops and Triticum species demonstrated an existence of extensive allelic variations in Gli-2 loci of the four Aegilops genomes. Specific structural features were found including the compositions and variations of two polyglutamine domains (QI and QII) and four T cell stimulatory toxic epitopes. The mean numbers of glutamine residues in the QI domain in C and N genomes and the QII domain in C, N, and U genomes were much higher than those in Triticum genomes, and the QI domain in C and N genomes and the QII domain in C, M, N, and U genomes displayed greater length variations. Interestingly, the types and numbers of four T cell stimulatory toxic epitopes in α-gliadins from the four Aegilops genomes were significantly less than those from Triticum A, B, D, and their progenitor genomes. Relationships between the structural variations of the two polyglutamine domains and the distributions of four T cell stimulatory toxic epitopes were found, resulting in the α-gliadin genes from the Aegilops and Triticum genomes to be classified into three groups.

  19. Illumina based whole mitochondrial genome of Junonia iphita reveals minor intraspecific variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Vanlalruati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the near complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome of Junonia iphita (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Nymphalinae was determined to be 14,892 bp. The gene order and orientation are identical to those in other butterfly species. The phylogenetic tree constructed from the whole mitogenomes using the 13 protein coding genes (PCGs defines the genetic relatedness of the two J. iphita species collected from two different regions. All the Junonia species clustered together, and were further subdivided into clade one consisting of J. almana and J. orithya and clade two comprising of the two J. iphita which were collected from Indo and Indochinese subregions separated by river barrier. Comparison between the two J. iphita sequences revealed minor variations and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms were identified at 51 sites amounting to 0.4% of the entire mitochondrial genome.

  20. Intraspecific variation in exploratory behavior and elevational affinity in a widely distributed songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete, Yanina; Gutiérrez, Víctor; Cid, Valeska; Newsome, Seth D; Sabat, Pablo; Vasquez, Rodrigo A

    2018-04-01

    Populations of the same species can vary substantially in their behavioral and morphometric traits when they are subject to different environmental pressures, which may lead to the development of different adaptive strategies. We quantified variation in exploratory behavior and morphometric traits among two rufous-collared sparrow populations that occur at low and high elevations in central Chile. Moreover, we used census and δ 2 H values of feather and blood to evaluate migration. We found that individual sparrows inhabiting high elevations were larger and showed more intense exploratory behavior in comparison with those that were captured at lower elevation. Moreover, we observed a steady decline in sparrow abundance during the winter and similar δ 2 H values for blood collected in the winter and summer at this site, which were significantly lower than blood δ 2 H values observed at low elevation. This pattern suggests that individuals do not move long distances during winter, and likely they remain at similar elevations in refuge habitats. As predicted, our results support the existent of different adaptive strategies among populations of the same species, and suggest that the combination of behavioral, morphometric, and stable isotope data is a novel and robust integrative approach to assess differences in adaptation across environmental gradients.

  1. Genetic Mapping and Phylogenetic Analysis Reveal Intraspecific Variation in Sex Chromosomes of the Virginian Strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Na; Govindarajulu, Rajanikanth; Tennessen, Jacob A; Liston, Aaron; Ashman, Tia-Lynn

    2017-10-30

    With their extraordinary diversity in sexual systems, flowering plants offer unparalleled opportunities to understand sex determination and to reveal generalities in the evolution of sex chromosomes. Comparative genetic mapping of related taxa with good phylogenetic resolution can delineate the extent of sex chromosome diversity within plant groups, and lead the way to understanding the evolutionary drivers of such diversity. The North American octoploid wild strawberries provide such an opportunity. We performed linkage mapping using targeted sequence capture for the subdioecious western Fragaria virginiana ssp. platypetala and compared the location of its sex-determining region (SDR) to those of 2 other (sub)dioecious species, the eastern subspecies, F. virginiana ssp. virginiana (whose SDR is at 0-5.5 Mb on chromosome VI of the B2 subgenome), and the sister species F. chiloensis (whose SDR is at 37 Mb on chromosome VI of the Av subgenome). Male sterility was dominant in F. virginiana ssp. platypetala and mapped to a chromosome also in homeologous group VI. Likewise, one major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for female fertility overlapped the male sterility region. However, the SDR mapped to yet another subgenome (B1), and to a different location (13 Mb), but similar to the location inferred in one population of the naturally occurring hybrid between F. chiloensis and F. virginiana (F. ×ananassa ssp. cuneifolia). Phylogenetic analysis of chromosomes across the octoploid taxa showed consistent subgenomic composition reflecting shared evolutionary history but also reinforced within-species variation in the SDR-carrying chromosome, suggesting either repeated evolution, or recent turnovers in SDR. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Inter- and Intraspecific Variations of Bacterial Communities Associated with Marine Sponges from San Juan Island, Washington

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, O. O.

    2009-04-10

    This study attempted to assess whether conspecific or congeneric sponges around San Juan Island, Washington, harbor specific bacterial communities. We used a combination of culture-independent DNA fingerprinting techniques (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis [DGGE]) and culture-dependent approaches. The results indicated that the bacterial communities in the water column consisted of more diverse bacterial ribotypes than and were drastically different from those associated with the sponges. High levels of similarity in sponge-associated bacterial communities were found only in Myxilla incrustans and Haliclona rufescens, while the bacterial communities in Halichondria panicea varied substantially among sites. Certain terminal restriction fragments or DGGE bands were consistently obtained for different individuals of M. incrustans and H. rufescens collected from different sites, suggesting that there are stable or even specific associations of certain bacteria in these two sponges. However, no specific bacterial associations were found for H. panicea or for any one sponge genus. Sequencing of nine DGGE bands resulted in recovery of seven sequences that best matched the sequences of uncultured Proteobacteria. Three of these sequences fell into the sponge-specific sequence clusters previously suggested. An uncultured alphaproteobacterium and a culturable Bacillus sp. were found exclusively in all M. incrustans sponges, while an uncultured gammaproteobacterium was unique to H. rufescens. In contrast, the cultivation approach indicated that sponges contained a large proportion of Firmicutes, especially Bacillus, and revealed large variations in the culturable bacterial communities associated with congeneric and conspecific sponges. This study revealed sponge species-specific but not genus- or site-specific associations between sponges and bacterial communities and emphasized the importance of using a combination

  3. Intraspecific variations of Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis genome studied by capillary electrophoresis separation of the intron splice site profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigentini, Ileana; De Lorenzis, Gabriella; Picozzi, Claudia; Imazio, Serena; Merico, Annamaria; Galafassi, Silvia; Piškur, Jure; Foschino, Roberto

    2012-06-15

    In enology, "Brett" character refers to the wine spoilage caused by the yeast Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis and its production of volatile phenolic off-flavours. However, the spoilage potential of this yeast is strain-dependent. Therefore, a rapid and reliable recognition at the strain level is a key point to avoid serious economic losses. The present work provides an operative tool to assess the genetic intraspecific variation in this species through the use of introns as molecular targets. Firstly, the available partial D./B. bruxellensis genome sequence was investigated in order to build primers annealing to introns 5' splice site sequence (ISS). This analysis allowed the detection of a non-random vocabulary flanking the site and, exploiting this feature, the creation of specific probes for strain discrimination. Secondly, the separation of the intron splice site PCR fragments was obtained throughout the set up of a capillary electrophoresis protocol, giving a 94% repeatability threshold in our experimental conditions. The comparison of results obtained with ISS-PCR/CE versus the ones performed by mtDNA RFLP revealed that the former protocol is more discriminating and allowed a reliable identification at strain level. Actually sixty D./B. bruxellensis isolates were recognised as unique strains, showing a level of similarity below 79% and confirming the high genetic polymorphism existing within the species. Two main clusters were grouped at similarity levels of about 46% and 47%, respectively, showing a poor correlation with the geographic area of isolation. Moreover, from the evolutionary point of view, the proposed technique could determine the frequency of the genome rearrangements that can occur in D./B. bruxellesis populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Intraspecific variation in body size and shape in an Andean highland anole species, Anolis ventrimaculatus (Squamata: Dactyloidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L. Calderón-Espinosa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Variation in body characteristics related to lizard locomotion has been poorly studied at the intraspecific level in Anolis species. Local adaptation due to habitat heterogeneity has been reported in some island species. However, studies of mainland species are particularly scarce and suggest different patterns: high variability among highland lizards and poorly differentiated populations in one Amazonian species. We characterized inter population variation of body size and shape in the highland Andean Anolis ventrimaculatus, an endemic species from Western Colombia. A total of 15 morphometric variables were measured in specimens from the reptile collection of the Instituto de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional, Colombia. The study included individuals from seven different highland localities. We found size and shape sexual dimorphism, both of which varied among localities. Patterns of variation in body proportions among populations were different in both males and females, suggesting that either sexual or natural selective factors are different in each locality and between sexes. Since this species exhibits a fragmented distribution in highlands, genetic divergence may also be a causal factor of the observed variation. Ecological, behavioral, additional morphological as well as phylogenetic data, may help to understand the evolutionary processes behind the geographic patterns found in this species.La diversificación fenotípica al interior de una especie en características de dimensiones corporales relacionadas con la locomoción de los lagartos, se ha estudiado poco en especies de Anolis. Los datos de algunas especies de isla revelan patrones distintos de variación geográfica y sugieren que la adaptación local, debida a la heterogeneidad del hábitat, ocurre a este nivel. Los estudios de especies de continente son particularmente escasos y sugieren patrones distintos: un lagarto altoandino altamente variable y poblaciones poco

  5. Intraspecific variation in the metabolic scaling exponent in ectotherms: testing the effect of latitudinal cline, ontogeny and transgenerational change in the land snail Cornu aspersum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitán-Espitia, Juan Diego; Bruning, Andrea; Mondaca, Fredy; Nespolo, Roberto F

    2013-06-01

    The strong dependence of metabolic rates on body mass has attracted the interest of ecological physiologists, as it has important implications to many aspects of biology including species variations in body size, the evolution of life history, and the structure and function of biological communities. The great diversity of observed scaling exponents has led some authors to conclude that there is no single universal scaling exponent, but instead it ranges from 2/3 to 1. Most of the telling evidence against the universality of power scaling exponents comes from ontogenetic changes. Nevertheless, there could be other sources of phenotypic variation that influence this allometric relationship at least at the intraspecific level. In order to explore the general concept of the metabolic scaling in terrestrial molluscs we tested the role of several biological and methodological sources of variation on the empirically estimated scaling exponent. Specifically, we measured a proxy of metabolic rate (CO(2) production) in 421 individuals, during three generations, in three different populations. Additionally, we measured this scaling relationship in 208 individuals at five developmental stages. Our results suggest that the metabolic scaling exponent at the intraspecific level does not have a single stationary value, but instead it shows some degree of variation across geographic distribution, transgenerational change and ontogenetic stages. The major differences in the metabolic scaling exponent that we found were at different developmental stages of snails, because ontogeny involves increases in size at different rates, which in turn, generate differential energy demands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Intraspecific variation and influence of diet on the venom chemical profile of the Ectatomma brunneum Smith (Formicidae) ant evaluated by photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Rafaella Caroline; Firmino, Ellen Liciane Barbosa; Mendonça, Angelica; Sguarizi-Antonio, Denise; Pereira, Márlon César; da Cunha Andrade, Luis Humberto; Antonialli-Junior, William Fernando; Lima, Sandro Marcio

    2017-10-01

    Studies of venomous animals have shown that environmental and genetic factors contribute to determining the chemical composition of venom. It is well known that external effects cause differences in the toxicity, concentration, and prey specificity of venom. However, the influence of different factors on the chemical profile of Hymenoptera venom remains little explored. In view of this, the aim of this study was to evaluate intraspecific differences and the influence of diet on the chemical profile of Ectatomma brunneum venom using Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy. For the study of intraspecific variation of the venom, foragers were collected at locations with different environmental conditions, such as urban, intermediate, woodland and monoculture sites. To investigate the influence of diet on the venom, two colonies were sampled in the same area and were maintained in the laboratory under controlled diet conditions and at room temperature. The mid-infrared absorption spectra obtained were interpreted using discriminant function analysis. The results showed significant differences among the chemical profiles of the venoms of individuals from different environments and individuals exposed to a controlled diet in the laboratory, suggesting that venom composition was determined not only by genetic traits inherent to the species, but also by exogenous factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Celiac disease T-cell epitopes from gamma-gliadins: immunoreactivity depends on the genome of origin, transcript frequency, and flanking protein variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salentijn Elma MJ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease (CD is caused by an uncontrolled immune response to gluten, a heterogeneous mixture of wheat storage proteins. The CD-toxicity of these proteins and their derived peptides is depending on the presence of specific T-cell epitopes (9-mer peptides; CD epitopes that mediate the stimulation of HLA-DQ2/8 restricted T-cells. Next to the thoroughly characterized major T-cell epitopes derived from the α-gliadin fraction of gluten, γ-gliadin peptides are also known to stimulate T-cells of celiac disease patients. To pinpoint CD-toxic γ-gliadins in hexaploid bread wheat, we examined the variation of T-cell epitopes involved in CD in γ-gliadin transcripts of developing bread wheat grains. Results A detailed analysis of the genetic variation present in γ-gliadin transcripts of bread wheat (T. aestivum, allo-hexaploid, carrying the A, B and D genome, together with genomic γ-gliadin sequences from ancestrally related diploid wheat species, enabled the assignment of sequence variants to one of the three genomic γ-gliadin loci, Gli-A1, Gli-B1 or Gli-D1. Almost half of the γ-gliadin transcripts of bread wheat (49% was assigned to locus Gli-D1. Transcripts from each locus differed in CD epitope content and composition. The Gli-D1 transcripts contained the highest frequency of canonical CD epitope cores (on average 10.1 per transcript followed by the Gli-A1 transcripts (8.6 and the Gli-B1 transcripts (5.4. The natural variants of the major CD epitope from γ-gliadins, DQ2-γ-I, showed variation in their capacity to induce in vitro proliferation of a DQ2-γ-I specific and HLA-DQ2 restricted T-cell clone. Conclusions Evaluating the CD epitopes derived from γ-gliadins in their natural context of flanking protein variation, genome specificity and transcript frequency is a significant step towards accurate quantification of the CD toxicity of bread wheat. This approach can be used to predict relative levels of CD toxicity of

  8. Consequences of Intraspecific Competition and Environmental Variation for Selection in the Mustard Sinapsis arvensis: Contrasting Ecological and Evolutionary Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, M L; Thiede, D A; Roy, B A

    2004-12-01

    Alternative models of plant life-history evolution differ in their views of how abiotic stress and competition interact to shape the evolution of plant life-history traits. To address this debate, which crosses traditional boundaries between community ecology and population biology, we grew wild turnip families from three selection histories in a field experiment in which we manipulated conspecific density and sun exposure. Hot spring conditions caused neutral shading to reduce drought stress, resulting in a greater mean and variance for lifetime fertility at low density and greater intensity of competition at high density. The variance in relative fitness among individuals or families was least in partial shade at low density. Prior selection under shade stress in the greenhouse reduced lifetime fitness in the less stressful partial-shade treatment under field conditions. Patterns of selection and predicted trait evolution were more similar between high and low densities than between the two light environments. Partial shade favored the proliferation of large leaves early in development, especially at high density. Selection in the stressful full-sun treatment favored reduced pathogen susceptibility at both densities and early flowering at low density. Because direct selection on traits changed principally in magnitude rather than in direction, genetic correlations for fitness were generally positive between light and density treatments. Greater intraspecific competition led to more rapid predicted trait evolution in the partial-shade environment but not in the stressful full-sun treatment.

  9. Intraspecific differentiation of Paramecium novaurelia strains (Ciliophora, Protozoa) inferred from phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarcz, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Paramecium novaurelia Beale and Schneller, 1954, was first found in Scotland and is known to occur mainly in Europe, where it is the most common species of the P. aurelia complex. In recent years, two non-European localities have been described: Turkey and the United States of America. This article presents the analysis of intraspecific variability among 25 strains of P. novaurelia with the application of ribosomal and mitochondrial loci (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2, 5' large subunit rDNA (5'LSU rDNA) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) mtDNA). The mean distance observed for all of the studied P. novaurelia sequence pairs was p=0.008/0.016/0.092 (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2/5'LSU rDNA/COI). Phylogenetic trees (NJ/MP/BI) based on a comparison of all of the analysed sequences show that the studied strains of P. novaurelia form a distinct clade, separate from the P. caudatum outgroup, and are divided into two clusters (A and B) and two branches (C and D). The occurrence of substantial genetic differentiation within P. novaurelia, confirmed by the analysed DNA fragments, indicates a rapid evolution of particular species within the Paramecium genus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Intraspecific Variation among Social Insect Colonies: Persistent Regional and Colony-Level Differences in Fire Ant Foraging Behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison A Bockoven

    Full Text Available Individuals vary within a species in many ecologically important ways, but the causes and consequences of such variation are often poorly understood. Foraging behavior is among the most profitable and risky activities in which organisms engage and is expected to be under strong selection. Among social insects there is evidence that within-colony variation in traits such as foraging behavior can increase colony fitness, but variation between colonies and the potential consequences of such variation are poorly documented. In this study, we tested natural populations of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, for the existence of colony and regional variation in foraging behavior and tested the persistence of this variation over time and across foraging habitats. We also reared single-lineage colonies in standardized environments to explore the contribution of colony lineage. Fire ants from natural populations exhibited significant and persistent colony and regional-level variation in foraging behaviors such as extra-nest activity, exploration, and discovery of and recruitment to resources. Moreover, colony-level variation in extra-nest activity was significantly correlated with colony growth, suggesting that this variation has fitness consequences. Lineage of the colony had a significant effect on extra-nest activity and exploratory activity and explained approximately half of the variation observed in foraging behaviors, suggesting a heritable component to colony-level variation in behavior.

  11. Inter- and intra-specific variation in drought sensitivity in Abies spec. and its relation to wood density and growth traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jan-Peter; Schueler, Silvio; Karanitsch-Ackerl, Sandra; Mayer, Konrad; Klumpp, Raphael T.; Grabner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Understanding drought sensitivity of tree species and its intra-specific variation is required to estimate the effects of climate change on forest productivity, carbon sequestration and tree mortality as well as to develop adaptive forest management measures. Here, we studied the variation of drought reaction of six European Abies species and ten provenances of Abies alba planted in the drought prone eastern Austria. Tree-ring and X-ray densitometry data were used to generate early- and latewood measures for ring width and wood density. Moreover, the drought reaction of species and provenances within six distinct drought events between 1970 and 2011, as identified by the standardized precipitation index, was determined by four drought response measures. The mean reaction of species and provenances to drought events was strongly affected by the seasonal occurrence of the drought: a short, strong drought at the beginning of the growing season resulted in growth reductions up to 50%, while droughts at the end of the growing season did not affect annual increment. Wood properties and drought response measures showed significant variation among Abies species as well as among A. alba provenances. Whereas A. alba provenances explained significant parts in the variation of ring width measures, the Abies species explained significant parts in the variation of wood density parameters. A consistent pattern in drought response across the six drought events was observed only at the inter-specific level, where A. nordmanniana showed the highest resistance and A. cephalonica showed the best recovery after drought. In contrast, differences in drought reaction among provenances were only found for the milder drought events in 1986, 1990, 1993 and 2000 and the ranking of provenances varied at each drought event. This indicates that genetic variation in drought response within A. alba is more limited than among Abies species. Low correlations between wood density parameters and

  12. Inter- and intra-specific variation in drought sensitivity inAbies spec. and its relation to wood density and growth traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jan-Peter; Schueler, Silvio; Karanitsch-Ackerl, Sandra; Mayer, Konrad; Klumpp, Raphael T; Grabner, Michael

    2015-12-15

    Understanding drought sensitivity of tree species and its intra-specific variation is required to estimate the effects of climate change on forest productivity, carbon sequestration and tree mortality as well as to develop adaptive forest management measures. Here, we studied the variation of drought reaction of six European Abies species and ten provenances of Abies alba planted in the drought prone eastern Austria. Tree-ring and X-ray densitometry data were used to generate early- and latewood measures for ring width and wood density. Moreover, the drought reaction of species and provenances within six distinct drought events between 1970 and 2011, as identified by the standardized precipitation index, was determined by four drought response measures. The mean reaction of species and provenances to drought events was strongly affected by the seasonal occurrence of the drought: a short, strong drought at the beginning of the growing season resulted in growth reductions up to 50%, while droughts at the end of the growing season did not affect annual increment. Wood properties and drought response measures showed significant variation among Abies species as well as among A. alba provenances. Whereas A. alba provenances explained significant parts in the variation of ring width measures, the Abies species explained significant parts in the variation of wood density parameters. A consistent pattern in drought response across the six drought events was observed only at the inter-specific level, where A. nordmanniana showed the highest resistance and A. cephalonica showed the best recovery after drought. In contrast, differences in drought reaction among provenances were only found for the milder drought events in 1986, 1990, 1993 and 2000 and the ranking of provenances varied at each drought event. This indicates that genetic variation in drought response within A. alba is more limited than among Abies species. Low correlations between wood density parameters and

  13. Intraspecific karyotypic polymorphism is highly concordant with allozyme variation in Lysimachia mauritiana (Primulaceae: Myrsinoideae) in Taiwan: implications for the colonization history and dispersal patterns of coastal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Yoshiko; Chung, Kuo-Fang; Chen, Chih-Hui; Hoshi, Yoshikazu; Setoguchi, Hiroaki; Chou, Chang-Hung; Oginuma, Kazuo; Peng, Ching-I

    2012-11-01

    Investigating intraspecific karyotypic and genetic variations jointly can provide unique insights into how historical, ecological and cytogenetic factors influence microevolution. A coastal herb, Lysimachia mauritiana, exhibits extensive karyotypic polymorphism and displays a complex cytogeographic pattern across the Ryukyus. To explore whether a similar degree of chromosomal variation exists south of the Ryukyus, and in an attempt to ascertain the mechanisms that may have generated the patterns, comprehensive sampling was conducted in Taiwan. Karyotypes were analysed at mitotic metaphase for 550 individuals from 42 populations throughout Taiwan Proper and its adjacent islands. In addition, genetic variation was estimated using 12 allozymes (21 loci) of 314 individuals sampled from 12 localities. Four chromosome numbers and eight cytotypes, including four endemic cytotypes, were detected. Cytotype distributions were highly structured geographically, with single cytotypes present in most populations and four major cytotypes dominating the north, east and south of Taiwan and the Penghu Archipelago. Allozyme variation was very low and F-statistics indicated an extremely high level of population differentiation, implying limited gene flow among populations. Cluster analysis of allozyme variation uncovered four geographic groups, each corresponding perfectly to the four dominant cytotypes. The geographic structure of cytotype distribution and allozyme variation probably resulted from severe genetic drift triggered by genetic bottlenecks, suggesting that Taiwanese populations were likely to be derived from four independent founder events. In the few localities with multiple cytotypes, cytogeographic patterns and inferences of chromosomal evolution revealed a trend of northward dispersal, consistent with the course of the Kuroshio Current that has been influential in shaping the coastal biota of the region. The data elucidate the patterns of colonization and the effects

  14. Chloride and sulphate toxicity to Hydropsyche exocellata (Trichoptera, Hydropsychidae): Exploring intraspecific variation and sub-lethal endpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sala, Miquel [Centre Tecnològic Forestal de Catalunya - CTFC, Solsona, Catalunya (Spain); Faria, Melissa [CESAM, Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Sarasúa, Ignacio [Technische Universität München, Munich, Bayern (Germany); Barata, Carlos [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Bonada, Núria [Grup de Recerca Freshwater Ecology and Management (FEM), Departament d' Ecologia, Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de Barcelona (UB), Diagonal 643, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Grup de Recerca Freshwater Ecology and Management (FEM), Departament d' Ecologia, Facultat de Biologia, Institut de Recerca de la Biodiversitat (IRBio), Universitat de Barcelona - UB, Diagonal 643, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Brucet, Sandra [Aquatic Ecology Group, BETA Tecnio Centre, University of Vic - Central University of Catalonia, Vic, Catalonia (Spain); Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, ICREA, Barcelona 08010 (Spain); Llenas, Laia; Ponsá, Sergio [Aquatic Ecology Group, BETA Tecnio Centre, University of Vic - Central University of Catalonia, Vic, Catalonia (Spain); Prat, Narcís [Grup de Recerca Freshwater Ecology and Management (FEM), Departament d' Ecologia, Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de Barcelona (UB), Diagonal 643, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Soares, Amadeu M.V.M. [CESAM, Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); and others

    2016-10-01

    The rivers and streams of the world are becoming saltier due to human activities. In spite of the potential damage that salt pollution can cause on freshwater ecosystems, this is an issue that is currently poorly managed. Here we explored intraspecific differences in the sensitivity of freshwater fauna to two major ions (Cl{sup −} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) using the net-spinning caddisfly Hydropsyche exocellata Dufour 1841 (Trichoptera, Hydropsychidae) as a model organism. We exposed H. exocellata to saline solutions (reaching a conductivity of 2.5 mS cm{sup −1}) with Cl{sup −}:SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratios similar to those occurring in effluents coming from the meat, mining and paper industries, which release dissolved salts to rivers and streams in Spain. We used two different populations, coming from low and high conductivity streams. To assess toxicity, we measured sub-lethal endpoints: locomotion, symmetry of the food-capturing nets and oxidative stress biomarkers. According to biomarkers and net building, the population historically exposed to lower conductivities (B10) showed higher levels of stress than the population historically exposed to higher conductivities (L102). However, the differences between populations were not strong. For example, net symmetry was lower in the B10 than in the L102 only 48 h after treatment was applied, and biomarkers showed a variety of responses, with no discernable pattern. Also, treatment effects were rather weak, i.e. only some endpoints, and in most cases only in the B10 population, showed a significant response to treatment. The lack of consistent differences between populations and treatments could be related to the high salt tolerance of H. exocellata, since both populations were collected from streams with relatively high conductivities. The sub-lethal effects tested in this study can offer an interesting and promising tool to monitor freshwater salinization by combining physiological and behavioural bioindicators

  15. Simulating the Interacting Effects of Intraspecific Variation, Disturbance, and Competition on Climate-Driven Range Shifts in Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Emily V; Ormond, Rhys A

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to favor shifts in plant distributions; some such shifts are already being observed along elevation gradients. However, the rate of such shifts may be limited by their ability to reach newly suitable areas and by competition from resident species. The degree of local adaptation and genetic variation may also play a role in the interaction between migrants and residents by affecting relative fitness. We used a simulation model to explore the interacting effects of dispersal, fecundity, disturbance, and genetic variation on range-edge dynamics between a pair of demographically similar tree species. Ideal climate for an individual is determined by genotype. The simulated landscape undergoes an 80-year period of climate change in which climate bands shift upslope; subsequently, climate is held constant for 300 years. The presence of a high-elevation competitor caused a significant lag in the range shift of the low-elevation species relative to competition-free scenarios. Increases in fecundity and dispersal distance both helped to speed up the replacement of the high-elevation species by the low-elevation species at their range boundary. While some disturbance scenarios facilitated this transition, frequent canopy disturbance inhibited colonization by removing reproductive adults and led to range contractions in both species. Differences between dispersal scenarios were more pronounced when disturbance was frequent (15 vs. 25 year return interval) and dispersal was limited. When the high-elevation species lacked genetic variation, its range was more-easily invaded by the low-elevation species, while a similar lack of variation in the low-elevation species inhibited colonization-but only when this lack of variation decreased the fitness of the affected species near the range boundary. Our model results support the importance of measuring and including dispersal/fecundity, disturbance type and frequency, and genetic variation when assessing the

  16. Intraspecific and Intracolonial Variation in the Profile of Venom Alkaloids and Cuticular Hydrocarbons of the Fire Ant Solenopsis saevissima Smith (Hymenoptera: Formicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Gonçalves Paterson Fox

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fire ants are aggressive Neotropical ants that are extensively similar in general biology and morphology, making species identification difficult. Some fire ant species are top-rated pests spreading throughout the world by trade vessels. Many researchers attempted to sort between invasive and native species by using chemical characters, including patterns of venom alkaloids. The present study is the first to report intraspecific variation in some chemical characters, namely, cuticular hydrocarbons and venom alkaloids, within the Brazilian fire ant species Solenopsis saevissima and also reports on within-nest variations among members of different castes. Two different haplotypes (cryptic species of S. saevissima were clearly identified, one presenting a predominant combination of the venom alkaloids cis- and trans-2-methyl-6-undecylpiperidine with the cuticular hydrocarbons C23, 3-Me-C23, 10-C25 : 1, C25, and 3-Me-C25, and the other a predominant combination of cis- and trans-2-methyl-6-tridecenylpiperidine with predominance of 12-C25 : 1, C25, 11-Me-C25, 3-Me-C25, 13-C27 : 1, C27, and 13-Me-C27. Intranest variations revealed that the proportions among these compounds varied sensibly among workers of different sizes, gynes, and males (no alkaloids were detected in the latter. Larva contained vestiges of the same compounds. The recorded chemical profiles are quite different from previous reports with S. saevissima samples from São Paulo. The finds thus support other recent claims that S. saevissima includes cryptic species; the study, moreover, adds the find that they can occur in the same geographical location.

  17. Intraspecific variation in fine root respiration and morphology in response to in situ soil nitrogen fertility in a 100-year-old Chamaecyparis obtusa forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Naoki; Hirano, Yasuhiro; Sugimoto, Takanobu; Tanikawa, Toko; Ishii, Hiroaki

    2015-12-01

    Soil N fertility has an effect on belowground C allocation, but the physiological and morphological responses of individual fine root segments to variations in N availability under field conditions are still unclear. In this study, the direction and magnitude of the physiological and morphological function of fine roots in response to variable in situ soil N fertility in a forest site were determined. We measured the specific root respiration (Rr) rate, N concentration and morphology of fine root segments with 1-3 branching orders in a 100-year-old coniferous forest of Chamaecyparis obtusa. Higher soil N fertility induced higher Rr rates, root N concentration, and specific root length (SRL), and lower root tissue density (RTD). In all fertility levels, the Rr rates were significantly correlated positively with root N and SRL and negatively with RTD. The regression slopes of respiration with root N and RTD were significantly higher along the soil N fertility gradient. Although no differences in the slopes of Rr and SRL relationship were found across the levels, there were significant shifts in the intercept along the common slope. These results suggest that a contrasting pattern in intraspecific relationships between specific Rr and N, RTD, and SRL exists among soils with different N fertility. Consequently, substantial increases in soil N fertility would exert positive effects on organ-scale root performance by covarying the Rr, root N, and morphology for their potential nutrient and water uptake.

  18. FTIR-ATR-based prediction and modelling of lignin and energy contents reveals independent intra-specific variation of these traits in bioenergy poplars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Gail

    2011-04-01

    estimations in large data sets. Our study revealed that the intra-specific variations in lignin and energy contents were unrelated to each other and that the lignin content, therefore, was no predictor of the energy content. Employing principle component analyses we showed that factor loadings for the energy content were mainly associated with carbohydrate ring vibrations, whereas those for lignin were mainly related to aromatic compounds. Therefore, our analysis suggests that it may be possible to optimize the energy content of trees without concomitant increase in lignin.

  19. An updated description of the osteology of the pancake tortoise Malacochersus tornieri (Testudines: Testudinidae) with special focus on intraspecific variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mautner, Anna-Katharina; Latimer, Ashley E; Fritz, Uwe; Scheyer, Torsten M

    2017-03-01

    Exceptional variability in the shell of the pancake tortoise Malacochersus tornieri, both in the keratinous surficial scutes and the underlying bones, in addition to its remarkably fenestrated bony shell are unique among tortoises. Based on 14 individuals of different sizes and ages, the observed variation in M. tornieri was described in detail, with additional notes on the typically testudinid skull, inner ear and brain endocast using microCT-scan data, as well as the limbs. Similar degrees of variation have not yet been described in any other extant turtle species and therefore seem notable in M. tornieri, and might be related to the species' unique lifestyle. Within the carapace, the peripherals and suprapygals are most variable in number. Furthermore, different combinations of peripherals are participating in the central plastral fontanelle and in some individuals additional bones take part in the formation of the plastron. J. Morphol. 278:321-333, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Inter and intra-specific variation in photosynthetic acclimation response to long term exposure of elevated carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, M. [Univ. of Essex, Colchester (United Kingdom)]|[Writtle Coll. (United Kingdom)

    1996-08-01

    The response of intra and interspecific variation in photosynthetic acclimation to growth at elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration (600{micro}mol mol-l) in six important grassland species was investigated. Plants were grown in a background sward of Lolium perenne and measurements were made after four years of growth at elevated C{sub a}. Elevated CO{sub 2} was maintained using a FACE (Free-Air Carbon Enrichment) system. Significant intra and interspecific variation in acclimation response was demonstrated. The response of adaxial and abaxial stomatal conductance to elevated CO{sub 2} was also investigated. The stomatal conductance of both the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces was found to be reduced by elevated C{sub a}. Significant asymmetric responses in stomatal conductance was demonstrated in D. glomerata and T. pratense. Analysis of stomatal indices and densities indicated that the observed reductions in stomatal conductance were probably the result of changes in stomatal aperture.

  1. Latitudinal variation in ecological opportunity and intraspecific competition indicates differences in niche variability and diet specialization of Arctic marine predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkowski, David J; Ferguson, Steve; Choy, Emily S; Loseto, Lisa L; Brown, Tanya M; Muir, Derek C G; Semeniuk, Christina A D; Fisk, Aaron T

    2016-03-01

    Individual specialization (IS), where individuals within populations irrespective of age, sex, and body size are either specialized or generalized in terms of resource use, has implications on ecological niches and food web structure. Niche size and degree of IS of near-top trophic-level marine predators have been little studied in polar regions or with latitude. We quantified the large-scale latitudinal variation of population- and individual-level niche size and IS in ringed seals (Pusa hispida) and beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis on 379 paired ringed seal liver and muscle samples and 124 paired beluga skin and muscle samples from eight locations ranging from the low to high Arctic. We characterized both within- and between-individual variation in predator niche size at each location as well as accounting for spatial differences in the isotopic ranges of potential prey. Total isotopic niche width (TINW) for populations of ringed seals and beluga decreased with increasing latitude. Higher TINW values were associated with greater ecological opportunity (i.e., prey diversity) in the prey fish community which mainly consists of Capelin (Mallotus villosus) and Sand lance (Ammodytes sp.) at lower latitudes and Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) at high latitudes. In beluga, their dietary consistency between tissues also known as the within-individual component (WIC) increased in a near 1:1 ratio with TINW (slope = 0.84), suggesting dietary generalization, whereas the slope (0.18) of WIC relative to TINW in ringed seals indicated a high degree of individual specialization in ringed seal populations with higher TINWs. Our findings highlight the differences in TINW and level of IS for ringed seals and beluga relative to latitude as a likely response to large-scale spatial variation in ecological opportunity, suggesting species-specific variation in dietary plasticity to spatial differences in prey resources and

  2. Intraspecific growth variation among rainbow trout and brook trout: Impact of initial body weight and feeding level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Richard Skøtt; Ostenfeld, T.

    2010-01-01

    larger body weight (BW) CVs compared to BT (0.257 vs. 0.206, P enhance size variations in terms...... for species (RT: 3.71, BT: 2.32, P > 0.05). The magnitude of slopes decreased over time (weeks 0–3:4.27, weeks 3–6:3.02 and weeks 6–9:1.74, P body growth. RT had...

  3. Intraspecific variation in seed dispersal of a Neotropical tree and its relationship to fruit and tree traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augspurger, Carol K; Franson, Susan E; Cushman, Katherine C; Muller-Landau, Helene C

    2016-02-01

    The distribution of wind-dispersed seeds around a parent tree depends on diaspore and tree traits, as well as wind conditions and surrounding vegetation. This study of a neotropical canopy tree, Platypodium elegans, explored the extent to which parental variation in diaspore and tree traits explained (1) rate of diaspore descent in still air, (2) distributions of diaspores dispersed from a 40-m tower in the forest, and (3) natural diaspore distributions around the parent tree. The geometric mean rate of descent in still air among 20 parents was highly correlated with geometric mean wing loading(1/2) (r = 0.84). However, diaspore traits and rate of descent predicted less variation in dispersal distance from the tower, although descent rate(-1) consistently correlated with dispersal distance. Measured seed shadows, particularly their distribution edges, differed significantly among six parents (DBH range 62-181 cm) and were best fit by six separate anisotropic dispersal kernels and surveyed fecundities. Measured rate of descent and tree traits, combined in a mechanistic seed dispersal model, did not significantly explain variation among parents in natural seed dispersal distances, perhaps due to the limited power to detect effects with only six trees. Seedling and sapling distributions were at a greater mean distance from the parents than seed distributions; saplings were heavily concentrated at far distances. Variation among parents in the distribution tails so critical for recruitment could not be explained by measured diaspore or tree traits with this sample size, and may be determined more by wind patterns and the timing of abscission in relation to wind conditions. Studies of wind dispersal need to devote greater field efforts at recording the "rare" dispersal events that contribute to far dispersal distances, following their consequences, and in understanding the mechanisms that generate them.

  4. Patterns and drivers of intraspecific variation in avian life history along elevational gradients: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alice Boyle, W; Sandercock, Brett K; Martin, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    Elevational gradients provide powerful natural systems for testing hypotheses regarding the role of environmental variation in the evolution of life-history strategies. Case studies have revealed shifts towards slower life histories in organisms living at high elevations yet no synthetic analyses exist of elevational variation in life-history traits for major vertebrate clades. We examined (i) how life-history traits change with elevation in paired populations of bird species worldwide, and (ii) which biotic and abiotic factors drive elevational shifts in life history. Using three analytical methods, we found that fecundity declined at higher elevations due to smaller clutches and fewer reproductive attempts per year. By contrast, elevational differences in traits associated with parental investment or survival varied among studies. High-elevation populations had shorter and later breeding seasons, but longer developmental periods implying that temporal constraints contribute to reduced fecundity. Analyses of clutch size data, the trait for which we had the largest number of population comparisons, indicated no evidence that phylogenetic history constrained species-level plasticity in trait variation associated with elevational gradients. The magnitude of elevational shifts in life-history traits were largely unrelated to geographic (altitude, latitude), intrinsic (body mass, migratory status), or habitat covariates. Meta-population structure, methodological issues associated with estimating survival, or processes shaping range boundaries could potentially explain the nature of elevational shifts in life-history traits evident in this data set. We identify a new risk factor for montane populations in changing climates: low fecundity will result in lower reproductive potential to recover from perturbations, especially as fewer than half of the species experienced higher survival at higher elevations. © 2015 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  5. Intraspecific variation in root and leaf traits and leaf-root trait linkages in eight aspen demes (Populus tremula and P. tremuloides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eHajek

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Leaf and fine root morphology and physiology have been found to vary considerably among tree species, but not much is known about intraspecific variation in root traits and their relatedness to leaf traits. Various aspen progenies (Populus tremula and P. tremuloides with different growth performance are used in short-rotation forestry. Hence, a better understanding of the link between root trait syndromes and the adaptation of a deme to a particular environment is essential in order to improve the match between planted varieties and their growth conditions. We examined the between-deme (genetic and within-deme (mostly environmental variation in important fine root traits [mean root diameter, specific root area (SRA and specific root length (SRL, root tissue density (RTD, root tip abundance, root N concentration] and their co-variation with leaf traits [specific leaf area (SLA, leaf size, leaf N concentration] in eight genetically distinct P. tremula and P. tremuloides demes. Five of the six root traits varied significantly between the demes with largest genotypic variation in root tip abundance and lowest in mean root diameter and RTD (no significant difference. Within-deme variation in root morphology was as large as between-deme variation suggesting a relatively low genetic control. Significant relationships existed neither between SLA and SRA nor between leaf N and root N concentration in a plant. Contrary to expectation, high aboveground relative growth rates (RGR were associated with large, and not small, fine root diameters with low SRA and SRL. Compared to leaf traits, the influence of root traits on RGR was generally low. We conclude that aspen exhibits large intraspecific variation in leaf and also in root morphological traits which is only partly explained by genetic distances. A root order-related analysis might give deeper insights into intraspecific root trait variation.

  6. Intraspecific variation in stomatal traits, leaf traits and physiology reflects adaptation along aridity gradients in a South African shrub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jane E; Adams, Christopher A; Holsinger, Kent E

    2016-01-01

    Trait-environment relationships are commonly interpreted as evidence for local adaptation in plants. However, even when selection analyses support this interpretation, the mechanisms underlying differential benefits are often unknown. This study addresses this gap in knowledge using the broadly distributed South African shrub Protea repens. Specifically, the study examines whether broad-scale patterns of trait variation are consistent with spatial differences in selection and ecophysiology in the wild. In a common garden study of plants sourced from 19 populations, associations were measured between five morphological traits and three axes describing source climates. Trait-trait and trait-environment associations were analysed in a multi-response model. Within two focal populations in the wild, selection and path analyses were used to test associations between traits, fecundity and physiological performance. Across 19 populations in a common garden, stomatal density increased with the source population's mean annual temperature and decreased with its average amount of rainfall in midsummer. Concordantly, selection analysis in two natural populations revealed positive selection on stomatal density at the hotter, drier site, while failing to detect selection at the cooler, moister site. Dry-site plants with high stomatal density also had higher stomatal conductances, cooler leaf temperatures and higher light-saturated photosynthetic rates than those with low stomatal density, but no such relationships were present among wet-site plants. Leaf area, stomatal pore index and specific leaf area in the garden also co-varied with climate, but within-population differences were not associated with fitness in either wild population. The parallel patterns of broad-scale variation, differences in selection and differences in trait-ecophysiology relationships suggest a mechanism for adaptive differentiation in stomatal density. Densely packed stomata may improve performance by

  7. Intraspecific variation in body size and the rate of reproduction in female insects - adaptive allometry or biophysical constraint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, David; Olofsson, Martin; Friberg, Magne; Karlsson, Bengt; Wiklund, Christer; Gotthard, Karl

    2012-11-01

    1. A high rate of reproduction may be costly if ecological factors limit immediate reproductive output as a fast metabolism compromises own future survival. Individuals with more reserves need more time and opportunity to realize their reproductive potential. Theory therefore predicts that the reproductive rate, defined as the investment in early reproduction in proportion to total potential, should decrease with body size within species. 2. However, metabolic constraints on body size- and temperature-dependent biological rates may impede biophysical adaptation. Furthermore, the sequential manner resources that are allocated to somatic vs. reproductive tissue during ontogeny may, when juveniles develop in unpredictable environments, further contribute to non-adaptive variation in adult reproductive rates. 3. With a model on female egg laying in insects, we demonstrate how variation in body reserves is predicted to affect reproductive rate under different ecological scenarios. Small females always have higher reproductive rates but shorter lifespans. However, incorporation of female host selectivity leads to more similar reproductive rates among female size classes, and oviposition behaviour is predicted to co-evolve with reproductive rate, resulting in small females being more selective in their choice and gaining relatively more from it. 4. We fed simulations with data on the butterfly Pararge aegeria to compare model predictions with reproductive rates of wild butterflies. However, simulated reproductive allometry was a poor predictor of that observed. Instead, reproductive rates were better explained as a product of metabolic constraints on rates of egg maturation, and an empirically derived positive allometry between reproductive potential and size. However, fitness is insensitive to moderate deviations in reproductive rate when oviposition behaviour is allowed to co-evolve in the simulations, suggesting that behavioural compensation may mitigate putative

  8. Venom of Bothrops asper from Mexico and Costa Rica: intraspecific variation and cross-neutralization by antivenoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Alvaro; Herrera, María; Villalta, Mauren; Vargas, Mariángela; Uscanga-Reynell, Alfredo; de León-Rosales, Samuel Ponce; Jiménez-Corona, María Eugenia; Reta-Mares, José Francisco; Gutiérrez, José María; León, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Bothrops asper is the species that induces the highest incidence of snakebite envenomation in southern Mexico, Central America and parts of northern South America. The intraspecies variability in HPLC profile and toxicological activities between the venoms from specimens collected in Mexico (Veracruz) and Costa Rica (Caribbean and Pacific populations) was investigated, as well as the cross-neutralization by antivenoms manufactured in these countries. Venoms differ in their HPLC profiles and in their toxicity, since venom from Mexican population showed higher lethal and defibrinogenating activities, whereas those from Costa Rica showed higher hemorrhagic and in vitro coagulant activities. In general, antivenoms were more effective in the neutralization of homologous venoms. Overall, both antivenoms effectively neutralized the various toxic effects of venoms from the two populations of B. asper. However, antivenom raised against venom from Costa Rican specimens showed a higher efficacy in the neutralization of defibrinogenating and coagulant activities, thus highlighting immunochemical differences in the toxins responsible for these effects associated with hemostatic disturbances in snakebite envenoming. These observations illustrate how intraspecies venom variation may influence antivenom neutralizing profile. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [RAPD analysis of the intraspecific and interspecific variation and phylogenetic relationships of Aegilops L. species with the U genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriunova, S V; Chikida, N N; Kochieva, E Z

    2010-07-01

    RAPD analysis was used to study the genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of polyploid Aegilops species with the U genome. In total, 115 DNA samples of eight polyploid species containing the U genome and the diploid species Ae. umbellulata (U) were examined. Substantial interspecific polymorphism was observed for the majority of the polyploid species with the U genome (interspecific differences, 0.01-0,2; proportion of polymorphic loci, 56.6-88.2%). Aegilops triuncialis was identified as the only alloploid species with low interspecific polymorphism (interspecific differences, 0-0.01, P = 50%) in the U-genome group. The U-genome Aegilops species proved to be separated from other species of the genus. The phylogenetic relationships were established for the U-genome species. The greatest separation within the U-genome group was observed for the US-genome species Ae. kotschyi and Ae. variabilis. The tetraploid species Ae. triaristata and Ae. columnaris, which had the UX genome, and the hexaploid species Ae. recta (UXN) were found to be related to each other and separate from the UM-genome species. A similarity was observed between the U M-genome species Ae. ovata and Ae. biuncialis, which had the UM genome, and the ancestral diploid U-genome species Ae. umbellulata. The UC-genome species Ae. triuncialis was rather separate and slightly similar to the UX-genome species.

  10. Untangling interacting mechanisms of see variation with elevation: insights from the comparison of interspecific and intraspecific studies on eastern Tibetan angiosperm species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qi, Wei; Bu, Haiyan; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Zhang, Chunhui; Guo, Shuqing; Wang, Juhong; Zhou, Xianhui; Li, Wenjin; Du, Guozhen

    2015-01-01

    With increasing elevation, seed mass is expected to be either larger for its advantage during seedling establishment in stressful high-elevation environments (“stress-tolerance” mechanism) or smaller due to energy constraints. Based on the combination of inter- and intra-specific analyses on 4,023

  11. Intraspecific plant-soil feedback and intraspecific overyielding in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Alexandra R; Petermann, Jana S

    2014-06-01

    -specific resource use based on genetic differences that are not expressed in morphological traits. Synthesis. Our results provide some of the first evidence for intraspecific plant-soil feedback and intraspecific overyielding. These findings may have wider implications for the maintenance of variation within species and the importance of this variation for ecosystem functioning. Our results highlight the need for an increased focus on intraspecific processes in plant diversity research to fully understand the mechanisms of coexistence and ecosystem functioning.

  12. Intraspecific variation in aerobic and anaerobic locomotion: gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata) do not exhibit a trade-off between maximum sustained swimming speed and minimum cost of transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Jon C.; Tirsgaard, Bjørn; Cordero, Gerardo A.; Steffensen, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and trade-off in aerobic and anaerobic traits remain poorly understood in aquatic locomotion. Using gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), both axial swimmers, this study tested four hypotheses: (1) gait transition from steady to unsteady (i.e., burst-assisted) swimming is associated with anaerobic metabolism evidenced as excess post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC); (2) variation in swimming performance (critical swimming speed; Ucrit) correlates with metabolic scope (MS) or anaerobic capacity (i.e., maximum EPOC); (3) there is a trade-off between maximum sustained swimming speed (Usus) and minimum cost of transport (COTmin); and (4) variation in Usus correlates positively with optimum swimming speed (Uopt; i.e., the speed that minimizes energy expenditure per unit of distance traveled). Data collection involved swimming respirometry and video analysis. Results showed that anaerobic swimming costs (i.e., EPOC) increase linearly with the number of bursts in S. aurata, with each burst corresponding to 0.53 mg O2 kg−1. Data are consistent with a previous study on striped surfperch (Embiotoca lateralis), a labriform swimmer, suggesting that the metabolic cost of burst swimming is similar across various types of locomotion. There was no correlation between Ucrit and MS or anaerobic capacity in S. aurata indicating that other factors, including morphological or biomechanical traits, influenced Ucrit. We found no evidence of a trade-off between Usus and COTmin. In fact, data revealed significant negative correlations between Usus and COTmin, suggesting that individuals with high Usus also exhibit low COTmin. Finally, there were positive correlations between Usus and Uopt. Our study demonstrates the energetic importance of anaerobic metabolism during unsteady swimming, and provides intraspecific evidence that superior maximum sustained swimming speed is associated with superior swimming economy and

  13. Intraspecific variation in aerobic and anaerobic locomotion: gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata) do not exhibit a trade-off between maximum sustained swimming speed and minimum cost of transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Jon C; Tirsgaard, Bjørn; Cordero, Gerardo A; Steffensen, John F

    2015-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and trade-off in aerobic and anaerobic traits remain poorly understood in aquatic locomotion. Using gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), both axial swimmers, this study tested four hypotheses: (1) gait transition from steady to unsteady (i.e., burst-assisted) swimming is associated with anaerobic metabolism evidenced as excess post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC); (2) variation in swimming performance (critical swimming speed; U crit) correlates with metabolic scope (MS) or anaerobic capacity (i.e., maximum EPOC); (3) there is a trade-off between maximum sustained swimming speed (U sus) and minimum cost of transport (COTmin); and (4) variation in U sus correlates positively with optimum swimming speed (U opt; i.e., the speed that minimizes energy expenditure per unit of distance traveled). Data collection involved swimming respirometry and video analysis. Results showed that anaerobic swimming costs (i.e., EPOC) increase linearly with the number of bursts in S. aurata, with each burst corresponding to 0.53 mg O2 kg(-1). Data are consistent with a previous study on striped surfperch (Embiotoca lateralis), a labriform swimmer, suggesting that the metabolic cost of burst swimming is similar across various types of locomotion. There was no correlation between U crit and MS or anaerobic capacity in S. aurata indicating that other factors, including morphological or biomechanical traits, influenced U crit. We found no evidence of a trade-off between U sus and COTmin. In fact, data revealed significant negative correlations between U sus and COTmin, suggesting that individuals with high U sus also exhibit low COTmin. Finally, there were positive correlations between U sus and U opt. Our study demonstrates the energetic importance of anaerobic metabolism during unsteady swimming, and provides intraspecific evidence that superior maximum sustained swimming speed is associated with superior swimming

  14. Intraspecific variation in aerobic and anaerobic locomotion: gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata do not exhibit a trade-off between maximum sustained swimming speed and minimum cost of transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Christian Svendsen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Intraspecific variation and trade-off in aerobic and anaerobic traits remain poorly understood in aquatic locomotion. Using gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata, both axial swimmers, this study tested four hypotheses: 1 gait transition from steady to unsteady (i.e. burst-assisted swimming is associated with anaerobic metabolism evidenced as excess post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC; 2 variation in swimming performance (critical swimming speed; Ucrit correlates with metabolic scope (MS or anaerobic capacity (i.e. maximum EPOC; 3 there is a trade-off between maximum sustained swimming speed (Usus and minimum cost of transport (COTmin; and 4 variation in Usus correlates positively with optimum swimming speed (Uopt; i.e. the speed that minimizes energy expenditure per unit of distance travelled. Data collection involved swimming respirometry and video analysis. Results showed that anaerobic swimming costs (i.e. EPOC increase linearly with the number of bursts in S. aurata, with each burst corresponding to 0.53 mg O2 kg-1. Data are consistent with a previous study on striped surfperch (Embiotoca lateralis, a labriform swimmer, suggesting that the metabolic cost of burst swimming is similar across various types of locomotion. There was no correlation between Ucrit and MS or anaerobic capacity in S. aurata indicating that other factors, including morphological or biomechanical traits, influenced Ucrit. We found no evidence of a trade-off between Usus and COTmin. In fact, data revealed significant negative correlations between Usus and COTmin, suggesting that individuals with high Usus also exhibit low COTmin. Finally, there were positive correlations between Usus and Uopt. Our study demonstrates the energetic importance of anaerobic metabolism during unsteady swimming, and provides intraspecific evidence that superior maximum sustained swimming speed is associated with superior swimming economy and optimum

  15. Allelic variation in two distinct Pseudomonas syringae flagellin epitopes modulates the strength of plant immune responses but not bacterial motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Christopher R.; Chinchilla, Delphine; Hind, Sarah R.; Taguchi, Fumiko; Miki, Ryuji; Ichinose, Yuki; Martin, Gregory B.; Leman, Scotland; Felix, Georg; Vinatzer, Boris A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The bacterial flagellin (FliC) epitopes flg22 and flgII-28 are microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). While flg22 is recognized by many plant species via the pattern recognition receptor FLS2, neither the flgII-28 receptor nor the extent of flgII-28 recognition by different plant families is known.Here we tested the significance of flgII-28 as a MAMP and the importance of allelic diversity in flg22 and flgII-28 in plant–pathogen interactions using purified peptides and a Pseudomonas syringae ΔfliC mutant complemented with different fliC alleles.Plant genotype and allelic diversity in flg22 and flgII-28 were found to significantly affect the plant immune response but not bacterial motility. Recognition of flgII-28 is restricted to a number of Solanaceous species. While the flgII-28 peptide does not trigger any immune response in Arabidopsis, mutations in both flg22 and flgII-28 have FLS2-dependent effects on virulence. However, expression of a tomato allele of FLS2 does not confer to Nicotiana benthamiana the ability to detect flgII-28 and tomato plants silenced for FLS2 are not altered in flgII-28 recognition.Therefore, MAMP diversification is an effective pathogen virulence strategy and flgII-28 appears to be perceived by a yet unidentified receptor in the Solanaceae although it has an FLS2-dependent virulence effect in Arabidopsis. PMID:23865782

  16. Clustering patterns of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proteins reveal imprints of immune evasion on HIV-1 global variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusim, K.; Kesmir, Can; Gaschen, B.

    2002-01-01

    The human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been intensely studied, and hundreds of CTL epitopes have been experimentally defined, published, and compiled in the HIV Molecular Immunology Database. Maps of CTL epitopes on HIV-1 protein sequenc...

  17. Intraspecific Variation and Phylogenetic Relationships Are Revealed by ITS1 Secondary Structure Analysis and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism in Ganoderma lucidum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuqing Zhang

    Full Text Available Ganoderma lucidum is a typical polypore fungus used for traditional Chinese medical purposes. The taxonomic delimitation of Ganoderma lucidum is still debated. In this study, we sequenced seven internal transcribed spacer (ITS sequences of Ganoderma lucidum strains and annotated the ITS1 and ITS2 regions. Phylogenetic analysis of ITS1 differentiated the strains into three geographic groups. Groups 1-3 were originated from Europe, tropical Asia, and eastern Asia, respectively. While ITS2 could only differentiate the strains into two groups in which Group 2 originated from tropical Asia gathered with Groups 1 and 3 originated from Europe and eastern Asia. By determining the secondary structures of the ITS1 sequences, these three groups exhibited similar structures with a conserved central core and differed helices. While compared to Group 2, Groups 1 and 3 of ITS2 sequences shared similar structures with the difference in helix 4. Large-scale evaluation of ITS1 and ITS2 both exhibited that the majority of subgroups in the same group shared the similar structures. Further Weblogo analysis of ITS1 sequences revealed two main variable regions located in helix 2 in which C/T or A/G substitutions frequently occurred and ITS1 exhibited more nucleotide variances compared to ITS2. ITS1 multi-alignment of seven spawn strains and culture tests indicated that a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP site at position 180 correlated with strain antagonism. The HZ, TK and 203 fusion strains of Ganoderma lucidum had a T at position 180, whereas other strains exhibiting antagonism, including DB, RB, JQ, and YS, had a C. Taken together, compared to ITS2 region, ITS1 region could differentiated Ganoderma lucidum into three geographic originations based on phylogenetic analysis and secondary structure prediction. Besides, a SNP in ITS 1 could delineate Ganoderma lucidum strains at the intraspecific level. These findings will be implemented to improve species quality

  18. Intraspecific Variation and Phylogenetic Relationships Are Revealed by ITS1 Secondary Structure Analysis and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism in Ganoderma lucidum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Haisheng; Chen, Zhou; Tan, Xiaoyan; Hu, Jing; Yang, Bin; Sun, Junshe

    2017-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a typical polypore fungus used for traditional Chinese medical purposes. The taxonomic delimitation of Ganoderma lucidum is still debated. In this study, we sequenced seven internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of Ganoderma lucidum strains and annotated the ITS1 and ITS2 regions. Phylogenetic analysis of ITS1 differentiated the strains into three geographic groups. Groups 1–3 were originated from Europe, tropical Asia, and eastern Asia, respectively. While ITS2 could only differentiate the strains into two groups in which Group 2 originated from tropical Asia gathered with Groups 1 and 3 originated from Europe and eastern Asia. By determining the secondary structures of the ITS1 sequences, these three groups exhibited similar structures with a conserved central core and differed helices. While compared to Group 2, Groups 1 and 3 of ITS2 sequences shared similar structures with the difference in helix 4. Large-scale evaluation of ITS1 and ITS2 both exhibited that the majority of subgroups in the same group shared the similar structures. Further Weblogo analysis of ITS1 sequences revealed two main variable regions located in helix 2 in which C/T or A/G substitutions frequently occurred and ITS1 exhibited more nucleotide variances compared to ITS2. ITS1 multi-alignment of seven spawn strains and culture tests indicated that a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) site at position 180 correlated with strain antagonism. The HZ, TK and 203 fusion strains of Ganoderma lucidum had a T at position 180, whereas other strains exhibiting antagonism, including DB, RB, JQ, and YS, had a C. Taken together, compared to ITS2 region, ITS1 region could differentiated Ganoderma lucidum into three geographic originations based on phylogenetic analysis and secondary structure prediction. Besides, a SNP in ITS 1 could delineate Ganoderma lucidum strains at the intraspecific level. These findings will be implemented to improve species quality control in the

  19. Intraspecific Variation and Phylogenetic Relationships Are Revealed by ITS1 Secondary Structure Analysis and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism in Ganoderma lucidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuqing; Xu, Zhangyang; Pei, Haisheng; Chen, Zhou; Tan, Xiaoyan; Hu, Jing; Yang, Bin; Sun, Junshe

    2017-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a typical polypore fungus used for traditional Chinese medical purposes. The taxonomic delimitation of Ganoderma lucidum is still debated. In this study, we sequenced seven internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of Ganoderma lucidum strains and annotated the ITS1 and ITS2 regions. Phylogenetic analysis of ITS1 differentiated the strains into three geographic groups. Groups 1-3 were originated from Europe, tropical Asia, and eastern Asia, respectively. While ITS2 could only differentiate the strains into two groups in which Group 2 originated from tropical Asia gathered with Groups 1 and 3 originated from Europe and eastern Asia. By determining the secondary structures of the ITS1 sequences, these three groups exhibited similar structures with a conserved central core and differed helices. While compared to Group 2, Groups 1 and 3 of ITS2 sequences shared similar structures with the difference in helix 4. Large-scale evaluation of ITS1 and ITS2 both exhibited that the majority of subgroups in the same group shared the similar structures. Further Weblogo analysis of ITS1 sequences revealed two main variable regions located in helix 2 in which C/T or A/G substitutions frequently occurred and ITS1 exhibited more nucleotide variances compared to ITS2. ITS1 multi-alignment of seven spawn strains and culture tests indicated that a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) site at position 180 correlated with strain antagonism. The HZ, TK and 203 fusion strains of Ganoderma lucidum had a T at position 180, whereas other strains exhibiting antagonism, including DB, RB, JQ, and YS, had a C. Taken together, compared to ITS2 region, ITS1 region could differentiated Ganoderma lucidum into three geographic originations based on phylogenetic analysis and secondary structure prediction. Besides, a SNP in ITS 1 could delineate Ganoderma lucidum strains at the intraspecific level. These findings will be implemented to improve species quality control in the

  20. Intraspecific variation in a physiological thermoregulatory mechanism: the case of the lizard Liolaemus tenuis (Liolaeminae Variación intraespecífica en un mecanismo termorregulatorio fisiológico: el caso del lagarto Liolaemus tenuis (Liolaeminae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCELA A VIDAL

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The interspecific variation of heating rates in Liolaemus lizards, suggests an adaptive value of this physiological thermoregulatory mechanism, which would allow lizards to cope with the environmental thermal restrictions, imposed to behavioral thermoregulation. This trend has barely been tested at intraspecific level, and here we explore if intraspecific variation in heating rates occurs in Liolaemus tenuis, a relative widely distributed species from central Chile. We test the hypothesis that heating rates are related to the thermal environmental conditions at which populations are exposed, by comparing the heating rates of three populations (from a latitudinal range, which inhabit under different thermal conditions. Additionally, we explore if the intrinsic factor, sex, also modulates heating rates. There was a significant intraspecific variation in heating rates, at population and gender level. These rates however, showed only a partial relationship with the environmental thermal conditions. We found that the northern population, inhabiting at higher temperature, heated slower, which might reduce the risk of overheating. On the other hand, independent of the population, females heated slower than males. The meaning of this sexual variation is unclear, but may be consequence of the significant differences in genders' social behavior. Because males defend a territory with a harem, by heating faster, they can allocate extra time in behaviors associated to the defense and maintenance of the territory.La variación interespecífica en las tasas de calentamiento de Liolaemus pareciera ser un mecanismo fisiológico adaptativo que permitiría a los lagartos enfrentar restricciones térmicas ambientales impuestas a la termorregulación conductual. Esta tendencia ha sido raramente analizada a nivel intraespecífico y en este estudio exploramos si existe variación intraespecífica en las tasas de calentamiento de Liolaemus tenuis, una especie con rango

  1. Equivalent T cell epitope promiscuity in ecologically diverse human pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten E Wiens

    Full Text Available The HLA (human leukocyte antigen molecules that present pathogen-derived epitopes to T cells are highly diverse. Correspondingly, many pathogens such as HIV evolve epitope variants in order to evade immune recognition. In contrast, another persistent human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has highly conserved epitope sequences. This raises the question whether there is also a difference in the ability of these pathogens' epitopes to bind diverse HLA alleles, referred to as an epitope's binding promiscuity. To address this question, we compared the in silico HLA binding promiscuity of T cell epitopes from pathogens with distinct infection strategies and outcomes of human exposure.We used computer algorithms to predict the binding affinity of experimentally-verified microbial epitope peptides to diverse HLA-DR, HLA-A and HLA-B alleles. We then analyzed binding promiscuity of epitopes derived from HIV and M. tuberculosis. We also analyzed promiscuity of epitopes from Streptococcus pyogenes, which is known to exhibit epitope diversity, and epitopes of Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium tetani toxins, as these bacteria do not depend on human hosts for their survival or replication, and their toxin antigens are highly immunogenic human vaccines.We found that B. anthracis and C. tetani epitopes were the most promiscuous of the group that we analyzed. However, there was no consistent difference or trend in promiscuity in epitopes contained in HIV, M. tuberculosis, and S. pyogenes.Our results show that human pathogens with distinct immune evasion strategies and epitope diversities exhibit equivalent levels of T cell epitope promiscuity. These results indicate that differences in epitope promiscuity do not account for the observed differences in epitope variation and conservation.

  2. Equivalent T cell epitope promiscuity in ecologically diverse human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Kirsten E; Swaminathan, Harish; Copin, Richard; Lun, Desmond S; Ernst, Joel D

    2013-01-01

    The HLA (human leukocyte antigen) molecules that present pathogen-derived epitopes to T cells are highly diverse. Correspondingly, many pathogens such as HIV evolve epitope variants in order to evade immune recognition. In contrast, another persistent human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has highly conserved epitope sequences. This raises the question whether there is also a difference in the ability of these pathogens' epitopes to bind diverse HLA alleles, referred to as an epitope's binding promiscuity. To address this question, we compared the in silico HLA binding promiscuity of T cell epitopes from pathogens with distinct infection strategies and outcomes of human exposure. We used computer algorithms to predict the binding affinity of experimentally-verified microbial epitope peptides to diverse HLA-DR, HLA-A and HLA-B alleles. We then analyzed binding promiscuity of epitopes derived from HIV and M. tuberculosis. We also analyzed promiscuity of epitopes from Streptococcus pyogenes, which is known to exhibit epitope diversity, and epitopes of Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium tetani toxins, as these bacteria do not depend on human hosts for their survival or replication, and their toxin antigens are highly immunogenic human vaccines. We found that B. anthracis and C. tetani epitopes were the most promiscuous of the group that we analyzed. However, there was no consistent difference or trend in promiscuity in epitopes contained in HIV, M. tuberculosis, and S. pyogenes. Our results show that human pathogens with distinct immune evasion strategies and epitope diversities exhibit equivalent levels of T cell epitope promiscuity. These results indicate that differences in epitope promiscuity do not account for the observed differences in epitope variation and conservation.

  3. Intraspecific chemical communication in microalgae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Venuleo, M.; Raven, J. A.; Giordano, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 215, č. 2 (2017), s. 516-530 ISSN 1469-8137 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : evolution * infochemicals * intraspecific communication Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology

  4. Intra-specific variations in expression of stress-related genes in beech progenies are stronger than drought-induced responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsjens, Caroline; Nguyen Ngoc, Quynh; Guzy, Jonas; Knutzen, Florian; Meier, Ina Christin; Müller, Markus; Finkeldey, Reiner; Leuschner, Christoph; Polle, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Rapidly decreasing water availability as a consequence of climate change is likely to endanger the range of long-lived tree species. A pressing question is, therefore, whether adaptation to drought exists in important temperate tree species like European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), a wide-spread, dominant forest tree in Central Europe. Here, five beech stands were selected along a precipitation gradient from moist to dry conditions. Neutral genetic markers revealed strong variation within and little differentiation between the populations. Natural regeneration from these stands was transferred to a common garden and used to investigate the expression of genes for abscisic acid (ABA)-related drought signaling [9-cis-epoxy-dioxygenase (NCED), protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C), early responsive to dehydration (ERD)] and stress protection [ascorbate peroxidase (APX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), glutamine amidotransferase (GAT)] that are involved in drought acclimation. We hypothesized that progenies from dry sites exhibit constitutively higher expression levels of ABA- and stress-related genes and are less drought responsive than progenies from moist sites. Transcript levels and stress responses (leaf area loss, membrane integrity) of well-irrigated and drought-stressed plants were measured during the early, mid- and late growing season. Principal component (PC) analysis ordered the beech progenies according to the mean annual precipitation at tree origin by the transcript levels of SOD, ALDH, GAT and ERD as major loadings along PC1. PC2 separated moist and drought treatments with PP2C levels as important loading. These results suggest that phosphatase-mediated signaling is flexibly acclimated to the current requirements, whereas stress compensatory measures exhibited genotypic variation, apparently underlying climate selection. In contrast to expectation, the drought responses were less pronounced than the progeny-related differences and the

  5. Characterization and intraspecific variation of Fusarium semitectum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-01-18

    Jan 18, 2010 ... PCR was performed in a Peltier Thermal Cycler, PTC-100® (MJ. Research, Inc. USA) with the following conditions: an initial denaturation at 94°C for 2 min, followed by 35 cycles of denatu- ration at 94°C for 35 s, annealing at 59°C for 55 s, extension at. 72°C for 2 min and final extension at 72°C for 7 min.

  6. Intraspecific variation in pollen viability, germination and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oleaceae) cultivars 'Koroneiki', 'Mastoidis' and 'Kalamata' was studied with scanning electron microscopy to identify genotype- distinguishing characters that could be employed for morphological cultivar discrimination. Pollen viability and germination ...

  7. Intraspecific variation in Tsuga canadensis foliar chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura Ingwell; Joseph Brady; Matthew Fitzpatrick; Brian Maynard; Richard Casagrande; Evan Preisser

    2009-01-01

    Three groups of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis Carr.) trees were analyzed to compare their chemical composition and the potential for naturally occurring resistance to hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsguae...

  8. Consequences of intra-specific metabolic diversity in plants for soil organisms : a baseline approach for evaluating ecological effects of genetic modifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabouw, P.

    2012-01-01

    Plant intra-specific variation, i.e. variation within a plant species, is known to affect organisms that are directly associated to plants. These effects may be due to for example differences in nutritional quality or defensive metabolites. Plant intra-specific variation can also affect

  9. The conditions for speciation through intraspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger, Reinhard; Schneider, Kristan A; Willensdorfer, Martin

    2006-11-01

    It has been shown theoretically that sympatric speciation can occur if intraspecific competition is strong enough to induce disruptive selection. However, the plausibility of the involved processes is under debate, and many questions on the conditions for speciation remain unresolved. For instance, is strong disruptive selection sufficient for speciation? Which roles do genetic architecture and initial composition of the population play? How strong must assortative mating be before a population can split in two? These are some of the issues we address here. We investigate a diploid multilocus model of a quantitative trait that is under frequency-dependent selection caused by a balance of intraspecific competition and frequency-independent stabilizing selection. This trait also acts as mating character for assortment. It has been established previously that speciation can occur only if competition is strong enough to induce disruptive selection. We find that speciation becomes more difficult for very strong competition, because then extremely strong assortment is required. Thus, speciation is most likely for intermediate strengths of competition, where it requires strong, but not extremely strong, assortment. For this range of parameters, however, it is not obvious how assortment can evolve from low to high levels, because with moderately strong assortment less genetic variation is maintained than under weak or strong assortment-sometimes none at all. In addition to the strength of frequency-dependent competition and assortative mating, the roles of the number of loci, the distribution of allelic effects, the initial conditions, costs to being choosy, the strength of stabilizing selection, and the particular choice of the fitness function are explored. A multitude of possible evolutionary outcomes is observed, including loss of all genetic variation, splitting in two to five species, as well as very short and extremely long stable limit cycles. On the methodological

  10. Intraspecific competition increases toxicant effects in outdoor pond microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knillmann, Saskia; Stampfli, Nathalie C; Beketov, Mikhail A; Liess, Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Competition is a ubiquitous factor in natural populations and has been reported to alter the ecological impact of xenobiotics. We investigated conditions that mirror the natural variation of environmental factors. For this, different treatments were applied to 96 outdoor pond microcosms by shading the ponds and harvesting the communities. Then, the effect of esfenvalerate (0.03, 0.3, and 3 μg/L) on populations of Daphnia spp. was investigated. The pesticide effect and the sensitivity of Daphnia spp. in the context of a zooplankton community was increased by intraspecific competition 11 days after contamination. This relationship was most pronounced at 0.03 and 0.3 μg/L esfenvalerate, which were the concentrations that led to partial mortality. In contrast, interspecific interaction did not significantly alter the effect of the toxicant on Daphnia spp. Modelled concentration-response curves showed that the negative effects of the pesticide differed by a factor of up to 100 depending on the strength of intraspecific competition. In addition, a wider range of concentrations led to negative effects at high levels of intraspecific competition than at low levels. We argue that increased intraspecific competition reduces the availability of resources at the individual level and thereby increases the effect of contaminants. This knowledge about the interaction between competition and the response to toxicants is important in assessing the effects of these factors under field conditions.

  11. Revisiting Darwin's hypothesis: Does greater intraspecific variability increase species' ecological breadth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sides, Colby B; Enquist, Brian J; Ebersole, James J; Smith, Marielle N; Henderson, Amanda N; Sloat, Lindsey L

    2014-01-01

    Darwin first proposed that species with larger ecological breadth have greater phenotypic variation. We tested this hypothesis by comparing intraspecific variation in specific leaf area (SLA) to species' local elevational range and by assessing how external (abiotic) filters may influence observed differences in ecological breadth among species. Understanding the patterns of individual variation within and between populations will help evaluate differing hypotheses for structuring of communities and distribution of species. We selected 21 species with varying elevational ranges and compared the coefficient of variation of SLA for each species against its local elevational range. We examined the influence of external filters on local trait composition by determining if intraspecific changes in SLA with elevation have the same direction and similar rates of change as the change in community mean SLA value. In support of Darwin's hypothesis, we found a positive relationship between species' coefficient of variation for SLA with species' local elevational range. Intraspecific changes in SLA had the same sign, but generally lower magnitude than the community mean SLA. The results indicate that wide-ranging species are indeed characterized by greater intraspecific variation and that species' phenotypes shift along environmental gradients in the same direction as the community phenotypes. However, across species, the rate of intraspecific trait change, reflecting plastic and/or adaptive changes across populations, is limited and prevents species from adjusting to environmental gradients as quickly as interspecific changes resulting from community assembly.

  12. Intra-specific Differences in Root and Shoot Glucosinolate Profiles among White Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var capitata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabouw, P.; Biere, A.; Putten, van der W.H.; Dam, van N.M.

    2010-01-01

    Shoot glucosinolate profiles of Brassicaceae are known to vary within species, across environmental conditions, and between developmental stages. Here we study whether root profiles follow the intra-specific, environmental, and developmental variation observed for aerial parts in white cabbage

  13. Intraspecific niche models for ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) suggest potential variability in population-level response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Kaitlin C.; Shinneman, Douglas; Potter, Kevin M.; Hipkins, Valerie D.

    2018-01-01

    Unique responses to climate change can occur across intraspecific levels, resulting in individualistic adaptation or movement patterns among populations within a given species. Thus, the need to model potential responses among genetically distinct populations within a species is increasingly recognized. However, predictive models of future distributions are regularly fit at the species level, often because intraspecific variation is unknown or is identified only within limited sample locations. In this study, we considered the role of intraspecific variation to shape the geographic distribution of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), an ecologically and economically important tree species in North America. Morphological and genetic variation across the distribution of ponderosa pine suggest the need to model intraspecific populations: the two varieties (var. ponderosa and var. scopulorum) and several haplotype groups within each variety have been shown to occupy unique climatic niches, suggesting populations have distinct evolutionary lineages adapted to different environmental conditions. We utilized a recently-available, geographically-widespread dataset of intraspecific variation (haplotypes) for ponderosa pine and a recently-devised lineage distance modeling approach to derive additional, likely intraspecific occurrence locations. We confirmed the relative uniqueness of each haplotype-climate relationship using a niche-overlap analysis, and developed ecological niche models (ENMs) to project the distribution for two varieties and eight haplotypes under future climate forecasts. Future projections of haplotype niche distributions generally revealed greater potential range loss than predicted for the varieties. This difference may reflect intraspecific responses of distinct evolutionary lineages. However, directional trends are generally consistent across intraspecific levels, and include a loss of distributional area and an upward shift in elevation. Our results

  14. Intraspecific diversity regulates fungal productivity and respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wilkinson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals and not just species are key components of biodiversity, yet the relationship between intraspecific diversity and ecosystem functioning in microbial systems remains largely untested. This limits our ability to understand and predict the effects of altered genetic diversity in regulating key ecosystem processes and functions. Here, we use a model fungal system to test the hypothesis that intraspecific genotypic richness of Paxillus obscurosporus stimulates biomass and CO(2 efflux, but that this is dependent on nitrogen supply. Using controlled experimental microcosms, we show that populations containing several genotypes (maximum 8 of the fungus had greater productivity and produced significantly more CO(2 than those with fewer genotypes. Moreover, intraspecific diversity had a much stronger effect than a four-fold manipulation of the carbon:nitrogen ratio of the growth medium. The effects of intraspecific diversity were underpinned by strong roles of individuals, but overall intraspecific diversity increased the propensity of populations to over-yield, indicating that both complementarity and selection effects can operate within species. Our data demonstrate the importance of intraspecific diversity over a range of nitrogen concentrations, and the need to consider fine scale phylogenetic information of microbial communities in understanding their contribution to ecosystem processes.

  15. Estimating intraspecific genetic diversity from community DNA metabarcoding data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Elbrecht

    2018-04-01

    Taeniopteryx nebulosa and the caddisfly Hydropsyche pellucidula showed a distinct north–south cline with respect to haplotype distribution, while the beetle Oulimnius tuberculatus and the isopod Asellus aquaticus displayed no clear population pattern but differed in genetic diversity. Discussion We developed a strategy to infer intraspecific genetic diversity from bulk invertebrate metabarcoding data. It needs to be stressed that at this point this metabarcoding-informed haplotyping is not capable of capturing the full diversity present in such samples, due to variation in specimen size, primer bias and loss of sequence variants with low abundance. Nevertheless, for a high number of species intraspecific diversity was recovered, identifying potentially isolated populations and taxa for further more detailed phylogeographic investigation. While we are currently lacking large-scale metabarcoding datasets to fully take advantage of our new approach, metabarcoding-informed haplotyping holds great promise for biomonitoring efforts that not only seek information about species diversity but also underlying genetic diversity.

  16. Epitope prediction methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita

    on machine learning techniques. Several MHC class I binding prediction algorithms have been developed and due to their high accuracy they are used by many immunologists to facilitate the conventional experimental process of epitope discovery. However, the accuracy of these methods depends on data defining...... the NetMHCIIpan-3.0 predictor based on artificial neural networks, which is capable of giving binding affinities to any human MHC class II molecule. Chapter 4 of this thesis gives an overview of bioinformatics tools developed by the Immunological Bioinformatics group at Center for Biological Sequence...

  17. Immune epitope database analysis resource

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yohan; Ponomarenko, Julia; Zhu, Zhanyang

    2012-01-01

    The immune epitope database analysis resource (IEDB-AR: http://tools.iedb.org) is a collection of tools for prediction and analysis of molecular targets of T- and B-cell immune responses (i.e. epitopes). Since its last publication in the NAR webserver issue in 2008, a new generation of peptide...

  18. Intraspecific chromosomal and genetic polymorphism in Brassica ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-16

    Apr 16, 2014 ... A. V., Lemesh V. A. and Muravenko O. V. 2014 Intraspecific chromosomal and genetic polymorphism in Brassica napus L. detected by cytogenetic and molecular markers. J. Genet. ...... Howell E. C., Kearsey M. J., Jones G. H., King G. J. and Armstrong. S. J. 2008 A and C genome distinction and ...

  19. Molecular markers unravel intraspecific and interspecific genetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular markers unravel intraspecific and interspecific genetic variability in Plantago ovata and some of its wild allies. Shivanjali Kotwal, Manoj K. Dhar, Balbir Kour, Kuldeep Raj and Sanjana Kaul. J. Genet. 92, 293–298. Table 1. Jaccard's similarity matrix of AFLP analysis of Plantago species. P. coronopus P. lanceolata ...

  20. Bioinformatics Analysis of Envelope Glycoprotein E epitopes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The E glycoprotein of dengue virus is responsible for the viral binding to the receptor. The crystal structure of envelope glycoprotein has already been determined. However, where the well-defined Bcell and T-cell epitopes are located is still a question. Because of the large variations among the four dengue genotypes, it is ...

  1. Identification of a variant antigenic neutralizing epitope in hypervariable region 1 of avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Minbo; Zhou, Defang; Li, Gen; Guo, Huijun; Liu, Jianzhu; Wang, Guihua; Zheng, Qiankun; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2016-03-08

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is a hypervariable oncogenic retrovirus that causes great economic loss in poultry. Antigenic variations in the variable regions make the development of an effective vaccine a challenging task. In the present study, we identified a variant antigenic neutralizing epitope using reverse vaccinology methods. First, we predicted the B-cell epitopes in gp85 gene of ALV-J strains by DNAman and bioinformatics. Fourteen candidate epitopes were selected and linked in tandem with glycines or serines as a multi-epitope gene. The expressed protein of multi-epitope gene can induce high-titer antibody that can recognize nature ALV-J and neutralize the infectivity of ALV-J strains. Next, we identified a high effective epitope using eight overlapping fragments of gp85 gene reacting with mAb 2D5 and anti-multi-epitope sera. The identified epitope contained one of the predicted epitopes and localized in hyervariable region 1 (hr1), indicating a variant epitope. To better understand if the variants of the epitope have a good antigenicity, we synthesized four variants to react with mAb 2D5 and anti-ALV-J sera. The result showed that all variants could react with the two kinds of antibodies though they showed different antigenicity, while could not react with ALV-J negative sera. Thus, the variant antigenic neutralizing epitope was determined as 137-LRDFIA/E/TKWKS/GDDL/HLIRPYVNQS-158. The result shows a potential use of this variant epitopes as a novel multi-epitope vaccine against ALV-J in poultry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Field manipulations of resources mediate the transition from intraspecific competition to facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanfeldt, Karin; Monro, Keyne; Marshall, Dustin J

    2017-05-01

    Population density affects individual performance, though its effects are often mixed. For sessile species, increases in population density typically reduce performance. Still, cases of positive density-dependence do occur in sessile systems and demand explanation. The stress gradient hypothesis (SGH) predicts that under stressful conditions, positive effects of facilitation may outweigh the negative effects of competition. While some elements of the SGH are well studied, its potential to explain intraspecific facilitation has received little attention. Further, there have been questions regarding whether the SGH holds if the stressor is a resource. Most studies of interactions between the environment and intraspecific facilitation have relied on natural environmental gradients; manipulative studies are much rarer. To test the effects of intraspecific density and resources, we manipulated resource availability over natural population densities for the marine bryozoan Watersipora subtorquata. We found negative effects of density on colony performance in low resource environments, but mainly positive density-dependence in high resource environments. By adding resources, competition effects were reduced and the positive effects of facilitation were revealed. Our results suggest that resource availability mediates the relative strength of competition and facilitation in our system. We also suggest that intraspecific facilitation is more common than may be appreciated and that environmental variation may mediate the balance between negative and positive density-dependence. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2017 British Ecological Society.

  3. Can we predict diatoms herbicide sensitivities with phylogeny? Influence of intraspecific and interspecific variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Sara M; Keck, François; Almeida, Salomé F P; Figueira, Etelvina; Bouchez, Agnès; Rimet, Frédéric

    2017-10-01

    Diatoms are used as indicators of freshwater ecosystems integrity. Developing diatom-based tools to assess impact of herbicide pollution is expected by water managers. But, defining sensitivities of all species to multiple herbicides would be unattainable. The existence of a phylogenetic signal of herbicide sensitivity was shown among diatoms and should enable prediction of new species sensitivity. However, diatoms present a cryptic diversity that may lead to variation in their sensitivity to herbicides that would need to be taken into account. Using bioassays, the sensitivity to four herbicides (Atrazine, Terbutryn, Diuron, Isoproturon) was evaluated for 11 freshwater diatom taxa and intraspecific variability was assessed for two of them (Nitzschia palea and Achnanthidium spp.). Intraspecific variability of herbicide sensitivity was always smaller than interspecific variability, but intraspecific variability was more important in N. palea than in Achnanthidium spp. Indeed, one species showed no intraspecific phylogenetic signal (N. palea) whereas the other did (Achnanthidium spp.). On one hand, species boundaries are not set properly for Achnanthidium spp. which encompass several taxa. On the other hand, there is a higher phenotypic plasticity for N. palea. Finally, a phylogenetic signal of herbicide sensitivity was measured at the interspecific level, opening up prospects for setting up reliable biomonitoring tools based on sensitivity prediction, insofar as species boundaries are correctly defined.

  4. Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This repository contains antibody/B cell and T cell epitope information and epitope prediction and analysis tools for use by the research community worldwide. Immune...

  5. Computer-aided design of T-cell epitope-based vaccines: addressing population coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzun, P; Kobe, B

    2015-10-01

    Epitope-based vaccines (EVs) make use of short antigen-derived peptides corresponding to immune epitopes, which are administered to trigger a protective humoral and/or cellular immune response. EVs potentially allow for precise control over the immune response activation by focusing on the most relevant - immunogenic and conserved - antigen regions. Experimental screening of large sets of peptides is time-consuming and costly; therefore, in silico methods that facilitate T-cell epitope mapping of protein antigens are paramount for EV development. The prediction of T-cell epitopes focuses on the peptide presentation process by proteins encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Because different MHCs have different specificities and T-cell epitope repertoires, individuals are likely to respond to a different set of peptides from a given pathogen in genetically heterogeneous human populations. In addition, protective immune responses are only expected if T-cell epitopes are restricted by MHC proteins expressed at high frequencies in the target population. Therefore, without careful consideration of the specificity and prevalence of the MHC proteins, EVs could fail to adequately cover the target population. This article reviews state-of-the-art algorithms and computational tools to guide EV design through all the stages of the process: epitope prediction, epitope selection and vaccine assembly, while optimizing vaccine immunogenicity and coping with genetic variation in humans and pathogens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Prediction of common epitopes on hemagglutinin of the influenza A virus (H1 subtype).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chunyan; Xie, Xin; Li, Huijin; Zhao, Penghua; Zhao, Xiangrong; Sun, Jingying; Wang, Haifang; Liu, Yang; Li, Yan; Hu, Qiaoxia; Hu, Jun; Li, Yuan

    2015-02-01

    Influenza A virus infection is a persistent threat to public health worldwide due to hemagglutinin (HA) variation. Current vaccines against influenza A virus provide immunity to viral isolates similar to vaccine strains. Antibodies against common epitopes provide immunity to diverse influenza virus strains and protect against future pandemic influenza. Therefore, it is vital to analyze common HA antigenic epitopes of influenza virus. In this study, 14 strains of monoclonal antibodies with high sensitivity to common epitopes of influenza virus antigens identified in our previous study were selected as the tool to predict common HA epitopes. The common HA antigenic epitopes were divided into four categories by ELISA blocking experiments, and separately, into three categories according to the preliminary results of computer simulation. Comparison between the results of computer simulations and ELISA blocking experiments indicated that at least two classes of common epitopes are present in influenza virus HA. This study provides experimental data for improving the prediction of HA epitopes of influenza virus (H1 subtype) and the development of a potential universal vaccine as well as a novel approach for the prediction of epitopes on other pathogenic microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Trait-Based Community Assembly along an Elevational Gradient in Subalpine Forests: Quantifying the Roles of Environmental Factors in Inter- and Intraspecific Variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Huang Luo

    Full Text Available Understanding how communities respond to environmental variation is a central goal in ecology. Plant communities respond to environmental gradients via intraspecific and/or interspecific variation in plant functional traits. However, the relative contribution of these two responses to environmental factors remains poorly tested. We measured six functional traits (height, leaf thickness, specific leaf area (SLA, leaf carbon concentration (LCC, leaf nitrogen concentration (LNC and leaf phosphorus concentration (LPC for 55 tree species occurring at five elevations across a 1200 m elevational gradient of subalpine forests in Yulong Mountain, Southwest China. We examined the relative contribution of interspecific and intraspecific traits variability based on community weighted mean trait values and functional diversity, and tested how different components of trait variation respond to different environmental axes (climate and soil variables. Species turnover explained the largest amount of variation in leaf morphological traits (leaf thickness and SLA across the elevational gradient. However, intraspecific variability explained a large amount of variation (49.3%-76.3% in three other traits (height, LNC and LPC despite high levels of species turnover. The detection of limiting similarity in community assembly was improved when accounting for both intraspecific and interspecific variability. Different components of trait variation respond to different environmental axes, especially soil water content and climatic variables. Our results indicate that intraspecific variation is critical for understanding community assembly and evaluating community response to environmental change.

  8. Trait-Based Community Assembly along an Elevational Gradient in Subalpine Forests: Quantifying the Roles of Environmental Factors in Inter- and Intraspecific Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ya-Huang; Liu, Jie; Tan, Shao-Lin; Cadotte, Marc William; Wang, Yue-Hua; Xu, Kun; Li, De-Zhu; Gao, Lian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how communities respond to environmental variation is a central goal in ecology. Plant communities respond to environmental gradients via intraspecific and/or interspecific variation in plant functional traits. However, the relative contribution of these two responses to environmental factors remains poorly tested. We measured six functional traits (height, leaf thickness, specific leaf area (SLA), leaf carbon concentration (LCC), leaf nitrogen concentration (LNC) and leaf phosphorus concentration (LPC)) for 55 tree species occurring at five elevations across a 1200 m elevational gradient of subalpine forests in Yulong Mountain, Southwest China. We examined the relative contribution of interspecific and intraspecific traits variability based on community weighted mean trait values and functional diversity, and tested how different components of trait variation respond to different environmental axes (climate and soil variables). Species turnover explained the largest amount of variation in leaf morphological traits (leaf thickness and SLA) across the elevational gradient. However, intraspecific variability explained a large amount of variation (49.3%-76.3%) in three other traits (height, LNC and LPC) despite high levels of species turnover. The detection of limiting similarity in community assembly was improved when accounting for both intraspecific and interspecific variability. Different components of trait variation respond to different environmental axes, especially soil water content and climatic variables. Our results indicate that intraspecific variation is critical for understanding community assembly and evaluating community response to environmental change.

  9. Repeated intraspecific divergence in life span and aging of African annual fishes along an aridity gradient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blažek, Radim; Polačik, Matej; Kačer, P.; Cellerino, A.; Řežucha, Radomil; Methling, Caroline; Tomášek, Oldřich; Syslová, K.; Terzibasi Tozzini, E.; Albrecht, Tomáš; Vrtílek, Milan; Reichard, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 2 (2017), s. 386-402 ISSN 0014-3820 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-05872S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-00291S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Intraspecific variation * life span * neoplasia * pace-of-life syndrome * parallel evolution * reproductive senescence Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 4.201, year: 2016

  10. Terrestrial carbon and intraspecific size-variation shape lake ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansson, M.; Persson, L.; de Roos, A.M.; I. Jones, R.; Tranvik, L.J.

    2007-01-01

    Conceptual models of lake ecosystem structure and function have generally assumed that energy in pelagic systems is derived from in situ photosynthesis and that its use by higher trophic levels depends on the average properties of individuals in consumer populations. These views are challenged by

  11. Intra-specific variations in Silene: Morphometry and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MRT

    2013-08-14

    Aug 14, 2013 ... Silene conica L. and Silene lacera (Steven) Sims. (Sopova and Sekovski, 1982), and 2n = 46 for Silene firma Siebold and Zucc (Zhang, 1994). .... Fully mature and undamaged seeds were selected. The seeds were thoroughly vacuum-coated with gold to provide conductivity for the SEM images at Tehran ...

  12. Epitope mapping of Ebola virus dominant and subdominant glycoprotein epitopes facilitates construction of an epitope-based DNA vaccine able to focus the antibody response in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    Epitope mapping of Ebola virus dominant and subdominant glycoprotein epitopes facilitates construction of an epitope-based DNA vaccine able to focus... vaccinated against or infected with EBOV. Using the information obtained along with structural modeling to predict epitope accessibility, we then...constructed two DNA vaccines encoding immunodominant and subdominant epitopes predicted to be accessible on EBOV GP. Although a construct designed to

  13. The good, the bad, and the ugly: the influence of skull reconstructions and intraspecific variability in studies of cranial morphometrics in theropods and Basal saurischians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Foth

    Full Text Available Several studies investigating macroevolutionary skull shape variation in fossil reptiles were published recently, often using skull reconstructions taken from the scientific literature. However, this approach could be potentially problematic, because skull reconstructions might differ notably due to incompleteness and/or deformation of the material. Furthermore, the influence of intraspecific variation has usually not been explored in these studies. Both points could influence the results of morphometric analyses by affecting the relative position of species to each other within the morphospace. The aim of the current study is to investigate the variation in morphometric data between skull reconstructions based on the same specimen, and to compare the results to shape variation occurring in skull reconstructions based on different specimens of the same species (intraspecific variation and skulls of closely related species (intraspecific variation. Based on the current results, shape variation of different skull reconstructions based on the same specimen seems to have generally little influence on the results of a geometric morphometric analysis, although it cannot be excluded that some erroneous reconstructions of poorly preserved specimens might cause problems occasionally. In contrast, for different specimens of the same species the variation is generally higher than between different reconstructions based on the same specimen. For closely related species, at least with similar ecological preferences in respect to the dietary spectrum, the degree of interspecific variation can overlap with that of intraspecific variation, most probably due to similar biomechanical constraints.

  14. Effects of intraspecific competition on the life cycle of the stonefly, Nemurella pictetii (Plecoptera: Nemouridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieske, Reimo; Zwick, Peter

    2008-04-16

    Considerable variation of life cycle duration in given insect species has been frequently recorded. Splitting of populations into cohorts with different life cycle lengths may occur, sometimes even between siblings from the same batch. Larval populations of the stonefly Nemurella pictetii in central Europe regularly split into a very fast developing and a normal univoltine cohort, leading to partial multivoltinism. The causes for such variation remain unknown but presumably act on the larval stage in which most of the life cycle is spent. We therefore studied possible effects of intraspecific competition on growth and development of larvae in the laboratory. Intraspecific competition had important influence on growth and development of the larvae. High larval densities led to reduced growth and retarded development through interference, not through exploitative competition. All specimens were negatively affected by frequent encounters and the resulting disturbance. There were no dominant individuals able to grow and develop faster than the rest, at the expense of the others. Differences in life cycle length of Nemurella pictetii may result from different larval densities in different microhabitats and resultant different degrees of interference competition. Although competition alone probably does not cause splitting of populations into cohorts with different life cycle duration differences in size and development caused by other factors are certainly enhanced by intraspecific competition.

  15. Computational prediction of immunodominant antigenic regions & potential protective epitopes for dengue vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusamy, Karthikeyan; Gopinath, Krishnasamy; Nandhini, Dharmalingam

    2016-10-01

    Epitope-based vaccines (EVs) are specific, safe and easy to produce. However, vaccine failure has been frequently reported due to variation within epitopic regions. Therefore, development of vaccines based on conserved epitopes may prevent such vaccine failure. This study was undertaken to identify highly conserved antigenic regions in the four dengue serotypes to produce an epitope-based dengue vaccine. Polyprotein sequences of all four dengue serotypes were collected and aligned using MAFFT multiple sequence alignment plugin with Geneious Pro v6.1. Consensus sequences of the polyproteins for all four dengue serotypes were designed and screened against experimentally proven epitopes to predict potential antigenic regions that are conserved among all four dengue serotypes. The antigenic region VDRGWGNGCGLFGKG was 100 per cent conserved in the consensus polyprotein sequences of all four dengue serotypes. Fifteen experimentally proven epitopes were identical to the immunodominant antigenic region. Computationally predicted antigenic regions may be considered for use in the development of EVs for protection against dengue virus. Such vaccines would be expected to provide protection against dengue infections caused by all dengue serotypes because these would contain antigenic regions highly conserved across those serotypes. Therefore, the immunodominant antigenic region (VDRGWGNGCGLFGKG) and 15 potential epitopes may be considered for use in dengue vaccines.

  16. The Immune Epitope Database 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Vita, R; Zarebski, L

    2010-01-01

    The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB, www.iedb.org) provides a catalog of experimentally characterized B and T cell epitopes, as well as data on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) binding and MHC ligand elution experiments. The database represents the molecular structures recognized by adaptive...... immune receptors and the experimental contexts in which these molecules were determined to be immune epitopes. Epitopes recognized in humans, nonhuman primates, rodents, pigs, cats and all other tested species are included. Both positive and negative experimental results are captured. Over the course...

  17. Intraspecific diet shift in Talitrus saltator inhabiting exposed sandy beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabarria, Celia; Incera, Mónica; Garrido, Josefina; Rodil, Iván F.; Rossi, Francesca

    2009-09-01

    Talitrid amphipods are the most abundant herbivores on exposed sandy beaches. Despite their important role as trophic intermediates between macrophytes and higher levels (i.e. insect and bird) of beach food webs, very little information is available on their feeding patterns. The main aim of this study was to investigate intraspecific differences in the feeding behaviour of Talitrus saltator. We tested the hypotheses that: (1) adult females and males showed different isotope signatures and therefore relied on different sources of food; and (2) patterns of variation of isotope signatures of juveniles differed from those of adult specimens, evidencing a diet shift during the development. We used stable isotope signatures and tested for differences upon the level on the shore, times of the year and beaches experiencing similar morpho-dynamic and environmental conditions. Finally, we investigated the trophic significance of macrophyte detritus in the diet of males, females and juveniles. Results showed that adult males had a more variable diet than females and juveniles (inferred from δ 13C and δ 15N values). Dual-isotope graphs suggested that Sargassum muticum and Cystoseira baccata wrack could be among the main food sources for both juvenile and adult stage.

  18. Intraspecific competition between co-infecting parasite strains enhances host survival in African trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Oliver; Stearns, Stephen Curtis; Schötzau, Andreas; Brun, Reto

    2009-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that under natural conditions parasitic infections commonly consist of co-infections with multiple conspecific strains. Multiple-strain infections lead to intraspecific interactions and may have important ecological and evolutionary effects on both hosts and parasites. However, experimental evidence on intraspecific competition or facilitation in infections has been scarce because of the technical challenges of distinguishing and tracking individual co-infecting strains. To overcome this limitation, we engineered transgenic strains of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, the causal agent of human African sleeping sickness. Different strains were transfected with fluorescence genes of different colors to make them visually distinguishable in order to investigate the effects of multiple-strain infections on parasite population dynamics and host fitness. We infected mice either with each strain alone or with mixes of two strains. Our results show a strong mutual competitive suppression of co-infecting T. brucei strains very early in infection. This mutual suppression changes within-host parasite dynamics and alleviates the effects of infection on the host. The strength of suppression depends on the density of the co-infecting strain, and differences in life-history traits between the strains determine the consequences of strain-strain competition for the host. Unexpectedly, co-infection with a less virulent strain significantly enhances host survival (+15%). Analysis of the strain dynamics reveals that this is due to the suppression of the density of the more virulent strain (-33%), whose degree of impact ultimately determines the physical condition of the host. The competitive suppression is likely caused by allelopathic interference or by apparent competition mediated by strain-specific immune responses. These findings highlight the importance of intraspecific variation for parasite-parasite and parasite-host interactions. To

  19. Intraspecific adaptive radiation: Competition, ecological opportunity, and phenotypic diversification within species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, Nicholas A; Martin, Ryan A; O'Donnell, Kerry A; Pfennig, David W

    2017-10-01

    Intraspecific variation in resource-use traits can have profound ecological and evolutionary implications. Among the most striking examples are resource polymorphisms, where alternative morphs that utilize different resources evolve within a population. An underappreciated aspect of their evolution is that the same conditions that favor resource polymorphism-competition and ecological opportunity-might foster additional rounds of diversification within already existing morphs. We examined these issues in spadefoot toad tadpoles that develop into either a generalist "omnivore" or a specialist "carnivore" morph. Specifically, we assessed the morphological diversity of tadpoles from natural ponds and experimentally induced carnivores reared on alternative diets. We also surveyed natural ponds to determine if the strength of intramorph competition and the diversity and abundance of dietary resources (measures of ecological opportunity) influenced the diversity of within-morph variation. We found that five omnivore and four carnivore types were present in natural ponds; alternative diets led to shape differences, some of which mirrored variation in the wild; and both competition and ecological opportunity were associated with enhanced morphological diversity in natural ponds. Such fine-scale intraspecific variation might represent an underappreciated form of biodiversity and might constitute a crucible of evolutionary innovation and diversification. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  20. Intraspecific competition facilitates the evolution of tolerance to insect damage in the perennial plant Solanum carolinense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, David W; Halpern, Stacey L; Barrows, Kahaili; Underwood, Nora

    2012-12-01

    Tolerance to herbivory (the degree to which plants maintain fitness after damage) is a key component of plant defense, so understanding how natural selection and evolutionary constraints act on tolerance traits is important to general theories of plant-herbivore interactions. These factors may be affected by plant competition, which often interacts with damage to influence trait expression and fitness. However, few studies have manipulated competitor density to examine the evolutionary effects of competition on tolerance. In this study, we tested whether intraspecific competition affects four aspects of the evolution of tolerance to herbivory in the perennial plant Solanum carolinense: phenotypic expression, expression of genetic variation, the adaptive value of tolerance, and costs of tolerance. We manipulated insect damage and intraspecific competition for clonal lines of S. carolinense in a greenhouse experiment, and measured tolerance in terms of sexual and asexual fitness components. Compared to plants growing at low density, plants growing at high density had greater expression of and genetic variation in tolerance, and experienced greater fitness benefits from tolerance when damaged. Tolerance was not costly for plants growing at either density, and only plants growing at low density benefited from tolerance when undamaged, perhaps due to greater intrinsic growth rates of more tolerant genotypes. These results suggest that competition is likely to facilitate the evolution of tolerance in S. carolinense, and perhaps in other plants that regularly experience competition, while spatio-temporal variation in density may maintain genetic variation in tolerance.

  1. Egg size matching by an intraspecific brood parasite

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick R. Lemons; James S. Sedinger

    2011-01-01

    Avian brood parasitism provides an ideal system with which to understand animal recognition and its affect on fitness. This phenomenon of laying eggs in the nests of other individuals has classically been framed from the perspective of interspecific brood parasitism and host recognition of parasitic eggs. Few examples exist of strategies adopted by intraspecific brood parasites to maximize success of parasitic eggs. Intraspecific brood parasitism within precocial birds can be a risky strategy...

  2. How variation between individuals affects species coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Simon P; Schreiber, Sebastian J; Levine, Jonathan M

    2016-08-01

    Although the effects of variation between individuals within species are traditionally ignored in studies of species coexistence, the magnitude of intraspecific variation in nature is forcing ecologists to reconsider. Compelling intuitive arguments suggest that individual variation may provide a previously unrecognised route to diversity maintenance by blurring species-level competitive differences or substituting for species-level niche differences. These arguments, which are motivating a large body of empirical work, have rarely been evaluated with quantitative theory. Here we incorporate intraspecific variation into a common model of competition and identify three pathways by which this variation affects coexistence: (1) changes in competitive dynamics because of nonlinear averaging, (2) changes in species' mean interaction strengths because of variation in underlying traits (also via nonlinear averaging) and (3) effects on stochastic demography. As a consequence of the first two mechanisms, we find that intraspecific variation in competitive ability increases the dominance of superior competitors, and intraspecific niche variation reduces species-level niche differentiation, both of which make coexistence more difficult. In addition, individual variation can exacerbate the effects of demographic stochasticity, and this further destabilises coexistence. Our work provides a theoretical foundation for emerging empirical interests in the effects of intraspecific variation on species diversity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  3. A trans-Amazonian screening of mtDNA reveals deep intraspecific divergence in forest birds and suggests a vast underestimation of species diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja Milá

    Full Text Available The Amazonian avifauna remains severely understudied relative to that of the temperate zone, and its species richness is thought to be underestimated by current taxonomy. Recent molecular systematic studies using mtDNA sequence reveal that traditionally accepted species-level taxa often conceal genetically divergent subspecific lineages found to represent new species upon close taxonomic scrutiny, suggesting that intraspecific mtDNA variation could be useful in species discovery. Surveys of mtDNA variation in Holarctic species have revealed patterns of variation that are largely congruent with species boundaries. However, little information exists on intraspecific divergence in most Amazonian species. Here we screen intraspecific mtDNA genetic variation in 41 Amazonian forest understory species belonging to 36 genera and 17 families in 6 orders, using 758 individual samples from Ecuador and French Guiana. For 13 of these species, we also analyzed trans-Andean populations from the Ecuadorian Chocó. A consistent pattern of deep intraspecific divergence among trans-Amazonian haplogroups was found for 33 of the 41 taxa, and genetic differentiation and genetic diversity among them was highly variable, suggesting a complex range of evolutionary histories. Mean sequence divergence within families was the same as that found in North American birds (13%, yet mean intraspecific divergence in Neotropical species was an order of magnitude larger (2.13% vs. 0.23%, with mean distance between intraspecific lineages reaching 3.56%. We found no clear relationship between genetic distances and differentiation in plumage color. Our results identify numerous genetically and phenotypically divergent lineages which may result in new species-level designations upon closer taxonomic scrutiny and thorough sampling, although lineages in the tropical region could be older than those in the temperate zone without necessarily representing separate species. In

  4. Intraspecific competition delays recovery of population structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liess, Matthias; Foit, Kaarina

    2010-04-01

    Ecotoxicological field studies have shown that total abundance and biomass often recover shortly after pulsed toxicant stress. In contrast, population structure showed comparatively long-term alterations before reaching pre-treatment conditions. We investigated two mechanisms that may explain the prolonged recovery of population structure: latent toxicant effects on life-history traits on the individual level and competition on the population level. To test these hypotheses we exposed populations of Daphnia magna to a pulse of the pyrethroid Fenvalerate. For several generations the populations were kept at two different degrees of competition: strong competition at carrying capacity and reduced competition maintained by simulated predation. After disturbance due to Fenvalerate exposure, biomass recovered after 14-17 days. In contrast, size structure characterised by a lack of large and dominance of small organisms recovered after 43 days in populations with strong competition. Size structure recovered twice faster in populations with reduced competition. We explain this as follows: due to toxicant induced mortality, food availability and consequently birth rate increased and populations were dominated by small individuals. In populations without predation, these cohorts grew and eventually exerted high intraspecific competition that (i) stopped further growth of juveniles and (ii) increased mortality of adults. These demographic processes were mainly responsible for the prolonged recovery of size structure. In contrast, for populations with predation, the regular harvest of individuals reduced competition. Juveniles developed continuously, allowing a fast recovery of size structure in these dynamic populations. In risk assessment the duration for populations to recover from (toxicant) stress, is crucial for the determination of ecological acceptable effects. We conclude that competition needs to be considered in order to understand and predict recovery of size

  5. Malondialdehyde epitopes as mediators of sterile inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Clara J; Binder, Christoph J

    2017-04-01

    Enhanced lipid peroxidation occurs during oxidative stress and results in the generation of lipid peroxidation end products such as malondialdehyde (MDA), which can attach to autologous biomolecules, thereby generating neo-self epitopes capable of inducing potentially undesired biological responses. Therefore, the immune system has developed mechanisms to protect from MDA epitopes by binding and neutralizing them through both cellular and soluble effectors. Here, we briefly discuss innate immune responses targeting MDA epitopes and their pro-inflammatory properties, followed by a review of physiological carriers of MDA epitopes that are relevant in homeostasis and disease. Then we discuss in detail the evidence for cellular responses towards MDA epitopes mainly in lung, liver and the circulation as well as signal transduction mechanisms and receptors implicated in the response to MDA epitopes. Last, we hypothesize on the role of MDA epitopes as mediators of inflammation in diseases and speculate on their contribution to disease pathogenesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid modification and lipid peroxidation products in innate immunity and inflammation edited by Christoph J. Binder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Epitope discovery with phylogenetic hidden Markov models.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lacerda, Miguel

    2010-05-01

    Existing methods for the prediction of immunologically active T-cell epitopes are based on the amino acid sequence or structure of pathogen proteins. Additional information regarding the locations of epitopes may be acquired by considering the evolution of viruses in hosts with different immune backgrounds. In particular, immune-dependent evolutionary patterns at sites within or near T-cell epitopes can be used to enhance epitope identification. We have developed a mutation-selection model of T-cell epitope evolution that allows the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype of the host to influence the evolutionary process. This is one of the first examples of the incorporation of environmental parameters into a phylogenetic model and has many other potential applications where the selection pressures exerted on an organism can be related directly to environmental factors. We combine this novel evolutionary model with a hidden Markov model to identify contiguous amino acid positions that appear to evolve under immune pressure in the presence of specific host immune alleles and that therefore represent potential epitopes. This phylogenetic hidden Markov model provides a rigorous probabilistic framework that can be combined with sequence or structural information to improve epitope prediction. As a demonstration, we apply the model to a data set of HIV-1 protein-coding sequences and host HLA genotypes.

  7. Intra-specific diversity of Serratia marcescens in Anopheles mosquito midgut defines Plasmodium transmission capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Hironori; Okado, Kiyoshi; Guelbeogo, Wamdaogo M.; Badolo, Athanase; Aonuma, Hiroka; Nelson, Bryce; Fukumoto, Shinya; Xuan, Xuenan; Sagnon, N'Fale; Kanuka, Hirotaka

    2013-01-01

    A critical stage in malaria transmission occurs in the Anopheles mosquito midgut, when the malaria parasite, Plasmodium, ingested with blood, first makes contact with the gut epithelial surface. To understand the response mechanisms within the midgut environment, including those influenced by resident microbiota against Plasmodium, we focus on a midgut bacteria species' intra-specific variation that confers diversity to the mosquito's competency for malaria transmission. Serratia marcescens isolated from either laboratory-reared mosquitoes or wild populations in Burkina Faso shows great phenotypic variation in its cellular and structural features. Importantly, this variation is directly correlated with its ability to inhibit Plasmodium development within the mosquito midgut. Furthermore, this anti-Plasmodium function conferred by Serratia marcescens requires increased expression of the flagellum biosynthetic pathway that is modulated by the motility master regulatory operon, flhDC. These findings point to new strategies for controlling malaria through genetic manipulation of midgut bacteria within the mosquito. PMID:23571408

  8. Intraspecific functional diversity of common species enhances community stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Connor M; McKinney, Shawn T; Loftin, Cynthia S

    2017-03-01

    Common species are fundamental to the structure and function of their communities and may enhance community stability through intraspecific functional diversity (iFD). We measured among-habitat and within-habitat iFD (i.e., among- and within-plant community types) of two common small mammal species using stable isotopes and functional trait dendrograms, determined whether iFD was related to short-term population stability and small mammal community stability, and tested whether spatially explicit trait filters helped explain observed patterns of iFD. Southern red-backed voles ( Myodes gapperi ) had greater iFD than deer mice ( Peromyscus maniculatus ), both among habitats, and within the plant community in which they were most abundant (their "primary habitat"). Peromyscus maniculatus populations across habitats differed significantly between years and declined 78% in deciduous forests, their primary habitat, as did the overall deciduous forest small mammal community. Myodes gapperi populations were stable across habitats and within coniferous forest, their primary habitat, as was the coniferous forest small mammal community. Generalized linear models representing internal trait filters (e.g., competition), which increase within-habitat type iFD, best explained variation in M. gapperi diet, while models representing internal filters and external filters (e.g., climate), which suppress within-habitat iFD, best explained P. maniculatus diet. This supports the finding that M. gapperi had higher iFD than P. maniculatus and is consistent with the theory that internal trait filters are associated with higher iFD than external filters. Common species with high iFD can impart a stabilizing influence on their communities, information that can be important for conserving biodiversity under environmental change.

  9. Intraspecific maternal competition induces summer diapause in insect parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougeron, Kévin; Hraoui, George; Le Lann, Cécile; van Baaren, Joan; Brodeur, Jacques

    2017-06-15

    Organisms often live in unpredictable environments and have to adopt life history strategies that optimize their fitness under these conditions. According to bet-hedging theory, individuals can reduce variation in fitness outcomes by investing in different strategies at the same time. For arthropods, facultative summer diapause enables survival during dry and hot periods of the year, and can be triggered by a decrease in resource abundance. However, the effect of resource depletion on diapause induction has never been disentangled from the effect of the perception of the presence of competitors. Using two solitary parasitoid species of cereal aphids as a model system, Aphidius avenae (Haliday) and Aphidius rhopalosiphi (De Stefani-Perez) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), we tested whether (i) low absolute host density and/or (ii) high levels of parasitoid females' competition lead to maternal-induced summer diapause in parasitoid offspring. Under summer-like climatic conditions, emerging parasitoid females were (i) reared alone and exposed to different host densities (from 5 to 130 aphids), or (ii) reared together with competing females (from 2 to 20 females) and then exposed individually to 50 aphids. For both parasitoid species, low aphid densities did not induce summer diapause. However, the incidence of summer diapause increased up to a maximum of 11% with increasing levels of competition experienced by female parasitoids. More than 60% of the females produced both diapausing and nondiapausing offspring after being kept at the two highest competition densities. Such a "spreading-the-risk" strategy has likely evolved to optimize parasitoid fitness by preventing the following generation from exposure to low populations of suitable hosts and high mortality from superparasitism. These results provide the first experimental evidence of direct maternal competition-induced diapause in insects, and may change the way we apprehend the evolution of arthropod seasonal ecology

  10. Intraspecific variability and systematics in South American Syrotrigoniinae (Trigoniida, Bivalvia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarría, Javier; Damborenea, Susana E.; Manceñido, Miguel O.

    2015-04-01

    The systematics of the genus Syrotrigonia is revised in the light of the intraspecific variability of a large sample of Syrotrigonia sigeli from the Valanginian from Neuquén Basin, Argentina. The genus can be recognized by the presence of concentric or subconcentric costae surrounding the umbo, later on developing an inflection and finally resulting in a set of anterior horizontal to commarginal costae and another set of posterior sub-vertical costae. The anterior part of the area bears transverse, usually anteriorly concave, costae which direct towards the umbo on the escutcheon; initially they are continuous with those on the flank, but later on they usually alternate. General shell shape, the presence of an antecarinal sulcus, the junction pattern between both sets of costae and the number of horizontal costae relative to vertical costae are variable among species, while costae width or density and the development of horizontal vs. commarginal costae may vary highly within species. The presence of commarginal rugae developed on the whole surface of the shell is interpreted as a result of environmental perturbations. A brief biogeographical interpretation of the family Buchotrigoniidae is also outlined. Syrotrigonia probably originated in North America in the Tithonian, being widespread in the Pacific coast of South America by Early Cretaceous times; at least six (probably seven) South American species could be recognized. By Aptian times the taxon reached the Tethyan realm, its last record being Aptian or Albian in age. The frequent presence of different species in marginal marine deposits suggests a euryhaline lineage adapted to salinity variations, this may also be the cause of the frequent presence of commarginal rugae. Considering the high variability displayed in the analyzed material, large samples are needed to characterize new species within the group.

  11. Intraspecific functional diversity of common species enhances community stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Connor M.; McKinney, Shawn T.; Loftin, Cynthia S.

    2017-01-01

    Common species are fundamental to the structure and function of their communities and may enhance community stability through intraspecific functional diversity (iFD). We measured among-habitat and within-habitat iFD (i.e., among- and within-plant community types) of two common small mammal species using stable isotopes and functional trait dendrograms, determined whether iFD was related to short-term population stability and small mammal community stability, and tested whether spatially explicit trait filters helped explain observed patterns of iFD. Southern red-backed voles (Myodes gapperi) had greater iFD than deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), both among habitats, and within the plant community in which they were most abundant (their “primary habitat”). Peromyscus maniculatus populations across habitats differed significantly between years and declined 78% in deciduous forests, their primary habitat, as did the overall deciduous forest small mammal community. Myodes gapperi populations were stable across habitats and within coniferous forest, their primary habitat, as was the coniferous forest small mammal community. Generalized linear models representing internal trait filters (e.g., competition), which increase within-habitat type iFD, best explained variation in M. gapperidiet, while models representing internal filters and external filters (e.g., climate), which suppress within-habitat iFD, best explained P. maniculatus diet. This supports the finding that M. gapperi had higher iFD than P. maniculatus and is consistent with the theory that internal trait filters are associated with higher iFD than external filters. Common species with high iFD can impart a stabilizing influence on their communities, information that can be important for conserving biodiversity under environmental change.

  12. Viral O-GalNAc peptide epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, Sigvard; Blixt, Klas Ola; Bergström, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    meningitis patients, CSF antibodies are focussed to only one single glycoform peptide of a major viral glycoprotein. Thus, dependent on the viral disease, the serological response may be variable or constant with respect to the number of targeted peptide glycoforms. Mapping of these epitopes relies......Viral envelope glycoproteins are major targets for antibodies that bind to and inactivate viral particles. The capacity of a viral vaccine to induce virus-neutralizing antibodies is often used as a marker for vaccine efficacy. Yet the number of known neutralization target epitopes is restricted...... owing to various viral escape mechanisms. We expand the range of possible viral glycoprotein targets, by presenting a previously unknown type of viral glycoprotein epitope based on a short peptide stretch modified with small O-linked glycans. Besides being immunologically active, these epitopes have...

  13. Intraspecific relationship within the genus convolvulus l. inferred by rbcl gene using different phylogenetic approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kausar, S.; Qamarunnisa, S.

    2016-01-01

    A molecular systematics analysis was conducted using sequence data of chloroplast rbcL gene for the genus Convolvulus L., by distance and character based phylogenetic methods. Fifteen representative members from genus Convolvulus L., were included as in group whereas two members from a sister family Solanaceae were taken as out group to root the tree. Intraspecific relationships within Convolvulus were inferred by distance matrix, maximum parsimony and bayesian analysis. Transition/transversion ratio was also calculated and it was revealed that in the investigated Convolvulus species, transitional changes were more prevalent in rbcL gene. The nature of rbcL gene in the present study was observed to be conserved, as it does not show major variations between examined species. Distance matrix represented the minimal genetic variations between some species (C. glomeratus and C. pyrrhotrichus), thus exhibiting them as close relatives. The result of parsimonious and bayesian analysis revealed almost similar clades however maximum parsimony based tree was unable to establish relationship between some Convolvulus species. The bayesian inference method was found to be the method of choice for establishing intraspecific associations between Convolvulus species using rbcL data as it clearly defined the connections supported by posterior probability values. (author)

  14. Ecological opportunities and intraspecific competition alter trophic niche specialization in an opportunistic stream predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Charlotte; Boiche, Anatole; Lecerf, Antoine; Cucherousset, Julien

    2014-09-01

    Many generalist populations are composed of specialized individuals that use a narrow part of the population's niche. Ecological theories predict that individual specialization and population trophic niche are determined by biotic interactions and resource diversity emerging from environmental variations (i.e. ecological opportunities). However, due to the paucity of empirical and experimental demonstrations, the genuine importance of each of these drivers in determining trophic niche attributes is not fully appreciated. The present study aimed at determining the population level and individual responses of brown trout (Salmo trutta) to variations in ecological opportunities (terrestrial prey inputs) and autochthonous prey communities among 10 stream reaches along a riparian condition gradient using individual longitudinal monitoring and stable isotope analyses. Our results suggested that trophic niche diversity varied along the environmental gradient, while individual trophic specialization was indirectly driven by ecological opportunities through strengthened intraspecific competition. Individual diet was repeatable over the study period, and the growth rate of juvenile brown trout increased with their specialization for aquatic predatory invertebrates. Our findings highlight the dual influences of intraspecific competition and ecological opportunities on individual trophic specialization and population trophic niche. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2014 British Ecological Society.

  15. Specialist-generalist model of body temperature regulation can be applied at the intraspecific level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylska, Anna S; Boratyński, Jan S; Wojciechowski, Michał S; Jefimow, Małgorzata

    2017-07-01

    According to theoretical predictions, endothermic homeotherms can be classified as either thermal specialists or thermal generalists. In high cost environments, thermal specialists are supposed to be more prone to using facultative heterothermy than generalists. We tested this hypothesis at the intraspecific level using male laboratory mice (C57BL/cmdb) fasted under different thermal conditions (20 and 10°C) and for different time periods (12-48 h). We predicted that variability of body temperature ( T b ) and time spent with T b below normothermy would increase with the increase of environmental demands (duration of fasting and cold). To verify the above prediction, we measured T b and energy expenditure of fasted mice. We did not record torpor bouts but we found that variations in T b and time spent in hypothermia increased with environmental demands. In response to fasting, mice also decreased their energy expenditure. Moreover, animals that showed more precise thermoregulation when fed had more variable T b when fasted. We postulate that the prediction of the thermoregulatory generalist-specialist trade-off can be applied at the intraspecific level, offering a valid tool for identifying mechanistic explanations of the differences in animal responses to variations in energy supply. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Automatic Generation of Validated Specific Epitope Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Carrasco Pro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of B and T cell responses is a valuable tool to study autoimmunity, allergies, immunity to pathogens, and host-pathogen interactions and assist in the design and evaluation of T cell vaccines and immunotherapies. In this context, it is desirable to elucidate a method to select validated reference sets of epitopes to allow detection of T and B cells. However, the ever-growing information contained in the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB and the differences in quality and subjects studied between epitope assays make this task complicated. In this study, we develop a novel method to automatically select reference epitope sets according to a categorization system employed by the IEDB. From the sets generated, three epitope sets (EBV, mycobacteria and dengue were experimentally validated by detection of T cell reactivity ex vivo from human donors. Furthermore, a web application that will potentially be implemented in the IEDB was created to allow users the capacity to generate customized epitope sets.

  17. Variação intraspecífica do lenho de Pseudopiptadenia contorta (DC. G.P. Lewis & M.P. Lima (Leguminosae - Mimosoideae de populações ocorrentes em dois remanescentes de Floresta Atlântica Intraspecific variation in wood anatomy of Pseudopiptadenia contorta (DC G.P. Lewis & M.P. Lima (Leguminosae -Mimosoidae in two Atlantic rain forest remnants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza R. da Costa Ribeiro

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho compara populações distintas de Pseudopiptadenia contorta (DC. G.P. Lewis & M.P. Lima ocorrentes em dois remanescentes de Floresta Atlântica no Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Foram amostradas árvores de diâmetro semelhante retas e sem defeitos aparentes. Os resultados obtidos comprovam estatisticamente a ocorrência de variação intraspecífica na estrutura anatômica da madeira. Os caracteres qualitativos mantiveram-se constantes, enquanto os quantitativos variaram, sendo os significativos, de acordo com o teste t de Student, a freqüencia, comprimento e diâmetro dos elementos vasos, o comprimento e espessura da parede das fibras, a freqüência e largura dos raios. A análise dos componentes principais, utilizando características anatômicas quantitativas ordenou as duas populações separadamente. O eixo I responde por 33% da variância total principalmente pela relação positiva do diâmetro do elemento de vaso, enquanto o eixo II responde por 20% da variância total, principalmente pelo comprimento das fibras.This study compares distinct populations of Pseudopiptadenia contorta (DC G.P. Lewis & M.P. Lima occurring in two remnants of Atlantic rain forest in Rio de Janeiro state. Trees with similar diameters and with no apparent defects were selected. The results confirm intraspecific variation in wood anatomy. Qualitative features do not change, while according to the Student t test quantitative features showed significant differences in vessel-element frequency, width, and length, fiber length and wall thickness, and ray frequency and width. Principal component analysis showed two separate populations. Factor 1 explains 33% of the total variance, mainly due to the positive relationship of vessel-element tangential diameter; factor 2 explains 20% of the total variance, mainly due to fiber length.

  18. Intraspecific competition reveals conditional fitness effects of single gene polymorphism at the Arabidopsis root growth regulator BRX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Chikako; Bernasconi, Giorgina; Hardtke, Christian S

    2008-01-01

    Intraspecific genetic variation for morphological traits is observed in many organisms. In Arabidopsis thaliana, alleles responsible for intraspecific morphological variation are increasingly being identified. However, the fitness consequences remain unclear in most cases. Here, the fitness effects of alleles of the BRX gene are investigated. A brx loss-of-function allele, which was found in a natural accession, results in a highly branched but poorly elongated root system. Comparison between the control accession Sav-0 and an introgression of brx into this background (brxS) indicated that, surprisingly, brx loss of function did not negatively affect fitness in pure stands. However, in mixed, well-watered stands brxS performance and reproductive output decreased significantly, as the proportion of Sav-0 neighbors increased. Additional comparisons between brxS and a brxS line that was complemented by a BRX transgene confirmed a direct effect of the loss-of-function allele on plant performance, as indicated by restored competitive ability of the transgenic genotype. Further, because plant height was very similar across genotypes and because the experimental setup largely excluded shading effects, the impaired competitiveness of the brx loss-of-function genotype likely reflects below-ground competition. In summary, these data reveal conditional fitness effects of a single gene polymorphism in response to intraspecific competition in Arabidopsis.

  19. Sampling intraspecific variability in leaf functional traits: Practical suggestions to maximize collected information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzellis, Francesco; Palandrani, Chiara; Savi, Tadeja; Alberti, Roberto; Nardini, Andrea; Bacaro, Giovanni

    2017-12-01

    The choice of the best sampling strategy to capture mean values of functional traits for a species/population, while maintaining information about traits' variability and minimizing the sampling size and effort, is an open issue in functional trait ecology. Intraspecific variability (ITV) of functional traits strongly influences sampling size and effort. However, while adequate information is available about intraspecific variability between individuals (ITV BI ) and among populations (ITV POP ), relatively few studies have analyzed intraspecific variability within individuals (ITV WI ). Here, we provide an analysis of ITV WI of two foliar traits, namely specific leaf area (SLA) and osmotic potential (π), in a population of Quercus ilex L. We assessed the baseline ITV WI level of variation between the two traits and provided the minimum and optimal sampling size in order to take into account ITV WI , comparing sampling optimization outputs with those previously proposed in the literature. Different factors accounted for different amount of variance of the two traits. SLA variance was mostly spread within individuals (43.4% of the total variance), while π variance was mainly spread between individuals (43.2%). Strategies that did not account for all the canopy strata produced mean values not representative of the sampled population. The minimum size to adequately capture the studied functional traits corresponded to 5 leaves taken randomly from 5 individuals, while the most accurate and feasible sampling size was 4 leaves taken randomly from 10 individuals. We demonstrate that the spatial structure of the canopy could significantly affect traits variability. Moreover, different strategies for different traits could be implemented during sampling surveys. We partially confirm sampling sizes previously proposed in the recent literature and encourage future analysis involving different traits.

  20. HLA Epitopes: The Targets of Monoclonal and Alloantibodies Defined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim El-Awar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitization to human leukocyte antigens (HLA in organ transplant patients causes graft rejection, according to the humoral theory of transplantation. Sensitization is almost ubiquitous as anti-HLA antibodies are found in almost all sera of transplant recipients. Advances in testing assays and amino acid sequencing of HLA along with computer software contributed further to the understanding of antibody-antigen reactivity. It is commonly understood that antibodies bind to HLA antigens. With current knowledge of epitopes, it is more accurate to describe that antibodies bind to their target epitopes on the surface of HLA molecular chains. Epitopes are present on a single HLA (private epitope or shared by multiple antigens (public epitope. The phenomenon of cross-reactivity in HLA testing, often explained as cross-reactive groups (CREGs of antigens with antibody, can be clearly explained now by public epitopes. Since 2006, we defined and reported 194 HLA class I unique epitopes, including 56 cryptic epitopes on dissociated HLA class I heavy chains, 83 HLA class II epitopes, 60 epitopes on HLA-DRB1, 15 epitopes on HLA-DQB1, 3 epitopes on HLA-DQA1, 5 epitopes on HLA-DPB1, and 7 MICA epitopes. In this paper, we provide a summary of our findings.

  1. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected to...... immunogenic structures inaccessible on the envelope oligomer. The limited ability of recombinant gp120 vaccines to induce neutralizing antibodies against primary isolates may thus not exclusively reflect genetic variation.......An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...

  2. From phenotypic to molecular polymorphisms involved in naturally occurring variation for plant development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso-Blanco, C.; Mendez-Vigo, B.; Koornneef, M.

    2005-01-01

    An enormous amount of naturally occurring genetic variation affecting development is found within wild and domesticated plant species. This diversity is presumably involved in plant adaptation to different natural environments or in human preferences. In addition, such intraspecific variation

  3. Testing the niche variation hypothesis with a measure of body condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Individual variation and fitness are cornerstones of evolution by natural selection. The niche variation hypothesis (NVH) posits that when interspecific competition is relaxed, intraspecific competition should drive niche expansion by selection favoring use of novel resources. Po...

  4. Intraspecific hybridization studies in three wild strains of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were no significant (P > 0.05) differences in the weight of the three parental strains and the six intraspecific hybrids at hatching and six weeks of rearing indoor aquaria and outdoor concrete tanks. The best survival value of 96% was recorded for the Jos strain followed by that of the hybrid cross involving female Jos ...

  5. Hypothalamically Induced Intraspecific Aggressive Behaviour in the Rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolhaas, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) of rats on intraspecific aggressive behaviour were studied. In order to investigate the specificity of the stimulation effects, each experimental animal was stimulated in a number of different social situations. Stimulation of

  6. Intraspecific prey choice of bushmeat hunters outside the Serengeti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study we investigated intraspecific prey choice of illegal bushmeat hunters outside the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. During the study 151 animals belonging to 12 species were reported killed. The majority, 76%, of prey species were migratory herbivores. Night hunting with dogs was the most common hunting ...

  7. BepiPred-2.0: improving sequence-based B-cell epitope prediction using conformational epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Martin Closter; Peters, Bjoern; Nielsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    for predicting B-cell epitopes from antigen sequences. BepiPred-2.0 is based on a random forest algorithm trained on epitopes annotated from antibody-antigen protein structures. This new method was found to outperform other available tools for sequence-based epitope prediction both on epitope data derived from......Antibodies have become an indispensable tool for many biotechnological and clinical applications. They bind their molecular target (antigen) by recognizing a portion of its structure (epitope) in a highly specific manner. The ability to predict epitopes from antigen sequences alone is a complex...... and immunology community....

  8. Experimental Evidence for an Eco-Evolutionary Coupling between Local Adaptation and Intraspecific Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepielski, Adam M; Nemirov, Alex; Cattivera, Matthew; Nickerson, Avery

    2016-04-01

    Determining how adaptive evolution can be coupled to ecological processes is key for developing a more integrative understanding of the demographic factors that regulate populations. Intraspecific competition is an especially important ecological process because it generates negative density dependence in demographic rates. Although ecological factors are most often investigated to determine the strength of density dependence, evolutionary processes such as local adaptation could also feed back to shape variation in the strength of density dependence among populations. Using an experimental approach with damselflies, a predaceous aquatic insect, we find evidence that both density-dependent intraspecific competition and local adaptation can reduce per capita growth rates. In some cases, the effects of local adaptation on reducing per capita growth rates exceeded the ecological competitive effects of a doubling of density. However, we also found that these ecological and evolutionary properties of populations are coupled, and we offer two interpretations of the causes underlying this pattern: (1) the strength of density-dependent competition depends on the extent of local adaptation, or (2) the extent of local adaptation is shaped by the strength of density-dependent competition. Regardless of the underlying causal pathway, these results show how eco-evolutionary dynamics can affect a key demographic process regulating populations.

  9. Light induced intraspecific variability in response to thermal stress in the hard coral Stylophora pistillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen Tilstra

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent research suggests that prior exposure of several months to elevated irradiance induces enhanced thermal tolerance in scleractinian corals. While this tolerance has been reported at the species level, individual coral colonies may react differently due to individual variability in thermal tolerance. As thermal anomalies are predicted to become common in the upcoming future, intraspecific variation may be key to the survival of coral populations. In order to study light-history based thermal stress responses on individual colonies, we developed a preliminary microcosm experiment where three randomly chosen, aquacultured colonies of the model coral Stylophora pistillata were exposed to two irradiance treatments (200 and 400 μmol photons m−2 s−1 for 31 days, followed by artificially induced heat stress (∼33.4 °C. We found different responses to occur at both the intraspecific and the intracolonial levels, as indicated by either equal, less severe, delayed, and/or even non-necrotic responses of corals previously exposed to the irradiance of 400 compared to 200 μmol photons m−2 s−1. In addition, all individual colonies revealed light-enhanced calcification. Finally, elevated irradiance resulted in a lower chlorophyll a concentration in one colony compared to the control treatment, and the same colony displayed more rapid bleaching compared to the other ones. Taken together, this study highlights the potential importance of intra-individual variability in physiological responses of scleractinian corals and provides recommendations for improving methodological designs for future studies.

  10. Solid-phase microextraction-based cuticular hydrocarbon profiling for intraspecific delimitation in Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Chen

    Full Text Available Insect cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs play critical roles in reducing water loss and chemical communication. Species-specific CHC profiles have been used increasingly as an excellent character for species classification. However, considerably less is known about their potential for population delimitation within species. The aims of this study were to develop a solid-phase microextraction (SPME-based CHC collection method and to investigate whether CHC profiles could serve as potential chemotaxonomic tools for intraspecific delimitation in Acyrthosiphon pisum. Optimization of fibers for SPME sampling revealed that 7 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS demonstrated the most efficient adsorption of CHCs among five different tested fibers. SPME sampling showed good reproducibility with repeated collections of CHCs from a single aphid. Validation of SPME was performed by comparing CHC profiles with those from conventional hexane extractions. The two methods showed no qualitative differences in CHCs, although SPME appeared to extract relatively fewer short-chained CHCs. While CHC profiles of a given population differed among developmental stages, wing dimorphism types, and host plants, wingless adult aphids showed very low variance in relative proportions of individual CHC components. Reproducibility of CHC profiles was explored further to classify wingless adult morphs of A. pisum from five different geographic regions that showed no variation in mitochondrial COI gene sequences. Our results demonstrate that CHC profiles are useful in intraspecific delimitation in the field of insect chemotaxonomy.

  11. Solid-phase microextraction-based cuticular hydrocarbon profiling for intraspecific delimitation in Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Bai, Yu; Fan, Yong-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Insect cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) play critical roles in reducing water loss and chemical communication. Species-specific CHC profiles have been used increasingly as an excellent character for species classification. However, considerably less is known about their potential for population delimitation within species. The aims of this study were to develop a solid-phase microextraction (SPME)-based CHC collection method and to investigate whether CHC profiles could serve as potential chemotaxonomic tools for intraspecific delimitation in Acyrthosiphon pisum. Optimization of fibers for SPME sampling revealed that 7 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) demonstrated the most efficient adsorption of CHCs among five different tested fibers. SPME sampling showed good reproducibility with repeated collections of CHCs from a single aphid. Validation of SPME was performed by comparing CHC profiles with those from conventional hexane extractions. The two methods showed no qualitative differences in CHCs, although SPME appeared to extract relatively fewer short-chained CHCs. While CHC profiles of a given population differed among developmental stages, wing dimorphism types, and host plants, wingless adult aphids showed very low variance in relative proportions of individual CHC components. Reproducibility of CHC profiles was explored further to classify wingless adult morphs of A. pisum from five different geographic regions that showed no variation in mitochondrial COI gene sequences. Our results demonstrate that CHC profiles are useful in intraspecific delimitation in the field of insect chemotaxonomy. PMID:28859151

  12. Consumer interaction strength may limit the diversifying effect of intraspecific competition: a test in alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew W; Post, David M

    2013-06-01

    Intraspecific competition is considered a principal driver of dietary variation, but empirical studies provide mixed support for this mechanism. Here we link comparative and experimental work testing the effects of competition and resource availability on the dietary variation of the alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus). The alewife, a consumer with extreme effects on its resources, was specifically utilized to additionally test the idea that strong interactions between a consumer and its resources can diminish the diversifying effect of competition. First, we compared the short- and long-term diet measures of wild populations across a wide range of densities. Second, in a pair of large-scale field mesocosm experiments, we explored the influence of competition and interaction strength on alewife dietary variation. Results from a whole-lake comparison and field experiments indicated that increasing competition was negatively correlated with population dietary variation. Further, altering the strength of the interaction between the alewife and its prey via prey supplementation eliminated this negative relationship. Collectively, our results suggest that competitive interactions may not drive dietary diversification in the alewife and, potentially, in other highly effective consumers. Our results also indicate that further consideration of the strength of species interactions (and the consumer traits that underlie them) would improve our understanding of the link between intraspecific competition and variation.

  13. Intraspecific relationships among wood density, leaf structural traits and environment in four co-occurring species of Nothofagus in New Zealand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Richardson

    Full Text Available Plant functional traits capture important variation in plant strategy and function. Recent literature has revealed that within-species variation in traits is greater than previously supposed. However, we still have a poor understanding of how intraspecific variation is coordinated among different traits, and how it is driven by environment. We quantified intraspecific variation in wood density and five leaf traits underpinning the leaf economics spectrum (leaf dry matter content, leaf mass per unit area, size, thickness and density within and among four widespread Nothofagus tree species in southern New Zealand. We tested whether intraspecific relationships between wood density and leaf traits followed widely reported interspecific relationships, and whether variation in these traits was coordinated through shared responses to environmental factors. Sample sites varied widely in environmental variables, including soil fertility (25-900 mg kg(-1 total P, precipitation (668-4875 mm yr(-1, temperature (5.2-12.4 °C mean annual temperature and latitude (41-46 °S. Leaf traits were strongly correlated with one another within species, but not with wood density. There was some evidence for a positive relationship between wood density and leaf tissue density and dry matter content, but no evidence that leaf mass or leaf size were correlated with wood density; this highlights that leaf mass per unit area cannot be used as a surrogate for component leaf traits such as tissue density. Trait variation was predicted by environmental factors, but not consistently among different traits; e.g., only leaf thickness and leaf density responded to the same environmental cues as wood density. We conclude that although intraspecific variation in wood density and leaf traits is strongly driven by environmental factors, these responses are not strongly coordinated among functional traits even across co-occurring, closely-related plant species.

  14. DRREP: deep ridge regressed epitope predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Gene; Zhi, Degui; Zhang, Shaojie

    2017-10-03

    The ability to predict epitopes plays an enormous role in vaccine development in terms of our ability to zero in on where to do a more thorough in-vivo analysis of the protein in question. Though for the past decade there have been numerous advancements and improvements in epitope prediction, on average the best benchmark prediction accuracies are still only around 60%. New machine learning algorithms have arisen within the domain of deep learning, text mining, and convolutional networks. This paper presents a novel analytically trained and string kernel using deep neural network, which is tailored for continuous epitope prediction, called: Deep Ridge Regressed Epitope Predictor (DRREP). DRREP was tested on long protein sequences from the following datasets: SARS, Pellequer, HIV, AntiJen, and SEQ194. DRREP was compared to numerous state of the art epitope predictors, including the most recently published predictors called LBtope and DMNLBE. Using area under ROC curve (AUC), DRREP achieved a performance improvement over the best performing predictors on SARS (13.7%), HIV (8.9%), Pellequer (1.5%), and SEQ194 (3.1%), with its performance being matched only on the AntiJen dataset, by the LBtope predictor, where both DRREP and LBtope achieved an AUC of 0.702. DRREP is an analytically trained deep neural network, thus capable of learning in a single step through regression. By combining the features of deep learning, string kernels, and convolutional networks, the system is able to perform residue-by-residue prediction of continues epitopes with higher accuracy than the current state of the art predictors.

  15. Identification of a novel linear B-cell epitope using a monoclonal antibody against the carboxy terminus of the canine distemper virus nucleoprotein and sequence analysis of the identified epitope in different CDV isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Li; Cao, Zhigang; Tong, Mingwei; Cheng, Yuening; Yang, Yong; Li, Shuang; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Sun, Yaru; Zhang, Miao; Cheng, Shipeng

    2017-09-29

    The Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant and highly immunogenic protein in canine distemper virus (CDV), playing an important role in CDV viral replication and assembly. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, named C8, was produced against the NP protein C terminal (amino acids 401-523). A linear N protein epitope was identified by subjecting a series of partially overlapping synthesized peptides to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis.The results indicated that 444 GDKYPIHFNDER 455 was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb C8. Sequence alignments demonstrated that this linear epitope is less conserved among three CDV genotypes. We next analyzed the level of conservation of the defined epitope in19 Chinese CDV clinical isolates, and it has one site variation in amino acid among these CDV isolations. 2 isolates have the amino acid mutations F451L, while one has P448Ssubstitution.Phylogenetic analysis showed the two isolates with F451Lsubstitution had a closer relationship in a virulent strain ZJ-7, so the epitope may be a significant tag associated with virus virulence. This collection of mAb along with defined linear epitope may provide useful reagents for investigations of NP protein function and the development of CDV specific diagnostics.

  16. Localization of immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes of Vibrio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-05-01

    May 1, 2012 ... Outer membrane protein U (OmpU), an adhesion protein of Vibrio mimicus, is a good antigen, but its epitopes are still unclear. In order to locate the epitopes of OmpU protein, epitope prediction was performed using the amino acid sequence of OmpU protein of V. mimicus HX4 strain that was isolated.

  17. Prediction of antigenic epitopes and MHC binders of neurotoxin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... learning techniques such as Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). This method has been trained and tested on non-redundant dataset of T cell epitopes and non-epitopes that includes 1137 experimen- tally proven MHC class 1 restricted T cell epitopes. (Bhasin and Raghava ...

  18. Localization of immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes of Vibrio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outer membrane protein U (OmpU), an adhesion protein of Vibrio mimicus, is a good antigen, but its epitopes are still unclear. In order to locate the epitopes of OmpU protein, epitope prediction was performed using the amino acid sequence of OmpU protein of V. mimicus HX4 strain that was isolated from the diseased ...

  19. Recombinant and epitope-based vaccines on the road to the market and implications for vaccine design and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún, Patricio; Kobe, Bostjan

    2016-03-03

    Novel vaccination approaches based on rational design of B- and T-cell epitopes - epitope-based vaccines - are making progress in the clinical trial pipeline. The epitope-focused recombinant protein-based malaria vaccine (termed RTS,S) is a next-generation approach that successfully reached phase-III trials, and will potentially become the first commercial vaccine against a human parasitic disease. Progress made on methods such as recombinant DNA technology, advanced cell-culture techniques, immunoinformatics and rational design of immunogens are driving the development of these novel concepts. Synthetic recombinant proteins comprising both B- and T-cell epitopes can be efficiently produced through modern biotechnology and bioprocessing methods, and can enable the induction of large repertoires of immune specificities. In particular, the inclusion of appropriate CD4+ T-cell epitopes is increasingly considered a key vaccine component to elicit robust immune responses, as suggested by results coming from HIV-1 clinical trials. In silico strategies for vaccine design are under active development to address genetic variation in pathogens and several broadly protective "universal" influenza and HIV-1 vaccines are currently at different stages of clinical trials. Other methods focus on improving population coverage in target populations by rationally considering specificity and prevalence of the HLA proteins, though a proof-of-concept in humans has not been demonstrated yet. Overall, we expect immunoinformatics and bioprocessing methods to become a central part of the next-generation epitope-based vaccine development and production process.

  20. Molecular and functional analysis of a conserved CTL epitope in HIV-1 p24 recognized from a long-term nonprogressor: constraints on immune escape associated with targeting a sequence essential for viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R; Leschonsky, B; Harrer, E; Paulus, C; Weber, C; Walker, B D; Buchbinder, S; Wolf, H; Kalden, J R; Harrer, T

    1999-03-15

    It has been hypothesized that sequence variation within CTL epitopes leading to immune escape plays a role in the progression of HIV-1 infection. Only very limited data exist that address the influence of biologic characteristics of CTL epitopes on the emergence of immune escape variants and the efficiency of suppression HIV-1 by CTL. In this report, we studied the effects of HIV-1 CTL epitope sequence variation on HIV-1 replication. The highly conserved HLA-B14-restricted CTL epitope DRFYKTLRAE in HIV-1 p24 was examined, which had been defined as the immunodominant CTL epitope in a long-term nonprogressing individual. We generated a set of viral mutants on an HX10 background differing by a single conservative or nonconservative amino acid substitution at each of the P1 to P9 amino acid residues of the epitope. All of the nonconservative amino acid substitutions abolished viral infectivity and only 5 of 10 conservative changes yielded replication-competent virus. Recognition of these epitope sequence variants by CTL was tested using synthetic peptides. All mutations that abrogated CTL recognition strongly impaired viral replication, and all replication-competent viral variants were recognized by CTL, although some variants with a lower efficiency. Our data indicate that this CTL epitope is located within a viral sequence essential for viral replication. Targeting CTL epitopes within functionally important regions of the HIV-1 genome could limit the chance of immune evasion.

  1. Indirect detection of an epitope-specific response to HIV-1 gp120 immunization in human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Shmelkov

    Full Text Available A specific response of human serum neutralizing antibodies (nAb to a conformational epitope as a result of vaccination of human subjects with the surface envelope glycoprotein (gp120 of HIV-1 has not previously been documented. Here, we used computational analysis to assess the epitope-specific responses of human subjects, which were immunized with recombinant gp120 immunogens in the VAX003 and VAX004 clinical trials. Our computational methodology--a variation of sieve analysis--compares the occurrence of specific nAb targeted conformational 3D epitopes on viruses from infected individuals who received vaccination to the occurrence of matched epitopes in the viruses infecting placebo subjects. We specifically studied seven crystallographically defined nAb targeted conformational epitopes in the V3 loop, an immunogenic region of gp120. Of the six epitopes present in the immunogens and targeted by known monoclonal neutralizing antibodies, only the one targeted by the anti-V3 nAb 2219 exhibited a significant reduction in occurrence in vaccinated subjects compared to the placebo group. This difference occurred only in the VAX003 Thailand cohort. No difference was seen between vaccinated and placebo groups for the occurrence of an epitope that was not present in the immunogen. Thus, it can be theorized that a specific 2219-like human neutralizing antibody immune response to AIDSVAX immunization occurred in the VAX003 cohort, and that this response protected subjects from a narrow subset of HIV-1 viruses circulating in Thailand in the 1990s and bearing the conformational epitope targeted by the neutralizing antibody 2219.

  2. Intraspecific competition in Tridacna crocea, a burrowing bivalve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamner, W M

    1978-01-01

    Intraspecific competition for space and light occurred when Tridacna crocea burrowed into coralline substratum of boulders on leeward coral reefs in the central Great Barrier Reef near Townsville, Australia. Intensity of competition was linearly related to clam density. Above about 200 clams/m 2 , all clams physically contacted one another and all shells sustained damage. Mortality in isolated populations due to intraspecific competition was estimated at 40%. Principles of intraspecific competition in plants were tested for applicability to T. crocea populations. Juvenile mortality due to competitive stress was density dependent. Aggregated distributions of one year old clams changed to random or regular distribution of adults. Normal size-frequency distribution for juveniles became skewed for older groups. A bimodal size-frequency distribution of the population was related to selective mortality in 1-3 year old clams. Adult mortality due to crowding was less severe but significant. Growth rates were inhibited by competition. Deformations in morphology resulted from crowding. Intraspecific competition for space and light by adults inhibited recruitment of young. Animal adaptations to reduce mortality under crowded conditions were also important. Larvae aggregated on settling and oriented with posterior ends pointed away from nearest neighbors. Positional alignment within the substratum was selectively advantageous. Burrowing posteriorly was preferential, but anterior and sideways burrowing as well as twisting within the burrow were also observed. Movement within substratum served to reduce local damage to the shell. Proteinaceous deposits secreted through perforations in the shell reduced subsequent damage. T. crocea populations exhibited many animal adaptations that reduced mortality during the first years of life, but as cohorts matured, plant-like patterns of competitive interaction became more significant.

  3. Intraspecific Competition and Population Dynamics of Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, C. A.; Charret, I. C.; Lima, R. R.

    2012-04-01

    We report computational simulations for the evolution of the population of the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The results suggest that controlling the mosquito population, on the basis of intraspecific competition at the larval stage, can be an efficient mechanism for controlling the spread of the epidemic. The results also show the presence of a kind of genetic evolution in vector population, which results mainly in increasing the average lifespan of individuals in adulthood.

  4. Intraspecific hybridization, developmental stability and fitness in Drosophila mercatorum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, DH; Pertoldi, C; Scali, V

    2002-01-01

    One of the possible effects of intraspecific hybridization is outbreeding depression, due to a breakdown of coadapted gene complexes, which can lead to reduced fitness and decreased developmental stability in hybrids. Alternatively, increased fitness and increased developmental stability in hybrids...... (hybrid vigour) may be a result of hybridization, probably due to increased heterozygosity. Developmental stability is assumed to be correlated with fitness and is commonly measured as fluctuating asymmetry or phenotypic variance. Drosophila mercatorum is capable of reproducing sexually, but also...

  5. Dominant epitopes and allergic cross-reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ipsen, H

    2000-01-01

    The symptoms characteristic of allergic hypersensitivity are caused by the release of mediators, i.e., histamine, from effector cells such as basophils and mast cells. Allergens with more than one B cell epitope cross-link IgE Abs bound to high affinity FcepsilonRI receptors on mast cell surfaces...

  6. Egg size matching by an intraspecific brood parasite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Patrick R.; Sedinger, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Avian brood parasitism provides an ideal system with which to understand animal recognition and its affect on fitness. This phenomenon of laying eggs in the nests of other individuals has classically been framed from the perspective of interspecific brood parasitism and host recognition of parasitic eggs. Few examples exist of strategies adopted by intraspecific brood parasites to maximize success of parasitic eggs. Intraspecific brood parasitism within precocial birds can be a risky strategy in that hatch synchrony is essential to reproductive success. Given that egg size is positively correlated with incubation time, parasitic birds would benefit by recognizing and selecting hosts with a similar egg size. Intraspecific brood parasitism is an alternative reproductive strategy in black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans), a colonial nesting goose with precocial young. Based on a randomization test, parasitic eggs in this study differed less in size from eggs in their host's nests than did random eggs placed in random nests. Parasitic eggs were remarkably similar in size to hosts’ eggs, differing by parasitic brant match the egg size of hosts in our study supports our hypothesis that brant match egg size of hosts, thereby maximizing hatching success of their parasitic eggs.

  7. Intraspecific competition, not predation, drives lizard tail loss on islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itescu, Yuval; Schwarz, Rachel; Meiri, Shai; Pafilis, Panayiotis

    2017-01-01

    Tail autotomy is mainly considered an antipredator mechanism. Theory suggests that predation pressure relaxes on islands, subsequently reducing autotomy rates. Intraspecific aggression, which may also cause tail loss, probably intensifies on islands due to the higher abundance. We studied whether tail autotomy is mostly affected by predation pressure or by intraspecific competition. We further studied whether predator abundance or predator richness is more important in this context. To test our predictions, we examined multiple populations of two gecko species: Kotschy's gecko (Mediodactylus kotschyi; mainland and 41 islands) and the Mediterranean house gecko (Hemidactylus turcicus; mainland and 17 islands), and estimated their abundance together with five indices of predation. In both species, autotomy rates are higher on islands and decline with most predation indices, in contrast with common wisdom, and increase with gecko abundance. In M. kotschyi, tail-loss rates are higher on predator and viper-free islands, but increase with viper abundance. We suggest that autotomy is not simply, or maybe even mainly, an antipredatory mechanism. Rather, such defence mechanisms are a response to complex direct and indirect biotic interactions and perhaps, in the case of tail autotomy in insular populations, chiefly to intraspecific aggression. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2016 British Ecological Society.

  8. Improved method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Jens Erik Pontoppidan; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2006-01-01

    Background B-cell epitopes are the sites of molecules that are recognized by antibodies of the immune system. Knowledge of B-cell epitopes may be used in the design of vaccines and diagnostics tests. It is therefore of interest to develop improved methods for predicting B-cell epitopes. In this paper, we describe an improved method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes. Results In order to do this, three data sets of linear B-cell epitope annotated proteins were constructed. A data set was co...

  9. Network analysis reveals contrasting effects of intraspecific competition on individual vs. population diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Márcio S; Guimarães, Paulo R; Svanbäck, Richard; Pinheiro, Aluisio; Guimarães, Paulo; Dos Reis, Sérgio F; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2008-07-01

    Optimal foraging theory predicts that individuals should become more opportunistic when intraspecific competition is high and preferred resources are scarce. This density-dependent diet shift should result in increased diet breadth for individuals as they add previously unused prey to their repertoire. As a result, the niche breadth of the population as a whole should increase. In a recent study, R. Svanbäck and D. I. Bolnick confirmed that intraspecific competition led to increased population diet breadth in threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). However, individual diet breadth did not expand as resource levels declined. Here, we present a new method based on complex network theory that moves beyond a simple measure of diet breadth, and we use the method to reexamine the stickleback experiment. This method reveals that the population as a whole added new types of prey as stickleback density was increased. However, whereas foraging theory predicts that niche expansion is achieved by individuals accepting new prey in addition to previously preferred prey, we found that a subset of individuals ceased to use their previously preferred prey, even though other members of their population continued to specialize on the original prey types. As a result, populations were subdivided into groups of ecologically similar individuals, with diet variation among groups reflecting phenotype-dependent changes in foraging behavior as prey density declined. These results are consistent with foraging theory if we assume that quantitative trait variation among consumers affects prey preferences, and if cognitive constraints prevent individuals from continuing to use their formerly preferred prey while adding new prey.

  10. Antigenic variation of the dominant gp41 epitope in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, J. M.; Teeuwsen, V. J.; Boucher, C. A.; Vahlne, A.; Barin, F.; Tjong-A-Hung, S.; Dekker, J.; Parkhede, U.; de Wolf, F.; Goudsmit, J.

    1993-01-01

    To determine the value of (combinations of) synthetic peptides representing immunodominant sites on HIV-1/HIV-2 transmembrane proteins for the detection and discrimination between HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection in various populations. Two 24-mer synthetic peptides derived from immunodominant sites on the

  11. A broadly applicable approach to T cell epitope identification: application to improving tumor associated epitopes and identifying epitopes in complex pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Michael D; Abdul-Alim, C Siddiq; Maben, Zachary J; Skrombolas, Denise; Hensley, Lucinda L; Kawula, Thomas H; Dziejman, Michelle; Lord, Edith M; Frelinger, Jeffrey A; Frelinger, John G

    2011-10-28

    Epitopes are a hallmark of the antigen specific immune response. The identification and characterization of epitopes is essential for modern immunologic studies, from investigating cellular responses against tumors to understanding host/pathogen interactions especially in the case of bacteria with intracellular residence. Here, we have utilized a novel approach to identify T cell epitopes exploiting the exquisite ability of particulate antigens, in the form of beads, to deliver exogenous antigen to both MHC class I and class II pathways for presentation to T cell hybridomas. In the current study, we coupled this functional assay with two distinct protein expression libraries to develop a methodology for the characterization of T cell epitopes. One set of expression libraries containing single amino acid substitutions in a defined epitope sequence was interrogated to identify epitopes with enhanced T cell stimulation for a MHC class I epitope. The second expression library is comprised of the majority of open reading frames from the intracellular pathogen and potential biowarfare agent, Francisella tularensis. By automating aspects of this technology, we have been able to functionally screen and identify novel T cell epitopes within F. tularensis. We have also expanded upon these studies to generate a novel expression vector that enables immunization of recombinant protein into mice, which has been utilized to facilitate T cell epitope discovery for proteins that are critically linked to Francisella pathogenicity. This methodology should be applicable to a variety of systems and other pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Epitope mapping of Brugia malayi ALT-2 and the development of a multi-epitope vaccine for lymphatic filariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhumathi, J; Prince, P R; Rao, D N; Karande, A A; Reddy, M V R; Kaliraj, P

    2017-01-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis is a neglected tropical disease, causing permanent and long-term disability with severe immunopathology. Abundant larval transcript (ALT) plays a crucial role in parasite establishment in the host, due to its multi-faceted ability in host immune regulation. Although ALT protein is a key filarial target, its exact function is yet to be explored. Here, we report epitope mapping and a structural model of Brugia malayi ALT-2, leading to development of a multi-epitope vaccine. Structural analysis revealed that ALT represents unique parasitic defence proteins belonging to a toxin family that carries a 'knottin' fold. ALT-2 has been a favourite vaccine antigen and was protective in filarial models. Due to the immunological significance of ALT-2, we mapped B-cell epitopes systematically and identified two epitope clusters, 1-30 and 89-128. To explore the prophylactic potential of epitope clusters, a recombinant multi-epitopic gene comprising the epitopic domains was engineered and the protective efficacy of recombinant ALT epitope protein (AEP) was tested in the permissive model, Mastomys coucha. AEP elicited potent antibody responses with predominant IgG1 isotype and conferred significantly high protection (74.59%) compared to ALT-2 (61.95%). This proved that these epitopic domains are responsible for the protective efficacy of ALT-2 and engineering protective epitopes as a multi-epitope protein may be a novel vaccine strategy for complex parasitic infections.

  13. Niche separation in Varecia variegata rubra and Eulemur fulvus albifrons: II. Intraspecific patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasey, Natalie

    2002-06-01

    Based on a year-long field study in northeastern Madagascar, I summarize annual patterns of niche use (food patch size, diet, forest height, and forest site) in two sympatric lemurs, Varecia variegata rubra and Eulemur fulvus albifrons. Furthermore, I examine intraspecific patterns of niche use according to sex, season, and reproductive stage in these two lemurs that differ in terms of energetic investment in reproduction. Lemurs as a group provide a special opportunity to test hypotheses concerning sex differences in niche use. Due to their body size monomorphism and seasonal, synchronous pattern of breeding, it is possible to directly evaluate whether sex differences in diet reflect high energetic investment in reproduction by females. Results confirm the hypothesis that intraspecific variation in niche use (e.g., sex differences, seasonal differences) would be more pronounced in V. v. rubra than in E. f. albifrons, due in large measure to the former's relatively high energetic investment in reproduction: 1a) Dietary sex differences in V. v. rubra are most pronounced during costly reproductive stages and involve acquisition of low-fiber, high-protein plant foods. Females of both species consume more seasonally available low-fiber protein (young leaves, flowers) relative to conspecific males during the hot dry season, but only in V. v. rubra females is this pattern also evident during gestation and lactation. 1b) The diets of female V. v. rubra and female E. f. albifrons are more similar to each other than are the diets of conspecific males and females in the case of V. v. rubra. This is not uniformly the case for female E. f. albifrons. This finding confirms a hypothesis put forward in Vasey ([2000] Am J Phys Anthropol 112:411-431) that energetic requirements of reproductive females drive niche separation more than do the energetic requirements of males. 1c) Both species synchronize most or all of lactation with seasonal food abundance and diversity. E. f

  14. Phylogeny and intraspecific variability of holoparasitic Orobanche (Orobanchaceae) inferred from plastid rbcL sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manen, Jean-François; Habashi, Christine; Jeanmonod, Daniel; Park, Jeong-Mi; Schneeweiss, Gerald M

    2004-11-01

    The rbcL sequences of 106 specimens representing 28 species of the four recognized sections of Orobanche were analyzed and compared. Most sequences represent pseudogenes with premature stop codons. This study confirms that the American lineage (sects. Gymnocaulis and Myzorrhiza) contains potentially functional rbcL-copies with intact open reading frames and low rates of non-synonymous substitutions. For the first time, this is also shown for a member of the Eurasian lineage, O. coerulescens of sect. Orobanche, while all other investigated species of sects. Orobanche and Trionychon contain pseudogenes with distorted reading frames and significantly higher rates of non-synonymous substitutions. Phylogenetic analyses of the rbcL sequences give equivocal results concerning the monophyly of Orobanche, and the American lineage might be more closely related to Boschniakia and Cistanche than to the other sections of Orobanche. Additionally, species of sect. Trionychon phylogenetically nest in sect. Orobanche. This is in concordance with results from other plastid markers (rps2 and matK), but in disagreement with other molecular (nuclear ITS), morphological, and karyological data. This might indicate that the ancestor of sect. Trionychon has captured the plastid genome, or parts of it, of a member of sect. Orobanche. Apart from the phylogenetically problematic position of sect. Trionychon, the phylogenetic relationships within sect. Orobanche are similar to those inferred from nuclear ITS data and are close to the traditional groupings traditionally recognized based on morphology. The intraspecific variation of rbcL is low and is neither correlated with intraspecific morphological variability nor with host range. Ancestral character reconstruction using parsimony suggests that the ancestor of O. sect. Orobanche had a narrow host range.

  15. Intraspecific hybridization, developmental stability and fitness in Drosophila mercatorum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, DH; Pertoldi, C; Scali, V

    2002-01-01

    (hybrid vigour) may be a result of hybridization, probably due to increased heterozygosity. Developmental stability is assumed to be correlated with fitness and is commonly measured as fluctuating asymmetry or phenotypic variance. Drosophila mercatorum is capable of reproducing sexually, but also....... Intraspecific hybridization between a parthenogenetic and a sexually reproducing strain of Drosophila mercatorum resulted in significant changes in fecundity as well as fluctuating asymmetry and phenotypic variance for the number of sternopleural bristles and in the length of two wing traits over three...

  16. Tat protein vaccination of cynomolgus macaques influences SHIV-89.6P cy243 epitope variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Barbara; Genovese, Domenico; Argentini, Claudio; Maggiorella, Maria Teresa; Sernicola, Leonardo; Buttò, Stefano; Titti, Fausto; Borsetti, Alessandra; Ensoli, Barbara

    2008-02-01

    In a previous study we showed that vaccination with the native Tat protein controlled virus replication in five out of seven monkeys against challenge with the simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-89.6P cy243 and that this protection correlated with T helper (Th)-1 response and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity. To address the evolution of the SHIV-89.6P cy243 both in control and vaccinated infected monkeys, the sequence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 Tat protein and the C2-V3 Env region of the proviral-DNA-derived clones were analyzed in both control and vaccinated but unprotected animals. We also performed analysis of the T cell epitope using a predictive epitope model taking into consideration the phylogeny of the variants. Our results suggest that even though the viral evolution observed in both groups of monkeys was directed toward variations in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I epitopes, in the control animals it was associated with mutational escape of such epitopes. On the contrary, it is possible that viral evolution in the vaccinated monkeys was linked to mutations that arose to keep high the viral fitness. In the vaccinated animals the reduction of epitope variability, obtained prompting the immune system by vaccination and inducing a specific immunological response against virus, was able to reduce the emergence of escape mutants. Thus the intervention of host's selective forces in driving CTL escape mutants and in modulating viral fitness appeared to be different in the two groups of monkeys. We concluded that in the vaccinated unprotected animals, vaccination with the Tat protein induced a broad antiviral response, as demonstrated by the reduced ability to develop escape mutants, which is known to help in the control of viral replication.

  17. Proof of principle for epitope-focused vaccine design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Bruno E.; Bates, John T.; Loomis, Rebecca J.; Baneyx, Gretchen; Carrico, Chris; Jardine, Joseph G.; Rupert, Peter; Correnti, Colin; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Vittal, Vinayak; Connell, Mary J.; Stevens, Eric; Schroeter, Alexandria; Chen, Man; MacPherson, Skye; Serra, Andreia M.; Adachi, Yumiko; Holmes, Margaret A.; Li, Yuxing; Klevit, Rachel E.; Graham, Barney S.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Crowe, James E.; Johnson, Philip R.; Schief, William R.

    2014-03-01

    Vaccines prevent infectious disease largely by inducing protective neutralizing antibodies against vulnerable epitopes. Several major pathogens have resisted traditional vaccine development, although vulnerable epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies have been identified for several such cases. Hence, new vaccine design methods to induce epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies are needed. Here we show, with a neutralization epitope from respiratory syncytial virus, that computational protein design can generate small, thermally and conformationally stable protein scaffolds that accurately mimic the viral epitope structure and induce potent neutralizing antibodies. These scaffolds represent promising leads for the research and development of a human respiratory syncytial virus vaccine needed to protect infants, young children and the elderly. More generally, the results provide proof of principle for epitope-focused and scaffold-based vaccine design, and encourage the evaluation and further development of these strategies for a variety of other vaccine targets, including antigenically highly variable pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus and influenza.

  18. CTL escape mediated by proteasomal destruction of an HIV-1 cryptic epitope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Cardinaud

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTLs play a critical role in controlling viral infections. HIV-infected individuals develop CTL responses against epitopes derived from viral proteins, but also against cryptic epitopes encoded by viral alternative reading frames (ARF. We studied here the mechanisms of HIV-1 escape from CTLs targeting one such cryptic epitope, Q9VF, encoded by an HIVgag ARF and presented by HLA-B*07. Using PBMCs of HIV-infected patients, we first cloned and sequenced proviral DNA encoding for Q9VF. We identified several polymorphisms with a minority of proviruses encoding at position 5 an aspartic acid (Q9VF/5D and a majority encoding an asparagine (Q9VF/5N. We compared the prevalence of each variant in PBMCs of HLA-B*07+ and HLA-B*07- patients. Proviruses encoding Q9VF/5D were significantly less represented in HLA-B*07+ than in HLA-B*07- patients, suggesting that Q9FV/5D encoding viruses might be under selective pressure in HLA-B*07+ individuals. We thus analyzed ex vivo CTL responses directed against Q9VF/5D and Q9VF/5N. Around 16% of HLA-B*07+ patients exhibited CTL responses targeting Q9VF epitopes. The frequency and the magnitude of CTL responses induced with Q9VF/5D or Q9VF/5N peptides were almost equal indicating a possible cross-reactivity of the same CTLs on the two peptides. We then dissected the cellular mechanisms involved in the presentation of Q9VF variants. As expected, cells infected with HIV strains encoding for Q9VF/5D were recognized by Q9VF/5D-specific CTLs. In contrast, Q9VF/5N-encoding strains were neither recognized by Q9VF/5N- nor by Q9VF/5D-specific CTLs. Using in vitro proteasomal digestions and MS/MS analysis, we demonstrate that the 5N variation introduces a strong proteasomal cleavage site within the epitope, leading to a dramatic reduction of Q9VF epitope production. Our results strongly suggest that HIV-1 escapes CTL surveillance by introducing mutations leading to HIV ARF-epitope destruction by proteasomes.

  19. Circulating Memory CD4+ T Cells Target Conserved Epitopes of Rhinovirus Capsid Proteins and Respond Rapidly to Experimental Infection in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, Lyndsey M; Mai, Duy T; Kwok, William W; Heymann, Peter W; Pomés, Anna; Woodfolk, Judith A

    2016-10-15

    Rhinovirus (RV) is a major cause of common cold and an important trigger of acute episodes of chronic lung diseases. Antigenic variation across the numerous RV strains results in frequent infections and a lack of durable cross-protection. Because the nature of human CD4 + T cells that target RV is largely unknown, T cell epitopes of RV capsid proteins were analyzed, and cognate T cells were characterized in healthy subjects and those infected by intranasal challenge. Peptide epitopes of the RV-A16 capsid proteins VP1 and VP2 were identified by peptide/MHC class II tetramer-guided epitope mapping, validated by direct ex vivo enumeration, and interrogated using a variety of in silico methods. Among noninfected subjects, those circulating RV-A16-specific CD4 + T cells detected at the highest frequencies targeted 10 unique epitopes that bound to diverse HLA-DR molecules. T cell epitopes localized to conserved molecular regions of biological significance to the virus were enriched for HLA class I and II binding motifs, and constituted both species-specific (RV-A) and pan-species (RV-A, -B, and -C) varieties. Circulating epitope-specific T cells comprised both memory Th1 and T follicular helper cells, and were rapidly expanded and activated after intranasal challenge with RV-A16. Cross-reactivity was evidenced by identification of a common *0401-restricted epitope for RV-A16 and RV-A39 by tetramer-guided epitope mapping and the ability for RV-A16-specific Th1 cells to proliferate in response to their RV-A39 peptide counterpart. The preferential persistence of high-frequency RV-specific memory Th1 cells that recognize a limited set of conserved epitopes likely arises from iterative priming by previous exposures to different RV strains. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Immune Responses against Conserved and Variable Viral Epitopes

    OpenAIRE

    Bittner, B.; Wahl, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    We extend well-known mathematical models of viral infection to examine the response of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to both conserved and variable viral epitopes. Because most viruses are subject to error-prone reproduction, CTL recognition may be faced with highly variable epitopes, while other CTL epitopes may remain conserved across viral strains. In this paper we examine the steady state conditions for a simple model of viral-immune system dynamics in which the viral strain can be limite...

  1. Epitope specificity is critical for high and moderate avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with control of viral load and clinical disease in horses with equine infectious anemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealey, Robert H; Zhang, Baoshan; Leib, Steven R; Littke, Matt H; McGuire, Travis C

    2003-09-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus that causes persistent infections in horses. We hypothesized that high-avidity CTL specific for nonvariable epitopes might be associated with low viral load and minimal disease in EIAV-infected horses. To test this hypothesis, memory CTL (CTLm) responses were analyzed in two infected horses with high plasma viral loads and recurrent disease (progressors), and in two infected horses with low-to-undetectable viral loads and mild disease (nonprogressors). High-avidity CTLm in one progressor recognized an envelope gp90 epitope, and the data documented for the first time in EIAV that viral variation led to CTL escape. Each of the nonprogressors had high-to-moderate avidity CTLm directed against epitopes within Rev, including the nuclear export and nuclear localization domains. These results suggested that the epitope specificity of high- and moderate-avidity CTLm was an important determinant for disease outcome in the EIAV-infected horses examined.

  2. Epitope specificity is critical for high and moderate avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with control of viral load and clinical disease in horses with equine infectious anemia virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mealey, Robert H.; Zhang Baoshan; Leib, Steven R.; Littke, Matt H.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2003-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus that causes persistent infections in horses. We hypothesized that high-avidity CTL specific for nonvariable epitopes might be associated with low viral load and minimal disease in EIAV-infected horses. To test this hypothesis, memory CTL (CTLm) responses were analyzed in two infected horses with high plasma viral loads and recurrent disease (progressors), and in two infected horses with low-to-undetectable viral loads and mild disease (nonprogressors). High-avidity CTLm in one progressor recognized an envelope gp90 epitope, and the data documented for the first time in EIAV that viral variation led to CTL escape. Each of the nonprogressors had high-to-moderate avidity CTLm directed against epitopes within Rev, including the nuclear export and nuclear localization domains. These results suggested that the epitope specificity of high- and moderate-avidity CTLm was an important determinant for disease outcome in the EIAV-infected horses examined

  3. Epitope specificity is critical for high and moderate avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with control of viral load and clinical disease in horses with equine infectious anemia virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealey, Robert H.; Zhang, Baoshan; Leib, Steven R.; Littke, Matt H.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2012-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus that causes persistent infections in horses. We hypothesized that high-avidity CTL specific for nonvariable epitopes might be associated with low viral load and minimal disease in EIAV-infected horses. To test this hypothesis, memory CTL (CTLm) responses were analyzed in two infected horses with high plasma viral loads and recurrent disease (progressors), and in two infected horses with low-to-undetectable viral loads and mild disease (nonprogressors). High-avidity CTLm in one progressor recognized an envelope gp90 epitope, and the data documented for the first time in EIAV that viral variation led to CTL escape. Each of the nonprogressors had high-to-moderate avidity CTLm directed against epitopes within Rev, including the nuclear export and nuclear localization domains. These results suggested that the epitope specificity of high- and moderate-avidity CTLm was an important determinant for disease outcome in the EIAV-infected horses examined. PMID:12954220

  4. Sequence-based in silico analysis of well studied Hepatitis C Virus epitopes and their variants in other genotypes (particularly genotype 5a against South African human leukocyte antigen backgrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabdial-Sing Nishi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Host genetics influence the outcome of HCV disease. HCV is also highly mutable and escapes host immunity. HCV genotypes are geographically distributed and HCV subtypes have been shown to have distinct repertoires of HLA-restricted viral epitopes which explains the lack of cross protection across genotypes observed in some studies. Despite this, immune databases and putative epitope vaccines concentrate almost exclusively on HCV genotype 1 class I-epitopes restricted by the HLA-A*02 allele. While both genotype and allele predominate in developed countries, we hypothesise that HCV variation and population genetics will affect the efficacy of proposed epitope vaccines in South Africa. This in silico study investigates HCV viral variability within well-studied epitopes identified in genotype 1 and uses algorithms to predict the immunogenicity of their variants from other less studied genotypes and thus rate the most promising vaccine candidates for the South African population. Six class I- and seven class II- restricted epitope sequences within the core, NS3, NS4B and NS5B regions were compared across the six HCV genotypes using local genotype 5a sequence data together with global data. Common HLA alleles in the South African population are A30:01, A02:01, B58:02, B07:02; DRB1*13:01 and DRB1*03:01. Epitope binding to 13 class I- and 8 class –II alleles were described using web-based prediction servers, Immune Epitope Database, (IEDB and Propred. Online population coverage tools were used to assess vaccine efficacy. Results Despite the homogeneity of genotype 1 and genotype 5 over the epitopes, there was limited promiscuity to local HLA-alleles.Host differences will make a putative vaccine less effective in South Africa. Of the 6 well-characterized class I- epitopes, only 2 class I- epitopes were promiscuous and 3 of the 7 class-II epitopes were better conserved and promiscuous. By fine tuning the putative vaccine using an

  5. Intraspecific larval competition in the olive fruit fly (Diptera: tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrack, Hannah Joy; Fornell, Angela M; Connell, Joseph H; O'Connell, Neil V; Phillips, Phil A; Vossen, Paul M; Zalom, Frank G

    2009-10-01

    Olive fruit flies [Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin)] occur at densities in California that can result in intraspecific larval competition within infested fruit. Larval B. oleae densities tracked in the field at six location were found to be highly variable and related to the proportion of fruit infested and adult densities. Egg and larval distribution within the field was generally aggregated early in the season and trended toward random and uniform as the season progressed. To determine whether B. oleae experienced fitness consequences at a range of larval densities observed in the field, olive fruits were infested with one, two, four, and six eggs, and larval and pupal developmental time, pupal weight, and pupal yield were compared. At the highest egg density, all measures of performance were negatively impacted, resulting in fewer and lighter pupae that took longer to pupate and emerge as adults, and even when only two larvae was present per olive, resulting pupae were significantly smaller. Density did not impact the sex ratio of the resulting flies or survive to adults. As field surveys showed, larval densities ranged from 1 to 11 B. oleae per fruit at some sites, and our results suggest that, at high densities, B. oleae do experience competition for larval resources. The impact of intraspecific larval competition North American in field populations of B. oleae is unknown, but the potential for competition is present.

  6. Effects of temperature on intraspecific competition in ectotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekare, Priyanga; Coutinho, Renato M

    2014-09-01

    Understanding how temperature influences population regulation through its effects on intraspecific competition is an important question for which there is currently little theory or data. Here we develop a theoretical framework for elucidating temperature effects on competition that integrates mechanistic descriptions of life-history trait responses to temperature with population models that realistically capture the variable developmental delays that characterize ectotherm life cycles. This framework yields testable comparative predictions about how intraspecific competition affects reproduction, development, and mortality under alternative hypotheses about the temperature dependence of competition. The key finding is that ectotherm population regulation in seasonal environments depends crucially on the mechanisms by which temperature affects competition. When competition is strongest at temperatures optimal for reproduction, effects of temperature and competition act antagonistically, leading to more complex dynamics than when competition is temperature independent. When the strength of competition increases with temperature past the optimal temperature for reproduction, effects of temperature and competition act synergistically, leading to dynamics qualitatively similar to those when competition is temperature independent. Paradoxically, antagonistic effects yield a higher population floor despite greater fluctuations. These findings have important implications for predicting effects of climate warming on population regulation. Synergistic effects of temperature and competition can predispose populations to stochastic extinction by lowering minimum population sizes, while antagonistic effects can increase the potential for population outbreaks through greater fluctuations in abundance.

  7. Conservation and diversity of influenza A H1N1 HLA-restricted T cell epitope candidates for epitope-based vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Thiamjoo Tan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune-related evolution of influenza viruses is exceedingly complex and current vaccines against influenza must be reformulated for each influenza season because of the high degree of antigenic drift among circulating influenza strains. Delay in vaccine production is a serious problem in responding to a pandemic situation, such as that of the current H1N1 strain. Immune escape is generally attributed to reduced antibody recognition of the viral hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins whose rate of mutation is much greater than that of the internal non-structural proteins. As a possible alternative, vaccines directed at T cell epitope domains of internal influenza proteins, that are less susceptible to antigenic variation, have been investigated.HLA transgenic mouse strains expressing HLA class I A*0201, A*2402, and B*0702, and class II DRB1*1501, DRB1*0301 and DRB1*0401 were immunized with 196 influenza H1N1 peptides that contained residues of highly conserved proteome sequences of the human H1N1, H3N2, H1N2, H5N1, and avian influenza A strains. Fifty-four (54 peptides that elicited 63 HLA-restricted peptide-specific T cell epitope responses were identified by IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. The 54 peptides were compared to the 2007-2009 human H1N1 sequences for selection of sequences in the design of a new candidate H1N1 vaccine, specifically targeted to highly-conserved HLA-restricted T cell epitopes.Seventeen (17 T cell epitopes in PB1, PB2, and M1 were selected as vaccine targets based on sequence conservation over the past 30 years, high functional avidity, non-identity to human peptides, clustered localization, and promiscuity to multiple HLA alleles. These candidate vaccine antigen sequences may be applicable to any avian or human influenza A virus.

  8. Artificial intelligence methods for predicting T-cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingdong; Sung, Myong-Hee; Simon, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Identifying epitopes that elicit a major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted T-cell response is critical for designing vaccines for infectious diseases and cancers. We have applied two artificial intelligence approaches to build models for predicting T-cell epitopes. We developed a support vector machine to predict T-cell epitopes for an MHC class I-restricted T-cell clone (TCC) using synthesized peptide data. For predicting T-cell epitopes for an MHC class II-restricted TCC, we built a shift model that integrated MHC-binding data and data from T-cell proliferation assay against a combinatorial library of peptide mixtures.

  9. Enhancing antibody patent protection using epitope mapping information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoxiang; Storz, Ulrich; Doranz, Benjamin J.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT As the $100B therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) market continues to grow, developers of therapeutic mAbs increasingly face the need to strengthen patent protection of their products and enforce their patents in courts. In view of changes in the patent law landscape, patent applications are strategically using information on the precise binding sites of their mAbs, i.e., the epitopes, to support patent novelty, non-obviousness, subject matter, and a tightened written description requirement for broad genus antibody claims. Epitope data can also allow freedom-to-operate for second-generation mAbs by differentiation from patented first-generation mAbs. Numerous high profile court cases, including Amgen v. Sanofi over rival mAbs that block PCSK9 activity, have been centered on epitope mapping claims, highlighting the importance of epitopes in determining broad mAb patent rights. Based on these cases, epitope mapping claims must describe a sufficiently large number of mAbs that share an epitope, and each epitope must be described at amino acid resolution. Here, we review current best practices for the use of epitope information to overcome the increasing challenges of patenting mAbs, and how the quality, conformation, and resolution of epitope residue data can influence the breadth and strength of mAb patents. PMID:29120697

  10. Enhancing antibody patent protection using epitope mapping information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoxiang; Storz, Ulrich; Doranz, Benjamin J

    As the $100B therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) market continues to grow, developers of therapeutic mAbs increasingly face the need to strengthen patent protection of their products and enforce their patents in courts. In view of changes in the patent law landscape, patent applications are strategically using information on the precise binding sites of their mAbs, i.e., the epitopes, to support patent novelty, non-obviousness, subject matter, and a tightened written description requirement for broad genus antibody claims. Epitope data can also allow freedom-to-operate for second-generation mAbs by differentiation from patented first-generation mAbs. Numerous high profile court cases, including Amgen v. Sanofi over rival mAbs that block PCSK9 activity, have been centered on epitope mapping claims, highlighting the importance of epitopes in determining broad mAb patent rights. Based on these cases, epitope mapping claims must describe a sufficiently large number of mAbs that share an epitope, and each epitope must be described at amino acid resolution. Here, we review current best practices for the use of epitope information to overcome the increasing challenges of patenting mAbs, and how the quality, conformation, and resolution of epitope residue data can influence the breadth and strength of mAb patents.

  11. Defining the immunogenicity and antigenicity of HLA epitopes is crucial for optimal epitope matching in clinical renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, C S M; Roelen, D L; Heidt, S; Claas, F H J

    2017-07-01

    Transplantation of an human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatched graft can lead to the development of donor-specific antibodies (DSA), which can result in antibody mediated rejection and graft loss as well as complicate repeat transplantation. These DSA are induced by foreign epitopes present on the mismatched HLA antigens of the donor. However, not all epitopes appear to be equally effective in their ability to induce DSA. Understanding the characteristics of HLA epitopes is crucial for optimal epitope matching in clinical transplantation. In this review, the latest insights on HLA epitopes are described with a special focus on the definition of immunogenicity and antigenicity of HLA epitopes. Furthermore, the use of this knowledge to prevent HLA antibody formation and to select the optimal donor for sensitised transplant candidates will be discussed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The molecular relationship between antigenic domains and epitopes on hCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Peter; Lapthorn, Adrian J

    2016-08-01

    Antigenic domains are defined to contain a limited number of neighboring epitopes recognized by antibodies (Abs) but their molecular relationship remains rather elusive. We thoroughly analyzed the antigenic surface of the important pregnancy and tumor marker human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a cystine knot (ck) growth factor, and set antigenic domains and epitopes in molecular relationships to each other. Antigenic domains on hCG, its free hCGα and hCGβ subunits are dependent on appropriate inherent molecular features such as molecular accessibility and protrusion indices that determine bulging structures accessible to Abs. The banana-shaped intact hCG comprises ∼7500Å(2) of antigenic surface with minimally five antigenic domains that encompass a continuum of overlapping non-linear composite epitopes, not taking into account the C-terminal peptide extension of hCGβ (hCGβCTP). Epitopes within an antigenic domain are defined by specific Abs, that bury nearly 1000Å(2) of surface accessible area on the antigen and recognize a few up to 15 amino acid (aa) residues, whereby between 2 and 5 of these provide the essential binding energy. Variability in Ab binding modes to the contact aa residues are responsible for the variation in affinity and intra- and inter-species specificity, e.g. cross-reactions with luteinizing hormone (LH). Each genetically distinct fragment antigen binding (Fab) defines its own epitope. Consequently, recognition of the same epitope by different Abs is only possible in cases of genetically identical sequences of its binding sites. Due to combinatorial V(D)J gene segment variability of heavy and light chains, Abs defining numerous epitopes within an antigenic domain can be generated by different individuals and species. Far more than hundred Abs against the immuno-dominant antigenic domains of either subunit at both ends of the hCG-molecule, the tips of peptide loops one and three (Ł1+3) protruding from the central ck, encompassing h

  13. Mechanisms of equine infectious anemia virus escape from neutralizing antibody responses define epitope specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponseller, Brett A; Clark, Sandra K; Friedrich, Rachel A

    2012-08-01

    Determining mechanisms of viral escape to particular epitopes recognized by virus-neutralizing antibody can facilitate characterization of host-neutralizing antibody responses as type- versus group-specific, and provides necessary information for vaccine development. Our study reveals that a single N-glycan located in the 5' region of the Wyoming wild-type equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) principal neutralizing domain (PND) accounts for the differences in neutralization phenotype observed between PND variants, while variations in charged amino acids within the PND do not appear to play a key role in viral escape. Site-directed mutagenesis and peptide mapping of a conserved epitope to neutralizing antibody in the 3' region of the PND showed rapid selective pressure for acquisition of a 5' PND N-glycan responsible for defining the specificity of the neutralizing-antibody response.

  14. Intraspecific competition drives increased resource use diversity within a natural population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanbäck, Richard; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2007-03-22

    Resource competition is thought to play a major role in driving evolutionary diversification. For instance, in ecological character displacement, coexisting species evolve to use different resources, reducing the effects of interspecific competition. It is thought that a similar diversifying effect might occur in response to competition among members of a single species. Individuals may mitigate the effects of intraspecific competition by switching to use alternative resources not used by conspecific competitors. This diversification is the driving force in some models of sympatric speciation, but has not been demonstrated in natural populations. Here, we present experimental evidence confirming that competition drives ecological diversification within natural populations. We manipulated population density of three-spine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in enclosures in a natural lake. Increased population density led to reduced prey availability, causing individuals to add alternative prey types to their diet. Since phenotypically different individuals added different alternative prey, diet variation among individuals increased relative to low-density control enclosures. Competition also increased the diet-morphology correlations, so that the frequency-dependent interactions were stronger in high competition. These results not only confirm that resource competition promotes niche variation within populations, but also show that this increased diversity can arise via behavioural plasticity alone, without the evolutionary changes commonly assumed by theory.

  15. Variable epitope library-based vaccines: shooting moving targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroza-Roldan, Cesar; Charles-Niño, Claudia; Saavedra, Rafael; Govezensky, Tzipe; Vaca, Luis; Avaniss-Aghajani, Eric; Gevorkian, Goar; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2009-12-01

    While the antigenic variability is the major obstacle for developing vaccines against antigenically variable pathogens (AVPs) and cancer, this issue is not addressed adequately in current vaccine efforts. We developed a novel variable epitope library (VEL)-based vaccine strategy using immunogens carrying a mixture of thousands of variants of a single epitope. In this proof-of-concept study, we used an immunodominant HIV-1-derived CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitope as a model antigen to construct immunogens in the form of plasmid DNA and recombinant M13 bacteriophages. We generated combinatorial libraries expressing epitope variants with random amino acid substitutions at 2-5 amino acid positions within the epitope. Mice immunized with these immunogens developed epitope-specific CD8+ IFN-gamma+ T-cell responses that recognized more than 50% of heavily mutated variants of wild-type epitope, as demonstrated in T-cell proliferation assays and FACS analysis. Strikingly, these potent and broad epitope-specific immune responses were long lasting: after 12 months of priming, epitope variants were recognized by CD8+ cells and effector memory T cells were induced. In addition, we showed, for the first time, the inhibition of T-cell responses at the molecular level by immune interference: the mice primed with wild-type epitope and 8 or 12 months later immunized with VELs, were not able to recognize variant epitopes efficiently. These data may give a mechanistic explanation for the failure of recent HIV vaccine trials as well as highlight specific hurdles in current molecular vaccine efforts targeting other important antigenically variable pathogens and diseases. These findings suggest that the VEL-based strategy for immunogen construction can be used as a reliable technological platform for the generation of vaccines against AVPs and cancer, and contribute to better understanding complex host-pathogen interactions.

  16. Catalase epitopes vaccine design for Helicobacter pylori: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-15

    Aug 15, 2011 ... Helicobacter pylori is necessary, because of high prevalence of the infection (25 to 90%). ... immunoinformatics tools would be valuable for developing new immuoprophylatic strategy against H. pylori infection. Key words: Helicobacter pylori, catalase, epitopes. ..... tuberculosis epitopes by HLA alleles.

  17. Immune epitope database analysis resource (IEDB-AR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Peng; Kim, Yohan

    2008-01-01

    We present a new release of the immune epitope database analysis resource (IEDB-AR, http://tools.immuneepitope.org), a repository of web-based tools for the prediction and analysis of immune epitopes. New functionalities have been added to most of the previously implemented tools, and a total...

  18. Confirmation of antibodies against L-tryptophan-like epitope in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Confirmation of antibodies against L-tryptophan-like epitope in human African trypanosomosis serological diagnostic. ... number of patients in Congo. A diagnostic test based on this synthetic epitope, especially in combination with other tests, might improve the HAT diagnostic test in field conditions. Key words: Tryptophan ...

  19. High epitope expression levels increase competition between T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almut Scherer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Both theoretical predictions and experimental findings suggest that T cell populations can compete with each other. There is some debate on whether T cells compete for aspecific stimuli, such as access to the surface on antigen-presenting cells (APCs or for specific stimuli, such as their cognate epitope ligand. We have developed an individual-based computer simulation model to study T cell competition. Our model shows that the expression level of foreign epitopes per APC determines whether T cell competition is mainly for specific or aspecific stimuli. Under low epitope expression, competition is mainly for the specific epitope stimuli, and, hence, different epitope-specific T cell populations coexist readily. However, if epitope expression levels are high, aspecific competition becomes more important. Such between-specificity competition can lead to competitive exclusion between different epitope-specific T cell populations. Our model allows us to delineate the circumstances that facilitate coexistence of T cells of different epitope specificity. Understanding mechanisms of T cell coexistence has important practical implications for immune therapies that require a broad immune response.

  20. Intraspecific functional and genetic diversity ofPetriella setifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertile, Giorgia; Panek, Jacek; Oszust, Karolina; Siczek, Anna; Frąc, Magdalena

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was an analysis of the intraspecific genetic and functional diversity of the new isolated fungal strains of P. setifera . This is the first report concerning the genetic and metabolic diversity of Petriella setifera strains isolated from industrial compost and the first description of a protocol for AFLP fingerprinting analysis optimised for these fungal species. The results showed a significant degree of variability among the isolates, which was demonstrated by the clearly subdivision of all the isolates into two clusters with 51% and 62% similarity, respectively. For the metabolic diversity, the BIOLOG system was used and this analysis revealed clearly different patterns of carbon substrates utilization between the isolates resulting in a clear separation of the five isolates into three clusters with 0%, 42% and 54% of similarity, respectively. These results suggest that genetic diversity does not always match the level of functional diversity, which may be useful in discovering the importance of this fungus to ecosystem functioning. The results indicated that P. setifera strains were able to degrade substrates produced in the degradation of hemicellulose (D-Arabinose, L-Arabinose, D-Glucuronic Acid, Xylitol, γ-Amino-Butyric Acid, D-Mannose, D-Xylose and L-Rhamnose), cellulose (α-D-Glucose and D-Cellobiose) and the synthesis of lignin (Quinic Acid) at a high level, showing their importance in ecosystem services as a decomposer of carbon compounds and as organisms, which make a significant contribution to carbon cycling in the ecosystem.The results showed for the first time that the use of molecular biology techniques (such as AFLP and BIOLOG analyses) may allow for the identification of intraspecific diversity of as yet poorly investigated fungal species with favourable consequences for our understanding their ecosystem function.

  1. Trichinella spiralis shares epitopes with human autoantigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Radovic

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Like other helminths, Trichinella spiralis has evolved strategies to allow it to survive in the host organism, including the expression of epitopes similar to those present in either expressed or hidden host antigens. To identify T. spiralis-derived antigens that are evolutionarily conserved in the parasite and its host and that could be responsible for its evasion of the host immune response, we examined the reactivity of six different types of autoantibodies to T. spiralis larvae from muscle. T. spiralis antigens that share epitopes with human autoantigens were identified by assessing the cross-reactivity of autoantibody-containing serum samples with T. spiralis antigens in the absence of specific anti-parasite antibodies. Of the 55 autoantibody-containing human serum samples that we analysed by immunohistological screening, 24 (43.6% recognised T. spiralis muscle larvae structures such as the subcuticular region, the genital primordium or the midgut. Using Western blots, we demonstrated that the same sera reacted with 24 protein components of T. spiralis muscle larvae excretory-secretory L1 antigens. We found that the human autoantibodies predominantly bound antigens belonging to the TSL1 group; more specifically, the autoantibody-containing sera reacted most frequently with the 53-kDa component. Thus, this protein is a good candidate for further studies of the mechanisms of T. spiralis-mediated immunomodulation.

  2. Dominant epitopes and allergic cross-reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ipsen, H

    2000-01-01

    leading to aggregation and subsequent mediator release. Thus, allergen-Ab complexes play a crucial role in the cascade leading to the allergic response. We here report the structure of a 1:1 complex between the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 and the Fab fragment from a murine monoclonal IgG1 Ab, BV16......, that has been solved to 2.9 A resolution by x-ray diffraction. The mAb is shown to inhibit the binding of allergic patients' IgE to Bet v 1, and the allergen-IgG complex may therefore serve as a model for the study of allergen-IgE interactions relevant in allergy. The size of the BV16 epitope is 931 A2...... as defined by the Bet v 1 Ab interaction surface. Molecular interactions predicted to occur in the interface are likewise in agreement with earlier observations on Ag-Ab complexes. The epitope is formed by amino acids that are conserved among major allergens from related species within the Fagales order...

  3. Recent advances in B-cell epitope prediction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Identification of epitopes that invoke strong responses from B-cells is one of the key steps in designing effective vaccines against pathogens. Because experimental determination of epitopes is expensive in terms of cost, time, and effort involved, there is an urgent need for computational methods for reliable identification of B-cell epitopes. Although several computational tools for predicting B-cell epitopes have become available in recent years, the predictive performance of existing tools remains far from ideal. We review recent advances in computational methods for B-cell epitope prediction, identify some gaps in the current state of the art, and outline some promising directions for improving the reliability of such methods. PMID:21067544

  4. Predicting linear B-cell epitopes using string kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Manzalawy, Yasser; Dobbs, Drena; Honavar, Vasant

    2008-01-01

    The identification and characterization of B-cell epitopes play an important role in vaccine design, immunodiagnostic tests, and antibody production. Therefore, computational tools for reliably predicting linear B-cell epitopes are highly desirable. We evaluated Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers trained utilizing five different kernel methods using fivefold cross-validation on a homology-reduced data set of 701 linear B-cell epitopes, extracted from Bcipep database, and 701 non-epitopes, randomly extracted from SwissProt sequences. Based on the results of our computational experiments, we propose BCPred, a novel method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes using the subsequence kernel. We show that the predictive performance of BCPred (AUC = 0.758) outperforms 11 SVM-based classifiers developed and evaluated in our experiments as well as our implementation of AAP (AUC = 0.7), a recently proposed method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes using amino acid pair antigenicity. Furthermore, we compared BCPred with AAP and ABCPred, a method that uses recurrent neural networks, using two data sets of unique B-cell epitopes that had been previously used to evaluate ABCPred. Analysis of the data sets used and the results of this comparison show that conclusions about the relative performance of different B-cell epitope prediction methods drawn on the basis of experiments using data sets of unique B-cell epitopes are likely to yield overly optimistic estimates of performance of evaluated methods. This argues for the use of carefully homology-reduced data sets in comparing B-cell epitope prediction methods to avoid misleading conclusions about how different methods compare to each other. Our homology-reduced data set and implementations of BCPred as well as the APP method are publicly available through our web-based server, BCPREDS, at: http://ailab.cs.iastate.edu/bcpreds/. PMID:18496882

  5. EPITOPE MAPPING OF SCLC-CLUSTER-2 MABS AND GENERATION OF ANTIBODIES DIRECTED AGAINST NEW EGP-2 EPITOPES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HELFRICH, W; KONING, PW; THE, TH; DELEIJ, L

    1994-01-01

    Western blot analysis proved that all cluster-2 MAbs recognize identical or overlapping disulfide-bond-dependent epitopes, indicating the presence of a disulfide-bond-stabilized EGP-2 domain carrying highly immunodominant non-linear epitopes. The apparent immunodominance of this domain makes it

  6. B Epitope Multiplicity and B/T Epitope Orientation Influence Immunogenicity of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Peptide Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Blanco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic peptides incorporating protective B- and T-cell epitopes are candidates for new safer foot-and-mouth disease (FMD vaccines. We have reported that dendrimeric peptides including four copies of a B-cell epitope (VP1 136 to 154 linked to a T-cell epitope (3A 21 to 35 of FMD virus (FMDV elicit potent B- and T-cell specific responses and confer protection to viral challenge, while juxtaposition of these epitopes in a linear peptide induces less efficient responses. To assess the relevance of B-cell epitope multivalency, dendrimers bearing two (B2T or four (B4T copies of the B-cell epitope from type O FMDV (a widespread circulating serotype were tested in CD1 mice and showed that multivalency is advantageous over simple B-T-epitope juxtaposition, resulting in efficient induction of neutralizing antibodies and optimal release of IFNγ. Interestingly, the bivalent B2T construction elicited similar or even better B- and T-cell specific responses than tetravalent B4T. In addition, the presence of the T-cell epitope and its orientation were shown to be critical for the immunogenicity of the linear juxtaposed monovalent peptides analyzed in parallel. Taken together, our results provide useful insights for a more accurate design of FMD subunit vaccines.

  7. Neutralization epitopes on HIV pseudotyped with HTLV-I: conservation of carbohydrate epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1994-01-01

    One mechanism for expanding the cellular tropism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in vitro is through formation of phenotypically mixed particles (pseudotypes) with human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). In this study we found that pseudotypes allow penetration of HIV particles into CD4...... by cell-free pseudotypes in CD4-negative cells. We suggest that although viral cofactors might expand the tropism of HIV in vivo, HIV and HTLV-I seem to induce common carbohydrate neutralization epitopes....

  8. The susceptible HLA class II alleles and their presenting epitope(s) in Goodpasture's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Li-Jun; Cui, Zhao; Chen, Fang-Jin; Pei, Zhi-Yong; Hu, Shui-Yi; Gu, Qiu-Hua; Jia, Xiao-Yu; Zhu, Li; Zhou, Xu-Jie; Zhang, Hong; Liao, Yun-Hua; Lai, Lu-Hua; Hudson, Billy G; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2017-08-01

    Goodpasture's disease is closely associated with HLA, particularly DRB1*1501. Other susceptible or protective HLA alleles are not clearly elucidated. The presentation models of epitopes by susceptible HLA alleles are also unclear. We genotyped 140 Chinese patients and 599 controls for four-digit HLA II genes, and extracted the encoding sequences from the IMGT/HLA database. T-cell epitopes of α3(IV)NC1 were predicted and the structures of DR molecule-peptide-T-cell receptor were constructed. We confirmed DRB1*1501 (OR = 4·6, P = 5·7 × 10 -28 ) to be a risk allele for Goodpasture's disease. Arginine at position 13 (ARG13) (OR = 4·0, P = 1·0 × 10 -17 ) and proline at position 11 (PRO11) (OR = 4·0, P = 2·0 × 10 -17 ) on DRβ1, encoded by DRB1*1501, were associated with disease susceptibility. α 134-148 (HGWISLWKGFSFIMF) was predicted as a T-cell epitope presented by DRB1*1501. Isoleucine 137 , tryptophan 140 , glycine 142 , phenylalanine 143 and phenylalanine 145 , were presented in peptide-binding pockets 1, 4, 6, 7 and 9 of DR2b, respectively. ARG13 in pocket 4 interacts with tryptophan 140 and forms a hydrogen bond. In conclusion, we propose a mechanism for DRB1*1501 susceptibility for Goodpasture's disease through encoding ARG13 and PRO11 on MHC-DRβ1 chain and presenting T-cell epitope, α 134-148 , with five critical residues. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Foliar Substrate Affects Cuticular Hydrocarbon Profiles and Intraspecific Aggression in the Leafcutter Ant Atta sexdens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohan Valadares

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs are traditionally considered to be one of the most important chemical cues used in the nestmate recognition process of social hymenopterans. However, it has been suggested that in the leafcutter ant genus Atta, it is not the CHCs, but the alarm pheromone that is involved in the nestmate recognition process. In this study we used a laboratory population of Atta sexdens to explore the association between their CHC profile variation and intraspecific aggression. In the first part of the experiment, four colonies were divided into two groups with distinct diets to stimulate differentiation of their CHC profiles. In the second part of the experiment, all colonies received the same diet to examine resemblance of chemical profiles. At the end of each part of the experiment we extracted the CHCs from workers. The results demonstrated that colonies that shared the same food resource had similar cuticular hydrocarbon profiles. Furthermore, colonies were significantly more aggressive towards conspecifics that used a different foliar substrate and consequently had greater differences in their cuticular chemical composition. This study suggests that the CHC profiles of A. sexdens can be affected by the foliar substrates used, and that the CHCs are used in the nestmate recognition process of this species.

  10. A xylogalacturonan epitope is specifically associated with plant cell detachment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willats, William George Tycho; McCartney, L.; Steele-King, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (LM8) was generated with specificity for xyloglacturonan (XGA) isolated from pea (Pisum sativum L.) testae. Characterization of the LM8 epitope indicates that it is a region of XGA that is highly substituted with xylose. Immunocytochemical analysis indicates that this epitop...... that is specifically associated with a plant cell separation process that results in complete cell detachment....... is restricted to loosely attached inner parenchyma cells at the inner face of the pea testa and does not occur in other cells of the testa. Elsewhere in the pea seedling, the LM8 epitope was found only in association with root cap cell development at the root apex. Furthermore, the LM8 epitope is specifically...... associated with root cap cells in a range of angiosperm species. In embryogenic carrot suspension cell cultures the epitope is abundant at the surface of cell walls of loosely attached cells in both induced and non-induced cultures. The LM8 epitope is the first cell wall epitope to be identified...

  11. Public epitopes and the antigenic structure of the HLA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodey, G E; Fuller, T C

    1987-01-01

    Simplified procedures for determining amino acid sequences in proteins and nucleotide sequences in DNA have rapidly expanded the number of MHC molecules for which primary amino acid structure is known. These molecules will be especially valuable as tools to study the structure-function relationships of globular proteins because of the extensive polymorphism of genes coding the MHC genes products. The general three-dimensional structure of class I MHC molecules was recently deduced, but the more subtle topographical microconformations are still undefined. Definition and topographical mapping of epitopes, defined by serological or cellular immune effector products, will be critical probes for these three-dimensional studies. Comparative studies of amino acid sequences among various MHC and molecules have revealed distinct regions of hypervariability in the alpha-1 and -2 domains of class I heavy chains and the alpha-1 and beta-1 domains of most class II molecules. Mutant MHC molecules that differ from each other by no more than one to three amino acids can have structural changes which may result in a loss of the private epitopes that defined the allelic gene product. On the basis of these studies, the private epitopes are thought to be determined by one or more of the hypervariable regions. Similar studies of the relationships between specific regions of the molecule and public epitopes are not fully explored. Because public epitopes are partially conserved structures, one might expect that their structure is not principally determined by hypervariable region. In fact, however, some public epitopes, such as A2/B17 and BW4/Bw6, do map to diversity regions. Epitope mapping as a means of identifying specific topographic sites and relating these sites to specific functional regions of the molecule will be difficult unless the epitopes themselves are better defined. Thus, the capacity to distinguish spatially distinct public epitopes from cross-reactive homologous

  12. EpitopeViewer: a Java application for the visualization and analysis of immune epitopes in the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, John E; Bourne, Philip E; Ponomarenko, Julia V

    2007-01-01

    Background Structural information about epitopes, particularly the three-dimensional (3D) structures of antigens in complex with immune receptors, presents a valuable source of data for immunology. This information is available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and provided in curated form by the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB). With continued growth in these data and the importance in understanding molecular level interactions of immunological interest there is a need for new specialized molecular visualization and analysis tools. Results The EpitopeViewer is a platform-independent Java application for the visualization of the three-dimensional structure and sequence of epitopes and analyses of their interactions with antigen-specific receptors of the immune system (antibodies, T cell receptors and MHC molecules). The viewer renders both 3D views and two-dimensional plots of intermolecular interactions between the antigen and receptor(s) by reading curated data from the IEDB and/or calculated on-the-fly from atom coordinates from the PDB. The 3D views and associated interactions can be saved for future use and publication. The EpitopeViewer can be accessed from the IEDB Web site through the quick link 'Browse Records by 3D Structure.' Conclusion The EpitopeViewer is designed and been tested for use by immunologists with little or no training in molecular graphics. The EpitopeViewer can be launched from most popular Web browsers without user intervention. A Java Runtime Environment (RJE) 1.4.2 or higher is required. PMID:17313688

  13. Navigating diabetes-related immune epitope data: resources and tools provided by the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Kerrie; Peters, Bjoern; Mallone, Roberto; von Herrath, Matthias; Roep, Bart O.; Sette, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Background The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB), originally focused on infectious diseases, was recently expanded to allergy, transplantation and autoimmunity diseases. Here we focus on diabetes, chosen as a prototype autoimmune disease. We utilize a combined tutorial and meta-analysis format, which demonstrates how common questions, related to diabetes epitopes can be answered. Results A total of 409 references are captured in the IEDB describing >2,500 epitopes from diabetes associated antigens. The vast majority of data were derived from GAD, insulin, IA-2/PTPRN, IGRP, ZnT8, HSP, and ICA-1, and the experiments related to T cell epitopes and MHC binding far outnumbers B cell assays. We illustrate how to search by specific antigens, epitopes or host. Other examples include searching for tetramers or epitopes restricted by specific alleles or assays of interest, or searching based on the clinical status of the host. Conclusions The inventory of all published diabetes epitope data facilitates its access for the scientific community. While the global collection of primary data from the literature reflects potential investigational biases present in the literature, the flexible search approach allows users to perform queries tailored to their preferences, including or excluding data as appropriate. Moreover, the analysis highlights knowledge gaps and identifies areas for future investigation. PMID:25140192

  14. Spatial Heterogeneity in Light Supply Affects Intraspecific Competition of a Stoloniferous Clonal Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Pu; Lei, Jing-Pin; Li, Mai-He; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in light supply is common in nature. Many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous light supply on growth, morphology, physiology and biomass allocation of clonal plants, but few have tested those effects on intraspecific competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (no competition) or nine ramets (with intraspecific competition) of a stoloniferous clonal plant, Duchesnea indica, in three homogeneous light conditions (high, medium and low light intensit...

  15. The cancer exome generated by alternative mRNA splicing dilutes predicted HLA class I epitope density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranzl, Thomas; Larsen, Mette V; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Brunak, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that cancers actively regulate alternative splicing. Altered splicing mechanisms in cancer lead to cancer-specific transcripts different from the pool of transcripts occurring only in healthy tissue. At the same time, altered presentation of HLA class I epitopes is frequently observed in various types of cancer. Down-regulation of genes related to HLA class I antigen processing has been observed in several cancer types, leading to fewer HLA class I antigens on the cell surface. Here, we use a peptidome wide analysis of predicted alternative splice forms, based on a publicly available database, to show that peptides over-represented in cancer splice variants comprise significantly fewer predicted HLA class I epitopes compared to peptides from normal transcripts. Peptides over-represented in cancer transcripts are in the case of the three most common HLA class I supertype representatives consistently found to contain fewer predicted epitopes compared to normal tissue. We observed a significant difference in amino acid composition between protein sequences associated with normal versus cancer tissue, as transcripts found in cancer are enriched with hydrophilic amino acids. This variation contributes to the observed significant lower likelihood of cancer-specific peptides to be predicted epitopes compared to peptides found in normal tissue.

  16. The cancer exome generated by alternative mRNA splicing dilutes predicted HLA class I epitope density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Stranzl

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that cancers actively regulate alternative splicing. Altered splicing mechanisms in cancer lead to cancer-specific transcripts different from the pool of transcripts occurring only in healthy tissue. At the same time, altered presentation of HLA class I epitopes is frequently observed in various types of cancer. Down-regulation of genes related to HLA class I antigen processing has been observed in several cancer types, leading to fewer HLA class I antigens on the cell surface. Here, we use a peptidome wide analysis of predicted alternative splice forms, based on a publicly available database, to show that peptides over-represented in cancer splice variants comprise significantly fewer predicted HLA class I epitopes compared to peptides from normal transcripts. Peptides over-represented in cancer transcripts are in the case of the three most common HLA class I supertype representatives consistently found to contain fewer predicted epitopes compared to normal tissue. We observed a significant difference in amino acid composition between protein sequences associated with normal versus cancer tissue, as transcripts found in cancer are enriched with hydrophilic amino acids. This variation contributes to the observed significant lower likelihood of cancer-specific peptides to be predicted epitopes compared to peptides found in normal tissue.

  17. Design and Characterization of Epitope-Scaffold Immunogens That Present the Motavizumab Epitope from Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLellan, Jason S.; Correia, Bruno E.; Chen, Man; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Schief, William R.; Kwong, Peter D. (UWASH); (NIH)

    2012-06-28

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, but an effective vaccine has not yet been developed. An ideal vaccine would elicit protective antibodies while avoiding virus-specific T-cell responses, which have been implicated in vaccine-enhanced disease with previous RSV vaccines. We propose that heterologous proteins designed to present RSV-neutralizing antibody epitopes and to elicit cognate antibodies have the potential to fulfill these vaccine requirements, as they can be fashioned to be free of viral T-cell epitopes. Here we present the design and characterization of three epitope-scaffolds that present the epitope of motavizumab, a potent neutralizing antibody that binds to a helix-loop-helix motif in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Two of the epitope-scaffolds could be purified, and one epitope-scaffold based on a Staphylococcus aureus protein A domain bound motavizumab with kinetic and thermodynamic properties consistent with the free epitope-scaffold being stabilized in a conformation that closely resembled the motavizumab-bound state. This epitope-scaffold was well folded as assessed by circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry, and its crystal structure (determined in complex with motavizumab to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution) was similar to the computationally designed model, with all hydrogen-bond interactions critical for binding to motavizumab preserved. Immunization of mice with this epitope-scaffold failed to elicit neutralizing antibodies but did elicit sera with F binding activity. The elicitation of F binding antibodies suggests that some of the design criteria for eliciting protective antibodies without virus-specific T-cell responses are being met, but additional optimization of these novel immunogens is required.

  18. Intraspecific competition reduces niche width in experimental populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Christine E; Agashe, Deepa; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2014-10-01

    Intraspecific competition is believed to drive niche expansion, because otherwise suboptimal resources can provide a refuge from competition for preferred resources. Competitive niche expansion is well supported by empirical observations, experiments, and theory, and is often invoked to explain phenotypic diversification within populations, some forms of speciation, and adaptive radiation. However, some foraging models predict the opposite outcome, and it therefore remains unclear whether competition will promote or inhibit niche expansion. We conducted experiments to test whether competition changes the fitness landscape to favor niche expansion, and if competition indeed drives niche expansion as expected. Using Tribolium castaneum flour beetles fed either wheat (their ancestral resource), corn (a novel resource) or mixtures of both resources, we show that fitness is maximized on a mixed diet. Next, we show that at higher population density, the optimal diet shifts toward greater use of corn, favoring niche expansion. In stark contrast, when beetles were given a choice of resources, we found that competition caused niche contraction onto the ancestral resource. This presents a puzzling mismatch between how competition alters the fitness landscape, versus competition's effects on resource use. We discuss several explanations for this mismatch, highlighting potential reasons why optimality models might be misleading.

  19. Spatial heterogeneity in light supply affects intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous clonal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; Lei, Jing-Pin; Li, Mai-He; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in light supply is common in nature. Many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous light supply on growth, morphology, physiology and biomass allocation of clonal plants, but few have tested those effects on intraspecific competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (no competition) or nine ramets (with intraspecific competition) of a stoloniferous clonal plant, Duchesnea indica, in three homogeneous light conditions (high, medium and low light intensity) and two heterogeneous ones differing in patch size (large and small patch treatments). The total light in the two heterogeneous treatments was the same as that in the homogeneous medium light treatment. Both decreasing light intensity and intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth (biomass, number of ramets and total stolon length) of D. indica. As compared with the homogeneous medium light treatment, the large patch treatment significantly increased the growth of D. indica without intraspecific competition. However, the growth of D. indica with competition did not differ among the homogeneous medium light, the large and the small patch treatments. Consequently, light heterogeneity significantly increased intraspecific competition intensity, as measured by the decreased log response ratio. These results suggest that spatial heterogeneity in light supply can alter intraspecific interactions of clonal plants.

  20. Spatial heterogeneity in light supply affects intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous clonal plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Wang

    Full Text Available Spatial heterogeneity in light supply is common in nature. Many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous light supply on growth, morphology, physiology and biomass allocation of clonal plants, but few have tested those effects on intraspecific competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (no competition or nine ramets (with intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous clonal plant, Duchesnea indica, in three homogeneous light conditions (high, medium and low light intensity and two heterogeneous ones differing in patch size (large and small patch treatments. The total light in the two heterogeneous treatments was the same as that in the homogeneous medium light treatment. Both decreasing light intensity and intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth (biomass, number of ramets and total stolon length of D. indica. As compared with the homogeneous medium light treatment, the large patch treatment significantly increased the growth of D. indica without intraspecific competition. However, the growth of D. indica with competition did not differ among the homogeneous medium light, the large and the small patch treatments. Consequently, light heterogeneity significantly increased intraspecific competition intensity, as measured by the decreased log response ratio. These results suggest that spatial heterogeneity in light supply can alter intraspecific interactions of clonal plants.

  1. High-throughput epitope identification for snakebite antivenom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engmark, Mikael; De Masi, Federico; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard

    Insight into the epitopic recognition pattern for polyclonal antivenoms is a strong tool for accurate prediction of antivenom cross-reactivity and provides a basis for design of novel antivenoms. In this work, a high-throughput approach was applied to characterize linear epitopes in 966 individua...... toxins from pit vipers (Crotalidae) using the ICP Crotalidae antivenom. Due to an abundance of snake venom metalloproteinases and phospholipase A2s in the venoms used for production of the investigated antivenom, this study focuses on these toxin families.......Insight into the epitopic recognition pattern for polyclonal antivenoms is a strong tool for accurate prediction of antivenom cross-reactivity and provides a basis for design of novel antivenoms. In this work, a high-throughput approach was applied to characterize linear epitopes in 966 individual...

  2. Analysis of Individuals from a Dengue-Endemic Region Helps Define the Footprint and Repertoire of Antibodies Targeting Dengue Virus 3 Type-Specific Epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela V. Andrade

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1 to 4 cause dengue, a major public health problem worldwide. Individuals exposed to primary DENV infections develop serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies, including strongly neutralizing antibodies targeting quaternary epitopes. To date, no studies have measured the levels and kinetics of serum antibodies directed to such epitopes among populations in regions where dengue is endemic. Here, we use a recombinant DENV4 (rDENV4/3-M14 displaying a major DENV3 type-specific quaternary epitope recognized by human monoclonal antibody 5J7 to measure the proportion, magnitude, and kinetics of DENV3 type-specific neutralizing antibody responses targeting this epitope. Primary DENV3 sera from 30 individuals in a dengue hospital-based study in Nicaragua were studied 3, 6, 12, and 18 months post-infection, alongside samples collected annually 1 to 4 years post-primary DENV3 infection from 10 individuals in a cohort study in Nicaragua. We found substantial individual variation in the proportion of DENV3 type-specific neutralizing antibody titers attributed to the 5J7 epitope (range, 0 to 100%, with the mean significantly increasing from 22.6% to 41.4% from 3 to 18 months. We extended the transplanted DENV3 5J7 epitope on the virion (rDENV4/3-M16, resulting in increased recognition in several individuals, helping define the footprint of the epitope. However, 37% and 13% of the subjects still showed little to no recognition of the 5J7 epitope at 3 and 18 months, respectively, indicating that one or more additional DENV3 type-specific epitopes exist. Overall, this study demonstrates how DENV-immune plasma from populations from areas of endemicity, when coupled with structurally guided recombinant viruses, can help characterize the epitope-specific neutralizing antibody response in natural DENV infections, with direct implications for design and evaluation of dengue vaccines.

  3. Immunogenicity of novel Dengue virus epitopes identified by bioinformatic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Burgos, Gilma; Ramos-Castañeda, José; Cedillo-Rivera, Roberto; Dumonteil, Eric

    2010-10-01

    We used T cell epitope prediction tools to identify epitopes from Dengue virus polyprotein sequences, and evaluated in vivo and in vitro the immunogenicity and antigenicity of the corresponding synthetic vaccine candidates. Twenty-two epitopes were predicted to have a high affinity for MHC class I (H-2Kd, H-2Dd, H-2Ld alleles) or class II (IAd alleles). These epitopes were conserved between the four virus serotypes, but with no similarity to human and mouse sequences. Thirteen synthetic peptides induced specific antibodies production with or without T cells activation in mice. Three synthetic peptides induced mostly IgG antibodies, and one of these from the E gene induced a neutralizing response. Ten peptides induced a combination of humoral and cellular responses by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Twelve peptides were novel B and T cell epitopes. These results indicate that our bioinformatics strategy is a powerful tool for the identification of novel antigens and its application to human HLA may lead to a potent epitope-based vaccine against Dengue virus and many other pathogens. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Intraspecific Variation in Maximum Ingested Food Size and Body Mass in Varecia rubra and Propithecus coquereli

    OpenAIRE

    Hartstone-Rose, Adam; Perry, Jonathan M. G.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent study, we quantified the scaling of ingested food size (Vb )—the maximum size at which an animal consistently ingests food whole—and found that Vb scaled isometrically between species of captive strepsirrhines. The current study examines the relationship between Vb and body size within species with a focus on the frugivorous Varecia rubra and the folivorous Propithecus coquereli. We found no overlap in Vb between the species (all V. rubra ingested larger pieces of food relative to...

  5. Intraspecific ploidy variation: a hidden, minor player in plant-soil-mycorrhizal fungi interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sudová, Radka; Pánková, Hana; Rydlová, Jana; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Suda, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 1 (2014), s. 26-33 ISSN 0002-9122 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/06/0598; GA ČR GAP504/10/1486 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : polyploidy * arbuscular mycorhizal symbiosis * Aster amellus Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.603, year: 2014

  6. Intraspecific variation of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles in the Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) species complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaníčková, Lucie; Břízová, Radka; Mendonca, A. L.; Pompeiano, A.; do Nascimento, R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 9 (2015), s. 679-689 ISSN 0931-2048 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : chemotaxonomy * GCxGC/TOFMS * multiple factorial analyses * putative species * South American fruit fly Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.517, year: 2015

  7. Intraspecific sequence variation in 16S rRNA gene of Ureaplasma diversum isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, L M; Buzinhani, M; Guimaraes, A M S; Marques, R C P; Farias, S T; Neto, R L; Yamaguti, M; Oliveira, R C; Timenetsky, J

    2011-08-26

    Ureaplasma diversum infection in bulls may result in seminal vesiculitis, balanoposthitis and alterations in spermatozoids. In cows, it can cause placentitis, fetal alveolitis, abortion and the birth of weak calves. U. diversum ATCC 49782 (serogroups A), ATCC 49783 (serogroup C) and 34 field isolates were used for this study. These microorganisms were submitted to Polymerase Chain Reaction for 16S gene sequence determination using Taq High Fidelity and the products were purified and bi-directionally sequenced. Using the sequence obtained, a fragment containing four hypervariable regions was selected and nucleotide polymorphisms were identified based on their position within the 16S rRNA gene. Forty-four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were detected. The genotypic variability of the 16S rRNA gene of U. diversum isolates shows that the taxonomy classification of these organisms is likely much more complex than previously described and that 16S rRNA gene sequencing may be used to suggest an epidemiologic pattern of different origin strains. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Intraspecific variation in plant size, secondary plant compounds, herbivory and parasitoid assemblages during secondary succession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostenko, O.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    During secondary succession on abandoned agricultural fields the diversity and abundance of insect communities often increases, whereas the performance and nutritional quality of early successional plants often declines. As the diversity and abundance of insects on a single plant are determined by

  9. Intraspecific ploidy variation: A hidden, minor player in plant-soil-mycorrhizal fungi interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudová, Radka; Pánková, Hana; Rydlová, Jana; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Suda, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Genome duplication and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis are ubiquitous in angiosperms. While the significance of each of these phenomena separately has been intensively studied, their interaction remains to be understood. Three diploid and three hexaploid populations of Aster amellus (Asteraceae) were characterized in terms of the soil conditions in situ and mycorrhizal root colonization. In a greenhouse experiment, the effects of ploidy level, substrate conditions, and AM fungi on plant performance were then separated by growing noninoculated plants or plants inoculated with AM fungi in substrates native to either the diploids or hexaploids. The diploids inhabited nutritionally richer sites but did not differ from hexaploid plants in the level of mycorrhizal root colonization in situ. In the experiment, hexaploids generally performed better than the diploids. This intercytotype growth difference was enhanced by soil fertility, with hexaploids benefiting more from nutritionally richer substrate than the diploids. AM inoculation was crucial for plant growth and phosphorus uptake. The interaction between ploidy level and AM inoculation significantly influenced only dry mass of roots, phosphorus concentrations in shoot biomass, and the length of the extraradical mycelium in the nonsterile substrates. Our results support the idea that polyploidy can affect the mycorrhizal growth response of host plants. Nevertheless, the effects of the interaction between ploidy and inoculation were weaker than the main effects of these factors.

  10. Intraspecific variation of the cephalic labial gland secretions in Bombus terrestris (L.) (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coppée, A.; Terzo, M.; Valterová, Irena; Rasmont, P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 12 (2008), s. 2654-2661 ISSN 1612-1872 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : bumblebees * labial gland secretions * pheromones * male-marking pheromones * Bombus terrestris Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.659, year: 2008

  11. Intraspecific variation in female sex pheromone of the codling moth Cydia pomonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duménil, C.; Judd, G.J.R.; Bosch, D.; Baldessari, M.; Gemeno, C.; Groot, A.T.

    2014-01-01

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae), is a major pest of apple, pear and walnut orchards worldwide. This pest is often controlled using the biologically friendly control method known as pheromone-based mating disruption. Mating disruption likely exerts selection on the

  12. Inter- and intraspecific variation of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in freshwater bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Novais, Adriana; Dias, Ester; Sousa, Ronaldo Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater bivalves provide important ecosystem functions and services, yet many of their ecological traits such as feeding mechanisms and resource use are largely ignored. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the potential overlap in resource use by bivalve species living in sympatry in European freshwater ecosystems. This was accomplished by analyzing the stable isotope ratios of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) values of six bivalve species (five native species plus th...

  13. Kangaroo rats: intraspecific variation in Dipodomys spectabilis Merriam and Dipodomys deserti Stephens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nader, Iyad A

    1978-01-01

    Twenty morpholoigcl characters in addition to color were studied throughout the geographic range of two species of kangaroo rats, the banner-tailed kangaroo rat Dipodomys spectabilis and the desert...

  14. Not all jellyfish are equal: isotopic evidence for inter- and intraspecific variation in jellyfish trophic ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas E.C. Fleming

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Jellyfish are highly topical within studies of pelagic food-webs and there is a growing realisation that their role is more complex than once thought. Efforts being made to include jellyfish within fisheries and ecosystem models are an important step forward, but our present understanding of their underlying trophic ecology can lead to their oversimplification in these models. Gelatinous zooplankton represent a polyphyletic assemblage spanning >2,000 species that inhabit coastal seas to the deep-ocean and employ a wide variety of foraging strategies. Despite this diversity, many contemporary modelling approaches include jellyfish as a single functional group feeding at one or two trophic levels at most. Recent reviews have drawn attention to this issue and highlighted the need for improved communication between biologists and theoreticians if this problem is to be overcome. We used stable isotopes to investigate the trophic ecology of three co-occurring scyphozoan jellyfish species (Aurelia aurita, Cyanea lamarckii and C. capillata within a temperate, coastal food-web in the NE Atlantic. Using information on individual size, time of year and δ13C and δ15N stable isotope values, we examined: (1 whether all jellyfish could be considered as a single functional group, or showed distinct inter-specific differences in trophic ecology; (2 Were size-based shifts in trophic position, found previously in A. aurita, a common trait across species?; (3 When considered collectively, did the trophic position of three sympatric species remain constant over time? Differences in δ15N (trophic position were evident between all three species, with size-based and temporal shifts in δ15N apparent in A. aurita and C. capillata. The isotopic niche width for all species combined increased throughout the season, reflecting temporal shifts in trophic position and seasonal succession in these gelatinous species. Taken together, these findings support previous assertions that jellyfish require more robust inclusion in marine fisheries or ecosystem models.

  15. Intraspecific shape variation in horseshoe crabs: the importance of sexual and natural selection for local adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurby, Søren; Nielsen, Kasper Sauer Kollerup; Bussarawit, Somchai

    2011-01-01

    A morphometric analysis of the body shape of three species of horseshoe crabs was undertaken in order to infer the importance of natural and sexual selection. It was expected that natural selection would be most intense, leading to highest regional differentiation, in the American species Limulus...... polyphemus, which has the largest climatic differences between different populations. Local adaptation driven by sexual selection was expected in males but not females because horseshoe crab mating behaviour leads to competition between males, but not between females. Three hundred fifty-nine horseshoe crabs...

  16. Intraspecific variation in the wing shape and genetic differentiation of Reed Warblers Acrocephalus scirpaceus in Croatia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kralj, J.; Procházka, Petr; Fainová, Drahomíra; Patzenhauerová, Hana; Tutiš, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2010), s. 51-58 ISSN 0001-6454 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB600930508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : wing morphology * migration * microsatellites * genetic diversity Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.889, year: 2010

  17. Inter- and intraspecific variation in mercury bioaccumulation by snakes inhabiting a contaminated river floodplain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewett, David V V; Willson, John D; Cristol, Daniel A; Chin, Stephanie Y; Hopkins, William A

    2013-04-01

    Although mercury (Hg) is a well-studied contaminant, knowledge about Hg accumulation in snakes is limited. The authors evaluated Hg bioaccumulation within and among four snake species (northern watersnakes, Nerodia sipedon; queen snakes, Regina septemvittata; common garter snakes, Thamnophis sirtalis; and rat snakes, Elaphe obsoleta [Pantherophis alleghaniensis]) from a contaminated site on the South River (Waynesboro, VA, USA) and two nearby reference sites. Total Hg (THg) concentrations in northern watersnake tail tissue at the contaminated site ranged from 2.25 to 13.84 mg/kg dry weight (mean: 4.85 ± 0.29), or 11 to 19 times higher than reference sites. Blood THg concentrations (0.03-7.04 mg/kg wet wt; mean: 2.24 ± 0.42) were strongly correlated with tail concentrations and were the highest yet reported in a snake species. Within watersnakes, nitrogen stable isotope values indicated ontogenetic trophic shifts that correlated with THg bioaccumulation, suggesting that diet plays a substantial role in Hg exposure. Female watersnakes had higher mean THg concentrations (5.67 ± 0.46 mg/kg) than males (4.93 ± 0.49 mg/kg), but no significant differences between sexes were observed after correcting for body size. Interspecific comparisons identified differences in THg concentrations among snake species, with more aquatic species (watersnakes and queen snakes) accumulating higher mean concentrations (5.60 ± 0.40 and 4.59 ± 0.38 mg/kg in tail tissue, respectively) than the more terrestrial species, garter snakes and rat snakes (1.28 ± 0.32 and 0.26 ± 0.09 mg/kg, respectively). The results of the present study warrant further investigation of potential adverse effects and will aid in prioritizing conservation efforts. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  18. Environmental and organismal predictors of intraspecific variation in the stoichiometry of a neotropical freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sabaawi, Rana W; Kohler, Tyler J; Zandoná, Eugenia; Travis, Joseph; Marshall, Michael C; Thomas, Steven A; Reznick, David N; Walsh, Matthew; Gilliam, James F; Pringle, Catherine; Flecker, Alexander S

    2012-01-01

    The elemental composition of animals, or their organismal stoichiometry, is thought to constrain their contribution to nutrient recycling, their interactions with other animals, and their demographic rates. Factors that affect organismal stoichiometry are generally poorly understood, but likely reflect elemental investments in morphological features and life history traits, acting in concert with the environmental availability of elements. We assessed the relative contribution of organismal traits and environmental variability to the stoichiometry of an insectivorous Neotropical stream fish, Rivulus hartii. We characterized the influence of body size, life history phenotype, stage of maturity, and environmental variability on organismal stoichiometry in 6 streams that differ in a broad suite of environmental variables. The elemental composition of R. hartii was variable, and overlapped with the wide range of elemental composition documented across freshwater fish taxa. Average %P composition was ∼3.2%(±0.6), average %N∼10.7%(±0.9), and average %C∼41.7%(±3.1). Streams were the strongest predictor of organismal stoichiometry, and explained up to 18% of the overall variance. This effect appeared to be largely explained by variability in quality of basal resources such as epilithon N:P and benthic organic matter C:N, along with variability in invertebrate standing stocks, an important food source for R. hartii. Organismal traits were weak predictors of organismal stoichiometry in this species, explaining when combined up to 7% of the overall variance in stoichiometry. Body size was significantly and positively correlated with %P, and negatively with N:P, and C:P, and life history phenotype was significantly correlated with %C, %P, C:P and C:N. Our study suggests that spatial variability in elemental availability is more strongly correlated with organismal stoichiometry than organismal traits, and suggests that the stoichiometry of carnivores may not be completely buffered from environmental variability. We discuss the relevance of these findings to ecological stoichiometry theory.

  19. Environmental and organismal predictors of intraspecific variation in the stoichiometry of a neotropical freshwater fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana W El-Sabaawi

    Full Text Available The elemental composition of animals, or their organismal stoichiometry, is thought to constrain their contribution to nutrient recycling, their interactions with other animals, and their demographic rates. Factors that affect organismal stoichiometry are generally poorly understood, but likely reflect elemental investments in morphological features and life history traits, acting in concert with the environmental availability of elements. We assessed the relative contribution of organismal traits and environmental variability to the stoichiometry of an insectivorous Neotropical stream fish, Rivulus hartii. We characterized the influence of body size, life history phenotype, stage of maturity, and environmental variability on organismal stoichiometry in 6 streams that differ in a broad suite of environmental variables. The elemental composition of R. hartii was variable, and overlapped with the wide range of elemental composition documented across freshwater fish taxa. Average %P composition was ∼3.2%(±0.6, average %N∼10.7%(±0.9, and average %C∼41.7%(±3.1. Streams were the strongest predictor of organismal stoichiometry, and explained up to 18% of the overall variance. This effect appeared to be largely explained by variability in quality of basal resources such as epilithon N:P and benthic organic matter C:N, along with variability in invertebrate standing stocks, an important food source for R. hartii. Organismal traits were weak predictors of organismal stoichiometry in this species, explaining when combined up to 7% of the overall variance in stoichiometry. Body size was significantly and positively correlated with %P, and negatively with N:P, and C:P, and life history phenotype was significantly correlated with %C, %P, C:P and C:N. Our study suggests that spatial variability in elemental availability is more strongly correlated with organismal stoichiometry than organismal traits, and suggests that the stoichiometry of carnivores may not be completely buffered from environmental variability. We discuss the relevance of these findings to ecological stoichiometry theory.

  20. Cuticular hydrocarbons of Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera: Reduviidae): intraspecific variation and chemotaxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Fernández, Gustavo M; Girotti, Juan R; Juárez, M Patricia

    2011-03-01

    Triatoma dimidiata Latreille is a major vector of Chagas disease with an extensive geographic distribution from Central Mexico, through Central America, to northern South America. As a result of its variability in phenetic and genetic characters, disagreement concerning its taxonomic status has been raised. In this study, the cuticular hydrocarbon pattern of T. dimidiata populations from Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica, and Colombia was analyzed by capillary gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry; linear discriminant analysis was used to help elucidate population structure. Vector populations segregated into five distinct groups; specimens from Yucatan Peninsula, together with those from Central Mexico, Central America, and Colombia corresponded to different T. dimidiata subspecies, a putative different species comprising insects from Belize, together with an isolated population collected at bat caves in Guatemala. The analysis revalidates the earlier division of T dimidiata into three subspecies, T. d. maculipennis, T. d. dimidiata, and T. d. capitata; and an additional subspecies and a distinct species are proposed.

  1. Neutralization epitopes on HIV pseudotyped with HTLV-I: conservation of carbohydrate epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1994-01-01

    for pseudotypes to escape neutralization by the immune system in vivo. Previous reports have suggested that carbohydrate structures may be conserved neutralization epitopes on retroviruses. In this study, the neutralizing capacity of lectins and anti-carbohydrate monoclonal antibodies was found to block infection......-negative cells, previously nonsusceptible to HIV infection. The infection of CD4-negative cells with pseudotypes could be blocked with anti-HTLV-I serum but failed to be significantly inhibited with anti-HIV serum or a V3-neutralizing anti-gp120 monoclonal antibody. This may represent a possibility...

  2. Functional genetics of intraspecific ecological interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jason B; Mutic, Joshua J; Kover, Paula X

    2011-05-12

    Studying the genetic basis of traits involved in ecological interactions is a fundamental part of elucidating the connections between evolutionary and ecological processes. Such knowledge allows one to link genetic models of trait evolution with ecological models describing interactions within and between species. Previous work has shown that connections between genetic and ecological processes in Arabidopsis thaliana may be mediated by the fact that quantitative trait loci (QTL) with 'direct' effects on traits of individuals also have pleiotropic 'indirect' effects on traits expressed in neighbouring plants. Here, we further explore these connections by examining functional relationships between traits affected directly and indirectly by the same QTL. We develop a novel approach using structural equation models (SEMs) to determine whether observed pleiotropic effects result from traits directly affected by the QTL in focal individuals causing the changes in the neighbours' phenotypes. This hypothesis was assessed using SEMs to test whether focal plant phenotypes appear to mediate the connection between the focal plants' genotypes and the phenotypes of their neighbours, or alternatively, whether the connection between the focal plants' genotypes and the neighbours' phenotypes is mediated by unmeasured traits. We implement this analysis using a QTL of major effect that maps to the well-characterized flowering locus, FRIGIDA. The SEMs support the hypothesis that the pleiotropic indirect effects of this locus arise from size and developmental timing-related traits in focal plants affecting the expression of developmental traits in their neighbours. Our findings provide empirical insights into the genetics and nature of intraspecific ecological interactions. Our technique holds promise in directing future work into the genetic basis and functional relationship of traits mediating and responding to ecological interactions.

  3. Genetic and molecular analyses of natural variation indicate CBF2 as a candidate gene for underlying a freezing tolerance quantitative trait locus in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso-Blanco, C.; Gomez-Mena, C.; Llorente, F.; Koornneef, M.; Salinas, J.; Martinez-Zapater, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Natural variation for freezing tolerance is a major component of adaptation and geographic distribution of plant species. However, little is known about the genes and molecular mechanisms that determine its naturally occurring diversity. We have analyzed the intraspecific freezing tolerance

  4. High frequency of T cells specific for cryptic epitopes in melanoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sick; Andersen, Sofie Ramskov; Hjortsø, Mads Duus

    2013-01-01

    A number of cytotoxic T-cell epitopes are cryptic epitopes generated from non-conventional sources. These include epitopes that are encoded by alternative open reading frames or in generally non-coding genomic regions, such as introns. We have previously observed a frequent recognition of cryptic...... epitopes by tumor infiltrating lymphocytes isolated from melanoma patients. Here, we show that such cryptic epitopes are more frequently recognized than antigens of the same class encoded by canonical reading frames. Furthermore, we report the presence of T cells specific for three cryptic epitopes encoded...

  5. Molecular assessment of trematode co-infection and intraspecific competition in molluscan intermediate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Elizabeth A; Minchella, Dennis J

    2013-01-01

    In natural populations of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni, parasite distribution among snail intermediate hosts is generally overdispersed, such that a small proportion of hosts harbor the majority of parasite genotypes. Within these few infected snails, researchers have found that it can be common for hosts to harbor multiple parasite genotypes, creating circumstances in which co-infecting parasites are faced with potential competition over limited host resources. Much theoretical modeling has focused on parasite competition, especially regarding the influence of co-infection on parasite exploitation strategy evolution. However, particularly in the case of intra-molluscan intermediate stages, empirical investigations of parasite-parasite competition have often hinged on the untested assumption that co-exposure produces co-infection. That is, infected hosts exposed to multiple strains have been assumed to harbor multiple strains, regardless of the true nature of the infection outcome. Here we describe a real-time quantitative PCR method to distinguish the conditions of multiple- versus single-strain infection, as well as quantify the relative larval output of co-infecting strains. We applied the method to an empirical investigation of intraspecific parasite competition between S. mansoni strains within the intermediate snail host Biomphalaria glabrata, assessing co-exposure's effects on parasite infectivity and productivity and the concomitant effects on host fitness. Overall, there was no effect of parasite co-infection on snail life history traits relative to single-strain infection. Parasite infectivity significantly increased as a result of increasing overall miracidial dose, rather than co-exposure, though strain-specific productivity was significantly reduced in co-infections in manner consistent with resource competition. Moreover, we show that less than half of infected, co-exposed hosts had patent co-infections and demonstrate the utility of this

  6. Multiple dimensions of intraspecific diversity affect biomass of eelgrass and its associated community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jessica M; Grosberg, Richard K; Williams, Susan L; Stachowicz, John J

    2017-12-01

    Genetic diversity within key species can play an important role in the functioning of entire communities. However, the extent to which different dimensions of diversity (e.g., the number of genotypes vs. the extent of genetic differentiation among those genotypes) best predicts functioning is unknown and may yield clues into the different mechanisms underlying diversity effects. We explicitly test the relative influence of genotypic richness and genetic relatedness on eelgrass productivity, biomass, and the diversity of associated invertebrate grazers in a factorial field experiment using the seagrass species, Zostera marina (eelgrass). Genotypic richness had the strongest effect on eelgrass biomass accumulation, such that plots with more genotypes at the end of the experiment attained a higher biomass. Genotypic diversity (richness + evenness) was a stronger predictor of biomass than richness alone, and both genotype richness and diversity were positively correlated with trait diversity. The relatedness of genotypes in a plot reduced eelgrass biomass independently of richness. Plots containing eelgrass with greater trait diversity also had a higher abundance of invertebrate grazers, while the diversity and relatedness of eelgrass genotypes had little effect on invertebrate abundance or richness. Our work extends previous findings by explicitly relating genotypic diversity to trait diversity, thus mechanistically connecting genotypic diversity to plot-level yields. We also show that other dimensions of diversity, namely relatedness, influence eelgrass performance independent of trait differentiation. Ultimately, richness and relatedness captured fundamentally different components of intraspecific variation and should be treated as complementary rather than competing dimensions of biodiversity affecting ecosystem functioning. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  7. Accurate prediction of immunogenic T-cell epitopes from epitope sequences using the genetic algorithm-based ensemble learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Niu, Yanqing; Zou, Hua; Luo, Longqiang; Liu, Qianchao; Wu, Weijian

    2015-01-01

    T-cell epitopes play the important role in T-cell immune response, and they are critical components in the epitope-based vaccine design. Immunogenicity is the ability to trigger an immune response. The accurate prediction of immunogenic T-cell epitopes is significant for designing useful vaccines and understanding the immune system. In this paper, we attempt to differentiate immunogenic epitopes from non-immunogenic epitopes based on their primary structures. First of all, we explore a variety of sequence-derived features, and analyze their relationship with epitope immunogenicity. To effectively utilize various features, a genetic algorithm (GA)-based ensemble method is proposed to determine the optimal feature subset and develop the high-accuracy ensemble model. In the GA optimization, a chromosome is to represent a feature subset in the search space. For each feature subset, the selected features are utilized to construct the base predictors, and an ensemble model is developed by taking the average of outputs from base predictors. The objective of GA is to search for the optimal feature subset, which leads to the ensemble model with the best cross validation AUC (area under ROC curve) on the training set. Two datasets named 'IMMA2' and 'PAAQD' are adopted as the benchmark datasets. Compared with the state-of-the-art methods POPI, POPISK, PAAQD and our previous method, the GA-based ensemble method produces much better performances, achieving the AUC score of 0.846 on IMMA2 dataset and the AUC score of 0.829 on PAAQD dataset. The statistical analysis demonstrates the performance improvements of GA-based ensemble method are statistically significant. The proposed method is a promising tool for predicting the immunogenic epitopes. The source codes and datasets are available in S1 File.

  8. Accurate prediction of immunogenic T-cell epitopes from epitope sequences using the genetic algorithm-based ensemble learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhang

    Full Text Available T-cell epitopes play the important role in T-cell immune response, and they are critical components in the epitope-based vaccine design. Immunogenicity is the ability to trigger an immune response. The accurate prediction of immunogenic T-cell epitopes is significant for designing useful vaccines and understanding the immune system.In this paper, we attempt to differentiate immunogenic epitopes from non-immunogenic epitopes based on their primary structures. First of all, we explore a variety of sequence-derived features, and analyze their relationship with epitope immunogenicity. To effectively utilize various features, a genetic algorithm (GA-based ensemble method is proposed to determine the optimal feature subset and develop the high-accuracy ensemble model. In the GA optimization, a chromosome is to represent a feature subset in the search space. For each feature subset, the selected features are utilized to construct the base predictors, and an ensemble model is developed by taking the average of outputs from base predictors. The objective of GA is to search for the optimal feature subset, which leads to the ensemble model with the best cross validation AUC (area under ROC curve on the training set.Two datasets named 'IMMA2' and 'PAAQD' are adopted as the benchmark datasets. Compared with the state-of-the-art methods POPI, POPISK, PAAQD and our previous method, the GA-based ensemble method produces much better performances, achieving the AUC score of 0.846 on IMMA2 dataset and the AUC score of 0.829 on PAAQD dataset. The statistical analysis demonstrates the performance improvements of GA-based ensemble method are statistically significant.The proposed method is a promising tool for predicting the immunogenic epitopes. The source codes and datasets are available in S1 File.

  9. High Throughput T Epitope Mapping and Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Li Pira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mapping of antigenic peptide sequences from proteins of relevant pathogens recognized by T helper (Th and by cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL is crucial for vaccine development. In fact, mapping of T-cell epitopes provides useful information for the design of peptide-based vaccines and of peptide libraries to monitor specific cellular immunity in protected individuals, patients and vaccinees. Nevertheless, epitope mapping is a challenging task. In fact, large panels of overlapping peptides need to be tested with lymphocytes to identify the sequences that induce a T-cell response. Since numerous peptide panels from antigenic proteins are to be screened, lymphocytes available from human subjects are a limiting factor. To overcome this limitation, high throughput (HTP approaches based on miniaturization and automation of T-cell assays are needed. Here we consider the most recent applications of the HTP approach to T epitope mapping. The alternative or complementary use of in silico prediction and experimental epitope definition is discussed in the context of the recent literature. The currently used methods are described with special reference to the possibility of applying the HTP concept to make epitope mapping an easier procedure in terms of time, workload, reagents, cells and overall cost.

  10. IEDB-3D: structural data within the immune epitope database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, Julia; Papangelopoulos, Nikitas; Zajonc, Dirk M; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro; Bourne, Philip E

    2011-01-01

    IEDB-3D is the 3D structural component of the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) available via the 'Browse by 3D Structure' page at http://www.iedb.org. IEDB-3D catalogs B- and T-cell epitopes and Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) ligands for which 3D structures of complexes with antibodies, T-cell receptors or MHC molecules are available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Journal articles that are primary citations of PDB structures and that define immune epitopes are curated within IEDB as any other reference along with accompanying functional assays and immunologically relevant information. For each curated structure, IEDB-3D provides calculated data on intermolecular contacts and interface areas and includes an application, EpitopeViewer, to visualize the structures. IEDB-3D is fully embedded within IEDB, thus allowing structural data, both curated and calculated, and all accompanying information to be queried using multiple search interfaces. These include queries for epitopes recognized in different pathogens, eliciting different functional immune responses, and recognized by different components of the immune system. The query results can be downloaded in Microsoft Excel format, or the entire database, together with structural data both curated and calculated, can be downloaded in either XML or MySQL formats.

  11. A role for gene duplication and natural variation of gene expression in the evolution of metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kliebenstein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most eukaryotic genomes have undergone whole genome duplications during their evolutionary history. Recent studies have shown that the function of these duplicated genes can diverge from the ancestral gene via neo- or sub-functionalization within single genotypes. An additional possibility is that gene duplicates may also undergo partitioning of function among different genotypes of a species leading to genetic differentiation. Finally, the ability of gene duplicates to diverge may be limited by their biological function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test these hypotheses, I estimated the impact of gene duplication and metabolic function upon intraspecific gene expression variation of segmental and tandem duplicated genes within Arabidopsis thaliana. In all instances, the younger tandem duplicated genes showed higher intraspecific gene expression variation than the average Arabidopsis gene. Surprisingly, the older segmental duplicates also showed evidence of elevated intraspecific gene expression variation albeit typically lower than for the tandem duplicates. The specific biological function of the gene as defined by metabolic pathway also modulated the level of intraspecific gene expression variation. The major energy metabolism and biosynthetic pathways showed decreased variation, suggesting that they are constrained in their ability to accumulate gene expression variation. In contrast, a major herbivory defense pathway showed significantly elevated intraspecific variation suggesting that it may be under pressure to maintain and/or generate diversity in response to fluctuating insect herbivory pressures. CONCLUSION: These data show that intraspecific variation in gene expression is facilitated by an interaction of gene duplication and biological activity. Further, this plays a role in controlling diversity of plant metabolism.

  12. Species coexistence under resource competition with intraspecific and interspecific direct competition in a chemostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yasuhisa; Miki, Takeshi

    2010-11-01

    Competition theory has developed separately for direct competition and for exploitative competition. However, the combined effects of the two types of competition on species coexistence remain unclear. To examine how intraspecific and interspecific direct competition contributes to the coexistence of species competing for a single resource, we constructed a chemostat-type resource competition model. With general functions for intraspecific and interspecific direct competition, we derived necessary and sufficient conditions (except for a critical case that rarely occurs in a biological sense) that determine the number of stably coexisting species. From these conditions, we found that the number of coexisting species is determined just by the invasibility of each species into subcommunities with a smaller number of species. In addition, using a combination of rigorous mathematical theory and a simple graphical method, we can demonstrate how the stronger intraspecific direct competition facilitates species invasion, leading to a larger number of coexisting species. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Epitope Mapping of Monoclonal Antibody PMab-48 Against Dog Podoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Itai, Shunsuke; Chang, Yao-Wen; Nakamura, Takuro; Yanaka, Miyuki; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Murata, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroaki; Tahara, Hideaki; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yukinari

    2018-04-02

    Podoplanin (PDPN), a type I transmembrane sialoglycoprotein, is expressed on normal renal podocytes, pulmonary type I alveolar cells, and lymphatic endothelial cells. Increased expression of PDPN in cancers is associated with poor prognosis and hematogenous metastasis through interactions with C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) on platelets. We previously reported a novel PMab-48 antibody, which is an anti-dog PDPN (dPDPN) monoclonal antibody (mAb) recognizing PDPN expressed in lymphatic endothelial cells. However, the binding epitope of PMab-48 is yet to be clarified. In this study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and flow cytometry were used to investigate epitopes of PMab-48. The results revealed that the critical epitope of PMab-48 comprises Asp29, Asp30, Ile31, Ile32, and Pro33 of dPDPN.

  14. Epitope Mapping of Monoclonal Antibody PMab-38 Against Dog Podoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-12-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), a type I transmembrane sialoglycoprotein, is extensively expressed by normal lymphatic endothelial cells, renal podocytes, and pulmonary type I alveolar cells. Nevertheless, increased expression of PDPN in malignant tumors not only associates with poor prognosis but also facilitates hematogenous metastasis through interaction with C-type lectin-like receptor-2 presented on platelets, followed by PDPN-mediated platelet activation. We previously reported a novel PMab-38 antibody, an anti-dog PDPN (dPDPN) monoclonal antibody, which specifically recognizes PDPN in squamous cell carcinomas melanomas and cancer-associated fibroblasts in canine cancer tissues. However, the specific binding with the epitope of PMab-38 remains undefined. In this study, flow cytometry was utilized to investigate the epitope of PMab-38, which was determined using a series of deletion or point mutants of dPDPN. The results revealed that the critical epitope of PMab-38 is Tyr67 and Glu68 of dPDPN.

  15. Analysis of cytotoxic T cell epitopes in relation to cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stranzl, Thomas

    kill the infected cells. The focus of my PhD project has been on improving a method for CTL epitope pathway prediction, on analyzing the epitope density in the alternative cancer exome, and on a study investigating minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags) associated with leukemia. Part I......The human immune system is a highly adaptable system, defending our bodies against pathogens and tumor cells. Cytotoxic T cells (CTL) are cells of the adaptive immune system, capable of inducing a programmed cell death and thus able to eliminate infected or tumor cells. CTLs discriminate between...... healthy and infected cells based on peptide fragments presented on the cells surface. All nucleated cells present these peptide fragments in complex with Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules. Peptides that are recognized by CTLs are called epitopes and induce the CTLs to subsequently...

  16. Neutralization epitopes on HIV pseudotyped with HTLV-I: Conservation of carbohydrate Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1994-01-01

    One mechanism for expanding the cellular tropism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in vitro is through formation of phenotypically mixed particles (pseudotypes) with human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). In this study we found that pseudotypes allow penetration of HIV particles into CD4......-negative cells, previously nonsusceptible to HIV infection. The infection of CD4-negative cells with pseudotypes could be blocked with anti-HTLV-I serum but failed to be significantly inhibited with anti-HIV serum or a V3-neutralizing anti-gp120 monoclonal antibody. This may represent a possibility...... by cell-free pseudotypes in CD4-negative cells. We suggest that although viral cofactors might expand the tropism of HIV in vivo, HIV and HTLV-I seem to induce common carbohydrate neutralization epitopes....

  17. Neutralization epitopes on HIV pseudotyped with HTLV-I: conservation of carbohydrate epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1994-01-01

    One mechanism for expanding the cellular tropism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in vitro is through formation of phenotypically mixed particles (pseudotypes) with human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). In this study we found that pseudotypes allow penetration of HIV particles into CD4......-negative cells, previously nonsusceptible to HIV infection. The infection of CD4-negative cells with pseudotypes could be blocked with anti-HTLV-I serum but failed to be significantly inhibited with anti-HIV serum or a V3-neutralizing anti-gp120 monoclonal antibody. This may represent a possibility...... by cell-free pseudotypes in CD4-negative cells. We suggest that although viral cofactors might expand the tropism of HIV in vivo, HIV and HTLV-I seem to induce common carbohydrate neutralization epitopes....

  18. Inter- and intraspecific sexual discrimination in the flour beetles Tribolium castaneum and Tribolium confusum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, J M; Castro, L; Toro, M A; López-Fanjul, C

    2000-08-01

    In Tribolium castaneum (CS) and T. confusum (CF), intra- and interspecific rates of homosexual mounting have been measured. The intraspecific results are compatible with the hypothesis of both species being sexually indiscriminate. However, the CF intraspecific rates were very high (35%-53% of mountings were homosexual), suggesting a lower sexual attractiveness, or a stronger rejection to being mounted, of CF females relative to conspecific males. CS males discriminate between species but, in interspecific contacts, preferentially mounted CF males rather than CF females. CF males do not discriminate between species, but the loss of sexual attractiveness of CF females, or their rejection to being mounted, may act as a precopulatory isolation mechanism.

  19. Analysis of an immunodominant epitope of topoisomerase I in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, T M; Hoet, M; van den Hoogen, F H; Verheijen, R; Habets, W J; van Venrooij, W J

    1992-05-01

    In this paper an immunodominant epitope of Topoisomerase I is described. An epitope expression sublibrary was constructed from Topoisomerase I cDNA. The subclones were screened with an antiserum from a patient with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The positive clones defined one immunodominant B cell epitope (epitope III), which was located at the carboxyterminal part of the protein. The epitope, 52 amino acids in length, neither contains the p30gag sequence nor the suggested active site Tyr-723, both presumed antibody recognition sites. More than 70% of our anti-TopoI sera recognize this epitope III, indicating that it is a major recognition site of the anti-TopoI autoantibodies in SSc sera. DNA relaxation experiments show that all sera that recognize epitope III and most sera with antibodies to other epitopes inhibit Topoisomerase I activity.

  20. In silico-accelerated identification of conserved and immunogenic variola/vaccinia T-cell epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moise, Leonard; McMurry, Julie A; Buus, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Epitopes shared by the vaccinia and variola viruses underlie the protective effect of vaccinia immunization against variola infection. We set out to identify a subset of cross-reactive epitopes using bioinformatics and immunological methods. Putative T-cell epitopes were computationally predicted...

  1. Characterization of a linear epitope on Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 DnaK-like protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend; Larsen, B; Holm, A

    1994-01-01

    technique, the epitope was limited to 14 amino acids. With synthetic peptides, the epitope was further limited to eight amino acids. Six of these amino acids are conserved in bovine HSP70, which has a known three-dimensional structure. The amino acid sequence homologous to the epitope is located in a linear...

  2. Identification of three antigen epitopes on the nucleocapsid protein of the genotype C of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jian-Le; Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Zhou, Yue-Hui; Lv, Chuang; Yan, Hao; Ma, Lei; Shi, Hong-Fei; Xue, Fei

    2015-07-09

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is an important respiratory tract pathogen for both young and adult cattle. So far, three genotypes A, B and C of BPIV3 have been described on the basis of genetic and phylogenetic analysis. But fine mapping of epitopes of BPIV3 is scant and the antigenic variations among the three genotypes of BPIV3 have not been reported. Nucleocapsid protein (NP) is the most abundant protein in the virion and highly conserved in BPIV3, which is crucial for the induction of protective immunity in host. To identify antigenic determinants of BPIV3 NP, a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was tested against a series of overlapping recombinant NP fragments expressed in Escherichia coli. Firstly, six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against NP of the genotype C of BPIV3 (BPIV3c) were generated by using the purified BPIV3c strain SD0835 as immunogen and the recombinant NP of SD0835 as screening antigen. Then three antigen epitopes were identified with the six mAbs. One epitope (91)GNNADVKYVIYM(102) was recognized by mAb 5E5. The mAbs 7G5, 7G8, 7G9, and 7H5 were reactive with another epitope (407)FYKPTGG(413). The third epitope (428)ESRGDQDQ(435) was reactive with mAb 6F8. Further analysis showed that the epitope (91-102 amino acids [aa]) was the most conserved and reactive with mAb 5E5 for all three genotypes of BPIV3 and HPIV3. The epitope (407-413 aa) was relatively conserved and reactive with mAbs 7G5, 7G8, 7G9, and 7H5 for BPIV3a, BPIV3c and HPIV3, but not reactive with BPIV3b. The epitope (428-435 aa) was less conserved and was reactive only with mAb 6F8 for BPIV3a and BPIV3c. These results suggested that there were evident antigenic variations among the three genotypes of BPIV3 and HPIV3. The mAb 6F8 could be used to detect BPIV3a and BPIV3c. The mAbs 7G5, 7G8, 7G9, and 7H5 might be used for differentiate BPIV3a, BPIV3c and HPIV3 from BPIV3b. The mAb 5E5 might be used for detecting all three types of BPIV3 and HPIV3. The results in this

  3. Growth and intraspecific competitive abilities of the dioecious Lindera melissifolia (Lauraceae) in varied flooding regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy S. Hawkins; Nathan M. Schiff; Theodor D. Leininger; Emile S Gardiner; Margaret S. Devall; Paul B. Hamel; A. Dan Wilson; Kristina F. Connor

    2009-01-01

    Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Stoneville, MS 38776). Growth and intraspecific competitive abilities of the dioecious Lindera melissifolia (Lauraceae) in varied flooding regimes. J. Torrey Bot. Soc. 136: 91–101. 2009.—The contribution of sexual dimorphism to malebiased colony ratios observed in field populations of the federally...

  4. Dynamical role of the degree of intraspecific cooperation: A simple model for prebiotic replicators and ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontich, Ernest; Sardanyés, Josep

    2009-05-01

    We present a simple mean field model to analyze the dynamics of competition between two populations of replicators in terms of the degree of intraspecific cooperation (i.e., autocatalysis) in one of these populations. The first population can only replicate with Malthusian kinetics while the second one can reproduce with Malthusian or autocatalytic replication or with a combination of both reproducing strategies. The model consists of two coupled, nonlinear, autonomous ordinary differential equations. We investigate analytically and numerically the phase plane dynamics and the bifurcation scenarios of this ecologically coupled system, focusing on the outcome of competition for several degrees of intraspecific cooperation, σ, in the second population of replicators. We demonstrate that the dynamics of both populations can not be governed by a limit cycle, and also that once cooperation is considered, the topology of phase space does not allow for coexistence. Even for low values of the degree of intraspecific cooperation, for large enough autocatalytic replication rates, the second population of replicators is able to outcompete the first one, having a wide basin of attraction in state space. We characterize the same power law dependence between the outcompetition extinction times, τ, and the degree of intraspecific cooperation for both populations, given by τ˜ciσ-1. Our results suggest that, under some kinetic conditions, the appearance of autocatalysis might be favorable in a population of replicators growing with Malthusian kinetics competing with another population also reproducing exponentially.

  5. Structural and Dynamic Insight into Hirudin Epitopes-HLADRB1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The selected epitopes were modeled and 20 ns of molecular dynamics simulation was performed on peptide-HLA1 0101 and MPLs-HLA1 0101 complexes to gain a better understanding of molecular recognition mechanisms of MHC peptide binding. Characterization of the process was done by evaluation of root mean ...

  6. Transient expression of Human papillomavirus type 16 L2 epitope ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transient expression of foreign genes based on plant viral vectors is a suitable system for the production of relevant immunogens that can be used for the development of a new generation of vaccines against a variety of infectious diseases. In the present study the epitope derived from HPV-16 L2 minor capsid protein ...

  7. Catalase epitopes vaccine design for Helicobacter pylori : A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Catalase, an important enzyme in the virulence of H. pylori, could be a suitable candidate for vaccine design because it is highly conserved, which is important for the survival of H. pylori; it is expressed in high level and it is exposed on the surface of the bacteria. In this study, we designed epitope-based vaccine for catalase ...

  8. An epitope delivery system for use with recombinant mycobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hetzel, C.; Janssen, R.; Ely, S.J.; Kristensen, N.M.; Bunting, K.; Cooper, J.B.; Lamb, J.R.; Young, D.B.; Thole, J.E.R.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a novel epitope delivery system based on the insertion of peptides within a permissive loop of a bacterial superoxide dismutase molecule. This system allowed high-level expression of heterologous peptides in two mycobacterial vaccine strains, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-

  9. Indirect recognition of HLA epitopes in solid organ transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, C.C.A.

    2017-01-01

    Alloreactivity due to HLA mismatches between donor and recipient remains the major limiting factor in successful graft outcome after solid organ transplantation. However, the immunogenicity of individual HLA mismatches is highly variable. Therefore, epitope-based HLA matching may be a sophisticated

  10. CD18 activation epitopes induced by leukocyte activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beals, C. R.; Edwards, A. C.; Gottschalk, R. J.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Staunton, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    The cell surface adhesion molecule LFA-1 coordinates leukocyte trafficking and is a costimulatory molecule for T cell activation. We developed a panel of mAbs that recognize activation epitopes on the CD18 subunit, and show that stimulation of T lymphocytes appears to be accompanied by a

  11. Antibodies against HLA-DP recognize broadly expressed epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Daimon P; Kafetzi, Maria L; Wood, Isabelle; Macaskill, Peter C; Milford, Edgar L; Guleria, Indira

    2016-12-01

    HLA matching and avoidance of pre-transplant donor-specific antibodies are important in selection of donors for solid organ transplant. Solid phase testing with single antigen beads allows resolution of antibody reactivity to the level of the allele. Single antigen bead testing results at a large transplant center were reviewed to identify selective reactivity patterns of anti-HLA antibodies. Many HLA-DP antibodies were identified in the context of other HLA antibodies, but some sera had antibodies against only HLA-DP. B cell flow crossmatch testing was positive for 2 out of 9 sera with HLA-DP antibodies. Many patterns of reactivity corresponded to epitopes in hypervariable regions C and F of DPB1, but some matched epitopes in other regions or DPA1. Through analysis of single antigen bead testing from a large number of patients, we report that anti-HLA-DP antibodies predominantly recognize broadly cross-reactive epitopes. The United Network for Organ Sharing has mandated HLA-DP typing on all deceased kidney donors, and HLA-DP epitopes should be considered as the major antigens for avoidance of pre-transplant donor-specific antibodies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. High-throughput epitope profiling of snake venom toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engmark, Mikael; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard

    Insight into the molecular details of polyclonal antivenom antibody specificity is a prerequisite for accurate prediction of cross-reactivity and can provide a basis for design of novel antivenoms. In this work, a highthroughput approach was applied to characterize linear elements in epitopes in 82...... toxins from four African mamba and three neurotoxic cobra snakes obtained from public databases....

  13. Comparative characteristic of the methods of protein antigens epitope mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Galkin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Comparative analysis of experimental methods of epitope mapping of protein antigens has been carried out. The vast majority of known techniques are involved in immunochemical study of the interaction of protein molecules or peptides with antibodies of corresponding specifici­ty. The most effective and widely applicable metho­dological techniques are those that use synthetic and genetically engineered peptides. Over the past 30 years, these groups of methods have travelled a notable evolutionary path up to the maximum automation and the detection of antigenic determinants of various types (linear and conformational epitopes, and mimotopes. Most of epitope searching algorithms were integrated into a computer program, which greatly facilitates the analysis of experimental data and makes it possible to create spatial models. It is possible to use comparative epitope mapping for solving the applied problems; this less time-consuming method is based on the analysis of competition between different antibodies interactions with the same antigen. The physical method of antigenic structure study is X-ray analysis of antigen-antibody complexes, which may be applied only to crystallizing­ proteins, and nuclear magnetic resonance.

  14. In silico design of Mycobacterium tuberculosis epitope ensemble vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Preksha; Mistry, Jaymisha; Reche, Pedro A; Gatherer, Derek; Flower, Darren R

    2018-03-19

    Effective control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a global necessity. In 2015, tuberculosis (TB) caused more deaths than HIV. Considering the increasing prevalence of multi-drug resistant forms of M. tuberculosis, the need for effective TB vaccines becomes imperative. Currently, the only licensed TB vaccine is Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Yet, BCG has many drawbacks limiting its efficacy and applicability. We applied advanced computational procedures to derive a universal TB vaccine and one targeting East Africa. Our approach selects an optimal set of highly conserved, experimentally validated epitopes, with high projected population coverage (PPC). Through rigorous data analysis, five different potential vaccine combinations were selected each with PPC above 80% for East Africa and above 90% for the World. Two potential vaccines only contained CD8+ epitopes, while the others included both CD4+ and CD8+ epitopes. Our prime vaccine candidate was a putative seven-epitope ensemble comprising: SRGWSLIKSVRLGNA, KPRIITLTMNPALDI, AAHKGLMNIALAISA, FPAGGSTGSL, MLLAVTVSL, QSSFYSDW and KMRCGAPRY, with a 97.4% global PPC and a 92.7% East African PPC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Confirmation of antibodies against L-tryptophan-like epitope in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rachel Oneya

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... test based on this synthetic epitope, especially in combination with other tests, might improve the HAT diagnostic test in field conditions. Key words: Tryptophan, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), human African trypanosomosis, serological diagnostic. INTRODUCTION. Trypanosoma brucei ...

  16. Humoral immune responses of dengue fever patients using epitope-specific serotype-2 virus-like particle antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne D Crill

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a serious mosquito-borne pathogen causing significant global disease burden, either as classic dengue fever (DF or in its most severe manifestation dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. Nearly half of the world's population is at risk of dengue disease and there are estimated to be millions of infections annually; a situation which will continue to worsen with increasing expansion of the mosquito vectors and epidemic DF/DHF. Currently there are no available licensed vaccines or antivirals for dengue, although significant effort has been directed toward the development of safe and efficacious dengue vaccines for over 30 years. Promising vaccine candidates are in development and testing phases, but a better understanding of immune responses to DENV infection and vaccination is needed. Humoral immune responses to DENV infection are complex and may exacerbate pathogenicity, yet are essential for immune protection. In this report, we develop DENV-2 envelope (E protein epitope-specific antigens and measure immunoglobulin responses to three distinct epitopes in DENV-2 infected human serum samples. Immunoglobulin responses to DENV-2 infection exhibited significant levels of individual variation. Antibody populations targeting broadly cross-reactive epitopes centered on the fusion peptide in structural domain II were large, highly variable, and greater in primary than in secondary DENV-2 infected sera. E protein domain III cross-reactive immunoglobulin populations were similarly variable and much larger in IgM than in IgG. DENV-2 specific domain III IgG formed a very small proportion of the antibody response yet was significantly correlated with DENV-2 neutralization, suggesting that the highly protective IgG recognizing this epitope in murine studies plays a role in humans as well. This report begins to tease apart complex humoral immune responses to DENV infection and is thus important for improving our understanding of dengue disease

  17. Plasticity and Epitope Exposure of the HIV-1 Envelope Trimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Rebecca L R; Totrov, Maxim; Itri, Vincenza; Liu, Xiaomei; Fox, Alisa; Zolla-Pazner, Susan

    2017-09-01

    We recently showed that mutations in the HIV-1 envelope (Env) destabilize the V3 loop, rendering neutralization-resistant viruses sensitive to V3-directed monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Here, we investigated the propagation of this effect on other Env epitopes, with special emphasis on V2 loop exposure. Wild-type JR-FL and 19 mutant JR-FL pseudoviruses were tested for neutralization sensitivity to 21 MAbs specific for epitopes in V2, the CD4 binding site (CD4bs), and the CD4-induced (CD4i) region. Certain glycan mutants, mutations in the gp120 hydrophobic core, and mutations in residues involved in intraprotomer interactions exposed epitopes in the V2i region (which overlies the α4β7 integrin binding site) and the V3 crown, suggesting general destabilization of the distal region of the trimer apex. In contrast, other glycan mutants, mutations affecting interprotomer interactions, and mutations affecting the CD4bs exposed V3 but not V2i epitopes. These data indicate for the first time that V3 can move independently of V2, with V3 pivoting out from its "tucked" position in the trimer while apparently leaving the V2 apex intact. Notably, none of the mutations exposed V2 epitopes without also exposing V3, suggesting that movement of V2 releases V3. Most mutations increased sensitivity to CD4bs-directed MAbs without exposure of the CD4i epitope, implying these mutations facilitate the trimers' maintenance of an intermediate energy state between open and closed conformations. Taken together, these data indicate that several transient Env epitopes can be rendered more accessible to antibodies (Abs) via specific mutations, and this may facilitate the design of V1V2-targeting immunogens. IMPORTANCE Many epitopes of the HIV envelope (Env) spike are relatively inaccessible to antibodies (Abs) compared to their exposure in the open Env conformation induced by receptor binding. However, the reduced infection rate that resulted from the vaccine used in the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine

  18. Comparative mapping in intraspecific populations uncovers a high degree of macrosynteny between A- and B-genome diploid species of peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yufang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated peanut or groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. is an important oilseed crop with an allotetraploid genome (AABB, 2n = 4x = 40. Both the low level of genetic variation within the cultivated gene pool and its polyploid nature limit the utilization of molecular markers to explore genome structure and facilitate genetic improvement. Nevertheless, a wealth of genetic diversity exists in diploid Arachis species (2n = 2x = 20, which represent a valuable gene pool for cultivated peanut improvement. Interspecific populations have been used widely for genetic mapping in diploid species of Arachis. However, an intraspecific mapping strategy was essential to detect chromosomal rearrangements among species that could be obscured by mapping in interspecific populations. To develop intraspecific reference linkage maps and gain insights into karyotypic evolution within the genus, we comparatively mapped the A- and B-genome diploid species using intraspecific F2 populations. Exploring genome organization among diploid peanut species by comparative mapping will enhance our understanding of the cultivated tetraploid peanut genome. Moreover, new sources of molecular markers that are highly transferable between species and developed from expressed genes will be required to construct saturated genetic maps for peanut. Results A total of 2,138 EST-SSR (expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers were developed by mining a tetraploid peanut EST assembly including 101,132 unigenes (37,916 contigs and 63,216 singletons derived from 70,771 long-read (Sanger and 270,957 short-read (454 sequences. A set of 97 SSR markers were also developed by mining 9,517 genomic survey sequences of Arachis. An SSR-based intraspecific linkage map was constructed using an F2 population derived from a cross between K 9484 (PI 298639 and GKBSPSc 30081 (PI 468327 in the B-genome species A. batizocoi. A high degree of macrosynteny was observed

  19. Conformational Occlusion of Blockade Antibody Epitopes, a Novel Mechanism of GII.4 Human Norovirus Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindesmith, Lisa C; Mallory, Michael L; Debbink, Kari; Donaldson, Eric F; Brewer-Jensen, Paul D; Swann, Excel W; Sheahan, Timothy P; Graham, Rachel L; Beltramello, Martina; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Baric, Ralph S

    2018-01-01

    Extensive antigenic diversity within the GII.4 genotype of human norovirus is a major driver of pandemic emergence and a significant obstacle to development of cross-protective immunity after natural infection and vaccination. However, human and mouse monoclonal antibody studies indicate that, although rare, antibodies to conserved GII.4 blockade epitopes are generated. The mechanisms by which these epitopes evade immune surveillance are uncertain. Here, we developed a new approach for identifying conserved GII.4 norovirus epitopes. Utilizing a unique set of virus-like particles (VLPs) representing the in vivo -evolved sequence diversity within an immunocompromised person, we identify key residues within epitope F, a conserved GII.4 blockade antibody epitope. The residues critical for antibody binding are proximal to evolving blockade epitope E. Like epitope F, antibody blockade of epitope E was temperature sensitive, indicating that particle conformation regulates antibody access not only to the conserved GII.4 blockade epitope F but also to the evolving epitope E. These data highlight novel GII.4 mechanisms to protect blockade antibody epitopes, map essential residues of a GII.4 conserved epitope, and expand our understanding of how viral particle dynamics may drive antigenicity and antibody-mediated protection by effectively shielding blockade epitopes. Our data support the notion that GII.4 particle breathing may well represent a major mechanism of humoral immune evasion supporting cyclic pandemic virus persistence and spread in human populations. IMPORTANCE In this study, we use norovirus virus-like particles to identify key residues of a conserved GII.4 blockade antibody epitope. Further, we identify an additional GII.4 blockade antibody epitope to be occluded, with antibody access governed by temperature and particle dynamics. These findings provide additional support for particle conformation-based presentation of binding residues mediated by a particle

  20. Time-lagged intraspecific competition in temporally separated cohorts of a generalist insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Elizabeth E; Murphy, Shannon M

    2018-03-01

    Competition can have far-reaching consequences for insect fitness and dispersion. Time-lagged interspecific competition is known to negatively affect fitness, yet time-lagged intraspecific competition is rarely studied outside of outbreak conditions. We tested the impact of competition between larval cohorts of the western tent caterpillar (Malacosoma californicum) feeding on chokecherry (Prunus virginiana). We reared larvae on host plants that either had or did not have feeding damage from tent caterpillars the previous season to test the bottom-up fitness effects of intraspecific competition. We measured host-plant quality to test potential mechanisms for bottom-up effects and conducted field oviposition surveys to determine if female adult tent caterpillars avoided host plants with evidence of prior tent caterpillar presence. We found that time-lagged intraspecific competition impacted tent caterpillar fitness by reducing female pupal mass, which is a predictor of lifetime fitness. We found that plants that had been fed upon by tent caterpillars the previous season had leaves that were significantly tougher than plants that had not been fed upon by tent caterpillars, which may explain why female tent caterpillars suffered reduced fitness on these plants. Finally, we found that there were fewer tent caterpillar egg masses on plants that had tent caterpillars earlier in the season than plants without tent caterpillars, which suggests that adult females avoid these plants for oviposition. Our results confirm that intraspecific competition occurs among tent caterpillars and suggests that time-lagged intraspecific competition has been overlooked as an important component of insect fitness.

  1. MIMOX: a web tool for phage display based epitope mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honda Wataru

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phage display is widely used in basic research such as the exploration of protein-protein interaction sites and networks, and applied research such as the development of new drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics. It has also become a promising method for epitope mapping. Research on new algorithms that assist and automate phage display based epitope mapping has attracted many groups. Most of the existing tools have not been implemented as an online service until now however, making it less convenient for the community to access, utilize, and evaluate them. Results We present MIMOX, a free web tool that helps to map the native epitope of an antibody based on one or more user supplied mimotopes and the antigen structure. MIMOX was coded in Perl using modules from the Bioperl project. It has two sections. In the first section, MIMOX provides a simple interface for ClustalW to align a set of mimotopes. It also provides a simple statistical method to derive the consensus sequence and embeds JalView as a Java applet to view and manage the alignment. In the second section, MIMOX can map a single mimotope or a consensus sequence of a set of mimotopes, on to the corresponding antigen structure and search for all of the clusters of residues that could represent the native epitope. NACCESS is used to evaluate the surface accessibility of the candidate clusters; and Jmol is embedded to view them interactively in their 3D context. Initial case studies show that MIMOX can reproduce mappings from existing tools such as FINDMAP and 3DEX, as well as providing novel, rational results. Conclusion A web-based tool called MIMOX has been developed for phage display based epitope mapping. As a publicly available online service in this area, it is convenient for the community to access, utilize, and evaluate, complementing other existing programs. MIMOX is freely available at http://web.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~hjian/mimox.

  2. Osteology and postmetamorphic development of Telmatobius oxycephalus (Anura: Telmatobiidae) with an analysis of skeletal variation in the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrionuevo, J Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    The osteological diversity among species of Telmatobius has been considered conservative. Nonetheless, the degree of ossification of several features varies both intraspecifically and interspecifically. Herein, intraspecific osteological variation and postmetamorphic ontogenetic changes in osteological features are described in Telmatobius oxycephalus. These data are compared with published descriptions of congeners. There is a considerable intraspecific osteological variation in T. oxycephalus, with cranial characters varying polymorphically, and the hyoid and postcranial characters being sexually dimorphic. This intraspecific variation is expressed by subtle differences in the degree of ossification or mineralization. Interspecific variation also can be described in terms of differential development of osteological features; these differences are more obvious than intraspecifically variable characters. The adult skeletons of several species of Telmatobius resemble the morphology observed in early stages of postmetamorphic development of T. oxycephalus. This is especially evident in the neopalatines, parasphenoid, sphenethmoid, exoccipitals, prootics, vomers, nasals, and plectra. These results suggest that within the conservative osteological architecture of Telmatobius, the variation observed is the result of heterochronic changes during the ossification process. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes identified from herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Zhang, Xiuli; Lamberth, Kasper

    2008-01-01

    epitopes identified to date. In this study, we screened the HSV-1 gD amino acid sequence for HLA-A*0201-restricted epitopes using several predictive computational algorithms and identified 10 high probability CD8+ T cell epitopes. Synthetic peptides corresponding to four of these epitopes, each nine to 10...

  4. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Ramanathan

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction approach. The selected peptides representing B-cell epitopes were attached to a known dengue T-helper epitope and evaluated for their vaccine potency. Immunization of mice revealed two novel synthetic vaccine constructs that elicited good humoral immune responses and produced cross-reactive neutralising antibodies against DENV-1, 2 and 3. The findings indicate new directions for epitope mapping and contribute towards the future development of multi-epitope based synthetic peptide vaccine.

  5. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Babu; Poh, Chit Laa; Kirk, Kristin; McBride, William John Hannan; Aaskov, John; Grollo, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction approach. The selected peptides representing B-cell epitopes were attached to a known dengue T-helper epitope and evaluated for their vaccine potency. Immunization of mice revealed two novel synthetic vaccine constructs that elicited good humoral immune responses and produced cross-reactive neutralising antibodies against DENV-1, 2 and 3. The findings indicate new directions for epitope mapping and contribute towards the future development of multi-epitope based synthetic peptide vaccine.

  6. Different Culture Media Affect Proliferation, Surface Epitope Expression, and Differentiation of Ovine MSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Adamzyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthopedic implants including engineered bone tissue are commonly tested in sheep. To avoid rejection of heterologous or xenogeneic cells, autologous cells are preferably used, that is, ovine mesenchymal stem cells (oMSC. Unlike human MSC, ovine MSC are not well studied regarding isolation, expansion, and characterization. Here we investigated the impact of culture media composition on growth characteristics, differentiation, and surface antigen expression of oMSC. The culture media varied in fetal calf serum (FCS content and in the addition of supplements and/or additional epidermal growth factor (EGF. We found that FCS strongly influenced oMSC proliferation and that specific combinations of supplemental factors (MCDB-201, ITS-plus, dexamethasone, and L-ascorbic acid determined the expression of surface epitopes. We compared two published protocols for oMSC differentiation towards the osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic fate and found (i considerable donor to donor variations, (ii protocol-dependent variations, and (iii variations resulting from the preculture medium composition. Our results indicate that the isolation and culture of oMSC in different growth media are highly variable regarding oMSC phenotype and behaviour. Furthermore, variations from donor to donor critically influence growth rate, surface marker expression, and differentiation.

  7. Chondroitin sulfate A-adhering Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes express functionally important antibody epitopes shared by multiple variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Lea; Dobrilovic, Tina; Magistrado, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Acquired protection from Plasmodium falciparum placental malaria, a major cause of maternal, fetal, and infant morbidity, is mediated by IgG specific for the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variant VAR2CSA. This protein enables adhesion of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes...... monoclonal IgG Abs from affinity-matured memory B cells of P. falciparum-exposed women to study interclonal variation and functional importance of Ab epitopes among placental and peripheral parasites from East and West Africa. Most placental P. falciparum isolates were labeled by several mAbs, whereas...

  8. Intraspecific eye color variability in birds and mammals: a recent evolutionary event exclusive to humans and domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro, Juan J; Carmen Blázquez, M; Galván, Ismael

    2017-01-01

    Human populations and breeds of domestic animals are composed of individuals with a multiplicity of eye (= iris) colorations. Some wild birds and mammals may have intraspecific eye color variability, but this variation seems to be due to the developmental stage of the individual, its breeding status, and/or sexual dimorphism. In other words, eye colour tends to be a species-specific trait in wild animals, and the exceptions are species in which individuals of the same age group or gender all develop the same eye colour. Domestic animals, by definition, include bird and mammal species artificially selected by humans in the last few thousand years. Humans themselves may have acquired a diverse palette of eye colors, likewise in recent evolutionary time, in the Mesolithic or in the Upper Paleolithic. We posit two previously unrecognized hypotheses regarding eye color variation: 1) eye coloration in wild animals of every species tends to be a fixed trait. 2) Humans and domestic animal populations, on the contrary, have eyes of multiple colors. Sexual selection has been invoked for eye color variation in humans, but this selection mode does not easily apply in domestic animals, where matings are controlled by the human breeder. Eye coloration is polygenic in humans. We wish to investigate the genetics of eye color in other animals, as well as the ecological correlates. Investigating the origin and function of eye colors will shed light on the reason why some species may have either light-colored irises (e.g., white, yellow or light blue) or dark ones (dark red, brown or black). The causes behind the vast array of eye colors across taxa have never been thoroughly investigated, but it may well be that all Darwinian selection processes are at work: sexual selection in humans, artificial selection for domestic animals, and natural selection (mainly) for wild animals.

  9. Evidence for multiple sources of invasion and intraspecific hybridization in Brachypodium sylvaticum (Hudson) Beauv. in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, David M; Ramakrishnan, Alisa P; Cruzan, Mitchell B

    2008-11-01

    We compared the levels and distribution of genetic diversity in Eurasian and North American populations of Brachypodium sylvaticum (Huds.) Beauv. (false brome), a newly invasive perennial bunchgrass in western North America. Our goals were to identify source regions for invasive populations, determine the number of independent invasion events, and assess the possibility that postinvasion bottlenecks and hybridization have affected patterns of genetic diversity in the invaded range. We tested the hypothesis that this Eurasian grass was accidentally introduced into two areas in Oregon and one site in California by examining nuclear microsatellites and chloroplast haplotype variation in 23 introduced and 25 native populations. In the invaded range, there was significantly lower allelic richness (R(S)), observed heterozygosity (H(O)) and within-population gene diversity (H(S)), although a formal test failed to detect a significant genetic bottleneck. Most of the genetic variation existed among populations in the native range but within populations in the invaded range. All of the allelic variation in the invaded range could be explained based on alleles found in western European populations. The distribution of identified genetic clusters in the North American populations and the unique alleles associated with them is consistent with two historical introductions in Oregon and a separate introduction to California. Further analyses of population structure indicate that intraspecific hybridization among genotypes from geographically distinct regions of western Europe occurred following colonization in Oregon. The California populations, however, are more likely to be derived from one or perhaps several genetically similar regions in the native range. The emergence and spread of novel recombinant genotypes may be facilitating the rapid spread of this invasive species in Oregon.

  10. Optimization and immune recognition of multiple novel conserved HLA-A2, human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific CTL epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corbet, S.; Nielsen, H.V.; Vinner, L.

    2003-01-01

    conserved. Such epitope peptides were anchor-optimized to improve immunogenicity and further increase the number of potential vaccine epitopes. About 67% of anchor-optimized vaccine epitopes induced immune responses against the corresponding non-immunogenic naturally occurring epitopes. This study......MHC-I-restricted cytotoxic responses are considered a critical component of protective immunity against viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). CTLs directed against accessory and early regulatory HIV-1 proteins might be particularly effective; however, CTL epitopes...

  11. Optimization and immune recognition of multiple novel conserved HLA-A2, human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific CTL epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corbet, S; Nielsen, HV; Vinner, L

    2003-01-01

    and more conserved. Such epitope peptides were anchor-optimized to improve immunogenicity and further increase the number of potential vaccine epitopes. About 67 % of anchor-optimized vaccine epitopes induced immune responses against the corresponding non-immunogenic naturally occurring epitopes......MHC-I-restricted cytotoxic responses are considered a critical component of protective immunity against viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). CTLs directed against accessory and early regulatory HIV-1 proteins might be particularly effective; however, CTL epitopes...

  12. Automated Detection of Conformational Epitopes Using Phage Display Peptide Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra S Negi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Precise determination of conformational epitopes of neutralizing antibodies represents a key step in the rational design of novel vaccines. A powerful experimental method to gain insights on the physical chemical nature of conformational epitopes is the selection of linear peptides that bind with high affinities to a monoclonal antibody of interest by phage display technology. However, the structural characterization of conformational epitopes from these mimotopes is not straightforward, and in the past the interpretation of peptide sequences from phage display experiments focused on linear sequence analysis to find a consensus sequence or common sequence motifs.Results: We present a fully automated search method, EpiSearch that predicts the possible location of conformational epitopes on the surface of an antigen. The algorithm uses peptide sequences from phage display experiments as input, and ranks all surface exposed patches according to the frequency distribution of similar residues in the peptides and in the patch. We have tested the performance of the EpiSearch algorithm for six experimental data sets of phage display experiments, the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2/neu, the antibody mAb Bo2C11 targeting the C2 domain of FVIII, antibodies mAb 17b and mAb b12 of the HIV envelope protein gp120, mAb 13b5 targeting HIV-1 capsid protein and 80R of the SARS coronavirus spike protein. In all these examples the conformational epitopes as determined by the X-ray crystal structures of the antibody-antigen complexes, were found within the highest scoring patches of EpiSearch, covering in most cases more than 50% residues of experimental observed conformational epitopes. Input options of the program include mapping of a single peptide or a set of peptides on the antigen structure, and the results of the calculation can be visualized on our interactive web server.Availability: Users can access the EpiSearch from our web

  13. Flight Morphology, Compound Eye Structure and Dispersal in the Bog and the Cranberry Fritillary Butterflies: An Inter- and Intraspecific Comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Turlure

    Full Text Available Understanding dispersal is of prime importance in conservation and population biology. Individual traits related to motion and navigation during dispersal may differ: (1 among species differing in habitat distribution, which in turn, may lead to interspecific differences in the potential for and costs of dispersal, (2 among populations of a species that experiences different levels of habitat fragmentation; (3 among individuals differing in their dispersal strategy and (4 between the sexes due to sexual differences in behaviour and dispersal tendencies. In butterflies, the visual system plays a central role in dispersal, but exactly how the visual system is related to dispersal has received far less attention than flight morphology. We studied two butterfly species to explore the relationships between flight and eye morphology, and dispersal. We predicted interspecific, intraspecific and intersexual differences for both flight and eye morphology relative to i species-specific habitat distribution, ii variation in dispersal strategy within each species and iii behavioural differences between sexes. However, we did not investigate for potential population differences. We found: (1 sexual differences that presumably reflect different demands on both male and female visual and flight systems, (2 a higher wing loading (i.e. a proxy for flight performance, larger eyes and larger facet sizes in the frontal and lateral region of the eye (i.e. better navigation capacities in the species inhabiting naturally fragmented habitat compared to the species inhabiting rather continuous habitat, and (3 larger facets in the frontal region in dispersers compared to residents within a species. Hence, dispersers may have similar locomotory capacity but potentially better navigation capacity. Dispersal ecology and evolution have attracted much attention, but there are still significant gaps in our understanding of the mechanisms of dispersal. Unfortunately, for many

  14. Flight Morphology, Compound Eye Structure and Dispersal in the Bog and the Cranberry Fritillary Butterflies: An Inter- and Intraspecific Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlure, Camille; Schtickzelle, Nicolas; Van Dyck, Hans; Seymoure, Brett; Rutowski, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Understanding dispersal is of prime importance in conservation and population biology. Individual traits related to motion and navigation during dispersal may differ: (1) among species differing in habitat distribution, which in turn, may lead to interspecific differences in the potential for and costs of dispersal, (2) among populations of a species that experiences different levels of habitat fragmentation; (3) among individuals differing in their dispersal strategy and (4) between the sexes due to sexual differences in behaviour and dispersal tendencies. In butterflies, the visual system plays a central role in dispersal, but exactly how the visual system is related to dispersal has received far less attention than flight morphology. We studied two butterfly species to explore the relationships between flight and eye morphology, and dispersal. We predicted interspecific, intraspecific and intersexual differences for both flight and eye morphology relative to i) species-specific habitat distribution, ii) variation in dispersal strategy within each species and iii) behavioural differences between sexes. However, we did not investigate for potential population differences. We found: (1) sexual differences that presumably reflect different demands on both male and female visual and flight systems, (2) a higher wing loading (i.e. a proxy for flight performance), larger eyes and larger facet sizes in the frontal and lateral region of the eye (i.e. better navigation capacities) in the species inhabiting naturally fragmented habitat compared to the species inhabiting rather continuous habitat, and (3) larger facets in the frontal region in dispersers compared to residents within a species. Hence, dispersers may have similar locomotory capacity but potentially better navigation capacity. Dispersal ecology and evolution have attracted much attention, but there are still significant gaps in our understanding of the mechanisms of dispersal. Unfortunately, for many species

  15. Epitope Predictions Indicate the Presence of Two Distinct Types of Epitope-Antibody-Reactivities Determined by Epitope Profiling of Intravenous Immunoglobulins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luštrek, Mitja; Lorenz, Peter; Kreutzer, Michael; Qian, Zilliang; Steinbeck, Felix; Wu, Di; Born, Nadine; Ziems, Bjoern; Hecker, Michael; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Cao, Zhiwei; Glocker, Michael O.; Li, Yixue; Fuellen, Georg; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Epitope-antibody-reactivities (EAR) of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) determined for 75,534 peptides by microarray analysis demonstrate that roughly 9% of peptides derived from 870 different human protein sequences react with antibodies present in IVIG. Computational prediction of linear B cell epitopes was conducted using machine learning with an ensemble of classifiers in combination with position weight matrix (PWM) analysis. Machine learning slightly outperformed PWM with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.884 vs. 0.849. Two different types of epitope-antibody recognition-modes (Type I EAR and Type II EAR) were found. Peptides of Type I EAR are high in tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine, and low in asparagine, glutamine and glutamic acid residues, whereas for peptides of Type II EAR it is the other way around. Representative crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) of Type I EAR are PDB 1TZI and PDB 2DD8, while PDB 2FD6 and 2J4W are typical for Type II EAR. Type I EAR peptides share predicted propensities for being presented by MHC class I and class II complexes. The latter interaction possibly favors T cell-dependent antibody responses including IgG class switching. Peptides of Type II EAR are predicted not to be preferentially presented by MHC complexes, thus implying the involvement of T cell-independent IgG class switch mechanisms. The high extent of IgG immunoglobulin reactivity with human peptides implies that circulating IgG molecules are prone to bind to human protein/peptide structures under non-pathological, non-inflammatory conditions. A webserver for predicting EAR of peptide sequences is available at www.sysmed-immun.eu/EAR. PMID:24244326

  16. Epitope predictions indicate the presence of two distinct types of epitope-antibody-reactivities determined by epitope profiling of intravenous immunoglobulins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitja Luštrek

    Full Text Available Epitope-antibody-reactivities (EAR of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs determined for 75,534 peptides by microarray analysis demonstrate that roughly 9% of peptides derived from 870 different human protein sequences react with antibodies present in IVIG. Computational prediction of linear B cell epitopes was conducted using machine learning with an ensemble of classifiers in combination with position weight matrix (PWM analysis. Machine learning slightly outperformed PWM with area under the curve (AUC of 0.884 vs. 0.849. Two different types of epitope-antibody recognition-modes (Type I EAR and Type II EAR were found. Peptides of Type I EAR are high in tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine, and low in asparagine, glutamine and glutamic acid residues, whereas for peptides of Type II EAR it is the other way around. Representative crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank (PDB of Type I EAR are PDB 1TZI and PDB 2DD8, while PDB 2FD6 and 2J4W are typical for Type II EAR. Type I EAR peptides share predicted propensities for being presented by MHC class I and class II complexes. The latter interaction possibly favors T cell-dependent antibody responses including IgG class switching. Peptides of Type II EAR are predicted not to be preferentially presented by MHC complexes, thus implying the involvement of T cell-independent IgG class switch mechanisms. The high extent of IgG immunoglobulin reactivity with human peptides implies that circulating IgG molecules are prone to bind to human protein/peptide structures under non-pathological, non-inflammatory conditions. A webserver for predicting EAR of peptide sequences is available at www.sysmed-immun.eu/EAR.

  17. Immunoinformatics Approach in Designing Epitope-based Vaccine against Meningitis-inducing Bacteria (, and Type b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilyatuz Zahroh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningitis infection is one of the major threats during Hajj season in Mecca. Meningitis vaccines are available, but their uses are limited in some countries due to religious reasons. Furthermore, they only give protection to certain serogroups, not to all types of meningitis-inducing bacteria. Recently, research on epitope-based vaccines has been developed intensively. Such vaccines have potential advantages over conventional vaccines in that they are safer to use and well responded to the antibody. In this study, we developed epitope-based vaccine candidates against various meningitis-inducing bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis , and Haemophilus influenzae type b. The epitopes were selected from their protein of polysaccharide capsule. B-cell epitopes were predicted by using BCPred, while T-cell epitope for major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I was predicted using PAProC, TAPPred, and Immune Epitope Database. Immune Epitope Database was also used to predict T-cell epitope for MHC class II. Population coverage and molecular docking simulation were predicted against previously generated epitope vaccine candidates. The best candidates for MHC class I- and class II-restricted T-cell epitopes were MQYGDKTTF, MKEQNTLEI, ECTEGEPDY, DLSIVVPIY, YPMAMMWRNASNRAI, TLQMTLLGIVPNLNK, ETSLHHIPGISNYFI, and SLLYILEKNAEMEFD, which showed 80% population coverage. The complexes of class I T-cell epitopes-HLA-C * 03:03 and class II T-cell epitopes-HLA-DRB1 * 11:01 showed better affinity than standards as evaluated from their δ G binding value and the binding interaction between epitopes and HLA molecules. These peptide constructs may further be undergone in vitro and in vivo testings for the development of targeted vaccine against meningitis infection.

  18. FRED--a framework for T-cell epitope detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldhahn, Magdalena; Dönnes, Pierre; Thiel, Philipp; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2009-10-15

    Over the last decade, immunoinformatics has made significant progress. Computational approaches, in particular the prediction of T-cell epitopes using machine learning methods, are at the core of modern vaccine design. Large-scale analyses and the integration or comparison of different methods become increasingly important. We have developed FRED, an extendable, open source software framework for key tasks in immunoinformatics. In this, its first version, FRED offers easily accessible prediction methods for MHC binding and antigen processing as well as general infrastructure for the handling of antigen sequence data and epitopes. FRED is implemented in Python in a modular way and allows the integration of external methods. FRED is freely available for download at http://www-bs.informatik.uni-tuebingen.de/Software/FRED.

  19. 'Multi-epitope-targeted' immune-specific therapy for a multiple sclerosis-like disease via engineered multi-epitope protein is superior to peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathali Kaushansky

    Full Text Available Antigen-induced peripheral tolerance is potentially one of the most efficient and specific therapeutic approaches for autoimmune diseases. Although highly effective in animal models, antigen-based strategies have not yet been translated into practicable human therapy, and several clinical trials using a single antigen or peptidic-epitope in multiple sclerosis (MS yielded disappointing results. In these clinical trials, however, the apparent complexity and dynamics of the pathogenic autoimmunity associated with MS, which result from the multiplicity of potential target antigens and "epitope spread", have not been sufficiently considered. Thus, targeting pathogenic T-cells reactive against a single antigen/epitope is unlikely to be sufficient; to be effective, immunospecific therapy to MS should logically neutralize concomitantly T-cells reactive against as many major target antigens/epitopes as possible. We investigated such "multi-epitope-targeting" approach in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE associated with a single ("classical" or multiple ("complex" anti-myelin autoreactivities, using cocktail of different encephalitogenic peptides vis-a-vis artificial multi-epitope-protein (designated Y-MSPc encompassing rationally selected MS-relevant epitopes of five major myelin antigens, as "multi-epitope-targeting" agents. Y-MSPc was superior to peptide(s in concomitantly downregulating pathogenic T-cells reactive against multiple myelin antigens/epitopes, via inducing more effective, longer lasting peripheral regulatory mechanisms (cytokine shift, anergy, and Foxp3+ CTLA4+ regulatory T-cells. Y-MSPc was also consistently more effective than the disease-inducing single peptide or peptide cocktail, not only in suppressing the development of "classical" or "complex EAE" or ameliorating ongoing disease, but most importantly, in reversing chronic EAE. Overall, our data emphasize that a "multi-epitope-targeting" strategy is required for

  20. Species interactions and chemical stress combined effects of intraspecific and interspecific interactions and pyrene n Daphnia magna populations dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viaene, K.P.J.; Laender, de F.; Rico, A.; Brink, van den P.J.; Guardo, Di A.; Morselli, M.; Janssen, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    Species interactions are often suggested as an important factor when assessing the effects of chemicals on higher levels of biological organization. Nevertheless, the contribution of intraspecific and interspecific interactions to chemical effects on populations is often overlooked. In the present

  1. The diverse effects of intraspecific competition on the selective advantage to resistance: A model and its predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weis, A.E.; Hochberg, M.E.

    2000-01-01

    We constructed a model to investigate conditions under which intraspecific competition amplifies or diminishes the selective advantage to resistance. The growth trajectories of competing individual plants were depicted by logistic difference equations that incorporated basic costs (lowered growth

  2. Intraspecific competition and high food availability are associated with insular gigantism in a lizard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafilis, Panayiotis; Meiri, Shai; Foufopoulos, Johannes; Valakos, Efstratios

    2009-09-01

    Resource availability, competition, and predation commonly drive body size evolution. We assess the impact of high food availability and the consequent increased intraspecific competition, as expressed by tail injuries and cannibalism, on body size in Skyros wall lizards ( Podarcis gaigeae). Lizard populations on islets surrounding Skyros (Aegean Sea) all have fewer predators and competitors than on Skyros but differ in the numbers of nesting seabirds. We predicted the following: (1) the presence of breeding seabirds (providing nutrients) will increase lizard population densities; (2) dense lizard populations will experience stronger intraspecific competition; and (3) such aggression, will be associated with larger average body size. We found a positive correlation between seabird and lizard densities. Cannibalism and tail injuries were considerably higher in dense populations. Increases in cannibalism and tail loss were associated with large body sizes. Adult cannibalism on juveniles may select for rapid growth, fuelled by high food abundance, setting thus the stage for the evolution of gigantism.

  3. Advances in synthetic peptide immuno-regulatory epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creticos, Peter Socrates

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic peptide immuno-regulatory epitopes (SPIRE) represent a new class of therapeutics for allergen immunotherapy that offer the potential to suppress the IgE-mediated allergic disease process through induction of T-cell tolerance. These synthetic T-cell-tolerizing peptides have been designed to induce immunologic tolerance via binding to MHC class II molecules on antigen presenting cells, with subsequent upregulation of regulatory T-cells.

  4. Rare insights into intraspecific brood parasitism and apparent quasi–parasitism in black–capped chickadees

    OpenAIRE

    Otter, K. A.; Murray, B. W.; Holschuh, C. I.; Fort, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic analysis of passerine birds often finds evidence of extra–pair copulations within species, but genetic evidence of intraspecific brood parasitism (IBP) and quasi–parasitism (Q–P) are relatively rare. Further, it is even rarer for genetic patterns that might indicate quasi–parasitism (resident male sires offspring through extra–pair copulations, and allows the female to lay these within the male’s nest) to be coupled with observational evidence of this behavior. In this paper, we repor...

  5. Behavioral signature of intraspecific competition and density dependence in colony-breeding marine predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, Greg A; Don Bowen, W; Leonard, Marty L

    2013-10-01

    In populations of colony-breeding marine animals, foraging around colonies can lead to intraspecific competition. This competition affects individual foraging behavior and can cause density-dependent population growth. Where behavioral data are available, it may be possible to infer the mechanism of intraspecific competition. If these mechanics are understood, they can be used to predict the population-level functional response resulting from the competition. Using satellite relocation and dive data, we studied the use of space and foraging behavior of juvenile and adult gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) from a large (over 200,000) and growing population breeding at Sable Island, Nova Scotia (44.0 (o)N 60.0 (o)W). These data were first analyzed using a behaviorally switching state-space model to infer foraging areas followed by randomization analysis of foraging region overlap of competing age classes. Patterns of habitat use and behavioral time budgets indicate that young-of-year juveniles (YOY) were likely displaced from foraging areas near (intraspecific competition between adults and juveniles, resulting in the currently observed decelerating logistic population growth. Competition theory predicts that intraspecific competition resulting in a clear losing competitor should cause compensatory population regulation. This functional response produces a smooth logistic growth curve as carrying capacity is approached, and is consistent with census data collected from this population over the past 50 years. The competitive mechanism causing compensatory regulation likely stems from the capital-breeding life-history strategy employed by gray seals. This strategy decouples reproductive success from resources available around breeding colonies and prevents females from competing with each other while young are dependent.

  6. Epitope Mapping of Monoclonal Antibody PMab-52 Against Cat Podoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Kaneko, Mika K; Yamada, Shinji; Kato, Yukinari

    2018-02-02

    The mucin-type membrane glycoprotein podoplanin (PDPN) is frequently overexpressed in numerous malignant cancers, including squamous cell carcinoma, germinal neoplasia, mesothelioma, lung cancer, oral cancer, and brain tumor. PDPN expression is strongly associated with cancer progression and poor prognosis. Furthermore, PDPN binds to C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) on platelets, followed by PDPN-mediated platelet aggregation to facilitate tumor metastasis. We have previously reported a novel anti-cat PDPN (cPDPN) monoclonal antibody (mAb), PMab-52, which specifically detects cPDPN using flow cytometry analysis and successfully identifies cPDPN in feline squamous cell carcinomas. However, the specific binding epitope of cPDPN for PMab-52 remains unelucidated. In this study, a series of deletion or point mutants of cPDPN were utilized for investigating the binding epitopes of PMab-52 using flow cytometry and Western blotting. The findings of this study revealed that the critical epitopes of platelet aggregation-stimulating domain 4 (PLAG4) of cPDPN are responsible for the binding of PMab-52 to cPDPN.

  7. Optimal selection of epitopes for TXP-immunoaffinity mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joos Thomas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass spectrometry (MS based protein profiling has become one of the key technologies in biomedical research and biomarker discovery. One bottleneck in MS-based protein analysis is sample preparation and an efficient fractionation step to reduce the complexity of the biological samples, which are too complex to be analyzed directly with MS. Sample preparation strategies that reduce the complexity of tryptic digests by using immunoaffinity based methods have shown to lead to a substantial increase in throughput and sensitivity in the proteomic mass spectrometry approach. The limitation of using such immunoaffinity-based approaches is the availability of the appropriate peptide specific capture antibodies. Recent developments in these approaches, where subsets of peptides with short identical terminal sequences can be enriched using antibodies directed against short terminal epitopes, promise a significant gain in efficiency. Results We show that the minimal set of terminal epitopes for the coverage of a target protein list can be found by the formulation as a set cover problem, preceded by a filtering pipeline for the exclusion of peptides and target epitopes with undesirable properties. Conclusions For small datasets (a few hundred proteins it is possible to solve the problem to optimality with moderate computational effort using commercial or free solvers. Larger datasets, like full proteomes require the use of heuristics.

  8. Effects of Intraspecific Competition and Host-Parasitoid Developmental Timing on Foraging Behaviour of a Parasitoid Wasp

    OpenAIRE

    Couchoux, Christelle; van Nouhuys, Saskya

    2014-01-01

    In a context where hosts are distributed in patches and susceptible to parasitism for a limited time, female parasitoids foraging for hosts might experience intraspecific competition. We investigated the effects of host and parasitoid developmental stage and intraspecific competition among foraging females on host-searching behaviour in the parasitoid wasp Hyposoter horticola. We found that H. horticola females have a pre-reproductive adult stage during which their eggs are not mature yet and...

  9. Antibody Production and Th1-biased Response Induced by an Epitope Vaccine Composed of Cholera Toxin B Unit and Helicobacter pylori Lpp20 Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Chen, Zhongbiao; Ye, Jianbin; Ning, Lijun; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Lili; Jiang, Yin; Xi, Yue; Ning, Yunshan

    2016-06-01

    The epitope vaccine is an attractive potential for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Lpp20 is one of major protective antigens which trigger immune response after H. pylori invades host and has been considered as an excellent vaccine candidate for the control of H. pylori infection. In our previous study, one B-cell epitope and two CD4(+) T-cell epitopes of Lpp20 were identified. In this study, an epitope vaccine composed of mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and these three identified Lpp20 epitopes were constructed to investigate the efficacy of this epitope vaccine in mice. The epitope vaccine including CTB, one B-cell, and two CD4(+) T-cell epitopes of Lpp20 was constructed and named CTB-Lpp20, which was then expressed in Escherichia coli and used for intraperitoneal immunization in BALB/c mice. The immunogenicity, specificity, and ability to induce antibodies against Lpp20 and cytokine secretion were evaluated. After that, CTB-Lpp20 was intragastrically immunized to investigate the prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy in infected mice. The results indicated that the epitope vaccine CTB-Lpp20 possessed good immunogenicity and immunoreactivity and could elicit specific high level of antibodies against Lpp20 and the cytokine of IFN-γ and IL-17. Additionally, CTB-Lpp20 significantly decreased H. pylori colonization in H. pylori challenging mice, and the protection was correlated with IgG, IgA, and sIgA antibody and Th1-type cytokines. This study will be better for understanding the protective immunity of epitope vaccine, and CTB-Lpp20 may be an alternative strategy for combating H. pylori invasion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Intraspecific differentiation of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides sensu lato based on in silico multilocus PCR-RFLP fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdeen, Stephen; Rampersad, Sephra N

    2013-02-01

    Colletotrichum gloeosporioides sensu lato is one of the most common and widely distributed plant pathogens in the world. Understanding fungal biodiversity is hinged on accurate identification and delimitation at the inter- and intraspecific levels. Sequences of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region (ITS), β-tubulin (TUB), actin (ACT), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) genes of 30 C. gloeosporioides sensu lato isolates, collected from anthracnose infected papaya fruits grown in the main production areas in Trinidad, were analyzed by in silico PCR-RFLP analysis with the aim of identifying which gene region(s) had the highest level of intraspecific polymorphism. Restriction site polymorphisms generated from 13 restriction enzymes enabled the identification of specific enzymes that were successful at intraspecific discrimination of the C. gloeosporioides isolates. Genetic distance values were reflective of the level of polymorphisms obtained for the four different gene regions. In both cases (calculated genetic distance and percentage of polymorphic loci from RFLP profiles), ACT and ITS gene regions had the highest level of restriction site polymorphisms and genetic diversity, GPDH and TUB had the lowest. Cluster analysis based on PCR-RFLP genetic distance data revealed sub-specific placement of the isolates which appeared to be gene-dependent. The implications of these findings are discussed relative to biodiversity monitoring and the need for multilocus, polyphasic investigations which must take into account the possibility of exaggerated estimates of genetic diversity.

  11. Experimental test of intraspecific competition mechanisms among tadpoles of Leptodactylus ocellatus (Anura: Leptodactylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Maneyro, Raúl

    2008-03-01

    Intraspecific competition is predicted to strongly influence species abundance and dynamics through two main mechanisms: consumption and interference of resources. Tadpoles were used in experiments in which we tried to elucidate the relative importance of each mechanism. Our goal was to apply this experimental procedure to Leptodactylus ocellatus, a common South American anuran, a species whose larvae exhibit aggregative behavior and receive parental care. Previous work suggests that tadpole schools should present lower levels of intraspecific competition. Tadpoles from a single nest were reared in the laboratory in three densities (1, 2, and 4 individuals/container) and three food levels (1, 2, and 4 ration multiples) in a randomized three-block design for a factorial analysis of variance, up to day eight. Contrary to previous work with other species, our results show both the absence of interference competition effects, and that larval growth depends only on per capita food availability. The differences between species in intraspecific competition mechanisms are probably related to strong differences in ecology and life history. Leptodactylus ocellatus tadpoles could be directing interference competition away from their kin, reducing schooling costs. Further studies (including kinship as a factor) would give more information about these larvae, allowing a better understanding of the evolutionary and ecological mechanisms behind the biological patterns observed in Leptodactylus species.

  12. Intraspecific Competition and Inbreeding Depression: Increased Competitive Effort by Inbred Males Is Costly to Outbred Opponents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jon; Smiseth, Per T

    2017-05-01

    A recent theoretical model suggests that intraspecific competition is an important determinant of the severity of inbreeding depression. The reason for this is that intraspecific competition is density dependent, leading to a stronger negative effect on inbred individuals if they are weaker competitors than outbred ones. In support of this prediction, previous empirical work shows that inbred individuals are weaker competitors than outbred ones and that intraspecific competition often exacerbates inbreeding depression. Here, we report an experiment on the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides, in which we recorded the outcome of competition over a small vertebrate carcass between an inbred or outbred male resident caring for a brood and a size-matched inbred or outbred male intruder. We found that inbred males were more successful as intruders in taking over a carcass from a male resident and were injured more frequently as either residents or intruders. Furthermore, inbred males gained less mass during the breeding attempt and had a shorter adult life span than outbred males. Finally, successful resident males reared a substantially smaller brood comprised of lighter larvae when the intruder was inbred than when it was outbred. Our results shows that inbred males increased their competitive effort, thus contradicting previous work suggesting that inbred males are weaker competitors. Furthermore, our results shows that inbred intruders impose a greater cost to resident males, suggesting that outbred individuals can suffer fitness costs as a result of competition with inbred ones.

  13. Effects of clonal fragmentation on intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous floating plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P; Xu, Y-S; Dong, B-C; Xue, W; Yu, F-H

    2014-11-01

    Disturbance is common and can fragment clones of plants. Clonal fragmentation may affect the density and growth of ramets so that it could alter intraspecific competition. To test this hypothesis, we grew one (low density), five (medium density) or nine (high density) parent ramets of the floating invasive plant Pistia stratiotes in buckets, and newly produced offspring ramets were either severed (with fragmentation) or remained connected to parent ramets (no fragmentation). Increasing density reduced biomass of the whole clone (i.e. parent ramet plus its offspring ramets), showing intense intraspecific competition. Fragmentation decreased biomass of offspring ramets, but increased biomass of parent ramets and the whole clone, suggesting significant resource translocation from parent to offspring ramets when clones were not fragmented. There was no interaction effect of density x fragmentation on biomass of the whole clone, and fragmentation did not affect competition intensity index. We conclude that clonal fragmentation does not alter intraspecific competition between clones of P. stratiotes, but increases biomass production of the whole clone. Thus, fragmentation may contribute to its interspecific competitive ability and invasiveness, and intentional fragmentation should not be recommended as a measure to stop the rapid growth of this invasive species. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  14. Identification of three HLA-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T cell epitopes in the cytomegalovirus protein pp65 that are conserved between eight strains of the virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solache, A; Morgan, C L; Dodi, A I; Morte, C; Scott, I; Baboonian, C; Zal, B; Goldman, J; Grundy, J E; Madrigal, J A

    1999-11-15

    The Ag specificity of the CTL response against CMV is directed almost entirely to a single CMV tegument protein, the phosphoprotein pp65. We report the identification of three peptides derived from the protein pp65 that displayed a high or intermediate binding to HLA-A*0201 molecules, which were also able to induce an in vitro CTL response in peripheral blood lymphocytes from CMV seropositive individuals. The peptide-specific CTLs generated were capable of recognizing the naturally processed pp65 either presented by CMV-infected cells or by cells infected with an adenovirus construct expressing pp65 in an HLA-A*0201-restricted manner. Thus, we were able to demonstrate responses to subdominant CTL epitopes in CMV-pp65 that were not detected in polyclonal cultures obtained by conventional stimulations. We also found that the amino acid sequences of the three peptides identified as HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes were conserved among different wild-type strains of CMV obtained from renal transplant patients, an AIDS patient, and a congenitally infected infant, as well as three laboratory strains of the virus (AD169, Towne and Davis). These observations suggest that these pp65 CTL peptide epitopes could potentially be used as synthetic peptide vaccines or for other therapeutic strategies aimed at HLA-A*0201-positive individuals, who represent approximately 40% of the European Caucasoid population. However, strain variation must be taken in consideration when the search for CTL epitopes is extended to other HLA class I alleles, because these mutations may span potential CTL epitopes for other HLA molecules, as it is described in this study.

  15. Traits underlying community consequences of plant intra-specific diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Abdala-Roberts

    upon the source of plant trait variation, and that the nature of such dynamics may vary both within and among trophic levels.

  16. Allozymic Variation and Relationships within Viola sect. Viola (Violaceae) in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrvarz Shahryar Saeidi; Yeganeh Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation and differentiation in taxa of the genus Viola L. sect. Viola, subsections Viola and Rostratae (Kupffer) W. Becker, were studied from natural populations occurring in Iran. Two isoenzyme systems, Phosphoglucoisomerase (PGI) and Aconitase (ACO), encoding four putative loci, were employed to detect interspecific and intraspecific genetic variation. Considering the patterns of isoenzyme variation in the studied taxa, it is evident that V. caspia (Rupr.) Freyn subsp. caspia and ...

  17. Epitope mapping from real time kinetic studies – Role of cross ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    gestion reduced k+1 by 50% (2⋅5 to 1⋅375: rows 1 and 2); clearly proving the .... tics (table 4). The core region of β-subunit is behind the epitope region and does not block the epitope. The role of βlys122 is very clearly marked as the amino acid block- ing the epitope ..... The relative affinity constant (KA de- termined by the ...

  18. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanathan, Babu; Poh, Chit Laa; Kirk, Kristin; McBride, William John Hannan; Aaskov, John; Grollo, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction app...

  19. Genetic dissection of maize phenology using an intraspecific introgression library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanguineti Maria C

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collections of nearly isogenic lines where each line carries a delimited portion of a donor source genome into a common recipient genetic background are known as introgression libraries and have already shown to be instrumental for the dissection of quantitative traits. By means of marker-assisted backcrossing, we have produced an introgression library using the extremely early-flowering maize (Zea mays L. variety Gaspé Flint and the elite line B73 as donor and recipient genotypes, respectively, and utilized this collection to investigate the genetic basis of flowering time and related traits of adaptive and agronomic importance in maize. Results The collection includes 75 lines with an average Gaspé Flint introgression length of 43.1 cM. The collection was evaluated for flowering time, internode length, number of ears, number of nodes (phytomeres, number of nodes above the ear, number and proportion of nodes below the ear and plant height. Five QTLs for flowering time were mapped, all corresponding to major QTLs for number of nodes. Three additional QTLs for number of nodes were mapped. Besides flowering time, the QTLs for number of nodes drove phenotypic variation for plant height and number of nodes below and above the top ear, but not for internode length. A number of apparently Mendelian-inherited phenotypes were also observed. Conclusions While the inheritance of flowering time was dominated by the well-known QTL Vgt1, a number of other important flowering time QTLs were identified and, thanks to the type of plant material here utilized, immediately isogenized and made available for fine mapping. At each flowering time QTL, early flowering correlated with fewer vegetative phytomeres, indicating the latter as a key developmental strategy to adapt the maize crop from the original tropical environment to the northern border of the temperate zone (southern Canada, where Gaspé Flint was originally cultivated. Because of

  20. Phenotypic and molecular variation in the green and black poison-dart frog Dendrobates auratus (Anura: Dendrobatidae) from Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa D Patrick; Mahmood Sasa

    2009-01-01

    The green and black poison-dart frog Dendrobates auratus exhibits high intraspecific variation in hue color and pattern throughout its range, making it a very popular species in the pet trade. We analyzed the correspondence between color variation and molecular variation of D. auratus from Costa Rica using RAPD analysis. Twenty-six random primers were analyzed for variation in 99 individuals from seven populations. Color pattern was scored from digital images of the dorsal and ventral views. ...

  1. Designing and overproducing a tandem epitope of gp350/220 that shows a potential to become an EBV vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widodo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV can cause cancer in people from around the world. There is no EBV vaccine available for use on a global scale. However, emerging evidence suggests that the epitope on the gp350/220 capsid protein may be developed into an EBV vaccine. Nevertheless, the production of small, single epitope is challenging of stability issues and possible alteration of peptide structure. In this study, a tandem epitope was developed consisting of three single epitopes, aimed to improve stability, antigenicity and preserve epitope structure. Materials and methods: A tandem epitope was designed using bioinformatics based on the epitope structure of the gp350/220 protein. The tandem epitope structure was analyzed using a protein folding method with Abalone software, which was further refined via YASARA force field and molecular repairing using a FoldX method. Immunogenicity was examined with Epitopia software, whereas allergen properties were tested using AlgPred. The pattern of the tandem epitope binding with anti-gp350/220 antibodies was performed using Z-dock and snugDock. The tandem epitope was then overproduced in E. coli strain BL21 as a host cell. Result: Our model demonstrated a successfully designed and overproduced tandem epitope. The tandem epitope demonstrated a similar structure compared with the epitope of whole protein gp350/220. Our epitope also demonstrated non-allergen and antigenicity properties, and possessed antibody binding patterns consistent with whole protein gp350/220. Conclusion and recommendation: These data suggest a novel tandem epitope composed of three similar epitopes demonstrates antigenicity, structure, and binding properties consistent with whole protein gp350/220. We also demonstrate successful production of the tandem epitope using E. coli strain BL21 as a host. Future in vivo experimental animal research is necessary to test the ability of this tandem epitope to stimulate antibody production

  2. Epitope-dependent functional effects of celiac disease autoantibodies on transglutaminase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hnida, Kathrin; Stamnaes, Jorunn; du Pré, M Fleur

    2016-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a Ca(2+)-dependent cross-linking enzyme involved in the pathogenesis of CD. We have previously characterized a panel of anti-TG2 mAbs generated from gut plasma cells of celiac patients and identified four epitopes (epitopes 1-4) located in the N-terminal part of TG2...... of epitope 1-targeting B cells to keep TG2 active and protected from oxidation might explain why generation of epitope 1-targeting plasma cells seems to be favored in celiac patients....

  3. Computer aided epitope design as a peptide vaccine component against Lassa virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Ar-Rafi Md; Imtiaz, Syed Hassan; Zerin, Tasnim; Rahman, Tania; Shekhar, Hossain Uddin

    2017-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is an arena virus causing hemorrhagic fever and it is endemic in several regions of West Africa. The disease-causing virus records high mortality rate in endemic regions due to lack of appropriate treatment and prevention strategies. Therefore, it is of interest to design and develop viable vaccine components against the virus. We used the Lassa virus envelope glyco-proteins as a vaccine target to identify linear peptides as potential epitopes with immunogenic properties by computer aided epitope prediction tools. We report a T-cell epitope 'LLGTFTWTL' and a B-cell epitope 'AELKCFGNTAVAKCNE' with predicted potential immunogenicity for further in vivo and in vitro consideration.

  4. Structural and dynamical characteristics of tropomyosin epitopes as the major allergens in shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Hideo; Umezawa, Koji; Takano, Mitsunori; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Watabe, Shugo; Ochiai, Yoshihiro

    2018-03-25

    Ingestion of marine invertebrates often causes food allergy, where the major allergens have been reported to be derived from tropomyosin (TM). Intact or the digestive fragments of food allergens generally show resistance to digestion, which is usually attributable to the structural stability (or rigidity). The difference in the structural and dynamical characteristics between the epitope and the non-epitope regions in TM has not yet been well understood. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulation was performed at constant pHs for shrimp TM. By analyzing the main-chain dihedral angle fluctuations and local α-helix contents, we found that the epitope regions are more stable than the non-epitope counterparts, providing a possible physical reason for the resistance to digestion in the epitopes regions. The difference of the structural stability between the epitope and the non-epitope regions was largest at low pHs, even though pH dependence of the structural stability in itself was not significant in both regions. The lower content of the Ala cluster in the epitope region is considered to cause the higher stability of the epitope region. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification and characterization of survivin-derived H-2Kb-restricted CTL epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, Uta B; Voigt, Heike; Andersen, Mads H

    2009-01-01

    for potential binding K(b)-restricted octamer peptide epitopes. Two epitopes, which bind strongly to K(b), were selected to test their immunogenicity in vivo. Spleen cells from mice vaccinated by intradermal injection of mature DC pulsed with these peptides displayed reactivity to the respective epitopes...... in subcutaneous tumors revealed that survivin-specific vaccination significantly reduced the number of intratumoral vessels. In summary, we demonstrated the immunogenicity of two K(b)-restricted peptide epitopes derived from the murine survivin protein; moreover, survivin-specific vaccination not only resulted...

  6. EpiJen: a server for multistep T cell epitope prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Pingping

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main processing pathway for MHC class I ligands involves degradation of proteins by the proteasome, followed by transport of products by the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, where peptides are bound by MHC class I molecules, and then presented on the cell surface by MHCs. The whole process is modeled here using an integrated approach, which we call EpiJen. EpiJen is based on quantitative matrices, derived by the additive method, and applied successively to select epitopes. EpiJen is available free online. Results To identify epitopes, a source protein is passed through four steps: proteasome cleavage, TAP transport, MHC binding and epitope selection. At each stage, different proportions of non-epitopes are eliminated. The final set of peptides represents no more than 5% of the whole protein sequence and will contain 85% of the true epitopes, as indicated by external validation. Compared to other integrated methods (NetCTL, WAPP and SMM, EpiJen performs best, predicting 61 of the 99 HIV epitopes used in this study. Conclusion EpiJen is a reliable multi-step algorithm for T cell epitope prediction, which belongs to the next generation of in silico T cell epitope identification methods. These methods aim to reduce subsequent experimental work by improving the success rate of epitope prediction.

  7. Sperm length variation as a predictor of extrapair paternity in passerine birds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lifjeld, J. T.; Laskemoen, T.; Kleven, O.; Albrecht, Tomáš; Robertson, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 10 (2010), e13456 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : postcopulatory sexual selection * pair paternity * intraspecific variation * molecular phylogeny * mating systems * zebra finch Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 4.411, year: 2010

  8. Length polymorphism scanning is an efficient approach for revealing chloroplast DNA variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew E. Horning; Richard C. Cronn

    2006-01-01

    Phylogeographic and population genetic screens of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) provide insights into seedbased gene flow in angiosperms, yet studies are frequently hampered by the low mutation rate of this genome. Detection methods for intraspecific variation can be either direct (DNA sequencing) or indirect (PCR-RFLP), although no single method incorporates the best...

  9. Multiple linear B-cell epitopes of classical swine fever virus glycoprotein E2 expressed in E.coli as multiple epitope vaccine induces a protective immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jian-Chao

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Classical swine fever is a highly contagious disease of swine caused by classical swine fever virus, an OIE list A pathogen. Epitope-based vaccines is one of the current focuses in the development of new vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV. Two B-cell linear epitopes rE2-ba from the E2 glycoprotein of CSFV, rE2-a (CFRREKPFPHRMDCVTTTVENED, aa844-865 and rE2-b (CKEDYRYAISSTNEIGLLGAGGLT, aa693-716, were constructed and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as multiple epitope vaccine. Fifteen 6-week-old specified-pathogen-free (SPF piglets were intramuscularly immunized with epitopes twice at 2-week intervals. All epitope-vaccinated pigs could mount an anamnestic response after booster vaccination with neutralizing antibody titers ranging from 1:16 to 1:256. At this time, the pigs were subjected to challenge infection with a dose of 1 × 106 TCID50 virulent CSFV strain. After challenge infection, all of the rE2-ba-immunized pigs were alive and without symptoms or signs of CSF. In contrast, the control pigs continuously exhibited signs of CSF and had to be euthanized because of severe clinical symptoms at 5 days post challenge infection. The data from in vivo experiments shown that the multiple epitope rE2-ba shown a greater protection (similar to that of HCLV vaccine than that of mono-epitope peptide(rE2-a or rE2-b. Therefore, The results demonstrated that this multiple epitope peptide expressed in a prokaryotic system can be used as a potential DIVA (differentiating infected from vaccinated animals vaccine. The E.coli-expressed E2 multiple B-cell linear epitopes retains correct immunogenicity and is able to induce a protective immune response against CSFV infection.

  10. Human Antibodies that Recognize Novel Immunodominant Quaternary Epitopes on the HIV-1 Env Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicar, Mark D; Chen, Xuemin; Sulli, Chidananda; Barnes, Trevor; Goodman, Jason; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Briney, Bryan; Willis, Jordan; Chukwuma, Valentine U; Kalams, Spyros A; Doranz, Benjamin J; Spearman, Paul; Crowe, James E

    2016-01-01

    Numerous broadly neutralizing antibodies (Abs) target epitopes that are formed or enhanced during mature HIV envelope formation (i.e. quaternary epitopes). Generally, it is thought that Env epitopes that induce broadly neutralizing Abs are difficult to access and poorly immunogenic because of the characteristic oligomerization, conformational flexibility, sequence diversity and extensive glycosylation of Env protein. To enhance for isolation of quaternary epitope-targeting Abs (QtAbs), we previously used HIV virus-like particles (VLPs) to bind B cells from long-term non-progressor subjects to identify a panel of monoclonal Abs. When expressed as recombinant full-length Abs, a subset of these novel Abs exhibited the binding profiles of QtAbs, as they either failed to bind to monomeric Env protein or showed much higher affinity for Env trimers and VLPs. These QtAbs represented a significant proportion of the B-cell response identified with VLPs. The Ab genes of these clones were highly mutated, but they did not neutralize common HIV strains. We sought to further define the epitopes targeted by these QtAbs. Competition-binding and mapping studies revealed these Abs targeted four separate epitopes; they also failed to compete for binding by Abs to known major neutralizing epitopes. Detailed epitope mapping studies revealed that two of the four epitopes were located in the gp41 subunit of Env. These QtAbs bound pre-fusion forms of antigen and showed differential binding kinetics depending on whether oligomers were produced as recombinant gp140 trimers or as full-length Env incorporated into VLPs. Antigenic regions within gp41 present unexpectedly diverse structural epitopes, including these QtAb epitopes, which may be targeted by the naturally occurring Ab response to HIV infection.

  11. IMMUNOCAT—A Data Management System for Epitope Mapping Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo L. Chung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To enable rationale vaccine design, studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of immune recognition need to be linked with clinical studies in humans. A major challenge in conducting such translational research studies lies in the management and integration of large amounts and various types of data collected from multiple sources. For this purpose, we have established “IMMUNOCAT”, an interactive data management system for the epitope discovery research projects conducted by our group. The system provides functions to store, query, and analyze clinical and experimental data, enabling efficient, systematic, and integrative data management. We demonstrate how IMMUNOCAT is utilized in a large-scale research contract that aims to identify epitopes in common allergens recognized by T cells from human donors, in order to facilitate the rational design of allergy vaccines. At clinical sites, demographic information and disease history of each enrolled donor are captured, followed by results of an allergen skin test and blood draw. At the laboratory site, T cells derived from blood samples are tested for reactivity against a panel of peptides derived from common human allergens. IMMUNOCAT stores results from these T cell assays along with MHC:peptide binding data, results from RAST tests for antibody titers in donor serum, and the respective donor HLA typing results. Through this system, we are able to perform queries and integrated analyses of the various types of data. This provides a case study for the use of bioinformatics and information management techniques to track and analyze data produced in a translational research study aimed at epitope identification.

  12. High-Throughput Tools for Characterization of Antibody Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Anders

    binders. In this study, phage display screenings were used to identify peptides that could inhibit a major toxin in cobra snake venom, α-cobratoxin. Peptide inhibitors were successfully identified. Importantly, HTS enabled the identification of toxin inhibitors that were not discovered by traditional...... phage display. Phage display coupled with HTS was again used in Chapter 3 in an attempt to map the epitopes of a therapeutic target injected into animals. The animals were immunized with a therapeutic target and the expectation was that they develop antibodies, which can be used in therapy. While...

  13. Some epitopes conservation in non structural 3 protein dengue virus serotype 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegar A. P. Siregar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Protein Non Struktural 3 (NS3 virus dengue menginduksi respon antibodi netralisasidan respon sel T CD4+ dan CD8+, serta berperan dalam replikasi virus. Protein NS3 memiliki epitopepitopsel T dan B yang terdapat perbedaan kelestarian pada berbagai strain virus dengue serotipe 4(DENV-4. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kelestarian epitop sel T dan B pada protein NS3DENV-4 strain-strain dunia dan keempat serotipe virus dengue strain Indonesia.Metode: Penelitian ini dilakukan di Departemen Mikrobiologi Fakultas Kedokteran UI sejak Juni 2013 - April2014. Sekuens asam amino NS3 DENV-4 strain 081 didapatkan setelah produk PCR gen NS3 DENV-4 081disekuensing. Epitop-epitop sel T dan sel B protein NS3 DENV-4 081 dianalisis dan dibandingkan dengansekuens asam amino protein NS3 dari 124 strain DENV-4 di dunia dan keempat serotipe DENV strain Indonesia.Strain-strain dunia merupakan strain yang ada di benua Amerika (Venezuela, Colombia, dll dan Asia (Cina,Singapura, dll. Referensi posisi epitop sel T dan B protein NS3 diperoleh dari laporan penelitian terdahulu.Hasil: Delapan epitop sel T dan 2 epitop sel B dari protein NS3 DENV-4 081 ternyata identik dan lestaripada protein NS3 dari 124 strain DENV-4 dunia. Epitop sel B di posisi asam amino 537-544 pada proteinNS3 DENV-4 081 ternyata identik dan lestari dengan epitop sel B protein NS3 dari keempat serotipeDENV strain Indonesia.Kesimpulan: Kelestarian yang luas dari epitop sel T dan B pada hampir seluruh strain DENV-4 dunia danserotipe-serotipe DENV strain Indonesia. (Health Science Journal of Indonesia 2015;6:126-31Kata kunci: virus dengue, protein NS3, epitop sel T, epitop sel B AbstractBackground: Non Structural 3 (NS3 protein of dengue virus (DENV is known to induce antibody, CD4+and CD8+ T cell responses, and playing role in viral replication. NS3 protein has T and B cell epitopes,which has conservation difference between DENV-4 strains. This study aimed to identify

  14. Assessing the Importance of Intraspecific Variability in Dung Beetle Functional Traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah M Griffiths

    Full Text Available Functional diversity indices are used to facilitate a mechanistic understanding of many theoretical and applied questions in current ecological research. The use of mean trait values in functional indices assumes that traits are robust, in that greater variability exists between than within species. While the assertion of robust traits has been explored in plants, there exists little information on the source and extent of variability in the functional traits of higher trophic level organisms. Here we investigated variability in two functionally relevant dung beetle traits, measured from individuals collected from three primary forest sites containing distinct beetle communities: body mass and back leg length. In doing so we too addressed the following questions: (i what is the contribution of intra vs. interspecific differences in trait values; (ii what sample size is needed to provide representative species mean trait values; and (iii what impact does omission of intraspecific trait information have on the calculation of functional diversity (FD indices from naturally assembled communities? At the population level, interspecific differences explained the majority of variability in measured traits (between 94% and 96%. In accordance with this, the error associated with calculating FD without inclusion of intraspecific variability was low, less than 20% in all cases. This suggests that complete sampling to capture intraspecific variance in traits is not necessary even when investigating the FD of small and/or naturally formed communities. To gain an accurate estimation of species mean trait values we encourage the measurement of 30-60 individuals and, where possible, these should be taken from specimens collected from the site of study.

  15. Assessing the Importance of Intraspecific Variability in Dung Beetle Functional Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Hannah M; Louzada, Julio; Bardgett, Richard D; Barlow, Jos

    2016-01-01

    Functional diversity indices are used to facilitate a mechanistic understanding of many theoretical and applied questions in current ecological research. The use of mean trait values in functional indices assumes that traits are robust, in that greater variability exists between than within species. While the assertion of robust traits has been explored in plants, there exists little information on the source and extent of variability in the functional traits of higher trophic level organisms. Here we investigated variability in two functionally relevant dung beetle traits, measured from individuals collected from three primary forest sites containing distinct beetle communities: body mass and back leg length. In doing so we too addressed the following questions: (i) what is the contribution of intra vs. interspecific differences in trait values; (ii) what sample size is needed to provide representative species mean trait values; and (iii) what impact does omission of intraspecific trait information have on the calculation of functional diversity (FD) indices from naturally assembled communities? At the population level, interspecific differences explained the majority of variability in measured traits (between 94% and 96%). In accordance with this, the error associated with calculating FD without inclusion of intraspecific variability was low, less than 20% in all cases. This suggests that complete sampling to capture intraspecific variance in traits is not necessary even when investigating the FD of small and/or naturally formed communities. To gain an accurate estimation of species mean trait values we encourage the measurement of 30-60 individuals and, where possible, these should be taken from specimens collected from the site of study.

  16. Warming effects on consumption and intraspecific interference competition depend on predator metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Birgit; Rall, Björn C; Brose, Ulrich

    2012-05-01

    1. Model analyses show that the stability of population dynamics and food web persistence increase with the strength of interference competition. Despite this critical importance for community stability, little is known about how external factors such as the environmental temperature affect intraspecific interference competition. 2. We aimed to fill this void by studying the functional responses of two ground beetle species of different body size, Pterostichus melanarius and Poecilus versicolor. These functional response experiments were replicated across four predator densities and two temperatures to address the impact of temperature on intraspecific interference competition. 3. We generally expected that warming should increase the speed of movement, encounter rates and in consequence interference among predator individuals. In our experiment, this expectation was supported by the results obtained for the larger predator, P. melanarius, whereas the opposite pattern characterized the interference behaviour of the smaller predator P. versicolor. 4. These results suggest potentially nontrivial implications for the effects of environmental temperature on intraspecific interference competition, for which we propose an explanation based on the different sensitivity to warming of metabolic rates of both species. As expected, increasing temperature led to stronger interference competition of the larger species, P. melanarius, which exhibited a weaker increase in metabolic rate with increasing temperature. The stronger increase in the metabolic rate of the smaller predator, P. versicolor, had to be compensated by increasing searching activity for prey, which did not leave time for increasing interference. 5. Together, these results suggest that any generalization how interference competition responds to warming should also take the species' metabolic response to temperature increases into account. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2011

  17. Long-term evolution of polygenic traits under frequency-dependent intraspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kristan A

    2007-05-01

    We analytically investigate the long-term evolution of a continuously varying quantitative character in a diploid population that is determined additively by a finite number of loci. The trait is under a mixture of frequency-dependent disruptive selection induced by intraspecific competition and frequency-independent stabilizing selection. Moreover, the trait is restricted to a finite range by constraints on the particular loci. Our investigations are based on explicit analytical results (provided by Bürger [2005. A multilocus analysis of intraspecific competition and stabilizing selection on a quantitative trait. J. Math. Biol. 50, 355-396]; Schneider [2006. A multilocus-multiallele analysis of frequency-dependent selection induced by intraspecific competition. J. Math. Biol. 52, 483-523]) on the short-term dynamics under the assumption of linkage equilibrium. We show that the population always reaches a long-term equilibrium (LTE), i.e., an equilibrium that is resistant against perturbations of mutations of sufficiently small effect. In general, several LTEs can coexist. They can be calculated explicitly, and we provide necessary and sufficient conditions for their existence. In the case that more than one LTE exists, we exemplify numerically that the evolutionary outcome depends crucially on the initial genetic architecture, on the joint distribution of mutational effects across loci, and on the particular realization of the mutation process. Therefore, long-term evolution cannot be predicted from the ecology alone. We further show that a partial order exists for the LTEs. The set of LTEs has a 'largest' element, an LTE which is reached during long-term evolution if the effects of the occurring mutant alleles are sufficiently large.

  18. Larval intraspecific competition for food in the European grapevine moth Lobesia botrana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiéry, D; Monceau, K; Moreau, J

    2014-08-01

    Effective pest management with lower amounts of pesticides relies on accurate prediction of insect pest growth rates. Knowledge of the factors governing this trait and the resulting fitness of individuals is thus necessary to refine predictions and make suitable decisions in crop protection. The European grapevine moth, Lobesia botrana, the major pest of grapes in Europe, is responsible for huge economic losses. Larvae very rarely leave the grape bunch on which they were oviposited and thus cannot avoid intraspecific competition. In this study, we determined the impact of intraspecific competition during the larval stage on development and adult fitness in this species. This was tested by rearing different numbers of larvae on an artificial diet and measuring developmental and reproductive life history traits. We found that intraspecific competition during larval development has a slight impact on the fitness of L. botrana. The principal finding of this work is that larval density has little effect on the life history traits of survivors. Thus, the timing of eclosion, duration of subsequent oviposition, fecundity appears to be more uniform in L. botrana than in other species. The main effect of larval crowding was a strong increase of larval mortality at high densities whereas the probability of emergence, sex ratio, pupal mass, fecundity and longevity of mated females were not affected by larval crowding. Owing to increased larval mortality at high larval densities, we hypothesized that mortality of larvae at high densities provided better access to food for the survivors with the result that more food was available per capita and there were no effect on fitness of survivors. From our results, larval crowding alters the reproductive capacity of this pest less than expected but this single factor should now be tested in interaction with limited resources in the wild.

  19. Multi-clone infections and the impact of intraspecific competition on trematode colonies with a division of labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Melanie M; Poulin, Robert

    2014-02-01

    A division of labour occurs in colonies of the trematode Philophthalmus sp. within their first intermediate hosts. Two castes exist: one which reproduces and one which does not reproduce. It has been hypothesized that the benefit of the non-reproductive caste is in competitive interactions. Evidence for this from past experiments with Philophthalmus sp. colonies has been contradictory: the non-reproductive caste appears to benefit the colony in some way but not necessarily by combating interspecific competitors. The aims of this study were to consider intraspecific competition as a possible cause of the division of labour in Philophthalmus sp. colonies. Results show that mixed genotype infections occur in Philophthalmus sp. infected hosts and thus intraspecific competition is likely. Furthermore, the total number of individuals per colony is reduced in mixed genotype infections, indicating that intraspecific competition reduces colony fitness. However, the results do not indicate that the division of labour in Philophthalmus sp. plays a role in competitive interactions as the ratio of small, non-reproductive to large, reproductive individuals is unaffected by the presence of intraspecific competition. This is the first study to identify and quantify intraspecific competition in Philophthalmus sp., and to assess its selective role in this species' division of labour.

  20. Rhizosphere priming effects on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics among tree species with and without intraspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liming; Dijkstra, Feike A; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Biao; Cheng, Weixin

    2018-03-07

    Rhizosphere priming effects (RPEs) play a central role in modifying soil organic matter mineralization. However, effects of tree species and intraspecific competition on RPEs are poorly understood. We investigated RPEs of three tree species (larch, ash and Chinese fir) and the impact of intraspecific competition of these species on the RPE by growing them at two planting densities for 140 d. We determined the RPE on soil organic carbon (C) decomposition, gross and net nitrogen (N) mineralization and net plant N acquisition. Differences in the RPE among species were associated with differences in plant biomass. Gross N mineralization and net plant N acquisition increased, but net N mineralization decreased, as the RPE on soil organic C decomposition increased. Intraspecific competition reduced the RPE on soil organic C decomposition, gross and net N mineralization, and net plant N acquisition, especially for ash and Chinese fir. Microbial N mining may explain the overall positive RPEs across species, whereas intensified plant-microbe competition for N may have reduced the RPE with intraspecific competition. Overall, the species-specific effects of tree species play an important role in modulating the magnitude and mechanisms of RPEs and the intraspecific competition on soil C and N dynamics. © 2018 The Authors New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Buffer zones of territories of gray wolves as regions of intraspecific strife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L.D.

    1994-01-01

    The locations of 22 territorial gray wolves (Canis lupus) killed by conspecifics in northeastern Minnesota were analyzed in a study involving radio-telemetry from 1968 through 1992. Twenty-three percent of the wolves were killed precisely on the borders of their estimated territories; 41%, within 1.0 km (16% of the radius of their mean-estimated territory) inside or outside the estimated edge; 91%, within 3.2 km inside or outside (50% of the radius of their mean-estimated territory) of the estimated edge. This appears to be the first report of intraspecific mortality of mammals along territorial boundaries.

  2. Examining variation in the leaf mass per area of dominant species across two contrasting tropical gradients in light of community assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neyret, Margot; Bentley, Lisa Patrick; Oliveras Menor, Imma; Marimon, Beatriz S.; Marimon-Junior, Ben Hur; Almeida de Oliveira, Edmar; Barbosa Passos, Fábio; Castro Ccoscco, Rosa; Santos, dos Josias; Matias Reis, Simone; Morandi, Paulo S.; Rayme Paucar, Gloria; Robles Cáceres, Arturo; Valdez Tejeira, Yolvi; Yllanes Choque, Yovana; Salinas, Norma; Shenkin, Alexander; Asner, Gregory P.; Díaz, Sandra; Enquist, Brian J.; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2016-01-01

    Understanding variation in key functional traits across gradients in high diversity systems and the ecology of community changes along gradients in these systems is crucial in light of conservation and climate change. We examined inter- and intraspecific variation in leaf mass per area (LMA) of

  3. Computational Approaches to Facilitate Epitope-Based HLA Matching in Solid Organ Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, Kirsten; Wissing, Jeroen; Koppenaal, Dirk; Niemann, Matthias; Spierings, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Epitope-based HLA matching has been emerged over the last few years as an improved method for HLA matching in solid organ transplantation. The epitope-based matching concept has been incorporated in both the PIRCHE-II and the HLAMatchmaker algorithm to find the most suitable donor for a recipient.

  4. Epitope mapping from real time kinetic studies–Role of cross-linked ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Real time kinetic studies were used to map conformational epitopes in human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) for two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The epitopes were identified in the regions (5–14 and 55–62). The association rate constant (+1) was found to be altered by chemical modification of hCG, and the ionic ...

  5. Conservation analysis of dengue virust-cell epitope-based vaccine candidates using peptide block entropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Zhang, Guang Lan; Keskin, Derin B.

    2011-01-01

    Broad coverage of the pathogen population is particularly important when designing CD8+ T-cell epitope vaccines against viral pathogens. Traditional approaches are based on combinations of highly conserved T-cell epitopes. Peptide block entropy analysis is a novel approach for assembling sets of ...

  6. Docking of B-cell epitope antigen to specific hepatitis B antibody

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interaction of pres1 region of hepatitis B virus B-cell epitope antigen with specific hepatitis B neutralizing monoclonal antibody was examined by docking study. We modelled the 3D complex structure of B-cell epitope antigen residues CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNCY by homology modelling and docked it with the ...

  7. IgE epitopes of intact and digested Ara h 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Nielsen, H.; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    epitopes have been suggested to be of great importance. ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to identify IgE specific epitopes of intact and digested Ara h 1, and to compare epitope patterns between humans and rats. MethodsSera from five peanut allergic patients and five Brown Norway rats were used...... to identify intact and digested Ara h 1-specific IgE epitopes by competitive immunoscreening of a phage-displayed random hepta-mer peptide library using polyclonal IgE from the individual sera. The resulting peptide sequences were mapped on the surface of a three-dimensional structure of the Ara h 1 molecule...... to mimic epitopes using a computer-based algorithm. ResultsPatients as well as rats were shown to have individual IgE epitope patterns. All epitope mimics were conformational and found to cluster into three different areas of the Ara h 1 molecule. Five epitope motifs were identified by patient IgE, which...

  8. In Silico Analysis of Epitope-Based Vaccine Candidates against Hepatitis B Virus Polymerase Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Juzeng; Lin, Xianfan; Wang, Xiuyan; Zheng, Liyu; Lan, Songsong; Jin, Sisi; Ou, Zhanfan; Wu, Jinming

    2017-05-16

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has persisted as a major public health problem due to the lack of an effective treatment for those chronically infected. Therapeutic vaccination holds promise, and targeting HBV polymerase is pivotal for viral eradication. In this research, a computational approach was employed to predict suitable HBV polymerase targeting multi-peptides for vaccine candidate selection. We then performed in-depth computational analysis to evaluate the predicted epitopes' immunogenicity, conservation, population coverage, and toxicity. Lastly, molecular docking and MHC-peptide complex stabilization assay were utilized to determine the binding energy and affinity of epitopes to the HLA-A0201 molecule. Criteria-based analysis provided four predicted epitopes, RVTGGVFLV, VSIPWTHKV, YMDDVVLGA and HLYSHPIIL. Assay results indicated the lowest binding energy and high affinity to the HLA-A0201 molecule for epitopes VSIPWTHKV and YMDDVVLGA and epitopes RVTGGVFLV and VSIPWTHKV, respectively. Regions 307 to 320 and 377 to 387 were considered to have the highest probability to be involved in B cell epitopes. The T cell and B cell epitopes identified in this study are promising targets for an epitope-focused, peptide-based HBV vaccine, and provide insight into HBV-induced immune response.

  9. Mature Epitope Density - A strategy for target selection based on immunoinformatics and exported prokaryotic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Anderson R; Pereira, Vanessa Bastos; Barbosa, Eudes

    2013-01-01

    . However, currently available tools do not account for the concentration of epitope products in the mature protein product and its relation to the reliability of target selection. RESULTS: We developed a computational strategy based on measuring the epitope's concentration in the mature protein, called...

  10. MHC class I epitope binding prediction trained on small data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Morten; Lamberth, K.

    2004-01-01

    The identification of potential T-cell epitopes is important for development of new human or vetenary vaccines, both considering single protein/subunit vaccines, and for epitope/peptide vaccines as such. The highly diverse MHC class I alleles bind very different peptides, and accurate binding pre...... in situations where only very limited data are available for training....

  11. Approaching rational epitope vaccine design for hepatitis C virus with meta-server and multivalent scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Linling; Cheng, Yushao; Kong, Leopold; Azadnia, Parisa; Giang, Erick; Kim, Justin; Wood, Malcolm R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun; Zhu, Jiang

    2015-08-01

    Development of a prophylactic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been hampered by the extraordinary viral diversity and the poor host immune response. Scaffolding, by grafting an epitope onto a heterologous protein scaffold, offers a possible solution to epitope vaccine design. In this study, we designed and characterized epitope vaccine antigens for the antigenic sites of HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 (residues 314-324) and E2 (residues 412-423), for which neutralizing antibody-bound structures are available. We first combined six structural alignment algorithms in a “scaffolding meta-server” to search for diverse scaffolds that can structurally accommodate the HCV epitopes. For each antigenic site, ten scaffolds were selected for computational design, and the resulting epitope scaffolds were analyzed using structure-scoring functions and molecular dynamics simulation. We experimentally confirmed that three E1 and five E2 epitope scaffolds bound to their respective neutralizing antibodies, but with different kinetics. We then investigated a “multivalent scaffolding” approach by displaying 24 copies of an epitope scaffold on a self-assembling nanoparticle, which markedly increased the avidity of antibody binding. Our study thus demonstrates the utility of a multi-scale scaffolding strategy in epitope vaccine design and provides promising HCV immunogens for further assessment in vivo.

  12. Structural and Dynamic Insight into Hirudin Epitopes-HLA- DRB1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    problem in the clinical use of hirudin is its immunogenicity [4]. Hirudin has been shown to ... The construction of the three-dimensional structures of the two selected epitopes ( .... (a) native epitope Hir 1-15 (I1TYTDCTESGQNLCL15) native residue Thr (ball and stick, mauve) and its analog modified peptide [Lys4] Hir 1-15 ...

  13. Docking of B-cell epitope antigen to specific hepatitis B antibody

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Abstract. The interaction of pres1 region of hepatitis B virus B-cell epitope antigen with specific hepa- titis B neutralizing monoclonal antibody was examined by docking study. We modelled the 3D complex structure of B-cell epitope antigen residues CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNCY by homology model- ling and ...

  14. Production of Epitope-Specific Antibodies by Immunization with Synthetic Epitope Peptide Formulated with CpG-DNA-Liposome Complex Without Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongbum; Lee, Younghee; Kwon, Hyung-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Antibody production using synthetic peptides has been investigated extensively to develop therapeutic antibodies and prophylactic vaccines. Previously, we reported that a complex of CpG-DNA and synthetic peptides corresponding to B cell epitopes, encapsulated in a phosphatidyl-β-oleoyl-γ-palmitoyl ethanolamine (DOPE):cholesterol hemisuccinate (CHEMS) complex, significantly enhanced the synthetic peptide-specific IgG production. Here, we describe synthetic peptide-based epitope screening and antibody production without conventional carriers.

  15. Immunoglobulins against Tyrosine Nitrated Epitopes in Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Leonor; Tenopoulou, Margarita; Lightfoot, Richard; Tsika, Epida; Parastatidis, Ioannis; Martinez, Marissa; Greco, Todd M.; Doulias, Paschalis-Thomas; Wu, Yuping; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Hazen, Stanley L.; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Background Several lines of evidence support a pathophysiological role of immunity in atherosclerosis. Tyrosine nitrated proteins, a footprint of oxygen and nitrogen derived oxidants generated by cells of the immune system, are enriched in atheromatous lesions and in circulation of coronary artery disease (CAD) subjects. However, the consequences of possible immune reactions triggered by the presence of nitrated proteins in subjects with clinically documented atherosclerosis have not been explored. Methods and Results Specific immunoglobulins that recognize 3-nitrotyrosine epitopes were identified in human lesions, as well as in circulation of CAD subjects. The levels of circulating immunoglobulins against 3-nitrotyrosine epitopes were quantified in CAD patients (n=374) and subjects without CAD (non CAD controls, n=313). A ten-fold increase in the mean level of circulating immunoglobulins against protein-bound 3-nitrotyrosine was documented in the CAD subjects (3.75 ± 1.8 μg antibody Eq/mL plasma vs. 0.36 ± 0.8 μg antibody Eq/mL plasma), and was strongly associated with angiographic evidence of significant CAD. Conclusions The results of this cross sectional study suggest that post-translational modification of proteins via nitration within atherosclerotic plaque-laden arteries and in circulation serve as neoepitopes for elaboration of immunoglobulins, thereby providing an association between oxidant production and the activation of the immune system in CAD. PMID:23081989

  16. Epitope-based approaches to a universal influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Tanya; Ben-Yedidia, Tamar

    2014-11-01

    The development of vaccines has been one of the most important contributions of immunology to public health to date. Although several infectious diseases have all but vanished thanks to effective vaccines, the most common infectious disease, influenza, still represents a major threat to public health. This is more concerning than ever before in light of potentially virulent avian pandemic strains which have emerged in the last decade and infected human hosts, causing high morbidity and mortality. Despite considerable efforts to improve production of influenza vaccines and vaccinate large portions of the population annually, the currently available influenza vaccines are strain-specific and not effective enough. Considering the vulnerability of infants and elderly to seasonal influenza-related complications and the ever present public health threat of a deadly influenza pandemic, there is urgent need for a new kind of influenza vaccine. Ideally, such a vaccine should provide enhanced long term, multi-strain protection without compromising safety and in this way, dramatically improve global protection against seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses. This review highlights one approach to developing a universal influenza vaccine, which is based on highly conserved viral sequences, 'epitopes', that specifically activate humoral and/or cellular immune responses. This approach to vaccinology was pioneered by Prof Arnon, who initiated development of an epitope-based universal vaccine called Multimeric-001 (M-001), which has already been validated in clinical trials to induce broad immunity against A and B-Type, seasonal and pandemic strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Improving wheat to remove coeliac epitopes but retain functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewry, Peter R; Tatham, Arthur S

    2016-01-01

    Coeliac disease is an intolerance triggered by the ingestion of wheat gluten proteins. It is of increasing concern to consumers and health professionals as its incidence appears to be increasing. The amino acid sequences in gluten proteins that are responsible for triggering responses in sensitive individuals have been identified showing that they vary in distribution among and between different groups of gluten proteins. Conventional breeding may therefore be used to select for gluten protein fractions with lower contents of coeliac epitopes. Molecular breeding approaches can also be used to specifically down-regulate coeliac-toxic proteins or mutate coeliac epitopes within individual proteins. A combination of these approaches may therefore be used to develop a "coeliac-safe" wheat. However, this remains a formidable challenge due to the complex multigenic control of gluten protein composition. Furthermore, any modified wheats must retain acceptable properties for making bread and other processed foods. Not surprisingly, such coeliac-safe wheats have not yet been developed despite over a decade of research.

  18. Reliable B cell epitope predictions: impacts of method development and improved benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kringelum, Jens Vindahl; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole

    2012-01-01

    evaluation data set improved from 0.712 to 0.727. Our results thus demonstrate that given proper benchmark definitions, B-cell epitope prediction methods achieve highly significant predictive performances suggesting these tools to be a powerful asset in rational epitope discovery. The updated version...... biomedical applications such as; rational vaccine design, development of disease diagnostics and immunotherapeutics. However, experimental mapping of epitopes is resource intensive making in silico methods an appealing complementary approach. To date, the reported performance of methods for in silico mapping...... of B-cell epitopes has been moderate. Several issues regarding the evaluation data sets may however have led to the performance values being underestimated: Rarely, all potential epitopes have been mapped on an antigen, and antibodies are generally raised against the antigen in a given biological...

  19. Conservation of HIV-1 T cell epitopes across time and clades: validation of immunogenic HLA-A2 epitopes selected for the GAIA HIV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitz, Lauren; Koita, Ousmane A; Sangare, Kotou; Ardito, Matthew T; Boyle, Christine M; Rozehnal, John; Tounkara, Karamoko; Dao, Sounkalo M; Koné, Youssouf; Koty, Zoumana; Buus, Soren; Moise, Leonard; Martin, William D; De Groot, Anne S

    2012-12-14

    HIV genomic sequence variability has complicated efforts to generate an effective globally relevant vaccine. Regions of the viral genome conserved in sequence and across time may represent the "Achilles' heel" of HIV. In this study, highly conserved T-cell epitopes were selected using immunoinformatics tools combining HLA-A2 supertype binding predictions with relative global conservation. Analysis performed in 2002 on 10,803 HIV-1 sequences, and again in 2009, on 43,822 sequences, yielded 38 HLA-A2 epitopes. These epitopes were experimentally validated for HLA binding and immunogenicity with PBMCs from HIV-infected patients in Providence, Rhode Island, and/or Bamako, Mali. Thirty-five (92%) stimulated an IFNγ response in PBMCs from at least one subject. Eleven of fourteen peptides (79%) were confirmed as HLA-A2 epitopes in both locations. Validation of these HLA-A2 epitopes conserved across time, clades, and geography supports the hypothesis that such epitopes could provide effective coverage of virus diversity and would be appropriate for inclusion in a globally relevant HIV vaccine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Selection of SARS-Coronavirus-specific B cell epitopes by phage peptide library screening and evaluation of the immunological effect of epitope-based peptides on mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hua; Jiang Lifang; Fang Danyun; Yan Huijun; Zhou Jingjiao; Zhou Junmei; Liang Yu; Gao Yang; Zhao, Wei; Long Beiguo

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies to SARS-Coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-specific B cell epitopes might recognize the pathogen and interrupt its adherence to and penetration of host cells. Hence, these epitopes could be useful for diagnosis and as vaccine constituents. Using the phage-displayed peptide library screening method and purified Fab fragments of immunoglobulin G (IgG Fab) from normal human sera and convalescent sera from SARS-CoV-infected patients as targets, 11 B cell epitopes of SARS-CoV spike glycoprotein (S protein) and membrane protein (M protein) were screened. After a bioinformatics tool was used to analyze these epitopes, four epitope-based S protein dodecapeptides corresponding to the predominant epitopes were chosen for synthesis. Their antigenic specificities and immunogenicities were studied in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry and ELISPOT analysis of lymphocytes as well as a serologic analysis of antibody showed that these peptides could trigger a rapid, highly effective, and relatively safe immune response in BALB/c mice. These findings might aid development of SARS diagnostics and vaccines. Moreover, the role of S and M proteins as important surface antigens is confirmed

  1. Comparative method of protein expression and isolation of EBV epitope in E.coli DH5α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyndita, Nadya V. M.; Dluha, Nurul; Himmah, Karimatul; Rifa'i, Muhaimin; Widodo

    2017-11-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) or human herpes virus 4 (HHV-4) is a virus that infects human B cell and leads to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The prevention of this disease remains unsuccessful since the vaccine has not been discovered. The objective of this study is to over-produce EBV gp350/220 epitope using several methods in E.coli DH5α. EBV epitope sequences were inserted into pMAL-p5x vector, then transformed into DH5α E.coli and over-produced using 0.3, 1 and 2 mM IPTG. Plasmid transformation was validated using AflIII restriction enzyme in 0.8% agarose. Periplasmic protein was isolated using 2 comparative methods and then analyzed using SDS-PAGE. Method A produced a protein band around 50 kDa and appeared only at transformant. Method B failed to isolate the protein, indicated by no protein band appearing. In addition, any variations in IPTG concentration didn't give a different result. Thus it can be concluded that even the lowest IPTG concentration is able to induce protein expression.

  2. A novel multi-variant epitope ensemble vaccine against avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Defang; Wang, Guihua; Huang, Libo; Zheng, Qiankun; Li, Chengui; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2017-12-04

    The hypervariable antigenicity and immunosuppressive features of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) has led to great challenges to develop effective vaccines. Epitope vaccine will be a perspective trend. Previously, we identified a variant antigenic neutralizing epitope in hypervariable region 1 (hr1) of ALV-J, N-LRDFIA/E/TKWKS/GDDL/HLIRPYVNQS-C. BLAST analysis showed that the mutation of A, E, T and H in this epitope cover 79% of all ALV-J strains. Base on this data, we designed a multi-variant epitope ensemble vaccine comprising the four mutation variants linked with glycine and serine. The recombinant multi-variant epitope gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The expressed protein of the variant multi-variant epitope gene can react with positive sera and monoclonal antibodies of ALV-J, while cannot react with ALV-J negative sera. The multi-variant epitope vaccine that conjugated Freund's adjuvant complete/incomplete showed high immunogenicity that reached the titer of 1:64,000 at 42 days post immunization and maintained the immune period for at least 126 days in SPF chickens. Further, we demonstrated that the antibody induced by the variant multi-variant ensemble epitope vaccine recognized and neutralized different ALV-J strains (NX0101, TA1, WS1, BZ1224 and BZ4). Protection experiment that was evaluated by clinical symptom, viral shedding, weight gain, gross and histopathology showed 100% chickens that inoculated the multi-epitope vaccine were well protected against ALV-J challenge. The result shows a promising multi-variant epitope ensemble vaccine against hypervariable viruses in animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification and validation of T-cell epitopes in outer membrane protein (OMP) of Salmonella typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanu, Arifur Rahman; Ashraf, Mohammad Arif; Hossain, Md Faruk; Ismail, Md; Shekhar, Hossain Uddin

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to design epitope-based peptides for the utility of vaccine development by targeting outer membrane protein F (Omp F), because two available licensed vaccines, live oral Ty21a and injectable polysaccharide, are 50% to 80% protective with a higher rate of side effects. Conventional vaccines take longer time for development and have less differentiation power between vaccinated and infected cells. On the other hand, Peptide-based vaccines present few advantages over other vaccines, such as stability of peptide, ease to manufacture, better storage, avoidance of infectious agents during manufacture, and different molecules can be linked with peptides to enhance their immunogenicity. Omp F is highly conserved and facilitates attachment and fusion of Salmonella typhi with host cells. Using various databases and tools, immune parameters of conserved sequences from Omp F of different isolates of Salmonella typhi were tested to predict probable epitopes. Binding analysis of the peptides with MHC molecules, epitopes conservancy, population coverage, and linear B cell epitope prediction were analyzed. Among all those predicted peptides, ESYTDMAPY epitope interacted with six MHC alleles and it shows highest amount of interaction compared to others. The cumulative population coverage for these epitopes as vaccine candidates was approximately 70%. Structural analysis suggested that epitope ESYTDMAPY fitted well into the epitope-binding groove of HLA-C*12:03, as this HLA molecule was common which interact with each and every predicted epitopes. So, this potential epitope may be linked with other molecules to enhance its immunogenicity and used for vaccine development.

  4. Structural and functional analysis of orthopoxvirus epitopes with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerny, C P; Mahnel, H

    1990-10-01

    Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced in BALB/c mice immunized with live modified vaccinia virus Ankara or infected with sublethal doses of the neurovirulent vaccinia virus strain Munich 1. The immunization scheme proved to be important for obtaining MAbs of different specificity. The MAbs could be classified into three epitope groups (1 A, 1 B and 2). Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that the epitopes were localized on the virus surface. In immunoblotting, MAbs were reactive with polypeptides of 14K, 16K and 30K. Purified MAbs binding to the epitopes 1 A and 2 showed a 50% reduction of 100 p.f.u./0.05 ml vaccinia virus M1 with respectively 3.9 and 5.9 ng of immunoglobulin/0.05 ml. MAbs binding to the epitope 1 B neutralized the virus at a concentration of 250 ng/0.05 ml. In intraperitoneal challenge experiments, MAbs binding to the epitopes 1 A and 2 protected mice against 4 LD50 of vaccinia virus M1, but not against local lesions by subcutaneous application. MAbs against epitope 1 B had no protective effect in vivo. The three epitopes were present in 14 of 16 orthopoxviruses tested but with quantitative differences. Maximal binding (Vmax) and the antibody concentration at half-maximal binding (Km) which were calculated as for Michaelis-Menten kinetics from regression analysis of the ELISA data and the MAb concentration giving 50% plaque reduction were the basis for the evaluation. In monkey-pox virus Kopenhagen the epitopes 1 A and 1 B were absent. MAbs binding to epitope 2 reacted just as well as with vaccinia viruses. Ectromelia virus lacked all the epitopes.

  5. Which species will successfully track climate change? The influence of intraspecific competition and density dependent dispersal on range shifting dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, A.S.; Johst, K.; Muenkemueller, T.; Travis, J.M.J.

    2007-09-15

    Understanding the ability of species to shift their geographic range is of considerable importance given the current period of rapid climate change. Furthermore, a greater understanding of the spatial population dynamics underlying range shifting is required to complement the advances made in climate niche modelling. A simulation model is developed which incorporates three key features that have been largely overlooked in studies of range shifting dynamics: the form of intraspecific competition, density dependent dispersal and the transient dynamics of habitat patches. The results show that the exact shape of the response depends critically on both local and patch dynamics. Species whose intraspecific competition is contest based are more vulnerable than those whose competition is scramble based. Contesters are especially sensitive when combined with density dependent dispersal. Species living in patches whose carrying capacity grows slowly are also susceptible to rapid shifts of environmental conditions. A complementary analytic approach further highlights the importance of intraspecific competition. (au)

  6. Recent observations of intraspecific predation and cannibalism among polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Stirling, I.; Smith, T.S.; Perham, C.; Thiemann, G.W.

    2006-01-01

    Intraspecific killing has been reported among polar bears (Ursus maritimus), brown bears (U. arctos), and black bears (U. americanus). Although cannibalism is one motivation for such killings, the ecological factors mediating such events are poorly understood. Between 24 January and 10 April 2004, we confirmed three instances of intraspecific predation and cannibalism in the Beaufort Sea. One of these, the first of this type ever reported for polar bears, was a parturient female killed at her maternal den. The predating bear was hunting in a known maternal denning area and apparently discovered the den by scent. A second predation event involved an adult female and cub recently emerged from their den, and the third involved a yearling male. During 24 years of research on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea region of northern Alaska and 34 years in northwestern Canada, we have not seen other incidents of polar bears stalking, killing, and eating other polar bears. We hypothesize that nutritional stresses related to the longer ice-free seasons that have occurred in the Beaufort Sea in recent years may have led to the cannibalism incidents we observed in 2004. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  7. Rare insights into intraspecific brood parasitism and apparent quasi–parasitism in black–capped chickadees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otter, K. A.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic analysis of passerine birds often finds evidence of extra–pair copulations within species, but genetic evidence of intraspecific brood parasitism (IBP and quasi–parasitism (Q–P are relatively rare. Further, it is even rarer for genetic patterns that might indicate quasi–parasitism (resident male sires offspring through extra–pair copulations, and allows the female to lay these within the male’s nest to be coupled with observational evidence of this behavior. In this paper, we report behavioral observations surrounding the nest of black–capped chickadee, one of the few species in which both IBP and Q–P have been detected through a genetic analysis. These were later confirmed to have young genetically mismatched with both attending parents, as well as mismatched with the attending female but sired by the attending male. The behavioral patterns associated with this nest are contrasted with the two previously reported cases of IPB/Q–P in this species, and suggest that rare ‘detection’ of quasi–parasitism may be explained by converging patterns of extra–pair behavior and the rarer strategy of intraspecific brood parasitism.

  8. Cultivar mixtures: a meta-analysis of the effect of intraspecific diversity on crop yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Emily R; Drinkwater, Laurie E

    2018-01-01

    Extensive research has shown that greater plant community diversity leads to higher levels of productivity and other ecosystem services, and such increased diversity has been suggested as a way to improve yield and agricultural sustainability. Increasing intraspecific diversity with cultivar mixtures is one way to increase diversity in agricultural systems. We examined the relationship between intraspecific diversity and yield in cultivar mixtures using a meta-analysis of 91 studies and >3,600 observations. Additionally, we investigated how environmental and management factors might influence this relationship, and if the yield stability of cultivar mixtures differed from that of monocultures. We found that the yield increased by 2.2% overall in cultivar mixtures relative to their monoculture components. Mixtures with more cultivars and those with more functional trait diversity showed higher relative yields. Under biotic stressors, such as disease pressure, and abiotic stressors, such as low levels of soil organic matter and nutrient availability, this diversity effect was stronger, resulting in higher relative yields. Finally, cultivar mixtures generally showed higher yield stability compared to monocultures, especially in response to annual weather variability at a site over time. This practice of mixing cultivars can be integrated into intensified cropping systems where species monocultures dominate, as well as in smallholder cropping systems where low-cost improvements are in demand. Overall, these results suggest that cultivar mixtures are a viable strategy to increase diversity in agroecosystems, promoting increased yield and yield stability, with minimal environmental impact. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  9. Intraspecific reproductive character displacement in a polymorphic poison dart frog, Dendrobates pumilio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards-Zawacki, Corinne L; Cummings, Molly E

    2011-01-01

    Divergence in male mating signals and associated female preferences is often an important step in the process of speciation. Reproductive character displacement, the pattern of greater divergence of male signals and/or female preference in sympatry than in allopatry, has been observed in a variety of taxa with different degrees of postzygotic isolation. A number of selective processes, including reinforcement, have been proposed to cause such a pattern. Cases in which reproductive character displacement occurs among intraspecific variants are especially informative for understanding how selection acting within a species can lead to the evolution of reproductive barriers and speciation. This study tested the hypothesis that female strawberry poison dart frogs (Dendrobates pumilio) in polymorphic populations of the Bocas del Toro archipelago of Panama show stronger mating discrimination than do females from monomorphic populations, exhibiting an intraspecific pattern of reproductive character displacement. Our results contribute important insights into understanding selection's role in generating the striking diversity of Bocas del Toro's D. pumilio and provide a snapshot of what could be the early stages of reproductive isolation and speciation. © 2010 The Author(s). Evolution© 2010 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. Evolution of dominance under frequency-dependent intraspecific competition in an assortatively mating population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peischl, Stephan; Schneider, Kristan A

    2010-02-01

    We study the evolution of higher levels of dominance as a response to negative frequency-dependent selection. In contrast to previous studies, we focus on the effect of assortative mating on the evolution of dominance under frequency-dependent intraspecific competition. We analyze a two-locus two-allele model, in which the primary locus has a major effect on a quantitative trait that is under a mixture of frequency-independent stabilizing selection, density-dependent selection, and frequency-dependent selection caused by intraspecific competition for a continuum of resources. The second (modifier) locus determines the degree of dominance at the trait level. Additionally, the population mates assortatively with respect to similarities in the ecological trait. Our analysis shows that the parameter region in which dominance can be established decreases if small levels of assortment are introduced. In addition, the degree of dominance that can be established also decreases. In contrast, if assortment is intermediate, sexual selection for extreme types can be established, which leads to evolution of higher levels of dominance than under random mating. For modifiers with large effects, intermediate levels of assortative mating are most favorable for the evolution of dominance. For large modifiers, the speed of fixation can even be higher for intermediate levels of assortative mating than for random mating.

  11. Effect of intraspecific competition and substrate type on terpene emissions from some Mediterranean plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormeño, Elena; Bousquet-Mélou, Anne; Mévy, Jean-Philippe; Greff, Stéphane; Robles, Christine; Bonin, Gilles; Fernandez, Catherine

    2007-02-01

    Competition is an important factor that has been extensively reported in the Mediterranean area. There is evidence that leaf terpene accumulation may vary between plants growing on calcareous and siliceous soils. In the present study, leaf terpene emissions from potted seedlings of Pinus halepensis, Cistus albidus, and Quercus coccifera, growing under natural environmental conditions on calcareous and siliceous substrates, were studied by using a bag enclosure method. In both substrates, seedlings were potted alone and in intraspecific competition, to examine the effect of substrate type and that of intraspecific competition on terpene emissions. The results showed that competition favored: (i) overall monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions from Q. coccifera; (ii) overall monoterpene emissions from P. halepensis; (iii) overall sesquiterpene emissions from C. albidus. Substrate type affected terpene emissions to a limited extent and in a species-specific way. Whereas for Q. coccifera, the overall monoterpene emissions and that of Allo-aromadendrene were favored on siliceous substrate, no significant changes were found in emissions from P. halepensis. Only the release of AR-curcumene from C. albidus was higher on siliceous substrate. We also found high variability in terpene emission composition from the study species, particularly for P. halepensis and Q. coccifera. These two species released both monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, instead of monoterpenes only, as shown in previous studies.

  12. Conflicting selection in the course of adaptive diversification: the interplay between mutualism and intraspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimundo, Rafael L G; Gibert, Jean P; Hembry, David H; Guimarães, Paulo R

    2014-03-01

    Adaptive speciation can occur when a population undergoes assortative mating and disruptive selection caused by frequency-dependent intraspecific competition. However, other interactions, such as mutualisms based on trait matching, may generate conflicting selective pressures that constrain species diversification. We used individual-based simulations to explore how different types of mutualism affect adaptive diversification. A magic trait was assumed to simultaneously mediate mate choice, intraspecific competition, and mutualisms. In scenarios of intimate, specialized mutualisms, individuals interact with one or few individual mutualistic partners, and diversification is constrained only if the mutualism is obligate. In other scenarios, increasing numbers of different partners per individual limit diversification by generating stabilizing selection. Stabilizing selection emerges from the greater likelihood of trait mismatches for rare, extreme phenotypes than for common intermediate phenotypes. Constraints on diversification imposed by increased numbers of partners decrease if the trait matching degree has smaller positive effects on fitness. These results hold after the relaxation of various assumptions. When trait matching matters, mutualism-generated stabilizing selection would thus often constrain diversification in obligate mutualisms, such as ant-myrmecophyte associations, and in low-intimacy mutualisms, including plant-seed disperser systems. Hence, different processes, such as trait convergence favoring the incorporation of nonrelated species, are needed to explain the higher richness of low-intimacy assemblages--shown here to be up to 1 order of magnitude richer than high-intimacy systems.

  13. Multiple infestation by seed predators: the effect of loculate fruits on intraspecific insect larval competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, José M.; Delgado, Juan A.; López, Francisco; Acosta, Francisco J.; Fungairiño, Sara G.

    2001-06-01

    Many morphological features of fruits are important factors affecting predispersal seed predation by insects. This paper analyses the predispersal seed predation process of a major predator (a Noctuidae lepidopteran larvae) in loculate fruits of a bushy perennial plant, Cistus ladanifer. The main aim of the study is to assess the potential effect of internal valvae (which partition groups of seeds) in the intraspecific competition between larvae in multiple-infested fruits. Our results show that larvae do not reject already infested fruits, but they avoid the proximity of other larvae within the fruit, keeping an average minimum distance of one locule. In multiple-infested fruits, larval mortality increases and the proportion of seeds consumed by each larvae decreases. In those situations in which valvae keep apart larvae within a fruit, these only suffer the cost of exploitation competition with a low acquisition of resources. However, when all valvae between them are pierced by the larvae, competition switches to an interference component and larval mortality increases markedly. The existence of valvae within a fruit allows larvae to diminish the cost of intraspecific competition, obtaining high life expectancies (70%), even in triple-infested fruits.

  14. Intraspecific Crossability in Andrographis paniculata Nees: A Barrier against Breeding of the Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Valdiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ambiguity of crossability in Andrographis paniculata (AP was pointed out in the present research. Accordingly, the effects of different style length and crossing time on intraspecific crossability of seven AP accessions in 21 possible combinations were investigated. The best results came out between 08:00 to 11:00 h for manual out-crossing of AP, while the time from 12:00 to 18:00 h showed a decreasing trend. Moreover, 12 mm style length was found as the most proper phenological stage in terms of stigmatic receptivity to perform out-crossing in this plant. All in all, AP behaved unlikely in each combination, and a significant difference was observed in crossability of AP accessions (<0.01. The lowest and highest crossability rate was found in hybrids 21 (11261NS × 11344K and 27 (11322PA × 11350T with 0.25% and 13.33%, respectively. Furthermore, a significant negative relationship between style length and crossibility (2=0.762∗∗ was recorded in this research. As a final conclusion, crossing time and proper style length can improve the intraspecific crossability in the species, considerably. Despite all the mentioned contrivances, we still believe that a genetic incongruity should be involved as an additional obstacle in crossability of those combinations that failed or responded deficiently to outcrossing.

  15. How recruitment, intraspecific interactions, and predation control species borders in a tidal estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, George H; Ewanchuk, Patrick J; Bertness, Mark D

    1999-03-01

    We examined the relative contribution of recruitment, intraspecific species interactions, and predation in controlling the upper intertidal border of the northern acorn barnacle, Semibalanusbalanoides, in a tidal estuary in Maine. We hypothesized that the contracted border at sites that experienced low tidal currents was due to flow-mediated recruitment that resulted in reduced survival due to the absence of neighbor buffering of thermal stress (i.e., positive intraspecific interactions). We tested this hypothesis by manipulating the density of recently settled barnacles and their thermal environment in a field experiment. Counter to our original hypothesis, barnacles with neighbors suffered severe mortality at low-flow sites. When density-dependent predation by the green crab (Carcinusmaenus) was experimentally eliminated, however, we did detect evidence for positive interactions at the low-flow sites but not at the high-flow sites. In spite of the close proximity of the sites, maximum daily rock temperatures at the low-flow sites were slightly, but consistently, greater than those at high-flow sites. Our findings suggest that the upper intertidal border of S. balanoides in the Damariscotta River is limited at low-flow sites by a combination of reduced recruitment, elevated mortality from thermal stress and enhanced predation by green crabs. More generally, our findings highlight how physical stress and predation interact to alter the nature of density-dependent species interactions in natural assemblages.

  16. Affinity study on bovine serum albumin's peptides to amphiphilic gold nanoparticles: A test of epitopes and non-epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming; Li, Wanrong; Yang, Mingming; Huang, Xiufeng; Bai, Zhijun; Liu, Yushuang; Cai, Weijun; Wang, Yuqin; Zhang, Feng

    2017-09-01

    It is an inevitable event that nanoparticles (NPs) will encounter proteins/peptides in nano-medicine, so it has been significant to know their interaction mechanism before in vivo applications. Previously, a 105-amino-acid sequence had been reported as the binding site between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and amphiphilic polymer coated gold nanoparticles (AP-AuNPs) along with a mortise-tenon joint hypothesis. This article tested the affinity difference between two epitope peptide sequences such as: LGEYGFQNALIVR (S1), DAFLGSFLYEYSR (S2) and one non-epitope peptide sequence as: FDEHVKLVNELTEF (S3). With the photoluminescent amino acid residues, the fluorescence quenching method based on the nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) principle was able to study the thermodynamics of the current binding system. The binding constants (Ka) were determined and followed the order as: Ka-S1 > Ka-S2 >> Ka-S3. Moreover, Hill constants indicated that cooperativity only presented in the interactions of AP-AuNP with either S1 or S2, but not for S3. Moreover, gel electrophoresis, surface plasmon resonance, atomic force microscopy and three dimensional fluorescence microscopy were all also used to comprehensively analyse the binding interaction mechanism. These results further provided useful information to better understand the mortise-tenon joint, which might find applications to nanofabrication and biomedicine.

  17. Systematic screening for novel, serologically reactive Hepatitis E Virus epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osterman Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The National Institutes of Health classified Hepatitis E as an emerging disease since Hepatitis E Virus (HEV is the major cause of acute hepatitis in developing countries. Interestingly, an increasing number of sporadic cases of HEV infections are described in industrialized countries as zoonosis from domestic livestock. Despite the increasing relevance of this pathogen in clinical virology, commercial antibody assays are mainly based on fragments of HEV open reading frame (ORF 2 and ORF3. The largest ORF1 (poly-protein, however, is not part of current testing formats. Methods From a synthesized full length HEV genotype 1 cDNA-bank we constructed a complete HEV gene library consisting of 15 respective HEV ORF domains. After bacterial expression and purification of nine recombinant HEV proteins under denaturating conditions serum profiling experiments using 55 sera from patients with known infection status were performed in microarray format. SPSS software assessed the antigenic potential of these nine ORF domains in comparison to seven commercial HEV antigens (genotype 1 and 3 by performing receiver operator characteristics, logistic regression and correlation analysis. Results HEV antigens produced with our method for serum profiling experiments exhibit the same quality and characteristics as commercial antigens. Serum profiling experiments detected Y, V and X domains as ORF1-antigens with potentially comparable diagnostic significance as the well established epitopes of ORF2 and ORF3. However no obvious additional increase in sensitivity or specificity was achieved in diagnostic testing as revealed by bioinformatic analysis. Additionally we found that the C-terminal domain of the potential transmembrane protein ORF3 is responsible for IgG and IgM seroreactivity. Data suggest that there might be a genotype specific seroreactivity of homologous ORF2-antigens. Conclusions The diagnostic value of identified ORF1 epitopes might

  18. Natural variation in avenin epitopes among oat varieties: implications for Celiac

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujico, J.R.; Mitea, C.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Ru, A.; Veelen, van P.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Koning, de F.

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the small intestinal mucosa. The causative agents have been identified as gluten proteins from wheat, barley and rye, and the only available treatment for CD patients is a lifelong gluten-free diet. Non-gluten containing cereals would

  19. Elicitation of neutralizing antibodies directed against CD4-induced epitope(s using a CD4 mimetic cross-linked to a HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antu K Dey

    Full Text Available The identification of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env structures that can generate broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs is pivotal to the development of a successful vaccine against HIV-1 aimed at eliciting effective humoral immune responses. To that end, the production of novel Env structure(s that might induce BNAbs by presentation of conserved epitopes, which are otherwise occluded, is critical. Here, we focus on a structure that stabilizes Env in a conformation representative of its primary (CD4 receptor-bound state, thereby exposing highly conserved "CD4 induced" (CD4i epitope(s known to be important for co-receptor binding and subsequent virus infection. A CD4-mimetic miniprotein, miniCD4 (M64U1-SH, was produced and covalently complexed to recombinant, trimeric gp140 envelope glycoprotein (gp140 using site-specific disulfide linkages. The resulting gp140-miniCD4 (gp140-S-S-M64U1 complex was recognized by CD4i antibodies and the HIV-1 co-receptor, CCR5. The gp140-miniCD4 complex elicited the highest titers of CD4i binding antibodies as well as enhanced neutralizing antibodies against Tier 1 viruses as compared to gp140 protein alone following immunization of rabbits. Neutralization against HIV-2(7312/V434M and additional serum mapping confirm the specific elicitation of antibodies directed to the CD4i epitope(s. These results demonstrate the utility of structure-based approach in improving immunogenic response against specific region, such as the CD4i epitope(s here, and its potential role in vaccine application.

  20. Differential Recognition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific Epitopes as a Function of Tuberculosis Disease History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriba, Thomas J; Carpenter, Chelsea; Pro, Sebastian Carrasco; Sidney, John; Musvosvi, Munyaradzi; Rozot, Virginie; Seumois, Grégory; Rosales, Sandy L; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Goletti, Delia; Makgotlho, Edward; Hanekom, Willem; Hatherill, Mark; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro; Arlehamn, Cecilia S Lindestam

    2017-09-15

    Individuals with a history of tuberculosis (TB) disease are at elevated risk of disease recurrence. The underlying cause is not known, but one explanation is that previous disease results in less-effective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We hypothesized that the repertoire of Mtb-derived epitopes recognized by T cells from individuals with latent Mtb infection differs as a function of previous diagnosis of active TB disease. T-cell responses to peptide pools in samples collected from an adult screening and an adolescent validation cohort were measured by IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assay or intracellular cytokine staining. We identified a set of "type 2" T-cell epitopes that were recognized at 10-fold-lower levels in Mtb-infected individuals with a history of TB disease less than 6 years ago than in those without previous TB. By contrast, "type 1" epitopes were recognized equally well in individuals with or without previous TB. The differential epitope recognition was not due to differences in HLA class II binding, memory phenotypes, or gene expression in the responding T cells. Instead, "TB disease history-sensitive" type 2 epitopes were significantly (P < 0.0001) more homologous to sequences from bacteria found in the human microbiome than type 1 epitopes. Preferential loss of T-cell reactivity to Mtb epitopes that are homologous to bacteria in the microbiome in persons with previous TB disease may reflect long-term effects of antibiotic TB treatment on the microbiome.

  1. Identification and characterization of two linear epitope motifs in hepatitis E virus ORF2 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Wang

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV is responsible for hepatitis E, which represents a global public health problem. HEV genotypes 3 and 4 are reported to be zoonotic, and animals are monitored for HEV infection in the interests of public hygiene and food safety. The development of novel diagnostic methods and vaccines for HEV in humans is thus important topics of research. Opening reading frame (ORF 2 of HEV includes both linear and conformational epitopes and is regarded as the primary candidate for vaccines and diagnostic tests. We investigated the precise location of the HEV epitopes in the ORF2 protein. We prepared four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against genotype 4 ORF2 protein and identified two linear epitopes, G438IVIPHD444 and Y457DNQH461, corresponding to two of these mAbs using phage display biopanning technology. Both these epitopes were speculated to be universal to genotypes 1, 2, 3, 4, and avian HEVs. We also used two 12-mer fragments of ORF2 protein including these two epitopes to develop a peptide-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to detect HEV in serum. This assay demonstrated good specificity but low sensitivity compared with the commercial method, indicating that these two epitopes could serve as potential candidate targets for diagnosis. Overall, these results further our understanding of the epitope distribution of HEV ORF2, and provide important information for the development of peptide-based immunodiagnostic tests to detect HEV in serum.

  2. Large-scale geographical variation in eggshell heavy metal and calcium content in a passerine bird (Ficedula hypoleuca)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruuskanen, S.; Morales, J.; Laaksonen, T.; Moreno, J.; Mateo, R.; Belskii, E.; Bushuev, A.; Jarvinen, A.; Kerimov, A.; Krams, I.; Morosinotto, C.; Mand, R.; Orell, M.; Qvarnstrom, A.; Slater, F.M.; Siitari, H.; Tilgar, V.; Visser, M.E.; Winkel, W.; Zang, H.; Eeva, T.

    2014-01-01

    Birds have been used as bioindicators of pollution, such as toxic metals. Levels of pollutants in eggs are especially interesting, as developing birds are more sensitive to detrimental effects of pollutants than adults. Only very few studies have monitored intraspecific, large-scale variation in

  3. Low-Cost Peptide Microarrays for Mapping Continuous Antibody Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ryan; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Law, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for understanding antibody specificity in antibody and vaccine research, pepscan assays provide a rapid method for mapping and profiling antibody responses to continuous epitopes. We have developed a relatively low-cost method to generate peptide microarray slides for studying antibody binding. Using a setup of an IntavisAG MultiPep RS peptide synthesizer, a Digilab MicroGrid II 600 microarray printer robot, and an InnoScan 1100 AL scanner, the method allows the interrogation of up to 1536 overlapping, alanine-scanning, and mutant peptides derived from the target antigens. Each peptide is tagged with a polyethylene glycol aminooxy terminus to improve peptide solubility, orientation, and conjugation efficiency to the slide surface.

  4. Intraspecific variation in host susceptibility and climatic factors mediate epidemics of sudden oak death in western US forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Huberli; K.J. Hayden; M. Calver; M. Garbelotto

    2011-01-01

    Umbellularia californica is one of the key infectious hosts of the exotic Phytophthora ramorum, which causes sudden oak death (SOD) in California and Oregon forests. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the epidemiologically relevant parameters for SOD in California and southern Oregon, including potential differences between the two...

  5. Intraspecific variation in seed size and light intensity affect seed germination and initial seedling growth of a tropical shrub

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniele C. R. Veloso

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Seed germination and seedling performance are affected by environmental factors and seed traits. In this study we investigated the effects of seed size and light intensity on germinability and seedling development of Copaifera oblongifolia. A total of 225 seeds were individually weighed and sown in three germination trays composed of 75 cells each. Each tray was placed in a different germination chamber with controlled photoperiod, temperature and light intensity. Seed size showed a positive relationship with time required for seed germination, and seeds exposed to high light intensity required more time to germinate. Seed size did not affect germination percentage, but seeds sown under high light intensity had a lower germination percentage than seeds sown under low light intensity and darkness. Seedling shoot mass showed a positive relationship with seeds mass, and seedlings grown in high light intensity had greater shoot mass than seedling growth in low light intensity and darkness. Thus, seed germinability of C. oblongifolia was higher in darkness while seedlings exhibited greater development under light. Looking to explain the ability of C. oblongifolia to colonize open/disturbed sites, it seems possible that plowing soil can bury seeds, thereby stimulating the germination of seeds present in the seed bank.

  6. Investigating Intraspecific Variation of Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli Using DNA Fingerprinting and Whole Cell Fatty Acid Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walcott, R R; Langston, D B; Sanders, F H; Gitaitis, R D

    2000-02-01

    ABSTRACT To assess the diversity of Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli, 121 strains from watermelon, cantaloupe, and pumpkin were compared using pulse field gel electrophoresis of SpeI-digested DNA and gas chromatographic analysis of fatty acid methyl esters. Twenty-nine unique DNA fragments resulted from DNA digestion, and 14 distinct haplotypes were observed. Based on cluster analysis, two subgroups, I and II, were recognized, which accounted for 84.8% (eight haplotypes) and 15.2% (six haplotypes) of the strains, respectively. Results of cellular fatty acid analysis varied quantitatively and qualitatively for the A. avenae subsp. citrulli strains and supported the existence of the two subgroups. Group I includes strains from cantaloupe and pumpkin as well as the ATCC type strain, which was first described in the United States in 1978, whereas group II represents the typical watermelon fruit blotch-causing strains that appeared in the mainland United States in 1989. Knowledge of the two A. avenae subsp. citrulli groups may be useful in screening for watermelon fruit blotch resistance.

  7. Intraspecific variations in growth, yield and photosynthesis of sorghum varieties to ambient UV (280-400 nm) radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Sunita; Guruprasad, K N

    2012-11-01

    A field study was conducted to investigate the impact of ambient solar UV on the various growth, physiological and yield parameters of four sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) varieties-Indore-12, Indore-26, CSV-23 and Indore-27 by excluding either UV-B (plant height, area and specific leaf weight of flag leaf, biomass accumulation, yield parameters and harvest index in all the sorghum varieties. Chlorophyll b was significantly enhanced and chlorophyll a increased to a lesser extent, UV-B absorbing substances and chlorophyll a/b ratio were significantly decreased by the exclusion of solar UV. The enhancement in the vegetative growth and yield by UV exclusion might be linked to the remarkable increase in rate of photosynthesis in sorghum varieties. The magnitude of the response was high in I-26 and I-27 as compared to CSV-23 and I-12 after exclusion of solar UV. All the varieties of sorghum had a negative cumulative stress response index (CSRI), the sensitivity of the sorghum varieties was in the following sequence I-12>CSV-23>I-26>I-27. Thus I-27 was the most sensitive and I-12 the least sensitive variety to present level of solar UV radiation. The differences in UV sensitivity identified among sorghum varieties might be useful in breeding programs for increased tolerance to UV-B radiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular phylogeny of mangroves IV. nature and extent of intra-specific genetic variation and species diversity in mangroves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parida, A.; Parani, M.; Lakshmi, M.; Elango, S.; Ram, N.; Anuratha, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    Mangroves occupy estuarine ecosystems in the tropical regions of the world. Despite their highly productive nature and the protective roles they play in the coastal region, the ecosystem as a whole is under severe threat due to various climatic and anthropogenic factors. Therefore, the need for conservation of mangroves is widely emphasised. However, information on existing genetic diversity based on which a strategy for genetic conservation is to be drawn is not available for mangroves. This is primarily because conventional genetic analysis is difficult in these species for various reasons. Therefore, as an aid to our on-going conservation programme, efforts were made to assess the nature and extent of diversity in a number of mangrove species of the Indian coast using molecular markers. The nature and extent of intra-population diversity in sixteen mangrove species and detailed analysis of inter-population genetic polymorphism in four species, Acanthus ilicifolius, Excoecaria agallocha, Avicennia spp and Rhizophora (species and hybrid), is reported in the present communication. (author)

  9. Intraspecific variation in mitochondrial genome sequence, structure, and gene content in Silene vulgaris, an angiosperm with pervasive cytoplasmic male sterility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sloan, D.B.; Müller, Karel; McCauley, D.; Taylor, D.R.; Štorchová, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 196, č. 4 (2012), s. 1228-1239 ISSN 0028-646X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/09/0261; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004; GA MŠk ME09035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) * gynodioecy * intracellular gene transfer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.736, year: 2012

  10. Intraspecific variation in essential oil composition of the medicinal plant Lippia integrifolia (Verbenaceae). Evidence for five chemotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcial, Guillermo; de Lampasona, Marina P; Vega, Marta I; Lizarraga, Emilio; Viturro, Carmen I; Slanis, Alberto; Juárez, Miguel A; Elechosa, Miguel A; Catalán, César A N

    2016-02-01

    The aerial parts of Lippia integrifolia (incayuyo) are widely used in northwestern and central Argentina for their medicinal and aromatic properties. The essential oil composition of thirty-one wild populations of L. integrifolia covering most of its natural range was analyzed by GC and GC-MS. A total of one hundred and fifty two terpenoids were identified in the essential oils. Sesquiterpenoids were the dominant components in all but one of the collections analyzed, the only exception being a sample collected in San Juan province where monoterpenoids amounted to 51%. Five clearly defined chemotypes were observed. One possessed an exquisite and delicate sweet aroma with trans-davanone as dominant component (usually above 80%). Another with an exotic floral odour was rich in oxygenated sesquiterpenoids based on the rare lippifoliane and africanane skeletons. The trans-davanone chemotype is the first report of an essential oil containing that sesquiterpene ketone as the main constituent. The absolute configuration of trans-davanone from L. integrifolia was established as 6S, 7S, 10S, the enantiomer of trans-davanone from 'davana oil' (Artemisia pallens). Wild plants belonging to trans-davanone and lippifolienone chemotypes were propagated and cultivated in the same parcel of land in Santa Maria, Catamarca. The essential oil compositions of the cultivated plants were essentially identical to the original plants in the wild, indicating that the essential oil composition is largely under genetic control. Specimens collected near the Bolivian border that initially were identified as L. boliviana Rusby yielded an essential oil practically identical to the trans-davanone chemotype of L. integrifolia supporting the recent view that L. integrifolia (Gris.) Hieron. and L. boliviana Rusby are synonymous. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The evolution of the manus of early theropod dinosaurs is characterized by high inter- and intraspecific variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel E; Nesbitt, Sterling J; Norell, Mark A

    2018-01-01

    The origin of the avian hand, with its reduced and fused carpals and digits, from the five-fingered hands and complex wrists of early dinosaurs represents one of the major transformations of manus morphology among tetrapods. Much attention has been directed to the later part of this transition, from four- to three-fingered taxa. However, earlier anatomical changes may have influenced these later modifications, possibly paving the way for a later frameshift in digit identities. We investigate the five- to four-fingered transition among early dinosaurs, along with changes in carpus morphology. New three-dimensional reconstructions from computed tomography data of the manus of the Triassic and Early Jurassic theropod dinosaurs Coelophysis bauri and Megapnosaurus rhodesiensis are described and compared intra- and interspecifically. Several novel findings emerge from these reconstructions and comparisons, including the first evidence of an ossified centrale and a free intermedium in some C. bauri specimens, as well as confirmation of the presence of a vestigial fifth metacarpal in this taxon. Additionally, a specimen of C. bauri and an unnamed coelophysoid from the Upper Triassic Hayden Quarry, New Mexico, are to our knowledge the only theropods (other than alvarezsaurs and birds) in which all of the distal carpals are completely fused together into a single unit. Several differences between the manus of C. bauri and M. rhodesiensis are also identified. We review the evolution of the archosauromorph manus more broadly in light of these new data, and caution against incorporating carpal characters in phylogenetic analyses of fine-scale relationships of Archosauromorpha, in light of the high degree of observed polymorphism in taxa for which large sample sizes are available, such as the theropod Coelophysis and the sauropodomorph Plateosaurus. We also find that the reduction of the carpus and ultimate loss of the fourth and fifth digits among early dinosaurs did not proceed in a neat, stepwise fashion, but was characterized by multiple losses and possible gains of carpals, metacarpals and phalanges. Taken together, the high degree of intra- and interspecific variability in the number and identities of carpals, and the state of reduction of the fourth and fifth digits suggest the presence of a 'zone of developmental variability' in early dinosaur manus evolution, from which novel avian-like morphologies eventually emerged and became channelized among later theropod clades. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Anatomical Society.

  12. Inter- and intraspecific morphological variation of four-shelled Actinomma taxa (Radiolaria) in polar and subpolar regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burridge, A.K.; Bjørklund, K.R.; Kruglikova, S.B.; Hammer, Ø.

    2014-01-01

    The taxonomy of polycystine radiolarians is important for biostratigraphic, paleoecological and paleoceanographical reconstructions. In this study we describe four morphogroups of Actinomma boreale from the North-Atlantic and Arctic oceans. We distinguish them from two other four-shelled Actinomma

  13. Intraspecific variation of the octotaxic system in Protoribates paracapucinus (Acari, Oribatida, Haplozetidae), with systematic and taxonomic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigmann, Gerd; Ermilov, Sergey G

    2016-01-25

    The octotaxic system of notogaster in poronotic oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) usually is represented by two types, either porose areas or saccules. These dermal gland structures are observed as constant for each species (except sexual dimorphism; see below), therefore their type often is used as key character, and in consequence of this, it is used in taxonomy and systematics as diagnostic character for different taxa levels from species to family (Subías 2004, online version 2015; Weigmann 2006; Norton & Behan-Pelletier 2009; Bayartogtokh 2010). However, there are exceptions: for Drymobates silvicola Grandjean, 1930 (Drymobatidae) and Galumna (Atypicogalumna) corpuzrarosae Ermilov, Sandmann, Klarner, Widyastuti & Scheu, 2015 (Galumnidae), a composite octotaxic system is known, including side by side porose areas and saccules in every specimen (Grandjean 1930; Ermilov et al. 2015). Behan-Pelletier (2015) reports several cases of sexual dimorphism of the octotaxic system in Poronota, all with different appearance of porose areas. But for the licneremaeoid Glanderemaeus hammerae Balogh & Csiszár, 1963 (whose familial placement is unclear) a unique sexual dimorphism in octotaxic system is described-males with saccules, females with porose areas (see also Norton et al. 1997).

  14. Heated communities: : large inter- and intraspecific variation in heat tolerance across trophic levels of a soil arthropod community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, Oscar; Huizinga, Milou; Ellers, Jacintha; Berg, Matty P

    Temperature extremes are predicted to increase in frequency, intensity and duration under global warming and are believed to significantly affect community composition and functioning. However, the effect of extreme climatic events on communities remains difficult to predict, especially because

  15. Measuring Intraspecific Variation in Flight-Related Morphology of Monarch Butterflies (Danaus plexippus: Which Sex Has the Best Flying Gear?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew K. Davis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimal flight in butterflies depends on structural features of the wings and body, including wing size, flight muscle size, and wing loading. Arguably, there is no butterfly for which flight is more important than the monarch (Danaus plexippus, which undergoes long-distance migrations in North America. We examined morphological features of monarchs that would explain the apparent higher migratory success and flight ability of females over males. We examined 47 male and 45 female monarch specimens from a project where monarchs were reared under uniform conditions. We weighed individual body parts, including the thorax (flight muscle and wings, and computed wing loading and wing thickness for all specimens. When we compared each morphological trait between sexes, we found that females did not differ from males in terms of relative thorax (wing muscle size. Females were generally smaller than males, but females had relatively thicker wings than males for their size, which suggests greater mechanical strength. Importantly, females had significantly lower wing loading than males (7% lower. This would translate to more efficient flight, which may explain their higher migratory success. Results of this work should be useful for interpreting flight behavior and/or migration success in this and other Lepidopteran species.

  16. Intraspecific variation of the Green Turtle, Chelonia mydas (Cheloniidae), in the foraging area of Gorgona Natural National Park (Colombian Pacific)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, Laura; Payan, Luis Fernando; Amorocho, Diego Fernando; Seminoff, Jeffrey A; Giraldo, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The size distribution and body condition of the two morphotypes of green turtle (Chelonia mydas) foraging in Gorgona Natural National Park (GNNP) in the Colombian Pacific was assessed from 2003 to 2012. Measurements of straight carapace length (SCL), curved carapace length (CCL), weight, and body condition of 1,023 turtles captured on the GNNP reefs were recorded. More black turtles (n = 747) than yellow turtles (n = 276) were captured, all of them juveniles. Black turtles were significantly larger and heavier than yellow turtles. The size of recruitment to the neritic zone was 40.0-49.9 cm SCL for both morphotypes, but there were more yellow than black turtles in this size class, indicating a difference in the recruitment pattern. The body condition index of yellow turtles was significantly higher than that of black turtles, which could indicate differences in resource use. Based on our results, we suggest that GNNP might function as a recruitment area for yellow turtles, which arrive at smaller sizes and as part of a coastal migratory route for black turtles, which arrive at larger sizes and maintain residence at this location for an unknown period of time.

  17. Comprehensive Mapping Antigenic Epitopes of NS1 Protein of Japanese Encephalitis Virus with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Hong Hua

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV non-structural protein 1 (NS1 contributes to virus replication and elicits protective immune responses during infection. JEV NS1-specific antibody responses could be a target in the differential diagnosis of different flavivirus infections. However, the epitopes on JEV NS1 are poorly characterized. The present study describes the full mapping of linear B-cell epitopes in JEV NS1. We generated eleven NS1-specific monoclonal antibodies from mice immunized with recombinant NS1. For epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies, a set of 51 partially-overlapping peptides covering the entire NS1 protein were expressed with a GST-tag and then screened using monoclonal antibodies. Through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, five linear epitope-containing peptides were identified. By sequentially removing amino acid residues from the carboxy and amino terminal of peptides, the minimal units of the five linear epitopes were identified and confirmed using monoclonal antibodies. Five linear epitopes are located in amino acids residues (5AIDITRK(11, (72RDELNVL(78, (251KSKHNRREGY(260, (269DENGIVLD(276, and (341DETTLVRS(348. Furthermore, it was found that the epitopes are highly conserved among JEV strains through sequence alignment. Notably, none of the homologous regions on NS1 proteins from other flaviviruses reacted with the MAbs when they were tested for cross-reactivity, and all five epitope peptides were not recognized by sera against West Nile virus or Dengue virus. These novel virus-specific linear B-cell epitopes of JEV NS1 would benefit the development of new vaccines and diagnostic assays.

  18. Optimization and immune recognition of multiple novel conserved HLA-A2, human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific CTL epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corbet, S.; Nielsen, H.V.; Vinner, L.

    2003-01-01

    MHC-I-restricted cytotoxic responses are considered a critical component of protective immunity against viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). CTLs directed against accessory and early regulatory HIV-1 proteins might be particularly effective; however, CTL epitopes...... conserved. Such epitope peptides were anchor-optimized to improve immunogenicity and further increase the number of potential vaccine epitopes. About 67% of anchor-optimized vaccine epitopes induced immune responses against the corresponding non-immunogenic naturally occurring epitopes. This study...... demonstrates the potency of ANNs for identifying putative virus CTL epitopes, and the new HIV-1 CTL epitopes identified should have significant implications for HIV-1 vaccine development. As a novel vaccine approach, it is proposed to increase the coverage of HIV variants by including multiple anchor...

  19. Intraspecific non-sexual interactions of Grammostola schulzei (Araneae: Theraphosidae under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson E Ferretti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intraspecific interactions of araneomorph spiders have received considerable attention, but there are few detailed studies on intraspecific interactions of mygalomorph spiders. Moreover, a thorough understanding of theraphosid biology and ecology is necessary from a conservation standpoint because natural populations may be threatened by habitat disturbances and captures for pet commerce. We described the behavior of conspecific individuals of Grammostola schulzei during non-sexual interactions, under laboratory conditions. Pairs of individuals involving adult males, adult females and juveniles were confronted and observed in resident and intruder conditions, totalizing 115 trials. When confronted two adult females, they retreated or grappled, and performed gaping display with bite attempts, usually resulted in severe injury of the intruder spiders. When confronted females with large juveniles, we frequently observed cannibalism on juveniles. Juveniles exposed to females or to other juveniles retreated or made leg tapping with forelegs and palpal drumming, which are common displays of courting adult males. Adult males courted and clasped some juveniles, but juveniles avoided or reject clasping. The behaviors observed during intraspecific interactions could play an important role determining spatial distribution and could lead to behavioral adaptations of territoriality. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (3: 1173-1182. Epub 2011 September 01.Hay pocos estudios detallados sobre las interacciones intraespecíficas de arañas migalomorfas. Por lo tanto, se describe el comportamiento de individuos conspecíficos de Grammostola schulzei durante interacciones nosexuales en condiciones de laboratorio. Se confrontaron y observaron pares de individuos involucrando machos adultos, hembras adultas y juveniles en condiciones de locatarios y visitantes, totalizando 115 encuentros. Cuando dos hembras adultas se enfrentaron, retrocedieron o lucharon adoptando elevaciones

  20. Density-dependent intraspecific aggression regulates survival in northern Yellowstone wolves (Canis lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubaynes, Sarah; MacNulty, Daniel R; Stahler, Daniel R; Quimby, Kira A; Smith, Douglas W; Coulson, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the population dynamics of top-predators is essential to assess their impact on ecosystems and to guide their management. Key to this understanding is identifying the mechanisms regulating vital rates. Determining the influence of density on survival is necessary to understand the extent to which human-caused mortality is compensatory or additive. In wolves (Canis lupus), empirical evidence for density-dependent survival is lacking. Dispersal is considered the principal way in which wolves adjust their numbers to prey supply or compensate for human exploitation. However, studies to date have primarily focused on exploited wolf populations, in which density-dependent mechanisms are likely weak due to artificially low wolf densities. Using 13 years of data on 280 collared wolves in Yellowstone National Park, we assessed the effect of wolf density, prey abundance and population structure, as well as winter severity, on age-specific survival in two areas (prey-rich vs. prey-poor) of the national park. We further analysed cause-specific mortality and explored the factors driving intraspecific aggression in the prey-rich northern area of the park. Overall, survival rates decreased during the study. In northern Yellowstone, density dependence regulated adult survival through an increase in intraspecific aggression, independent of prey availability. In the interior of the park, adult survival was less variable and density-independent, despite reduced prey availability. There was no effect of prey population structure in northern Yellowstone, or of winter severity in either area. Survival was similar among yearlings and adults, but lower for adults older than 6 years. Our results indicate that density-dependent intraspecific aggression is a major driver of adult wolf survival in northern Yellowstone, suggesting intrinsic density-dependent mechanisms have the potential to regulate wolf populations at high ungulate densities. When low prey availability or high

  1. Intraspecific competition affects population size and resource allocation in an ant dispersing by colony fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulay, Raphaël; Galarza, Juan A; Chéron, Blandine; Hefetz, Abraham; Lenoir, Alain; van Oudenhove, Louise; Cerdá, Xim

    2010-11-01

    Intraspecific competition is a pervasive phenomenon with important ecological and evolutionary consequences, yet its effect in natural populations remains controversial. Although numerous studies suggest that in many cases populations across all organisms are limited by density-dependent processes, this conclusion often relies on correlative data. Here, using an experimental approach, we examined the effect of intraspecific competition on population regulation of the ant Aphaenogaster senilis. In this species females are philopatric while males disperse by flying over relatively long distances. All colonies were removed from 15 experimental plots, except for one focal colony in each plot, while 15 other plots remained unmanipulated. After the first reproductive season, nest density in the experimental plots returned to a level nonsignificantly different from that in the control plots, which was not expected if the populations were indeed regulated by density-independent phenomena. In both the control plots and the experimental plots colonies remained overdispersed throughout the experiment, suggesting colony mutual exclusion. Nests outside the plots rapidly extended their foraging span, but we did not detect any significant inward migration into the experimental plots. Experimental reduction in density did not significantly affect the focal colonies' biomass, measured just before the first reproductive season. However, the ratio of males to workers-pupae biomasses was smaller in experimental plots, suggesting that colonies there had redirected part of the resources normally allocated to male production to the production instead of new workers. Microsatellite analysis indicated that, after the reproductive season, many colonies in the experimental plots were headed by a young queen that was the mother of the brood but not of the old workers, indicating that reduction in colony density stimulated fission of the remaining colonies. Finally, at the end of the

  2. CD4+ T cells targeting dominant and cryptic epitopes from Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eAscough

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax is an endemic infection in many countries, particularly in the developing world. The causative agent, Bacillus anthracis, mediates disease through the secretion of binary exotoxins. Until recently, research into adaptive immunity targeting this bacterial pathogen has largely focused on the humoral response to these toxins. There is, however, growing recognition that cellular immune responses involving IFNγ producing CD4+ T cells also contribute significantly to a protective memory response. An established concept in adaptive immunity to infection is that during infection of host cells, new microbial epitopes may be revealed, leading to immune recognition of so called ‘cryptic’ or ‘subdominant’ epitopes. We analysed the response to both cryptic and immunodominant T cell epitopes derived from the toxin component lethal factor and presented by a range of HLA-DR alleles. Using IFNγ-ELISPOT assays we characterised epitopes that elicited a response following immunisation with synthetic peptide and the whole protein and tested their capacities to bind purified HLA-DR molecules in vitro. We found that DR1 transgenics demonstrated T cell responses to a greater number of domain III cryptic epitopes than other HLA-DR transgenics, and that this pattern was repeated with the immunodominant epitopes, a greater proportion of these epitopes induced a T cell response when presented within the context of the whole protein. Immunodominant epitopes LF457-476 and LF467-487 were found to induce a T cell response to the peptide, as well as to the whole native LF protein in DR1 and DR15, but not in DR4 trangenics. The analysis of Domain I revealed the presence of several unique cryptic epitopes all of which showed a strong to moderate relative binding affinity to HLA-DR4 molecules. However, none of the cryptic epitopes from either domain III or I displayed notably high binding affinities across all HLA-DR alleles assayed. These responses were

  3. Large-scale validation of methods for cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Voldby; Lundegaard, Claus; Lamberth, K.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reliable predictions of Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes are essential for rational vaccine design. Most importantly, they can minimize the experimental effort needed to identify epitopes. NetCTL is a web-based tool designed for predicting human CTL epitopes in any given protein....... of the other methods achieved a sensitivity of 0.64. The NetCTL-1.2 method is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetCTL.All used datasets are available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/suppl/immunology/CTL-1.2.php....

  4. Application of phage peptide display technology for the study of food allergen epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueni; Dreskin, Stephen C

    2017-06-01

    Phage peptide display technology has been used to identify IgE-binding mimotopes (mimics of natural epitopes) that mimic conformational epitopes. This approach is effective in the characterization of those epitopes that are important for eliciting IgE-mediated allergic responses by food allergens and those that are responsible for cross-reactivity among allergenic food proteins. Application of this technology will increase our understanding of the mechanisms whereby food allergens elicit allergic reactions, will facilitate the discovery of diagnostic reagents and may lead to mimotope-based immunotherapy. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Construction of multiple-epitope tag sequence by PCR for sensitive Western blot analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakajima, K; Yaoita, Y

    1997-01-01

    Epitope tagging is a powerful technique to characterize a recombinantly expressed protein encoded by cDNA without the purification of the protein and the immunization of animals. In some cases, however, the expression of a tagged protein is too low to analyze by Western blot. We have developed a simple method to generate tandem repetitive nucleotide sequence by PCR, which allows us to label a protein of interest with a multiple-epitope tag. When five myc epitopes were attached to vaccinia vir...

  6. Further progress on defining highly conserved immunogenic epitopes for a global HIV vaccine: HLA-A3-restricted GAIA vaccine epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groot, Anne S; Levitz, Lauren; Ardito, Matthew T; Skowron, Gail; Mayer, Kenneth H; Buus, Soren; Boyle, Christine M; Martin, William D

    2012-07-01

    Two major obstacles confronting HIV vaccine design have been the extensive viral diversity of HIV-1 globally and viral evolution driven by escape from CD8(+) cytotoxic T-cell lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated immune pressure. Regions of the viral genome that are not able to escape immune response and that are conserved in sequence and across time may represent the "Achilles' heel" of HIV and would be excellent candidates for vaccine development. In this study, T-cell epitopes were selected using immunoinformatics tools, combining HLA-A3 binding predictions with relative sequence conservation in the context of global HIV evolution. Twenty-seven HLA-A3 epitopes were chosen from an analysis performed in 2003 on 10,803 HIV-1 sequences, and additional sequences were selected in 2009 based on an expanded set of 43,822 sequences. These epitopes were tested in vitro for HLA binding and for immunogenicity with PBMCs of HIV-infected donors from Providence, Rhode Island. Validation of these HLA-A3 epitopes conserved across time, clades, and geography supports the hypothesis that epitopes such as these would be candidates for inclusion in our globally relevant GAIA HIV vaccine constructs.

  7. The effect of medium composition on ovary-slice culture and ovule culture in intraspecific Tulipa gesneriana crosses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creij, van M.G.M.; Kerckhoffs, D.M.F.J.; Bruijn, de S.M.; Tuyl, van J.M.; Vreugdenhil, D.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of several media components on the germination percentage of ovules in intraspecific T. gesneriana L. crosses was studied by using two embryo rescue techniques, viz. ovary-slice culture followed by ovule culture and direct ovule culture. The addition of 9% sucrose to medium for

  8. Are negative intra-specific interactions important for recruitment dynamics? A case study of Atlantic fish stocks.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ricard, Daniel; Zimmermann, F.; Heino, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 547, April (2016), s. 211-217 ISSN 0171-8630 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cannibalism * intra-specific competition * recruitment * population dynamics * Atlantic Ocean Subject RIV: EH - Ecology , Behaviour Impact factor: 2.292, year: 2016

  9. Molecular evidence for extra-pair paternity and intraspecific brood parasitism in the Black-headed Gull

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ležalová-Piálková, Radka

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 152, č. 2 (2011), s. 291-295 ISSN 0021-8375 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Black-headed Gull * genetic mating system * extra-pair paternity * intraspecific brood parasitism Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.636, year: 2011

  10. Intraspecific morphological and genetic variability in the European freshwater snail Radix labiata (Rossmaessler, 1835) (Gastropoda: Basommatophora: Lymnaeidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schniebs, K.; Glöer, P.; Vinarski, M.V.; Hundsdoerfer, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Radix labiata is a widely distributed Palaearctic freshwater snail. This work aims to improve the knowledge of the intraspecific variability in the most important characters used for its determination. To find out which characters are really suitable to distinguish this species from other similar

  11. Intraspecific genetic diversity of Drechslera tritici-repentis as detected by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Pujol Vieira dos Santos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The phytopathogenic fungus Drechslera tritici-repentis causes tan spot, an important disease of wheat in the southern Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul. Twelve D. tritici-repentis isolates were obtained from wheat seeds from different locations in the state. Their colony morphology on potato dextrose agar and polymorphisms in genomic DNA by the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD method were investigated. For the RAPD method, 23 primers were tested of which nine were selected for use in the study of D. tritici-repentis polymorphisms. The degree of similarity between isolates was calculated using a simple matching coefficient and dendrograms constructed by the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetical averages (UPGMA. The morphological and RAPD analyses showed intraspecific polymorphisms within the isolates, but it was not possible to establish a relationship between these polymorphisms and the geographical regions from where the host seeds were collected.

  12. Intraspecific genetic diversity of Oenococcus oeni as derived from DNA fingerprinting and sequence analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavaleta, A I; Martínez-Murcia, A J; Rodríguez-Valera, F

    1997-04-01

    The intraspecific genetic diversity of Oenococcus oeni, the key organism in the malolactic fermentation of wine, has been evaluated by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), ribotyping, small-plasmid content, and sequencing of RAPD markers with widespread distribution among the strains. Collection strains representing the diversity of this species have been studied together with some new isolates, many of which were obtained from wines produced by spontaneous malolactic fermentation. The RAPD profiles were strain specific and discerned two main groups of strains coincident with clusters obtained by macrorestriction typing in a previous work. Ribotyping and the conservation of RAPD markers indicates that O. oeni is a relatively homogeneous species. Furthermore, identical DNA sequences of some RAPD markers among strains representative of the most divergent RAPD clusters indicates that O. oeni is indeed a phylogenetically tight group, probably corresponding to a single clone, or clonal line of descent, specialized to grow in the wine environment and universally spread.

  13. Role of intraspecific competition in the coexistence of mobile populations in spatially extended ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2010-06-01

    Evolutionary-game based models of nonhierarchical, cyclically competing populations have become paradigmatic for addressing the fundamental problem of species coexistence in spatially extended ecosystems. We study the role of intraspecific competition in the coexistence and find that the competition can strongly promote the coexistence for high individual mobility in the sense that stable coexistence can arise in parameter regime where extinction would occur without the competition. The critical value of the competition rate beyond which the coexistence is induced is found to be independent of the mobility. We derive a theoretical model based on nonlinear partial differential equations to predict the critical competition rate and the boundaries between the coexistence and extinction regions in a relevant parameter space. We also investigate pattern formation and well-mixed spatiotemporal population dynamics to gain further insights into our findings.

  14. Strain specific differences in intraspecific competition in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesavaraju, Banugopan; Afify, Ali; Gaugler, Randy

    2012-09-01

    Malathion is an organophosphate insecticide that is used for the control of adult mosquitoes and agricultural pests. Recent studies have shown that malathion affects competition among mosquitoes in the larval stage. Individuals from laboratory colonies are often used in experiments but it is not known whether there is a difference between laboratory and field strains in their response to competition and malathion. Intraspecific larval competition in the presence of malathion (0.11 mg/liter) was compared between laboratory and field strains of Aedes albopictus (Skuse), a native of Asia that has established in the United States. There was no difference in the responses of the two strains to the presence of malathion. The fitness (finite growth rate) of the field strain decreased at the highest larval density tested but there was no difference in fitness across densities for the laboratory strain. This finding suggests that laboratory rearing could reduce sensitivity to crowding.

  15. Effects of soil nutrient heterogeneity on intraspecific competition in the invasive, clonal plant Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Dong, Bi-Cheng; Alpert, Peter; Li, Hong-Li; Zhang, Ming-Xiang; Lei, Guang-Chun; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2012-03-01

    Fine-scale, spatial heterogeneity in soil nutrient availability can increase the growth of individual plants, the productivity of plant communities and interspecific competition. If this is due to the ability of plants to concentrate their roots where nutrient levels are high, then nutrient heterogeneity should have little effect on intraspecific competition, especially when there are no genotypic differences between individuals in root plasticity. We tested this hypothesis in a widespread, clonal species in which individual plants are known to respond to nutrient heterogeneity. Plants derived from a single clone of Alternanthera philoxeroides were grown in the greenhouse at low or high density (four or 16 plants per 27·5 × 27·5-cm container) with homogeneous or heterogeneous availability of soil nutrients, keeping total nutrient availability per container constant. After 9 weeks, measurements of size, dry mass and morphology were taken. Plants grew more in the heterogeneous than in the homogeneous treatment, showing that heterogeneity promoted performance; they grew less in the high- than in the low-density treatment, showing that plants competed. There was no interactive effect of nutrient heterogeneity and plant density, supporting the hypothesis that heterogeneity does not affect intraspecific competition in the absence of genotypic differences in plasticity. Treatments did not affect morphological characteristics such as specific leaf area or root/shoot ratio. Results indicate that fine-scale, spatial heterogeneity in the availability of soil nutrients does not increase competition when plants are genetically identical, consistent with the suggestion that effects of heterogeneity on competition depend upon differences in plasticity between individuals. Heterogeneity is only likely to increase the spread of monoclonal, invasive populations such as that of A. philoxeroides in China.

  16. Inter- and intra-specific competition of duckweed under multiple heavy metal contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Shi, Huijuan; Kang, Xianjiang; Liu, Cunqi; Chen, Lingci; Liang, Xiaofei; Jin, Lei

    2017-11-01

    The influences of intra- and inter-species competition on ecosystems are poorly understood. Lemna aequinoctialis and Spirodela polyrhiza were used to assess the effects of exposure to different concentrations of multiple heavy metals (copper-cadmium-zinc), when the plants were grown in mixed- or mono-culture. Parameters assessed included relative growth rate (RGR), content of chlorophyll, glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as the activity of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD). Inter-specific competition was affected by metal concentration, with results indicating that inter-specific competition significantly affected duckweed growth and metal uptake in different heavy metal exposure conditions. Inter-specific competition increased growth rate of duckweed under high metal concentrations, although when compared with intra-specific competition, it caused no obvious differences under low metal concentrations. The growth of L. aequinoctialis was further increased in mixed culture when exposed to high metal concentrations, with inter-specific competition increasing the content of cadmium and zinc, while decreasing copper content of L. aequinoctialis compared with under intra-specific conditions. Conversely, inter-specific competition increased the content of copper and cadmium of S. polyrhiza, without causing obvious differences in zinc accumulation under high ambient concentrations. Under high metal conditions, inter-specific competition increased antioxidant enzyme activities in duckweed species, increasing resistance to heavy metals. Results show that inter-specific competition makes duckweed develop mechanisms to increase fitness and survival, such as enhancement of antioxidant enzyme activities, rather than limiting metal uptake when exposed to high concentrations of multiple metals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The novel carbohydrate epitope L3 is shared by some neural cell adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kücherer, A; Faissner, A; Schachner, M

    1987-06-01

    The monoclonal L3 antibody reacts with an N-glycosidically linked carbohydrate structure on at least nine glycoproteins of adult mouse brain. Three out of the L3 epitope-carrying glycoproteins could be identified as the neural cell adhesion molecules L1 and myelin-associated glycoprotein, and the novel adhesion molecule on glia. Expression of the L3 carbohydrate epitope is regulated independently of the protein backbone of these three glycoproteins. Based on the observation that out of three functionally characterized L3 epitope-carrying glycoproteins three fulfill the operational definition of an adhesion molecule, we would like to suggest that they form a new family of adhesion molecules that is distinct from the L2/HNK-1 carbohydrate epitope family of neural cell adhesion molecules. Interestingly, some members in each family appear to be unique to one family while other members belong to the two families.

  18. The design and implementation of the immune epitope database and analysis resource

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, B.; Sidney, J.; Bourne, P.

    2005-01-01

    is reflected in the vast amount of epitope-related information gathered, ranging from interactions between epitopes and major histocompatibility complex molecules determined by X-ray crystallography to clinical studies analyzing correlates of protection for epitope based vaccines. Our goal is to provide...... a central resource capable of capturing this information, allowing users to access and connect realms of knowledge that are currently separated and difficult to access. Here, we portray a new initiative, "The Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource." We describe how we plan to capture, structure......, and store this information, what query interfaces we will make available to the public, and what additional predictive and analytical tools we will provide....

  19. Identification of murine T-cell epitopes in Ebola virus nucleoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, Graham; Lee, Anee; Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Fan Xin; Bates, Paul; Shen Hao

    2004-01-01

    CD8 T cells play an important role in controlling Ebola infection and in mediating vaccine-induced protective immunity, yet little is known about antigenic targets in Ebola that are recognized by CD8 T cells. Overlapping peptides were used to identify major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted epitopes in mice immunized with vectors encoding Ebola nucleoprotein (NP). CD8 T-cell responses were mapped to a H-2 d -restricted epitope (NP279-288) and two H-2 b -restricted epitopes (NP44-52 and NP288-296). The identification of these epitopes will facilitate studies of immune correlates of protection and the evaluation of vaccine strategies in murine models of Ebola infection

  20. Epitope mapping from real time kinetic studies – Role of cross ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Epitope mapping from real time kinetic studies – Role of cross- linked disulphides and incidental interacting regions in affinity measurements: Study with human chorionic gonadotropin and monoclonal antibodies. NONAVINAKERE SEETHARAM SRILATHA, P TAMIL SELVI and GUNDLUPET SATYANARAYANA MURTHY*.

  1. Synthetic Peptide-Based ELISA and ELISpot Assay for Identifying Autoantibody Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozsgay, Judit; Szarka, Eszter; Huber, Krisztina; Babos, Fruzsina; Magyar, Anna; Hudecz, Ferenc; Sarmay, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is an invaluable diagnostic tool to detect serum autoantibody binding to target antigen. To map the autoantigenic epitope(s), overlapping synthetic peptides covering the total sequence of a protein antigen are used. A large set of peptides synthesized on the crown of pins can be tested by Multipin ELISA for fast screening. Next, to validate the results, the candidate epitope peptides are resynthesized by solid-phase synthesis, coupled to ELISA plate directly, or in a biotinylated form, bound to neutravidin-coated surface and the binding of autoantibodies from patients' sera is tested by indirect ELISA. Further, selected epitope peptides can be applied in enzyme-linked immunospot assay to distinguish individual, citrullinated peptide-specific autoreactive B cells in a pre-stimulated culture of patients' lymphocytes.

  2. High-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes using ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Søren; Rockberg, Johan; Forsström, Björn

    2012-01-01

    against unwanted (e.g. autoimmune) reactivities. Antibodies target proteins as either conformational or linear epitopes. The latter are typically probed with peptides, but the cost of peptide screening programs tends to prohibit comprehensive specificity analysis. To perform high-throughput, high......-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes, we have used ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays generating several hundred thousand different peptides per array. Using exhaustive length and substitution analysis, we have successfully examined the specificity of a panel of polyclonal antibodies raised against...... linear epitopes of the human proteome and obtained very detailed descriptions of the involved specificities. The epitopes identified ranged from 4 to 12 amino acids in size. In general, the antibodies were of exquisite specificity, frequently disallowing even single conservative substitutions. In several...

  3. Analysis of Conformational B-Cell Epitopes in the Antibody-Antigen Complex Using the Depth Function and the Convex Hull.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zheng

    Full Text Available The prediction of conformational b-cell epitopes plays an important role in immunoinformatics. Several computational methods are proposed on the basis of discrimination determined by the solvent-accessible surface between epitopes and non-epitopes, but the performance of existing methods is far from satisfying. In this paper, depth functions and the k-th surface convex hull are used to analyze epitopes and exposed non-epitopes. On each layer of the protein, we compute relative solvent accessibility and four different types of depth functions, i.e., Chakravarty depth, DPX, half-sphere exposure and half space depth, to analyze the location of epitopes on different layers of the proteins. We found that conformational b-cell epitopes are rich in charged residues Asp, Glu, Lys, Arg, His; aliphatic residues Gly, Pro; non-charged residues Asn, Gln; and aromatic residue Tyr. Conformational b-cell epitopes are rich in coils. Conservation of epitopes is not significantly lower than that of exposed non-epitopes. The average depths (obtained by four methods for epitopes are significantly lower than that of non-epitopes on the surface using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Epitopes are more likely to be located in the outer layer of the convex hull of a protein. On the benchmark dataset, the cumulate 10th convex hull covers 84.6% of exposed residues on the protein surface area, and nearly 95% of epitope sites. These findings may be helpful in building a predictor for epitopes.

  4. A novel monoclonal antibody to a defined peptide epitope in MUC16

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos-Silva, Lara; Ricardo, Sara; Chen, Kowa

    2015-01-01

    The MUC16 mucin is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in ovarian carcinomas. Immunodetection of circulating MUC16 is one of the most used cancer biomarker assays, but existing antibodies to MUC16 fail to distinguish normal and aberrant cancer glycoforms. Although all antibodies react...... of ovarian benign and cancer lesions, 5E11 showed similar reactivity as traditional MUC16 antibodies, suggesting that the epitope is not efficiently glycosylated. The study provides a vaccine design and immunodominant MUC16 TR epitopes....

  5. Microarray glycan profiling reveals algal fucoidan epitopes in diverse marine metazoans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asunción Salmeán, Armando; Hervé, Cécile; Jørgensen, Bodil

    2017-01-01

    Despite the biological importance and pharmacological potential of glycans from marine organisms, there are many unanswered questions regarding their distribution, function, and evolution. Here we describe microarray-based glycan profiling of a diverse selection of marine animals using antibodies...... raised against fucoidan isolated from a brown alga. We demonstrate the presence of two fucoidan epitopes in six animals belonging to three phyla including Porifera, Molusca, and Chordata. We studied the spatial distribution of these epitopes in Cliona celata ("boring sponge") and identified...

  6. Construction and characterization of 3A-epitope-tagged foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xueqing; Li, Pinghua; Sun, Pu; Bai, Xingwen; Bao, Huifang; Lu, Zengjun; Fu, Yuanfang; Cao, Yimei; Li, Dong; Chen, Yingli; Qiao, Zilin; Liu, Zaixin

    2015-04-01

    Nonstructural protein 3A of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a partially conserved protein of 153 amino acids (aa) in most FMDVs examined to date. Specific deletion in the FMDV 3A protein has been associated with the inability of FMDV to grow in primary bovine cells and cause disease in cattle. However, the aa residues playing key roles in these processes are poorly understood. In this study, we constructed epitope-tagged FMDVs containing an 8 aa FLAG epitope, a 9 aa haemagglutinin (HA) epitope, and a 10 aa c-Myc epitope to substitute residues 94-101, 93-101, and 93-102 of 3A protein, respectively, using a recently developed O/SEA/Mya-98 FMDV infectious cDNA clone. Immunofluorescence assay (IFA), Western blot and sequence analysis showed that the epitope-tagged viruses stably maintained and expressed the foreign epitopes even after 10 serial passages in BHK-21 cells. The epitope-tagged viruses displayed growth properties and plaque phenotypes similar to those of the parental virus in BHK-21 cells. However, the epitope-tagged viruses exhibited lower growth rates and smaller plaque size phenotypes than those of the parental virus in primary fetal bovine kidney (FBK) cells, but similar growth properties and plaque phenotypes to those of the recombinant viruses harboring 93-102 deletion in 3A. These results demonstrate that the decreased ability of FMDV to replicate in primary bovine cells was not associated with the length of 3A, and the genetic determinant thought to play key role in decreased ability to replicate in primary bovine cells could be reduced from 93-102 residues to 8 aa residues at positions 94-101 in 3A protein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Standardization of Epitopes for Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) Immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Peter; Lapthorn, Adrian J

    2016-01-01

    hCG and its variants are markers for pregnancy tests, pregnancyrelated complications, trophoblastic diseases, pre-natal screening of Down's syndrome and doping controls. Strong demands are imposed on diagnostic methods by the dynamic changes in the absolute and relative levels of hCG protein backbone variants and glycosylation isoforms in serum and urine during development of pregnancy or the progression/remission of tumors. Observed differences in the results between commercial diagnostic immunoassays reflect the unequal molar recognition of the different metabolic hCG variants, in particular the hCG beta core fragment (hCGβcf), by the diagnostic antibodies (Abs), as their epitopes are not standardized, and the fact that suboptimal hCG standards are used. To rapidly characterize Abs by their epitope recognition and specificity to evaluate their suitability for diagnostic immunoassays a procedure of comparative epitope mapping has been developed using epitope-defined reference Abs. Comparative epitope mapping of diagnostic Abs will provide the basis for the standardization of diagnostic antigenic domains/epitopes and consequently for improved reliability of hCG measurements. Diagnostic first line assays likely consist of pairs of Abs that recognize specific epitopes at the top of the neighboring peptide loops 1 and 3 (Ł1+3) and the cystine knot (ck) of hCGβ, respectively. In future, significant improvements of reliability, robustness and comparability of the results of immunoassays for complex glycoproteins such as hCG will be achieved by the use (i) of standardized diagnostic Abs against welldefined epitopes and (ii) of the new International Standards for hCG and for five hCG variants established by WHO, that are calibrated in molar (SI) units.

  8. Expression of goose parvovirus whole VP3 protein and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasiuk, K; Woźniakowski, G; Holec-Gąsior, L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was the expression of goose parvovirus capsid protein (VP3) and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells. Expression of the whole VP3 protein provided an insufficient amount of protein. In contrast, the expression of two VP3 epitopes (VP3ep4, VP3ep6) in E. coli, resulted in very high expression levels. This may suggest that smaller parts of the GPV antigenic determinants are more efficiently expressed than the complete VP3 gene.

  9. Substantial gaps in knowledge of Bordetella pertussis antibody and T cell epitopes relevant for natural immunity and vaccine efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Kerrie; Seymour, Emily; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The recent increase in whooping cough in vaccinated populations has been attributed to waning immunity associated with the acellular vaccine. The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) is a repository of immune epitope data from the published literature and includes T cell and antibody epitopes for human pathogens. The IEDB conducted a review of the epitope literature, which revealed 300 Bordetella pertussis-related epitopes from 39 references. Epitope data are currently available for six virulence factors of B. pertussis: pertussis toxin, pertactin, fimbrial 2, fimbrial 3, adenylate cyclase and filamentous hemagglutinin. The majority of epitopes were defined for antibody reactivity; fewer T cell determinants were reported. Analysis of available protective correlates data revealed a number of candidate epitopes; however few are defined in humans and few have been shown to be protective. Moreover, there are a limited number of studies defining epitopes from natural infection versus whole cell or acellular/subunit vaccines. The relationship between epitope location and structural features, as well as antigenic drift (SNP analysis) was also investigated. We conclude that the cumulative data is yet insufficient to address many fundamental questions related to vaccine failure and this underscores the need for further investigation of B. pertussis immunity at the molecular level. PMID:24530743

  10. Contrasting patterns of leaf trait variation among and within species during tropical dry forest succession in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derroire, Géraldine; Powers, Jennifer S; Hulshof, Catherine M; Cárdenas Varela, Luis E; Healey, John R

    2018-01-10

    A coordinated response to environmental drivers amongst individual functional traits is central to the plant strategy concept. However, whether the trait co-ordination observed at the global scale occurs at other ecological scales (especially within species) remains an open question. Here, for sapling communities of two tropical dry forest types in Costa Rica, we show large differences amongst traits in the relative contribution of species turnover and intraspecific variation to their directional changes in response to environmental changes along a successional gradient. We studied the response of functional traits associated with the leaf economics spectrum and drought tolerance using intensive sampling to analyse inter- and intra-specific responses to environmental changes and ontogeny. Although the overall functional composition of the sapling communities changed during succession more through species turnover than through intraspecific trait variation, their relative contributions differed greatly amongst traits. For instance, community mean specific leaf area changed mostly due to intraspecific variation. Traits of the leaf economics spectrum showed decoupled responses to environmental drivers and ontogeny. These findings emphasise how divergent ecological mechanisms combine to cause great differences in changes of individual functional traits over environmental gradients and ecological scales.

  11. Epitope mapping porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus by phage display: the nsp2 fragment of the replicase polyprotein contains a cluster of B-cell epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Bøtner, Anette; Toft, P.

    2001-01-01

    We screened phage display libraries of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) protein fragments with sera from exper