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Sample records for intraoral fiber optic-based

  1. Intraoral fiber-optic-based diagnostic for periodontal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Gutierrez, Dora M.; Everett, Matthew J.; Brown, Steve B.; Langry, Kevin C.; Cox, Weldon R.; Johnson, Paul W.; Roe, Jeffrey N.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this initial study was to begin development of a new, objective diagnostic instrument that will allow simultaneous quantitation of multiple proteases within a single periodontal pocket using a chemical fiber optic senor. This approach could potentially be adapted to use specific antibodies and chemiluminescence to detect and quantitate virtually any compound and compare concentrations of different compounds within the same periodontal pocket. The device could also be used to assay secretions in salivary ducts or from a variety of wounds. The applicability is, therefore, not solely limited to dentistry and the device would be important both for clinical diagnostics and as a research too.

  2. Intraoral fiber optic-based diagnostic for periodontal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P W; Gutierrez, D M; Everett, M J; Brown, S B; Langry, K C; Colston, B W; Roe, J N

    2000-01-21

    The purpose of this initial study was to begin development of a new, objective diagnostic instrument that will allow simultaneous quantitation of multiple proteases within a single periodontal pocket using a chemical fiber optic sensor. This approach could potentially be adapted to use specific antibodies and chemiluminescence to detect and quantitate virtually any compound and compare concentrations of different compounds within the same periodontal pocket. The device could also be used to assay secretions in salivary ducts or from a variety of wounds. The applicability is, therefore, not solely limited to dentistry and the device would be important both for clinical diagnostics and as a research tool.

  3. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  4. Fiber optic-based regenerable biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepaniak, Michael J.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1993-01-01

    A fiber optic-based regenerable biosensor. The biosensor is particularly suitable for use in microscale work in situ. In one embodiment, the biosensor comprises a reaction chamber disposed adjacent the distal end of a waveguide and adapted to receive therein a quantity of a sample containing an analyte. Leading into the chamber is a plurality of capillary conduits suitable for introducing into the chamber antibodies or other reagents suitable for selective interaction with a predetermined analyte. Following such interaction, the contents of the chamber may be subjected to an incident energy signal for developing fluorescence within the chamber that is detectable via the optical fiber and which is representative of the presence, i.e. concentration, of the selected analyte. Regeneration of the biosensor is accomplished by replacement of the reagents and/or the analyte, or a combination of these, at least in part via one or more of the capillary conduits. The capillary conduits extend from their respective terminal ends that are in fluid communication with the chamber, away from the chamber to respective location(s) remote from the chamber thereby permitting in situ location of the chamber and remote manipulation and/or analysis of the activity with the chamber.

  5. Fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) for dental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M. J., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    We have developed a hand-held fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for scanning of the oral cavity We have produced, using this scanning device, in viva cross-sectional images of hard and soft dental tissues in human volunteers Clinically relevant anatomical structures, including the gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento-enamel junction, were visible in all the images The dento-enamel junction and the alveolar bone were identifiable in approximately two thirds of the images These images represent, to our knowledge, the first in viva OCT images of human dental tissue.

  6. Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen; Chan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this task is to investigate, develop, and demonstrate a low-cost swept lasing light source for NASA DFRC's fiber optics sensing system (FOSS) to perform structural health monitoring on current and future aerospace vehicles. This is the regular update of the Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems website.

  7. Applications of fiber-optics-based nanosensors to drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Scaffidi, Jonathan; Gregas, Molly; Zhang, Yan; Seewaldt, Victoria

    2009-08-01

    Fiber-optic nanosensors are fabricated by heating and pulling optical fibers to yield sub-micron diameter tips and have been used for in vitro analysis of individual living mammalian cells. Immobilization of bioreceptors (e.g., antibodies, peptides, DNA) selective to targeting analyte molecules of interest provides molecular specificity. Excitation light can be launched into the fiber, and the resulting evanescent field at the tip of the nanofiber can be used to excite target molecules bound to the bioreceptor molecules. The fluorescence or surface-enhanced Raman scattering produced by the analyte molecules is detected using an ultra-sensitive photodetector. This article provides an overview of the development and application of fiber-optic nanosensors for drug discovery. The nanosensors provide minimally invasive tools to probe subcellular compartments inside single living cells for health effect studies (e.g., detection of benzopyrene adducts) and medical applications (e.g., monitoring of apoptosis in cells treated with anticancer drugs).

  8. Fiber Optic Based Thermometry System for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochergin, Vladimir [Microxact Inc.

    2013-05-06

    Thermometry is recognized as the best technique to identify and characterize losses in SRF cavities. The most widely used and reliable apparatus for temperature mapping at cryogenic temperatures is based on carbon resistors (RTDs). The use of this technology on multi-cell cavities is inconvenient due to the very large number of sensors required to obtain sufficient spatial resolution. Recent developments make feasible the use of multiplexible fiber optic sensors for highly distributed temperature measurements. However, sensitivity of multiplexible cryogenic temperature sensors was found extending only to 12K at best and thus was not sufficient for SRF cavity thermometry. During the course of the project the team of MicroXact, JLab and Virginia Tech developed and demonstrated the multiplexible fiber optic sensor with adequate response below 20K. The demonstrated temperature resolution is by at least a factor of 60 better than that of the best multiplexible fiber optic temperature sensors reported to date. The clear path toward at least 10times better temperature resolution is shown. The first to date temperature distribution measurements with ~2.5mm spatial resolution was done with fiber optic sensors at 2K to4K temperatures. The repeatability and accuracy of the sensors were verified only at 183K, but at this temperature both parameters significantly exceeded the state of the art. The results of this work are expected to find a wide range of applications, since the results are enabling the whole new testing capabilities, not accessible before.

  9. Virtual Instrumentation for a Fiber-Optics-Based Artificial Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Donald R.; Kyaw, Thet Mon; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A LabView-based computer interface for fiber-optic artificial nerves has been devised as a Masters thesis project. This project involves the use of outputs from wavelength multiplexed optical fiber sensors (artificial nerves), which are capable of producing dense optical data outputs for physical measurements. The potential advantages of using optical fiber sensors for sensory function restoration is the fact that well defined WDM-modulated signals can be transmitted to and from the sensing region allowing networked units to replace low-level nerve functions for persons desirous of "intelligent artificial limbs." Various FO sensors can be designed with high sensitivity and the ability to be interfaced with a wide range of devices including miniature shielded electrical conversion units. Our Virtual Instrument (VI) interface software package was developed using LabView's "Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench" package. The virtual instrument has been configured to arrange and encode the data to develop an intelligent response in the form of encoded digitized signal outputs. The architectural layout of our nervous system is such that different touch stimuli from different artificial fiber-optic nerve points correspond to gratings of a distinct resonant wavelength and physical location along the optical fiber. Thus, when an automated, tunable diode laser sends scans, the wavelength spectrum of the artificial nerve, it triggers responses that are encoded with different touch stimuli by way wavelength shifts in the reflected Bragg resonances. The reflected light is detected and a resulting analog signal is fed into ADC1 board and DAQ card. Finally, the software has been written such that the experimenter is able to set the response range during data acquisition.

  10. Fiber-Optic Based Compact Gas Leak Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroot, Wim A.

    1995-01-01

    A propellant leak detection system based on Raman scattering principles is introduced. The proposed system is flexible and versatile as the result of the use of optical fibers. It is shown that multiple species can be monitored simultaneously. In this paper oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen are detected and monitored. The current detection sensitivity for both hydrogen and carbon monoxide is 1% partial pressure at ambient conditions. The sensitivity for oxygen and nitrogen is 0.5% partial pressure. The response time to changes in species concentration is three minutes. This system can be used to monitor multiple species at several locations.

  11. Utility of an optically-based, micromechanical system for printing collagen fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paten, Jeffrey A.; Tilburey, Graham E.; Molloy, Eileen A.; Zareian, Ramin; Trainor, Christopher V.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen's success as the principal structural element in load-bearing, connective tissue has motivated the development of numerous engineering approaches designed to recapitulate native fibril morphology and strength. It has been shown recently that collagen fibers can be drawn from monomeric solution through a fiber forming buffer (FFB), followed by numerous additional treatments in a complex serial process. However, internal fibril alignment, packing and resultant mechanical behavior of the fibers have not been optimized and remain inferior to native tissue. Further, no system has been developed which permits simultaneous application of molecular crowding, measurement of applied load, and direct observation of polymerization dynamics during fiber printing. The ability to perform well-controlled investigations early in the process of fiber formation, which vary single input parameters (i.e. collagen concentration, crowding agent concentration, draw rate, flow rate, temperature, pH, etc.) should substantially improve fiber morphology and strength. We have thus designed, built, and tested a versatile, in situ, optically-based, micromechanical assay and fiber printing system which permits the correlation of parameter changes with mechanical properties of fibers immediately after deposition into an FFB. We demonstrate the sensitivity of the assay by detecting changes in the fiber mechanics in response to draw rate, collagen type, small changes in the molecular crowding agent concentration and to variations in pH. In addition we found the ability to observe fiber polymerization dynamics leads to intriguing new insights into collagen assembly behavior. PMID:23352045

  12. Towards development of a fiber optic-based transmission monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Chris S.; Kiddy, Jason S.; Samuel, Paul D.

    2011-06-01

    There is interest in the rotorcraft community to develop health monitoring technologies. Among these technologies is the ability to monitor the transmission planetary gear system. The gearbox environment does not lend itself to traditional sensing technologies due to the harsh environment and crowed space. Traditional vibration-based diagnostics are based on the output from externally mounted sensors, usually accelerometers fixed to the gearbox exterior. This type of system relies on the ability of the vibration signal to travel from the gears through the gearbox housing. These sensors are also susceptible to other interference including electrical magnetic interference (EMI). For these reasons, the development of a fiber optic-based transmission monitoring system represents an appealing alternative to the accelerometer due to their resistance to EMI and other signal corrupting influences. Aither Engineering has been working on integrating the fiber optic sensors into the gearbox environment to measure strain on the ring gear of the planetary gear system. This application utilizes a serial array of wavelength division multiplexed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. Work in this area has been conducted at both the University of Maryland, College Park and more recently at the NASA Glenn Research Center (NGRC) OH-58 transmission test rig facility. This paper discusses some of the testing results collected from the fiber optic ring gear sensor array. Based on these results, recommendations for system requirements are addressed in terms of the capabilities of the FBG instrumentation.

  13. A compact fiber optics-based heterodyne combined normal and transverse displacement interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuanetti, Bryan; Wang, Tianxue; Prakash, Vikas

    2017-03-01

    While Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) has become a common diagnostic tool for the measurement of normal component of particle motion in shock wave experiments, this technique has not yet been modified for the measurement of combined normal and transverse motion, as needed in oblique plate impact experiments. In this paper, we discuss the design and implementation of a compact fiber-optics-based heterodyne combined normal and transverse displacement interferometer. Like the standard PDV, this diagnostic tool is assembled using commercially available telecommunications hardware and uses a 1550 nm wavelength 2 W fiber-coupled laser, an optical focuser, and single mode fibers to transport light to and from the target. Two additional optical probes capture first-order beams diffracted from a reflective grating at the target free-surface and deliver the beams past circulators and a coupler where the signal is combined to form a beat frequency. The combined signal is then digitized and analyzed to determine the transverse component of the particle motion. The maximum normal velocity that can be measured by this system is limited by the equivalent transmission bandwidth (3.795 GHz) of the combined detector, amplifier, and digitizer and is estimated to be ∼2.9 km/s. Sample symmetric oblique plate-impact experiments are performed to demonstrate the capability of this diagnostic tool in the measurement of the combined normal and transverse displacement particle motion.

  14. A Newly Designed Fiber-Optic Based Earth Pressure Transducer with Adjustable Measurement Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou-Zhen Wei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel fiber-optic based earth pressure sensor (FPS with an adjustable measurement range and high sensitivity is developed to measure earth pressures for civil infrastructures. The new FPS combines a cantilever beam with fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors and a flexible membrane. Compared with a traditional pressure transducer with a dual diaphragm design, the proposed FPS has a larger measurement range and shows high accuracy. The working principles, parameter design, fabrication methods, and laboratory calibration tests are explained in this paper. A theoretical solution is derived to obtain the relationship between the applied pressure and strain of the FBG sensors. In addition, a finite element model is established to analyze the mechanical behavior of the membrane and the cantilever beam and thereby obtain optimal parameters. The cantilever beam is 40 mm long, 15 mm wide, and 1 mm thick. The whole FPS has a diameter of 100 mm and a thickness of 30 mm. The sensitivity of the FPS is 0.104 kPa/με. In addition, automatic temperature compensation can be achieved. The FPS’s sensitivity, physical properties, and response to applied pressure are extensively examined through modeling and experiments. The results show that the proposed FPS has numerous potential applications in soil pressure measurement.

  15. A family of fiber-optic based pressure sensors for intracochlear measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Elizabeth S.; Nakajima, Hideko H.

    2015-02-01

    Fiber-optic pressure sensors have been developed for measurements of intracochlear pressure. The present family of transducers includes an 81 μm diameter sensor employing a SLED light source and single-mode optic fiber, and LED/multi-mode sensors with 126 and 202 μm diameter. The 126 μm diameter pressure sensor also has been constructed with an electrode adhered to its side, for coincident pressure and voltage measurements. These sensors have been used for quantifying cochlear mechanical impedances, informing our understanding of conductive hearing loss and its remediation, and probing the operation of the cochlear amplifier.

  16. Advanced Fiber Optic-Based Sensing Technology for Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Ko, William L.; Chan, Patrick; Bakalyar, John

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of fiber optic sensing technology development activities performed at NASA Dryden in support of Unmanned Aircraft Systems. Examples of current and previous work are presented in the following categories: algorithm development, system development, instrumentation installation, ground R&D, and flight testing. Examples of current research and development activities are provided.

  17. Design of fiber optic based respiratory sensor for newborn incubator application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhia, Arika; Devara, Kresna; Abuzairi, Tomy; Poespawati, N. R.; Purnamaningsih, Retno W.

    2018-02-01

    This paper reports the design of respiratory sensor using fiber optic for newborn incubator application. The sensor works based on light intensity losses difference obtained due to thorax movement during respiration. The output of the sensor launched to support electronic circuits to be processed in Arduino Uno microcontroler such that the real-time respiratory rate (breath per minute) can be presented on LCD. Experiment results using thorax expansion of newborn simulator show that the system is able to measure respiratory rate from 10 up to 130 breaths per minute with 0.595% error and 0.2% hysteresis error.

  18. Fiber optic-based fluorescence detection system for in vivo studies of exogenous chromophore pharmacokinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Daniel R.; Dunn, J. B.; Mitchell, W. L.; Dalton, Brian K.; Garbo, Greta M.; Warner, Jon A.

    1995-05-01

    The detection and quantification of the concentration of exogenous chromophores in-vivo by their fluorescence is complicated by many physical and geometrical parameters. Measurement of such signals is advantageous in determining the pharmacokinetics of photosensitizers such as those used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) or to assist in the diagnosis of tissue histological state. To overcome these difficulties a ratio based fiber optic contact fluorometer has been developed. This fluorescence detection system (FDS) uses the ratio of the fluorescence emission peak of the exogenous chromophore to that of endogenous chromophores, i.e. autofluorescence, to correct for a variety of parameters affecting the magnitude of the measured signals. By doing so it also minimizes the range of baseline measurements prior to exogenous drug injection, for various tissue types. Design of the FDS and results of its testing in animals and patients using the second generation photosensitizer Tin ethyletiopurpurin (SnET2) are presented. These results support the feasibility and usefulness of the Ratio FDS system.

  19. Intraoral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Robert L

    2004-10-01

    Chronic nonodontogenic toothache has been reported in the literature since the 1700s. This problem has followed a similar scenario since those first reports. The patient typically is misdiagnosed and then subjected to multiple unnecessary procedures, ultimately resulting in tooth extractions because of dentists and physicians being unaware of the existence of atypical odontalgia and other types of intraoral neuropathic pain that are treatable without sacrificing the teeth. This paper reviews the medications and procedures used to treat nonodontogenic toothache.

  20. Fiber-optic-based chemical sensors for in-situ measurement of metals and aromatic organic compounds in seawater and soil systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Stephen H.; Inman, Scott; Theriault, Gregory A.; Cooper, Stafford S.; Malone, Philip G.; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Lurk, Paul W.

    1990-08-01

    Use of UV-visibletransmitting optical fibers for real-time, remote, in situfluorescencemeasurementsof chemical constituents in environmental samples is described. In order to improve the capability of fluorescence techniques for resoMng complex mixtures we have deVelOped a fiber optic-based system that uses a pulsed nrogen laser to induce fluorescence and a time-gated linear photodiode array coupled to a spectrograph for measuring resutting emisalon spectra This permfts rapid extraction of both spectral information and temporal data (fluorescence decay times). The performance of the system for monftoring aromatic hydrocarbons directly in seawater over a bare-ended" fiber optic cable is discussed. Techniques for extending the Capability to determination of metals and other non-fluorescing compounds are presented. A system in which a fluorogenic indicator molecule for metal ions is constantly renewed at the sensing end of the fiber is described that (1)exhibits very fast response times (1 second) and (2)eliminates problems of reversibility common with immobilized indicators. Presently, the pulsed-laser/photodiode fiber optic system is being adapted to a truck-mounted cone penetrometer system for characterizing the distribution of chemical contaminants at hazardous waste sites. The system can push a 35.7 mm diameter rod up to 50 m into the sI at a rate of approximately 2 cm/sec. The penetrometer probe tip will be equipped with sapphire viewing windows that permft one fiber to screen for aromatic orgarc compounds and a fluorogeruc indicator release system that can be used with a second fiber for trace metal screening.

  1. Depth probing of the hydride formation process in thin Pd films by combined electrochemistry and fiber optics-based in situ UV/vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Björn; Fredriksson, Mattias; Feng, Ligang; Lindahl, Niklas; Hagberg, Johan; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-07-15

    We demonstrate a flexible combined electrochemistry and fiber optics-based in situ UV/vis spectroscopy setup to gain insight into the depth evolution of electrochemical hydride and oxide formation in Pd films with thicknesses of 20 and 100 nm. The thicknesses of our model systems are chosen such that the films are thinner or significantly thicker than the optical skin depth of Pd to create two distinctly different situations. Low power white light is irradiated on the sample and analyzed in three different configurations; transmittance through, and, reflectance from the front and the back side of the film. The obtained optical sensitivities correspond to fractions of a monolayer of adsorbed or absorbed hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) on Pd. Moreover, a combined simultaneous readout obtained from the different optical measurement configurations provides mechanistic insights into the depth-evolution of the studied hydrogenation and oxidation processes.

  2. Intraoral Pain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, Mary Hil; Khaled, Yasser; Napeñas, Joel J

    2016-08-01

    Those experiencing intraoral pain associated with dental and oral diseases are likely to pursue treatment from medical and dental providers. The causes for intraoral pain include odontogenic, periodontal, oral mucosal, or contiguous hard and soft tissue structures to the oral cavity. Providers should be vigilant when diagnosing these, as they should be among the first in their differential diagnoses to be ruled out. This review provides brief overviews of frequently encountered oral/dental diseases that cause intraoral pain, originating from the teeth, the surrounding mucosa and gingivae, tongue, bone, and salivary glands and their causes, features, diagnosis, and management strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intraoral gothic arch tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubel, Barry; Hill, Edward E

    2011-01-01

    In order to create optimum esthetics, function and phonetics in complete denture fabrication, it is necessary to record accurate maxillo-mandibular determinants of occlusion. This requires clinical skill to establish an accurate, verifiable and reproducible vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) and centric relation (CR). Correct vertical relation depends upon a consideration of several factors, including muscle tone, inter-dental arch space and parallelism of the ridges. Any errors made while taking maxillo-mandibular jaw relation records will result in dentures that are uncomfortable and, possibly, unwearable. The application of a tracing mechanism such as the Gothic arch tracer (a central bearing device) is a demonstrable method of determining centric relation. Intraoral Gothic arch tracers provide the advantage of capturing VDO and CR in an easy-to-use technique for practitioners. Intraoral tracing (Gothic arch tracing) is a preferred method of obtaining consistent positions of the mandible in motion (retrusive, protrusive and lateral) at a comfortable VDO.

  4. Intraoral giant condyloma acuminatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta R

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A case of intraoral giant condyloma acuminatum is reported in a 50- year- old Indian. He did not respond to topical application of podophyllin 20% but responded partially to electric cauterisation. Surgical excision was done to get rid of the warty growh completely. Since there were no skin or genital lesions and no history of marital or extramarital sexual contact the lesion was probably acquired from environmental sources. Nonsexual transmission should be considered especially when the lesions are extragenital.

  5. The Intraoral Ultrasonography in Dentistry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... resorption in edentulous patients; second molar implants may also cause lingual nerve injuries. It should be .... with narrow palates; small-footprint convex probes may be more appropriate. However, their ... tissue around implants are measurable by intraoral USG.[52]. On buccal surfaces, it is quite easy to ...

  6. Intraoral Morgellons disease or delusional parasitosis: a first case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovigi, Allan J

    2010-08-01

    Morgellons disease is a new emerging disease that is still controversial and believed to be, by some practitioners, as nothing more than delusional parasitosis. The Center for Disease Control has recently launched an epidemiological investigation into this disease due to the increased number of reports. A first case is reported of an oral lesion and symptoms consistent with Morgellons disease. The nature of the characteristic fibers associated with the intraoral lesion is investigated. Research has started at a number of institutions to elucidate the nature of this emerging disease.

  7. The CT appearance of intraoral chewing gum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towbin, Alexander J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2008-12-15

    When imaged, intraoral chewing gum has the potential to be misdiagnosed. Chewing gum has a characteristic appearance on CT: it is ovoid in shape, hyperdense, and has small internal locules of air. Reports have described the appearance of gum on radiographs and abdominal CT images; however, no reports could be found detailing its appearance within the mouth. This report describes the appearance of intraoral chewing gum as well as the properties of the gum that lead to this appearance. Because of the potential for misdiagnosis, screening for intraoral foreign bodies should be considered prior to imaging. (orig.)

  8. 21 CFR 872.5570 - Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. 872.5570 Section 872.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 872.5570 Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep...

  9. Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the treatment of diverticulosis , diabetes , and heart disease . ... fiber is found in oat bran, barley, nuts, seeds, beans, lentils, peas, ... heart disease. Insoluble fiber is found in foods such as ...

  10. Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not getting enough fiber. According to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines, teen girls (14 to 18 years) should get 25 grams of fiber per day and teen boys (14 to 18 years) should get 31 grams of fiber per day. The best sources are fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts and legumes, ...

  11. Evaluation of the Beam Quality of Intraoral X-ray Equipment using Intraoral Standard Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Sub; Kwon, Hyok Rak; Sim, Woo Hyoun; Oh, Seung Hyoun; Lee, Ji Youn; Jeon, Kug Jin; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-15

    This study was to evaluate the beam quality of intraoral X-ray equipment used at Yonsei University Dental Hospital (YUDH) using the half value layer (HVL) and the characteristic curve of intraoral standard X-ray film. The study was done using the intraoral X-ray equipment used at each clinical department at YUDH. Aluminum filter was used to determine the HVL. Intraoral standard film was used to get the characteristic curve of each intraoral X-ray equipment. Most of the HVLs of intraoral X-ray equipment were higher than the least recommended thickness, but the REX 601 model used at the operative dentistry department and the X-707 model used at the pediatric dentistry department had HVLs lower than the recommended thickness. The slopes of the characteristic curves of films taken using the PANPAS 601 model and REX 601 model at operative dentistry department, the X-70S model of prosthodontic dentistry department, and the REX 601 model at the student clinic were relatively low. HVL and the characteristic curve of X-ray film can be used to evaluate the beam quality of intraoral X-ray equipment. In order to get the best X-ray films with the least radiation exposure to patients and best diagnostic information in clinical dentistry, X-ray equipment should be managed in the planned and organized fashion.

  12. Evaluation of the Beam Quality of Intraoral X-ray Equipment using Intraoral Standard Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Sub; Kwon, Hyok Rak; Sim, Woo Hyoun; Oh, Seung Hyoun; Lee, Ji Youn; Jeon, Kug Jin; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo

    2000-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the beam quality of intraoral X-ray equipment used at Yonsei University Dental Hospital (YUDH) using the half value layer (HVL) and the characteristic curve of intraoral standard X-ray film. The study was done using the intraoral X-ray equipment used at each clinical department at YUDH. Aluminum filter was used to determine the HVL. Intraoral standard film was used to get the characteristic curve of each intraoral X-ray equipment. Most of the HVLs of intraoral X-ray equipment were higher than the least recommended thickness, but the REX 601 model used at the operative dentistry department and the X-707 model used at the pediatric dentistry department had HVLs lower than the recommended thickness. The slopes of the characteristic curves of films taken using the PANPAS 601 model and REX 601 model at operative dentistry department, the X-70S model of prosthodontic dentistry department, and the REX 601 model at the student clinic were relatively low. HVL and the characteristic curve of X-ray film can be used to evaluate the beam quality of intraoral X-ray equipment. In order to get the best X-ray films with the least radiation exposure to patients and best diagnostic information in clinical dentistry, X-ray equipment should be managed in the planned and organized fashion.

  13. Isolated Horner's syndrome caused by intraoral gunshot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, R; Corres, J; Culebras, A; Riva, E; Masjuán, J

    2006-12-01

    A 45-year-old man developed Horner's syndrome after sustaining an intraoral gunshot in a suicide attempt. Examination did not show any major vascular injury or other neurological symptoms. Radiograph of the skull and helical computed tomography angiography of the brain and neck detected a bullet embedded in the interior of the left internal carotid artery (ICA) sheath. Surgical examination showed an intact left ICA. Horner's syndrome resulting from intraoral trauma rarely presents as an isolated sign and is generally associated with carotid injuries. It may herald a life-threatening artery injury and needs urgent investigation.

  14. The Intraoral Ultrasonography in Dentistry | Caglayan | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compared to other medical imaging methods, USG has several advantages of being real time, portable, inexpensive, radiation free, and noninvasive. In the medicine, most of the USG applications are transcutaneous. However, intraoral USG has been a relatively rare application, it has recently been drawing more interest.

  15. Tamper indicating and sensing optical-based smart structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sliva, P.; Anheier, N.C.; Gordon, N.R.; Simmons, K.L.; Stahl, K.A.; Undem, H.A.

    1995-05-01

    This paper has presented an overview of the type of optical-based structures that can be designed and constructed. These smart structures are capable of responding to their environment. The examples given represent a modest sampling of the complexity that can be achieved in both design and practice. Tamper-indicating containers and smart, sensing windows demonstrate just a few of the applications. We have shown that optical-based smart structures can be made multifunctional with the sensing built in. The next generation smart structure will combine the sensing functionality of these optical-based smart structures with other sensors such as piezoelectrics and electro-rheological fluids to not only be able to respond to the environment, but to adapt to it as well. An example of functionality in this regime would be a piezosensor that senses pressure changes (e.g., shock waves), which then causes an electro-rheological fluid to change viscosity. A fiber sensor located in or near the electro-rheological fluid senses the stiffness change and sends a signal through a feedback loop back to the piezosensor for additional adjustments to the electro-rheological fluid

  16. Cyanoacrylate for Intraoral Wound Closure: A Possibility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parimala Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound closure is a part of any surgical procedure and the objective of laceration repair or incision closure is to approximate the edges of a wound so that natural healing process may occur. Over the years new biomaterials have been discovered as an alternate to conventional suture materials. Cyanoacrylate bioadhesives are one among them. They carry the advantages of rapid application, patient comfort, resistance to infection, hemostatic properties, and no suture removal anxiety. Hence this study was undertaken to study the effect of long chain cyanoacrylate as an adhesive for intraoral wound closure and also to explore its hemostatic and antibacterial effects. Isoamyl-2-cyanoacrylate (AMCRYLATE was used as the adhesive in the study. In conclusion isoamyl cyanoacrylate can be used for intraoral wound closure, as an alternative to sutures for gluing the mucoperiosteum to bone, for example, after impaction removal, periapical surgeries, and cleft repair. Its hemostatic and antibacterial activity has to be further evaluated.

  17. Intraoral digital radiography: elements of effective imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederberg, Robert

    2012-10-01

    Intraoral digital imaging has evolved from an experimental and sometimes disparaged technique in the mid 1980s to a reliable and ubiquitously used technology today. There are many advantages for use of digital radiographic techniques in dentistry, one of the chief ones being patient dose reduction. However, as important as dose reduction is for safe and effective radiography, practicing dentists would also like to understand the fundamental differences between digital system configurations so they may be able to make an informed choice as to which system best fits their needs. In addition, there has been considerable debate on the following topics: sensor technology; factors associated with image display; optimum techniques for image manipulation; and image storage, retrieval, and archiving. This article provides insight into these and other elements of effective imaging in intraoral digital imaging.

  18. Evaluation of occupational exposure in intraoral radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miguel, Cristiano; Barros, Frieda S.; Rocha, Anna S.P.S.; Godoi, Walmor C.; Tilly Junior, Joao G.

    2014-01-01

    The intraoral radiography is widely performed in the dental office due to low cost and agility. The doses in intraoral radiology are considered low, however it is known that doses below the threshold for deterministic radiation has the potential to induce stochastic effects. An intraoral radiography has a risk of inducing fatal cancer or serious in order of 1:10,000,000. Besides the patient, the dentist may also be being exposed to radiation during the work with the radiographics practices. The bibliographies demonstrates the lack of information on radiation protection of dentists, however, the occupational dose reduction was observed in radiology over the past 14 years. This work aims to evaluate the effective dose of radiation to which workers can be exposed dentists in dental offices to perform intraoral radiographs. In this context, a study was be conducted between June 2013 and May 2014 with 44 professionals in Curitiba city. For each dentist was given a personal dosimeter to be used for 30 days. During this period, the number of radiographies and the length of the cable triggers of the X-ray equipment was registered and, the dosimeter´s dose was read. It was observed that the cables triggers meet regulatory standards and allow dentists to get the mean minimum distance of two meters from the radiation source in 93% of cases. Through analysis of the doses, it was concluded that occupational exposures of these workers are within the recommended threshold by regulatory 453/1998 of the Ministry of Health from Brazil. (author)

  19. Organ absorbed doses in intraoral dental radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomber, A R; Faulkner, K

    1993-11-01

    A dental radiography unit operating at 70 kV (nominal) and 20 cm focus-skin distance was used to irradiate an anthropomorphic phantom loaded with lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters, in order to assess the variation in organ absorbed dose with intraoral periapical radiographic view. 14 views using the bisecting-angle technique and four views using the paralleling technique were studied. The results are presented and the doses and dose distributions examined. Doses for the paralleling and bisecting-angle techniques are compared, and the effects of focus-skin distance and beam collimation upon patient dosimetry discussed. Sources of uncertainty in dental dosimetry studies using phantoms are also considered.

  20. Evaluation of occupational exposure in intraoral radiography; Avaliacao da dose ocupacional em radiografia intraoral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel, Cristiano; Barros, Frieda S.; Rocha, Anna S.P.S.; Godoi, Walmor C., E-mail: miguel_cristianoch@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: saicla@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: annarocha@yahoo.com, E-mail: walmor.godoi@gmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Tilly Junior, Joao G., E-mail: joao.tilly@derax.com.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (HC/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas

    2014-07-01

    The intraoral radiography is widely performed in the dental office due to low cost and agility. The doses in intraoral radiology are considered low, however it is known that doses below the threshold for deterministic radiation has the potential to induce stochastic effects. An intraoral radiography has a risk of inducing fatal cancer or serious in order of 1:10,000,000. Besides the patient, the dentist may also be being exposed to radiation during the work with the radiographics practices. The bibliographies demonstrates the lack of information on radiation protection of dentists, however, the occupational dose reduction was observed in radiology over the past 14 years. This work aims to evaluate the effective dose of radiation to which workers can be exposed dentists in dental offices to perform intraoral radiographs. In this context, a study was be conducted between June 2013 and May 2014 with 44 professionals in Curitiba city. For each dentist was given a personal dosimeter to be used for 30 days. During this period, the number of radiographies and the length of the cable triggers of the X-ray equipment was registered and, the dosimeter´s dose was read. It was observed that the cables triggers meet regulatory standards and allow dentists to get the mean minimum distance of two meters from the radiation source in 93% of cases. Through analysis of the doses, it was concluded that occupational exposures of these workers are within the recommended threshold by regulatory 453/1998 of the Ministry of Health from Brazil. (author)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraoral hard and soft tissues using an intraoral coil and FLASH sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Kathrin; Spittau, Björn; Hennig, Jürgen; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Nelson, Katja

    2016-12-01

    To ascertain the feasibility of MRI as a non-ionizing protocol for routine dentomaxillofacial diagnostic imaging. Wireless coils were used for MRI of intraoral hard and soft tissues. FLASH MRI was applied in vivo with a mandible voxel size of 250 × 250 × 500 μm 3 , FOV of 64 × 64 × 28 mm 3 and acquisition time of 3:57 min and with a maxilla voxel size of 350 μm 3 and FOV of 34 cm 3 in 6:40 min. Ex vivo imaging was performed in 4:38 min, with a resolution of 200 μm 3 and FOV of 36.5 cm 3 . Cone beam (CB) CT of the mandible and subjects were acquired. MRI was compared to CBCT and histological sections. Deviations were calculated with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (c v ). A high congruence between CBCT, MRI and specimens was demonstrated. Hard and soft tissues including dental pulp, periodontium, gingiva, cancellous bone and mandibular canal contents were adequately displayed with MRI. Imaging of select intraoral tissues was achieved using custom MRI protocols with an easily applicable intraoral coil in a clinically acceptable acquisition time. Comparison with CBCT and histological sections helped demonstrate dimensional accuracy of the MR images. The course of the mandibular canal was accurately displayed with CBCT and MRI. • MRI is a clinically available diagnostic tool in dentistry • Intraoral hard and soft tissues can be imaged with a high resolution with MRI • The dimensional accuracy of MRI is comparable to cone beam CT.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraoral hard and soft tissues using an intraoral coil and FLASH sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluegge, Tabea; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Kathrin; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Nelson, Katja; Hoevener, Jan-Bernd; Ludwig, Ute; Hennig, Juergen; Spittau, Bjoern

    2016-01-01

    To ascertain the feasibility of MRI as a non-ionizing protocol for routine dentomaxillofacial diagnostic imaging. Wireless coils were used for MRI of intraoral hard and soft tissues. FLASH MRI was applied in vivo with a mandible voxel size of 250 x 250 x 500 μm 3 , FOV of 64 x 64 x 28 mm 3 and acquisition time of 3:57 min and with a maxilla voxel size of 350 μm 3 and FOV of 34 cm 3 in 6:40 min. Ex vivo imaging was performed in 4:38 min, with a resolution of 200 μm 3 and FOV of 36.5 cm 3 . Cone beam (CB) CT of the mandible and subjects were acquired. MRI was compared to CBCT and histological sections. Deviations were calculated with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (c v ). A high congruence between CBCT, MRI and specimens was demonstrated. Hard and soft tissues including dental pulp, periodontium, gingiva, cancellous bone and mandibular canal contents were adequately displayed with MRI. Imaging of select intraoral tissues was achieved using custom MRI protocols with an easily applicable intraoral coil in a clinically acceptable acquisition time. Comparison with CBCT and histological sections helped demonstrate dimensional accuracy of the MR images. The course of the mandibular canal was accurately displayed with CBCT and MRI. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraoral hard and soft tissues using an intraoral coil and FLASH sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluegge, Tabea; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Kathrin; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Nelson, Katja [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Freiburg (Germany); Hoevener, Jan-Bernd; Ludwig, Ute; Hennig, Juergen [University Medical Center Freiburg, Medical Physics, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Spittau, Bjoern [Albert Ludwig University of Freiburg, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To ascertain the feasibility of MRI as a non-ionizing protocol for routine dentomaxillofacial diagnostic imaging. Wireless coils were used for MRI of intraoral hard and soft tissues. FLASH MRI was applied in vivo with a mandible voxel size of 250 x 250 x 500 μm{sup 3}, FOV of 64 x 64 x 28 mm{sup 3} and acquisition time of 3:57 min and with a maxilla voxel size of 350 μm{sup 3} and FOV of 34 cm{sup 3} in 6:40 min. Ex vivo imaging was performed in 4:38 min, with a resolution of 200 μm{sup 3} and FOV of 36.5 cm{sup 3}. Cone beam (CB) CT of the mandible and subjects were acquired. MRI was compared to CBCT and histological sections. Deviations were calculated with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (c{sub v}). A high congruence between CBCT, MRI and specimens was demonstrated. Hard and soft tissues including dental pulp, periodontium, gingiva, cancellous bone and mandibular canal contents were adequately displayed with MRI. Imaging of select intraoral tissues was achieved using custom MRI protocols with an easily applicable intraoral coil in a clinically acceptable acquisition time. Comparison with CBCT and histological sections helped demonstrate dimensional accuracy of the MR images. The course of the mandibular canal was accurately displayed with CBCT and MRI. (orig.)

  4. Extraoral periapical radiography: an alternative approach to intraoral periapical radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rahul; Khambete, Neha; Priya, Ekta

    2011-01-01

    It is difficult to take intraoral radiographs in some patients who are intolerable to place the film in their mouth. For these patients, Newman and Friedman recommended a new technique of extraoral film placement. Here we report various cases that diagnostic imaging was performed in patients using the extraoral periapical technique. This technique was used to obtain the radiographs for the patients with severe gag reflex, pediatric dental patients, and patients with restricted mouth opening. This technique can be recommended as an alternative to conventional intraoral periapical technique in cases where intraoral film placement is difficult to achieve.

  5. Extraoral periapical radiography: an alternative approach to intraoral periapical radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambete, Neha; Priya, Ekta

    2011-01-01

    It is difficult to take intraoral radiographs in some patients who are intolerable to place the film in their mouth. For these patients, Newman and Friedman recommended a new technique of extraoral film placement. Here we report various cases that diagnostic imaging was performed in patients using the extraoral periapical technique. This technique was used to obtain the radiographs for the patients with severe gag reflex, pediatric dental patients, and patients with restricted mouth opening. This technique can be recommended as an alternative to conventional intraoral periapical technique in cases where intraoral film placement is difficult to achieve. PMID:22232725

  6. Extraoral periapical radiography: an alternative approach to intraoral periapical radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rahul [Vasantdada Patil Dental College and Hospital, Sangli (India); Khambete, Neha [CSMSS Dental College and Hospital, Aurangabad (India); Priya, Ekta [Saveetha Dental College and Hospital, Chennai (India)

    2011-12-15

    It is difficult to take intraoral radiographs in some patients who are intolerable to place the film in their mouth. For these patients, Newman and Friedman recommended a new technique of extraoral film placement. Here we report various cases that diagnostic imaging was performed in patients using the extraoral periapical technique. This technique was used to obtain the radiographs for the patients with severe gag reflex, pediatric dental patients, and patients with restricted mouth opening. This technique can be recommended as an alternative to conventional intraoral periapical technique in cases where intraoral film placement is difficult to achieve.

  7. [The most frequent mistakes in intraoral radiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, U; Schwarz, H M

    1976-01-01

    The authors analysed 2000 intra-oral radiographs that had been taken, using the bisecting technique according to the isometry rule of Cieszynski/Dieck, at an institution being typical of the ambulatory public health service during a period of 5 months. 602 (30.1%) faulty radiographs were detected. The classification of the faulty radiographs showed that 395 (65.6%) were caused by errors in projection; 116 (19.3%), by errors in the dark-room; 59 (9.8%), by errors in exposure; and 32 (5.3%), by defective equipment. Defects in the film material used in the present study were not observed. The relatively high rate of faults calls for improvements of the programs for the education and the advanced training of stomatologists and stomatological nurses, and for improvement of the radiographic technique.

  8. Guides for intraoral x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogunsunlade, O.A.

    1988-01-01

    An h-shaped exterior guide for use in combination with a SNAP-A-RAY film holder for accurately aligning a beam from an X-ray cone with an X-ray film during the process of taking intraoral periapical dental X-rays of the maxillary and mandibular teeth is described comprising: a first guide arm laterally and detachably connectable through a housing means; a traverse arm extending from the midpoint of the first guide arm and parallel to the X-ray film; and a second guide arm extending perpendicularly from an end of the traverse arm toward a plane of the X-ray film and in parallel relation up to an end point of the first guide arm

  9. Intraoral capillary haemangioma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Parimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiomas are common benign vascular tumors of the head and neck region which account for 7% of all benign tumors of infancy and childhood. Adults are rarely affected, and they have a female predilection. Based on the microscopic appearance, they are classified into capillary, cavernous, mixed, and sclerosing variety. Incidence of intraoral capillary hemangioma (CH is infrequent, and its topographical presentation on the palatal mucosa and gingiva marks extreme rarity. They are uncommonly encountered by the dentists. The aim of this article is to present a case of CH in a 46-year-old male who presented with a swelling on the posterior hard palate on the left side involving the palatal gingiva and palatal mucosa.

  10. Intraoral hydatid cyst: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kiran Alaparthi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available "Hydatid" is a Greek word which means "a drop of water." Hydatid cysts occur in hydatid disease or echinococcosis, which is one of the most geographically prevalent zoonosis. This zoonotic infection in humans is mainly caused by infection by the larval stage of the dog tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. This tapeworm infestation is widespread in sheep, goats, cattle, and dogs. This chronic disease is present worldwide among herding populations who live in close proximity to dogs and herd animals. It is a serious and potentially fatal condition and symptoms may occur a long time after the early infection. The most frequently affected organs are liver, lungs, followed by bones and brain, and extremely unusual occurrence has been found in the oral cavity, which was noticed in the present case. So hereby, we reveal a very rare case of intraoral hydatid cyst in a 20-year-old female patient.

  11. Intraoral blue (Jadassohn-Tieche) nevus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, C D; Zoutendam, G L; Gombas, O F

    1978-05-01

    Blue nevus of the oral mucosa is a distinctly uncommon clincial entity. Careful review of the literature yielded thirty-one previously reported cases. The present article reports the occurrence of a blue nevus of the hard palate in a 58-year-old man. It is of interest since it is the smallest (1 by 1 mm.) intraoral blue nevus to be reported. A clinicopathologic study of the previous thirty-one cases and of our case suggests that this lesion has no age or sex predilection. The most common site of occurrence was the hard palate. There appears to be no tendency toward recurrence. A brief review of the historical background, clinical features, theories of possible origin, and differential diagnosis is presented. Excisional biopsy of localized areas of oral pibmentation, together with histopathologic study, is indicated to rule out melanoma.

  12. Intraoral digital impressions to enhance implant esthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Kenneth F

    2014-09-01

    Providing an accurate soft-tissue transfer for anterior implants is not a new concept; however, it is currently an especially relevant one. There are numerous documented cases in which residual excess cement with cement-retained implant restorations was a contributing cause in periimplantitis. In 2012, Wadhwani et al reported the importance of placing the crown abutment margins supragingivally for ease of cement removal as a possible solution to address this important issue. Therefore, if placement of the crown abutment margin location is imperative, making an impression that reproduces the soft tissue is equally critical. In 1997, this author introduced the "custom impression coping" to achieve such an accurate transfer. Given the wide use of intraoral digital impressions in 2014, this discussion describes how to fabricate a "custom scan body" using that technology to replicate the transition zone in the virtual environment.

  13. Motivation and compliance with intraoral elastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeroo, Helen J; Cunningham, Susan J; Newton, Jonathon Timothy; Travess, Helen C

    2014-07-01

    Intraoral elastics are commonly used in orthodontics and require regular changing to be effective. Unfortunately, poor compliance with elastics is often encountered, especially in adolescents. Intention for an action and its implementation can be improved using "if-then" plans that spell out when, where, and how a set goal, such as elastic wear, can be put into action. Our aim was to determine the effect of if-then plans on compliance with elastics. To identify common barriers to compliance with recommendations concerning elastic wear, semistructured interviews were carried out with 14 adolescent orthodontic patients wearing intraoral elastics full time. Emerging themes were used to develop if-then plans to improve compliance with elastic wear. A prospective pilot study assessed the effectiveness of if-then planning aimed at overcoming the identified barriers on compliance with elastic wear. Twelve participants were randomized equally into study and control groups; the study group received information about if-then planning. The participants were asked to collect used elastics, and counts of these were used to assess compliance. A wide range of motivational and volitional factors were described by the interviewed participants, including the perceived benefits of elastics, cues to remember, pain, eating, social situations, sports, loss of elastics, and breakages. Compliance with elastic wear was highly variable among patients. The study group returned more used elastics, suggesting increased compliance, but the difference was not significant. The use of if-then plans might improve compliance with elastic wear when compared with routine clinical instructions. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dental models made with an intraoral scanner: A validation study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuperus, A.M.; Harms, M.C.; Rangel, F.A.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Schols, J.G.J.H.; Breuning, K.H.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Our objectives were to determine the validity and reproducibility of measurements on stereolithographic models and 3-dimensional digital dental models made with an intraoral scanner. METHODS: Ten dry human skulls were scanned; from the scans, stereolithographic models and digital

  15. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors for Thermal Protection Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) proposes an innovative fiber optic-based, multiplexable, highly ruggedized, integrated sensor system for real-time...

  16. Intra-oral PTH Administration Promotes Tooth Extraction Socket Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroshima, S.; Kovacic, B.L.; Kozloff, K.M.; McCauley, L.K.; Yamashita, J.

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) administration increases systemic and craniofacial bone mass. However, the effect of PTH therapy on healing of tooth extraction sites is unknown. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of PTH therapy on tooth extraction socket healing and to examine whether PTH intra-oral injection promotes healing. The mandibular first molars were extracted in rats, and subcutaneous PTH was administered intermittently for 7, 14, and 28 days. In a second study, maxillary second molars were extracted, and PTH was administered by either subcutaneous or intra-oral injection to determine the efficacy of intra-oral PTH administration. Healing was assessed by micro-computed tomography and histomorphometric analyses. PTH therapy accelerated the entire healing process and promoted both hard- and soft-tissue healing by increasing bone fill and connective tissue maturation. PTH therapy by intra-oral injection was as effective as subcutaneous injection in promoting tooth extraction socket healing. The findings suggest that PTH therapy promotes tooth extraction socket healing and that intra-oral injections can be used to administer PTH. PMID:23611925

  17. Dose measurements in intraoral radiography using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorín, C; Rivera, T; Azorín, J; Aguirre, F

    2015-01-01

    The use of X-ray in medicine demands to expose the patient and the professional to the lowest radiation doses available in agreement with ALARA philosophy. The reference level for intraoral dental radiography is 7 mGy and, in Mexico, a number of examinations of this type are performed annually. It is considered that approximately 25% of all the X-rays examinations carried out in our country correspond to intraoral radiographies. In other hand, most of the intraoral X-ray equipment correspond to conventional radiological systems using film, which are developed as much manual as automatically. In this work the results of determining the doses received by the patients in intraoral radiological examinations made with different radiological systems using LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE thermoluminescent dosimeters are presented. In some conventional radiological systems using film, when films are developed manual or automatically, incident kerma up to 10.61 ± 0.74 mGv were determined. These values exceed that reference level suggested by the IAEA and in the Mexican standards for intraoral examinations

  18. Anaesthetic management of a case of schwannoma with intraoral extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Bhardwaj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma is a benign nerve sheath tumour. This benign lesion frequently occurs in the soft tissues of head and neck region and has various complicated growth patterns. These patients can present a challenge to the anaesthesiologist due to intraoral extension, leading to difficult mask ventilation and intubation. We report a 16 year old male with mandibular nerve schwannoma with intraoral extension. Intraoral examination revealed a diffuse swelling in the left side of soft palate with deviation of uvula to right side. He was advised gargles with 4 ml of 2% xylocaine viscous and 2–3 puffs of 10% xylocaine spray done in oral cavity and oropharynx. Check laryngoscopy revealed Cormack and Lehane grade 1 view. Patient was intubated using standard induction technique and successfully managed

  19. Diagnostic reference levels in intraoral dental radiography in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Han, Won Jeong; Choi, Jin Woo; Jung, Yun Hoa; Yoon, Suk Ja; Lee, Jae Seo

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to survey the radiographic exposure parameters, to measure the patient doses for intraoral dental radiography nationwide, and thus to establish the diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in intraoral dental X-ray examination in Korea. One hundred two intraoral dental radiographic machines from all regions of South Korea were selected for this study. Radiographic exposure parameters, size of hospital, type of image receptor system, installation duration of machine, and type of dental X-ray machine were documented. Patient entrance doses (PED) and dose-area products (DAP) were measured three times at the end of the exit cone of the X-ray unit with a DAP meter (DIAMENTOR M4-KDK, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for adult mandibular molar intraoral dental radiography, and corrections were made for room temperature and pressure. Measured PED and DAP were averaged and compared according to the size of hospital, type of image receptor system, installation duration, and type of dental X-ray machine. The mean exposure parameters were 62.6 kVp, 7.9 mA, and 0.5 second for adult mandibular molar intraoral dental radiography. The mean patient dose was 2.11 mGy (PED) and 59.4 mGycm2 (DAP) and the third quartile one 3.07 mGy (PED) and 87.4 mGycm 2 (DAP). Doses at university dental hospitals were lower than those at dental clinics (p 2 (DAP) as the DRLs in adult mandibular molar intraoral dental radiography in Korea.

  20. Unusual presentation of firework injury causing intraoral burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Chintan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Fireworks are commonly used in celebrate festive occasions. We present a case of an unusual presentation of intraoral firework injury, which is a very rare case. A fifteen year old boy kept four explosive papercaps wrapped in a small polythene bags in between his left molars and crushed them. This resulted in a contused lacerated wound over the left buccal mucosa. Patient was treated conservatively with maintenance of intraoral hygiene, antibiotics, proteolytic enzymes and analgesics. It took 18 days for complete healing of the wound.

  1. A new combination mirror with template for intraoral photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new design of a mirror for intraoral photography is presented. Advantages of this mirror are reduced armamentarium, better photographic views, elimination of fingers appearing on occlusal views, adult and pediatric size availability, customization according to user preference, and availability of a free template for download to enable easy fabrication and use.

  2. Assessment of intraoral image artifacts related to photostimulable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of intraoral image artifacts related to photostimulable phosphor plates in a dentomaxillofacial radiology department. ... Of these, 2008 were of adult patients and 336 were of pediatric patients. While movement of the phosphor plate in the disposable pocket was the most common cause of the observed image ...

  3. Pyogenic granuloma: a rare case of an infantile intraoral lesion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The onset of symptoms is mostly observed at adolescence in children. In this presentation, the second youngest case of gingival PG in the literature is ... Intraoral lesions of neonatal period are unfamiliar to the parents resulting in their anxiety. The PG is a benign lesion that can be healed completely, with good cosmetic ...

  4. Piezosurgical osteotomy for harvesting intraoral block bone graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahalingam Lakshmiganthan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of ultrasonic vibrations for the cutting of bone was first introduced two decades ago. Piezoelectric surgery is a minimally invasive technique that lessens the risk of damage to surrounding soft tissues and important structures such as nerves, vessels, and mucosa. It also reduces damage to osteocytes and permits good survival of bony cells during harvesting of bone. Grafting with intraoral bone blocks is a good way to reconstruct severe horizontal and vertical bone resorption in future implants sites. The piezosurgery system creates an effective osteotomy with minimal or no trauma to soft tissue in contrast to conventional surgical burs or saws and minimizes a patient′s psychological stress and fear during osteotomy under local anesthesia. The purpose of this article is to describe the harvesting of intraoral bone blocks using the piezoelectric surgery device.

  5. Intraoral lipoma at an unusual site: A rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moni Thakur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipomas are soft tissue benign mesenchymal tumors and are composed of mature adipocytes. They can occur anywhere on the human body where fat is found and thus called it is called “universal tumor” or “ubiquitous tumor.” However, its representation in the oral cavity is rare, i.e., 1%–4% only. Most of the patients affected are above 40 years of age with no gender predilection, but some studies reported male predilection and is uncommon in children. The size of the tumor rarely exceeds 25 mm in diameter and is mostly asymptomatic until secondarily infected or grow to a large size and interfere with mastication and speech. The most common site of occurrence intraorally is buccal mucosa, tongue, lips and floor of the mouth. Here, we report a case of intraoral lipoma occurring at an unusual site (retromolar area in a 35-year-old female patient with a histopathologically confirmed diagnosis.

  6. Intra-oral Sebaceous Gland Tumours in Two Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, D-M; Lee, S-H; Woo, S-H; Kim, D-Y

    2017-11-01

    A 12-year-old female miniature schnauzer and a 12-year-old neutered female cocker spaniel each had a grey-yellow nodular lesion arising from the gingiva. Microscopical examination showed that both nodules were composed of varied proportions of sebocytes and basal-type reserve cells with few ducts lined by stratified squamous epithelium. Based on the histopathological findings, the cases were diagnosed as sebaceous adenoma and sebaceous epithelioma, respectively. In man, the occurrence of sebaceous neoplasms in the oral cavity has been reported to some extent, but these lesions are very rare in animals. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of intra-oral sebaceous neoplasms in dogs. Intra-oral sebaceous epithelioma has never been reported in animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multiple intraoral neurofibromas: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Krithika

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type I (NF I is an autosomal dominant disease transmitted with a high degree of penetrance. The disease is expressed in different forms. NF I accounts for almost 90% of the cases although nine types have been described to date. We report one such case of a 40-year-old male who presented with multiple nodules on the body and multiple intraoral soft tissue swellings. He was diagnosed to have NF I, having satisfied the diagnostic criteria for the same. This paper highlights the clinical features and diagnostic criteria of NF, the prevalence and the significance of intraoral neurofibromas and the need for the general practitioner to be aware of this condition.

  8. Dental models made with an intraoral scanner: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperus, Anne Margreet R; Harms, Marit C; Rangel, Frits A; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Schols, Jan G J H; Breuning, K Hero

    2012-09-01

    Our objectives were to determine the validity and reproducibility of measurements on stereolithographic models and 3-dimensional digital dental models made with an intraoral scanner. Ten dry human skulls were scanned; from the scans, stereolithographic models and digital models were made. Two observers measured transversal distances, mesiodistal tooth widths, and arch segments on the skulls and the stereolithographic and digital models. All measurements were repeated 4 times. Arch length discrepancy and tooth size discrepancy were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed by using paired t tests. For the measurements on the stereolithographic and digital models, statistically significant differences were found. However, these differences were considered to be clinically insignificant. Digital models had fewer statistically significant differences and generally the smallest duplicate measurement errors compared with the stereolithographic models. Stereolithographic and digital models made with an intraoral scanner are a valid and reproducible method for measuring distances in a dentition. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Breakaway safety feature for an intra-oral cone system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggs, P.J.; Wang, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    With an increasing number of high energy accelerators in operation, intra-oral electron radiotherapy is likely to become a more widely-used modality in the treatment of lesions of the oral cavity. However, there is one potential problem associated with this modality which concerns patient safety. There must never be any uncontrolled movement of the couch or gantry while the cone is in the patients's mouth, otherwise serious consequences could occur. In an effort to overcome this problem, a set of cones previously constructed by the authors for use in intra-oral electron radiotherapy has been modified to include a breakaway safety feature. This modification consists of separating the plate into which each of the treatment cones screws, into two pieces, the dividing line being in the shape of a cone frustum flaring out in the upward direction

  10. Order of magnitude dose reduction in intraoral radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircos, L.T.; Angin, L.L.; Lorton, L.

    1987-01-01

    This comparative clinical investigation concerns the radiation dose from intraoral radiography using E-speed film and rectangular and circular beam collimation. Dose to organs not of diagnostic importance (brain, lens of the eye, thyroid, and breast) is reduced by approximately an order of magnitude when rectangular collimation and E-speed film are used in periapical radiography. And dose to the thyroid and breast is further reduced by a third with the use of a full leaded apron and thyroid shield

  11. Order of magnitude dose reduction in intraoral radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kircos, L.T.; Angin, L.L.; Lorton, L.

    1987-03-01

    This comparative clinical investigation concerns the radiation dose from intraoral radiography using E-speed film and rectangular and circular beam collimation. Dose to organs not of diagnostic importance (brain, lens of the eye, thyroid, and breast) is reduced by approximately an order of magnitude when rectangular collimation and E-speed film are used in periapical radiography. And dose to the thyroid and breast is further reduced by a third with the use of a full leaded apron and thyroid shield.

  12. Avance maxilar en pacientes fisurados labio palatinos con distractor intraoral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adoración Martínez Plaza

    2015-07-01

    Conclusiones: La DO intraoral es una técnica alternativa exitosa para avance del maxilar en pacientes fisurados labio palatinos que necesiten un avance inferior a 10 mm. Produce mejoras en el perfil esquelético y blando. Los dispositivos internos no producen impacto psicológico. La contención más larga en el tiempo. La recidiva es difícil de definir y calcular.

  13. Immediately Loaded Intraorally Welded Complete-Arch Maxillary Provisional Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albiero, Alberto Maria; Benato, Renato; Fincato, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Guided implant surgery is not completely accurate when using computer-designed stereolithographic surgical guides. Complications are frequently reported when combining computer-guided flapless surgery with an immediately loaded prefabricated prosthesis. Achieving passive fit of a prefabricated prosthesis on the inserted implants the same day of the surgery can be difficult. The aim of this report is to show a new treatment approach to immediately loaded implants inserted with computer-guided surgery using an intraoral welded full-arch provisional prosthesis.

  14. Full-Mouth Intraoral Radiographic Survey in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalado, Adriana; Legendre, Loïc

    2017-09-01

    Dental pathologies are highly prevalent in pet rabbit populations, making oral radiography an essential tool in the evaluation of lagomorph dentitions. The unique anatomy of the rabbit's mouth limits the examination of the conscious animal to the rostral portion of it's mouth. In addition, the oral examination of an aradicular hypsodont tooth is restricted to the short coronal fraction of its crown. Erstwhile images obtained by the extraoral technique were once considered the most practical and informative tool in rabbit dentistry; however, limited visualization of the key structures of individual teeth became the major drawback of this technique. As new imaging technologies are becoming widely available and affordable for veterinarians, intraoral radiography offers the ability to prevent, diagnose, and treat oral pathologies in lagomorphs. This article describes a step-by-step procedure to obtain a full-mouth radiographic survey in rabbits. For this technique, a standard dental X-ray generator and intraoral storage phosphor plates are used while applying the bisecting angle technique. Among the advantages of this technique are detailed visualization of internal and external dental structures, identification of early lesions, and detection of occult pathologies. Furthermore, intraoral images offer superior resolution and higher diagnostic quality with minimal radiation exposure, making this method safer for the veterinarian, staff members, and their patients.

  15. Evaluation of radiation protection conditions in intraoral radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel, Cristiano; Barros, Frieda Saicla; Rocha, Anna Silvia Penteado Setti da, E-mail: miguel_cristianoch@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (PPGEB/UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Biomedica; Tilly Junior, Joao Gilberto [Universidade Federal do Parana (UNIR/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Unidade de Imagem e Radioterapia; Almeida, Claudio Domingues de [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica Medica

    2016-04-15

    Introduction: The dental radiology represents about 20% of human exposure to radiation in radio diagnostic. Although the doses practiced in intraoral dentistry are considered low, they should not be ignored due to the volume of the performed procedures. This study presents the radiation protection conditions for intraoral radiology in Curitiba - PR. Methods: Data was collected through a quantitative field research of a descriptive nature during the period between September of 2013 and December of 2014. The survey sample consisted of 97 dentists and 130 intraoral equipment. The data related to the equipment was collected using structured questions and quality control evaluations. The evaluations of the entrance skin dose, the size of the radiation field and the total filtration were performed with dosimetry kits provided and evaluated by IRD/CNEN. The exposure time and voltage were measured using noninvasive detectors. The occupational dose was verified by thermoluminescent dosimeters. The existence of personal protection equipment, the type of image processing and knowledge of dentists about radiation protection were verified through the application of a questionnaire. Results: Among the survey's results, it is important to emphasize that 90% of the evaluated equipment do not meet all the requirements of the Brazilian radiation protection standards. Conclusion: The lack of knowledge about radiation protection, the poor operating conditions of the equipment, and the image processing through visual method are mainly responsible for the unnecessary exposure of patients to ionizing radiation. (author)

  16. Stable fiber interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izmajlov, G.N.; Nikolaev, F.A.; Ozolin, V.V.; Grigor'yants, V.V.; Chamorovskij, Yu.K.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of construction the long-base Michelson interferometer for gravitational wave detection is discussed. Possible sources of noise and instability are considered. It is shown that evacuation of fiber interferometer, the winding of its arms on the glass ceramic bases, stabilization of radiation source frequency and seismic isolation of the base allow one to reduce its instability to the level, typical of mirror interferometer with the comparable optical base. 10 refs.; 2 figs

  17. Intraoral Neurinoma of the Lingual Nerve: An Uncommon Tumor in Floor of the Mouth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh Kumar kuppusamy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurinoma or schwannoma is an uncommon benign tumor that arises primarily from the nerve sheath of Schwann cells. About 25% has been reported in head and neck region extracranially, but only 1% in the intraoral origin. Intraorally, the tongue is the most common site followed by the palate, floor of the mouth, lips and buccal mucosa. In review of literature, intraoral schwannoma of the lingual nerve origin has not been reported frequently. So, we present a case of intraoral neurinoma of the lingual nerve.

  18. Influence of intraoral temperature and relative humidity on the dentin bond strength: an in situ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Letícia O; Aguiar, Thaiane R; Costa, Leonardo; Cavalcanti, Andrea N; Giannini, Marcelo; Mathias, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the intraoral environment during adhesive restorative procedures remains a concern, especially in the absence of rubber dam isolation. To evaluate the temperature and relative humidity (RH) at anterior and posterior intraoral sites and their effects on the dentin bond strength of two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Sixty human molars were assigned to six groups according to the adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond Plus and One Step Plus) and intraoral sites (incisor and molar sites). The room condition was used as a control group. Dentin fragments were individually placed in custom-made acetate trays and direct composite restorations were performed. The intraoral temperature and RH were recorded during adhesive procedures. Then, specimens were removed from the acetate trays and sectioned to obtain multiple beams for the microtensile bond strength test. In addition, the adhesive interface morphology was evaluated through scanning electron microscopy. Intraoral conditions were statistically analyzed by paired Students' t-tests and the bond strength data by two-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (α = 0.05). The posterior intraoral site showed a significant increase in the temperature and RH when compared with the anterior site. However, both intraoral sites revealed higher temperatures and RH than the room condition. In regards to the adhesive systems, the intraoral environment did not affect the bond strength, and the One Step Plus system showed the highest bond strength means. Despite the fact that remarkable changes in the intraoral conditions were observed for both anterior and posterior sites, the intraoral environment was not able to compromise the immediate dentin bond strength. Some conditions of intraoral temperature and relative humidity may not impair the dentin bond strength of two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Thus, an adequate relative isolation seems to be a good alternative under the specific clinical conditions in

  19. Versatility of radial forearm free flap for intraoral reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremić Jelena V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The radial forearm free flap has an important role in reconstruction of the oncologic defects in the region of head and neck. Objective. The aim was to present and evaluate clinical experience and results in the radial forearm free transfer for intraoral reconstructions after resections due to malignancies. Methods. This article illustrates the versatility and reliability of forearm single donor site in 21 patients with a variety of intraoral oncologic defects who underwent immediate (19 patients, 90.5% or delayed (2 patients, 9.5% reconstruction using free flaps from the radial forearm. Fascio-cutaneous flaps were used in patients with floor of the mouth (6 cases, buccal mucosa (5 cases, lip (1 case and a retromolar triangle (2 cases defects, or after hemiglossectomy (7 cases. In addition, the palmaris longus tendon was included with the flap in 2 patients that required oral sphincter reconstruction. Results. An overall success rate was 90.5%. Flap failures were detected in two (9.5% patients, in one patient due to late ischemic necrosis, which appeared one week after the surgery, and in another patient due to venous congestion, which could not be salvaged after immediate re-exploration. Two patients required re-exploration due to vein thrombosis. The donor site healed uneventfully in all patients, except one, who had partial loss of skin graft. Conclusion. The radial forearm free flap is, due to multiple advantages, an acceptable method for reconstructions after resection of intraoral malignancies. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 41006

  20. Intraoral scan bodies in implant dentistry: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumoto, Ryan M; Yilmaz, Burak

    2018-04-05

    Intraoral scan body (ISB) design is highly variable and its role in the digital workflow and accuracy of digital impressions is not well understood. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the relevant reports pertaining to ISBs with regard to design and accuracy and to describe their evolution and role in the digital dentistry workflow. Special attention was placed on their key features in relation to intraoral scanning technology and the digitization process. A MEDLINE/PubMed search was performed to identify relevant reports pertaining to ISB usage in dentistry. This search included but was not limited to scan body features and design, scan body accuracy, and scan body techniques and the role of ISBs in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) processes. Commercially available scan bodies were examined, and a patient situation was shown highlighting the use of ISBs in the digital workflow. Deficiencies in the reports were found regarding various scan body topics, including ISB features/design, accuracy, and the role of ISBs in CAD-CAM processes. ISBs are complex implant-positioning-transfer devices that play an essential role in the digital workflow and fabrication of accurately fitting implant-supported restorations. With scanner technology rapidly evolving and becoming more widespread, future studies are needed and should be directed toward all parts of the digital workflow when using ISBs. By understanding the basic components of ISBs and how they relate to digital scanning and CAD-CAM technology, more emphasis may be placed on their importance and usage in the digital workflow to ensure accurate transfer of implant position to the virtual and analog definitive cast. Efforts should be made by clinicians to identify an optimal ISB design in relation to the specific intraoral scanning technology being used. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. Establishment of diagnostic reference levels for dental intraoral radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) is a tool for the optimisation of radiological procedures. Establishment of a DRL is a requirement of national regulations. Measurements performed by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission on 529 dental intraoral radiographic facilities have been used in order to define DRLs for digital and film imaging modalities, taking into account the region of the mouth to be imaged. Thus, different DRL values have been proposed for minimum (usually incisors), maximum (usually maxillary molars) and average exposure settings, both for film and digital imaging. The results have been compared with similar studies performed in Europe and the USA and are in line with the most recent ones. (authors)

  2. Efficiency of the cervical lead shield during intraoral radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaffe, I.; Littner, M.M.; Shlezinger, T.; Segal, P.

    1986-12-01

    The cervical lead shield was compared with the conventional lead apron with regard to efficiency of protection against radiation during a full-month survey (fourteen periapical and two bitewing radiographs). The study was performed on a Temex tissue-equivalent human phantom, and thermoluminescent dosimetry was used to measure radiation absorption in the ovaries, testes, and thyroid gland areas. Results showed that the cervical shield significantly reduces the amount of radiation to the skin in all three areas and is equally as effective as the combination of lead apron and thyroid shield. It is therefore recommended as a protective measure during intraoral radiography.

  3. 21 CFR 872.1810 - Intraoral source x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... structures. The x-ray source (a tube) is located inside the mouth. This generic type of device may include... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraoral source x-ray system. 872.1810 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1810 Intraoral source x-ray system. (a...

  4. Intraoral telangiectasias associated with Raynaud disease: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipone, Elizabeth; Yoon, Angela J; Zegarelli, David

    2010-01-01

    The finding of intraoral telangiectasias in two patients previously diagnosed with Raynaud disease is reported. Neither patient exhibited any other feature of CREST syndrome, namely, calcinosis cutis, esophageal dysfunction, or sclerodactyly. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time intraoral telangiectasias has been reported in conjunction with Raynaud disease in the absence of any other features of CREST syndrome.

  5. Application of intra-oral dental scanners in the digital workflow of implantology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, W.J.; Andriessen, F.S.; Wismeijer, D.; Ren, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared. Materials and methods: A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned with three

  6. Application of intra-oral dental scanners in the digital workflow of implantology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Wicher J; Andriessen, Frank S; Wismeijer, Daniel; Ren, Yijin

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned

  7. Fiber gratings strain sensor systems for composites and adhesive joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Ingrid; Udd, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and other fiber optic based sensors have been used to sense environmental parameters for numerous applications including aerospace, oil and gas, civil structure health monitoring, mining, and medical. There are many benefits to using fiber optic based sensors over traditional electrical sensing methods. These advantages include: immunity to electromagnetic interference, high bandwidth, low loss, small, lightweight, and portability. New developments allow these physical measurements such as strain, temperature, pressure, vibration, and acoustics to be made at extremely fast speeds extending the capability of fiber optic sensor systems to monitor impacts and other rapid events.

  8. A method of multi-view intraoral 3D measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huijie; Wang, Zhen; Jiang, Hongzhi; Xu, Yang; Lv, Peijun; Sun, Yunchun

    2015-02-01

    In dental restoration, its important to achieve a high-accuracy digital impression. Most of the existing intraoral measurement systems can only measure the tooth from a single view. Therfore - if we are wilng to acquire the whole data of a tooth, the scans of the tooth from multi-direction ad the data stitching based on the features of the surface are needed, which increases the measurement duration and influence the measurement accuracy. In this paper, we introduce a fringe-projection based on multi-view intraoral measurement system. It can acquire 3D data of the occlusal surface, the buccal surface and the lingual surface of a tooth synchronously, by using a senor with three mirrors, which aim at the three surfaces respectively and thus expand the measuring area. The constant relationship of the three mirrors is calibrated before measurement and can help stitch the data clouds acquired through different mirrors accurately. Therefore the system can obtain the 3D data of a tooth without the need to measure it from different directions for many times. Experiments proved the availability and reliability of this miniaturized measurement system.

  9. Evaluation of physical properties of different digital intraoral sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Wisam; Teich, Sorin

    2013-09-01

    Digital technologies provide clinically acceptable results comparable to traditional films while having other advantages such as the ability to store and manipulate images, immediate evaluation of the image diagnostic quality, possible reduction in patient radiation exposure, and so on. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the evaluation of the physical design of eight CMOS digital intraoral sensors. Sensors tested included: XDR (Cyber Medical Imaging, Los Angeles, CA, USA), RVG 6100 (Carestream Dental LLC, Atlanta, GA, USA), Platinum (DEXIS LLC., Hatfield, PA, USA), CDR Elite (Schick Technologies, Long Island City, NY, USA), ProSensor (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland), EVA (ImageWorks, Elmsford, NY, USA), XIOS Plus (Sirona, Bensheim, Germany), and GXS-700 (Gendex Dental Systems, Hatfield, PA, USA). The sensors were evaluated for cable configuration, connectivity interface, presence of back-scattering radiation shield, plate thickness, active sensor area, and comparing the active imaging area to the outside casing and to conventional radiographic films. There were variations among the physical design of different sensors. For most parameters tested, a lack of standardization exists in the industry. The results of this study revealed that these details are not always available through the material provided by the manufacturers and are often not advertised. For all sensor sizes, active imaging area was smaller compared with conventional films. There was no sensor in the group that had the best physical design. Data presented in this paper establishes a benchmark for comparing the physical design of digital intraoral sensors.

  10. Comparison of absorbed doses resulting from various intraoral periapical radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Mi Ae; Park, Tae Won [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-15

    This study was designed to measure the absorbed dose to organs of special interest from full mouth with intraoral film (14 films) and to compare the five periapical techniques. Thermoluminescent crystals (TLD-100 chip) were located in brain, orbit, bone marrow of mandibular ramus, bone marrow of mandibular body, bone marrow of 4th cervical spine, parotid gland, submandibular gland and thyroid gland. X-ray machine was operated at 70 kVp and round collimating film holding device (XCP) and rectangular collimating film holding device (Precision Instrument) were used. The distance from the X-ray focus to the open end of the collimator was 8 inch, 12 inch and 16 inch. The following results obtained; 1. The absorbed dose was the highest in bone marrow of mandibular body (5.656 mGy) and the lowest in brain (0.050 mGy). 2. Generally, the lowest absorbed dose was measured from 16 inch cylinder, rectangular collimating film holding device with paralleling technique. But, in bone marrow of mandibular body and the floor of mouth, the highest absorbed dose was measured from 12 inch cylinder, rectangular collimating film holding device with paralleling techniques. 3. Comparing of five intraoral radiographic techniques, it was appeared statistically significant reduction of the absorbed doses measured with rectangualr collimating film holding device compared to XCP film holding device (p<0.05). 4. No statistically significant reduction in the absorbed dose was found as cylinder length was change (p>0.05).

  11. Comparison of absorbed doses resulting from various intraoral periapical radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Mi Ae; Park, Tae Won

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to measure the absorbed dose to organs of special interest from full mouth with intraoral film (14 films) and to compare the five periapical techniques. Thermoluminescent crystals (TLD-100 chip) were located in brain, orbit, bone marrow of mandibular ramus, bone marrow of mandibular body, bone marrow of 4th cervical spine, parotid gland, submandibular gland and thyroid gland. X-ray machine was operated at 70 kVp and round collimating film holding device (XCP) and rectangular collimating film holding device (Precision Instrument) were used. The distance from the X-ray focus to the open end of the collimator was 8 inch, 12 inch and 16 inch. The following results obtained; 1. The absorbed dose was the highest in bone marrow of mandibular body (5.656 mGy) and the lowest in brain (0.050 mGy). 2. Generally, the lowest absorbed dose was measured from 16 inch cylinder, rectangular collimating film holding device with paralleling technique. But, in bone marrow of mandibular body and the floor of mouth, the highest absorbed dose was measured from 12 inch cylinder, rectangular collimating film holding device with paralleling techniques. 3. Comparing of five intraoral radiographic techniques, it was appeared statistically significant reduction of the absorbed doses measured with rectangualr collimating film holding device compared to XCP film holding device (p 0.05).

  12. Comparison of two intraoral scanners based on three-dimensional surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Min

    2018-02-12

    This in vivo study evaluated the difference of two well-known intraoral scanners used in dentistry, namely iTero (Align Technology) and TRIOS (3Shape). Thirty-two participants underwent intraoral scans with TRIOS and iTero scanners, as well as conventional alginate impressions. The scans obtained with the two intraoral scanners were compared with each other and were also compared with the corresponding model scans by means of three-dimensional surface analysis. The average differences between the two intraoral scans on the surfaces were evaluated by color-mapping. The average differences in the three-dimensional direction between each intraoral scans and its corresponding model scan were calculated at all points on the surfaces. The average differences between the two intraoral scanners were 0.057 mm at the maxilla and 0.069 mm at the mandible. Color histograms showed that local deviations between the two scanners occurred in the posterior area. As for difference in the three-dimensional direction, there was no statistically significant difference between two scanners. Although there were some deviations in visible inspection, there was no statistical significance between the two intraoral scanners.

  13. Comparison of two intraoral scanners based on three-dimensional surface analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Min Lee

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This in vivo study evaluated the difference of two well-known intraoral scanners used in dentistry, namely iTero (Align Technology and TRIOS (3Shape. Methods Thirty-two participants underwent intraoral scans with TRIOS and iTero scanners, as well as conventional alginate impressions. The scans obtained with the two intraoral scanners were compared with each other and were also compared with the corresponding model scans by means of three-dimensional surface analysis. The average differences between the two intraoral scans on the surfaces were evaluated by color-mapping. The average differences in the three-dimensional direction between each intraoral scans and its corresponding model scan were calculated at all points on the surfaces. Results The average differences between the two intraoral scanners were 0.057 mm at the maxilla and 0.069 mm at the mandible. Color histograms showed that local deviations between the two scanners occurred in the posterior area. As for difference in the three-dimensional direction, there was no statistically significant difference between two scanners. Conclusions Although there were some deviations in visible inspection, there was no statistical significance between the two intraoral scanners.

  14. In vivo intraoral reflectance confocal microscopy of an amalgam tattoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yélamos, Oriol; Cordova, Miguel; Peterson, Gary; Pulitzer, Melissa P; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DeFazio, Jennifer L

    2017-10-01

    The majority of oral pigmentations are benign lesions such as nevi, melanotic macules, melanoacanthomas or amalgam tattoos. Conversely, mucosal melanomas are rare but often lethal; therefore, excluding oral melanomas in this setting is crucial. Reflectance confocal microscopy is a non-invasive, in vivo imaging system with cellular resolution that has been used to distinguish benign from malignant pigmented lesions in the skin, and more recently in the mucosa. However, lesions located posteriorly in the oral cavity are difficult to assess visually and difficult to biopsy due to their location. Herein we present a patient with previous multiple melanomas presenting with an oral amalgam tattoo in the buccal mucosa, which was imaged using an intraoral telescopic probe attached to a commercially available handheld RCM. In this case report we describe this novel probe, the first RCM description of an amalgam tattoo and we discuss its differences with the findings described in oral melanomas.

  15. A Rare Clinical Presentation of Intraoral Darier's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. D. Manoja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Darier's disease, also known as keratosis follicularis or dyskeratosis follicularis, is a rare disorder of keratinization. It is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis with high penetrance and variable expressivity. Its manifestation appears as hyperkeratotic papules primarily affecting seborrheic areas on the head, neck, thorax, and less frequently the oral mucosa. When oral manifestations are present, the palatal and alveolar mucosae are primarily affected. They usually asymptomatic and are discovered in routine dental examination. Histologically, the lesions present as suprabasal clefts in the epithelium with acantholytic and dyskeratotic cells represented by “corps ronds and grains.” This paper reports a case of an adult male patient who presented with painful whitish lesions on buccal mucosa with crusty lips as the only clinical sign of Darier's disease. As this patient did not have skin lesions or family history, an intraoral biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of Darier's disease by a multidisciplinary team.

  16. Removal of an extensive mandibular odontoma using an intraoral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Hadas; Lustmann, Joshua; Regev, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Odontomas, the most common odontogenic tumors, occur more frequently in the maxilla and are rarely larger than a tooth. They are usually found incidentally on routine dental radiographs during the second decade of life. The treatment of choice is surgical removal, and large tumors are challenging as damage may occur to surrounding anatomic structures. In this article we describe a "giant" compound odontoma occupying the entire body of the mandible and ramus in a 7-year-old girl. A conservative intraoral enucleation was used to avoid facial scarring and preserve mandibular continuity and function. The huge bony defect healed completely without a bone graft or further intervention. This case report emphasizes the importance of the early diagnosis of these lesions and a conservative surgical approach as well as the extraordinary healing potential of young patients.

  17. Intraoral epithelioid hemangioendothelioma: An intermediate vascular tumor- A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhari Sharanesha Manjunatha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular neoplasms, other than benign are characterized as intermediate or malignant. They are often enshrouded in controversy, because the same neoplasm could show variability in biologic behavior that may not be correlated with microscopic features. The intermediate grade vascular neoplasm is named as epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE. Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of the oral cavity has been infrequently reported. To the best of our knowledge, the review of the English litera-ture revealed a total of 30 cases of intraoral EHE reported till today. We report such a rare case in a 20 year old male, presented with a growth in lower anterior lingual gingiva since five months before the diagnosis with a history of similar swelling, twice in the same area. The differential diagnosis and brief review of literature is also discussed in the current article.

  18. Impact of Orthodontic Brackets on the Intraoral Scan Data Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Man; Choi, Shin-Ae; Myung, Ji-Yun; Chun, Youn-Sic

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to compare the impact of buccal and lingual brackets on the accuracy of dental arch data acquired by 4 different digital intraoral scanners. Two pairs of dental casts, one with buccal brackets and the other with lingual brackets, were used. Digital measurements of the 3D images were compared to the actual measurements of the dental models, which were considered standard values. The horizontal measurements included intercanine widths and intermolar widths. The Mann–Whitney U test was performed for comparisons. iTero® and Trios® both showed high accuracy with relatively small maximum deviation of measurements. iTero showed a significantly higher accuracy in most of the arch width measurements on the buccal bracket model than on the lingual model (P scanners should be used more cautiously in arches with lingual brackets than in those with buccal brackets. PMID:27999798

  19. Chronic intraoral pain--assessment of diagnostic methods and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigg, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The overall goal of this thesis was to broaden our knowledge of chronic intraoral pain. The research questions were: What methods can be used to differentiate inflammatory, odontogenic tooth pain from pain that presents as toothache but is non-odontogenic in origin? What is the prognosis of chronic tooth pain of non-odontogenic origin, and which factors affect the prognosis? Atypical odontalgia (AO) is a relatively rare but severe and chronic pain condition affecting the dentoalveolar region. Recent research indicates that the origin is peripheral nerve damage: neuropathic pain. The condition presents as tooth pain and is challenging to dentists because it is difficult to distinguish from ordinary toothache due to inflammation or infection. AO is of interest to the pain community because it shares many characteristics with other chronic pain conditions, and pain perpetuation mechanisms are likely to be similar. An AO diagnosis is made after a comprehensive examination and assessment of patients' self-reported characteristics: the pain history. Traditional dental diagnostic methods do not appear to suffice, since many patients report repeated care-seeking and numerous treatment efforts with little or no pain relief. Developing methods that are useful in the clinical setting is a prerequisite for a correct diagnosis and adequate treatment decisions. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) is used to assess sensory function on skin when nerve damage or disease is suspected. A variety of stimuli has been used to examine the perception of, for example, touch, temperature (painful and non-painful), vibration, pinprick pain, and pressure pain. To detect sensory abnormalities and nerve damage in the oral cavity, the same methods may be possible to use. Study I examined properties of thermal thresholds in and around the mouth in 30 pain-free subjects: the influence of measurement location and stimulation area size on threshold levels, and time variability of thresholds

  20. Analyses of superficial and depth doses in intraoral radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Santos de Oliveira, C.; Morais, R.P. de; Nascimento Souza, D. do [Universidade Federal de Sergipe - CCET - Dept. de Fisica, Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    In this work dosimetric analysis using thermoluminescence technique to study the beams characteristics of x-rays employed in dental radiology has been carried out. The obtained results with CaSO{sub 4}:Dy thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were compared to the doses obtained with parallel-plates ionization chamber. Dosimetric evaluations were also done using radiographic films of large dimensions. The x-rays equipments analyzed were installed in the radiological services of Odontology Department of Sergipe Federal University (U.F.S.). Depending on the anatomical region to be examined the proper exposure time was select, for a fix voltage of 70 kV. The results with TLD and ionization chamber have been determined to female and male individuals. The intraoral regions analysed were the peri apical of the incisors, molar and pre-molar teeth and the occlusive region. These regions were simulated using acrylic plates absorbers installed on the film packet holder. The evaluation of the depth doses in the intraoral tissue was obtained using different acrylic plate thickness. The air kerma values have been evaluated with the ionization chamber located in the dental cone exit of the x-rays equipments. The integrated areas of the thermoluminescent glow curves showed coherent values when compared to the ones obtained with the ionization chamber and both methods presented a linear dependence with the exposition time. The analyses with films have allowed the evaluation of the beam scattering in the simulator apparatus. The studies had proven that the analysis of superficial dose and in depth used in dental radiology can be carried with thermoluminescent dosimeters. (authors)

  1. Analyses of superficial and depth doses in intraoral radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Santos de Oliveira, C.; Morais, R.P. de; Nascimento Souza, D. do

    2006-01-01

    In this work dosimetric analysis using thermoluminescence technique to study the beams characteristics of x-rays employed in dental radiology has been carried out. The obtained results with CaSO 4 :Dy thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were compared to the doses obtained with parallel-plates ionization chamber. Dosimetric evaluations were also done using radiographic films of large dimensions. The x-rays equipments analyzed were installed in the radiological services of Odontology Department of Sergipe Federal University (U.F.S.). Depending on the anatomical region to be examined the proper exposure time was select, for a fix voltage of 70 kV. The results with TLD and ionization chamber have been determined to female and male individuals. The intraoral regions analysed were the peri apical of the incisors, molar and pre-molar teeth and the occlusive region. These regions were simulated using acrylic plates absorbers installed on the film packet holder. The evaluation of the depth doses in the intraoral tissue was obtained using different acrylic plate thickness. The air kerma values have been evaluated with the ionization chamber located in the dental cone exit of the x-rays equipments. The integrated areas of the thermoluminescent glow curves showed coherent values when compared to the ones obtained with the ionization chamber and both methods presented a linear dependence with the exposition time. The analyses with films have allowed the evaluation of the beam scattering in the simulator apparatus. The studies had proven that the analysis of superficial dose and in depth used in dental radiology can be carried with thermoluminescent dosimeters. (authors)

  2. Recent advances in dental optics - Part I: 3D intraoral scanners for restorative dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logozzo, Silvia; Zanetti, Elisabetta M.; Franceschini, Giordano; Kilpelä, Ari; Mäkynen, Anssi

    2014-03-01

    Intra-oral scanning technology is a very fast-growing field in dentistry since it responds to the need of an accurate three-dimensional mapping of the mouth, as required in a large number of procedures such as restorative dentistry and orthodontics. Nowadays, more than 10 intra-oral scanning devices for restorative dentistry have been developed all over the world even if only some of those devices are currently available on the market. All the existing intraoral scanners try to face with problems and disadvantages of traditional impression fabrication process and are based on different non-contact optical technologies and principles. The aim of this publication is to provide an extensive review of existing intraoral scanners for restorative dentistry evaluating their working principles, features and performances.

  3. A comparative evaluation of intraoral and extraoral digital impressions: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sason, Gursharan Kaur; Mistry, Gaurang; Tabassum, Rubina; Shetty, Omkar

    2018-01-01

    The accuracy of a dental impression is determined by two factors: "trueness" and "precision." The scanners used in dentistry are relatively new in market, and very few studies have compared the "precision" and "trueness" of intraoral scanner with the extraoral scanner. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare accuracy of intraoral and extraoral digital impressions. Ten dentulous participants (male/female) aged 18-45 years with an asymptomatic endodontically treated mandibular first molars with adjacent teeth present were selected for this study. The prepared test tooth was measured using a digital Vernier caliper to obtain reference datasets. The tooth was then scanned using the intraoral scanner, and the extraoral scans were obtained using the casts made from the impressions. The datasets were divided into four groups and then statistically analyzed. The test tooth preparation was done, and dimples were made using a round diamond point on the bucco-occlusal, mesio-occlusal, disto-occlusal, and linguo-occlusal lines angles, and these were used to obtain reference datasets intraorally using a digital Vernier caliper. The test tooth was then scanned with the IO scanner (CS 3500, Carestream dental) thrice and also impressions were made using addition silicone impression material (3M™ ESPE) and dental casts were poured in Type IV dental stone (Kalrock-Kalabhai Karson India Pvt. Ltd., India) which were later scanned with the EO scanner (LAVA™ Scan ST Design system [3M™ ESPE]) thrice. The Datasets obtained from Intraoral and Extraoral scanner were exported to Dental Wings software and readings were obtained. Repeated measures ANOVA test was used to compare differences between the groups and independent t -test for comparison between the readings of intraoral and extraoral scanner. Least significant difference test was used for comparison between reference datasets with intraoral and extraoral scanner, respectively. A level of statistical significance of P

  4. Intraoral Scanning for Single-Tooth Implant Prosthetics: Rationale for a Digital Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duello, George V

    2018-01-01

    Conventional and implant prosthetics have benefited from recent advances in digital dentistry. Intraoral scanning devices can generate files that can be used for the design and milling of implant prosthetics both in the office and out of the office in the dental laboratory. This article will discuss the rationale for clinicians to consider the benefits of using intraoral scanners in their offices to provide patients with a unique experience in contrast to conventional elastomeric impression techniques.

  5. Validation of 3D documentation of palatal soft tissue shape, color, and irregularity with intraoral scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deferm, Julie T; Schreurs, Ruud; Baan, Frank; Bruggink, Robin; Merkx, Matthijs A W; Xi, Tong; Bergé, Stefaan J; Maal, Thomas J J

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of 3D intraoral scanning for documentation of palatal soft tissue by evaluating the accuracy of shape, color, and curvature. Intraoral scans of ten participants' upper dentition and palate were acquired with the TRIOS® 3D intraoral scanner by two observers. Conventional impressions were taken and digitized as a gold standard. The resulting surface models were aligned using an Iterative Closest Point approach. The absolute distance measurements between the intraoral models and the digitized impression were used to quantify the trueness and precision of intraoral scanning. The mean color of the palatal soft tissue was extracted in HSV (hue, saturation, value) format to establish the color precision. Finally, the mean curvature of the surface models was calculated and used for surface irregularity. Mean average distance error between the conventional impression models and the intraoral models was 0.02 ± 0.07 mm (p = 0.30). Mean interobserver color difference was - 0.08 ± 1.49° (p = 0.864), 0.28 ± 0.78% (p = 0.286), and 0.30 ± 1.14% (p = 0.426) for respectively hue, saturation, and value. The interobserver differences for overall and maximum surface irregularity were 0.01 ± 0.03 and 0.00 ± 0.05 mm. This study supports the hypothesis that the intraoral scan can perform a 3D documentation of palatal soft tissue in terms of shape, color, and curvature. An intraoral scanner can be an objective tool, adjunctive to the clinical examination of the palatal tissue.

  6. Fiber Coupled Pulse Shaper for Sub-Nanosecond Pulse Lidar, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II effort will develop an all-diode laser and fiber optic based, single frequency, sub-nanosecond pulsed laser source...

  7. Intraoral Scanner Technologies: A Review to Make a Successful Impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Richert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To overcome difficulties associated with conventional techniques, impressions with IOS (intraoral scanner and CAD/CAM (computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies were developed for dental practice. The last decade has seen an increasing number of optical IOS devices, and these are based on different technologies; the choice of which may impact on clinical use. To allow informed choice before purchasing or renewing an IOS, this article summarizes first the technologies currently used (light projection, distance object determination, and reconstruction. In the second section, the clinical considerations of each strategy such as handling, learning curve, powdering, scanning paths, tracking, and mesh quality are discussed. The last section is dedicated to the accuracy of files and of the intermaxillary relationship registered with IOS as the rendering of files in the graphical user interface is often misleading. This overview leads to the conclusion that the current IOS is adapted for a common practice, although differences exist between the technologies employed. An important aspect highlighted in this review is the reduction in the volume of hardware which has led to an increase in the importance of software-based technologies.

  8. Intra-oral schwannoma: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Manoela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma is a relatively uncommon, slow-growing benign tumor that is derived apparently from the Schwann cells. The tongue is the most common site, followed by the palate, floor of mouth, buccal mucosa, lips, and jaws. It can present itself at any age. Usually, this lesion is not taken into account during clinical practice and the differential diagnosis includes numerous benign neoformations based on epithelial and connective tissues. Immunohistochemical features can be useful in determining the neural differentiation. Anti-S100 protein is probably the most used antibody to identify this lesion. The schwannoma is usually a solitary lesion, and can be multiple when associated with neurofibromatosis. In the current study, authors report a case of an intraoral schwannoma situated at the vestibule with 20 years of evolution treated by complete surgical excision. The diagnosis was established based on clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical aspects. The patient is under clinical control, with no signs of recurrence even after four years.

  9. First detection of lead in black paper from intraoral film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedes, Debora F.C., E-mail: defcg@usp.br [Departamento de Odontologia Restauradora, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. do Cafe, S/N, Monte Alegre, CEP 14040-904, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, Reginaldo S. [Departamento de Odontologia Restauradora, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. do Cafe, S/N, Monte Alegre, CEP 14040-904, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Veiga, Marcia A.M.S. da [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. do Cafe, S/N, Monte Alegre, CEP 14040-904, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Pecora, Jesus D. [Departamento de Odontologia Restauradora, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. do Cafe, S/N, Monte Alegre, CEP 14040-904, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2009-10-30

    Lead (Pb) contamination in the black paper that recovers intraoral films (BKP) has been investigated. BKP samples were collected from the Radiology Clinics of the Dental School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. For sake of comparison, four different methods were used. The results revealed the presence of high lead levels, well above the maximum limit allowed by the legislation. Pb contamination levels achieved after the following treatments: paper digestion in nitric acid, microwave treatment, DIN38414-54 method and TCLP method were 997 {mu}g g{sup -1}, 189 {mu}g g{sup -1}, 20.8 {mu}g g{sup -1}, and 54.0 {mu}g g{sup -1}, respectively. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were employed for lead determination according to the protocols of the applied methods. Lead contamination in used BKP was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDS). All the SEM imaging was carried out in the secondary electron mode (SE) and backscattered-electron mode (QBSD) following punctual X-ray fluorescence spectra. Soil contamination derived from this product revealed the urgent need of addressing this problem. These elevated Pb levels, show that a preliminary treatment of BKP is mandatory before it is disposed into the common trash. The high lead content of this material makes its direct dumping into the environment unwise.

  10. Fatigue failure of dental implants in simulated intraoral media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemtov-Yona, K; Rittel, D

    2016-09-01

    Metallic dental implants are exposed to various intraoral environments and repetitive loads during service. Relatively few studies have systematically addressed the potential influence of the environment on the mechanical integrity of the implants, which is therefore the subject of this study. Four media (groups) were selected for room temperature testing, namely dry air, saliva substitute, same with 250ppm of fluoride, and saline solution (0.9%). Monolithic Ti-6Al-4V implants were loaded until fracture, using random spectrum loading. The study reveals that the only aggressive medium of all is the saline solution, as it shortens significantly the spectrum fatigue life of the implants. The quantitative scanning electron fractographic analysis indicates that all the tested implants grew fatigue cracks of similar lengths prior to catastrophic fracture. However, the average crack growth rate in the saline medium was found to largely exceed that in other media, suggesting a decreased fracture toughness. The notion of a characteristic timescale for environmental degradation was proposed to explain the results of our spectrum tests that blend randomly low and high cycle fatigue. Random spectrum fatigue testing is powerful technique to assess and compare the mechanical performance of dental implants for various designs and/or environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Symptomatic Intraoral Submuscular Lipoma Located Nearby Mental Foramen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hwan Jun; Byeon, Je Yeon

    2016-07-01

    This report describes and discusses the clinical investigations available for the investigation of intraoral fatty tumors of the chin, with a focus on lipomas. Lipomas are relatively uncommon tumors in the oral cavity; only 1% to 4% of cases occur at this site. The presence of lipoma in the head and neck area may raise problems in surgical resection. Treatment of lipoma needs wide excision to reduce recurrence. But there are important structures on mental foramen, especially mental nerve. So careful dissection must be done to avoid nerve injury. Importantly, the development of sarcomatous change within the lipoma cannot be ruled out at imaging and requires a histologic specimen. Because of the histologic similarity between normal adipose tissue and lipoma, accurate clinical and surgical information is very important in making a definitive diagnosis. Thus, a clinician sending a surgical specimen for microscopic analysis must provide the oral pathologist with all available clinical and surgical information. The treatment of oral lipomas, including all the histologic variants, is simple surgical excision. No recurrence is observed. Although the growth of oral lipomas is usually limited, they can reach great dimensions, interfering with speech and mastication and reinforcing the need for excision. In this study, the authors describe the clinical and histopathologic features of symptomatic 2 patients of oral lipomas.

  12. First detection of lead in black paper from intraoral film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes, Debora F.C.; Silva, Reginaldo S.; Veiga, Marcia A.M.S. da; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2009-01-01

    Lead (Pb) contamination in the black paper that recovers intraoral films (BKP) has been investigated. BKP samples were collected from the Radiology Clinics of the Dental School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. For sake of comparison, four different methods were used. The results revealed the presence of high lead levels, well above the maximum limit allowed by the legislation. Pb contamination levels achieved after the following treatments: paper digestion in nitric acid, microwave treatment, DIN38414-54 method and TCLP method were 997 μg g -1 , 189 μg g -1 , 20.8 μg g -1 , and 54.0 μg g -1 , respectively. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were employed for lead determination according to the protocols of the applied methods. Lead contamination in used BKP was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDS). All the SEM imaging was carried out in the secondary electron mode (SE) and backscattered-electron mode (QBSD) following punctual X-ray fluorescence spectra. Soil contamination derived from this product revealed the urgent need of addressing this problem. These elevated Pb levels, show that a preliminary treatment of BKP is mandatory before it is disposed into the common trash. The high lead content of this material makes its direct dumping into the environment unwise.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of insight intraoral film on dental caries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Young Nam; Lee, Byung Do [Wonkwang University College of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Rae [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of Kodak Insight film with other intra-oral films in the detection of dental caries. Periapical radiographs of 99 extracted human teeth with sound proximal surfaces and interproximal artificial cavities were made on Kodak Ultra speed, Ektaspeed, Agfa Ektaspeed and Kodak Insight films and automatically processed. Six dentists examined the presence of dental caries using a five-point confidence rating scale and compared the diagnostic accuracy by ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) analysis and ANOVA test. The sensitivity of Kodak Ultra speed, Ektaspeed, Agfa Ektaspeed and Insight film were 0.84, 0.77, 0.75 and 0.79 respectively. The specificity of Kodak Ultra speed, Ektaspeed, Agfa Ektaspeed and Insight film were 0.97, 0.95, 0.96 and 0.94 respectively. The mean ROC areas (Az) of Kodak Ultra speed, Ektaspeed, Agfa Ektaspeed and Insight film were 0.917, 0.910, 0.894, 0.909 respectively. There was no significant differences between Az of Insight film and other films (p = 0.178). Theses results suggested that Kodak Insight film have the comparative diagnostic accuracy of dental caries with Ultraspeed and Ektaspeed films. (77)

  14. Digital subtraction radiographic evaluation of the standardize periapical intraoral radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo

    1993-01-01

    The geometrically standardized intraoral radiographs using 5 occlusal registration material were taken serially from immediate, 1 day, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks after making the bite blocks. The qualities of those subtracted images were evaluated to check the degree of reproducibility of each impression material. The results were as follows: 1. The standard deviations of the grey scales of the overall subtracted images were 4.9 for Exaflex, 7.2 for Pattern resin, 9.0 for Tooth Shade Acrylic, 12.2 for XCP only, 14.8 for Impregum. 2. The standard deviation of the grey scales of the overall subtracted images were grossly related to those of the localized horizontal line of interest. 3. Exaflex which showed the best subtracted image quality had 15 cases of straight, 14 cases of wave, 1 case of canyon shape. Impregum which showed the worst subtracted image quality had 4 cases of straight, 8 cases of wave, 18 cases of canyon shape respectively.

  15. Optical-based smart structures for tamper-indicating applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sliva, P.; Anheier, N.C.; Simmons, K.L.; Undem, H.A.

    1996-11-01

    This report is a compilation of several related projects performed from 1991 through 1996 concerning the design, construction, and application of optical-based smart structure to tamper-indicating and sensing secure containers. Due to several influences, the projects were carried through to varying degrees of completion. Cancellation of the overall project at the client level motivated the authors to gather all of the technology and ideas about smart structures developed during these several projects, whether completed or just conceptualized, into one document. Although each section individually discusses a specific project, the overall document is written chronologically with each successive section showing how increased smart structure complexity was integrated into the container

  16. Wave Optics Based LEO-LEO Radio Occultation Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per

    2016-01-01

    optics based retrieval chain is used on a number of examples and the retrieved atmospheric parameters are compared to the parameters from a global ECMWF analysis model. This model is used in a forward propagator that simulates the electromagnetic field amplitudes and phases at the receiver on board...... receiver on board a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite. The technique is based on the Doppler shift imposed, by the atmosphere, on the signal emitted from the GPS satellite. Two LEO satellites are assumed in the occultations discussed in this paper and the retrieval is also dependent on the decrease...

  17. Accuracy of intraoral digital impressions using an artificial landmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Amelya, Ami; Shin, Yooseok; Shim, June-Sung

    2017-06-01

    Intraoral scanners have been reported to have limited accuracy in edentulous areas. Large amounts of mobile tissue and the lack of obvious anatomic landmarks make it difficult to acquire a precise digital impression of an edentulous area with an intraoral scanner. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of an artificial landmark on a long edentulous space on the accuracy outcomes of intraoral digital impressions. A mandibular model containing 4 prepared teeth and an edentulous space of 26 mm in length was used. A blue-light light-emitting diode tabletop scanner was used as a control scanner, and 3 intraoral scanners were used as experimental groups. Five scans were made using each intraoral scanner without an artificial landmark, and another 5 scans were performed after application of an artificial landmark (a 4×3 mm alumina material) on the edentulous area. The obtained datasets were used to evaluate trueness and precision. Without an artificial landmark on the edentulous area, the mean trueness for the intraoral scanner ranged from 36.1 to 38.8 μm and the mean precision ranged from 13.0 to 43.6 μm. With an artificial landmark on the edentulous area, accuracy was improved significantly: the mean trueness was 26.7 to 31.8 μm, and the mean precision was 9.2 to 12.4 μm. The use of an alumina artificial landmark in an edentulous space improved the trueness and precision of the intraoral scanners tested. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dietary Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... label as soluble fiber or insoluble fiber. Both types have important health benefits. Good sources of dietary fiber include Whole grains Nuts and seeds Fruit and vegetables Dietary fiber adds bulk to ...

  19. Fiber webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell; James S. Han; Von L. Byrd

    2005-01-01

    Wood fibers can be used to produce a wide variety of low-density three-dimensional webs, mats, and fiber-molded products. Short wood fibers blended with long fibers can be formed into flexible fiber mats, which can be made by physical entanglement, nonwoven needling, or thermoplastic fiber melt matrix technologies. The most common types of flexible mats are carded, air...

  20. Technical errors in intraoral radiographs performed by undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Laureano da Rosa

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the technical errors in periapical examinations performed by dental students. Methods: Patient record charts at the dental clinic of the dentistry course were analyzed. Of these, the charts that presented at least ten periapical intraoral radiographs were used in the study, therefore a total of 219 patient record charts were selected, totaling 2 821 radiographs. The radiographs were analyzed one by one, using an uniform light negatoscope, in a darkened room, by a professional radiologist, taking into consideration the following evaluation criteria: technically good and unsatisfactory radiographs. The technical errorswere classified as errors in radiographic technique and radiographic processing errors. The data on quality critera stipulated and obtainedin the evaluation were tabulated, intervals of confidence were used to infer the percentage that were suitable and unsuitable in the studied period, and were statistically analyzed using the chi-square test, at the level of significance of 5%. Results: The results were: of the 2 821 radiographs analyzed, only 1 425 (50.51% were technically good. of the 1 396 (49.49% considered inadequat, 1 155 (82.74% presented errors in radiographic technique, while 241 (17.26% presented radiographic processing errors. The most frequently repeated error was image overlapping (32.88%, followed by the underexposure (25.43%, cut of the tooth (9.31%, chemicalcontamination problems (4.51%, cone cut (3.15%, other errors in radiographic technique (1.86% and other radiographic processing errors (1.43%. Conclusion: The conclusion was that steps must be taken to improve the quality of radiographs obtained because, although they did not make it impossible to interpret the radiographs, this was made extremely difficult, and the depreciated the value of the achives of past clinical situations and cases.

  1. IDEFIX: identification of dental fixtures in intraoral x rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Thomas M.; Schmitt, Walter; Horn, Harald; Hillen, Walter

    1996-04-01

    In dental implantology more than one hundred enossal implant systems are in use. Once embedded, the dental x-ray examination is the most important tool for determining implants' producer, name, and type. In this paper, we present a system for automatic detection and identification of dental fixtures in intraoral x rays (IDEFIX) combining common direct digital image acquisition techniques with specially designed image analysis. IDEFIX can process any digital radiograph (e.g. RVG, Sens-A-Ray, Schick, Sidexis, Digora) as well as digitized dental films. A reference database has been generated by precise measurement on the implant systems used so far (eight implants) including parameters like length, diameter, and cross section area. After binarization of the current digital x-ray image, a parameter set is extracted from each detected object applying mathematical morphology. All objects are classified using a simplified nearest neighbor method and the Euclidean distance metric. If the distance of the objects' parameter set to one of the reference sets is below a given threshold, name and type of the identified dental fixture are displayed on the screen. Otherwise, the actual object will be rejected as a no-implant. IDEFIX has been evaluated by processing various in-vitro acquired radiographs. Different implants were classified captured with identical conditions as well as acquired varying the angulation of the x-ray tube. It is shown that misangulations up to twenty degrees are tolerable preserving correct identification. Other image structures like teeth or fillings result in large distances to all reference parameter sets and, therefore, they are reliably recognized as non-implants.

  2. Effect of an intraoral retrusion plate on maxillary arch dimensions in complete bilateral cleft lip and palate patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, B.C.; van Oort, R.P.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stellingsma, K.; Bierman, M.W.; de Bont, L.G.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze maxillary arch dimensions in patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate treated with an intraoral retrusion plate prior to lip closure. Patients: The effects of the intraoral retrusion plate were evaluated on serially obtained maxillary

  3. Proximal caries detection accuracy using intraoral bitewing radiography, extraoral bitewing radiography and panoramic radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamburoglu, K; Kolsuz, E; Murat, S; Yüksel, S; Ozen, T

    2012-09-01

    To compare proximal caries detection using intraoral bitewing, extraoral bitewing and panoramic radiography. 80 extracted human premolar and molar teeth with and without proximal caries were used. Intraoral radiographs were taken with Kodak Insight film (Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, NY) using the bitewing technique. Extraoral bitewing and panoramic images were obtained using a Planmeca Promax Digital Panoramic X-ray unit (Planmeca Inc., Helsinki, Finland). Images were evaluated by three observers twice. In total, 160 proximal surfaces were assessed. Intra- and interobserver kappa coefficients were calculated. Scores obtained from the three techniques were compared with the histological gold standard using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Az values for each image type, observer and reading were compared using z-tests, with a significance level of α = 0.05. Kappa coefficients ranged from 0.883 to 0.963 for the intraoral bitewing, from 0.715 to 0.893 for the extraoral bitewing, and from 0.659 to 0.884 for the panoramic radiography. Interobserver agreements for the first and second readings for the intraoral bitewing images were between 0.717 and 0.780, the extraoral bitewing readings were between 0.569 and 0.707, and the panoramic images were between 0.477 and 0.740. The Az values for both readings of all three observers were highest for the intraoral bitewing. Az values for the extraoral bitewing images were higher than those of the panoramic images without statistical significance (p > 0.05). Intraoral bitewing radiography was superior to extraoral bitewing and panoramic radiography in diagnosing proximal caries of premolar and molar teeth ex vivo. Similar intra- and interobserver coefficients were calculated for extraoral bitewing and panoramic radiography.

  4. Intraoral somatosensory abnormalities in patients with atypical odontalgia – a controlled multicenter quantitative sensory testing study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baad-Hansen, Lene; Pigg, Maria; Ivanovic, Susanne El’Masry; Faris, Hanan; List, Thomas; Drangsholt, Mark; Svensson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Intraoral somatosensory sensitivity in patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) has not been investigated systematically according to the most recent guidelines. The aims of this study were to: 1. Examine intraoral somatosensory disturbances in AO patients using healthy subjects as reference and 2. Evaluate the percent agreement between intraoral quantitative sensory testing (QST) and qualitative sensory testing (QualST). Forty-seven AO patients and 69 healthy controls were included at Universities of Washington, Malmö and Aarhus. In AO patients, intraoral somatosensory testing was performed on the painful site, the corresponding contralateral site and at thenar. In healthy subjects, intraoral somatosensory testing was performed bilaterally on the upper premolar gingiva and at thenar. Thirteen QST and 3 QualST parameters were evaluated at each site, z-scores were computed for AO patients based on the healthy reference material and LossGain scores were created. 87.3% of AO patients had QST abnormalities compared with controls. The most frequent somatosensory abnormalities in AO patients were somatosensory gain with regard to painful mechanical and cold stimuli and somatosensory loss with regard to cold detection and mechanical detection. The most frequent LossGain code was L0G2 (no somatosensory loss with gain of mechanical somatosensory function)(31.9% of AO patients). Percent agreement between corresponding QST and QualST measures of thermal and mechanical sensitivity ranged between 55.6 and 70.4% in AO patients and between 71.1 and 92.1% in controls. In conclusion, intraoral somatosensory abnormalities were commonly detected in AO patients and agreement between quantitative and qualitative sensory testing was good to excellent. PMID:23725780

  5. Intraoral somatosensory abnormalities in patients with atypical odontalgia--a controlled multicenter quantitative sensory testing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baad-Hansen, Lene; Pigg, Maria; Ivanovic, Susanne Eímasry; Faris, Hanan; List, Thomas; Drangsholt, Mark; Svensson, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Intraoral somatosensory sensitivity in patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) has not been investigated systematically according to the most recent guidelines. The aims of this study were to examine intraoral somatosensory disturbances in AO patients using healthy subjects as reference, and to evaluate the percent agreement between intraoral quantitative sensory testing (QST) and qualitative sensory testing (QualST). Forty-seven AO patients and 69 healthy control subjects were included at Universities of Washington, Malmö, and Aarhus. In AO patients, intraoral somatosensory testing was performed on the painful site, the corresponding contralateral site, and at thenar. In healthy subjects, intraoral somatosensory testing was performed bilaterally on the upper premolar gingiva and at thenar. Thirteen QST and 3 QualST parameters were evaluated at each site, z-scores were computed for AO patients based on the healthy reference material, and LossGain scores were created. Compared with control subjects, 87.3% of AO patients had QST abnormalities. The most frequent somatosensory abnormalities in AO patients were somatosensory gain with regard to painful mechanical and cold stimuli and somatosensory loss with regard to cold detection and mechanical detection. The most frequent LossGain code was L0G2 (no somatosensory loss with gain of mechanical somatosensory function) (31.9% of AO patients). Percent agreement between corresponding QST and QualST measures of thermal and mechanical sensitivity ranged between 55.6% and 70.4% in AO patients and between 71.1% and 92.1% in control subjects. In conclusion, intraoral somatosensory abnormalities were commonly detected in AO patients, and agreement between quantitative and qualitative sensory testing was good to excellent. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel non-imaging optics based Raman spectroscopy device for transdermal blood analyte measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Chae-Ryon; Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Kang, Jeon Woong; Galindo, Luis; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Due to its high chemical specificity, Raman spectroscopy has been considered to be a promising technique for non-invasive disease diagnosis. However, during Raman excitation, less than one out of a million photons undergo spontaneous Raman scattering and such weakness in Raman scattered light often require highly efficient collection of Raman scattered light for the analysis of biological tissues. We present a novel non-imaging optics based portable Raman spectroscopy instrument designed for enhanced light collection. While the instrument was demonstrated on transdermal blood glucose measurement, it can also be used for detection of other clinically relevant blood analytes such as creatinine, urea and cholesterol, as well as other tissue diagnosis applications. For enhanced light collection, a non-imaging optical element called compound hyperbolic concentrator (CHC) converts the wide angular range of scattered photons (numerical aperture (NA) of 1.0) from the tissue into a limited range of angles accommodated by the acceptance angles of the collection system (e.g., an optical fiber with NA of 0.22). A CHC enables collimation of scattered light directions to within extremely narrow range of angles while also maintaining practical physical dimensions. Such a design allows for the development of a very efficient and compact spectroscopy system for analyzing highly scattering biological tissues. Using the CHC-based portable Raman instrument in a clinical research setting, we demonstrate successful transdermal blood glucose predictions in human subjects undergoing oral glucose tolerance tests. PMID:22125761

  7. Accuracy of Intraoral Digital Impressions for Whole Upper Jaws, Including Full Dentitions and Palatal Soft Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ning; Xiong, Yaoyang; Jiao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Intraoral digital impressions have been stated to meet the clinical requirements for some teeth-supported restorations, though fewer evidences were proposed for larger scanning range. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision) of intraoral digital impressions for whole upper jaws, including the full dentitions and palatal soft tissues, as well as to determine the effect of different palatal vault height or arch width on accuracy of intraoral digital impressions. Thirty-two volunteers were divided into three groups according to the palatal vault height or arch width. Each volunteer received three scans with TRIOS intraoral scanner and one conventional impression of whole upper jaw. Three-dimensional (3D) images digitized from conventional gypsum casts by a laboratory scanner were chose as the reference models. All datasets were imported to a specific software program for 3D analysis by "best fit alignment" and "3D compare" process. Color-coded deviation maps showed qualitative visualization of the deviations. For the digital impressions for palatal soft tissues, trueness was (130.54±33.95)μm and precision was (55.26±11.21)μm. For the digital impressions for upper full dentitions, trueness was (80.01±17.78)μm and precision was (59.52±11.29)μm. Larger deviations were found between intraoral digital impressions and conventional impressions in the areas of palatal soft tissues than that in the areas of full dentitions (pimpressions for palatal soft tissues was slightly better than that for full dentitions (p = 0.049). There was no significant effect of palatal vault height on accuracy of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues (p>0.05), but arch width was found to have a significant effect on precision of intraoral digital impressions for full dentitions (p = 0.016). A linear correlation was found between arch width and precision of digital impressions for whole upper jaws (r = 0.326, p = 0.034 for palatal soft tissues and r

  8. Natural fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig M. Clemons; Daniel F. Caulfield

    2005-01-01

    The term “natural fibers” covers a broad range of vegetable, animal, and mineral fibers. However, in the composites industry, it usually refers to wood fiber and agrobased bast, leaf, seed, and stem fibers. These fibers often contribute greatly to the structural performance of the plant and, when used in plastic composites, can provide significant reinforcement. Below...

  9. Photorefractive Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuzyk, Mark G

    2003-01-01

    ... scope of the project. In addition to our work in optical limiting fibers, spillover results included making fiber-based light-sources, writing holograms in fibers, and developing the theory of the limits of the nonlinear...

  10. Radiografia intraoral e convencional da hemiarcada superior direita de gatos domésticos Intraoral and convencional radiography of the right maxilla hemiarcade of domestic cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Nepomuceno

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A proposta com este trabalho foi avaliar a hemiarcada superior direita de gatos domésticos por meio de técnicas radiográficas odontológicas do paralelismo, empregando-se filmes intraorais aos posicionadores de Han Shin. As imagens obtidas por essa metodologia foram correlacionadas com as técnicas radiográficas convencionais (extraorais, com o intuito de se estabelecerem vantagens ou desvantagens para detectar possíveis afecções dentais e periodontais. Foram utilizados 30 gatos, sem raça definida, 17 machos e 13 fêmeas, faixa etária entre um e três anos, confinados em gatis do Departamento de Zootecnia da Universidade Federal de Lavras/MG. Com os animais sob anestesia geral, foram realizadas radiografias da hemiarcada superior direita, incluindo três incisivos, um canino, três pré-molares e um molar em radiografias intraorais e extraorais. As imagens radiográficas foram analisadas e efetuaram-se comparações qualitativas entre pares intraorais e convencionais dos mesmos animais. Para se estabelecer a técnica radiográfica dental mais bem adaptada, foram realizadas análises estatísticas pelo teste de McNemar (qui-quadrado modificado. A técnica intraoral mostrou ser superior à extraoral (PThe aim of this research was to evaluate the right maxilla hemiarcade of cats through parallel dental radiographic techniques, applying Han Shin intraoral film positioner. Images obtained with this method were correlated with conventional radiographic techniques (extraoral. The goal was to establish the advantages and disadvantages to detect possible dental and periodontal diseases. Thirty mixed breed cats were evaluated, 17 males and 13 females, ages one to three years old, confined in catteries in the Department of Zootecnia of the Federal University of Lavras/MG. Radiographies of the right maxilla were taken with the animals under general anesthesia, and three incisors, one canine, three premolars and one molar teeth were included in the

  11. Ophthalmologic complications after intraoral local anesthesia: case report and review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenen, Serge A.; Dubois, Leander; Saeed, Peerooz; de Lange, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Intraoral administration of local anesthetics is one of the most common dental procedures. Ophthalmologic complications can occur after maxillary as well as mandibular local anesthetic injections and may be underreported and sometimes misinterpreted. A review of the literature from the years

  12. Recurrent intraoral HSV-1 infection: A retrospective study of 58 immunocompetent patients from Eastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovaru, Serban; Parlatescu, Ioanina; Tovaru, Mihaela; Cionca, Lucia; Arduino, Paolo-Giacomo

    2011-03-01

    To revise the clinical features of the recurrent intraoral herpetic infection (RIOH) with respect to precipitating factors, demographic, clinical features and outcome. Fifty-eight, unrelated Caucasian, immunocompetent patients with positive laboratory test for intraoral Herpes simplex virus infection were studied. The mean age in the women's group (n=42) was 41.23 years (± 21.73) and in the men's group was 32.25 years (±15.68). Possible trigger factors were identified in 9 cases (15.5%). General symptoms were noted in 20 cases (34.48%). Most of patients in this study presented multiple lesions. 14 patients had vermillion lesions associated with intraoral lesions. In most of the cases both fixed and mobile mucosa was concomitantly involved. Treatment was prescribed in order to control the symptoms and to shorten the evolution with minimal side effects. Intraoral secondary herpetic infection could be polymorphous and sometimes associated with general symptoms. The recognition of its atypical features may prevent unnecessary and costly investigations and treatments for unrelated though clinically similar-appearing disorders.

  13. Lower incisor intrusion with intraoral transosseous stainless steel wire anchorage in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-chao; Huang, Ji-na; Lin, Xin-ping

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the potential use of intraoral transosseous stainless steel wires as anchorage for intrusion of the lower incisors using a rabbit model. Placement of intraoral transosseous stainless steel wires around incisors is similar to that of intraoral transosseous wiring of edentulous mandibular fractures. Ten male New Zealand rabbits, 9 +/- 1.5 months of age, average weight 1.8 +/- 0.3 kg, were used in this study. One lower incisor was intruded with a 50 g bilateral force using a coil spring for 10 weeks, while the other incisor served as the control. Clinical measurements of the distances between the occlusal edges of the incisors (EE) were performed weekly with a calliper. In addition to standard descriptive statistical calculations, a paired Student's t-test was used for comparison of the two groups. All surgical sites healed uneventfully after insertion of the wires. Significant differences were found in the change of EE between the experimental and control sides from 4 weeks onwards. Intrusion of the incisor, 4 +/- 0.58 mm, was seen on the test side, while EE on the control side remained unchanged. Within the limits of this animal study, it is concluded that the intraoral transosseous stainless steel wire anchorage system is a cost-effective method for intrusion of lower incisors when the use of other anchorage system is not possible.

  14. Validity of scoring caries and primary molar hypomineralization (DMH) on intraoral photographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elfrink, M.E.C.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Moll, H.A.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: The aims of this study were to assess whether intraoral photographs could be used to score caries and hypomineralization on primary molars (Using adapted Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH)-criteria), and also to assess the reliability and validity in 3-7 year-old Dutch children of these

  15. Factors influencing the design of aiming devices for intraoral radiography and their practical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aken, J. van; Verhoeven, J.W.

    Intraoral roentgenograms can be made according to the long-tube paralleling technique utilizing aiming devices. These instruments consist of a bite block, an indicator rod, and a collimator plate. For the position of the film in relation to the bite block surface, the following data are decisive and

  16. Detection of periapical bone defects in human jaws using cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Dawood, A; Mannocci, F; Wilson, R; Pitt Ford, T

    2009-06-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of intraoral digital periapical radiography with that of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for the detection of artificial periapical bone defects in dry human jaws. Small and large artificial periapical lesions were prepared in the periapical region of the distal root of six molar teeth in human mandibles. Scans and radiographs were taken with a charged couple device (CCD) digital radiography system and a CBCT scanner before and after each periapical lesion had been created. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, negative predictive values and Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves as well as the reproducibility of each technique were determined. The overall sensitivity was 0.248 and 1.0 for intraoral radiography and CBCT respectively, i.e. these techniques correctly identified periapical lesions in 24.8% and 100% of cases, respectively. Both imaging techniques had specificity values of 1.0. The ROC Az values were 0.791 and 1.000 for intraoral radiography and CBCT, respectively. With intraoral radiography, external factors (i.e. anatomical noise and poor irradiation geometry), which are not in the clinician's control, hinder the detection of periapical lesions. CBCT removes these external factors. In addition, it allows the clinician to select the most relevant views of the area of interest resulting in improved detection of the presence and absence of artificial periapical lesions.

  17. Absorbed and effective dose from periapical radiography by portable intraoral x-ray machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jeong Yeon; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Dankook Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to measure the absorbed dose and to calculate the effective dose for periapical radiography done by portable intraoral x-ray machines. 14 full mouth, upper posterior and lower posterior periapical radiographs were taken by wall-type 1 and portable type 3 intraoral x-ray machines. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were placed at 23 sites at the layers of the tissue-equivalent ART woman phantom for dosimetry. Average tissue absorbed dose and radiation weighted dose were calculated for each major anatomical site. Effective dose was calculated using 2005 ICRP tissue weighted factors. On 14 full mouth periapical radiographs, the effective dose for wall-type x-ray machine was 30 Sv; for portable x-ray machines were 30 Sv, 22 Sv, 36 Sv. On upper posterior radiograph, the effective dose for wall-type x-ray machine was 4 Sv; for portable x-ray machines doses were 4 Sv, 3 Sv, 5 Sv. On lower posterior radiograph, the effective dose for wall type x-ray machine was 5 Sv; for portable x-ray machines doses were 4 Sv, 4 Sv, 5 Sv. Effective doses for periapical radiographs performed by portable intraoral x-ray machines were similar to doses for periapical radiographs taken by wall type intraoral x-ray machines.

  18. Reliability of intra-oral camera using teledentistry in screening of oral diseases – Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyana Chakravarthy Pentapati

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion/recommendations: Intra-oral camera was shown to be a reliable tool to identify common oral diseases. Further studies involving applications like sealant retention, pre-malignant lesions, recurrent apthae, gingival recession and dental malocclusion and effectiveness in regular screening are needed.

  19. [Intra-oral restoration and correction of single- and multi-unit dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters, F.J.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.

    2014-01-01

    In cases of a fracture of the porcelain or non-aesthetic margin of a correctly functioning single- or multi-unit dental prosthesis, an intra-oral restoration or correction using a resin composite can generally be chosen. To establish adhesion to metal, porcelain, resin and composite,

  20. Intraoral distraction osteogenesis to lengthen the ascending ramus - Experience with seven patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansma, J; Bierman, MWJ; Becking, AG

    2004-01-01

    Seven children with facial asymmetry, mean age 12 years (range 11-14.5) were treated by intraoral distraction osteogenesis to lengthen the hypoplastic ramus. We achieved a mean increase in length of the ramus of 13 mm (range 10-16). In only one patient did we achieve a posterior open bite on the

  1. A new intraoral device to facilitate preparation of the guide plane for removable dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Borges, Alessandra Buhler; da Silva, Lucas Hian; Uemura, Eduardo Shigueuki; Saavedra, Guilherme de Siqueira Ferreira Anzalone

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a prototype of an intraoral device that facilitates preparation of parallel guide planes with accuracy and minimal occlusal divergence. The design of this device facilitates transfer of the desired path of insertion from the diagnostic cast to the mouth quickly and efficiently.

  2. Intraoral distraction osteogenesis to lengthen the ascending ramus. Experience with seven patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansma, Johan; Bierman, Michiel W. J.; Becking, Alfred G.

    2004-01-01

    Seven children with facial asymmetry, mean age 12 years (range 11-14.5) were treated by intraoral distraction osteogenesis to lengthen the hypoplastic ramus. We achieved a mean increase in length of the ramus of 13mm (range 10-16). In only one patient did we achieve a posterior open bite on the

  3. Chairside intraoral qualitative somatosensory testing: reliability and comparison between patients with atypical odontalgia and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baad-Hansen, Lene; Pigg, Maria; Ivanovic, Susanne Elmasry; Faris, Hanan; List, Thomas; Drangsholt, Mark; Svensson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    To assess intraoral inter- and intraexaminer reliability of three qualitative measures of intraoral somatosensory function and to compare these measures between patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) and healthy controls. Thirty-one AO patients and 47 healthy controls participated. Inter- and intraexaminer reliability was tested on a subgroup of 46 subjects (25 AO; 21 healthy). Sensitivity to touch, cold, and pinprick stimuli was evaluated on the painful gingival site and the corresponding contralateral site in AO patients, and bilaterally on the gingiva of the first maxillary premolars in controls. Patients were asked to report hypersensitivity, hyposensitivity, or normal sensitivity to stimuli on the painful site compared with the nonpainful site. Kappa values were calculated, and chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare frequencies between groups. Kappa values ranged between 0.63 and 0.75. The frequency of hypersensitivity to either modality was significantly higher in patients (29% to 61%) than in controls (9% to 17%) (P .057). Only 3.2% of the AO patients had no reports of abnormal sensitivity on any of the tests, compared with 59.6% of the healthy subjects (P < .001). Intraoral qualitative somatosensory testing can detect intraoral sensory disturbances in AO patients, and the reliability is sufficient for initial screening of orofacial somatosensory function.

  4. Absorbed and effective dose from periapical radiography by portable intraoral x-ray machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jeong Yeon; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the absorbed dose and to calculate the effective dose for periapical radiography done by portable intraoral x-ray machines. 14 full mouth, upper posterior and lower posterior periapical radiographs were taken by wall-type 1 and portable type 3 intraoral x-ray machines. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were placed at 23 sites at the layers of the tissue-equivalent ART woman phantom for dosimetry. Average tissue absorbed dose and radiation weighted dose were calculated for each major anatomical site. Effective dose was calculated using 2005 ICRP tissue weighted factors. On 14 full mouth periapical radiographs, the effective dose for wall-type x-ray machine was 30 Sv; for portable x-ray machines were 30 Sv, 22 Sv, 36 Sv. On upper posterior radiograph, the effective dose for wall-type x-ray machine was 4 Sv; for portable x-ray machines doses were 4 Sv, 3 Sv, 5 Sv. On lower posterior radiograph, the effective dose for wall type x-ray machine was 5 Sv; for portable x-ray machines doses were 4 Sv, 4 Sv, 5 Sv. Effective doses for periapical radiographs performed by portable intraoral x-ray machines were similar to doses for periapical radiographs taken by wall type intraoral x-ray machines

  5. Immediate loading of zygomatic implants using the intraoral welding technique: a 12-month case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degidi, Marco; Nardi, Diego; Piattelli, Adriano; Malevez, Chantal

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the concept of intraoral welding as a suitable technique for fabricating a fixed restoration for the edentulous maxilla the day of surgery using standard and zygomatic implants. Ten consecutive patients (four men, six women; mean age, 62.3 ± 11.6 years) were involved in this study, each of whom had an edentulous atrophic maxilla and received two standard and two zygomatic implants. All implants were loaded immediately with a fixed prosthesis supported by an intraorally welded titanium framework. Definitive abutments were connected to the implants, and a titanium bar was welded to them using an intraoral welding unit. This framework was used to support the definitive prosthesis, which was fitted the day of implant placement. Patients were checked for swelling, pain, and framework stability at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. A total of 20 immediately loaded standard and 20 zygomatic implants were used. The cases included in this study achieved a 100% prosthetic success rate at the 12-month follow-up. No fracture or radiographically detectable alteration of the welded frameworks was noticed. It is possible to successfully rehabilitate the edentulous atrophic maxilla with a permanently fixed prosthesis supported by an intraorally welded titanium framework attached to standard and zygomatic implants the day of surgery.

  6. Computer-aided analysis of digital dental impressions obtained from intraoral and extraoral scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, Lauren Oliveira Lima; De Luca Canto, Graziela; Marció, Bruno Silva; Laganá, Dalva Cruz; Sesma, Newton; Tortamano Neto, Pedro

    2017-11-01

    The internal and marginal adaptation of a computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) prosthesis relies on the quality of the 3-dimensional image. The quality of imaging systems requires evaluation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the trueness of intraoral and extraoral scanners in scanning prepared teeth. Ten acrylic resin teeth to be used as a reference dataset were prepared according to standard guidelines and scanned with an industrial computed tomography system. Data were acquired with 4 scanner devices (n=10): the Trios intraoral scanner (TIS), the D250 extraoral scanner (DES), the Cerec Bluecam intraoral scanner (CBIS), and the Cerec InEosX5 extraoral scanner (CIES). For intraoral scanners, each tooth was digitized individually. Extraoral scanning was obtained from dental casts of each prepared tooth. The discrepancy between each scan and its respective reference model was obtained by deviation analysis (μm) and volume/area difference (μm). Statistical analysis was performed using linear models for repeated measurement factors test and 1-way ANOVA (α=.05). No significant differences in deviation values were found among scanners. For CBIS and CIES, the deviation was significantly higher (PDentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Validity of scoring caries and primary molar hypomineralization (DMH) on intraoral photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfrink, M E C; Veerkamp, J S J; Aartman, I H A; Moll, H A; Ten Cate, J M

    2009-11-01

    The aims of this study were to assess whether intraoral photographs could be used to score caries and hypomineralization on primary molars (Using adapted Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH)-criteria), and also to assess the reliability and validity in 3-7 year-old Dutch children of these scores by comparing them to direct clinical scorings. Cross-sectional study. In this study 62 children (38.7% girls) with a mean age of 4.96 years (SD 1.27) participated. The children were rated clinically by their own dentist (authors JV or ME) for caries reaching the dentine in their primary molars (WHO criteria) and also for primary molar hypomineralization using the adapted MIH-criteria. For the intraoral photographs, a digital intraoral camera was used. The two paediatric dentists rated all the intraoral photographs on caries and hypomineralizations on the second primary molars, using the same criteria for the clinical scoring as for the scoring of the photographs. They scored independently, at least 2 weeks after the initial clinical scoring to avoid observational bias with the clinical scoring. This clinical observation was used as the gold standard from which sensitivity, specificity, Positive Predictive Value (PPV), Negative Predictive Value (NPV) and the Positive and Negative Likelihood Ratio were computed. To test the intra-observer agreement 25 % of the photographs were scored again, at least 2 weeks after the initial scoring of the images. Inter- and intra-observer agreement were tested using Cohen's Kappa. The mean prevalence of clinically detected caries at tooth level was 46.7% and the mean prevalence of clinically detected hypomineralizations in second primary molars at tooth level was 21.8%. The sensitivity of assessing caries using intraoral photographs was 85.5%, the specificity 83.6%, the positive likelihood ratio 5.2 and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.17. For Primary Molar Hypomineralization (DMH) the sensitivity was 72.3%, the specificity 92.8%, the

  8. Clinical Acceptability of the Internal Gap of CAD/CAM PD-AG Crowns Using Intraoral Digital Impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Gyung; Kim, Sungtae; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the internal gap between CAD/CAM palladium-silver crowns and cast gold crowns generated from intraoral digital versus conventional impressions and to determine the clinical acceptability. Nickel-chrome master dies were made from the prepared resin tooth with the conventional impression method (n = 40). For ICC (Intraoral, CAD/CAM) group, 10 intraoral digital impressions were made, and 10 CAD/CAM crowns of a PD-AG (palladium-silver) machinable alloy were generated. For IC (Intraoral, Cast) group, 10 gold crowns were cast from ten intraoral digital impressions. For CCC (Conventional, CAD/CAM) group, 10 CAD/CAM PD-AG crowns were made using the conventional impression method. For CC (Conventional, Cast) group, 10 gold crowns were fabricated from 10 conventional impressions. One hundred magnifications of the internal gaps of each crown were measured at 50 points with an optical microscope and these values were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (α = 0.05). The internal gap of the intraoral digital impression group was significantly larger than in the conventional impression group (P 0.05). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, crowns from intraoral digital impressions showed larger internal gap values than crowns from conventional impressions. PMID:28018914

  9. Clinical Acceptability of the Internal Gap of CAD/CAM PD-AG Crowns Using Intraoral Digital Impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Gyung Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the internal gap between CAD/CAM palladium-silver crowns and cast gold crowns generated from intraoral digital versus conventional impressions and to determine the clinical acceptability. Nickel-chrome master dies were made from the prepared resin tooth with the conventional impression method (n=40. For ICC (Intraoral, CAD/CAM group, 10 intraoral digital impressions were made, and 10 CAD/CAM crowns of a PD-AG (palladium-silver machinable alloy were generated. For IC (Intraoral, Cast group, 10 gold crowns were cast from ten intraoral digital impressions. For CCC (Conventional, CAD/CAM group, 10 CAD/CAM PD-AG crowns were made using the conventional impression method. For CC (Conventional, Cast group, 10 gold crowns were fabricated from 10 conventional impressions. One hundred magnifications of the internal gaps of each crown were measured at 50 points with an optical microscope and these values were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (α=0.05. The internal gap of the intraoral digital impression group was significantly larger than in the conventional impression group (P0.05. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, crowns from intraoral digital impressions showed larger internal gap values than crowns from conventional impressions.

  10. Optical-Based Artificial Palpation Sensors for Lesion Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jun Park

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Palpation techniques are widely used in medical procedures to detect the presence of lumps or tumors in the soft breast tissues. Since these procedures are very subjective and depend on the skills of the physician, it is imperative to perform detailed a scientific study in order to develop more efficient medical sensors to measure and generate palpation parameters. In this research, we propose an optical-based, artificial palpation sensor for lesion characterization. This has been developed using a multilayer polydimethylsiloxane optical waveguide. Light was generated at the critical angle to reflect totally within the flexible and transparent waveguide. When a waveguide was compressed by an external force, its contact area would deform and cause the light to scatter. The scattered light was captured by a high-resolution camera and saved as an image format. To test the performance of the proposed system, we used a realistic tissue phantom with embedded hard inclusions. The experimental results show that the proposed sensor can detect inclusions and provide the relative value of size, depth, and Young’s modulus of an inclusion.

  11. Accuracy of intraoral and extraoral digital data acquisition for dental restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Rudolph

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The computer-aided design (CAD and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM process chain for dental restorations starts with taking an impression of the clinical situation. For this purpose, either extraoral digitization of gypsum models or intraoral digitization can be used. Despite the increasing use of dental digitizing systems, there are only few studies on their accuracy. Objective This study compared the accuracy of various intraoral and extraoral digitizing systems for dental CAD/CAM technology. Material and Methods An experimental setup for three-dimensional analysis based on 2 prepared ceramic master dies and their corresponding virtual CAD-models was used to assess the accuracy of 10 extraoral and 4 intraoral optical non-contact dental digitizing systems. Depending on the clinical procedure, 10 optical measurements of either 10 duplicate gypsum dies (extraoral digitizing or directly of the ceramic master dies (intraoral digitizing were made and compared with the corresponding CAD-models. Results The digitizing systems showed differences in accuracy. However, all topical systems were well within the benchmark of ±20 µm. These results apply to single tooth measurements. Conclusions Study results are limited, since only single teeth were used for comparison. The different preparations represent various angles and steep and parallel opposing tooth surfaces (incisors. For most digitizing systems, the latter are generally the most difficult to capture. Using CAD/CAM technologies, the preparation angles should not be too steep to reduce digitizing errors. Older systems might be limited to a certain height or taper of the prepared tooth, whereas newer systems (extraoral as well as intraoral digitization do not have these limitations.

  12. Toward the next fiber optic revolution and decision making in the oil and gas industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Boering, M.; Braal, F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Fiber optic data transmission has caused revolutionary developments in the current information society. It was also an eye opener for the Oil & Gas industry when fiber optic-based Distributed Temperature Sensing was introduced in the nineties. Temperature profiles over the entire length of the

  13. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-03

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  14. Optics based biometric encryption using log polar transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Nirmala; Sinha, Aloka

    2010-01-01

    We propose an optics based biometric encryption technique using log polar transform. In this method, the key of the encryption process has been linked to the fingerprint of the enrolled person. The order of fractional Fourier transform and the seed values of the chaotic random phase masks in combination act as the key for the encryption process. In order to link the combined key to the fingerprint, a lookup table has been formed by the key and the log polar transform of the fingerprint. The linking algorithm not only encrypts the image of the enrolled person but also authenticates the input image. The main advantage of this method is its capability to retrieve the same key in the decryption process by using the live fingerprint. The key is not required to be communicated to the receiver side. The retrieval of the image is possible only when the live fingerprint of the enrolled person is presented at the decryption side. The real life fingerprints have been used to demonstrate the proposed technique. Simulations have been performed on the Matlab platform to validate the proposed technique. The signal to noise ratio and mean square error has been calculated in order to support the proposed technique. The effect of the rotation and the scaling of the fingerprints have been studied to check the key retrieval from the live fingerprint of the enrolled person. The study of the different whorl types of fingerprint of different persons has also been done to check the efficacy of the key retrieval from the whorl types of the live fingerprints of different person.

  15. Fiber Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The chapter provides a discussion of optical fiber amplifiers and through three sections provides a detailed treatment of three types of optical fiber amplifiers, erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA), Raman amplifiers, and parametric amplifiers. Each section comprises the fundamentals including...... the basic physics and relevant in-depth theoretical modeling, amplifiers characteristics and performance data as a function of specific operation parameters. Typical applications in fiber optic communication systems and the improvement achievable through the use of fiber amplifiers are illustrated....

  16. The accuracy of the CAD system using intraoral and extraoral scanners for designing of fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Sakura; Shinya, Akikazu; Kuroda, Soichi; Gomi, Harunori

    2017-07-26

    The accuracy of prostheses affects clinical success and is, in turn, affected by the accuracy of the scanner and CAD programs. Thus, their accuracy is important. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of an intraoral scanner with active triangulation (Cerec Omnicam), an intraoral scanner with a confocal laser (3Shape Trios), and an extraoral scanner with active triangulation (D810). The second aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of the digital crowns designed with two different scanner/CAD combinations. The accuracy of the intraoral scanners and extraoral scanner was clinically acceptable. Marginal and internal fit of the digital crowns fabricated using the intraoral scanner and CAD programs were inferior to those fabricated using the extraoral scanner and CAD programs.

  17. Comparison of antibacterial-coated and non-coated suture material in intraoral surgery by isolation of adherent bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Pelz

    2015-09-01

    In terms of the total number of oral bacteria, and especially oral pathogens, that adhered to suture material, no reduction was demonstrated for Vicryl Plus. The use of triclosan-coated suture material offers no advantage in intraoral surgery.

  18. Case report of nipple shield trauma associated with breastfeeding an infant with high intra-oral vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrella, Sharon L; Lai, Ching T; Geddes, Donna T

    2015-07-26

    Nipple pain is associated with early cessation of breastfeeding and may be caused by high intra-oral vacuum. However identification of high intra-oral vacuum is typically restricted to the research setting. This is the first reported case of an infant with high intra-oral vacuum that was clinically identified through a specific pattern of nipple trauma associated with nipple shield use. Knowledge of clinical signs associated with high intra-oral vacuum may facilitate early recognition of this unusual breastfeeding challenge. The mother of an exclusively breastfed 3 month old infant had severe bilateral nipple pain with minimal trauma that persisted from birth. The nipples were not misshapen immediately after breastfeeding and adjustments to infant attachment at the breast did not attenuate the pain. Examination of the infant's oral anatomy was unremarkable with no ankyloglossia present. Microbiological cultures of nipple swabs and breast milk were negative for bacterial and fungal growth, and prescribed antimicrobial treatments did not reduce the nipple pain. Mild blanching and erythema of the nipples were occasionally observed, and were not consistent with nipple vasospasm. Nipple shields were used regularly as they modified the pain, although this resulted in blisters that corresponded with the nipple shield holes. Measurement of infant intra-oral vacuum during breastfeeding confirmed intra-oral vacuum up to 307 % higher than reference values. Breastfeeding gradually became less painful, and after 6 months was completely comfortable. High intra-oral vacuum is difficult to assess in the clinical setting and is likely an under-reported cause of early weaning that is not well understood. This original case report highlights high intra-oral vacuum as at differential diagnosis to be considered by health professionals when evaluating mothers experiencing strong nipple pain during the initiation of breastfeeding. A clinical screening tool is needed to enable prompt

  19. The Efficiency of Operating Microscope Compared with Unaided Visual Examination, Conventional and Digital Intraoral Radiography for Proximal Caries Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Peker, Ilkay; Toraman Alkurt, Meryem; Bala, Oya; Altunkaynak, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of operating microscope compared with unaided visual examination, conventional and digital intraoral radiography for proximal caries detection. Materials and Methods. The study was based on 48 extracted human posterior permanent teeth. The teeth were examined with unaided visual examination, operating microscope, conventional bitewing and digital intraoral radiographs. Then, true caries depth was determined by histological ex...

  20. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide ...

  1. Evidence for use of intraoral scanners under clinical conditions for obtaining full-arch digital impressions is insufficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khraishi, Hadil; Duane, Brett

    2017-03-01

    Data sourcesPubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Embase. Relevant papers were also searched from the reference lists of selected studies. A web search of current manufacturers of intraoral scanners.Study selectionStudies with full-arch digital impressions recorded intraorally that tested any of the following outcomes; validity, repeatability, reproducibility, time efficiency. Patient acceptance of digital impressions were considered for the review.Data extraction and synthesisInitially, only titles of the papers identified from the databases were screened, then further screening of the abstracts of the selected titles was carried out. Then finally, full text articles of the selected abstracts were read and only relevant articles were included in the review. Two examiners assessed the quality of the chosen articles using the QUADAS checklist. Any disagreement was resolved by discussion between the two examiners.ResultsOnly eight studies were found that carried out full-arch intraoral scanning. Four studies reported on validity, repeatability and reproducibility of digital measurements. These studies were included in the qualitative assessment. Two intraoral scanners were tested, Lava COS and iTero. In assessing scanning times and patient perception, six and four studies were included, respectively. A decrease in the scanning time was noted as the operator gained experience.ConclusionsThe literature lacks sufficient evidence to comment on the use of intraoral scanners under clinical conditions. Further studies are needed to properly assess the reliability, accuracy, reproducibility and scanning times of intraoral scans.

  2. A Study of the Resolution of Dental Intraoral X-Ray Machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seon Ju; Chung, Hyon De

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the resolution and focal spot size of dental X-ray machines. Fifty dental X-ray machines were selected for measuring resolution and focal spot size. These machines were used in general dental clinics. The time on installation of the X-ray machine varies from 1 years to 10 years. The resolution of these machines was measured with the test pattern. The focal spot size of these machines was measured with the star test pattern. The following results were obtained: 1. The resolution of dental intraoral X-ray machines was not significantly changed in ten years. 2. The focal spot size of dental intraoral X-ray machines was not significantly increased in ten years. The statistical analysis between the mean focal spot size and nominal focal spot size was significant at the 0.05 level about the more than 3 years used machines.

  3. ABOUT EXPERIENCE OF THE DR.SUNI1800 INTRAORAL RADIOVISIOGRAPH AND OPENDENTAL EMR-SYSTEM INTEGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Semenets

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Digital radiovisiography is widely used X-ray technology in the dentistry practice for the diagnostics currently. The brief overview of the market of the digital radiovisiographs and related radiology information systems is given. High hardware and software prices are often combined with insufficient and low-quality support services. The Dr.Suni 1800 intraoral radiovisiograph installation problems due to the outdated software are described. The abilities of the open-source free software usage in the radiology diagnoses tasks are shown. The existing methodology of the Dr.Suni 1800 intraoral radiovisiograph and the OpenDental medical information system integration is improved. An updated step-by-step integration procedure is presented. The Windows 7 (32-bit edition compatibility is confirmed.

  4. Co-occurrence of intraoral hemangioma and port wine stain: A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Kumar Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiomas are neoplastic proliferations of endothelial cells, characterized by a period of growth after birth, and eventual spontaneous involution. The course can be uneventful with spontaneous resolution; or it may be marked by complications such as infection, bleeding, ulceration, visual defects and feeding difficulties. Apart from these, rare life-threatening complications such as congestive heart failure and consumption coagulopathy may also be seen. Although hemangiomas commonly occur in the head and neck region, intraoral occurrence is relatively rare. A port wine stain is defined as a macular telangiectatic patch which is present at birth and remains throughout life. They may be localized or extensive, affecting a whole limb. This article reports a rare case of co-occurrence of port wine stain with intraoral hemangioma.

  5. A posteriori registration and subtraction of panoramic compared with intraoral radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno, Thomas M; Rangarajan, Janaki Raman; Hoffmann, Jens; Brägger, Urs; Mericske-Stern, Regina; Enkling, Norbert

    2009-08-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of panoramic image subtraction for implant assessment. Three titanium implants were inserted into a fresh pig mandible. One intraoral and 2 panoramic images were obtained at baseline and after each of 6 incremental (0.3, 0.6, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 mm) removals of bone. For each incremental removal of bone, the mandible was removed from and replaced in the holding device. Images representing incremental bone removals were registered by computer with the baseline images and subtracted. Assessment of the subtraction images was based on visual inspection and analysis of structured noise. Incremental bone removals were more visible in intraoral than in panoramic subtraction images; however, computer-based registration of panoramic images reduced the structured noise and enhanced the visibility of incremental removals. The feasibility of panoramic image subtraction for implant assessment was demonstrated.

  6. Intraoral Digital Impressions for Virtual Occlusal Records: Section Quantity and Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaberrieta, Eneko; Garmendia, Asier; Brizuela, Aritza; Otegi, Jose Ramon; Pradies, Guillermo; Szentpétery, Andras

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to locate the 3D spatial position mandibular cast and determine its occlusal contacts in a novel way by using an intraoral scanner as part of the virtual occlusal record procedure. This study also analyzes the requirements in quantity and dimensions of the intraoral virtual occlusal record. The results showed that the best section combination consists of 2 lateral and frontal sections, the width of this section being that of 2 teeth (24 mm × 15 mm). This study concluded that this procedure was accurate enough to locate the mandibular cast on a virtual articulator. However, at least 2 sections of the virtual occlusal records were necessary, and the best results were obtained when the distance between these sections was maximum. PMID:26881226

  7. Intraoral Digital Impressions for Virtual Occlusal Records: Section Quantity and Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneko Solaberrieta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to locate the 3D spatial position mandibular cast and determine its occlusal contacts in a novel way by using an intraoral scanner as part of the virtual occlusal record procedure. This study also analyzes the requirements in quantity and dimensions of the intraoral virtual occlusal record. The results showed that the best section combination consists of 2 lateral and frontal sections, the width of this section being that of 2 teeth (24 mm × 15 mm. This study concluded that this procedure was accurate enough to locate the mandibular cast on a virtual articulator. However, at least 2 sections of the virtual occlusal records were necessary, and the best results were obtained when the distance between these sections was maximum.

  8. What's the angle: a study of the angle bisected in intraoral radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson-Hing, L R

    1980-01-01

    Intraoral radiographs were made via the bisecting-the-angle technique on patients of different ages, sexes, and races. The tooth-film angles for various areas of the mouth were measured and found to be close to 30 degrees for all areas of the mouth except the mandibular posterior regions. The study was conducted to assist in quick positioning of the x-ray beam in difficult cases.

  9. ARTROPLASTIA DE LA ARTICULACIÓN TEMPORO-MANDIBULAR Y EMPLEO DEL ACTIVADOR INTRAORAL.

    OpenAIRE

    Merino Martijena, Adolfo; Doctor en Odontología. Director de Asuntos Administrativos. Fac. Odontología. Jefe de la Sección de Cirugía Bucomáxilofacial del Departamento de Estomatología médico-quirúrgico.

    2014-01-01

    Sixty Clinic Quirurgical Cases were Diagnostic with Anquilosis by the Pre Articular (Arthoplastic) Technique Using the Intra-Oral Activator design by the Author of this research the results were satisfactory in the one hundred per-cent of the treated cases.This Technique has the advantage of being very confortable don't cause pain is of casy manipulation and health in the rehabilitation process allowing the masticate recuperation and the mandible movements. Fueron efectuados 60 casos clíni...

  10. Accuracy of 3-dimensional curvilinear measurements on digital models with intraoral scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Spencer; Bonilla, Tammy; English, Jeryl D; Cozad, Benjamin; Akyalcin, Sercan

    2017-09-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate and compare the digital dental models generated from 2 commercial intraoral scanners with manual measurements when performing 3-dimensional surface measurements along a curved line (curvilinear). Dry mandibles (n = 61) with intact dentition were used. The mandibles were digitized using 2 chair-side intraoral scanners: Cadent iTero (Align Technology, San Jose, Calif) and Lythos Digital Impression system (Ormco, Orange, Calif). Digitized 3-dimensional models were converted to individual stereolithography files and used with commercial software to obtain the curvilinear measurements. Manual measurements were carried out directly on the mandibular teeth. Measurements were made on different locations on the dental arch in various directions. One-sample t tests and linear regression analyses were performed. To further graphically examine the accuracy between the different methods, Bland-Altman plots were computed. The level of significance was set at P 0.05). Bland-Altman analysis showed no fixed bias of 1 approach vs the other, and random errors were detected in all comparisons. Although the mean biases of the digital models obtained by the iTero and Lythos scanners, when compared with direct caliper measurements, were low, the comparison of the 2 intraoral scanners yielded the lowest mean bias. No comparison displayed statistical significance for the t scores; this indicated the absence of proportional bias in these comparisons. The intraoral scanners tested in this study produced digital dental models that were comparatively accurate when performing direct surface measurements along a curved line in 3 dimensions. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Management of Subcondylar Fracture through Intraoral Approach with Rigid Internal Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ravi S; Gudi, Santosh S

    2011-09-01

    In Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, the majority of the condylar fractures are treated by closed reduction with generally satisfactory long term results. But in such cases of closed reduction, patient will be uncomfortable owing to long term application of inter maxillary fixation (IMF). Where as, Disadvantages of extra oral open reduction and fixation of condylar fracture includes facial nerve damage, facial scars etc. which are surely eliminated by the intraoral reduction and rigid fixation. The present study was conducted to determine the efficacy of reduction and fixation of low sub-condylar fractures through intra-oral approach. In this study, ten patients with low sub-condylar fracture, reported to department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. P.M.N.M. Dental College and Hospital Bagalkot were included. These patients were treated by open reduction and internal fixation through intra-oral approach. All the patients were evaluated postoperatively for mouth opening, occlusion and mandibular deviation with regular radiographic examination for 6 weeks. All operated patients followed for 6 weeks, maximum mouth opening was more than 40 mm in seven patients (range from 40 to 50 mm) and less than 40 mm in three patients. Occlusion was satisfactory in all and none of the patients showed deviation of mandible on mouth opening. Statistical analysis showed that postoperative mouth opening was significant ('t' value = 7.88, 'P' = (0.000) value = 1.96, 'P' value (0.081), 0.05]. For occlusion standard photographs were obtained at sixth week and found minor occlusal corrections in two patients are treated by elastic traction for few days. Open reduction with internal fixation through intraoral approach has proved to be safe for early function and also effective by avoiding the patient discomfort due to long term intermaxillary fixation, psychological effect, facial nerve damage, facial scar and weight loss.

  12. Intraoral versus extraoral bitewing radiography in detection of enamel proximal caries: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Ela, Walaa Hussein; Farid, Mary Medhat; Mostafa, Mostafa Saad El-Din

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of digital intraoral and extraoral bitewing (EO BW) radiography in the detection of enamel proximal caries regardless of their ability to separate contacts. Artificial caries with different degrees of decalcification was induced in 80 human sound premolars and molars using formic acid. Intraoral radiographs were taken with photostimulable phosphor plate (PSP) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS), using the paralleling bitewing technique. Extraoral bitewing radiographs were obtained using Sirona digital panoramic X-ray unit (Sirona Siemens, Bensheim, Germany). In total, 160 proximal surfaces were assessed by 2 observers twice. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) values for each image type, observer and reading were compared using z-tests, with a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Sensitivity, specificity, positive-predictive value and negative-predictive value for each observer and reading were calculated. Spearman's test showed a strong positive correlation between the duration of demineralization and histological grading of carious teeth surfaces. For the three radiographic techniques, intraobserver reliability was strong to excellent. Moreover, interobserver agreement was strong. The differences between all detection methods were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Intraoral bitewing using CMOS sensor had the highest sensitivity while EO BW had the highest specificity in the detection of incipient proximal caries. Within the limits of the ex vivo design, the difference in diagnostic accuracy between the three radiographic techniques was not significant. EO BW could be used in the detection of enamel proximal caries with results comparable with intraoral bitewing with PSP plate and CMOS sensor.

  13. Use of an Intraoral Laser Scanner During the Prosthetic Phase of Implant Dentistry: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cameron Y S; Wong, Natalie; Ganz, Scott D; Mursic, Jonathan; Suzuki, Jon B

    2015-08-01

    The accuracy of a digital impression technique to fabricate the implant restoration and abutment for a dental implant using an intraoral laser scanner was evaluated in 36 patients who were missing a single posterior tooth in either the mandible or maxilla that was restored with a single implant. The spatial position of each integrated implant, including the surrounding anatomic hard and soft tissues of adjacent structures, was captured utilizing a special scanning abutment with an intraoral laser scanner. Data from the scanning protocol was then delivered via the Internet in the form of an STL file to the manufacturing site for the production of a custom computer-aided design abutment and crown. All 36 restorations and abutments were delivered to the patients and evaluated for marginal integrity, interproximal contact points, and occlusion. Of the 36 patients, 6 required contact adjustments, 7 required occlusal adjustments, and 3 required a gingivectomy around the implant to completely seat the restoration. Chair time for adjustments did not exceed 15 minutes. The findings suggest that an intraoral laser scanner can be used with confidence to obtain consistent and accurate digital impressions to fabricate custom restorations and abutments for dental implants.

  14. Clinical ligation forces and intraoral friction during sliding on a stainless steel archwire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Laura R; Beatty, Mark W; Randall, C Jared; Nickel, Jeffrey C

    2003-04-01

    The efficiency of tooth movement associated with some orthodontic mechanics can be compromised by friction between archwire and bracket. This study examined the effects of bracket ligation forces (F(N Ligation)) and mastication on friction when sliding a bracket along an archwire. Preliminary data from 5 orthodontists and 5 orthodontic residents characterized average tight and loose stainless steel F(N Ligation). These values were reproduced by a calibrated operator in a custom device used to estimate changes in the measurement of ex vivo and intraoral frictional forces, represented by mu(a), the apparent coefficient of static friction. Ten subjects chewed gum with the device in place to determine whether vibration eliminated friction when compared to ex vivo measurements. Nested analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests determined the effects of ligation type and environmental variables. No significant differences (P >.01) were found between ex vivo and intraoral mu(a) values for tight and loose stainless steel ligation. Intraoral mu(a) values for elastic ligation were significantly greater than ex vivo mu(a) values (P friction when sliding a bracket along an archwire. In addition, there was considerable intraoperator variation in F(N Ligation), although ligation techniques were well controlled. Variations in clinical ligation forces are likely to be equal or greater than these experimental data. These variations could affect treatment efficiency.

  15. Development of Novel, Optically-Based Instrumentation for Aircraft System Testing and Control, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design, build and evaluate a prototype of a compact, robust, optically-based sensor for making temperature and multi-species concentration measurements...

  16. Development of Novel, Optically-Based Instrumentation for Aircraft System Testing and Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a compact, robust, optically-based sensor for making temperature and multi-species concentration measurements in aircraft system ground and...

  17. A miniature X-ray tube based on carbon nanotube for an intraoral dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Park, Han Beom; Lee, Ju Hyuk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2016-01-01

    The number of human teeth that can be radiographically taken is limited. Moreover, at least two X-ray shots are required to get images of teeth from both sides of the mouth. In order to overcome the disadvantages of conventional dental radiography, a dental radiograph has been proposed in which an X-ray tube is inserted into the mouth while an X-ray detector is placed outside the mouth. The miniature X-ray tube is required small size to insert into the mouth. Recently, we have fabricated a miniature x-ray tube with the diameter of 7 mm using a carbon nanotube (CNT) field. But, commercialized miniature X-ray tube were adopted a thermionic type using tungsten filament. The X-ray tubes adopted thermionic emission has a disadvantage of increasing temperature of x-ray tube. So it need to cooling system to cool x-ray tube. On the other hands, X-ray tubes adopted CNT field emitters don't need cooling systems because electrons are emitted from CNT by applying high voltage without heating. We have developed the miniature x-ray tube that produce x-ray with uniform spatial distribution based on carbon nanotube field emitters. The fabricated miniature x-ray tube can be stably and reliably operated at 50kV without any vacuum pump. The developed miniature X-ray tube was applied for intraoral dental radiography that employs an intra-oral CNT-based miniature X-ray tube and extra-oral X-ray detectors. An X-ray image of many teeth was successfully obtained by a single X-ray shot using the intra-oral miniature X-ray tube system. Furthermore, images of both molar teeth of pig were simultaneously obtained by a single X-ray shot. These results show that the intraoral dental radiography, which employs an intraoral miniature X-ray tube and an extraoral X-ray detector, performs better than conventional dental radiography

  18. Multifactorial assessment of measurement errors affecting intraoral quantitative sensory testing reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moana-Filho, Estephan J; Alonso, Aurelio A; Kapos, Flavia P; Leon-Salazar, Vladimir; Durand, Scott H; Hodges, James S; Nixdorf, Donald R

    2017-07-01

    Measurement error of intraoral quantitative sensory testing (QST) has been assessed using traditional methods for reliability, such as intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Most studies reporting QST reliability focused on assessing one source of measurement error at a time, e.g., inter- or intra-examiner (test-retest) reliabilities and employed two examiners to test inter-examiner reliability. The present study used a complex design with multiple examiners with the aim of assessing the reliability of intraoral QST taking account of multiple sources of error simultaneously. Four examiners of varied experience assessed 12 healthy participants in two visits separated by 48h. Seven QST procedures to determine sensory thresholds were used: cold detection (CDT), warmth detection (WDT), cold pain (CPT), heat pain (HPT), mechanical detection (MDT), mechanical pain (MPT) and pressure pain (PPT). Mixed linear models were used to estimate variance components for reliability assessment; dependability coefficients were used to simulate alternative test scenarios. Most intraoral QST variability arose from differences between participants (8.8-30.5%), differences between visits within participant (4.6-52.8%), and error (13.3-28.3%). For QST procedures other than CDT and MDT, increasing the number of visits with a single examiner performing the procedures would lead to improved dependability (dependability coefficient ranges: single visit, four examiners=0.12-0.54; four visits, single examiner=0.27-0.68). A wide range of reliabilities for QST procedures, as measured by ICCs, was noted for inter- (0.39-0.80) and intra-examiner (0.10-0.62) variation. Reliability of sensory testing can be better assessed by measuring multiple sources of error simultaneously instead of focusing on one source at a time. In experimental settings, large numbers of participants are needed to obtain accurate estimates of treatment effects based on QST measurements. This is different from clinical

  19. Comparative study of cone beam computed tomography and intraoral periapical radiographs in diagnosis of lingual-simulated external root resorptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Ricardo Affonso; de Paulo, Renata Silvéria; Pereira, Luciana Oliveira; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; de Azevedo, José Ribamar

    2012-08-01

    Owing to a lack of symptoms and difficult visualization in routine intraoral radiographs, diagnosis of external root resorptions can be challenging. The goal of this study was to compare two image acquisition methods, intraoral radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), in the diagnosis of external resorption. Thirty-four maxillary and mandibular bicuspids were divided into three groups. Perforations measuring 0.3 and 0.6 mm in diameter and 0.15 and 0.3 mm in depth, respectively, were made on the lingual root surfaces in thirty teeth, and four were used as controls. Next, teeth were mounted on an apparatus and radiographed at mesial, distal, and orthoradial angulations. CBCT images were also taken. The analysis of the intraoral radiographic and tomographic images was carried out by two experts using standardized scores. Data were then compared statistically. A strong agreement between the examiners was observed in both diagnosis methods, the intraoral radiographic (r = 0.93) and the tomographic analysis (r = 1.0). Tomography had higher statistically significant detection values than intraoral radiography (P radiography was significantly higher than that of 0.3-mm perforations (P radiography, regardless of the tooth or the dimensions of the resorption evaluated. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Reliability of intraoral quantitative sensory testing (QST) in patients with atypical odontalgia and healthy controls – a multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baad-Hansen, Lene; Pigg, Maria; Yang, Guangju; List, Thomas; Svensson, Peter; Drangsholt, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Summary The reliability of comprehensive intraoral quantitative sensory testing (QST) protocol has not been examined systematically in patients with chronic orofacial pain. The aim of the present multi-center study was to examine test-retest and inter-examiner reliability of intraoral QST measures in terms of absolute values and z-scores as well as within-session coefficients of variation (CV) values in patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) and healthy pain-free controls. Forty-five AO patients and 68 healthy controls were subjected to bilateral intraoral gingival QST and unilateral extratrigeminal QST (thenar) on three occasions (twice on one day by two different examiners and once approximately one week later by one of the examiners). Intraclass correlation coefficients and kappa values for inter-examiner and test-retest reliability were computed. Most of the standardized intraoral QST measures showed fair to excellent inter-examiner (9–12 of 13 measures) and test-retest (7–11 of 13 measures) reliability. Furthermore, no robust differences in reliability measures or within-session variability (CV) were detected between AO patients and the healthy reference group. These reliability results in chronic orofacial pain patients support earlier suggestions based on data from healthy subjects that intraoral QST is sufficiently reliable for use as a part of a comprehensive evaluation of patients with somatosensory disturbances or neuropathic pain in the trigeminal region. PMID:25284726

  1. Reliability of intra-oral quantitative sensory testing (QST) in patients with atypical odontalgia and healthy controls - a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baad-Hansen, L; Pigg, M; Yang, G; List, T; Svensson, P; Drangsholt, M

    2015-02-01

    The reliability of comprehensive intra-oral quantitative sensory testing (QST) protocol has not been examined systematically in patients with chronic oro-facial pain. The aim of the present multicentre study was to examine test-retest and interexaminer reliability of intra-oral QST measures in terms of absolute values and z-scores as well as within-session coefficients of variation (CV) values in patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) and healthy pain-free controls. Forty-five patients with AO and 68 healthy controls were subjected to bilateral intra-oral gingival QST and unilateral extratrigeminal QST (thenar) on three occasions (twice on 1 day by two different examiners and once approximately 1 week later by one of the examiners). Intra-class correlation coefficients and kappa values for interexaminer and test-retest reliability were computed. Most of the standardised intra-oral QST measures showed fair to excellent interexaminer (9-12 of 13 measures) and test-retest (7-11 of 13 measures) reliability. Furthermore, no robust differences in reliability measures or within-session variability (CV) were detected between patients with AO and the healthy reference group. These reliability results in chronic orofacial pain patients support earlier suggestions based on data from healthy subjects that intra-oral QST is sufficiently reliable for use as a part of a comprehensive evaluation of patients with somatosensory disturbances or neuropathic pain in the trigeminal region. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. INCIDENCE OF TUMOR CELLS PRESENCE ON HISTOPATHOLOGICAL SPECIMENTS MARGINS IN RELATION TO WIDENESS OF INTRAORAL CARCINOMAS EXCISION

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    Dragan Mihailović

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Correct surgical therapy considers radical excision of tumor formation, what can be certificated by absence of tumor cells on histopathological specimen margins.The aim of this investigation is to estimate incidence of presence of tumor cells on histopathological specimen margins in cases of intraoral carcinomas, surgically excised in macroscopically normal tissue with different wideness of normal tissue zone and relation to postoperative survival of this patients with intraoral carcinomas.Fifty seven patients with intraoral carcinomas were divided in three groups according to wideness of zone of excision in macroscopically normal tissue. Lowest percent of presence of tumor cells on margins of histopathological specimens were in group of patients with zone of excision behind zone of indurations of soft tissue, but patients from this group had shortest postoperative survival period. Presence of tumor cells on margins of histopathological specimens of excided intraoral carcinomas was found in high number of 81,07%.It can be said that presence of tumor cells on margins of histopathological specimens of exceeded intraoral carcinomas was found in extremely high number of 81,07%, but direct statistical significant relation in-between wideness of surgical excision and postoperative survival period was not found what show that another factors connected with postoperative survival of this patients must be examine.

  3. Effects of fluoride on caries development and progression using intra-oral models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefel, J S

    1990-02-01

    This paper reviews the use of intra-oral model systems to help elucidate the role of fluoride and its mechanism of action in caries prevention. The intra-oral models currently in use were found to be of three general types. The most widely used system has consisted of a removable appliance that relies on the use of dacron gauze or a recessed sample to enhance plaque formation. Similarly, the banding model of Ogaard requires the presence of orthodontic band material to produce a plaque accumulation niche for demineralization, while the crown single-section technique relies mainly on placement of the sections in plaque-retentive areas (below contact points). In general, the models may be used for the assessment of food cariogenicity, an evaluation of de- and re-mineralization, and measurement of fluoride incorporation into enamel or root substrates. On evaluation of lesion initiation and progression in vivo, it is apparent that few non-destructive in vivo techniques are available that offer the sensitivity of laboratory-based analysis. Thus, the use of intra-oral models that allow lesion formation and progression to occur in the oral environment, but can be measured with the sensitivity of in vitro techniques, has been extremely important. Although the magnitude of the fluoride dose, the longevity of fluoride in the oral environment, and the time required for remineralization are different from those found in vitro, it is apparent that the presence of fluoride in the aqueous phase is now thought to be of primary importance. Mechanistically, the presence of fluoride will both inhibit demineralization by acid and promote remineralization under more neutral conditions. Thus, one of fluoride's major contributions is to affect the rates of lesion formation and progression. It was concluded that low-concentration fluoride agents with a high frequency of application would best fulfill the above needs.

  4. Effect of beverages and mouthwashes on the hardness of polymers used in intraoral prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Andreotti, Agda Marobo; Nobrega, Adhara Smith; Moreno, Amalia; Haddad, Marcela Filié; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves

    2014-10-01

    The mechanical properties of acrylic resins used in intraoral prostheses may be altered by frequent exposure to liquids such as beverages and mouthwashes. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of thermocycling and liquid immersion on the hardness of four brands of acrylic resins commonly used in removable prostheses (Onda Cryl, QC-20, Clássico, Lucitone). For each brand of resin, seven specimens were immersed in each of six solutions (coffee, cola, red wine, Plax-Colgate, Listerine [LI], Oral B), and seven more were placed in artificial saliva (control). The hardness was tested using a microhardness tester before and after 5000 thermocycles and after 1, 3, 24, 48, and 96 hours of immersion. The results were analyzed using three-way repeated-measures ANOVA and Tukey's test (p hardness of the resins decreased following thermocycling and immersion in the solutions. Specimens immersed in cola and wine exhibited significant decreases in hardness after immersion for 96 hours, although the greatest significant decrease in hardness occurred in specimens immersed in LI. However, according to American Dental Association specification 12, the Knoop hardness of acrylic resins for intraoral prostheses should not be below 15. Thus, the median values of superficial hardness observed in most of the acrylic resins in this study are considered clinically acceptable. The microhardness of polymers used for intraoral prostheses decreases following thermocycling. Among specimens immersed in beverages, those immersed in cola or wine experienced the greatest decrease in microhardness. Immersion of acrylic resins in LI significantly decreased the microhardness in relation to the initial value. Among the resins assessed, QC-20 exhibited the lowest initial hardness. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Surface changes of metal alloys and high-strength ceramics after ultrasonic scaling and intraoral polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung-In; Noh, Hyo-Mi; Park, Eun-Jin

    2017-06-01

    This study was to evaluate the effect of repeated ultrasonic scaling and surface polishing with intraoral polishing kits on the surface roughness of three different restorative materials. A total of 15 identical discs were fabricated with three different materials. The ultrasonic scaling was conducted for 20 seconds on the test surfaces. Subsequently, a multi-step polishing with recommended intraoral polishing kit was performed for 30 seconds. The 3D profiler and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate surface integrity before scaling (pristine), after scaling, and after surface polishing for each material. Non-parametric Friedman and Wilcoxon signed rank sum tests were employed to statistically evaluate surface roughness changes of the pristine, scaled, and polished specimens. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Surface roughness values before scaling (pristine), after scaling, and polishing of the metal alloys were 3.02±0.34 µm, 2.44±0.72 µm, and 3.49±0.72 µm, respectively. Surface roughness of lithium disilicate increased from 2.35±1.05 µm (pristine) to 28.54±9.64 µm (scaling), and further increased after polishing (56.66±9.12 µm, P scaling (from 1.65±0.42 µm to 101.37±18.75 µm), while its surface roughness decreased after polishing (29.57±18.86 µm, P scaling significantly changed the surface integrities of lithium disilicate and zirconia. Surface polishing with multi-step intraoral kit after repeated scaling was only effective for the zirconia, while it was not for lithium disilicate.

  6. Quantitative analysis of alveolar bone change following implant placement using intraoral radiographic subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kanda, Shigenobu; Tanaka, Takemasa

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a procedure for quantitative analysis using intraoral radiographs of alveolar bone after placement of dental implants and to consider the validity of the method. We evaluated the ten patients (2 males and 8 females, average age: 48.4 years-old), who were treated with dental implant operation in the site of mandibular molar region, since October of 1999 until September of 2000 in Kimura Dental Clinic (Kumamoto, Japan). We evaluated the intraoral radiographs taken pre- and post- operatively and at follow-up examination. To detect alveolar bone change on radiograph, we adopted the digital subtraction method. Although the radiographs were taken under an ordinary technique with cone indicator, we did not apply the standardized technique with fixing material customized for each patient. Therefore, we used geometric correction and density compensation before subtraction. We assessed the basic statistical values (mean, variance, kurtosis and skewness) of the region of interest (ROI) of the subtracted images. Also, we noted PPD (probing pocket depth) and BOP (bleeding on probing) at each site as indicators of clinical findings and all implanted sites were classified according to the PPD or BOP, i.e. PPD increased group ''PPD (+)'' and PPD stable group ''PPD (-)'', likewise BOP positive group ''BOP (+)'' and negative group ''BOP (-)''. We considered the statistical values of ROI in each group and compared these findings. Mean and variance values of PPD (+) were higher than those of PPD (-) and there was a significant difference in mean value (p=0.031). Similarly, mean and variance values of BOP (+) were statistically higher than those of BOP (-) (p=0.041 and p=0.0087, respectively). Concerning kurtosis and skewness, there was no difference between PPD (+) and PPD (-), or between BOP (+) and BOP (-). Using our method, the radiographs taken for follow-up examination could be assessed quantitatively. It is suggested that geometric

  7. Knowledge, Attitude and Performance of Shiraz General Dentists about Infection Control Principles during Preparing Intraoral Radiographies

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    Abdolaziz Hagh Negahdar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Infection control in dental centers is affected by the persons’ attitude and knowledge about mechanisms of infection transmission. This study was designed to evaluate the knowledge and the attitude of Shiraz dentists about infection control during intraoral radiographies preparation. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional, and analytical research, the attitude and the knowledge of 45 male and 25 female, randomly selected dentists, were obtained through completion of a researcher- planed questioner which its validity and reliability had been confirmed. Data were analyzed using Cronbach`s alpha, one-way ANOVA, student’s t-test, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient in SPSS (V.21. Results: The average of the dentists’ age was 40.59±10.72 and their average occupational experience was 13.49±9.75 years. The mean score obtained for knowledge about infection control during intraoral radiographic procedures was less than fifty percent of total obtainable score, and was assessed as weak knowledge. There was no significant difference in the level of knowledge between studied male and female dentists (P>0.05. In addition, no significant relationship was detected between level, age/experience, and the university of education (P>0.05. The attitude of the dentists about infection control during intraoral radiography preparation assessed as moderate to good level. Conclusions: The results showed that the main reason for the present problems is insufficient knowledge of the dentists in related subjects. Therefore, the solution, which is recommended among dentists, is to raise their awareness and to change their attitudes and culture in order to improve their performance.

  8. Evaluation of radiation dose to patients in intraoral dental radiography using Monte Carlo Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Il; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Oh, Seung Chul; Song, Ji Young [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The use of dental radiographic examinations is common although radiation dose resulting from the dental radiography is relatively small. Therefore, it is required to evaluate radiation dose from the dental radiography for radiation safety purpose. The objectives of the present study were to develop dosimetry method for intraoral dental radiography using a Monte Carlo method based radiation transport code and to calculate organ doses and effective doses of patients from different types of intraoral radiographies. Radiological properties of dental radiography equipment were characterized for the evaluation of patient radiation dose. The properties including x-ray energy spectrum were simulated using MCNP code. Organ doses and effective doses to patients were calculated by MCNP simulation with computational adult phantoms. At the typical equipment settings (60 kVp, 7 mA, and 0.12 sec), the entrance air kerma was 1.79 mGy and the measured half value layer was 1.82 mm. The half value layer calculated by MCNP simulation was well agreed with the measurement values. Effective doses from intraoral radiographies ranged from 1 μSv for maxilla premolar to 3 μSv for maxilla incisor. Oral cavity layer (23⁓82 μSv) and salivary glands (10⁓68 μSv) received relatively high radiation dose. Thyroid also received high radiation dose (3⁓47 μSv) for examinations. The developed dosimetry method and evaluated radiation doses in this study can be utilized for policy making, patient dose management, and development of low-dose equipment. In addition, this study can ultimately contribute to decrease radiation dose to patients for radiation safety.

  9. Effect of Intraoral Mechanical Cleaning Techniques on Bond Strength of Cast Crowns to Metal Cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlZain, Sahar; Kattadiyil, Mathew T; AlHelal, Abdulaziz; Alqahtani, Ali

    2017-11-30

    To evaluate the effect of cleaning of metal cores from provisional cement, using an intraoral airborne-particle abrasion method, on the bond strength of permanent resin cement with cast crowns to cores. Thirty stainless steel models of a standard complete crown tooth preparation were fabricated. Thirty Type III gold crowns were fabricated. Each cast crown corresponded to one stainless steel crown preparation model. All crowns were cemented with noneugenol zinc oxide cement and stored for 7 days at 37°C. All crowns were debonded, and the cement was cleaned with airborne-particle abrasion using 50 μm aluminum oxide at 4.1 bar (0.41 MPa) followed by ultrasonic cleaning. Based on the mechanical cleaning technique of the remaining provisional cement on surfaces of cast cores, specimens were equally divided into 3 groups: hand cleaning (HC) with a dental excavator, hand cleaning followed by polishing using a brush and pumice (BP), and hand cleaning followed by intraoral airborne-particle abrasion (APA). All crowns were then cemented to their corresponding cores using universal resin cement. All crowns were stored for 7 days at 37°C. An Instron universal testing machine was used to record the bond strength of crowns. Airborne-particle abrasion method for intraoral mechanical cleaning revealed a statistically significantly higher bond strength compared to the other two methods. When comparing the three methods of provisional cement cleaning from metal cores, airborne-particle abrasion resulted in the highest bond strength for cast crowns. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  10. Increased pain sensitivity to intraoral capsaicin in patients with atypical odontalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baad-Hansen, Lene; List, Thomas; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Svensson, Peter

    2006-01-01

    To use 2 well-characterized stimuli, the intraoral capsaicin model and the "nociceptive-specific" electrode, to compare superficial nociceptive function between patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) and matched healthy controls. Furthermore, the authors aimed to describe the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values (PPV) of the techniques if group differences could be established. Thirty-eight patients with AO and 27 matched healthy controls participated in this study. Thirty microliters of 5% capsaicin was applied to the gingiva on the left and right sides of all participants as a pain-provocation test. The participants scored the capsaicin-evoked pain continuously on a 0-to-10 visual analog scale (VAS). Furthermore, individual electrical sensory and pain thresholds to stimulation with a "nociceptive-specific" electrode on the facial skin above the infraorbital or mental nerve were determined. AO patients had higher VAS pain scores for capsaicin application than healthy controls (ANOVA: F > 4.88; P .262). No main effects of group or stimulation side on the electrical sensory and pain thresholds were detected (ANOVA: F .579). Sensitivity was 0.51; specificity, 0.81; and PPV, 0.77 when a VAS value of > or = 8 for capsaicin-evoked pain was used. AO patients show increased sensitivity to intraoral capsaicin but normal sensitivity to "nociceptive-specific" electrical stimulation of the face in an area proximal to the painful site. The use of the intraoral pain-provocation test with capsaicin as a possible adjunct to the diagnostic workup is hampered by the only moderately good sensitivity and specificity.

  11. Examination of the Position Accuracy of Implant Abutments Reproduced by Intra-Oral Optical Impression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Ajioka

    Full Text Available An impression technique called optical impression using intraoral scanner has attracted attention in digital dentistry. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the optical impression, comparing a virtual model reproduced by an intraoral scanner to a working cast made by conventional silicone impression technique. Two implants were placed on a master model. Working casts made of plaster were fabricated from the master model by silicone impression. The distance between the ball abutments and the angulation between the healing abutments of 5 mm and 7 mm height at master model were measured using Computer Numerical Control Coordinate Measuring Machine (CNCCMM as control. Working casts were then measured using CNCCMM, and virtual models via stereo lithography data of master model were measured by a three-dimensional analyzing software. The distance between ball abutments of the master model was 9634.9 ± 1.2 μm. The mean values of trueness of the Lava COS and working casts were 64.5 μm and 22.5 μm, respectively, greater than that of control. The mean of precision values of the Lava COS and working casts were 15.6 μm and 13.5 μm, respectively. In the case of a 5-mm-height healing abutment, mean angulation error of the Lava COS was greater than that of the working cast, resulting in significant differences in trueness and precision. However, in the case of a 7-mm-height abutment, mean angulation errors of the Lava COS and the working cast were not significantly different in trueness and precision. Therefore, distance errors of the optical impression were slightly greater than those of conventional impression. Moreover, the trueness and precision of angulation error could be improved in the optical impression using longer healing abutments. In the near future, the development of information technology could enable improvement in the accuracy of the optical impression with intraoral scanners.

  12. Application of Intra-Oral Dental Scanners in the Digital Workflow of Implantology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Wicher J.; Andriessen, Frank S.; Wismeijer, Daniel; Ren, Yijin

    2012-01-01

    Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared. Materials and methods: A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned with three intra-oral scanners: the CEREC (Sirona), the iTero (Cadent) and the Lava COS (3M). In software the digital files were imported and the distance between the centres of the cylinders and the angulation between the cylinders was assessed. These values were compared to the measurements made on a high accuracy 3D scan of the master model. Results: The distance errors were the smallest and most consistent for the Lava COS. The distance errors for the Cerec were the largest and least consistent. All the angulation errors were small. Conclusions: The Lava COS in combination with a high accuracy scanning protocol resulted in the smallest and most consistent errors of all three scanners tested when considering mean distance errors in full arch impressions both in absolute values and in consistency for both measured distances. For the mean angulation errors, the Lava COS had the smallest errors between cylinders 1–2 and the largest errors between cylinders 1–3, although the absolute difference with the smallest mean value (iTero) was very small (0,0529°). An expected increase in distance and/or angular errors over the length of the arch due to an accumulation of registration errors of the patched 3D surfaces could be observed in this study design, but the effects were statistically not significant. Clinical relevance For making impressions of implant cases for digital workflows, the most accurate scanner with the scanning protocol that will ensure the most accurate digital impression should be used. In our study model that was the Lava COS with the high accuracy scanning protocol. PMID:22937030

  13. Application of intra-oral dental scanners in the digital workflow of implantology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wicher J van der Meer

    Full Text Available Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared.A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned with three intra-oral scanners: the CEREC (Sirona, the iTero (Cadent and the Lava COS (3M. In software the digital files were imported and the distance between the centres of the cylinders and the angulation between the cylinders was assessed. These values were compared to the measurements made on a high accuracy 3D scan of the master model.The distance errors were the smallest and most consistent for the Lava COS. The distance errors for the Cerec were the largest and least consistent. All the angulation errors were small.The Lava COS in combination with a high accuracy scanning protocol resulted in the smallest and most consistent errors of all three scanners tested when considering mean distance errors in full arch impressions both in absolute values and in consistency for both measured distances. For the mean angulation errors, the Lava COS had the smallest errors between cylinders 1-2 and the largest errors between cylinders 1-3, although the absolute difference with the smallest mean value (iTero was very small (0,0529°. An expected increase in distance and/or angular errors over the length of the arch due to an accumulation of registration errors of the patched 3D surfaces could be observed in this study design, but the effects were statistically not significant.For making impressions of implant cases for digital workflows, the most accurate scanner with the scanning protocol that will ensure the most accurate digital impression should be used. In our study model that was the Lava COS with the high accuracy scanning protocol.

  14. Examination of the Position Accuracy of Implant Abutments Reproduced by Intra-Oral Optical Impression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaira, Chikayuki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    An impression technique called optical impression using intraoral scanner has attracted attention in digital dentistry. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the optical impression, comparing a virtual model reproduced by an intraoral scanner to a working cast made by conventional silicone impression technique. Two implants were placed on a master model. Working casts made of plaster were fabricated from the master model by silicone impression. The distance between the ball abutments and the angulation between the healing abutments of 5 mm and 7 mm height at master model were measured using Computer Numerical Control Coordinate Measuring Machine (CNCCMM) as control. Working casts were then measured using CNCCMM, and virtual models via stereo lithography data of master model were measured by a three-dimensional analyzing software. The distance between ball abutments of the master model was 9634.9 ± 1.2 μm. The mean values of trueness of the Lava COS and working casts were 64.5 μm and 22.5 μm, respectively, greater than that of control. The mean of precision values of the Lava COS and working casts were 15.6 μm and 13.5 μm, respectively. In the case of a 5-mm-height healing abutment, mean angulation error of the Lava COS was greater than that of the working cast, resulting in significant differences in trueness and precision. However, in the case of a 7-mm-height abutment, mean angulation errors of the Lava COS and the working cast were not significantly different in trueness and precision. Therefore, distance errors of the optical impression were slightly greater than those of conventional impression. Moreover, the trueness and precision of angulation error could be improved in the optical impression using longer healing abutments. In the near future, the development of information technology could enable improvement in the accuracy of the optical impression with intraoral scanners. PMID:27706225

  15. Removal of a Maxillary Third Molar Displaced into Pterygopalatine Fossa via Intraoral Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedim Özer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of impacted maxillary third molars is one of the most common procedures performed in oral and maxillofacial surgery units with low rates of complications and morbidity. A few cases of accidental displacement of third molars into adjacent anatomical spaces, such as the infratemporal fossa, the pterygomandibular space, the maxillary sinus, buccal space, or the lateral pharyngeal space, during surgical interventions have been reported. In this paper, a case of a maxillary third molar accidentally displaced into the pterygopalatine fossa is presented, and the removal of the tooth via intraoral approach is described.

  16. 3D monitoring and quality control using intraoral optical camera systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, A; Koch, R; Zaruba, M; Ender, A

    2013-01-01

    The quality of intraoral scanning systems is steadily improving, and they are becoming easier and more reliable to operate. This opens up possibilities for routine clinical applications. A special aspect is that overlaying (superimposing) situations recorded at different times facilitates an accurate three-dimensional difference analysis. Such difference analyses can also be used to advantage in other areas of dentistry where target/actual comparisons are required. This article presents potential indications using a newly developed software, explaining the functionality of the evaluation process and the prerequisites and limitations of 3D monitoring.

  17. A monolateral TMJ replacement under intraoral endoscopic assistance for jaw osteomielitis: a modified approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, E; Mici, E; Mazzone, N; Catalfamo, L; Fini, G; Liberatore, G M

    2015-01-01

    Alloplastic replacement has become a valid treatment for TMJ endstage disease. The Alkayat and Bramley pre-auricular approach combined with the submandibular incision are the current surgical approaches for TMJ surgery. The present study shows a modified approach using intraoral endoscopic assistance. A female patient affected by jaw osteomielitis with condylar detachment was treated with total left TMJ alloplastic replacement combined with a right TMJ arthroplasty. No subamandibular incision was performed and, subsequently, the risks for permanent or temporary damage to the marginalis mandibulae nerve and surgical submandibular scar were avoided. Postoperative CT-Scan evidenced a good prosthesis position. No complications occurred after two years of follow-up.

  18. Accuracy evaluation of intraoral optical impressions: A clinical study using a reference appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atieh, Mohammad A; Ritter, André V; Ko, Ching-Chang; Duqum, Ibrahim

    2017-09-01

    Trueness and precision are used to evaluate the accuracy of intraoral optical impressions. Although the in vivo precision of intraoral optical impressions has been reported, in vivo trueness has not been evaluated because of limitations in the available protocols. The purpose of this clinical study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision) of optical and conventional impressions by using a novel study design. Five study participants consented and were enrolled. For each participant, optical and conventional (vinylsiloxanether) impressions of a custom-made intraoral Co-Cr alloy reference appliance fitted to the mandibular arch were obtained by 1 operator. Three-dimensional (3D) digital models were created for stone casts obtained from the conventional impression group and for the reference appliances by using a validated high-accuracy reference scanner. For the optical impression group, 3D digital models were obtained directly from the intraoral scans. The total mean trueness of each impression system was calculated by averaging the mean absolute deviations of the impression replicates from their 3D reference model for each participant, followed by averaging the obtained values across all participants. The total mean precision for each impression system was calculated by averaging the mean absolute deviations between all the impression replicas for each participant (10 pairs), followed by averaging the obtained values across all participants. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA (α=.05), first to assess whether a systematic difference in trueness or precision of replicate impressions could be found among participants and second to assess whether the mean trueness and precision values differed between the 2 impression systems. Statistically significant differences were found between the 2 impression systems for both mean trueness (P=.010) and mean precision (P=.007). Conventional impressions had higher accuracy with a mean trueness of 17.0

  19. A clinical comparison of extraoral panoramic and intraoral radiographic modalities for detecting proximal caries and visualizing open posterior interproximal contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Glenn L; Noujeim, Marcel; Langlais, Robert P; Moore, William S; Prihoda, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare extraoral panoramic bitewings (BWs) to intraoral photostimulable phosphor (PSP) plate BWs for the detection of proximal surface caries and to establish if there was any difference between extraoral BWs, intraoral BWs and panoramic radiographs in visualizing open posterior interproximal contacts. Extraoral panoramic and intraoral BW images were acquired on each of 20 patients, resulting in 489 total non-restored, readable surfaces that were evaluated by 4 observers. The ANOVA analysis to determine diagnostic variability between and within each subject was utilized. The surfaces included in the study extended from the distal of each canine to the last posterior contact in each arch with non-readable proximal surfaces excluded (i.e.surfaces where over half the enamel layer was overlapped or where those surfaces were not visible in one or both modalities). The statistical analysis indicated that the overall mean area under the receiver operating characteristic curves across all observers for the intraoral BWs and extraoral panoramic BWs were 0.832 and 0.827, respectively, and the difference of 0.005 was not significant at p = 0.7781. The percentage of non-readable proximal surfaces across the three modalities was 4.1% for intraoral BWs, 18.3% for extraoral panoramic BWs and 51.5% for the standard panoramic images. The investigators concluded there was no significant difference in posterior proximal surface caries detection between the modalities. Extraoral panoramic BWs were much better than panoramic radiographs in visualizing open posterior interproximal contacts, 81.7% vs 48.5%, but below the 95.9% value for intraoral BWs.

  20. A Novel Method for Intraoral Access to the Superior Head of the Human Lateral Pterygoid Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Aleli Tôrres; Camilo, Anderson Aparecido; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; DosSantos, Marcos Fabio; da Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes; Monteiro, André Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background. The uncoordinated activity of the superior and inferior parts of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) has been suggested to be one of the causes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement. A therapy for this muscle disorder is the injection of botulinum toxin (BTX), of the LPM. However, there is a potential risk of side effects with the injection guide methods currently available. In addition, they do not permit appropriate differentiation between the two bellies of the muscle. Herein, a novel method is presented to provide intraoral access to the superior head of the human LPM with maximal control and minimal hazards. Methods. Computational tomography along with digital imaging software programs and rapid prototyping techniques were used to create a rapid prototyped guide to orient BTX injections in the superior LPM. Results. The method proved to be feasible and reliable. Furthermore, when tested in one volunteer it allowed precise access to the upper head of LPM, without producing side effects. Conclusions. The prototyped guide presented in this paper is a novel tool that provides intraoral access to the superior head of the LPM. Further studies will be necessary to test the efficacy and validate this method in a larger cohort of subjects. PMID:24963484

  1. Clinical evaluation of CAD/CAM metal-ceramic posterior crowns fabricated from intraoral digital impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamim, Hazem; Skjerven, Henrik; Ekfeldt, Anders; Rønold, Hans Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this in vivo study was to evaluate the accuracy of metal-ceramic crowns fabricated using computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in conjunction with intraoral digital impressions. Fifty patients in a general practice participated in the study. Patients were provided with crowns fabricated from digital impressions taken with an intraoral chairside scanner. Prior to crown insertion, the marginal integrity, esthetics, and occlusal and articulation contacts were evaluated using California Dental Association (CDA) criteria. The precementation space of the crowns was evaluated with the replica technique. No adjustments were needed for any of the interproximal contact points. Adjustments of occlusion and articulation contacts were needed in 20% of the restorations. Clinical evaluation of the marginal integrity showed satisfactory results according to the CDA criteria. The 50 silicone replicas showed a median precementation space of 46 μm at the marginal measurement location, 94 μm at the midaxial location, and 185 μm at the centro-occlusal location. The precementation spaces of the crowns were within the acceptable range for CAD/CAM restorations.

  2. Influence of different rubber dam application on intraoral temperature and relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, Akiko; Kameyama, Atsushi; Tatsuta, Chihiro; Ishii, Kurumi; Sugiyama, Toshiko; Sugiyama, Setsuko; Takahashi, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of type of rubber dam and application method on the moisture exclusion effect. The intraoral temperature and relative humidity were compared among various moisture exclusion appliances. Various dry field techniques were applied to 5 subjects and intraoral temperature and relative humidity measured 5 min after placing a digital hygro-thermometer in the mouth. The relative humidity was 100% in all subjects when moisture was excluded by means of cotton rolls alone. When only tooth 36 was exposed, relative humidity was significantly lower with latex, urethane, or 3-dimensional sheets than with cotton rolls alone, and was similar to the level of humidity in the room. When a local rubber dam was used, the relative humidity was significantly higher than the indoor humidity (prelative humidity between exposure of 4 teeth and 1 tooth, but variation in the relative humidity was more marked in 4- than in 1-tooth exposure. The creation of an air vent did not influence the moisture exclusion effect. These results suggest that the rubber dam isolation technique excludes moisture to a level equivalent to the humidity in the room when only a single tooth is exposed, but the moisture exclusion effect may be inconsistent when several teeth are exposed.

  3. Comparison of JPEG and wavelet compression on intraoral digital radiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung

    2004-01-01

    To determine the proper image compression method and ratio without image quality degradation in intraoral digital radiographic images, comparing the discrete cosine transform (DCT)-based JPEG with the wavelet-based JPEG 2000 algorithm. Thirty extracted sound teeth and thirty extracted teeth with occlusal caries were used for this study. Twenty plaster blocks were made with three teeth each. They were radiographically exposed using CDR sensors (Schick Inc., Long Island, USA). Digital images were compressed to JPEG format, using Adobe Photoshop v. 7.0 and JPEG 2000 format using Jasper program with compression ratios of 5 : 1, 9 : 1, 14 : 1, 28 : 1 each. To evaluate the lesion detectability, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed by the three oral and maxillofacial radiologists. To evaluate the image quality, all the compressed images were assessed subjectively using 5 grades, in comparison to the original uncompressed images. Compressed images up to compression ratio of 14: 1 in JPEG and 28 : 1 in JPEG 2000 showed nearly the same the lesion detectability as the original images. In the subjective assessment of image quality, images up to compression ratio of 9 : 1 in JPEG and 14 : 1 in JPEG 2000 showed minute mean paired differences from the original images. The results showed that the clinically acceptable compression ratios were up to 9 : 1 for JPEG and 14 : 1 for JPEG 2000. The wavelet-based JPEG 2000 is a better compression method, comparing to DCT-based JPEG for intraoral digital radiographic images.

  4. Precise positioning of an intraoral distractor using augmented reality in patients with hemifacial microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Miao; Hou, Yikang; Xu, Yourong; Shen, Congcong; Zhu, Ming; Xie, Le; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Yan; Chai, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Through three-dimensional real time imaging, augmented reality (AR) can provide an overlay of the anatomical structure, or visual cues for specific landmarks. In this study, an AR Toolkit was used for distraction osteogenesis with hemifacial microsomia to define the mandibular osteotomy line and assist with intraoral distractor placement. 20 patients with hemifacial microsomia were studied and were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Pre-operative computed tomography was used in both groups, whereas AR was used in the experimental group. Afterwards, pre- and post-operative computed tomographic scans of both groups were superimposed, and several measurements were made and analysed. Both the conventional method and AR technique achieved proper positioning of the osteotomy planes, although the AR was more accurate. The difference in average vertical distance from the coronoid and condyle process to the pre- and post-operative cutting planes was significant (p 0.05) was observed in the average angle between the two planes. The difference in deviations between the intersection points of the overlaid mandible across two cutting planes was also significant (p Augmented reality tools such as the AR Toolkit may be helpful for precise positioning of intraoral distractors in patients with hemifacial microsomia in craniofacial surgery. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Anatomical variations of trabecular bone structure in intraoral radiographs using fractal and particles count analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, Maha Eshak; Heo, Min Suk; Brooks, Sharon L; Benavides, Erika

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate possible variations in maxillary and mandibular bone texture of normal population using the fractal analysis, particles count, and area fraction in intraoral radiographs. Periapical radiographs of patients who had full mouth intraoral radiographs were collected. Regions of interest (100X100 pixels) were located between the teeth of the maxillary anterior, premolar, and molar area, as well as the mandibular anterior, premolar, and molar areas. The fractal dimension (FD) was calculated by using the box counting method. The particle count (PC) and area fraction (AF) analyses were also performed. There was no significant difference in the FD values among the different groups of age, gender, upper, and lower jaws. The mean FD value was 1.49±0.01. The mean PC ranged from 44 to 54, and the mean AF ranged from 10.92 to 11.85. The values of FD, PC, and AF were significantly correlated with each other except for the upper molar area. According to the results, patients with normal trabecular pattern showed a FD of approximately 1.5. Based on these results, further investigation would be recommended if the FD value of patient significantly different from this number, since the alteration of this value indicates microstructural modification of trabecular pattern of the jaws. Additionally, with periapical radiographs, simple and cost-effective, PC and AF could be used to assess the deviation from the normal.

  6. Simulation of dental intensifying screen for intraoral radiographic using MCNP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Vanessa M.; Oliveira, Renato C.M.; Barros, Graiciany P.; Oliveira, Arno H.; Veloso, M. Auxiliadora F.

    2011-01-01

    One of basic principles for radiological protection is the optimization of techniques for obtain radiographic images, in way that the dose in the patient is kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Intensifying screens are used in medical radiology, which reduce considerably the dose rates in the production of radiographic images, maintaining the quality of these, while in dental radiology, there is no a intensifying screen available for intraoral examinations. From this technological requirement, this paper evaluates a computational modeling of an intensifying screen for use in intraoral radiography. For this, it was used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 that allows the radiography simulation through the transport of electrons and photons in the different materials present in this examination. The goal of an intensifying screen is the conversion of X-ray photons to photons in the visible spectrum, knowing that radiographic films are more sensitive to light photons than to X-ray photons. So the screen should be composed of an efficient material for converting x-rays photons in light photons, therefore was made simulations using different materials, thicknesses and positions possible for placing screen in radiographic film in order to find the way more technically feasible. (author)

  7. Microbial adherence on various intraoral suture materials in patients undergoing dental surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banche, Giuliana; Roana, Janira; Mandras, Narcisa; Amasio, Mario; Gallesio, Cesare; Allizond, Valeria; Angeretti, Alessandra; Tullio, Vivian; Cuffini, Anna Maria

    2007-08-01

    Sutures used in oral surgery should avoid or limit bacterial adhesion and proliferation to those parts exposed to oral fluids. Hence, microbial colonization on various intraoral suture materials from patients undergoing dental surgery was compared. During dentoalveolar surgery, various suture materials were used in 60 patients, who were randomly divided into 5 groups of 12. In each group, silk was placed intraorally in association with a different type of suture (ie, Supramid, Synthofil, Ethibond Excel, Ti-cron, Monocryl) at the same site to compare microbial colonization intraindividually. Eight days postoperatively, the sutures were removed, and adhered micro-organisms were isolated, counted, and identified through enzymatic activities and fermentation of sugars. In all 60 patients, silk sutures exhibited the smallest affinity toward the adhesion of bacteria compared with considerable proliferation with nonresorbable multifilament sutures (Supramid, Synthofil, Ethibond Excel, Ti-cron). On the contrary, the microbial load was significantly lower when absorbable monofilament Monocryl was used. A greater quantity of bacteria was found on nonresorbable sutures than on absorbable ones, and nearly 2 times more facultative anaerobic bacteria were isolated in total. Our results show that bacteria adhere with different affinity to various types of suture materials. Absorbable silk and Monocryl exhibited the smallest number of adherent bacteria. Colonization by pathogens on sutures leads to the recommendation that sutures should be removed as early as possible after surgery is performed, to eliminate or to limit the reservoir for oral pathogens. This recommendation is dependent on whether the suture is absorbable.

  8. Effect of heat treatments on machinability of gold alloy with age-hardenability at intraoral temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, I; Baba, N; Watanabe, E; Atsuta, M; Okabe, T

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of heat treatment on the machinability of heat-treated cast gold alloy with age-hardenability at intraoral temperature using a handpiece engine with SiC wheels and an air-turbine handpiece with carbide burs and diamond points. Cast gold alloy specimens underwent various heat treatments [As-cast (AC); Solution treatment (ST); High-temperature aging (HA), Intraoral aging (IA)] before machinability testing. The machinability test was conducted at a constant machining force of 0.784N. The three circumferential speeds used for the handpiece engine were 500, 1,000 and 1,500 m/min. The machinability index (M-index) was determined as the amount of metal removed by machining (volume loss, mm(3)). The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Scheffé's test. When an air-turbine handpiece was used, there was no difference in the M-index of the gold alloy among the heat treatments. The air-turbine carbide burs showed significantly (pmachinability of the gold alloy using the air-turbine handpiece. The heat treatments had a small effect on the M-index of the gold alloy machined with a SiC wheel for a handpiece engine.

  9. Diagnostic Performance of the Intraoral Radiographs on the Interproximal Dental Caries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Ji; Kang, Byung Cheol

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluated the diagnostic performance of the senior dental students for the proximal dental caries in intraoral radiographs and to compare it with the dental hospital residents, the reference group. It was also investigated the diagnostic performance according to the carious lesion depth. Thirty-five intraoral periapical and bitewing radiographs with 213 proximal surface included in this study were selected from the dental patients at Chonnam National University Hospital. The observers were 181 senior dental students from 5 dental schools and 40 dentists who were second year resident from 5 dental hospitals. They were asked to evaluate the presence ro the absence of the proximal dental caries. The results were as follows : 1. The mean of the hitting rate for the overall observers was 184.51 surfaces and the diagnostic accuracy was 86.62%. 2. The diagnostic performance of the sound proximal tooth surfaces was very high, i.e., 91.5% true negative rate and 8.5% false positive rate. 3. The diagnostic performance of the dentist group was higher than the student group (P 0.001).

  10. Activation of lateral hypothalamus-projecting parabrachial neurons by intraorally delivered gustatory stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi eTokita

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated a subpopulation of neurons in the mouse parabrachial nucleus (PbN, a gustatory and visceral relay area in the brainstem, that project to the lateral hypothalamus (LH. We made injections of the retrograde tracer Fluorogold (FG into LH, resulting in fluorescent labeling of neurons located in different regions of the PbN. Mice were stimulated through an intraoral cannula with one of seven different taste stimuli, and PbN sections were processed for immunohistochemical detection of the immediate early gene c-Fos, which labels activated neurons. LH projection neurons were found in all PbN subnuclei, but in greater concentration in lateral subnuclei, including the dorsal lateral subnucleus (dl. Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI was observed in the PbN in a stimulus-dependent pattern, with the greatest differentiation between intraoral stimulation with sweet (0.5 M sucrose and bitter (0.003 M quinine compounds. In particular, sweet and umami-tasting stimuli evoked robust FLI in cells in the dl, whereas quinine evoked almost no FLI in cells in this subnucleus. Double-labeled cells were also found in the greatest quantity in the dl. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that the dl contains direct a projection to the LH that is activated preferentially by appetitive compounds; this projection may be mediated by taste and/or postingestive mechanisms.

  11. Numerical Evaluation of Image Contrast for Thicker and Thinner Objects among Current Intraoral Digital Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyunbat Dashpuntsag

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to evaluate the performance of current intraoral digital detectors in detail using a precise phantom and new method. Two aluminum step wedges in 0.5 mm steps were exposed by two photostimulable phosphor plate (PSP systems—one with automatic exposure compensation (AEC and the other without AEC—and a CCD sensor. Images were obtained with 3 doses at 60 kV. The effect of metallic material also was evaluated. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR for thinner steps and the low contrast value (LCV for thicker steps were obtained. The CCD system was the best under all conditions (P<0.001, although the Gray value was sensitive to the dose, and the Gray value-dose relation varied greatly. The PSP system with AEC was superior to that without AEC for the LCV (P<0.001 but was inferior to it regarding the CNR (P<0.001. CNR and LCV in the PSP system without AEC were not affected by the metallic plate. Intraoral digital imaging systems should be chosen according to their diagnostic purpose. PSP system with AEC may be the best for detecting molar proximal caries, whereas the PSP system without AEC may be better for evaluating small bone regeneration in periodontal disease. The CCD system provided the best performance.

  12. Diagnostic Performance of the Intraoral Radiographs on the Interproximal Dental Caries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Ji; Kang, Byung Cheol [Faculty of Dental Science, Graduate School, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluated the diagnostic performance of the senior dental students for the proximal dental caries in intraoral radiographs and to compare it with the dental hospital residents, the reference group. It was also investigated the diagnostic performance according to the carious lesion depth. Thirty-five intraoral periapical and bitewing radiographs with 213 proximal surface included in this study were selected from the dental patients at Chonnam National University Hospital. The observers were 181 senior dental students from 5 dental schools and 40 dentists who were second year resident from 5 dental hospitals. They were asked to evaluate the presence ro the absence of the proximal dental caries. The results were as follows : 1. The mean of the hitting rate for the overall observers was 184.51 surfaces and the diagnostic accuracy was 86.62%. 2. The diagnostic performance of the sound proximal tooth surfaces was very high, i.e., 91.5% true negative rate and 8.5% false positive rate. 3. The diagnostic performance of the dentist group was higher than the student group (P<0.05). 4. The proximal dental caries perceptibility increased as the lesion depth increased significantly (P<0.001) except no difference between the carious lesion depth III and IV (P>0.001).

  13. A Novel Method for Intraoral Access to the Superior Head of the Human Lateral Pterygoid Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleli Tôrres Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The uncoordinated activity of the superior and inferior parts of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM has been suggested to be one of the causes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ disc displacement. A therapy for this muscle disorder is the injection of botulinum toxin (BTX, of the LPM. However, there is a potential risk of side effects with the injection guide methods currently available. In addition, they do not permit appropriate differentiation between the two bellies of the muscle. Herein, a novel method is presented to provide intraoral access to the superior head of the human LPM with maximal control and minimal hazards. Methods. Computational tomography along with digital imaging software programs and rapid prototyping techniques were used to create a rapid prototyped guide to orient BTX injections in the superior LPM. Results. The method proved to be feasible and reliable. Furthermore, when tested in one volunteer it allowed precise access to the upper head of LPM, without producing side effects. Conclusions. The prototyped guide presented in this paper is a novel tool that provides intraoral access to the superior head of the LPM. Further studies will be necessary to test the efficacy and validate this method in a larger cohort of subjects.

  14. Rehabilitations with immediate loading of one-piece implants stabilized with intraoral welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, M E; Lauritano, D; Rossi, F; Dal Carlo, L; Shulman, M; Meynardi, F; Colombo, D; Manenti, P; Comola, G; Zampetti, P

    2018-01-01

    The authors present an implant prosthesis procedure that uses screws on one-piece implants connected with a titanium pin at their abutment level and one supporter titanium bar in order to guarantee immediate stabilization. These can be implanted and fitted with customized temporary crowns in a single surgical procedure, restoring function and aesthetics and consenting recovery of the bone deficit with reduced healing times and limited patient discomfort. One-piece wide-diameter titanium screw implants with thread measurements of 2.1 and 2.6 mm (smaller diameter) up to diameter of 4.5 mm with one abutment of 2.0 and 2.5 mm respectively, were positioned and splinted by intraoral welding. One-piece titanium implants were used together with a pin (needle) titanium implant as supporting structure to achieve deep stabilization. The Scialom-like pin has a diameter of 1.2 mm and it is long enough to reach deep cortical bone that is “bicorticalism”. The One-piece implant is tightly connected to the needle implant by means of Mondani intra-oral welding technique. In severely atrophic anterior maxilla, the use of this method allows the immediate loading of a fixed resin prosthesis soon after surgery. These implants yielded satisfactory functional and aesthetic outcome in bone-deficient upper anterior sectors, without invasive regenerative procedures. The low invasiveness of this approach also consents rapid healing, reduced biological burden and greater patient benefit.

  15. Intraoral conversion of occlusal force to electricity and magnetism by biting of piezoelectric elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Takashi; Ohkuma, Kazuo; Sano, Natsuki; Ogura, Hideo; Terada, Kazuto

    2012-01-01

    Very weak electrical, magnetic and ultrasound signal stimulations are known to promote the formation, metabolism, restoration and stability of bone and surrounding tissues after treatment and operations. We have therefore investigated the possibility of intraoral generation of electricity and magnetism by occlusal force in an in vitro study. Biting bimorph piezoelectric elements with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) using dental models generated appropriate magnetism for bone formation, i. e. 0.5-0.6 gauss, and lower electric currents and higher voltages, i. e. 2.0-6.0 μA at 10-22 V (appropriate levels are 30 μA and 1.25 V), as observed by a universal testing machine. The electric currents and voltages could be changed using amplifier circuits. These results show that intraoral generation of electricity and magnetism is possible and could provide post-operative stabilization and activation of treated areas of bone and the surrounding tissues directly and/or indirectly by electrical, magnetic and ultrasound stimulation, which could accelerate healing.

  16. Simulation of dental intensifying screen for intraoral radiographic using MCNP5 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Vanessa M.; Oliveira, Renato C.M., E-mail: vanessamachado@ufmg.br [Curso Superior de Tecnologia em Radiologia. Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Barros, Graiciany P.; Oliveira, Arno H.; Veloso, M. Auxiliadora F. [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear. Escola de Engenharia. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    One of basic principles for radiological protection is the optimization of techniques for obtain radiographic images, in way that the dose in the patient is kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Intensifying screens are used in medical radiology, which reduce considerably the dose rates in the production of radiographic images, maintaining the quality of these, while in dental radiology, there is no a intensifying screen available for intraoral examinations. From this technological requirement, this paper evaluates a computational modeling of an intensifying screen for use in intraoral radiography. For this, it was used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 that allows the radiography simulation through the transport of electrons and photons in the different materials present in this examination. The goal of an intensifying screen is the conversion of X-ray photons to photons in the visible spectrum, knowing that radiographic films are more sensitive to light photons than to X-ray photons. So the screen should be composed of an efficient material for converting x-rays photons in light photons, therefore was made simulations using different materials, thicknesses and positions possible for placing screen in radiographic film in order to find the way more technically feasible. (author)

  17. Radiation protection and quality assurance in dental radiology: I. Intraoral radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Beneyto, Y.; Alcaraz, M.; Jodar-Porlan, S.; Saura-Iniesta, A.M.; Velasco-Hidalgo, E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies 2524 official reports on quality assurance in dental radiography, made in the context of the three first revisions of these dental clinics as a result of the entry into force of the regulations establishing the duties for these types of facilities. In the results section we present a quantitative analysis of the facilities equipped with an intraoral device, making a special reference to the brands they have available, as well as their physical features (KV, mAs, filtration, length of cone) and the deviations detected in their operation. Some of the features in the process of obtaining radiological images at those facilities (film control, development time, liquid renewal) are determined, and the average dose of ionizing radiation used in order to obtain the radiological image of the same tooth is presented. This paper shows, in a quantitative way, the characteristic features of intraoral dental radiology in our medium. The study is intended to be continued during the next years, which would allow the assessment of the prospective improvement in dental radiological performances as a result of the newly established regulations. (author)

  18. A Novel Approach to Determine the Prevalence of Type of Soft Palate Using Digital Intraoral Impression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled Addas, Mohamed; Al Humaidi, Abdullah Saad Ali; Al Qahtani, Abdulrazaq Mohammed; Al Qahtani, Mubarak Daghash

    2017-01-01

    Aim To determine the prevalence of type of soft palate in targeted population. Materials and Methods Using computer technology in dentistry, intraoral digital scanner, and 3D analysis software tool, study was conducted. 100 patients selected from the outpatient clinics were divided into two groups based on the ages of 20–40 years and 41–60 years with equal ratio of males and females. Each selected patient's maxillary arch was scanned with intraoral scanner; images so obtained were sectioned in anteroposterior cross section and with the 3D analysis software; the angulation between hard and soft palate was determined. Results The prevalence of type II soft palate (angulation between hard and soft palate is between 10 and 45 degrees) was highest, 60% in group 1 and 44% in group 2. The difference between genders was statistically significant with p value <0.05 in both the groups, although females had higher angulation compared to the males in all classes of both groups. Conclusions In targeted population of Aseer Province, Saudi Arabia, the prevalence of type II soft palate was more common, with higher soft palate angulation among females. The advanced age had no effect in the type of soft palate in the region. PMID:28951740

  19. Comparison of intraoral scanning and conventional impression techniques using 3-dimensional superimposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Ye-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study is to evaluate the appropriate impression technique by analyzing the superimposition of 3D digital model for evaluating accuracy of conventional impression technique and digital impression. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-four patients who had no periodontitis or temporomandibular joint disease were selected for analysis. As a reference model, digital impressions with a digital impression system were performed. As a test models, for conventional impression dual-arch and full-arch, impression techniques utilizing addition type polyvinylsiloxane for fabrication of cast were applied. 3D laser scanner is used for scanning the cast. Each 3 pairs for 25 STL datasets were imported into the inspection software. The three-dimensional differences were illustrated in a color-coded map. For three-dimensional quantitative analysis, 4 specified contact locations(buccal and lingual cusps of second premolar and molar) were established. For twodimensional quantitative analysis, the sectioning from buccal cusp to lingual cusp of second premolar and molar were acquired depending on the tooth axis. RESULTS In color-coded map, the biggest difference between intraoral scanning and dual-arch impression was seen (Pimpression and the smallest difference was seen between dual-arch and full-arch impression. CONCLUSION The two- and three-dimensional deviations between intraoral scanner and dual-arch impression was bigger than full-arch and dual-arch impression (P.05). PMID:26816576

  20. An intra-oral cone for an 18 MeV linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggs, P.J.; Wang, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    A set of intra-oral cones has been constructed for electron beam therapy from a linear accelerator. The 4 cm x 4 cm treatment accessory provided with this machine was modified by simply removing the lower collimator and replacing it with a brass plate into which all the cones can fit, so that they are easily interchangeable. Six circular cones, with diameters ranging from 27 mm to 45 mm, plus two elliptical cones are currently in use. A light field system has been built that fits into the acrylic compartment directly above the base, and provides a clear, well-illuminated view of the treatment field. The dosimetry for these cones shows that the percent depth dose curve for a 41 mm diameter field is the same as that obtained with the 4 cm x 4 cm treatment accessory, and that the isodose curves are very similar. This intra-oral cone system has been in operation for over two years and we have found it very useful in boosting the dose to specific primary lesions in the oral cavity, for example, oral tongue, floor of mouth, retromolar trigone, and soft palate

  1. Two Fiber Optical Fiber Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mathew R.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Breeding, Shawn P.

    2000-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose sensing tip is given a metallic coating. The sensing tip of the fiber is essentially an isothermal cavity, so the emission from this cavity will be approximately equal to the emission from a blackbody. Temperature readings are obtained by measuring the spectral radiative heat flux at the end of the fiber at two wavelengths. The ratio of these measurements and Planck's Law are used to infer the temperature at the sensing tip. Optical fiber thermometers have high accuracy, excellent long-term stability and are immune to electromagnetic interference. In addition, they can be operated for extended periods without requiring re-calibration. For these reasons. it is desirable to use optical fiber thermometers in environments such as the International Space Station. However, it has recently been shown that temperature readings are corrupted by emission from the fiber when extended portions of the probe are exposed to elevated temperatures. This paper will describe several ways in which the reading from a second fiber can be used to correct the corrupted temperature measurements. The accuracy and sensitivity to measurement uncertainty will be presented for each method.

  2. Neurofibroma paciniano: relato de um caso raro de localização intra-oral Pacinian neurofibroma: report of a rare intraoral case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lélia B. Souza

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available O neurofibroma paciniano é uma lesão rara encontrada predominantemente em mãos, incluindo digitais, em nádegas e pés. As lesões podem ser solitárias ou múltiplas como componente da doença de Von Recklinghausen. Na cavidade oral, o neurofibroma paciniano é um achado incomum, existindo apenas um caso relatado na literatura mundial. O objetivo deste trabalho é apresentar um caso de neurofibroma paciniano localizado em mucosa gengival, bem como descrever as suas características clínicas e histopatológicas, contribuindo, assim, para um melhor conhecimento desta entidade.PPacinian Neurofibroma is a rare lesion that has been reported predominantly on the hand, including the digits, on buttocks and feet. The lesions can be solitaries or multiples as part of the Von Recklinghausen's disease. The intraoral site is unusual and just one case has been related in the world's literature. The purpose of this report is to present one case of pacinian neurofibroma and to describe its clinical and histopathological features contributing for the best knowledge about this entity.

  3. A prospective placebo-controlled double-blind trial of antibiotic prophylaxis in intraoral bone grafting procedures: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, Jerome A. H.; van den Akker, Hans P.

    2003-01-01

    Objective. A pilot study was conducted to assess the efficacy of a single-dose preoperative prophylactic of the penicillin pheneticillin compared with placebo in the antibiotic prophylaxis of surgical wound infections in intra-oral bone grafting procedures. Patients and Methods. Twenty patients (age

  4. Patients' preferences when comparing analogue implant impressions using a polyether impression material versus digital impressions (Intraoral Scan) of dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismeijer, D.; Mans, R.S.; Van Genuchten, M.J.I.M; Reijers, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The primary objective of this clinical study was to assess the patients' perception of the difference between an analogue impression approach on the one hand and an intra-oral scan (IO scan) on the other when restoring implants in the non-aesthetic zone. A second objective was to analyse

  5. Patients' preferences when comparing analogue implant impressions using a polyether impression material versus digital impressions (Intraoral Scan) of dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismeijer, D.; Mans, R.; van Genugten, M.; Reijers, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The primary objective of this clinical study was to assess the patients' perception of the difference between an analogue impression approach on the one hand and an intra-oral scan (IO scan) on the other when restoring implants in the non-aesthetic zone. A second objective was to analyse

  6. Immediate rehabilitation of the edentulous mandible using Ankylos SynCone telescopic copings and intraoral welding: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degidi, Marco; Nardi, Diego; Sighinolfi, Gianluca; Piattelli, Adriano

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the suitability of immediate rehabilitation of the edentulous mandible using SynCone copings and the intraoral welding technique. Patients with an edentulous mandible were fitted with a removable restoration supported by an intraorally welded titanium bar. Copings were connected to their respective SynCone 5-degree abutments and then welded to a titanium bar using an intraoral welding unit. This framework was used to support the definitive restoration, which was delivered on the day of implant placement. Restoration success and survival, implant success, and biologic or technical complications were assessed immediately after surgery and at 6 and 12 months. Twenty-two patients were consecutively treated with 88 immediately loaded implants. No acrylic resin fractures or radiographically detectable alterations of the welded frameworks were present in the 22 restorations delivered. One implant (1.1%) failed 1 month after surgery; all remaining implants (98.9%) were clinically stable at the 12-month follow-up. Within its limitations, this pilot study demonstrated that it is possible to successfully rehabilitate the edentulous mandible on the day of surgery with a definitive restoration supported by an intraorally welded titanium framework and SynCone 5-degree abutments.

  7. Comparison of cone - beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography in detection of recurrent caries under composite restorations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasraei, Shahin; Shokri, Abbas; Poorolajal, Jalal; Rahmani, Hamid, E-mail: Dr.a.shokri@gmail.com [Hamadan University of Medical Sciences Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khajeh, Samira [Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Secondary caries is the most common cause of dental restoration failures. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital intraoral radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for detection of recurrent caries around composite restorations mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities were prepared using bur on 45 extracted sound human molar teeth. The teeth were divided into 3 groups. In the control group, cavities were restored with composite resin after etching and bonding (n=15). In Group 2, 500-μm thick wax was placed over the buccal, lingual and gingival walls and the cavities were restored with composite resin. Group 3 specimens were subjected to pH cycling and artificial caries were created on the buccal, lingual and gingival walls. The cavities were restored with composite. Conventional and digital photo-stimulable phosphor (PSP; Optime) radiographs and two CBCTs images (NewTom 3G and Cranex 3D) were obtained from them. Presence or absence of caries in the cavity walls was assessed on these images. Data were analyzed using Kappa statistic. The diagnostic accuracy of CBCT was significantly higher than that of digital and conventional intraoral radiography (p<0.05). The accuracy was 0.83, 0.78, 0.55 and 0.49 for CBCT Cranex 3D, CBCT NewTom 3G, conventional and digital intraoral radiography, respectively. CBCT has a higher diagnostic accuracy than digital and conventional intraoral radiography for detection of secondary caries around composite restorations. (author)

  8. Clinical evaluation comparing the fit of all-ceramic crowns obtained from silicone and digital intraoral impressions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarauz, C.; Valverde, A.; Martinez-Rus, F.; Hassan, B.; Pradies, G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to compare the fit of all-ceramic crowns fabricated from conventional silicone impressions with the fit of all-ceramic crowns fabricated from intraoral digital impressions. Methods Twenty patients with 26 posterior teeth with a prosthetic demand were selected for

  9. A Study on Possibility of Clinical Application for Color Measurements of Shade Guides Using an Intraoral Digital Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung-In; Bae, Ji-Won; Park, Ji-Man; Chun, Youn-Sic; Kim, Mi-Ae; Kim, Minji

    2016-11-07

    To assess if color measurement with intraoral scanner correlates with digital colorimeter and to evaluate the possibility of application of a digital scanner for shade selection. The L*a*b* values of the five shade tabs (A1, A2, A3, A3.5, and A4) were obtained with an intraoral scanner (TRIOS Pod) and a colorimeter (ShadeEye). Both devices were calibrated according to the manufacturer's instructions before measurements. Color measurement values were compared with paired t-test, and a Pearson's correlation analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship of two methods. The L*a*b* values of the colorimeter were significantly different from those of the digital scanner (p < 0.001). The L* and b* values of both methods were strongly correlated with each other (both p < 0.05). The device repeatability in both methods were reported to be excellent (p < 0.05). Within the limitations of this study, color measurements with digital intraoral scanners and computer-assisted image analysis were in accordance with those of the colorimeter with respect to L* and b* values; however, all the coordinates of shade tabs were significantly different between two methods. The digital intraoral scanner may not be used as the primary method of color selection in clinical practices, considering significant differences in color parameters with colorimeter. The scanner's capability in shade selection should be further evaluated. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  10. Stereologic, histopathologic, flow cytometric, and clinical parameters in the prognostic evaluation of 74 patients with intraoral squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, T; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Gaihede, M

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: A consecutive series of all 78 incident cases of intraoral squamous cell carcinoma occurring during a 2-year period in a population of 1.4 million inhabitants were evaluated by histologic score (the modified classification of Jacobsson et al.), flow cytometry, stereology, ...

  11. Comparison of cone - beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography in detection of recurrent caries under composite restorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasraei, Shahin; Shokri, Abbas; Poorolajal, Jalal; Rahmani, Hamid; Khajeh, Samira

    2017-01-01

    Secondary caries is the most common cause of dental restoration failures. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital intraoral radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for detection of recurrent caries around composite restorations mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities were prepared using bur on 45 extracted sound human molar teeth. The teeth were divided into 3 groups. In the control group, cavities were restored with composite resin after etching and bonding (n=15). In Group 2, 500-μm thick wax was placed over the buccal, lingual and gingival walls and the cavities were restored with composite resin. Group 3 specimens were subjected to pH cycling and artificial caries were created on the buccal, lingual and gingival walls. The cavities were restored with composite. Conventional and digital photo-stimulable phosphor (PSP; Optime) radiographs and two CBCTs images (NewTom 3G and Cranex 3D) were obtained from them. Presence or absence of caries in the cavity walls was assessed on these images. Data were analyzed using Kappa statistic. The diagnostic accuracy of CBCT was significantly higher than that of digital and conventional intraoral radiography (p<0.05). The accuracy was 0.83, 0.78, 0.55 and 0.49 for CBCT Cranex 3D, CBCT NewTom 3G, conventional and digital intraoral radiography, respectively. CBCT has a higher diagnostic accuracy than digital and conventional intraoral radiography for detection of secondary caries around composite restorations. (author)

  12. Effects of short-term training on behavioral learning and skill acquisition during intraoral fine motor task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Grigoriadis, Joannis; Trulsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    movements. Thirty healthy volunteers were asked to intraorally manipulate and split a chocolate candy, into two equal halves. The participants performed three series (with ten 10 trials) of the task before and after a short-term (approximately 30min) training. The accuracy of the split and vertical jaw...

  13. The Effect of Short-Term Auditory Deprivation on the Control of Intraoral Pressure in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David L.; Gao, Sujuan; Svirsky, Mario A.

    2003-01-01

    A study investigated whether two speech measures (peak intraoral air pressure (IOP) and IOP duration) obtained during production of intervocalic stops would be altered by the presence or absence of a cochlear implant in five children (ages 7-10). The auditory condition affected peak IOP more than IOP duration. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  14. Clinical evaluation of all-ceramic crowns fabricated from intraoral digital impressions based on the principle of active wavefront sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrek, Andreas; Reich, Gunnar; Ranftl, Dieter; Klein, Christoph; Cerny, Barbara; Brodesser, Jutta

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the fit of all-ceramic crowns fabricated from intraoral digital impressions with the fit of all-ceramic crowns fabricated from silicone impressions. Twenty patients agreed to take part in the study to receive two Lava crowns each for the same preparation. One crown was fabricated from intraoral scans using the Lava Chairside Oral Scanner (Lava C.O.S.), and the other crown from a two-step silicone impression. Prior to cementation the fit of both crowns was clinically evaluated by two calibrated and blinded examiners; the marginal fit was also scored from replicas. Data from the replica scores were analysed by Anderson-Darling test, Levene's test and Mann-Whitney test. All tests were performed with alpha-level of 0.05. Median marginal gap in the conventional impression group was 71microm (Q1:45microm; Q3:98microm), and in the digital impression group 49microm (Q1:32microm; Q3:65microm). Mann-Whitney test revealed a significant difference between the groups (pdigitally fabricated crowns. 1. Crowns from intraoral scans revealed significantly better marginal fit than crowns from silicone impressions. 2. Marginal discrepancies in both groups were within the limits of clinical acceptability. 3. Crowns from intraoral scans tended to show better interproximal contact area quality. 4. Crowns from both groups performed equally well with regard to occlusion. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Processing of Intraoral Olfactory and Gustatory Signals in the Gustatory Cortex of Awake Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Chad L; Fontanini, Alfredo

    2017-01-11

    The integration of gustatory and olfactory information is essential to the perception of flavor. Human neuroimaging experiments have pointed to the gustatory cortex (GC) as one of the areas involved in mediating flavor perception. Although GC's involvement in encoding the chemical identity and hedonic value of taste stimuli is well studied, it is unknown how single GC neurons process olfactory stimuli emanating from the mouth. In this study, we relied on multielectrode recordings to investigate how single GC neurons respond to intraorally delivered tastants and tasteless odorants dissolved in water and whether/how these two modalities converge in the same neurons. We found that GC neurons could either be unimodal, responding exclusively to taste (taste-only) or odor (odor-only), or bimodal, responding to both gustatory and olfactory stimuli. Odor responses were confirmed to result from retronasal olfaction: monitoring respiration revealed that exhalation preceded odor-evoked activity and reversible inactivation of olfactory receptors in the nasal epithelium significantly reduced responses to intraoral odorants but not to tastants. Analysis of bimodal neurons revealed that they encode palatability significantly better than the unimodal taste-only group. Bimodal neurons exhibited similar responses to palatable tastants and odorants dissolved in water. This result suggested that odorized water could be palatable. This interpretation was further supported with a brief access task, where rats avoided consuming aversive taste stimuli and consumed the palatable tastants and dissolved odorants. These results demonstrate the convergence of the chemosensory components of flavor onto single GC neurons and provide evidence for the integration of flavor with palatability coding. Food perception and choice depend upon the concurrent processing of olfactory and gustatory signals from the mouth. The primary gustatory cortex has been proposed to integrate chemosensory stimuli

  16. Intraoral 3D Scanning or Dental Impressions for the Assessment of Dental Arch Relationships in Cleft Care: Which is Superior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, E V; McIntyre, G T; Wang, W; Gillgrass, T; Martin, C B; Mossey, P A

    2016-09-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate intraoral 3D scans for assessing dental arch relationships and obtain patient/parent perceptions of impressions and intraoral 3D scanning. Forty-three subjects with nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) had impressions taken for plaster models. These and the teeth were scanned using the R700 Orthodontic Study Model Scanner and Trios® Digital Impressions Scanner (3Shape A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark) to create indirect and direct digital models. All model formats were scored by three observers on two occasions using the GOSLON and modified Huddart Bodenham (MHB) indices. Participants and parents scored their perceptions of impressions and scanning from 1 (very good) to 5 (very bad). Intra- and interexaminer reliability were tested using GOSLON and MHB data (Cronbach's Alpha >0.9). Bland and Altman plots were created for MHB data, with each model medium (one-sample t tests, P 0.9) were good for all formats with the direct digital models having the lowest interexaminer differences. Participants had higher ratings for scanning comfort (84.8%) than impressions (44.2%) (P impressions (51.2%) (P > .05). None disliked scanning, but 16.3% disliked impressions. Data for parents and children positively correlated (P dental arch relationships using intraoral 3D scans was superior to indirect digital and to plaster models; Subjects with UCLP preferred intra-oral 3D scanning to dental impressions, mirrored by parents/carers; This study supports the replacement of conventional impressions with intra-oral 3D scans in longitudinal evaluations of the outcomes of cleft care.

  17. Does long-term intraoral service affect the mechanical properties and elemental composition of multistranded wires of lingual fixed retainers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinelis, Spiros; Pandis, Nikolaos; Al Jabbari, Youssef S; Eliades, George; Eliades, Theodore

    2017-06-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the elemental and mechanical alterations of stainless steel (SS) multistranded orthodontic wires used in fixed retention after intraoral ageing. Two types of 0.022-inch, seven-stranded wires, Lingual Retainer Wire (LRW) and Tru-Chrome (TCH), from the same manufacturer (Rocky Mountain Orthodontics, Denver, Colo, USA) were tested. Thirty-three samples from LRW group and thirty-seven from TCH were collected, whereas three unused wires from each package were used as controls. The median ageing time for LRW was 7.4 years and 8.4 for TCH. All samples were subjected to scanning electron microscope/X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. Three spectra were taken from the surface of each wire and then all samples were used for the assessment of Martens hardness, indentation modulus (EIT), and elastic index (ηIT) with the instrumented indentation testing method (IIT). The intraoral ageing time was statistically compared between the two groups by Mann-Whitney rank sum test and the compositional and mechanical properties were compared by unpaired t-test. The Spearman correlation between elemental content and ageing time was carried out for all elements (a = 0.05). No significant differences were found for both the elemental content and for the mechanical properties between the wires tested. Spearman analysis revealed no correlation between elemental content and intraoral time while two groups share statistically equal intraoral ageing times (P > 0.05). Both wires seemed to maintain their mechanical and elemental integrity within a period of 14-year intraoral exposure, whereas no measurable ionic release could be identified. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. A Field-Portable, Fiber-Optic Based Near-Infrared Spectrometer and its Applications to Fuels Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-28

    is usually not available. Field testing may help to identify adulterated or otherwise substandard materials before their use. Early identification of...clinical analyses (25,26), agricultural materials analysis (27,28,29), and determinations such as the fat content in milk (30), and the identity of

  19. Cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography for diagnosis of dental abnormalities in dogs and cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luiz Antonio F.; Barriviera, Mauricio; Januário, Alessandro L.; Bezerra, Ana Cristina B.; Fioravanti, Maria Clorinda S.

    2011-01-01

    The development of veterinary dentistry has substantially improved the ability to diagnose canine and feline dental abnormalities. Consequently, examinations previously performed only on humans are now available for small animals, thus improving the diagnostic quality. This has increased the need for technical qualification of veterinary professionals and increased technological investments. This study evaluated the use of cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography as complementary exams for diagnosing dental abnormalities in dogs and cats. Cone beam computed tomography was provided faster image acquisition with high image quality, was associated with low ionizing radiation levels, enabled image editing, and reduced the exam duration. Our results showed that radiography was an effective method for dental radiographic examination with low cost and fast execution times, and can be performed during surgical procedures. PMID:22122905

  20. Surgical Resolution of Bilateral Hypertrophy of Masseter Muscle Through Intraoral Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trento, Guilherme Dos Santos; Benato, Leonardo Silva; Rebellato, Nelson Luis Barbosa; Klüppel, Leandro Eduardo

    2017-06-01

    Masseter muscle hypertrophy is an untypical anomaly with no definite cause and its diagnosis is easily completed through physical examination and imaging examinations. In some cases, patient may report signs and symptoms of well-localizated pain. However, it is generally asymptomatic and patient's chief complaint is about esthetic because of facial asymmetry. In this case, surgery is carefully indicated. The aim of this article is to report a case of a male patient with no painful and functional complaints but an important unease over his facial asymmetry. Patient underwent surgery involving bilateral resection of mandibular angles and unilateral resection of masseter muscle through intraoral approach. Surgical approaches and techniques rely heavily on surgeon. There are few reports in the literature about this anomaly, but those available present several techniques. The surgeon's dexterity and knowledge become extremely important, whereas this procedure is essentiallyesthetic.

  1. Limited cone-beam CT and intraoral radiography for the diagnosis of periapical pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara; Huumonen, Sisko; Gröndahl, Kerstin; Gröndahl, Hans-Göran

    2007-01-01

    To compare intraoral periapical radiography with 3D images for the diagnosis of periapical pathology. Maxillary molars and premolars and mandibular molars with endodontic problems and examined with periapical radiographs and a 3D technique (3D Accuitomo) were retrospectively selected and evaluated by 3 oral radiologists. Numbers of roots and root canals, presence and location of periapical lesions, and their relation to neighboring structures were studied. Among 46 teeth, both techniques demonstrated lesions in 32 teeth, and an additional 10 teeth were found in the Accuitomo images. As regards individual roots, 53 lesions were found in both techniques, and 33 more roots were found to have lesions in Accuitomo images. Artefacts were sometimes a problem in Accuitomo images. In 32 of the 46 cases, all observers agreed that additional clinically relevant information was obtained with Accuitomo images. A high-resolution 3D technique can be of value for diagnosis of periapical problems.

  2. A study of radiological condition on dixel (direct digital intraoral radiographic system)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naitoh, Nunetaka; Shiojima, Masaru; Iida, Hiroto; Hayashi, Masanori; Nakamura, Moriatsu; Kikuchi, Atsushi [Aichi-Gakuin Univ., Nagoya (Japan)

    1995-06-01

    The dixel unit (J. Morita Co., Japan) is a direct digital intraoral radiographic system using a charged coupled device (CCD). We studied an optimum exposure using the dixel by a subjective evaluation. Moreover we used the dixel clinically for the diagnosis of proximal caries and periapical lesions. The results are summarized below. An optimum exposure in the dixel was 1/3 to 1/2 compared to the Ektaspeed film (Eastman Kodak Co., USA). An image showed on the monitor in 15 seconds after the radiography. The image on the monitor was magnified about sixty times. The image quality was in fair agreement with that of the Ektaspeed film. We consider that the dixel unit is a suitable system for clinical use. (author).

  3. Effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Haan, R.A.; van Aken, J. (Utrecht Univ., (The Netherlands))

    1990-08-01

    The effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography has been determined. The exposure from a bitewing radiograph and periapical views of the left maxillary incisors and first molar was measured at nine heights and 16 positions, all 1 m from the patient. The effective dose equivalent was determined using data from ICRP 51 (International Commission on Radiological Protection: Data for Use in Protection Against External Radiation). The values presented are related to an exposure of 1 C kg-1 (3876 R) measured free in air at the tube-end. They thus constitute ratios which are not influenced by the sensitivity of the film or other detector used and form standard tables which permit the calculation of the effective dose equivalent in clinical situations.

  4. An investigation of potential applications of intensifying screens in intraoral radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, R.G.; Kogon, S.L.; Reid, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    In medicine, the somewhat degraded image from the screen/film system is accepted for most diagnostic purposes in the interest of radiation thrift. In dentistry, however, the superb image resolution and sharpness of the radiation-intensive, direct-exposure film is the standard for intraoral radiography. There may be occasions in dental practice where such quality is not necessary, thus making the high level of exposure difficult to justify. In a laboratory study, screen-type radiographs were effectively substituted for ultraspeed film in the monitoring stages of endodontic therapy and as posttreatment films in operative dentistry. Even with a slow system, the radiation exposure was one sixteenth of the usual periapical dose. If clinical trials support these conclusions, only the lack of a practical periapical cassette limits the application of this significant method of radiation reduction to dental practice

  5. An investigation of potential applications of intensifying screens in intraoral radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, R.G.; Kogon, S.L.; Reid, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    In medicine, the somewhat degraded image from the screen/film system is accepted for most diagnostic purposes in the interest of radiation thrift. In dentistry, however, the superb image resolution and sharpness of the radiation-intensive, direct-exposure film is the standard for intraoral radiography. There may be occasions in dental practice where such quality is not necessary, thus making the high level of exposure difficult to justify. In a laboratory study, screen-type radiographs were effectively substituted for ultraspeed film in the monitoring stages of endodontic therapy and as posttreatment films in operative dentistry. Even with a slow system, the radiation exposure was one sixteenth of the usual periapical dose. If clinical trials support these conclusions, only the lack of a practical periapical cassette limits the application of this significant method of radiation reduction to dental practice.

  6. Effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Haan, R.A.; van Aken, J.

    1990-01-01

    The effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography has been determined. The exposure from a bitewing radiograph and periapical views of the left maxillary incisors and first molar was measured at nine heights and 16 positions, all 1 m from the patient. The effective dose equivalent was determined using data from ICRP 51 (International Commission on Radiological Protection: Data for Use in Protection Against External Radiation). The values presented are related to an exposure of 1 C kg-1 (3876 R) measured free in air at the tube-end. They thus constitute ratios which are not influenced by the sensitivity of the film or other detector used and form standard tables which permit the calculation of the effective dose equivalent in clinical situations

  7. A study of radiological condition on dixel (direct digital intraoral radiographic system)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Nunetaka; Shiojima, Masaru; Iida, Hiroto; Hayashi, Masanori; Nakamura, Moriatsu; Kikuchi, Atsushi

    1995-01-01

    The dixel unit (J. Morita Co., Japan) is a direct digital intraoral radiographic system using a charged coupled device (CCD). We studied an optimum exposure using the dixel by a subjective evaluation. Moreover we used the dixel clinically for the diagnosis of proximal caries and periapical lesions. The results are summarized below. An optimum exposure in the dixel was 1/3 to 1/2 compared to the Ektaspeed film (Eastman Kodak Co., USA). An image showed on the monitor in 15 seconds after the radiography. The image on the monitor was magnified about sixty times. The image quality was in fair agreement with that of the Ektaspeed film. We consider that the dixel unit is a suitable system for clinical use. (author)

  8. Cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography for diagnosis of dental abnormalities in dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roza, Marcello R.; Fioravanti, Maria Clorinda S.; Silva, Luiz Antonio F.; Barriviera, Mauricio; Januario, Alessandro L.; Bezerra, Ana Cristina B.

    2011-01-01

    The development of veterinary dentistry has substantially improved the ability to diagnose canine and feline dental abnormalities. Consequently, examinations previously performed only on humans are now available for small animals, thus improving the diagnostic quality. This has increased the need for technical qualification of veterinary professionals and increased technological investments. This study evaluated the use of cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography as complementary exams for diagnosing dental abnormalities in dogs and cats. Cone beam computed tomography was provided faster image acquisition with high image quality, was associated with low ionizing radiation levels, enabled image editing, and reduced the exam duration. Our results showed that radiography was an effective method for dental radiographic examination with low cost and fast execution times, and can be performed during surgical procedures

  9. Success and High Predictability of Intraorally Welded Titanium Bar in the Immediate Loading Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaniel Fogli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The implants failure may be caused by micromotion and stress exerted on implants during the phase of bone healing. This concept is especially true in case of implants placed in atrophic ridges. So the primary stabilization and fixation of implants are an important goal that can also allow immediate loading and oral rehabilitation on the same day of surgery. This goal may be achieved thanks to the technique of welding titanium bars on implant abutments. In fact, the procedure can be performed directly in the mouth eliminating possibility of errors or distortions due to impression. This paper describes a case report and the most recent data about long-term success and high predictability of intraorally welded titanium bar in immediate loading implants.

  10. Intraoral framework pick-up technique to improve fit of a metal-resin implant prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Rustum Baig

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The achievement of passive fit is an important prerequisite for the prevention of complications in full-arch screw-retained implant prosthesis. With cemented prosthesis, the cementation compensates for the discrepancies in the cast framework, but the lack of retrievability seems undesirable. The aim of this paper is to propose a modified screw-retained prosthesis design for complete arch implant fixed rehabilitation. A technique for the fabrication of a full-arch metal-resin implant-supported screw-retained prosthesis is described. Cementation of the framework to the abutments intraorally improves the passivity of fit of the prosthesis on the implants. Maintenance of screw-access channels in the final prosthesis ensures retrievability. The metal-resin design allows for easy repair and maintenance. The prosthesis is cost-effective compared to conventional options and can be employed as a viable treatment alternative when considering metal-acrylic resin complete arch fixed prosthesis.

  11. Coat-sleeve type giant congenital melanocytic nevus with intraoral blue nevus: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lata M Kale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital melanocytic nevi (CMN are visible hyperpigmented (melanocytic, benign, tumor like proliferations in the skin resulting from faulty development of pigment cell precursors in the embryo, and are composed of an abnormal mixture of skin elements. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus (GCMN is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a larger size in adulthood. GCMN is a rare variety of CMN which is characterized by its size (diameter ≥20 cm and the potential for malignant transformation. It is infrequently associated with other findings, which makes the clinical picture complex. In this case, we report a rare association of GCMN with intraoral blue nevus in a 24-year-old male patient.

  12. Dose and risk evaluation to the thyroid gland in intra-oral dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Edmilson M.; Lima, Marco A.F.; Kelecom, Alphonse; Correa, Samanda C.A.; Silva, Ademir X.; Brito, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Intra-oral technique is one of the most frequently used procedures of dental radiology, allowing the detection of a variety of dental anomalies such as caries, dental trauma and periodontal lesions, while exposing patients to relatively low doses of radiation. However, although the adverse effects of doses generated by dental radiology are essentially stochastic, a number of epidemiological studies have provided evidence of an increased risk of thyroid tumors for dental radiography. Many studies have measured doses of radiation for dental radiography, but only a few have estimated thyroid dose. Furthermore, most of the studies on dose evaluation in dental radiology are based on standardized calculation phantoms, which neglect the variance of the patient size or even sex. The purpose of this study is to use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX and the FAX (Female Adult voXel) and MAX (Male Adult voXel) phantoms to investigate how absorbed doses to the thyroid gland in intraoral dental examinations vary in female and male patients. The lifetime cancer incidence attributable to dental examinations were estimated using the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR) VII Committee Report. The phantoms study proved a useful trial for detecting the radiation dose to the thyroid gland and conclusively supported that the anatomy may be regarded as an influencing factor in radiation dose received during dental examination. Finally, the results have also confirmed that the association of the MCNPX code and the MAX and FAX phantoms is very useful in dosimetric studies on radiographic examinations of female and male patients. (author)

  13. Use of Intraoral Welding to Increase the Predictability of Immediately Loaded Computer-Guided Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albiero, Alberto Maria; Benato, Renato; Benato, Andrea; Degidi, Marco

    Inaccuracy of computer-guided implant placement may lead to complications when combined with an immediately loaded prefabricated prosthesis. The aim of this case series was to describe the use of an intraoral welding technique to increase the predictability of immediately loaded implants supporting a fixed full-arch prosthesis after computer-guided flapless implant placement. A total of 60 Ankylos plus implants (Dentsply) with a width of 3.5 mm and a length of 8 to 14 mm were placed consecutively in 10 patients. The implants were functionally loaded using the intraoral welding technique on the day of surgery. The accuracy of guided implant placement was assessed by matching the planning cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans with postoperative CBCT scans. No mechanical or biologic complications were registered at the 1-year follow-up. The global coronal deviation of implant placement from the guide plan ranged from 0.25 to 2.84 mm (SD: 0.6 mm), with a mean of 1.28 mm. Average angle deviation was 3.42 degrees (range 0.38-7.82 degrees; SD: 1.52 degrees). The global apical deviation ranged between 0.36 and 3.85 mm (SD: 0.71 mm), with a mean of 1.65 mm. Despite the inaccuracy registered, this guided-welded approach allowed successful achievement of a passive fit of the full-arch prosthesis on the inserted implants the same day of the surgery and provided a high implant and prosthetic survival rate at the 1-year follow-up.

  14. Current status on the application of image processing of digital intraoral radiographs amongst general dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidast, Parisa; Shi, Xie-Qi

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to present the subjective knowledge level and the use of image processing on digital intraoral radiographs amongst general dental practitioners at Distriktståndvrden AB, Stockholm. A questionnaire, consisting of12 questions, was sent to 12 dental prac- tices in Stockholm. Additionally, 2000 radiographs were randomly selected from these clinics for evaluation of applied image processing and its effect on image quality. Descriptive and analytical statistical methods were applied to present the current status of the use of image proces- sing alternatives for the dentists' daily clinical work. 50 out of 53 dentists participated in the survey.The survey showed that most of dentists in.this study had received education on image processing at some stage of their career. No correlations were found between application of image processing on one side and educa- tion received with regards to image processing, previous working experience, age and gender on the other. Image processing in terms of adjusting brightness and contrast was frequently used. Overall, in this study 24.5% of the 200 images were actually image processed in practice, in which 90% of the images were improved or maintained in image quality. According to our survey, image processing is experienced to be frequently used by the dentists at Distriktstandvåden AB for diagnosing anatomical and pathological changes using intraoral radiographs. 24.5% of the 200 images were actually image processed in terms of adjusting brightness and/or contrast. In the present study we did not found that the dentists' age, gender, previous working experience and education in image processing influence their viewpoint towards the application of image processing.

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of Quantitative Sensory Testing to Discriminate Inflammatory Toothache and Intraoral Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porporatti, André Luís; Costa, Yuri Martins; Stuginski-Barbosa, Juliana; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Duarte, Marco Antônio Hungaro; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2015-10-01

    A differential diagnosis between inflammatory toothache (IT) and intraoral neuropathic pain is challenging. The aim of this diagnostic study was to quantify somatosensory function of subjects with IT (acute pulpitis) and atypical odontalgia (AO, intraoral neuropathic pain) and healthy volunteers and to quantify how accurately quantitative sensory testing (QST) discriminates an IT or AO diagnosis. The sample consisted of 60 subjects equally divided (n = 20) into 3 groups: (1) IT, (2) AO, and (3) control. A sequence of 4 QST methods was performed over the dentoalveolar mucosa in the apical maxillar or mandibular area: mechanical detection threshold, pain detection threshold (PDT), dynamic mechanical allodynia, and temporal summation. One-way analysis of variance, Tukey post hoc analyses, and z score transformation were applied to the data. In addition, the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and diagnostic odds ratio of the QST methods were calculated (α = 5%). Somatosensory abnormalities were found for the AO group, which is consistent with a low detection threshold to touch and pain and the presence of mechanical allodynia. For the IT group, no somatosensory abnormality was observed when compared with the control group. The most accurate QST to discriminate the diagnostic differences between IT and healthy individuals is the PDT. The diagnostic differences between AO and healthy individuals and between IT and AO are best discriminated with the mechanical detection threshold, PDT, and dynamic mechanical allodynia. The proposed QST methods may aid in the differential diagnosis between IT and AO with strong accuracy and may be used as complementary diagnostic tests. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Construction and testing of a computer-based intraoral laser scanner for determining tooth positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commer, P; Bourauel, C; Maier, K; Jäger, A

    2000-11-01

    An optical set-up for intraoral data acquisition based on the principle of laser triangulation was developed. The system consists of a pig-tailed laser with line generating optics, a stepping motor driven positioning stage, a commercial CCD (charge coupled device) camera system with frame grabber interface, a control personal computer and a mirror system compensating for the fact that there is no possibility of watching an object directly in the mouth under a certain angle except from a facial position during intraoral scanning. Due to the size of the prototype measurements were still restricted to plaster casts. In order to evaluate its accuracy, the measurements were compared with those taken with a commercial laser scanner and a coordinate measurement table. The accuracy of the prototype scanner was determined to be DeltaXYZ=0.04 mm using gauge blocks of given dimensions and proved to range between the commercial laser scanner and the coordinate measurement table (i.e., it was slightly better than that of the commercial scanner). Applications in orthodontics were demonstrated by scanning plaster casts and measuring distances on reconstructed surfaces. The measured distances showed a maximum deviation of about +/-0.2 mm compared with the data of the coordinate measurement table, which served as a reference. In addition, reconstruction of three-dimensional tooth movements was performed on the scan data. The translational and rotational parameters gained from the superimposition of scanned point clouds and describing tooth movement were also in good accordance with the reference. The achieved accuracy proved to be sufficient for further development which should include a reduction in size and the use of more precise device components.

  17. [Is the precision of intraoral digital impressions in orthodontics enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvert, Romain; Gebeile-Chauty, Sarah

    2017-12-01

    Replacing impression by intraoral camera is a paradigm shift. However no in vivo independent studies have compared the accuracy of analog impressions with three systems of digital impression. Are digital recordings precise enough for our orthodontic practices? Five impressions of the maxillary and mandibular arch of the same subject were conducted in vinylpolysiloxane, cast in plaster type IV then scanned by a laboratory scanner (VPS group). A model (maxilla and mandible) is the reference. Five scans of the maxillary and mandibular arch of the plaster model reference (group EXO) and the subject in intra-oral (INTRA group) were performed successively by the Lythos™ cameras (Ormco) version 1, iTero ® (AlignTech) version 1 and TRIOS ® (3shape) version 2. Numerical models of each group were cut and stacked Best Fit technique references models. The images of the INTRA group have a lack of accuracy of 18 microns (p = 3.88 10 -08 ) compared to images of EXO and VPS group. The maxillary arch has greater fidelity of 6 microns with respect to the mandibular arch in the three systems (p = 0.002). The fingerprinting technique (analog or digital) and the camera model - despite a difference on the number of points recorded - has no statistically significant effect on accuracy. Carried out under ideal conditions, the accuracy of the cameras is certainly less than conventional impressions VPS but is clinically sufficient. The reduction of acquisition time may affect the accuracy, smooth out errors and get the arches contracted. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2017.

  18. Factors associated with dental caries, periodontitis and intra-oral lesions in individuals with HIV / AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Anderson Jambeiro de; Gomes-Filho, Isaac Suzart; Silva, Carlos Alberto Lima da; Passos-Soares, Johelle de Santana; Cruz, Simone Seixas da; Trindade, Soraya Castro; Figueiredo, Ana Claudia Morais Godoy; Buischi, Yvonne de Paiva; Seymour, Gregory J; Cerqueira, Eneida de Moraes Marcílio

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the factors associated with oral diseases in individuals with HIV/AIDS. A cross sectional study was carried out which included 312 individuals registered in the Specialized Care Services for HIV/AIDS in three municipalities of the State of Bahia: Feira de Santana, Santo Antonio de Jesus and Juazeiro, Brazil. Socioeconomic-demographic characteristics related to life style and to dental caries, periodontitis and intra-oral mucosal lesions were investigated in patients with HIV/AIDS infection. Prevalence Ratio with 95% Confidence Interval and significance level of 5% were employed for the statistical analysis. The majority of the individuals evaluated were male with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 41.5 ± 11.3 years, and a mean time of HIV infection diagnosis (± standard deviation) of 5.2 ± 4.4 years. The presence of dental caries was observed in 78.7% of the sample, periodontitis in 25.4% and 36.2% showed intra-oral lesions. Oral health status showed a statistically significant association with the following variables: gender, age, schooling level, current occupation, family income, past and current smoking, antiretroviral use time, latest viral burden dosage, latest CD4-positive T lymphocyte count, use of complete/partial dental prosthesis, need for dental prosthesis, and use of dental floss. With the exception of those factors directly related to HIV/AIDS i.e., antiretroviral use time, latest viral burden dosage and latest CD4-positive T lymphocyte count, the factors associated with oral diseases in this population were the same as those associated with oral diseases in the non-HIV/AIDS population.

  19. Active Star Architectures For Fiber Optics Ethernet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Yoseph L.

    1988-12-01

    Ethernet, and the closely related IEEE 802.3 CSMA/CD standard (Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection), is probably the widest used method for high speed Local Area Networks (LANs). The original Ethernet medium was baseband coax but the wide acceptance of the system necessitated the ability to use Ethernet on a variety of media. So far the use of Ethernet on Thin Coax (CheaperNet), Twisted Pair (StarLan) and Broadband Coax has been standardized. Recently, an increased interest in Fiber Optic based LANs resulted in a formation of an IEEE group whose charter is to recommend approaches for Active and Passive Fiber Optic Ethernet systems. The various approaches which are being considered are described in this paper with an emphasis on Active Star based systems.

  20. Photovoltaic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiana, Russell; Eckert, Robert; Cardone, John; Ryan, James; Montello, Alan

    2006-08-01

    It was realized early in the history of Konarka that the ability to produce fibers that generate power from solar energy could be applied to a wide variety of applications where fabrics are utilized currently. These applications include personal items such as jackets, shirts and hats, to architectural uses such as awnings, tents, large covers for cars, trucks and even doomed stadiums, to indoor furnishings such as window blinds, shades and drapes. They may also be used as small fabric patches or fiber bundles for powering or recharging batteries in small sensors. Power generating fabrics for clothing is of particular interest to the military where they would be used in uniforms and body armor where portable power is vital to field operations. In strong sunlight these power generating fabrics could be used as a primary source of energy, or they can be used in either direct sunlight or low light conditions to recharge batteries. Early in 2002, Konarka performed a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of building a photovoltaic cell using dye-sensitized titania and electrolyte on a metal wire core. The approach taken was based on the sequential coating processes used in making fiber optics, namely, a fiber core, e.g., a metal wire serving as the primary electrode, is passed through a series of vertically aligned coating cups. Each of the cups contains a coating fluid that has a specific function in the photocell. A second wire, used as the counter electrode, is brought into the process prior to entering the final coating cup. The latter contains a photopolymerizable, transparent cladding which hardens when passed through a UV chamber. Upon exiting the UV chamber, the finished PV fiber is spooled. Two hundred of foot lengths of PV fiber have been made using this process. When the fiber is exposed to visible radiation, it generates electrical power. The best efficiency exhibited by these fibers is 6% with an average value in the 4

  1. Computer-assisted surgery and intraoral welding technique for immediate implant-supported rehabilitation of the edentulous maxilla: case report and technical description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albiero, Alberto Maria; Benato, Renato

    2016-09-01

    Complications are frequently reported when combining computer assisted flapless surgery with an immediate loaded prefabricated prosthesis. The authors have combined computer-assisted surgery with the intraoral welding technique to obtain a precise passive fit of the immediate loading prosthesis. An edentulous maxilla was rehabilitated with four computer assisted implants welded together intraorally and immediately loaded with a provisional restoration. A perfect passive fit of the metal framework was obtained that enabled proper osseointegration of implants. Computer assisted preoperative planning has been shown to be effective in reducing the intraoperative time of the intraoral welding technique. No complications were observed at 1 year follow-up. This guided-welded approach is useful to achieve a passive fit of the provisional prosthesis on the inserted implants the same day as the surgery, reducing intraoperative time with respect to the traditional intraoral welding technique. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Validity of Intraoral Scans Compared with Plaster Models: An In-Vivo Comparison of Dental Measurements and 3D Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dental measurements have been commonly taken from plaster dental models obtained from alginate impressions can. Through the use of an intraoral scanner, digital impressions now acquire the information directly from the mouth. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of the intraoral scans compared to plaster models. Materials and Methods Two types of dental models (intraoral scan and plaster model) of 20 subjects were included in this study. The subjects had impressions taken of their teeth and made as plaster model. In addition, their mouths were scanned with the intraoral scanner and the scans were converted into digital models. Eight transverse and 16 anteroposterior measurements, 24 tooth heights and widths were recorded on the plaster models with a digital caliper and on the intraoral scan with 3D reverse engineering software. For 3D surface analysis, the two models were superimposed by using best-fit algorithm. The average differences between the two models at all points on the surfaces were computed. Paired t-test and Bland-Altman plot were used to determine the validity of measurements from the intraoral scan compared to those from the plaster model. Results There were no significant differences between the plaster models and intraoral scans, except for one measurement of lower intermolar width. The Bland-Altman plots of all measurements showed that differences between the two models were within the limits of agreement. The average surface difference between the two models was within 0.10 mm. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that the intraoral scans are clinically acceptable for diagnosis and treatment planning in dentistry and can be used in place of plaster models. PMID:27304976

  3. Validity of Intraoral Scans Compared with Plaster Models: An In-Vivo Comparison of Dental Measurements and 3D Surface Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang

    Full Text Available Dental measurements have been commonly taken from plaster dental models obtained from alginate impressions can. Through the use of an intraoral scanner, digital impressions now acquire the information directly from the mouth. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of the intraoral scans compared to plaster models.Two types of dental models (intraoral scan and plaster model of 20 subjects were included in this study. The subjects had impressions taken of their teeth and made as plaster model. In addition, their mouths were scanned with the intraoral scanner and the scans were converted into digital models. Eight transverse and 16 anteroposterior measurements, 24 tooth heights and widths were recorded on the plaster models with a digital caliper and on the intraoral scan with 3D reverse engineering software. For 3D surface analysis, the two models were superimposed by using best-fit algorithm. The average differences between the two models at all points on the surfaces were computed. Paired t-test and Bland-Altman plot were used to determine the validity of measurements from the intraoral scan compared to those from the plaster model.There were no significant differences between the plaster models and intraoral scans, except for one measurement of lower intermolar width. The Bland-Altman plots of all measurements showed that differences between the two models were within the limits of agreement. The average surface difference between the two models was within 0.10 mm.The results of the present study indicate that the intraoral scans are clinically acceptable for diagnosis and treatment planning in dentistry and can be used in place of plaster models.

  4. Effect of intra-oral aging on t→m phase transformation, microstructure, and mechanical properties of Y-TZP dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miragaya, Luciana Meireles; Guimarães, Renato Bastos; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio de Assunção E; Santos Botelho, Glauco Dos; Antunes Guimarães, José Guilherme; da Silva, Eduardo Moreira

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of intra-oral aging on the tetragonal-to-monoclinic (t→m) phase transformation of two Y-TZP dental ceramics - Lava Frame (Frame) and Lava Plus (Plus) - and determine the impact of this response on their microstructures and mechanical properties: flexural strength, Young's modulus, microhardness and fracture toughness. Standardized ceramic specimens were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). After the baseline analysis, the specimens were attached to personalized intra-oral resin appliances and exposed to the oral cavity of 20 subjects for 60 days and then analyzed again. Specimens produced for mechanical properties evaluation were also analyzed before and after the 60-day intra-oral aging. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD's post hoc test (α=0.05). Weibull analysis was used to evaluate the strength reliability. Both Y-TZP ceramics suffered t→m phase transformation after 60-day intra-oral aging (Plus=4.7%/Frame=7.7%). SEM and AFM analyses showed dislodgement of ZrO 2 grains and a significant increase in roughness after intra-oral aging for both ceramics. Both Y-TZP ceramics suffered a decrease on flexural strength, Young's modulus and fracture toughness after intra-oral aging (pceramics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The correlationship between mandibular radiomorphometric indices in panorama and bone mineral density in Cu-equivalent image of intraoral film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Duk

    2003-01-01

    To determine whether the mandibular radiomorphometric indices in panoramic radiography are correlated with the bone mineral density of Cu-equivalent images in intraoral film. The bone mineral density (BMD) of the mandibular premolar area was measured in the Cu-equivalent image of intraoral film. The Panoramic Mandibular Index (PMI) and Mandibular Cortical Width (MCW) were measured in panoramic radiographs of six dry mandibles, and the Pearson correlation between PMI, MCW, and BMD were tested. There were no significant correlations between PMI and BMD (r=0.280), nor between MCW and BMD (r=0.237). The results show that PMI and MCW were poor diagnostic indicators of mandibular BMD in the six dry mandibles used in this study. The correlationship between the mandibular radiomorphometric indices (PMI and MCW) and mandibular BMD needs to be researched further using large in vivo patient samples.

  6. Radiation absorbed from dental implant radiography: a comparison of linear tomography, CT scan, and panoramic and intra-oral techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D.E.; Danforth, R.A.; Barnes, R.W.; Burtch, M.L. (Loma Linda Univ., CA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Absorbed radiation dose in bone marrow, thyroid, salivary gland, eye, and skin entrance was determined by placement of lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's) at selected anatomical sites within and on a human-like x-ray phantom. The phantom was exposed to radiation from linear tomographic and computer-assisted tomographic (CT) simulated dental implant radiographic examinations. The mean dose was determined for each anatomical site. Resulting dose measurements from linear tomography and computer-assisted tomography are compared with reported panoramic and intra-oral doses. CT examination delivered the greatest dose, while linear tomography was generally lowest. Panoramic and intra-oral doses were similar to those of linear tomography.

  7. Identification of the Procedural Accidents During Root Canal Preparation Using Digital Intraoral Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Csinszka K.-Ivácson A.-; Maria Monea Adriana; Monica Monea; Mihai Pop; Angela Borda

    2016-01-01

    Crown or root perforation, ledge formation, fractured instruments and perforation of the roots are the most important accidents which appear during endodontic therapy. Our objective was to evaluate the value of digital intraoral periapical radiographs compared to cone beam computed tomography images (CBCT) used to diagnose some procedural accidents. Material and methods: Eleven extracted molars were used in this study. A total of 18 perforations and 13 ledges were created artifically and 10 i...

  8. Detection of root perforations using conventional and digital intraoral radiography, multidetector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Shokri, Abbas; Eskandarloo, Amir; Noruzi-Gangachin, Maruf; Khajeh, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to compare the accuracy of conventional intraoral (CI) radiography, photostimulable phosphor (PSP) radiography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for detection of strip and root perforations in endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods Mesial and distal roots of 72 recently extracted molar were endodontically prepared. Perforations were created in 0.2, 0.3, or 0.4 mm diameter around the furcation o...

  9. Behavioral and neural responses to gustatory stimuli delivered non-contingently through intra-oral cannulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ernesto S; Stapleton, Jennifer R; Rodriguez, Abel; Fitzsimmons, Nathan; Oliveira, Laura; Nicolelis, Miguel A L; Simon, Sidney A

    2007-11-23

    The act of eating requires a decision by an animal to place food in its mouth. The reasons to eat are varied and include hunger as well as the food's expected reward value. Previous studies of tastant processing in the rat primary gustatory cortex (GC) have used either anesthetized or awake behaving preparations that yield somewhat different results. Here we have developed a new preparation in which we explore the influences of intra-oral and non-contingent tastant delivery on rats' behavior and on their GC neural responses. We recorded single-unit activity in the rat GC during two sequences of tastant deliveries, PRE and POST, which were separated by a waiting period. Six tastants ranging in hedonic value from sucrose to quinine were delivered in the first two protocols called 4TW and L-S. In the third one, the App L-S protocol, only hedonically positive tastants were used. In the 4TW protocol, tastants were delivered in blocks whereas in the two L-S protocols tastants were randomly interleaved. In the 4TW and L-S protocols the probability of ingesting tastants in the PRE sequence decreased exponentially with the trial number. Moreover, in both protocols this decrease was greater in the POST than in the PRE sequence likely because the subjects learned that unpleasant tastants were to be delivered. In the App L-S protocol the decrease in ingestion was markedly slower than in the other protocols, thus supporting the hypothesis that the decrease in appetitive behavior arises from the non-contingent intra-oral delivery of hedonically negative tastants like quinine. Although neuronal responses in the three protocols displayed similar variability levels, significant differences existed between the protocols in the way the variability was partitioned between chemosensory and non-chemosensory neurons. While in the 4TW and L-S protocols the former population displayed more changes than the latter, in the App L-S protocol variability was homogeneously distributed between

  10. A STUDY OF INSERTION OF LMA CLASSIC™ WITH AND WITHOUT DIGITAL INTRAORAL MANIPULATION IN ANAESTHETISED PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeshwar Rao Madishetti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Airway management is the most essential skill in anaesthesiology and inability to secure the airway is one of the most common reasons for major anaesthesia-related morbidities and mortalities. Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA has established role in modern anaesthetic practice. It is used for airway maintenance of spontaneously breathing patients who are undergoing elective short surgical procedures. The aim of the study is to evaluate the modified technique of insertion of LMA Classic™, which does not require the insertion of fingers into the patient’s mouth as against the standard technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients were randomly allocated to one of two equal-sized groups (n=100.Patients were randomised to standard technique group (standard insertion technique with digital intraoral manipulation or modified technique group (modified insertion technique without digital intraoral manipulation using computer generated random number table and sealed envelope technique. RESULTS Both the groups were comparable with respect to distribution of age (0.935, weight (0.733 and sex (0.606 and the p values were nonsignificance. As indicated in Table 2, the groups were comparable with respect to American Society of Anaesthesiologists Physical Status of the patients. The duration of the entire surgical procedure was similar in both the groups. This implies that the duration for which the LMA ClassicTM was in situ in the patient was comparable between the two groups. The incidence of postoperative sore throat was comparable in both the groups. Five patients who had blood on the LMA ClassicTM at the end of the procedure had sore throat, 4 had sore throat after 1 hour and 1 after 24 hours. The glottic view obtained with the fiberoptic bronchoscope passed through the LMA ClassicTM was comparable in both the groups. Though more number of patients (68 patients had grade 1 view in the modified group compared to standard group (58 patients, it was not

  11. Intra-oral flow patterns and speeds in a suspension-feeding fish with gill rakers removed versus intact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer C; Sanderson, S Laurie

    2008-12-01

    Oreochromis aureus, a species of tilapia, is a suspension-feeding fish that employs a pumping action to bring water into its mouth for filtering.To address questions about water flow inside the mouth, we used a microthermistor flow probe to determine the speed of intra-oral flow during suspension feeding in this species before and after surgical removal of gill rakers. Synchronization with high-speed external videotapes of the fish and high-speed video endoscopy inside the oropharyngeal cavity allowed the first correlation of oral actions with intra-oral flow patterns and speeds during feeding. This analysis established the occurrence of a brief reversal of flow ( approximately 80-ms duration) from posterior to anterior in the oropharyngeal cavity prior to every feeding pump (250-500-ms duration). In industrial crossflow filtration, oscillating or pulsatile flow increases filtration performance by enhancing the back-migration of particles from the region near the filter surface to the bulk flow region, thus reducing particle accumulation that can clog the filter. In endoscopic videotapes, these pre-pump reversals, as well as post-pump reversals ( approximately 500-ms duration), were observed to lift mucus and particles from the branchial arches for subsequent transport toward the esophagus. Intra-oral flow speeds were reduced markedly after removal of the gill rakers. We hypothesize that the decrease in crossflow speed during feeding pumps following the removal of gill rakers and mucus could be due to increased loss of water between the anterior branchial arches.

  12. Comparison of intraoral radiography and cone-beam computed tomography for the detection of periodontal defects: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagis, Nilsun; Kolsuz, Mehmet Eray; Kursun, Sebnem; Orhan, Kaan

    2015-05-28

    This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit with digital intraoral radiography technique for detecting periodontal defects. The study material comprised 12 dry skulls with maxilla and mandible. Artificial defects (dehiscence, tunnel, and fenestration) were created on anterior, premolar and molar teeth separately using burs. In total 14 dehiscences, 13 fenestrations, eight tunnel and 16 without periodontal defect were used in the study. These were randomly created on dry skulls. Each teeth with and without defects were images at various vertical angles using each of the following modalities: a Planmeca Promax Cone Beam CT and a Digora photostimulable phosphor plates. Specificity and sensitivity for assessing periodontal defects by each radiographic technique were calculated. Chi-square statistics were used to evaluate differences between modalities. Kappa statistics assessed the agreement between observers. Results were considered significant at P < 0.05. The kappa values for inter-observer agreement between observers ranged between 0.78 and 0.96 for the CBCT, and 0.43 and 0.72 of intraoral images. The Kappa values for detecting defects on anterior teeth was the least, following premolar and molar teeth both CBCT and intraoral imaging. CBCT has the highest sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy for detecting various periodontal defects among the radiographic modalities examined.

  13. Endoscope-assisted intraoral removal of the thyroid isthmus mass using a frenotomy incision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seung Hoon

    2013-09-01

    A thyroid isthmus nodule is a relatively rare condition. A small number of patients will present with thyroid mass isolated at the thyroid isthmus, which can cause discomfort in swallowing and cosmetic problems. Thus, some patients choose to have these nodules excised. The surgical removal of the thyroid isthmus mass is usually accomplished through an external incision of the neck. However, this procedure inevitably results in a neck scar. We report a case of an 18-year-old woman with a thyroid isthmus mass. We implemented a modified approach for the removal of the thyroid isthmus mass by using a frenotomy incision of the mouth, accompanied by an endoscope system. A modified approach for the removal of the thyroid isthmus mass was used on the patient. The total operating time was 70 minutes. The patient continues to be free of any diseases 12 months after the excision. Resection of the thyroid isthmus mass can be performed by an intraoral endoscope-assisted approach through a frenotomy incision of the mouth. We described the detailed procedures for an endoscope-assisted transoral thyroid isthmus mass excision using a frenotomy incision.

  14. Intraoral removal of a thyroglossal duct cyst using a frenotomy incision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Pyeong; Park, Jung Je; Lee, Eun Jae; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2011-12-01

    Thyroglossal duct cyst (TGDC) is one of the most common causes of anterior neck swelling close to the midline. Surgical removal of a TGDC is usually accomplished through an external neck incision, including the removal of the middle part of hyoid bone and a block of tissues extending to the foramen cecum. However, this procedure inevitably results in a neck scar. We report the case of a 20-year-old woman with TGDC. We implemented a modified approach to TGDC removal through a frenotomy incision of the mouth using an endoscope system. The patient received a modified approach to TGDC removal. The total operative time was 60 minutes. She remains free of disease 12 months after her surgery. We describe, in a single patient, a procedure in detail for endoscope-assisted transoral TGDC excision using an intraoral frenotomy incision. The advantage of this approach is the avoidance of a neck scar. Our experience with this patient indicates that resection of a TGDC appears to be feasible through a transoral endoscope-assisted approach using a frenotomy incision in the mouth. Further experience with this procedure is required.

  15. Skin Absorbed Doses from Full Mouth Standard Intraoral Radiography in Bisecting Angle and Paralleling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo; Kim, Ae Ji [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Doh, Shi Hong [Dept. of Applied physics . National Fisheries University of Pusan Department of Radiotherapy, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Ja [Dept. of Oral Radiology, Baptist Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Meong Jin [Dept. of Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-08-15

    This study was performed to measure the skin absorbed doses from full mouth standard intraoral radiography(14 exposures) in bisecting angle and paralleling techniques. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used in a phantom. Circular tube collimator (60 mm in diameter, 20 cm in length) and rectangular collimator (35 mm X 44 mm, 40 cm in length) were set for bisecting angle and paralleling techniques respectively. All measurement sites were classified into 8 groups according to distance from each point of central rays. The results were as follows: 1. The skin absorbed doses from the paralleling technique were significantly decreased than those from the bisecting technique in both points at central ray and points away from central ray. The percentage rats of decrease were greater at points away from central ray than those at central ray. 2. The skin absorbed doses at the lens of eye, parotid gland, submandibular gland and thyroid region were significantly decreased in paralleling technique, but those of the midline of palate remained similar in both techniques. 3. The highest doses were measured at the site 20 mm above the point of central ray for the mandibular premolars in bisecting angle technique and at the point of central ray for the mandibular premolars in paralleling techniques. The lowest doses were measured at the thyroid region in both techniques.

  16. Evaluation of X-Ray Protective Measurements in Intraoral Radiography Equipped Centers in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Goodarzi Pour

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: A few decades have past from using radiographic technology as an accurate paraclinical method and always protective measurements is applicated against ionizing radiation. As dentalradiography is a routine procedure in dentistry the importance of protective strategies is clear.Propose: The aim of this descriptive study is to evaluate the protection principles in centers which haveintraoral radiographic devices in Yazd.Material and Methods: We have considered all three aspects of practitioner, environment and patientprotection using questionnaire and visiting those centers.Results: 33/7% of dental offices ,10 clinics ,3 institution and faculty of dentistry had intraoral radiographicequipments. Stablishment of protection principles for radiographer was favorable. 7.7% of centers had x-ray room with leaded walls, 23.1% had curtain , in 69/2% of centers radiographers stood in correct position anddistance while taking radiograph. Regarding to protection of environment, beams leakage control in 23.1% dental offices, 70% of clinics, all institution and faculty of dentistry have done.Conclusion: Non of the centers used rectangular localizator, thyroid shield, film holder and just some centers used leaded apron in specific circumstances. We have concluded that patient protection constitute less consideration. Generally lack of protective consideration is related to deficient knowledge of operators. Lackof information about protection equipments causes decrease of demanding of these tools and ultimately lack of these equipments in the market.

  17. Dental and skeletal changes after intraoral molar distalization with sectional jig assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, S; Kharbanda, O P; Parkash, H

    1998-09-01

    The present study was conducted on 10 subjects to evaluate dental and skeletal changes after intraoral molar distalization. The maxillary molars were distalized with a sectional jig assembly. Sentalloy open coil springs were used to exert 150 gm of force for a period of 12 weeks. A modified Nance appliance was the main source of anchorage. The pre- and postdistalization records included dental study casts, clinical photographs, and cephalograms. A total of 665 readings recorded from lateral cephalograms and dental casts were subjected to statistical analysis. The mean distal movement of the first molar was 2.78 mm, which was highly significant (o < 0.001). It moved distally at the rate of 0.86 mm/month. There was clinically some distal tipping (3.50 degrees) and distopalatal rotation (2.40 degrees). These changes were statistically significant (p < 0.001). The second molars accompanied the first molars and moved distally by nearly the same amount. There was 1.00 mm increase in the overjet and 2.60 degrees mesial tip of second premolar. The changes in the facial skeleton and dentition bases were minimal and statistically not significant. However, there was clockwise rotation of the mandible of 1.30 degrees that was statistically significant. This was the result of molar extrusion (1.60 mm).

  18. An intraoral miniature x-ray tube based on carbon nanotubes for dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Hyun Nam; Raza, Hamid Saeed; Park, Han Beom; Cho, Sung Oh

    2016-01-01

    A miniature X-ray tube based on a carbon-nanotube electron emitter has been employed for the application to a dental radiography. The miniature X-ray tube has an outer diameter of 7 mm and a length of 47 mm. The miniature X-ray tube is operated in a negative high-voltage mode in which the X-ray target is electrically grounded. In addition, X-rays are generated only to the teeth directions using a collimator while X-rays generated to other directions are shielded. Hence, the X-ray tube can be safely inserted into a human mouth. Using the intra-oral X-ray tube, a dental radiography is demonstrated where the positions of an X-ray source and a sensor are reversed compared with a conventional dental radiography system. X-ray images of five neighboring teeth are obtained and, furthermore, both left and right molar images are achieved by a single X-ray shot of the miniature X-ray tube

  19. Evaluation of Honey as a Topical Therapy for Intraoral Wound Healing in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamani, Goli; Zarei, Mohammad Reza; Mehrabani, Mitra; Mehdavinezhad, Ali; Vahabian, Mehrangiz; Ahmadi-Motamayel, Fatemah

    2017-03-01

    Honey is one of the oldest known medicines. Its medical and therapeutic importance has been recently rediscovered. Honey is an effective treatment for infected wounds and ulcers. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of honey as a topical therapy for intraoral wound healing in rats. Thirty-two male rats were divided into experimental and control groups (consisting of 16 rats, 4 animals in each group). A 2-mm mucosal defect was made to the depth of the periosteum using punch biopsy. Honey was applied to the wound every day, and the ulcer size was measured daily. On days 2, 4, 6, and 8, four rats were euthanized from each group (experimental and control groups), and tissues were histopathologically evaluated. Healing processes were studied as follows: the size of ulcer, inflammatory response, reepithelialization, and granulation tissue formation. The mean rank of wound size was significantly reduced in the honey group (2.50), as compared to the control group (6.50). Reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation mean rank were significantly higher in the honey group (6.50) than in the control group (2.50). Inflammation mean rank was statistically lower in the honey group (2.63) compared with the control group (6.38). Honey was shown to have a beneficial effect on the healing of oral ulcers in rats in this model. Further research may shed light on the effects of honey on different types of ulcers in humans.

  20. [Precision of digital impressions with TRIOS under simulated intraoral impression taking conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Sun, Yi-fei; Tian, Lei; Si, Wen-jie; Feng, Hai-lan; Liu, Yi-hong

    2015-02-18

    To evaluate the precision of digital impressions taken under simulated clinical impression taking conditions with TRIOS and to compare with the precision of extraoral digitalizations. Six #14-#17 epoxy resin dentitions with extracted #16 tooth preparations embedded were made. For each artificial dentition, (1)a silicone rubber impression was taken with individual tray, poured with type IV plaster,and digitalized with 3Shape D700 model scanner for 10 times; (2) fastened to a dental simulator, 10 digital impressions for each were taken with 3Shape TRIOS intraoral scanner. To assess the precision, best-fit algorithm and 3D comparison were conducted between repeated scan models pairwise by Geomagic Qualify 12.0, exported as averaged errors (AE) and color-coded diagrams. Non-parametric analysis was performed to compare the precisions of digital impressions and model images. The color-coded diagrams were used to show the deviations distributions. The mean of AE for digital impressions was 7.058 281 μm, which was greater than that of 4.092 363 μm for the model images (Pimpressions were no more than 10 μm, which meant that the consistency between the digital impressions was good. The deviations distribution was uniform in the model images,while nonuniform in the digital impressions with greater deviations lay mainly around the shoulders and interproximal surfaces. Digital impressions with TRIOS are of good precision and up to the clinical standard. Shoulders and interproximal surfaces scanning are more difficult.

  1. Development and functional demonstration of a wireless intraoral inductive tongue computer interface for severely disabled persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N S Andreasen Struijk, Lotte; Lontis, Eugen R; Gaihede, Michael; Caltenco, Hector A; Lund, Morten Enemark; Schioeler, Henrik; Bentsen, Bo

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with tetraplegia depend on alternative interfaces in order to control computers and other electronic equipment. Current interfaces are often limited in the number of available control commands, and may compromise the social identity of an individual due to their undesirable appearance. The purpose of this study was to implement an alternative computer interface, which was fully embedded into the oral cavity and which provided multiple control commands. The development of a wireless, intraoral, inductive tongue computer was described. The interface encompassed a 10-key keypad area and a mouse pad area. This system was embedded wirelessly into the oral cavity of the user. The functionality of the system was demonstrated in two tetraplegic individuals and two able-bodied individuals Results: The system was invisible during use and allowed the user to type on a computer using either the keypad area or the mouse pad. The maximal typing rate was 1.8 s for repetitively typing a correct character with the keypad area and 1.4 s for repetitively typing a correct character with the mouse pad area. The results suggest that this inductive tongue computer interface provides an esthetically acceptable and functionally efficient environmental control for a severely disabled user. Implications for Rehabilitation New Design, Implementation and detection methods for intra oral assistive devices. Demonstration of wireless, powering and encapsulation techniques suitable for intra oral embedment of assistive devices. Demonstration of the functionality of a rechargeable and fully embedded intra oral tongue controlled computer input device.

  2. Sliding window adaptive histogram equalization of intraoral radiographs: effect on image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sund, T; Møystad, A

    2006-05-01

    To investigate whether contrast enhancement by non-interactive, sliding window adaptive histogram equalization (SWAHE) can enhance the image quality of intraoral radiographs in the dental clinic. Three dentists read 22 periapical and 12 bitewing storage phosphor (SP) radiographs. For the periapical readings they graded the quality of the examination with regard to visually locating the root apex. For the bitewing readings they registered all occurrences of approximal caries on a confidence scale. Each reading was first done on an unprocessed radiograph ("single-view"), and then re-done with the image processed with SWAHE displayed beside the unprocessed version ("twin-view"). The processing parameters for SWAHE were the same for all the images. For the periapical examinations, twin-view was judged to raise the image quality for 52% of those cases where the single-view quality was below the maximum. For the bitewing radiographs, there was a change of caries classification (both positive and negative) with twin-view in 19% of the cases, but with only a 3% net increase in the total number of caries registrations. For both examinations interobserver variance was unaffected. Non-interactive SWAHE applied to dental SP radiographs produces a supplemental contrast enhanced image which in twin-view reading improves the image quality of periapical examinations. SWAHE also affects caries diagnosis of bitewing images, and further study using a gold standard is warranted.

  3. Influence of physical parameters on radiation protection and image quality in intra-oral radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinato, W. [Instituto Federal de Ensino Basico, Tecnico e Tecnologico da Bahia, Av. Amazonas, 1350-45030-220, Zabele, Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon s/n, 49100-000 Rosa Elze, Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Souza, D.N., E-mail: divanizi@ufs.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon s/n, 49100-000 Rosa Elze, Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    In the world of diagnostic imaging, radiography is an important supplementary method for dental diagnosis. In radiology, special attention must be paid to the radiological protection of patients and health professionals, and also to image quality for correct diagnosis. In Brazil, the national rules governing the operation of medical and dental radiology were specified in 1998 by the National Sanitary Surveillance Agency, complemented in 2005 by the guide 'Medical radiology: security and performance of equipment.' In this study, quality control tests were performed in public clinics with dental X-ray equipment in the State of Sergipe, Brazil, with consideration of the physical parameters that influence radiological protection and also the quality of images taken in intra-oral radiography. The accuracy of the exposure time was considered acceptable for equipment with digital timers. Exposure times and focal-spot size variations can lead to increased entrance dose. Increased dose has also been associated with visual processing of radiographic film, which often requires repeating the radiographic examination.

  4. Influence of physical parameters on radiation protection and image quality in intra-oral radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinato, W.; Souza, D. N.

    2011-10-01

    In the world of diagnostic imaging, radiography is an important supplementary method for dental diagnosis. In radiology, special attention must be paid to the radiological protection of patients and health professionals, and also to image quality for correct diagnosis. In Brazil, the national rules governing the operation of medical and dental radiology were specified in 1998 by the National Sanitary Surveillance Agency, complemented in 2005 by the guide "Medical radiology: security and performance of equipment." In this study, quality control tests were performed in public clinics with dental X-ray equipment in the State of Sergipe, Brazil, with consideration of the physical parameters that influence radiological protection and also the quality of images taken in intra-oral radiography. The accuracy of the exposure time was considered acceptable for equipment with digital timers. Exposure times and focal-spot size variations can lead to increased entrance dose. Increased dose has also been associated with visual processing of radiographic film, which often requires repeating the radiographic examination.

  5. Influence of physical parameters on radiation protection and image quality in intra-oral radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinato, W.; Souza, D.N.

    2011-01-01

    In the world of diagnostic imaging, radiography is an important supplementary method for dental diagnosis. In radiology, special attention must be paid to the radiological protection of patients and health professionals, and also to image quality for correct diagnosis. In Brazil, the national rules governing the operation of medical and dental radiology were specified in 1998 by the National Sanitary Surveillance Agency, complemented in 2005 by the guide 'Medical radiology: security and performance of equipment.' In this study, quality control tests were performed in public clinics with dental X-ray equipment in the State of Sergipe, Brazil, with consideration of the physical parameters that influence radiological protection and also the quality of images taken in intra-oral radiography. The accuracy of the exposure time was considered acceptable for equipment with digital timers. Exposure times and focal-spot size variations can lead to increased entrance dose. Increased dose has also been associated with visual processing of radiographic film, which often requires repeating the radiographic examination.

  6. Removal of supragingival plaque in an intraoral model by use of the Sonicare toothbrush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, C M; Srikantha, R; Kirchner, H L; Wu, C D

    2000-10-01

    This study was performed to evaluate plaque removal efficacy of a mechanical toothbrush in a controlled in vivo trial. The study used enamel sections, obtained from extracted human teeth, to evaluate the efficacy of supragingival plaque removal by a mechanical powered toothbrush in various modes of use. Enamel sections were positioned in milled depressions on metal extensions of a maxillary partial denture that bilaterally extended along the buccal corridors. Four sections were used per side, positioned zero, 2 or 3mm from the surface of the metal extension. The prosthesis was worn for 16 hours, whereupon four enamel sections (two per side) were removed. Intra-oral brushing was then performed for 5 or 15 seconds on the remaining four sections. The total of adherent bacteria was then assayed from all enamel sections. Ten to twenty trials were performed (n=4 pairs/trial) for each set of variables. When the electric toothbrush was used as a manual brush ('off'), it was equivalent in plaque removal to a conventional toothbrush (Oral-B 35; P = 0.49). However, when the powered brush was in its active mode ('on'), it removed more bacteria (P < 0.0001); this efficacy was observed even when the bristle tips were at a distance from the plaque surface.

  7. Identification of postmenopausal women at risk of osteoporosis using panoramic and intraoral radiographs- a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, A; Panat, S R

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common human bone diseases affecting millions of people, including over one-third of females above the age of 65. Osteoporosis is characterized by decreased bone density and weakened bones. There is evidence that osteoporosis affects the craniofacial and oral structures, although the contribution of osteoporosis in the loss of periodontal attachments, teeth, and height of the residual ridge has not been clearly elucidated. Therefore, the relationship between systemic osteoporosis and oral health is still a complex problem of great interest to a large number of researchers and clinicians. In addition, the dentist could screen patients with unrecognized osteoporosis using information already available in the dental office. The purpose of screening is to identify individuals who are likely to benefit from treatment. The fact that dental radiographs are regularly made on a large fraction of the adult population makes their potential use as a marker of skeletal health an exciting avenue of research. The purpose of this article was to review the use of various intraoral as well as panoramic radiographs to promote early identification of patients at risk for osteoporosis.

  8. Skin Absorbed Doses from Full Mouth Standard Intraoral Radiography in Bisecting Angle and Paralleling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nah, Kyung Soo; Kim, Ae Ji; Doh, Shi Hong; Kim, Hyun Ja; Yoo, Meong Jin

    1990-01-01

    This study was performed to measure the skin absorbed doses from full mouth standard intraoral radiography(14 exposures) in bisecting angle and paralleling techniques. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used in a phantom. Circular tube collimator (60 mm in diameter, 20 cm in length) and rectangular collimator (35 mm X 44 mm, 40 cm in length) were set for bisecting angle and paralleling techniques respectively. All measurement sites were classified into 8 groups according to distance from each point of central rays. The results were as follows: 1. The skin absorbed doses from the paralleling technique were significantly decreased than those from the bisecting technique in both points at central ray and points away from central ray. The percentage rats of decrease were greater at points away from central ray than those at central ray. 2. The skin absorbed doses at the lens of eye, parotid gland, submandibular gland and thyroid region were significantly decreased in paralleling technique, but those of the midline of palate remained similar in both techniques. 3. The highest doses were measured at the site 20 mm above the point of central ray for the mandibular premolars in bisecting angle technique and at the point of central ray for the mandibular premolars in paralleling techniques. The lowest doses were measured at the thyroid region in both techniques.

  9. A directly converting high-resolution intra-oral X-ray imaging sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Spartiotis, K; Schulman, T; Puhakka, K; Muukkonen, K

    2003-01-01

    A digital intra-oral X-ray imaging sensor with an active area of 3.6x2.9 cm sup 2 and consisting of six charge-integrating CMOS signal readout circuits bump bonded to one high-resistivity silicon pixel detector has been developed and tested. The pixel size is 35 mu m. The X-rays entering the sensor window are converted directly to electrical charge in the depleted detector material yielding minimum lateral signal spread and maximum image sharpness. The signal charge is collected on the gates of the input field effect transistors of the CMOS signal readout circuits. The analog signal readout is performed by multiplexing in the current mode independent of the signal charge collection enabling multiple readout cycles with negligible dead time and thus imaging with wide dynamic range. Since no intermediate conversion material of X-rays to visible light is needed, the sensor structure is very compact. The analog image signals are guided from the sensor output through a thin cable to signal processing, AD conversio...

  10. Case Series of an Intraoral Balancing Appliance Therapy on Subjective Symptom Severity and Cervical Spine Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Jun Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a holistic intraoral appliance (OA on cervical spine alignment and subjective symptom severity. Design. An observational study on case series with holistic OA therapy. Setting. An outpatient clinic for holistic temporomandibular joint (TMJ therapy under the supervision of the Pain Center, CHA Biomedical center, CHA University. Subjects. Ambulatory patients presenting with diverse chief complaints in the holistic TMJ clinic. Main Measures. Any immediate change in the curvature of cervical spine and the degree of atlantoaxial rotation was investigated in the images of simple X-ray and computed tomography of cervical spine with or without OA. Changes of subjective symptom severity were also analyzed for the holistic OA therapy cases. Results. A total of 59 cases were reviewed. Alignment of upper cervical spine rotation showed an immediate improvement (. Changes of subjective symptom severity also showed significant improvement (. Conclusion. These cases revealed rudimentary clinical evidence that holistic OA therapy may be related to an alleviated symptom severity and an improved cervical spinal alignment. These results show that further researches may warrant for the holistic TMJ therapy.

  11. Intraoperative Hemorrhage and Postoperative Sequelae after Intraoral Vertical Ramus Osteotomy to Treat Mandibular Prognathism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ming Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the factors affecting intraoperative hemorrhage and postoperative sequelae after orthognathic surgery. Materials and Methods. Eighty patients with mandibular prognathism underwent surgical mandibular setback with intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO. The correlation between the blood loss volume and postoperative VAS with the gender, age, and operating time was assessed using the t-test and Spearman rank correlation coefficient. The correlation between the magnitude of mandibular setback with the presence of TMJ clicking symptoms and lip sensation was also assessed. Results. The mean operating time and blood loss volume for men and women were 249.52 min and 229.39 min, and 104.03 mL and 86.12 mL, respectively. The mean VAS in men and women was 3.21 and 2.93, and 1.79 and 1.32 on the first and second postoperative days. There is no gender difference in the operating time, blood loss, VAS, TMJ symptoms, and lip numbness. The magnitude of mandibular setback was not correlated with immediate and long-term postoperative lip numbness. Conclusion. There are no gender differences in the intraoperative hemorrhage and postoperative sequelae (pain, lip numbness, and TMJ symptoms. In addition, neither symptom was significantly correlated with the amount of mandibular setback.

  12. Optical-Based Sensors for Monitoring Corrosion of Reinforcement Rebar via an Etched Cladding Bragg Grating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Rafiq Mahamd Adikan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the development and testing of an optical-based sensor for monitoring the corrosion of reinforcement rebar. The testing was carried out using an 80% etched-cladding Fibre Bragg grating sensor to monitor the production of corrosion waste in a localized region of the rebar. Progression of corrosion can be sensed by observing the reflected wavelength shift of the FBG sensor. With the presence of corrosion, the etched-FBG reflected spectrum was shifted by 1.0 nm. In addition, with an increase in fringe pattern and continuously, step-like drop in power of the Bragg reflected spectrum was also displayed.

  13. The Effects of Transcutaneous and Intraoral Low-Level Laser Therapy After Extraction of Lower Third Molars: A Randomized Single Blind, Placebo Controlled Dual-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Sevil Altundag; Cetiner, Sedat; Strauss, Robert A

    2017-08-01

    The surgical removal of impacted third molars is one of the most common procedures performed by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The purpose of this study is to determine whether either transcutaneous or intraoral low-level laser therapy (LLLT) reduces postoperative pain and assists in the healing of mandibular third molar extraction. This randomized, placebo controlled, single-blind, split-mouth design study was conducted on 60 patients with full bony impacted similar position mandibular third molars bilaterally. The patients were divided into two groups of 30 each: transcutaneous LLLT and intraoral LLLT and the other side of each group treated with nonactive laser (60 teeth). The laser treatment consisted of administering laser energy immediately before and after the extraction procedure with gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) 830 nm diode lasers. Postoperative pain and healing of the sockets were compared in transcutaneous and intraoral group with placebo for 1 week following the extraction. Descriptive and bivariate statistics was computed, and the p-value was set at 0.05. Intraoral LLLT application resulted in a statistically significant reduction of postoperative pain in comparison with transcutaneous laser group and placebo. The unhealed socket numbers were compared in two groups at seventh day and no differences were observed. The results of this study suggest that single-session intraoral LLLT is more effective than extraoral application for reducing postoperative pain. It was postulated that the differences between skin and mucosa could have effect on the results. Although intraoral use would allow closer application to the surgical site, the size of some laser devices precludes their use intraorally.

  14. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insoluble vs. soluble fiber; Fiber - soluble vs. insoluble ... There are 2 different types of fiber -- soluble and insoluble. Both ... water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. ...

  15. Accuracy of full-arch scans using intraoral and extraoral scanners: an in vitro study using a new method of evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muallah, Jonas; Wesemann, Christian; Nowak, Roxana; Robben, Jan; Mah, James; Pospiech, Peter; Bumann, Axel

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of six intraoral scanners as regards clinically relevant distances using a new method of evaluation. An additional objective was to compare intraoral scanners with the indirect digitization of model scanners. A resin master model was created by 3D printing and drilled in five places to reflect the following distances: intermolar width (IMW), intercanine width (ICW), and arch length (AL). To determine a gold standard, the distances were measured with a coordinate measuring instrument (Zeiss O-Inspect 422). The master model was scanned 37 times with the following intraoral scanners: Apollo DI (Sirona), CS 3500 (Carestream Dental), iTero (Cadent), PlanScan (Planmeca), Trios (3Shape), and True Definition (3M Espe), and indirectly digitized with the OrthoX Scan (Dentaurum). The digital models were then measured, and deviations from the gold standard calculated. Significant differences were found between the devices. Among the intraoral scanners, Trios and iTero showed the most accurate results, although CS 3500, True Definition, and Apollo DI achieved comparable results. PlanScan demonstrated the highest deviations from the gold standard, and presented a high standard deviation (SD). Direct digitization revealed comparable (and, in fact, slightly higher) accuracy than indirect digitization. Both indirect digitization and most of the intraoral scanners were therefore demonstrated to be suitable for use in the orthodontic office, with the exception of PlanScan, which did not meet the demands of individual orthodontic treatment.

  16. Impact of digital intraoral scan strategies on the impression accuracy using the TRIOS Pod scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Philipp; Ender, Andreas; Joda, Tim; Katsoulis, Joannis

    2016-04-01

    Little information is available on the impact of different scan strategies on the accuracy of full-arch scans with intraoral scanners. The aim of this in-vitro study was to investigate the trueness and precision of full-arch maxillary digital impressions comparing three scan strategies. Three scan strategies (A, B, and C) were applied each five times on one single model (A, first buccal surfaces, return from occlusal-palatal; B, first occlusal-palatal, return buccal; C, S-type one-way). The TRIOS Pod scanner (3shape, Copenhagen, Denmark) with a color detector was used for these digital impressions. A cast of a maxillary dentate jaw was fabricated and scanned with an industrial reference scanner. This full-arch data record was digitally superimposed with the test scans (trueness) and within-group comparison was performed for each group (precision). The values within the 90/10 percentiles from the digital superimposition were used for calculation and group comparisons with nonparametric tests (ANOVA, post-hoc Bonferroni). The trueness (mean ± standard deviation) was 17.9 ± 16.4 μm for scan strategy A, 17.1 ± 13.7 μm for B, and 26.8 ± 14.7 μm for C without statistically significant difference. The precision was lowest for scan strategy A (35.0 ± 51.1 μm) and significantly different to B (7.9 ± 5.6 μm) and C (8.5 ± 6.3 μm). Scan strategy B may be recommended as it provides the highest trueness and precision in full-arch scans and therefore minimizes inaccuracies in the final reconstruction.

  17. A novel technique for reference point generation to aid in intraoral scan alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renne, Walter G; Evans, Zachary P; Mennito, Anthony; Ludlow, Mark

    2017-11-12

    When using a completely digital workflow on larger prosthetic cases it is often difficult to communicate to the laboratory or chairside Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing system the provisional prosthetic information. The problem arises when common hard tissue data points are limited or non-existent such as in complete arch cases in which the 3D model of the complete arch provisional restorations must be aligned perfectly with the 3D model of the complete arch preparations. In these instances, soft tissue is not enough to ensure an accurate automatic or manual alignment due to a lack of well-defined reference points. A new technique is proposed for the proper digital alignment of the 3D virtual model of the provisional prosthetic to the 3D virtual model of the prepared teeth in cases where common and coincident hard tissue data points are limited. Clinical considerations: A technique is described in which fiducial composite resin dots are temporarily placed on the intraoral keratinized tissue in strategic locations prior to final impressions. These fiducial dots provide coincident and clear 3D data points that when scanned into a digital impression allow superimposition of the 3D models. Composite resin dots on keratinized tissue were successful at allowing accurate merging of provisional restoration and post-preparation 3D models for the purpose of using the provisional restorations as a guide for final CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Composite resin dots placed temporarily on attached tissue were successful at allowing accurate merging of the provisional restoration 3D models to the preparation 3D models for the purposes of using the provisional restorations as a guide for final restoration design and manufacturing. In this case, they allowed precise superimposition of the 3D models made in the absence of any other hard tissue reference points, resulting in the fabrication of ideal final restorations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Radiografia intraoral e convencional da hemiarcada superior direita de gatos domésticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Nepomuceno

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A proposta com este trabalho foi avaliar a hemiarcada superior direita de gatos domésticos por meio de técnicas radiográficas odontológicas do paralelismo, empregando-se filmes intraorais aos posicionadores de Han Shin. As imagens obtidas por essa metodologia foram correlacionadas com as técnicas radiográficas convencionais (extraorais, com o intuito de se estabelecerem vantagens ou desvantagens para detectar possíveis afecções dentais e periodontais. Foram utilizados 30 gatos, sem raça definida, 17 machos e 13 fêmeas, faixa etária entre um e três anos, confinados em gatis do Departamento de Zootecnia da Universidade Federal de Lavras/MG. Com os animais sob anestesia geral, foram realizadas radiografias da hemiarcada superior direita, incluindo três incisivos, um canino, três pré-molares e um molar em radiografias intraorais e extraorais. As imagens radiográficas foram analisadas e efetuaram-se comparações qualitativas entre pares intraorais e convencionais dos mesmos animais. Para se estabelecer a técnica radiográfica dental mais bem adaptada, foram realizadas análises estatísticas pelo teste de McNemar (qui-quadrado modificado. A técnica intraoral mostrou ser superior à extraoral (P<0,05, para achados referentes a espaço periodontal aumentado, canal radicular amplo e arredondamento de ápice, e também para a avaliação mais bem detalhada de dentes caninos, pré-molares e molares em gatos.

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of 4 intraoral radiographic techniques for misfit detection at the implant abutment joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darós, Pollyana; Carneiro, Vinícius Cavalcanti; Siqueira, Amanda Pasolini; de-Azevedo-Vaz, Sergio Lins

    2017-11-15

    A misfit or gap at the implant-abutment joint (IAJ) requires detection as it may compromise the health of the peri-implant tissue. However, which radiographic technique provides the most orthogonal relationship between the central beam and the implant/image receptor is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 4 intraoral radiographic techniques on misfit detection at the IAJ. Twenty implants were placed in polyamide jaws, and customized dental implant abutments with a metal collar were installed. Different gaps were simulated by placing one or three 50-μm-thick polyester strips at the IAJ; the absence of the strip represented the control group (no gap). The 4 radiographic techniques were evaluated by using different film holders: a periapical with bisecting angle (PBA), a bitewing interproximal (BI), a periapical with standard paralleling (PSP), and a periapical with modified paralleling (PMP) holder (with a custom-made paralleling index). A total of 240 digital radiographs were evaluated by 4 clinicians experienced with dental implants. Differences were evaluated by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves (Az) and Fisher tests (α=.05). Diagnostic values (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values) were also obtained. The Kappa test was used to assess intra- and interevaluator reproducibility, which ranged from moderate to almost perfect. All diagnostic values, except specificity, were lower for the PBA technique for both the 50- and 150-μm gaps. Az values for the PBA technique were significantly lower than those obtained for the other 3 techniques (P<.05), which did not differ from each other. The 150-μm gaps were more easily detected than the 50-μm gaps only for PBA (P<.05). The BI, PSP, and PMP techniques detected misfits at the IAJ most accurately. The PBA technique is not recommended for this purpose. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of

  20. Effect of laser pointer on students\\\\\\' levels of technical errors during intraoral radiographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Shams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: According to concerns of technical errors in intraoral radiographs and reports of positive effects of central ray laser pointer on the students, technical errors and shortcomings of earlier research, this study was conducted at Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology of Tehran Azad University to determine the role and use of laser pointer in the technical error made by students. Materials and Methods: This clinical trials study was carried out at the Department of Radiology, Dental School of Azad Tehran University. A total of eighty students were divided into two groups of forty. In the first group the periapical technique was taught without laser guided indicator, while in the second group laser guided indicator was applied in training the students. All students took X-rays from the phantoms. Laser guided indicator is made of one low power red laser diodes.Totally 560 X-rays were taken and the technical errors and the quality of X-rays were evaluated. Data were analyzed statistically using Mann-Whitney and Chi Square tests (&alpha=0.05. Results: The X-rays taken by students showed significant differences in cone cutting (P<0.001, and overlapping (P<0.001 between the two study groups. In the subjective review of X-ray quality, the difference was also significant (P=0.03. Conclusion: The use of laser guided indicator as a training aid seems to be practical for easier learning of central ray adjustment and reduction of technical errors in taking X-rays by dental students.

  1. Nilai Radiometrik Direct Digital Intraoral Radiography (DDIDR Kualitas Tulang Rahang Mandibula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna H. Bachtiar Iskandar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Complete diagnosis in dentistry needs more detail and accurate quantitative as well as qualitative jawbone trabeculation evaluation. This requires modern diagnostic radiography that in Indonesia are still very limited. One form of the periodontitis that demands more attention and detailed information due to the great efforts to overcome, is Rapidly Progressive Periodontitis, and thus this disease has chosen as a model in this study. The objective of this study to get more detail and accurate radiometric of Direct Digital Intraoral value from grading Conventional value. This method expected to be a model of studies on jawbone quality in dentistry. The healting RPP patients as a subjects of this study. The methods trabeculation density from mandibular DDIR and conventional periapical radiographs of 116 healthy subjects and 41 RPP patients were evaluated and correlated to obtain transformation formula in the form of regression function. This study was performed Clinic of Dental Radiology and Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia function were then used as a method to obtain quantitative data from conventional radiographs available. The results were indicated a significant independent variables were included in the regression function (p<0.05. Therefore even no DDIR equipment available, this transformation enable dentists all over Indonesia with only conventional radiographs available, to obtain more detail quantitative trabeculation density data. The conclusion is apart from getting a methode to transform conventional radiographic data into radiometric data equal to data obtained from DDR that more detail and accurate, this study also provides the normal radiographic trabeculation density value of peron 20 – 40 years as data base for further studies.

  2. Effect of display monitor devices on intra-oral radiographic caries diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kazuyuki; Fujikura, Mamiko; Sano, Tsukasa

    2015-11-01

    Recent developments in digital computer technology have enabled radiological diagnosis to be performed using a monitor screen. In medical radiography, the importance of monitors has been shown in many diseases. Digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM)-compatible monitors are widely used. However, the effect of monitors on the diagnosis of oral disease has not yet been clarified and remains controversial. The aims of this study are to compare the caries diagnostic ability between DICOM monitors and other monitors and to examine if monitor capability affects the diagnosis. One hundred proximal surfaces of 50 extracted human upper premolar teeth were used as specimens. Intra-oral radiographs of all specimens were taken digitally. Three types of monitors were compared in terms of caries diagnostic ability: a DICOM standard-compatible monitor, a standardized personal computer (PC) monitor, and a tablet PC. Six oral radiologists diagnosed each radiograph independently. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were generated and compared. Area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the DICOM monitor, PC monitor, and tablet PC was 0.68147, 0.67002, and 0.60189, respectively. There was no significant difference between the DICOM monitor and the PC monitor, but the tablet PC showed significantly lower accuracy. There were no significant differences among the monitors for dentin caries (p > 0.05). DICOM-compatible monitors and PC monitors have similar capabilities, but tablet PCs showed lower diagnostic accuracy, especially for superficial caries. Appropriate monitors are needed for radiographic diagnosis on monitor screens.

  3. Analysis on the Accuracy of Intraoral Scanners: The Effects of Mandibular Anterior Interdental Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-hye Chun

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the effects of mandibular anterior interdental space on the accuracy of intraoral scanners. Four models of mandibular arch with varying distances of anterior interdental space were analyzed; incisors were evenly spaced out between the two canines by 0 mm, 1 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm. The full arch of each model was scanned 10 times with iTero® and Trios®. The images were superimposed with those from the reference scanner (Sensable S3 and compared using Geomagic Verify. Statistical analysis was conducted using a t-test, paired t-test, and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Differences in the accuracy of images were statistically significant according to both iTero® and Trios®; a greater deviation was noted with increasing anterior interdental space (p < 0.05. Upon dividing the lower arch into five sections, larger deviation was observed with iTero® in the molar area, except in the model with 1 mm space. With Trios®, the largest deviation was observed in the right molar area in all models. The maximum deviations of intermolar width were 0.66 mm and 0.76 mm in iTero® and Trios®, respectively. This comparison suggests that Trios® demonstrates a higher accuracy than iTero® in all models and in all sections of the arch. However, the mean deviations indicate that both iTero® and Trios® are clinically acceptable.

  4. Effective professional intraoral tooth brushing instruction using the modified plaque score: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se-Ho; Cho, Sung-Hee; Han, Ji-Young

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the modified plaque score (MPS) for assessing the oral hygiene status of periodontitis patients. A total of 116 patients were included in this study. After evaluation of the Löe and Silness gingival index (GI), Silness and Löe plaque index (PlI), O'Leary plaque control record (PCR), and MPS, patients were randomly assigned to either a conventional tooth brushing instruction (C-TBI) group (n=56) or a professional intraoral tooth brushing instruction (P-TBI) group (n=60). The MPS and clinical parameters were re-evaluated after scaling and a series of root planing. The convergent validity of MPS with the PlI and PCR was assessed. The measurement time for MPS and PCR was compared according to the proficiency of the examiner. After root planing, the GI, PlI, PCR, and MPS improved from their respective baseline values in both groups. Three different plaque indices including the MPS, showed significant differences between the C-TBI group and the P-TBI group after root planing. The MPS showed significant concurrence with the PCR and PlI. The mean time for PCR measurement was 2.76±0.71 times longer than that for MPS measurement after 2 weeks of training. MPS seems to be a practical plaque scoring system compared with the PlI and PCR. These findings suggest that repetitive plaque control combined with an easily applicable plaque index (MPS) may facilitate more effective oral hygiene education and improved periodontal health.

  5. The effect of rare-earth filtration on organ doses in intraoral radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asako, Satoshi; Satoh, Kenji; Furumoto, Keiichi (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-08-01

    Filters of rare-earth elements such as lanthanum (La, Z=57), samarium (Sm, Z=62), gadolinium (Gd, Z=64) and erbium (Er, Z=68) are frequently used in radiography for the purpose of reducing the patient dose by eliminating low-energy and high-energy X-rays which are not involved in imaging. It is useful to evaluate the dose reduction achieved by these rare-earth filters in terms of organ dose, and the effective dose equivalent, which is used for evaluating carcinogenic risks and hereditary effects of X-ray irradiation, for the purpose of optimizing the radiographic technique and radiation protection. Therefore, we calculated the organ dose and effective dose equivalent during intraoral radiography of the maxillary incisor region by simulation using samarium or erbium, typical rare-earth elements, in filtration. We evaluated the effects of these metals in dose reduction. When samarium or erbium, 0.1 mm thick, was used in added filtration at tube voltage of 60, 70, 80 and 90 kV, the time required for radiography almost doubled, respectively. The organ dose at each tube voltage was the largest in the parathyroid and thyroid glands, followed by bone surfaces and the optic lenses, skin, red bone marrow and salivary glands, larynx, and brain, in that order. The organ dose at sites other than the larynx and brain decreased as the quality of the incident X-ray beam was hardened. When samarium or erbium was added at each voltage, the effective dose equivalent was reduced by about 20% to 45%. Erbium was more effective than samarium in reducing the effective dose equivalent, and either of the two elements decreased its effectiveness with an increase in tube voltage. (author) 43 refs.

  6. Optimum image compression rate maintaining diagnostic image quality of digital intraoral radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ju Seop; Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Institute of Oral Bio Science, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The aims of the present study are to determine the optimum compression rate in terms of file size reduction and diagnostic quality of the images after compression and evaluate the transmission speed of original or each compressed images. The material consisted of 24 extracted human premolars and molars. The occlusal surfaces and proximal surfaces of the teeth had a clinical disease spectrum that ranged from sound to varying degrees of fissure discoloration and cavitation. The images from Digora system were exported in TIFF and the images from conventional intraoral film were scanned and digitalized in TIFF by Nikon SF-200 scanner(Nikon, Japan). And six compression factors were chosen and applied on the basis of the results from a pilot study. The total number of images to be assessed were 336. Three radiologists assessed the occlusal and proximal surfaces of the teeth with 5-rank scale. Finally diagnosed as either sound or carious lesion by one expert oral pathologist. And sensitivity and specificity and kappa value for diagnostic agreement was calculated. Also the area (Az) values under the ROC curve were calculated and paired t-test and oneway ANOVA test was performed. Thereafter, transmission time of the image files of the each compression level were compared with that of the original image files. No significant difference was found between original and the corresponding images up to 7% (1:14) compression ratio for both the occlusal and proximal caries (p<0.05). JPEG3 (1:14) image files are transmitted fast more than 10 times, maintained diagnostic information in image, compared with original image files. 1:14 compressed image file may be used instead of the original image and reduce storage needs and transmission time.

  7. Intraoral laser welding: ultrastructural and mechanical analysis to compare laboratory laser and dental laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Passaretti, Francesca; Villa, Elena; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Merigo, Elisabetta; Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco; Manfredi, Maddalena; Nammour, Samir

    2011-07-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been used since 1970 in dental laboratories to weld metals on dental prostheses. Recently in several clinical cases, we have suggested that the Nd:YAG laser device commonly utilized in the dental office could be used to repair broken fixed, removable and orthodontic prostheses and to weld metals directly in the mouth. The aim of this work was to evaluate, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), the quality of the weld and its mechanical strength, comparing a device normally used in dental laboratory and a device normally used in the dental office for oral surgery, the same as that described for intraoral welding. Metal plates of a Co-Cr-Mo dental alloy and steel orthodontic wires were subjected to four welding procedures: welding without filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding with filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding without filler metal using the office laser, and welding with filler metal using the office laser. The welded materials were then analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA. SEM analysis did not show significant differences between the samples although the plates welded using the office laser without filler metal showed a greater number of fissures than the other samples. EDS microanalysis of the welding zone showed a homogeneous composition of the metals. Mechanical tests showed similar elastic behaviours of the samples, with minimal differences between the samples welded with the two devices. No wire broke even under the maximum force applied by the analyser. This study seems to demonstrate that the welds produced using the office Nd:YAG laser device and the laboratory Nd:YAG laser device, as analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA, showed minimal and nonsignificant differences, although these findings need to be confirmed using a greater number of samples.

  8. A wireless magnetoresistive sensing system for an intraoral tongue-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hangue; Kiani, Mehdi; Lee, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jeonghee; Block, Jacob; Gosselin, Benoit; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2012-12-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a tongue-operated, minimally invasive, unobtrusive, and wireless assistive technology (AT) that infers users' intentions by detecting their voluntary tongue motion and translating them into user-defined commands. Here we present the new intraoral version of the TDS (iTDS), which has been implemented in the form of a dental retainer. The iTDS system-on-a-chip (SoC) features a configurable analog front-end (AFE) that reads the magnetic field variations inside the mouth from four 3-axial magnetoresistive sensors located at four corners of the iTDS printed circuit board (PCB). A dual-band transmitter (Tx) on the same chip operates at 27 and 432 MHz in the Industrial/Scientific/Medical (ISM) band to allow users to switch in the presence of external interference. The Tx streams the digitized samples to a custom-designed TDS universal interface, built from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components, which delivers the iTDS data to other devices such as smartphones, personal computers (PC), and powered wheelchairs (PWC). Another key block on the iTDS SoC is the power management integrated circuit (PMIC), which provides individually regulated and duty-cycled 1.8 V supplies for sensors, AFE, Tx, and digital control blocks. The PMIC also charges a 50 mAh Li-ion battery with constant current up to 4.2 V, and recovers data and clock to update its configuration register through a 13.56 MHz inductive link. The iTDS SoC has been implemented in a 0.5-μm standard CMOS process and consumes 3.7 mW on average.

  9. An estimation of the percentage of dose in intraoral radiology exams using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonzoumet, S.P.J.; Braz, D.; Lopes, R.T.; Anjos, M.J.; Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro; Padilha, Lucas

    2005-01-01

    In this work we used the EGS4 code in a simulated study of dose percentage in intraoral examination to 10 energy range to 140 keV. The simulation was carried out on a model consisting of different geometry (cheek, tooth and mouth cavity) under normal incidence X-ray beam over the surface of the various simulated materials. It was observed that for energy smaller than 30 keV most of the energy is deposited on the cheek. In 30 keV there is a point of maximum radiation absorption in the tooth (approximately 60% of the energy of the incident radiation is deposited on the tooth) in relation to other simulated materials. It means that in this energy there is a better contrast in the radiographic image of the tooth and a smaller dose on the cheek. In 40 keV the deposited energy in the tooth is roughly equal to the energy that is transmitted (to the radiographic film or buccal cavity) causing a degradation in the radiographic image and/or a higher dose in the oral cavity. For energies above 40 keV, the amount of energy transmitted (to the oral cavity and/or radiographic film) is higher than the energy deposited in other materials, i.e, it only contributes to increasing of dose in the regions close to the oral cavity and the radiographic image degradation. These results can provide important information for radiological procedures applied in dentistry where the image quality is a relevant factor to a dental evaluation needs as well as reducing dose in the oral cavity.

  10. A Wireless Magnetoresistive Sensing System for an Intraoral Tongue-Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hangue; Kiani, Mehdi; Lee, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jeonghee; Block, Jacob; Gosselin, Benoit; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a tongue-operated, minimally invasive, unobtrusive, and wireless assistive technology (AT) that infers users’ intentions by detecting their voluntary tongue motion and translating them into user-defined commands. Here we present the new intraoral version of the TDS (iTDS), which has been implemented in the form of a dental retainer. The iTDS system-on-a-chip (SoC) features a configurable analog front-end (AFE) that reads the magnetic field variations inside the mouth from four 3-axial magnetoresistive sensors located at four corners of the iTDS printed circuit board (PCB). A dual-band transmitter (Tx) on the same chip operates at 27 and 432 MHz in the Industrial/Scientific/Medical (ISM) band to allow users to switch in the presence of external interference. The Tx streams the digitized samples to a custom-designed TDS universal interface, built from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components, which delivers the iTDS data to other devices such as smartphones, personal computers (PC), and powered wheelchairs (PWC). Another key block on the iTDS SoC is the power management integrated circuit (PMIC), which provides individually regulated and duty-cycled 1.8 V supplies for sensors, AFE, Tx, and digital control blocks. The PMIC also charges a 50 mAh Li-ion battery with constant current up to 4.2 V, and recovers data and clock to update its configuration register through a 13.56 MHz inductive link. The iTDS SoC has been implemented in a 0.5-μm standard CMOS process and consumes 3.7 mW on average. PMID:23853258

  11. Photonic crystal fibers -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2002-01-01

    During this ph.d. work, attention has been focused on understanding and analyzing the modal behavior of micro-structured fibers. Micro-structured fibers are fibers with a complex dielectric toplogy, and offer a number of novel possibilities, compared to standard silica based optical fibers......, and nonlinear fibers with zero dispersion wavelength well below 1300 nm. This thesis dexcribes the functionalities of these fibers, and further point to novel application areas, such as new efficient fiber amplifiers and fibers with new possibilities within dispersion management. When pointing toward novel...

  12. Evaluation of Aerogel Clad Optical Fibers Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1448-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitland, Duncan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Droege, M. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    Fiber-optic based sensors will be needed for in situ monitoring of degradation products in various components of nuclear weapons. These sensors typically consist of a transducer located at the measurement site whose optical properties are modulated by interaction with the targeted degradation product. The interrogating light source and the detector for determining sensor response are located remotely. These two subsystems are connected by fiber optic cables. LLNL has developed a new technology, aerogel clad optical fibers, that have the advantage of accepting incident rays over a much wider angular range than normal glass clad fibers. These fibers are also capable of transmitting light more efficiently. These advantages can lead to a factor of 2-4 improvement in sensitivity and detection limit.

  13. Trueness and precision of digital impressions obtained using an intraoral scanner with different head size in the partially edentulous mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Hironari; Fueki, Kenji; Wadachi, Juro; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2018-03-01

    It remains unclear whether digital impressions obtained using an intraoral scanner are sufficiently accurate for use in fabrication of removable partial dentures. We therefore compared the trueness and precision between conventional and digital impressions in the partially edentulous mandible. Mandibular Kennedy Class I and III models with soft silicone simulated-mucosa placed on the residual edentulous ridge were used. The reference models were converted to standard triangulated language (STL) file format using an extraoral scanner. Digital impressions were obtained using an intraoral scanner with a large or small scanning head, and converted to STL files. For conventional impressions, pressure impressions of the reference models were made and working casts fabricated using modified dental stone; these were converted to STL file format using an extraoral scanner. Conversion to STL file format was performed 5 times for each method. Trueness and precision were evaluated by deviation analysis using three-dimensional image processing software. Digital impressions had superior trueness (54-108μm), but inferior precision (100-121μm) compared to conventional impressions (trueness 122-157μm, precision 52-119μm). The larger intraoral scanning head showed better trueness and precision than the smaller head, and on average required fewer scanned images of digital impressions than the smaller head (pimpressions. Digital impressions are partially comparable to conventional impressions in terms of accuracy; the use of a larger scanning head may improve the accuracy for removable partial denture fabrication. Copyright © 2018 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurement of scattered and transmitted X-rays from intra-oral and panoramic dental X-ray equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, John Richard

    2018-04-10

    To quantify the levels of transmitted radiation arising from the use of intra-oral dental X-ray equipment and scattered radiation arising from the use of both intra-oral and panoramic X-ray equipment. Methods: Levels of scattered radiation were measured at 1 m from a phantom, using an 1800 cc ion chamber. Transmitted radiation was measured using both: i) a phantom and Dose Area Product (DAP) meter, ii) a patient and an 1800 cc ion chamber. Results: For intra-oral radiography the patient study gave a maximum transmission of 1.80% (range 0.04% to 1.80%, mean 0.26%) and the phantom study gave a maximum transmission of 6% (range 2% to 6%, mean 5%). The maximum scattered radiation, per unit DAP, was 5.5 nGy (mGy cm2)-1 at 70 kVp and a distance of 1 m. For panoramic radiography the maximum scattered radiation was 9.3 nGy (mGy cm2)-1 at 80 kVp and a distance of 1 m. Conclusions: Typical doses from scattered and transmitted radiation in modern dental practice have been measured and values are presented to enable the calculation of adequate protection measures for dental radiography rooms. Advances in knowledge: Previous studies have used a phantom and measured radiation doses at 1 m from the phantom to determine the radiation dose transmitted through a patient, whereas this study uses both patient and phantom measurements together with a large area dose meter, positioned to capture the entire X-ray beam, to ensure more realistic dose measurements can be made. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  15. Influence of conventional and digital intraoral impressions on the fit of CAD/CAM-fabricated all-ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrendero, S; Salido, M P; Valverde, A; Ferreiroa, A; Pradíes, G

    2016-12-01

    To compare the fit of all-ceramic crowns fabricated from conventional silicone impressions with the fit of all-ceramic crowns fabricated from intraoral digital impressions. Thirty patients with 30 posterior teeth with a prosthetic demand were selected. Zirconia-based ceramic crowns were made using an intraoral digital impression system (Ultrafast Optical Sectioning technology) (digital group, D) and 2-step silicone impression technique (conventional group, C). To replicate the interface between the crown and the preparation, each crown was cemented on its corresponding clinical preparation using ultra-flow silicone. Each crown was embedded in resin to stabilize the registered interface. Specimens were sectioned in buccolingual orientation, and internal misfit was measured at different areas using stereomicroscopy (×40). Data was analysed using Student's t test and Mann-Whitney test (α = 0.05). No statistically significant differences were found (P > 0.05) between two groups. The mean internal misfit and mean marginal misfit were 170.9 μm (SD = 119.4)/106.6 μm (SD = 69.6) for group D and 185.4 μm (SD = 112.1)/119.9 μm (SD = 59.9) for group C. Ceramic crowns fabricated using an intraoral scanner are comparable to elastomer conventional impressions in terms of their marginal and internal fits. The mean marginal fit in both groups was within the limits of clinical acceptability. Impressions based on Ultrafast Optical Sectioning technology can be used for manufacturing ceramic crowns in a normal workflow, with the same results as silicone conventional impressions.

  16. Immediate loading of the edentulous maxilla with a definitive restoration supported by an intraorally welded titanium bar and tilted implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degidi, Marco; Nardi, Diego; Piattelli, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the concept of intraoral welding as a suitable technique for the fabrication of a restoration for the edentulous atrophic maxilla on the day of placement of axial and tilted implants. Thirty patients received three axial and four tilted implants in the edentulous maxilla. Immediately after implant placement, definitive abutments were connected to the implants and then a titanium bar was welded to them using an intraoral welding unit. This framework was used as a support for the definitive restoration, which was attached on the day of implant placement. Mean marginal bone loss and radiographically detectable alteration of the welded framework were assessed using periapical radiographs immediately after surgery and at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months after placement. Sixteen men and 14 women with an average age of 58.1 years (SD 13.6) were consecutively treated with 210 immediately loaded implants. No fractures or radiographically detectable alterations of the welded frameworks were evident. A 100% prosthetic success rate was seen at 36 months. Three (1.4%) implants had serious biologic complications, resulting in success rates of 97.8% for axial implants and 99.2% for tilted implants. The accumulated mean marginal bone loss was 0.92 mm (SD 0.75; n = 90) for axial implants and 1.03 mm (SD 0.69; n = 120) for tilted implants. The average pocket probing depths were 1.87 mm (SD 0.98; n = 90) for the axial implants and 1.95 mm (SD 0.81; n = 120) for the tilted implants. It is possible on the day of implant placement surgery to successfully rehabilitate the edentulous atrophic maxilla with a fixed, definitive restoration supported by an intraorally welded titanium framework attached to axial and tilted implants.

  17. Clinical marginal fit of zirconia crowns and patients' preferences for impression techniques using intraoral digital scanner versus polyvinyl siloxane material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakornwimon, Nawapat; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2017-09-01

    The use of digital intraoral scanners is increasing; however, evidence of its precision in making crown impressions clinically remains scarce. Patients should also feel more comfortable with digital impressions, but only a few studies evaluating this subject have been performed. The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the marginal fit of monolithic zirconia crowns and patients' preferences for digital impressions versus polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions. Sixteen participants with indications for single molar crowns were included. After crown preparation, digital impressions by intraoral scanner and PVS impressions were made. The participants were asked to complete a 6-item questionnaire with a visual analog scale related to perceptions of each of the following topics: time involved, taste/smell, occlusal registration, size of impression tray/scanner, gag reflex, and overall preference. Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing monolithic zirconia crowns were fabricated from both impressions. The crowns were evaluated intraorally, and a blinded examiner measured the marginal discrepancy of silicone replicas under a stereomicroscope. Intraexaminer reliability was evaluated by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient. Data for patients' preferences and marginal discrepancies were analyzed using the paired t test (α=.05). Visual analog scale scores for digital impressions were statistically significantly higher than those for PVS impressions in every topic (Pdigital group on all sides (P>.05). No differences were found in the clinical marginal fit of zirconia crowns fabricated from either digital impressions compared with PVS impressions. Furthermore, patients' satisfaction with digital impressions was significantly higher than with conventional impressions. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A review of potential uses for fiber optic sensors in nuclear power plants, with attendant benefits in plant safety and operational efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, D.E.; Antonescu, C.

    1994-01-01

    Fiber optic-based sensing has a wide range of potential applications in nuclear power plants, and a fiber optic analog presently exists for virtually every conventional nuclear power plant sensing system. Fiber optic-based sensors are likely to eventually supplant many conventional sensors because of their inherent advantages-reduced mass, reduced size, ruggedness to vibration and shock, physical flexibility, high sensitivity, electrical isolation, extreme resistance to electromagnetic interference, high temperature resistance, reduced calibration requirements, passive operation, and high radiation resistance. In addition, fiber optic-based sensors exist which are capable of measuring parameters important to safety and performance which cannot be conventionally measured (high electromagnetic field, in-core, and distributed measurements). However, fiber optic sensors remain at too low a level of development for immediate application in safety-critical systems. Moreover, fiber optic sensors have different failure modes and mechanisms than conventional sensors; hence, considerable regulatory research will be necessary to establish the technical basis for the use of fiber optic sensors in safety-critical systems

  19. Use of PID and Iterative Learning Controls on Improving Intra-Oral Hydraulic Loading System of Dental Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Cheng; Chan, Manuel; Hsin, Yi-Ping; Ko, Ching-Chang

    This study presents the control design and tests of an intra-oral hydraulic system for quantitatively loading of a dental implant. The computer-controlled system was developed and employed for better pressure error compensation by PID (proportional-integral-derivative) control and point-to-point iterative learning algorithm. In vitro experiments showed that implant loading is precisely controlled (error 3%) for 0.5Hz loading without air inclusion, and reasonably performed (errorimplant loading. Quantitative information derived from this biomechanical model will add to improved designs of dental implants.

  20. Evaluation of the accuracy and precision of four intraoral scanners with 70% reduced inlay and four-unit bridge models of international standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Soo-Hyuk; Kim, Jae-Hong; Jiang, Heng Bo; Woo, Chang-Woo; Chang, Minho; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Bae, Ji-Myung; Oh, Seunghan

    2017-01-31

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of 70% reduced inlay and 4-unit bridge models of International Standard (ISO 12836) assessing the accuracy of laboratory scanners to measure the accuracy of intraoral scanner. Four intraoral scanners (CS3500, Trios, Omnicam, and Bluecam) and one laboratory scanner (Ceramill MAP400) were used in this study. The height, depth, length, and angle of the models were measured from thirty scanned stereolithography (STL) images. There were no statistically significant mean deviations in distance accuracy and precision values of scanned images, except the angulation values of the inlay and 4-unit bridge models. The relative errors of inlay model and 4-unit bridge models quantifying the accuracy and precision of obtained mean deviations were less than 0.023 and 0.021, respectively. Thus, inlay and 4-unit bridge models suggested by this study is expected to be feasible tools for testing intraoral scanners.

  1. Using Intraoral Scanning Technology for Three-Dimensional Printing of Kennedy Class I Removable Partial Denture Metal Framework: A Clinical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Feng; Pei, Zhenhua; Wen, Ying

    2017-11-16

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are used to restore missing teeth and are traditionally fabricated using the lost-wax casting technique. The casting process is arduous, time-consuming, and requires a skilled technician. The development of intraoral scanning and 3D printing technology has made rapid prototyping of the RPD more achievable. This article reports a completed case of direct fabrication of a maxillary RPD metal framework (Kennedy Class I) using intraoral scanning and 3D printing techniques. Acceptable fit and satisfactory clinical outcome were demonstrated. Intraoral scanning and 3D printing for fabrication of the RPD metal framework is a useful alternative to conventional impression and casting techniques, especially for patients suffering from nasal obstruction or intolerance. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. Visual stimulus presentation using fiber optics in the MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruey-Song; Sereno, Martin I

    2008-03-30

    Imaging the neural basis of visuomotor actions using fMRI is a topic of increasing interest in the field of cognitive neuroscience. One challenge is to present realistic three-dimensional (3-D) stimuli in the subject's peripersonal space inside the MRI scanner. The stimulus generating apparatus must be compatible with strong magnetic fields and must not interfere with image acquisition. Virtual 3-D stimuli can be generated with a stereo image pair projected onto screens or via binocular goggles. Here, we describe designs and implementations for automatically presenting physical 3-D stimuli (point-light targets) in peripersonal and near-face space using fiber optics in the MRI scanner. The feasibility of fiber-optic based displays was demonstrated in two experiments. The first presented a point-light array along a slanted surface near the body, and the second presented multiple point-light targets around the face. Stimuli were presented using phase-encoded paradigms in both experiments. The results suggest that fiber-optic based displays can be a complementary approach for visual stimulus presentation in the MRI scanner.

  3. Hard X-ray nanofocusing using adaptive focusing optics based on piezoelectric deformable mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takumi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Kimura, Takashi; Sano, Yasuhisa; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Tamasaku, Kenji; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Matsuyama, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    An adaptive Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror focusing optics based on piezoelectric deformable mirrors was constructed at SPring-8 and its focusing performance characteristics were demonstrated. By adjusting the voltages applied to the deformable mirrors, the shape errors (compared to a target elliptical shape) were finely corrected on the basis of the mirror shape determined using the pencil-beam method, which is a type of at-wavelength figure metrology in the X-ray region. The mirror shapes were controlled with a peak-to-valley height accuracy of 2.5 nm. A focused beam with an intensity profile having a full width at half maximum of 110 × 65 nm (V × H) was achieved at an X-ray energy of 10 keV.

  4. Photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Hansen, K P; Nielsen, M D

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers having a complex microstructure in the transverse plane constitute a new and promising class of optical fibers. Such fibers can either guide light through total internal reflection or the photonic bandgap effect, In this paper, we review the different types and applications...... of photonic crystal fibers with particular emphasis on recent advances in the field....

  5. High-fiber foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other dried fruits Grains Grains are another important source of dietary fiber. Eat more: Hot cereals, such as oatmeal and ... wheat Whole-wheat pastas Bran muffins Alternative Names Dietary fiber - self-care; Constipation - fiber Images Sources of fiber References Dahl WJ, Stewart ML. Position ...

  6. Generation of multiple VUV dispersive waves using a tapered gas-filled hollow-core anti-resonant fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habib, Md Selim; Markos, Christos; Bang, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Hollow-core anti-resonant (HC-AR) fibers are perhaps the best platform for ultrafast nonlinear optics based on light-gas interactions because they offer broadband guidance and low-loss guidance. The main advantage of using gases inside HC fibers is that both the dispersion and nonlinearity can...... be tuned by simply changing the pressure of the gas [1]. The emission of efficient dispersive wave (DW) in the deep-UV has been already observed in a uniform Ar-filled hollow-core fiber with tunability from 200 to 320 nm by changing the gas pressure and pulse energy [2]. In the quest of optimizing...

  7. Fiber optic connector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajic, Slobodan; Muhs, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled.

  8. Accuracy of digital implant impressions with intraoral scanners. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkūnas, Vygandas; Gečiauskaitė, Agnė; Jegelevičius, Darius; Vaitiekūnas, Mantas

    The use of intraoral scanners (IOS) for making digital implant impressions is increasing. However, there is a lack of evidence on the accuracy of IOS compared with conventional techniques. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to collect evidence on the accuracy of digital implant impression techniques, as well as to identify the main factors influencing the accuracy outcomes. Two reviewers searched electronic databases in November, 2016. Controlled vocabulary, free-text terms, and defined inclusion and exclusion criteria were used. Publications in English language evaluating the accuracy outcomes of digital implant impressions were identified. Pooled data were analysed qualitatively and pertinent data extracted. In total, 16 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria: one in vivo and 15 in vitro studies. The clinical study concluded that angular and distance errors were too large to be acceptable clinically. Less accurate findings were reported by several in vitro studies as well. However, all in vitro studies investigating the accuracy of newer generation IOS indicated equal or even better results compared with the conventional techniques. Data related to the influence of distance and angulation between implants, depth of placement, type of scanner, scanning strategy, characteristics of scanbody and reference scanner, operator experience, etc were analysed and summarised. Linear deviations (means) of IOS used in in vitro studies ranged from 6 to 337 µm. Recent studies indicated small angle deviations (0.07-0.3°) with digital impressions. Some studies reported that digital implant impression accuracy was influenced by implant angulation, distance between the implants, implant placement depth and operator experience. According to the results of this systematic review and based on mainly in vitro studies, digital implant impressions offer a valid alternative to conventional impressions for single- and multi-unit implant-supported restorations. Further in

  9. Signal loss in magnetic resonance imaging caused by intraoral anchored dental magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenstein, F.H.; Naumann, M.; Truong, B.; Thomas, A.; Schroeder, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: to measure the maximum extent of the signal loss areas in the center of the susceptibility artifacts generated by ferromagnetic dental magnet attachments using three different sequences in the 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI. Materials and methods: five different pieces of standard dental magnet attachments with volumes of 6.5 to 31.4 mm 3 were used: a NdFeB magnet with an open magnetic field, a NdFeB magnet with a closed magnetic field, a SmCo magnet with an open magnetic field, a stainless steel keeper (AUM-20) and a PdCo piece. The attachments were placed between two cylindrical phantoms and examined in 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI using gradient echo and T1- and T2-weighted spin echoes. We measured the maximum extent of the generated signal loss areas parallel and perpendicular to the direction of B O . Results: in gradient echoes the artifacts were substantially larger and symmetrically adjusted around the object. The areas with total signal loss were mushroom-like with a maximum extent of 7.4 to 9.7 cm parallel to the direction of B O and 6.7 to 7.4 cm perpendicular to B O . In spin echoes the signal loss areas were obviously smaller, but not centered. The maximum values ranged between 4.9 and 7.2 cm (parallel B O ) and 3.6 and 7.0 cm (perpendicular B O ). The different ferromagnetic attachments had no clinically relevant influence on the signal loss neither in 1.5 T nor 3.0 T MRI. Conclusions: ferromagnetic materials used in dentistry are not intraorally standardized. To ensure, that the area of interest is not affected by the described artifacts, the maximum extent of the signal loss area should be assumed: a radius of up to 7 cm in 1.5 and 3.0 T MRI by T1 and T2 sequences, and a radius of up to 10 cm in T2* sequences. To decide whether magnet attachments have to be removed before MR imaging, physicians should consider both the intact retention of the keepers and the safety distance between the ferromagnetic objects and the area of interest. (orig.)

  10. [Signal loss in magnetic resonance imaging caused by intraoral anchored dental magnetic materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenstein, F H; Truong, B; Thomas, A; Schröder, R J; Naumann, M

    2006-08-01

    To measure the maximum extent of the signal loss areas in the center of the susceptibility artifacts generated by ferromagnetic dental magnet attachments using three different sequences in the 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI. Five different pieces of standard dental magnet attachments with volumes of 6.5 to 31.4 mm(3) were used: a NdFeB magnet with an open magnetic field, a NdFeB magnet with a closed magnetic field, a SmCo magnet with an open magnetic field, a stainless steel keeper (AUM-20) and a PdCo piece. The attachments were placed between two cylindrical phantoms and examined in 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI using gradient echo and T1- and T2-weighted spin echoes. We measured the maximum extent of the generated signal loss areas parallel and perpendicular to the direction of B (O). In gradient echoes the artifacts were substantially larger and symmetrically adjusted around the object. The areas with total signal loss were mushroom-like with a maximum extent of 7.4 to 9.7 cm parallel to the direction of B (O) and 6.7 to 7.4 cm perpendicular to B (O). In spin echoes the signal loss areas were obviously smaller, but not centered. The maximum values ranged between 4.9 and 7.2 cm (parallel B (O)) and 3.6 and 7.0 cm (perpendicular B (O)). The different ferromagnetic attachments had no clinically relevant influence on the signal loss neither in 1.5 T nor 3.0 T MRI. Ferromagnetic materials used in dentistry are not intraorally standardized. To ensure, that the area of interest is not affected by the described artifacts, the maximum extent of the signal loss area should be assumed: a radius of up to 7 cm in 1.5 and 3.0 T MRI by T1 and T2 sequences, and a radius of up to 10 cm in T2* sequences. To decide whether magnet attachments have to be removed before MR imaging, physicians should consider both the intact retention of the keepers and the safety distance between the ferromagnetic objects and the area of interest.

  11. Spatial relation between a rigid (digital) intraoral X-ray receptor and longitudinal axes of maxillary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, Felix; von Rechenberg, Isabell; d'Hoedt, Bernd; Schulze, Ralf

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the existing (inevitable) angle which in intraoral radiology appears between tooth length axis and receptor caused by the anatomical situation. Especially in the upper jaw, due to its arched anatomy, a true "paralleling technique" is not achievable. The angulation necessarily causes distortion and a foreshortening of the image; hence, the foreshortened image leads to misinterpretations in diagnostics. We investigated the effects of the realistic angulation on these image deteriorating factors. Two hundred ninety-four plaster models of the upper jaw were collected, and the angles between a dummy receptor and the axes of the central incisor or the first molar were measured. For evaluation, a rigid dummy of an intraoral charge-coupled device (CCD) receptor (30 mm × 40 mm) was used. The mean angulation evaluated for central incisors was 36.7° (range 19-56°) and for first molars 42.5° (range 26-56°). This leads to a foreshortening of the tooth ranging from 5.4% to 44.1% in the image, when magnification is neglected. Large angles of up to 56°, in both incisor and molar region, result in a relevant underestimation of true tooth length up to 44%. It is important to note that this error cannot be simply corrected by means of local magnification correction. Techniques should be developed that allow for automated assessment of the effective angle to provide information for distortion correction.

  12. Efficacy of lead foil for reducing doses in the head and neck: a simulation study using digital intraoral systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejaim, Y; Silva, A I V; Brasil, D M; Vasconcelos, K F; Haiter Neto, F; Boscolo, F N

    2015-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of lead foils in reducing the radiation dose received by different anatomical sites of the head and neck during periapical intraoral examinations performed with digital systems. Images were acquired through four different manners: phosphor plate (PSP; VistaScan(®) system; Dürr Dental GmbH, Bissingen, Germany) alone, PSP plus lead foil, complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS; DIGORA(®) Toto, Soredex(®), Tuusula, Finland) alone and CMOS plus lead foil. Radiation dose was measured after a full-mouth periapical series (14 radiographs) using the long-cone paralleling technique. Lithium fluoride (LiF 100) thermoluminescent dosemeters were placed in an anthropomorphic phantom at points corresponding to the tongue, thyroid, crystalline lenses, parotid glands and maxillary sinuses. Dosemeter readings demonstrated the efficacy of the addition of lead foil in the intraoral digital X-ray systems provided in reducing organ doses in the selected structures, approximately 32% in the PSP system and 59% in the CMOS system. The use of lead foils associated with digital X-ray sensors is an effective alternative for the protection of different anatomical sites of the head and neck during full-mouth periapical series acquisition.

  13. Evaluation of the composition of filters additional of equipment radiological intraoral by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, Alana Caroline; Torres, Catarina A.M.P.; Rocha, Ana S.S.; Deniak, Valeriy; Lara, Alessandro L.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Fernandes, Angela; Westphalen, Fernando Henrique

    2013-01-01

    The need for high quality standards for radiographic images in order to make a diagnosis assertive, and being the additional filtration required in the intraoral X-ray equipment show the need of evaluating these filters. This study aims to examine the influence of the elemental composition of the filters of X-ray of dental intraoral equipment in the radiographic images quality. The filters analysis were performed by using the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method (EDXRF). Ten conventional filters were analysed. In this study, 33 radiographic exposures were performed using films: twenty radiographs in the incisor region and ten in the molar region, three exposures were also made in the same regions with same conditions without using filter. After radiographs development, optical density was measure and all radiographs were submitted to subjective evaluation by dental radiologists. Data obtained were correlated to effects evaluation of the elemental composition of all filters in the quality of the radiographic images. The elements found were: aluminum, cobalt, copper, sulfur, iron, manganese, titanium, zinc, and zirconium. The images obtained were identified in groups: Molars to 0.3 s; Incisors to 0.2 s; Incisors to 0.3 s, and for the group without filters. From the results obtained it was concluded that both unclear radiographs and ideal radiographs were produced by using filters of elementary common. Therefore, conventional filters evaluated were an acceptable option to produce quality images in dental radiology, despite differences in the composition of the alloys. (author)

  14. Identification of the Procedural Accidents During Root Canal Preparation Using Digital Intraoral Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csinszka K.-Ivácson A.-

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crown or root perforation, ledge formation, fractured instruments and perforation of the roots are the most important accidents which appear during endodontic therapy. Our objective was to evaluate the value of digital intraoral periapical radiographs compared to cone beam computed tomography images (CBCT used to diagnose some procedural accidents. Material and methods: Eleven extracted molars were used in this study. A total of 18 perforations and 13 ledges were created artifically and 10 instruments were fractured in the root canals. Digital intraoral periapical radiographs from two angles and CBCT scans were made with the teeth fixed in position. The images were evaluated and the number of detected accidents were stated in percentages. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi square-test. Results: On digital periapical radiographs the evaluators identified 12 (66.66% perforations, 10 (100 % separated instruments and 10 (76.9% created ledges. The CBCT scans made possible the recognition of 17 (94.66 % perforations, 9 (90 % separated instruments and 13 (100% ledges. The totally recognized accidental procedures showed significant differences between the two groups. (p<0.05 Conclusion: Digital periapical radiographs are the most common imaging modalities used during endodontic treatments. Though, the CBCT allows a better identification of the procedural accidents.

  15. Influence of intra-oral sensory impairment by anaesthesia on food comminution and mixing in dentate subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, E; Fueki, K; Wakabayashi, N

    2015-06-01

    Sensory input from sensory receptors regarding food morsels can affect jaw motor behaviours during mastication. The aim was to clarify the effects of intra-oral sensory input on the food-comminuting and food-mixing capacities of dentate subjects. Eleven dentate subjects without sensory dysfunction in their oro-facial region participated in this study. Local anaesthesia was achieved on the periodontal structures and on the oral mucosa of the subjects' preferred chewing side by injecting a lidocaine solution with adrenalin. At baseline (control) and after anaesthesia, data on the subjects' food-comminuting and food-mixing capacities were gathered. The food-comminuting capacity was quantified by measuring the degree of pulverisation of peanuts (objective hardness; 45.3 [Newton, N]) after a prescribed 20 chewing strokes. The food-mixing capacity was measured as the degree of immixture of a two-coloured paraffin wax cube after 10 chewing strokes. Wax cubes of three different hardness levels were used (soft, medium and hard: 20.3, 32.6 and 75.5 [N], respectively) and were chewed in random order. After anaesthesia, the subjects' food-comminuting capacity significantly decreased (P food-mixing capacity for each hardness level of the wax cubes (P food-mixing capacity (P deterioration of the mixing capacity increased as the hardness increased. In conclusion, intra-oral sensory input can affect both food-comminuting and food-mixing capacities. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Comparison of antibacterial-coated and non-coated suture material in intraoral surgery by isolation of adherent bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Pelz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. In general surgery the incidence of postoperative wound infections is reported to be lower using triclosan-coated sutures. In intraoral surgery, sutures are faced with different bacterial species and the question arises whether the antibacterial-coated suture material has the same positive effects. Materials and Methods. Triclosan-coated and uncoated suture materials were applied in 17 patients undergoing wisdom tooth extraction. Postoperatively, sutures were removed and adherent bacteria were isolated, colony-forming units (cfu were counted, and species identified. Results. Oral bacteria were found in high numbers (cfu>10[sup]7[/sup] on both Vicryl and the triclosan-coated Vicryl Plus. The total number of bacteria isolated from Vicryl Plus was 37% higher than for Vicryl, mainly due to increased numbers of anaerobes. The number of bacterial strains identified was higher for Vicryl ( n=203 than for Vicryl Plus (n=198, but the number of pathogens was higher on Vicryl Plus (n=100 than on Vicryl (n=97. Fewer Gram-positive strains were found on Vicryl Plus (n=95 than on Vicryl (n=107 and, conversely, more Gram-negative strains on Vicryl Plus (103vs.96. Conclusions. In terms of the total number of oral bacteria, and especially oral pathogens, that adhered to suture material, no reduction was demonstrated for Vicryl Plus. The use of triclosan-coated suture material offers no advantage in intraoral surgery.

  17. Evaluation of the composition of filters additional of equipment radiological intraoral by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca, Alana Caroline; Torres, Catarina A.M.P.; Rocha, Ana S.S.; Deniak, Valeriy; Lara, Alessandro L.; Paschuk, Sergei A., E-mail: alanacarolinef@gmail.com, E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (CPGEI/UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Eletrica e Informatica Industrial; Fernandes, Angela; Westphalen, Fernando Henrique, E-mail: angelafernandes@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Setor de Ciencias da Saude

    2013-07-01

    The need for high quality standards for radiographic images in order to make a diagnosis assertive, and being the additional filtration required in the intraoral X-ray equipment show the need of evaluating these filters. This study aims to examine the influence of the elemental composition of the filters of X-ray of dental intraoral equipment in the radiographic images quality. The filters analysis were performed by using the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method (EDXRF). Ten conventional filters were analysed. In this study, 33 radiographic exposures were performed using films: twenty radiographs in the incisor region and ten in the molar region, three exposures were also made in the same regions with same conditions without using filter. After radiographs development, optical density was measure and all radiographs were submitted to subjective evaluation by dental radiologists. Data obtained were correlated to effects evaluation of the elemental composition of all filters in the quality of the radiographic images. The elements found were: aluminum, cobalt, copper, sulfur, iron, manganese, titanium, zinc, and zirconium. The images obtained were identified in groups: Molars to 0.3 s; Incisors to 0.2 s; Incisors to 0.3 s, and for the group without filters. From the results obtained it was concluded that both unclear radiographs and ideal radiographs were produced by using filters of elementary common. Therefore, conventional filters evaluated were an acceptable option to produce quality images in dental radiology, despite differences in the composition of the alloys. (author)

  18. Stability of simultaneously placed dental implants with autologous bone grafts harvested from the iliac crest or intraoral jaw bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Min; Byun, June-Ho; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Sung, Iel-Yong; Cho, Yeong-Cheol; Park, Bong-Wook

    2015-12-30

    Jaw bone and iliac bone are the most frequently used autologous bone sources for dental implant placement in patients with atrophic alveolar ridges. However, the comparative long-term stability of these two autologous bone grafts have not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to compare the stability of simultaneously placed dental implants with autologous bone grafts harvested from either the iliac crest or the intraoral jaw bone for severely atrophic alveolar ridges. In total, 36 patients (21 men and 15 women) were selected and a retrospective medical record review was performed. We compared the residual increased bone height of the grafted bone, peri-implantitis incidence, radiological density in newly generated bones (HU values), and implant stability using resonance frequency analysis (ISQ values) between the two autologous bone graft groups. Both autologous bone graft groups (iliac bone and jaw bone) showed favorable clinical results, with similar long-term implant stability and overall implant survival rates. However, the grafted iliac bone exhibited more prompt vertical loss than the jaw bone, in particular, the largest vertical bone reduction was observed within 6 months after the bone graft. In contrast, the jaw bone graft group exhibited a slower vertical bone resorption rate and a lower incidence of peri-implantitis during long-term follow-up than the iliac bone graft group. These findings demonstrate that simultaneous dental implantation with the autologous intraoral jaw bone graft method may be reliable for the reconstruction of edentulous atrophic alveolar ridges.

  19. The Efficiency of Operating Microscope Compared with Unaided Visual Examination, Conventional and Digital Intraoral Radiography for Proximal Caries Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilkay Peker

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of operating microscope compared with unaided visual examination, conventional and digital intraoral radiography for proximal caries detection. Materials and Methods. The study was based on 48 extracted human posterior permanent teeth. The teeth were examined with unaided visual examination, operating microscope, conventional bitewing and digital intraoral radiographs. Then, true caries depth was determined by histological examination. The extent of the carious lesions was assessed by three examiners independently. One way variance of analysis (ANOVA and Scheffe test were performed for comparison of observers, and the diagnostic accuracies of all systems were assessed from the area under the ROC curve (Az. Results. Statistically significant difference was found between observers (P<.01. There was a statistically significant difference between operating microscope-film radiography, operating microscope-RVG, unaided visual examination-film radiography, and unaided visual examination-RVG according to pairwise comparison (P<.05. Conclusion. The efficiency of operating microscope was found statistically equal with unaided visual examination and lower than radiographic systems for proximal caries detection.

  20. Comparison of accuracies of an intraoral spectrophotometer and conventional visual method for shade matching using two shade guide systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswaran, Vidhya; Anilkumar, S; Lylajam, S; Rajesh, C; Narayan, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    This in vitro study compared the shade matching abilities of an intraoral spectrophotometer and the conventional visual method using two shade guides. The results of previous investigations between color perceived by human observers and color assessed by instruments have been inconclusive. The objectives were to determine accuracies and interrater agreement of both methods and effectiveness of two shade guides with either method. In the visual method, 10 examiners with normal color vision matched target control shade tabs taken from the two shade guides (VITAPAN Classical™ and VITAPAN 3D Master™) with other full sets of the respective shade guides. Each tab was matched 3 times to determine repeatability of visual examiners. The spectrophotometric shade matching was performed by two independent examiners using an intraoral spectrophotometer (VITA Easyshade™) with five repetitions for each tab. Results revealed that visual method had greater accuracy than the spectrophotometer. The spectrophotometer; however, exhibited significantly better interrater agreement as compared to the visual method. While VITAPAN Classical shade guide was more accurate with the spectrophotometer, VITAPAN 3D Master shade guide proved better with visual method. This in vitro study clearly delineates the advantages and limitations of both methods. There were significant differences between the methods with the visual method producing more accurate results than the spectrophotometric method. The spectrophotometer showed far better interrater agreement scores irrespective of the shade guide used. Even though visual shade matching is subjective, it is not inferior and should not be underrated. Judicious combination of both techniques is imperative to attain a successful and esthetic outcome.

  1. Intraoral administration of a T-cell epitope peptide induces immunological tolerance in Cry j 2-sensitized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitomi, Tomomi; Nakagami, Yasuhiro; Hirahara, Kazuki; Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Yamashita, Makoto

    2007-08-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy using allergen-derived peptides is feasible as a novel specific immunotherapy, but its efficacy has not yet been demonstrated in either humans or animals. In addition, it remains obscure whether the oral immune system is involved in the mechanism of sublingual immunotherapy. Here, we show that the intraoral administration of the T-cell epitope peptide P2-246-259 derived from Cry j 2, a major Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen allergen, to Cry j 2-sensitized mice induces immunological tolerance, and that ex vivo lymph node cell proliferation to P2-246-259 and Cry j 2 was inhibited. In addition, intraoral administration was shown to be superior to intragastric administration in terms of tolerance induction, suggesting that the oral immune system contributes to the induction of immunological tolerance. Therefore, the significant efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy using a peptide on allergen-specific T-cells was demonstrated in animals, and this may be potentiated by the oral mucosal immune system. Copyright (c) 2007 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Amplitude-modulated fiber-ring laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caputo, J. G.; Clausen, Carl A. Balslev; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2000-01-01

    Soliton pulses generated by a fiber-ring laser are investigated by numerical simulation and perturbation methods. The mathematical modeling is based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with perturbative terms. We show that active mode locking with an amplitude modulator leads to a self-starting......Soliton pulses generated by a fiber-ring laser are investigated by numerical simulation and perturbation methods. The mathematical modeling is based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with perturbative terms. We show that active mode locking with an amplitude modulator leads to a self......-starting of stable solitonic pulses from small random noise, provided the modulation depth is small. The perturbative analysis leads to a nonlinear coupled return map for the amplitude, phase, and position of the soliton pulses circulating in the fiber-ring laser. We established the validity of this approach...

  3. A fiber optic buckle transducer for measurement of in vitro tendon strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roriz, Paulo; Ramos, António; Marques, Manuel B.; Simões, José A.; Frazão, Orlando

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study is to present a prototype of a fiber optic based buckle transducer suitable for measuring strain caused by stretching of a tendon. The device has an E-shape and its central arm is instrumented with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. The tendon adjusts to the E-form in a fashion that when it is stretched the central arm bends causing a shift of the Bragg's wavelength (λB) that is proportional to the amount of strain. This prototype is presented as an alternative to conventional strain gauge (SG) buckle transducers.

  4. Combined raman and IR fiber-based sensor for gas detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jerry C; Chan, James W; Trebes, James E; Angel, Stanley M; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-06-24

    A double-pass fiber-optic based spectroscopic gas sensor delivers Raman excitation light and infrared light to a hollow structure, such as a hollow fiber waveguide, that contains a gas sample of interest. A retro-reflector is placed at the end of this hollow structure to send the light back through the waveguide where the light is detected at the same end as the light source. This double pass retro reflector design increases the interaction path length of the light and the gas sample, and also reduces the form factor of the hollow structure.

  5. Space radiation effects in high performance fiber optic data links for satellite data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, P.W.; Dale, C.J.; LaBel, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    Fiber optic based technologies are relatively new to satellite applications, and are receiving considerable attention for planned applications in NASA, DOD, and commercial space sectors. The authors review various activities in recent years aimed at understanding and mitigating radiation related risk in deploying fiber based data handling systems on orbit. Before concluding that there are no critical barriers to designing survivable and reliable systems, the authors analyze several possible types of radiation effects. Particular attention is given to the subject of particle-induced bit errors in InGaAs p-i-n photodiodes, including a discussion of error mitigation and upset rate prediction methods

  6. The long-term effect of a zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate containing mouth rinse on intra-oral halitosis-A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erovic Ademovski, Seida; Mårtensson, Carina; Persson, Gösta Rutger; Renvert, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the long-term effects of a zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate mouth rinse (Zn/CHX) on intra-oral halitosis. Forty-six adults with intra-oral halitosis were randomized into a 6-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. The presence of intra-oral halitosis was evaluated at baseline, 3 and 6 months after treatment by assessment of organoleptic score (OLS) and by total volatile sulphur compounds (T-VSC), hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S) and methyl mercaptan (MM) concentrations in exhaled air. A Zn/CHX mouth rinse provided significantly better control of intra-oral halitosis than a placebo mouth rinse. At 3 and 6 months, individuals rinsing with the Zn/CHX rinse presented with reductions of the OLS, T-VSC (p oral halitosis (i.e. H 2 S oral halitosis, assessed both objectively and subjectively. With regular rinsing, the effect was sustained for 6 months. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Solar optics-based active panel for solar energy storage and disinfection of greywater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W; Song, J; Son, J H; Gutierrez, M P; Kang, T; Kim, D; Lee, L P

    2016-09-01

    Smart city and innovative building strategies are becoming increasingly more necessary because advancing a sustainable building system is regarded as a promising solution to overcome the depleting water and energy. However, current sustainable building systems mainly focus on energy saving and miss a holistic integration of water regeneration and energy generation. Here, we present a theoretical study of a solar optics-based active panel (SOAP) that enables both solar energy storage and photothermal disinfection of greywater simultaneously. Solar collector efficiency of energy storage and disinfection rate of greywater have been investigated. Due to the light focusing by microlens, the solar collector efficiency is enhanced from 25% to 65%, compared to that without the microlens. The simulation of greywater sterilization shows that 100% disinfection can be accomplished by our SOAP for different types of bacteria including Escherichia coli . Numerical simulation reveals that our SOAP as a lab-on-a-wall system can resolve the water and energy problem in future sustainable building systems.

  8. An Optical-Based Aggregate Approach to Measuring Condensation Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kimberly A.; Crockett, Julie; Maynes, Daniel R.; Iverson, Brian D.

    2017-11-01

    Condensation heat transfer is significant in a variety of industries including desalination, energy conversion, atmospheric water harvesting, and electronics cooling. Recently, superhydrophobic surfaces have gained attention as a possible condensing surface due to their potential for high droplet mobility and coalescence-induced, out-of-plane jumping of the condensate droplets, both of which contribute to higher rates of condensate removal and thus higher thermal transport rates. Several studies involving condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces have quantified metrics which indirectly indicate the relative rate of heat transfer on a surface, such as maximum droplet diameter, drop size distribution, and individual droplet growth rates. In this study, an optical-based method is used to monitor growth and departure of individual condensate drops for the entire viewing area to obtain full-field, aggregate heat transfer measurements. This approach offers several advantages relative to traditional heat transfer measurement methods such as heat flux sensors and thermocouples, including the ability to provide a link between macroscopic heat transfer rates and the more indirect measures of heat transfer traditionally reported in the literature.

  9. Reducing fiber cross-talk in mineral fiber arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Lee Stark

    2017-01-01

    Monocentric optics replace current systems with diffraction limited performance. The fiber arrays have been the issue. Commercial expensive fiber arrays are available, but enhanced mineral fiber arrays offer very inexpensive fiber arrays.

  10. The prophylactic effect of neck irradiation combined with intra-oral electron beam irradiation for early tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamori, Jiro; Kamata, Rikisaburo; Sanuki, Eiichi

    1993-01-01

    Between 1967 and 1988, 102 patients with Stage T1-2N0 squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue were treated with uneven fractional irradiation therapy (intra-oral electron beam irradiation with and without prophylactic ipsilateral upper neck irradiation at the Dept. of Radiology, Nihon University School of Medicine. Of 102 primary lesions, 89 cases were controlled with this therapy. In this study, these 89 cases were investigated in order to analyze the prophylactic effect of upper neck irradiation. Of the 89 patients, 42 received only intra-oral electron beam irradiation, while the remaining 47 received a combination of intra-oral electron beam irradiation and prophylactic irradiation to the ipsilateral upper neck. Twenty three of the 89 (25.8%) developed metastasis to the neck after the radiotherapy. A breakdown of these 23 cases reveals that 3/21 (14.3%) received 40-50 Gy to the neck, 9/26 (34.6%) received 20-40 Gy to the neck, and 11/42 (26.2%) received no irradiation to the neck (p<0.05 between first and second groups, and between first and third groups). The neck metastasis was classified into one of three categories based on the region in which it first appeared (ipsilateral upper neck, ipsilateral lower neck or contralateral neck). The first metastasis was seen in the ipsilateral upper neck, in the ipsilateral lower neck and in the contralateral neck in 17, 4 and 2 patients, respectively. In 1/19 who had received 40-50 Gy, in 5/21 who had received 20-40 Gy and in 11/42 who had not received neck irradiation the first metastasis appeared in the ipsilateral upper neck. The five year survival rate was 94%, 75% and 85% in the patients receiving 40-50 Gy, 20-40 Gy and no neck irradiation, respectively. These results suggest that prophylactic irradiation of 40-50 Gy to the ipsilateral upper neck might decrease the incidence of neck metastasis and slightly prolong survival time. (author)

  11. Abordaje intraoral en el síndrome de Eagle: Presentación de un caso clínico Intraoral approach in Eagle syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Mareque Bueno

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de Eagle es una patología infrecuente secundaria a la elongación de la apófisis estiloides y/o calcificación del ligamento estilo-hioideo. La mayoría de pacientes afectados no presentan sintomatología, aunque la presión ejercida por esta estructura morfológicamente alterada contra estructuras vecinas puede desencadenar una gran variedad de síntomas, incluyendo dolor cervicofacial, sensación de cuerpo extraño en la orofaringe, aumento en la secreción salival, cefalea y dificultad para la deglución, el habla o los movimientos de la lengua. Presentamos el caso de una paciente de 50 años de edad con el síndrome de Eagle. La tomografía computerizada en haz de cono confirmó la sospecha clínica. Como tratamiento se realizó la resección parcial de ambas apófisis estiloides mediante un abordaje intraoral. La presentación clínica, el diagnóstico diferencial y el tratamiento se describen en este artículo.Eagle syndrome is a rare condition resulting from either the elongation of the temporal styloid process or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament. Most patients are asymptomatic, but when this structure presses against other parts of the head and neck it can originate a wide range of symptoms, including cervico-facial pain, foreign body sensation in oropharynx, increased saliva secretion, headache and difficulty with swallowing, speaking and neck or tongue movements. The case of a 50-year-old woman with Eagle syndrome is reported. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT confirmed the clinical suspicion. The intraoral approach was used for the partial resection of both styloid processes. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and differential diagnosis are described.

  12. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  13. Steel fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, S.U.

    2005-01-01

    Steel-Fiber Reinforced Concrete is constructed by adding short fibers of small cross-sectional size .to the fresh concrete. These fibers reinforce the concrete in all directions, as they are randomly oriented. The improved mechanical properties of concrete include ductility, impact-resistance, compressive, tensile and flexural strength and abrasion-resistance. These uniqlte properties of the fiber- reinforcement can be exploited to great advantage in concrete structural members containing both conventional bar-reinforcement and steel fibers. The improvements in mechanical properties of cementitious materials resulting from steel-fiber reinforcement depend on the type, geometry, volume fraction and material-properties of fibers, the matrix mix proportions and the fiber-matrix interfacial bond characteristics. Effects of steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete have been investigated in this paper through a comprehensive testing-programme, by varying the fiber volume fraction and the aspect-ratio (Lid) of fibers. Significant improvements are observed in compressive, tensile, flexural strength and impact-resistance of concrete, accompanied by marked improvement in ductility. optimum fiber-volume fraction and aspect-ratio of steel fibers is identified. Test results are analyzed in details and relevant conclusions drawn. The research is finally concluded with future research needs. (author)

  14. Treatment of intra-oral injection phobia: a randomized delayed intervention controlled trial among Norwegian 10- to 16-year-olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Karin G; Agdal, Maren Lillehaug; Vika, Margrethe; Skeie, Marit Slåttelid

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of five sessions of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for 10- to 16-year-olds with intra-oral injection phobia. This was a randomized delayed intervention controlled trial in 67 patients, fulfilling the DSM-5 criteria for specific phobia. All patients received the same CBT performed by dentists specially trained in CBT. The patients were randomly assigned to either an immediate treatment group (ITG) (34 patients) or a waitlist-control group (WCG) (33 patients). The WCG was put on a waitlist for 5 weeks. After treatment, all patients were combined for post-treatment analyses. Assessments including the psychometric self-report scales Intra-oral injection fear scale (IOIF-s), Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS), Injection Phobia Scale for children (IS-c) and Mutilation Questionnaire for children (MQ-c) and a behavioural avoidance test (BAT) followed by a questionnaire on cognitions during the BAT, occurred pre-, post-treatment/waitlist and at a 1-year follow-up. CBT had a significant effect compared to no treatment (WCG). After treatment, the scores on the psychometric self-report scales were significantly reduced and higher levels in the BAT were achieved. The results were maintained at 1-year follow-up. Of the 67 patients, 70.1% received intra-oral injections during CBT treatment, whereas 69.4% of those completing the CBT, in need for further dental treatment, managed to receive the necessary intra-oral injections at their regular dentist. The 10- to 16-year-olds diagnosed with intra-oral injection phobia benefitted positively on CBT performed by specially trained dentists.

  15. Nonlinear Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Per

    2004-01-01

    Despite the general recession in the global economy and the collapse of the optical telecommunication market, research within specialty fibers is thriving. This is, more than anything else, due to the technology transition from standard all-glass fibers to photonic crystal fibers, which, instead...... of doping, use a microstructure of air and glass to obtain a refractive index difference between the core and the cladding. This air/glass microstructure lends the photonic crystal fibers a range of unique and highly usable properties, which are very different from those found in solid standard fibers......, leading to reduced mode confinement and dispersion flexibility. In this thesis, we treat the nonlinear photonic crystal fiber – a special sub-class of photonic crystal fibers, the core of which has a diameter comparable to the wavelength of the light guided in the fiber. The small core results in a large...

  16. Ways to Boost Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not enough fluid, you may experience nausea or constipation. Before you reach for the fiber supplements, consider this: fiber is found naturally in nutritious foods. Studies have found the same benefits, such as a ...

  17. Fiber Optics Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  18. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  19. Shaped fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinnan, Mark K.; Roach, Dennis P.

    2017-12-05

    A composite article is disclosed that has non-circular fibers embedded in a polymer matrix. The composite article has improved damage tolerance, toughness, bending, and impact resistance compared to composites having traditional round fibers.

  20. Medicine and ionizing rays: a help sheet in analysing risks in intra-oral dental radiology and applicable texts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauron, C.

    2009-01-01

    This document proposes a synthesis of useful knowledge for radioprotection in the case of intra-oral dental radiology. In the first part, several aspects are considered: the concerned personnel, the course of treatment procedures, the hazards, the identification of the risk associated with ionizing radiation, the risk assessment and the determination of exposure levels, the strategy to control the risks (reduction of risks, technical measures concerning the installation or the personnel, teaching and information, prevention and medical monitoring), and risk control assessment. A second part indicates the various applicable legal and regulatory texts (European directives, institutions in charge of radioprotection, general arrangements applicable to workers and patients, and regulatory texts concerning worker protection or patient protection against ionizing radiations)

  1. The efficacy of an intraoral fluoride-releasing system in irradiated head and neck cancer patients: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerowitz, C; Watson, G E

    1998-09-01

    This study compared the anticaries effectiveness of an intraoral fluoride-releasing system, or IFRS, with a standard regimen of daily application of a 1.1 percent neutral sodium fluoride gel in custom trays. Caries protection in subjects in the IFRS group was comparable to that in subjects in the 1.1 percent neutral sodium fluoride group. The subjects all had head or neck cancer and had received radiation therapy, but no more recently than three months before taking part in the study. Overall, IFRS devices were well-tolerated and patient satisfaction was high. The IFRS appears to offer several advantages over the daily application of fluoride gels in custom trays.

  2. Detection of root perforations using conventional and digital intraoral radiography, multidetector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Shokri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study aimed to compare the accuracy of conventional intraoral (CI radiography, photostimulable phosphor (PSP radiography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT for detection of strip and root perforations in endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods Mesial and distal roots of 72 recently extracted molar were endodontically prepared. Perforations were created in 0.2, 0.3, or 0.4 mm diameter around the furcation of 48 roots (strip perforation and at the external surface of 48 roots (root perforation; 48 roots were not perforated (control group. After root obturation, intraoral radiography, CBCT and MDCT were taken. Discontinuity in the root structure was interpreted as perforation. Two observers examined the images. Data were analyzed using Stata software and Chi-square test. Results The sensitivity and specificity of CI, PSP, CBCT and MDCT in detection of strip perforations were 81.25% and 93.75%, 85.42% and 91.67%, 97.92% and 85.42%, and 72.92% and 87.50%, respectively. For diagnosis of root perforation, the sensitivity and specificity were 87.50% and 93.75%, 89.58% and 91.67%, 97.92% and 85.42%, and 81.25% and 87.50%, respectively. For detection of strip perforation, the difference between CBCT and all other methods including CI, PSP and MDCT was significant (p < 0.05. For detection of root perforation, only the difference between CBCT and MDCT was significant, and for all the other methods no statistically significant difference was observed. Conclusions If it is not possible to diagnose the root perforations by periapical radiographs, CBCT is the best radiographic technique while MDCT is not recommended.

  3. Patients' preferences when comparing analogue implant impressions using a polyether impression material versus digital impressions (Intraoral Scan) of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wismeijer, Daniel; Mans, Ronny; van Genuchten, Michiel; Reijers, Hajo A

    2014-10-01

    The primary objective of this clinical study was to assess the patients' perception of the difference between an analogue impression approach on the one hand and an intra-oral scan (IO scan) on the other when restoring implants in the non-aesthetic zone. A second objective was to analyse the difference in time needed to perform these two procedures. Thirty consecutive patients who had received 41 implants (Straumann tissue level) in the non-aesthetic zone in an implant-based referral practice setting in the Netherlands. As they were to receive crown and or bridge work on the implants, in one session, the final impressions were taken with both an analogue technique and with an intraoral scan. Patients were also asked if, directly after the treatment was carried out, they would be prepared to fill out a questionnaire on their perception of both techniques. The time involved following these two procedures was also recorded. The preparatory activities of the treatment, the taste of the impression material and the overall preference of the patients were significantly in favour of the IO scan. The bite registration, the scan head and gag reflex positively tended to the IO scan, but none of these effects were significant. The overall time involved with the IO scan was more negatively perceived than the analogue impression. Overall less time was involved when following the analogue impression technique than with the IO scan. The overall preference of the patients in our sample is significantly in favour of the approach using the IO scan. This preference relates mainly to the differences between the compared approaches with respect to taste effects and their preparatory activities. The patients did perceive the duration of IO scan more negatively than the analogue impression approach. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    2001-01-01

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  5. Resonant filtered fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Laurila, Marko; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our recent result on utilizing resonant/bandgap fiber designs to achieve high performance ytterbium doped fiber amplifers for achieving diffraction limited beam quality in large mode area fibers, robust bending performance and gain shaping for long wavelength operation of...

  6. Neutron scintillators using wavelength shifting fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Miller, V.C.; Ramsey, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    A proposed design for an optically-based, one-dimension scintillation detector to replace the gas-filled position-sensitive proportional counter currently used for a wide-angle neutron detector (WAND) at the high-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is presented. The scintillator, consisting of a mixture of 6 LiF and ZnS(Ag) powders in an epoxy binder, is coupled to an array of wavelength shifting optical fibers which provide position resolution. The wide-angle neutron detector is designed to cover a 120 degree arc with a 75 cm radius of curvature. The final detector design provides for 600 optical fibers coupled to the scintillator screen with an angular resolution of 0.2 degrees. Each individual pixel of the detector will be capable of operating at count rates exceeding 1 MHz. Results are presented from the measurement of neutron conversion efficiencies for several screen compositions, gamma-ray sensitivity, and spatial resolution of a 16 element one-dimensional array prototype

  7. Optically-based Sensor System for Critical Nuclear Facilities Post-Event Seismic Structural Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Petrone, Floriana [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Buckle, Ian [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Wu, Suiwen [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Coates, Jason [California State Univ., Chico, CA (United States)

    2017-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has ownership and operational responsibility for a large enterprise of nuclear facilities that provide essential functions to DOE missions ranging from national security to discovery science and energy research. These facilities support a number of DOE programs and offices including the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Science, and Office of Environmental Management. With many unique and “one of a kind” functions, these facilities represent a tremendous national investment, and assuring their safety and integrity is fundamental to the success of a breadth of DOE programs. Many DOE critical facilities are located in regions with significant natural phenomenon hazards including major earthquakes and DOE has been a leader in developing standards for the seismic analysis of nuclear facilities. Attaining and sustaining excellence in nuclear facility design and management must be a core competency of the DOE. An important part of nuclear facility management is the ability to monitor facilities and rapidly assess the response and integrity of the facilities after any major upset event. Experience in the western U.S. has shown that understanding facility integrity after a major earthquake is a significant challenge which, lacking key data, can require extensive effort and significant time. In the work described in the attached report, a transformational approach to earthquake monitoring of facilities is described and demonstrated. An entirely new type of optically-based sensor that can directly and accurately measure the earthquake-induced deformations of a critical facility has been developed and tested. This report summarizes large-scale shake table testing of the sensor concept on a representative steel frame building structure, and provides quantitative data on the accuracy of the sensor measurements.

  8. Superconducting tin core fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homa, Daniel; Liang, Yongxuan; Hill, Cary; Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2014-11-13

    In this study, we demonstrated superconductivity in a fiber with a tin core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a modified melt-draw technique and maintained core diameters ranging from 50-300 microns and overall diameters of 125-800 microns. Superconductivity of this fiber design was validated via the traditional four-probe test method in a bath of liquid helium at temperatures on the order of 3.8 K. The synthesis route and fiber design are perquisites to ongoing research dedicated all-fiber optoelectronics and the relationships between superconductivity and the material structures, as well as corresponding fabrication techniques. (orig.)

  9. Superconducting tin core fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, Daniel; Liang, Yongxuan; Hill, Cary; Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated superconductivity in a fiber with a tin core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a modified melt-draw technique and maintained core diameters ranging from 50-300 microns and overall diameters of 125-800 microns. Superconductivity of this fiber design was validated via the traditional four-probe test method in a bath of liquid helium at temperatures on the order of 3.8 K. The synthesis route and fiber design are perquisites to ongoing research dedicated all-fiber optoelectronics and the relationships between superconductivity and the material structures, as well as corresponding fabrication techniques. (orig.)

  10. Fiber Lasers V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2008-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last five years, and many of the traditional manufactures of gas and solid-state lasers are pursuing the attractive fiber-based systems, which are now displacing the old technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser...... systems require specially designed fibers with large cores and good power handling capabilities – requirements that are all met by the airclad fiber technology. In the present paper we go through many of the building blocks needed to build high-power systems and we show an example of a complete airclad...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 70 μm single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to MW power levels. Furthermore we describe the novel airclad based pump combiners and their use in a completely monolithic 350...

  11. Airclad fiber laser technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2008-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last five years, and many of the traditional manufactures of gas and solid-state lasers are pursuing the attractive fiber-based systems, which are now displacing the old technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser...... systems require specially designed fibers with large cores and good power handling capabilities - requirements that are all met by the airclad fiber technology. In the present paper we go through many of the building blocks needed to build high-power systems and we show an example of a complete airclad...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 70 μm single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to MW power levels. Furthermore we describe the novel airclad based pump combiners and their use in a completely monolithic 350...

  12. Precision of intraoral digital dental impressions with iTero and extraoral digitization with the iTero and a model scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flügge, Tabea V; Schlager, Stefan; Nelson, Katja; Nahles, Susanne; Metzger, Marc C

    2013-09-01

    Digital impression devices are used alternatively to conventional impression techniques and materials. The aims of this study were to evaluate the precision of digital intraoral scanning under clinical conditions (iTero; Align Technologies, San Jose, Calif) and to compare it with the precision of extraoral digitization. One patient received 10 full-arch intraoral scans with the iTero and conventional impressions with a polyether impression material (Impregum Penta; 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany). Stone cast models manufactured from the impressions were digitized 10 times with an extraoral scanner (D250; 3Shape, Copenhagen, Denmark) and 10 times with the iTero. Virtual models provided by each method were roughly aligned, and the model edges were trimmed with cutting planes to create common borders (Rapidform XOR; Inus Technologies, Seoul, Korea). A second model alignment was then performed along the closest distances of the surfaces (Artec Studio software; Artec Group, Luxembourg, Luxembourg). To assess precision, deviations between corresponding models were compared. Repeated intraoral scanning was evaluated in group 1, repeated extraoral model scanning with the iTero was assessed in group 2, and repeated model scanning with the D250 was assessed in group 3. Deviations between models were measured and expressed as maximums, means, medians, and root mean square errors for quantitative analysis. Color-coded displays of the deviations allowed qualitative visualization of the deviations. The greatest deviations and therefore the lowest precision were in group 1, with mean deviations of 50 μm, median deviations of 37 μm, and root mean square errors of 73 μm. Group 2 showed a higher precision, with mean deviations of 25 μm, median deviations of 18 μm, and root mean square errors of 51 μm. Scanning with the D250 had the highest precision, with mean deviations of 10 μm, median deviations of 5 μm, and root mean square errors of 20 μm. Intraoral and extraoral scanning

  13. Hierarchically Structured Electrospun Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E. Zander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional electrospun nanofibers have a myriad of applications ranging from scaffolds for tissue engineering to components of biosensors and energy harvesting devices. The generally smooth one-dimensional structure of the fibers has stood as a limitation to several interesting novel applications. Control of fiber diameter, porosity and collector geometry will be briefly discussed, as will more traditional methods for controlling fiber morphology and fiber mat architecture. The remainder of the review will focus on new techniques to prepare hierarchically structured fibers. Fibers with hierarchical primary structures—including helical, buckled, and beads-on-a-string fibers, as well as fibers with secondary structures, such as nanopores, nanopillars, nanorods, and internally structured fibers and their applications—will be discussed. These new materials with helical/buckled morphology are expected to possess unique optical and mechanical properties with possible applications for negative refractive index materials, highly stretchable/high-tensile-strength materials, and components in microelectromechanical devices. Core-shell type fibers enable a much wider variety of materials to be electrospun and are expected to be widely applied in the sensing, drug delivery/controlled release fields, and in the encapsulation of live cells for biological applications. Materials with a hierarchical secondary structure are expected to provide new superhydrophobic and self-cleaning materials.

  14. Analysis of Rain Effects on Terrestrial Free Space Optics based on Data Measured in Tropical Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriza Ahmad Zabidi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Free Space Optics (FSO shows a great alternative as the solution for last mile problem where fiber optics is unavailable due to deployment time and cost constraint.  However, the feasibility of using FSO system as communication link very much depends on local weather.  Since tropical region experiences heavy rainfall, rain with high intensity is expected to affect the FSO link severely. Few prediction models have been proposed by ITU-R based on France and Japan’s measurement. This paper has compared  rain attenuation predicted by  models and  data measured in Malaysia over Free Space Optical links for one year period. Prediction models are clearly unable to predict attenuation measured in tropical climate. ABSTRAK: Wayarles optik menjadi alternatif sebagai satu penyelesaian kepada masalah kesesakan terutama diakhir sesuatu talian dimana ianya tidak dapat diselesaikan dengan menggunakan gentian fiber akibat daripada kekangan masa pemasangan dan masalah kewangan.  Walaubagaimanapun, kejayaan untuk menggunakan wayarless optic ini amat bergantung kepada keadaan cuaca di sesuatu tempat.  Di rantau tropika  hujan lebat sentiasa dialami, oleh itu hujan dengan kepadatan tinggi adalah dijangkakan lebih memberi kesan kepada talian wayarles optic ini. Beberapa model yang telah dicadangkan oleh ITU-R berlandaskan kepada pengumpulan data yang dibuat di Perancis dan Jepun.  Kertas kajian ini akan membandingkan antara model-model yang telah digunapakai dengan data yang dikumpulkan di Malaysia selama setahun.  Jelasnya model yang telah digunapakai tidak dapat digunakan secara berkesan di rantau tropika.KEYWORDS: free space optics; rainfall rate; rain attenuation

  15. Repeat analysis of intraoral digital imaging performed by undergraduate students using a complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensor: An institutional case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nur Liyana Abdul; Asri, Amiza Aqiela Ahmad; Othman, Noor Ilyani; Wan Mokhtar, Ilham

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to quantify the repeat rate of imaging acquisitions based on different clinical examinations, and to assess the prevalence of error types in intraoral bitewing and periapical imaging using a digital complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) intraoral sensor. Materials and Methods A total of 8,030 intraoral images were retrospectively collected from 3 groups of undergraduate clinical dental students. The type of examination, stage of the procedure, and reasons for repetition were analysed and recorded. The repeat rate was calculated as the total number of repeated images divided by the total number of examinations. The weighted Cohen's kappa for inter- and intra-observer agreement was used after calibration and prior to image analysis. Results The overall repeat rate on intraoral periapical images was 34.4%. A total of 1,978 repeated periapical images were from endodontic assessment, which included working length estimation (WLE), trial gutta-percha (tGP), obturation, and removal of gutta-percha (rGP). In the endodontic imaging, the highest repeat rate was from WLE (51.9%) followed by tGP (48.5%), obturation (42.2%), and rGP (35.6%). In bitewing images, the repeat rate was 15.1% and poor angulation was identified as the most common cause of error. A substantial level of intra- and interobserver agreement was achieved. Conclusion The repeat rates in this study were relatively high, especially for certain clinical procedures, warranting training in optimization techniques and radiation protection. Repeat analysis should be performed from time to time to enhance quality assurance and hence deliver high-quality health services to patients. PMID:29279822

  16. Accuracy and precision of polyurethane dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional subtractive rapid prototyping method with an intraoral scanning technique

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Ki-Baek; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Young

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy and precision of polyurethane (PUT) dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional (3D) subtractive rapid prototyping (RP) method with an intraoral scanning technique by comparing linear measurements obtained from PUT models and conventional plaster models. Methods Ten plaster models were duplicated using a selected standard master model and conventional impression, and 10 PUT models were duplicated using the 3D subtractive RP techn...

  17. Absorbed organ and effective doses from digital intra-oral and panoramic radiography applying the ICRP 103 recommendations for effective dose estimations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granlund, Christina; Thilander-Klang, Anne; Ylhan, Betȕl; Lofthag-Hansen, Sara; Ekestubbe, Annika

    2016-10-01

    During dental radiography, the salivary and thyroid glands are at radiation risk. In 2007, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) updated the methodology for determining the effective dose, and the salivary glands were assigned tissue-specific weighting factors for the first time. The aims of this study were to determine the absorbed dose to the organs and to calculate, applying the ICRP publication 103 tissue-weighting factors, the effective doses delivered during digital intraoral and panoramic radiography. Thermoluminescent dosemeter measurements were performed on an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom. The organ-absorbed doses were measured at 30 locations, representing different radiosensitive organs in the head and neck, and the effective dose was calculated according to the ICRP recommendations. The salivary glands and the oral mucosa received the highest absorbed doses from both intraoral and panoramic radiography. The effective dose from a full-mouth intraoral examination was 15 μSv and for panoramic radiography, the effective dose was in the range of 19-75 μSv, depending on the panoramic equipment used. The effective dose from a full-mouth intraoral examination is lower and that from panoramic radiography is higher than previously reported. Clinicians should be aware of the higher effective dose delivered during panoramic radiography and the risk-benefit profile of this technique must be assessed for the individual patient. The effective dose of radiation from panoramic radiography is higher than previously reported and there is large variability in the delivered radiation dosage among the different types of equipment used.

  18. Dental measurements and Bolton index reliability and accuracy obtained from 2D digital, 3D segmented CBCT, and 3d intraoral laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    San José, Verónica; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos; Tarazona, Beatriz; Zamora, Natalia; O Lagravère, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Background To compare the reliability and accuracy of direct and indirect dental measurements derived from two types of 3D virtual models: generated by intraoral laser scanning (ILS) and segmented cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), comparing these with a 2D digital model. Material and Methods One hundred patients were selected. All patients’ records included initial plaster models, an intraoral scan and a CBCT. Patients´ dental arches were scanned with the iTero® intraoral scanner while the CBCTs were segmented to create three-dimensional models. To obtain 2D digital models, plaster models were scanned using a conventional 2D scanner. When digital models had been obtained using these three methods, direct dental measurements were measured and indirect measurements were calculated. Differences between methods were assessed by means of paired t-tests and regression models. Intra and inter-observer error were analyzed using Dahlberg´s d and coefficients of variation. Results Intraobserver and interobserver error for the ILS model was less than 0.44 mm while for segmented CBCT models, the error was less than 0.97 mm. ILS models provided statistically and clinically acceptable accuracy for all dental measurements, while CBCT models showed a tendency to underestimate measurements in the lower arch, although within the limits of clinical acceptability. Conclusions ILS and CBCT segmented models are both reliable and accurate for dental measurements. Integration of ILS with CBCT scans would get dental and skeletal information altogether. Key words:CBCT, intraoral laser scanner, 2D digital models, 3D models, dental measurements, reliability. PMID:29410764

  19. Clinical evaluation comparing the fit of all-ceramic crowns obtained from silicone and digital intraoral impressions based on wavefront sampling technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradíes, Guillermo; Zarauz, Cristina; Valverde, Arelhys; Ferreiroa, Alberto; Martínez-Rus, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fit of ceramic crowns fabricated from conventional silicone impressions with the fit of ceramic crowns fabricated from intraoral digital impressions. Twenty-five participants with 30 posterior teeth with a prosthetic demand were selected for the study. Two crowns were made for each preparation. One crown was fabricated from an intraoral digital impression system (IDI group) and the other crown was fabricated from a conventional two-step silicone impression (CI group). To replicate the interface between the crown and the preparation, each crown was cemented on its corresponding clinical preparation with ultra-flow silicone. Each crown was embedded in acrylic resin to stabilise the registered interface and then cut in 2mm thick slices in a buco-lingual orientation. The internal gap was determined as the vertical distance from the internal surface of the crown to the prepared tooth surface at four points (marginal gap, axial gap, crest gap, and occlusal fossa gap) using stereomicroscopy with a magnification of 40×. Data was analysed by using Wilcoxon signed rank test (α=0.05). Internal adaptation values were significantly affected by the impression technique (p=0.001). Mean marginal gap was 76.33 ± 65.32 μm for the crowns of the IDI group and 91.46 ± 72.17 μm for the CI group. All-ceramic crowns fabricated from intraoral digital impressions with wavefront sampling technology demonstrated better internal fit than crowns manufactured from silicone impressions. Impressions obtained from an intraoral digital scanner based on wavefront sampling technology can be used for manufacturing ceramic crowns in the normal clinical practice with better results than conventional impressions with elastomers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. HMGB1 Promotes Intraoral Palatal Wound Healing through RAGE-Dependent Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancharoen, Salunya; Gando, Satoshi; Binita, Shrestha; Nagasato, Tomoka; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Nawa, Yuko; Dararat, Pornpen; Yamamoto, Mika; Narkpinit, Somphong; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is tightly connected to the process of tissue organization upon tissue injury. Here we show that HMGB1 controls epithelium and connective tissue regeneration both in vivo and in vitro during palatal wound healing. Heterozygous HMGB1 (Hmgb1+/−) mice and Wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to palatal injury. Maxillary tissues were stained with Mallory Azan or immunostained with anti-HMGB1, anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), anti-nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p50 and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibodies. Palatal gingival explants were cultured with recombinant HMGB1 (rHMGB1) co-treated with siRNA targeting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGEs) for cell migration and PCNA expression analysis. Measurement of the wound area showed differences between Hmgb1+/− and WT mice on Day 3 after wounding. Mallory Azan staining showed densely packed of collagen fibers in WT mice, whereas in Hmgb1+/− mice weave-like pattern of low density collagen bundles were present. At three and seven days post-surgery, PCNA, NF-κB p50 and VEGF positive keratinocytes of WT mice were greater than that of Hmgb1+/− mice. Knockdown of RAGE prevents the effect of rHMGB1-induced cell migration and PCNA expression in gingival cell cultures. The data suggest that HMGB1/RAGE axis has crucial roles in palatal wound healing. PMID:27886093

  1. Composite fiber networks mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picu, Catalin; Shahsavari, Ali

    2014-03-01

    Random fiber networks are present in many soft biological and engineering materials. In most cases, these networks are composite, in the sense that they are constructed from multiple fiber types. In this work we develop elements of a theoretical understanding of the elasticity of these structures. To this end, we consider systems made from a softer base and varying fractions of stiff fibers and investigate the effect of various system parameters on the overall behavior. The small strain elasticity depends strongly on the presence of a small concentration of stiff fibers for some types of base networks, but is essentially insensitive to these additions for other types. The way in which the stiff fibers are cross-linked to the soft fibers and to themselves is also important. These issues will be discussed within a framework general enough to make the conclusions relevant for diverse applications.

  2. Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials evaluating intraoral orthopedic appliances for temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricton, James; Look, John O; Wright, Edward; Alencar, Francisco G P; Chen, Hong; Lang, Maureen; Ouyang, Wei; Velly, Ana Miriam

    2010-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have assessed the efficacy of intraoral orthopedic appliances to reduce pain in patients with temporomandibular disorders affecting muscle and joint (TMJD) compared to subjects receiving placebo control, no treatment, or other treatments. A search strategy of MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, the Cochrane CENTRAL Register, and manual search identified all English language publications of RCTs for intraoral appliance treatment of TMJD pain during the years of January 1966 to March 2006. Two additional studies from 2006 were added during the review process. Selection criteria included RCTs assessing the efficacy of hard and soft stabilization appliances, anterior positioning appliances, anterior bite appliances, and other appliance types for TMJD pain. Pain relief outcome measures were used in the meta-analyses, and the QUORUM criteria for data abstraction were used. A quality analysis of the methods of each RCT was conducted using the CONSORT criteria. The review findings were expressed both as a qualitative review and, where possible, as a mathematical synthesis using meta-analysis of results. A total of 47 publications citing 44 RCTs with 2,218 subjects were included. Ten RCTs were included in two meta-analyses. In the first meta-analysis of seven studies with 385 patients, a hard stabilization appliance was found to improve TMJD pain compared to non-occluding appliance. The overall odds ratio (OR) of 2.46 was statistically significant (P = .001), with a 95% confidence interval of 1.56 to 3.67. In the second meta-analysis of three studies including 216 patients, a hard stabilization appliance was found to improve TMJD pain compared to no-treatment controls. The overall OR of 2.15 was positive but not statistically significant, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.80 to 5.75. The quality (0 to 1) of the studies was moderate, with a mean of 55% of quality criteria being met

  3. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent on student's practice on intra-oral dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Shin-ichi; Hayama, Kazuhide; Toyama, Michio; Takase, Hiroshi (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    We tried to discuss the problems on radiological protection of students in the practice of technique of intra-oral radiography with use of classmates. This radiographic practice has been performed after the technical training use of 'DXTTR' as a preclinical training. The practice was performed as training to take peri-apical, bite-wing, occlusal and eccentric projections. The mean film numbers which were used to complete those technique were 56 films. In these practice, dosimetries were performed on six locations of the body surface of every student who was taken radiograms using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The measured locations were orbit, bilateral submandible, neck, chest and abdomen. The effective dose equivalent was estimated using weighting factors of International Comission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) pub. 26 and the values of tissue dose equivalent obtained by TLD measurements. The results showed that the mean value of dose equivalent of each part was 5.40 mSv at orbit, 5.06 mSv at submandible, 0.75 mSv at neck, 0.04 mSv at chest and 0.02 mSv at abdomen. The maximum value of effective equivalent dose was 17.03 mSv which was lower than the dose equivalent limit for workers (50 mSv/year) recommended by ICRP pub. 26. The mean value of effective dose equivalent was 2.36 mSv. ICRP recommended the radiation protection for students aged 18 years or over that the procedures for restricting exposure should be broadly similar to those for occupational exposure. So the results indicate that those training was considered to be controlled in some reasonable level. The mean value of risk was estimated to be 3.94 x 10{sup -5}. Because intra-oral radiographic training with use of classmates is performed under extreme non-uniform irradiation, the evaluation of effective dose equivalent was considered to be important to control this special educational exposure and useful for optimization of the educational programs of radiographic technical training

  4. A clinico-radiographic study to compare and co-relate sagittal condylar guidance determined by intraoral gothic arch tracing method and panoramic radiograph in completely edentulous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Sanath; Kunta, Mythili; Shenoy, Kamalakanth

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare and correlate sagittal condylar guidance determined by intraoral gothic arch tracing method and panoramic radiograph in edentulous patients. Twelve completely edentulous patients were selected by the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Conventional steps in the fabrication of complete denture till jaw relation were carried out. Intraoral gothic arch tracing and protrusive interocclusal records were obtained for each patient. Protrusive interocclusal record was used to program the Hanau Wide-Vue semi-adjustable articulator, thus obtaining the sagittal condylar guidance angle. Using RadiAnt DICOM software, on the orthopantomogram obtained for each patient in the study, two reference lines were drawn. The Frankfort's horizontal plane and the mean curvature line (joining the most superior and the inferior points on the glenoid fossa curvature) were drawn. The mean curvature line was extended to intersect the Frankfort's horizontal plane, thus obtaining the radiographic sagittal condylar guidance angle. The condylar guidance angles obtained by these two methods were compared and subjected to paired t -test. There was no statistically significant difference between the sagittal condylar guidance angles obtained between right and left sides with intraoral gothic arch tracing and radiographic methods ( P = 0.107 and 0.07, respectively). Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that the protrusive condylar guidance angles obtained by panoramic radiograph may be used for programming semi-adjustable articulators.

  5. Exposure reduction in general dental practice using digital x-ray imaging system for intraoral radiography with additional x-ray beam filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Hitoshi; Mori, Toshimichi; Hayakawa, Yoshihiko; Kuroyanagi, Kinya; Ota, Yoshiko

    1997-01-01

    To measure exposure reduction in general dental practice using digital x-ray imaging systems for intraoral radiography with additional x-ray beam filter. Two digital x-ray imaging systems, Pana Digital (Pana-Heraus Dental) and CDR (Schick Technologies), were applied for intraoral radiography in general dental practice. Due to the high sensitivity to x-rays, additional x-ray beam filters for output reduction were used for examination. An Orex W II (Osada Electric Industry) x-ray generator was operated at 60 kVp, 7 mA. X-ray output (air-kerma; Gy) necessary for obtaining clinically acceptable images was measured at 0 to 20 cm in 5 cm steps from the cone tip using an ionizing chamber type 660 (Nuclear Associates) and compared with those for Ektaspeed Plus film (Eastman Kodak). The Pana Digital system was used with the optional filter supplied by Pana-Heraus Dental which reduced the output to 38%. The exposure necessary to obtain clinically acceptable images was only 40% of that for the film. The CDR system was used with the Dental X-ray Beam Filter Kit (Eastman Kodak) which reduced the x-ray output to 30%. The exposure necessary to obtain clinically acceptable images was only 20% of that for the film. The two digital x-ray imaging systems, Pana Digital and CDR, provided large dose savings (60-80%) compared with Ektaspeed Plus film when applied for intraoral radiography in general dental practice. (author)

  6. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fareed, Ali [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States); Craig, Phillip A. [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  7. Oriented Fiber Filter Media

    OpenAIRE

    R. Bharadwaj; A. Patel, S. Chokdeepanich, Ph.D.; G.G. Chase, Ph.D.

    2008-01-01

    Coalescing filters are widely used throughout industry and improved performance will reduce droplet emissions and operating costs. Experimental observations show orientation of micro fibers in filter media effect the permeability and the separation efficiency of the filter media. In this work two methods are used to align the fibers to alter the filter structure. The results show that axially aligned fiber media improve quality factor on the order of 20% and cutting media on an angle from a t...

  8. Passive fiber resonator gyro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groellmann, P.; Herth, J.; Kemmler, M.; Kempf, K.; Neumann, G.

    After presenting the design principles of the passive fiber resonator gyroscope, which possesses the good scale-factor stability and repeatability of its active, ring-laser gyro counterpart, attention is given to the state of the art in fiber-optic component fabrication, with a view to achieving the requirements of low-loss fiber resonators. Also important is the rugged narrow-band semiconductor-laser light source that had to be modified for application in a system of this kind. Such error terms as polarization cross coupling and fiber backscattering are discussed, and methods are presented with which system output can be improved.

  9. Agave Americana Leaf Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Hulle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing environmental problems, the problem of waste disposal and the depletion of non-renewable resources have stimulated the use of green materials compatible with the environment to reduce environmental impacts. Therefore, there is a need to design products by using natural resources. Natural fibers seem to be a good alternative since they are abundantly available and there are a number of possibilities to use all the components of a fiber-yielding crop; one such fiber-yielding plant is Agave Americana. The leaves of this plant yield fibers and all the parts of this plant can be utilized in many applications. The “zero-waste” utilization of the plant would enable its production and processing to be translated into a viable and sustainable industry. Agave Americana fibers are characterized by low density, high tenacity and high moisture absorbency in comparison with other leaf fibers. These fibers are long and biodegradable. Therefore, we can look this fiber as a sustainable resource for manufacturing and technical applications. Detailed discussion is carried out on extraction, characterization and applications of Agave Americana fiber in this paper.

  10. Airclad fiber laser technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2011-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last 5 years. Many of the traditional manufacturers of gas and solid-state lasers are now pursuing the fiber-based systems, which are displacing the conventional technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser systems ...... monolithic 350 W cw fiber laser system with an M2 of less than 1.1. © 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).......High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last 5 years. Many of the traditional manufacturers of gas and solid-state lasers are now pursuing the fiber-based systems, which are displacing the conventional technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser systems...... require reliable fibers with large cores, stable mode quality, and good power handling capabilities-requirements that are all met by the airclad fiber technology. In the present paper we go through many of the building blocks needed to build high-power systems and we show an example of a complete airclad...

  11. Ultrafine PBI fibers and yarns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, J. R.; Tan, M.

    1979-01-01

    Gentle precisely controlled process is used to draw polybenzimidazole (PBI) fibers to denier as low as 0.17 per fiber. Yarns of lightweight fibers could be useful in applications where lightweight textiles must withstand high temperatures, corrosion, or radiation.

  12. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... two types of dietary fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber retains water and turns to gel during digestion. ... and nutrient absorption from the stomach and intestine. Soluble fiber is found in foods such as oat bran, ...

  13. Comparison of clinical values between cone beam computed tomography and conventional intraoral radiography in periodontal and infrabony defect assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suphanantachat, Supreda; Tantikul, Keenna; Tamsailom, Suphot; Kosalagood, Pasupen; Nisapakultorn, Kanokwan; Tavedhikul, Kanoknadda

    2017-08-01

    The use of CBCT for periodontal diagnosis and treatment plan is limited. The aim of this study is to compare the assessment of periodontal conditions and infrabony defects between conventional intraoral radiography (IOR) and CBCT. The study included 25 subjects who had periodontitis and at least two infrabony defects. All subjects received clinical periodontal examination, IOR and CBCT. Three periodontists assigned periodontal diagnosis and prognosis of each tooth. For teeth with infrabony defects, the number of defect walls and treatment was determined. IOR and CBCT assessment was compared. There were 666 teeth and 123 infrabony defects. The overall concordance between IOR and CBCT for periodontal diagnosis, prognosis, infrabony defect type and infrabony defect treatment were 79.3%, 69.5%, 44.7% and 64.2%, respectively. IOR underestimated diagnosis, prognosis and the number of infrabony defect walls at 16.4%, 24% and 37.4%, respectively. IOR and CBCT had poor concordance for periodontal regeneration (43.3%). Tooth extraction was more prevalent when assessed by CBCT (35.0% vs 22.7%). CBCT had excellent interexaminer agreement (Fleiss' kappa 0.87-0.94) and higher percentage of complete agreement among examiners than IOR for all assessments. IOR underestimated the severity and prognosis of periodontal disease. CBCT was superior to IOR for evaluation of infrabony defect morphology and treatment. CBCT provides excellent agreement among examiners on periodontal and infrabony defect assessment.

  14. Inverted L osteotomy: a new approach via intraoral access through the advances of virtual surgical planning and custom fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter B. Franco, DMD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a novel surgical approach via intraoral access to the Inverted L osteotomy utilizing virtual surgical planning (VSP and patient-specific customized mandibular fixation. VSP in orthognathic surgery has been well documented in its ability to increase preoperative and intraoperative efficiency, decrease cost and operating room time, and improve predictability and patient outcomes. In addition to occlusal splints, the adjunctive cutting guides and reference templates generated through computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing further aids in the precise transfer of the virtual plan to the intraoperative procedure. As the application of VSP is becoming more prevalent in the surgical treatment dentofacial deformities, 3-D virtual planning is moving beyond cutting jigs and guides and into the fabrication of patient-specific customized mandibular reconstruction plates in both the orthognathic and reconstructive arenas. Orthognathic surgery can be essential for the establishment of sound function and ideal esthetics for individuals who possess a dentofacial deformity. VSP and customized mandibular reconstruction plates have great potential to help safely guide the inverted L osteotomy and produce predictable functional and esthetic results while improving efficiency preoperatively as well as intraoperatively.

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of Image Enhancement in Intra-Oral Direct Digital Radiography in the Assessment of Interproximal Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Esmaeili

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The first commercial system for digital radiography was introduced in 1987, and it has evolved a great deal since then. Currently, it is possible to enhance images in digital radiography. Objectives The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of image enhancement in direct digital radiography as it relates to interproximal carries assessment. Materials and Methods Following extraction, 50 human teeth were kept in acidic gel (methyl cellulose + acetate buffer PH = 4.8 for 42 days at 37°C to cause caries before mounting. Direct digital radiography was then taken. Two filters were used: sharpen and emboss. Three radiologists evaluated the images with two weeks interval. The histologic assessments were gold standard. Additionally, SPSS 20 was used to draw an ROC curve and calculate AUC. Cohen’s kappa and interclass correlation coefficient (ICC were used to measure intra- and inter-observer reliability. Results For the emboss filter, sensitivity was 95%, specificity was 100%, and accuracy was 96%. For the sharpen filter, sensitivity was 88%, specificity was 100%, and accuracy was 90%. Also, the AUC for the emboss filter was 0.97, and it was 0.94 for the sharpen filter. Cohen’s simple kappa was in the range of excellent. Conclusions Using these filters in intra-oral direct digital radiography (especially the emboss filter can help some clinicians to increase diagnostic accuracy in the assessment of inter proximal caries of posterior teeth.

  16. In Vitro Comparison of D and F Speed Intraoral Radiographic Films in the Detection of Proximal Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliehsadat Javadzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of fast films is one of the major factors contributing to dose reduction. However, the diagnostic ability of fast film must be determined before current use of the films. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficiency of D and F speed films in the diagnosis of proximal caries.Materials & Methods: Eighty proximal surfaces in 40 extracted unrestored premolars were undergone radiography in standardized conditions using D- and F-speed flowdental intraoral films. True caries diagnosis was based on histological assessment of the surfaces after sectioning the teeth. Two observers read the radiographs using a four-point scale to record their diagnosis. Observer responses were evaluated using ROC analysis and areas under the ROC Curves (Az was microscopical assessed by pairwise comparison of ROC Curve.Results: D and F speed films had a mean Az of 0.934 and 0.920 respectively. The difference was not statistically significant (P=0.548 Difference between observers was also not statistically significant.Conclusion: The efficiency of the new F-Speed films was not statistically different from that D Speed films in caries detection. This film shows the ability of reducing patient’s dose while maintaining diagnostic quality.

  17. Dentists' use of digital radiographic techniques: Part I - intraoral X-ray: a questionnaire study of Swedish dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenson, Björn; Ståhlnacke, Katri; Karlsson, Reet; Fält, Anna

    2018-03-01

    The present study aims to gain knowledge about the dentist's use and choice of digital intraoral imaging methods. A questionnaire sent to 2481 dentists within the Swedish Dental Society contained questions about the type of X-ray technique used, problems experienced with digital radiography, and reasons for choosing digital technology, and about indications, clinic size and type of service. Response rate was 53%. Ninety-eight percent of the dentists had made the transition to digital radiography; only 2% used film technique, and solid-state detector (SSD) was the most used digital technique. More years in service decreases the likelihood of applying individual indications for performing a full mouth examination. More retakes were done with SSDs compared to storage phosphor plates. Reasons for choosing digital techniques were that work was easier and communication with the patients improved. However, dentists also experienced problems with digital techniques, such as exposure and projection errors and inadequate image quality. The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority states that all radiological examinations should be justified, something not always followed. This study showed that 98% of the respondents, Swedish dentists within the Swedish Dental Society, used digital techniques, and the most used was the solid-state technique.

  18. Validity, reliability, and reproducibility of the iOC intraoral scanner: a comparison of tooth widths and Bolton ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Devan; Freer, Terrence J

    2013-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the validity, reliability, and reproducibility of the iOC intraoral scanner (Cadent, Carlstadt, NJ) and its associated OrthoCAD software (Cadent) in measuring tooth widths and deriving Bolton ratios. Thirty subjects had impressions taken of their teeth and rendered as stone casts. In addition, their mouths were scanned with the iOC and the scans were converted into digital models. Tooth widths were measured with a digital caliper from the physical models and with the OrthoCAD software from the virtual models. Bolton ratios were derived using the data from each method. Validity was assessed with a paired t test, reliability with the Pearson correlation coefficient, and reproducibility with the intraclass correlation coefficient. Although there were statistically significant differences between mean tooth widths (P = 0.0083) and Bolton ratios (P = 0.0354 and P orthodontic aid. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Psychological, behavioral, and clinical effects of intra-oral camera: a randomized control trial on adults with gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Mário-Rui; Alvarez, Maria-João; Godinho, Cristina A; Pereira, Cícero

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of using an intra-oral camera (IOC) during supportive periodontal therapy (SPT), on the psychological, behavioral, and clinical parameters of patients with gingivitis, outlined by evidence and a theory-based framework. A group of 78 adult patients with gingivitis receiving an SPT was randomized into two groups: IOC and control. Bleeding on Marginal Probing (BOMP), self-reported dental hygiene behaviors, and psychological determinants of behavior change (outcome expectancies, self-efficacy, and planning) and IOC opinion were evaluated 1 week before or during the appointment and 4 months later. Repeated-measures anova was used to compare groups over time. Almost all the patients brushed their teeth daily, while 78% either never or hardly ever used dental floss. The IOC group showed significant improvements in BOMP index (P < 0.001), self-reported flossing (P < 0.05), and self-efficacy (P < 0.05) compared to the control group. The use of IOC significantly improves clinical, behavioral, and psychological determinants of periodontal health 4 months after treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Long-Term Stability of Pre-Orthodontic Orthognathic Bimaxillary Surgery Using Intraoral Vertical Ramus Osteotomy Versus Conventional Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jeong-Hwa; Choi, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Kee-Deog; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Lee, Sang-Hwy; Yu, Hyung-Seog

    2018-02-20

    The aim of the present study was to compare the long-term stability of bimaxillary surgery using an intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO) with and without presurgical orthodontic treatment. The present retrospective study included 31 consecutive patients with skeletal Class III malocclusions who had undergone bimaxillary surgery (Le Fort I osteotomy and bilateral IVRO). Patients were divided into 2 groups based on treatment type: pre-orthodontic orthognathic surgery (POGS; n = 17) and conventional surgery with presurgical orthodontic treatment (CS; n = 14). Lateral cephalograms were obtained before surgery, 1 day after surgery, 1 month after surgery, 1 year after surgery, and 2 years after surgery to evaluate skeletal and soft tissue changes between the 2 groups. Data were analyzed using χ 2 tests, Mann-Whitney U tests, repeated-measures analyses of variance, and independent t tests. There was no significant difference in skeletal or soft tissue measurements-with the exception of the angle between the sella-and-nasion plane and the occlusal plane (SN-OP; P stability in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. The three-dimensional assessment of dynamic changes of the proximal segments after intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Seigo; Nakao, Noriko; Awara, Kousuke; Tobita, Takayoshi; Minamizato, Tokutarou; Kawasaki, Takako; Koga, Takamitsu; Nakatani, Yuya; Yoshida, Noriaki; Asahina, Izumi

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the positional changes of the proximal segments after intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO). Fifteen patients underwent IVRO and were followed according to the authors' unique postoperative management regimen. The analyses of the positions and angles of the proximal segments were performed on frontal and lateral cephalograms, which were taken before surgery (T1) and within 3 days (T2), at 4 weeks (T3), and later than 6 months after surgery (T4). The three-dimensional positions of the condylar heads were also assessed by CT images, which were taken before and 1 year after surgery. The proximal segments temporarily swung posteriorly and laterally with a center on the condylar head as a fulcrum point at T2 and T3, compared with T1, and they repositioned at T4. The condylar heads moved inferior approximately 2 mm with lateral rotation one year after surgery, as seen in the CT. The condylar heads changed their positions physiologically for newly established jaw movement after IVRO with the authors' post-operative management regimen because the post-operative skeletal stability and the jaw function were good and stable using this method.

  2. [Intra-oral digital photography with the non professional camera--simplicity and effectiveness at a low price].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackstein, M

    2006-10-01

    Over the last five years digital photography has become ubiquitous. For the family photo album, a 4 or 5 megapixel camera costing about 2000 NIS will produce satisfactory results for most people. However, for intra-oral photography the common wisdom holds that only professional photographic equipment is up to the task. Such equipment typically costs around 12,000 NIS and includes the camera body, an attachable macro lens and a ringflash. The following article challenges this conception. Although professional equipment does produce the most exemplary results, a highly effective database of clinical pictures can be compiled even with a "non-professional" digital camera. Since the year 2002, my clinical work has been routinely documented with digital cameras of the Nikon CoolPix series. The advantages are that these digicams are economical both in price and in size and allow easy transport and operation when compared to their expensive and bulky professional counterparts. The details of how to use a non-professional digicam to produce and maintain an effective clinical picture database, for documentation, monitoring, demonstration and professional fulfillment, are described below.

  3. Method of carbonizing polyacrylonitrile fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, D. E.; Lerner, N. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of carbonizing polyacrylonitrile fibers by exposing the fibers at an elevated temperature to an oxidizing atmosphere; then exposing the oxidized fibers to an atmosphere of an inert gas such as nitrogen containing a carbonaceous material such as acetylene. The fibers are preferably treated with an organic compound, for example benzoic acid, before the exposure to an oxidizing atmosphere. The invention also relates to the resulting fibers. The treated fibers have enhanced tensile strength.

  4. Applications of nonlinear fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind

    2008-01-01

    * The only book describing applications of nonlinear fiber optics * Two new chapters on the latest developments: highly nonlinear fibers and quantum applications* Coverage of biomedical applications* Problems provided at the end of each chapterThe development of new highly nonlinear fibers - referred to as microstructured fibers, holey fibers and photonic crystal fibers - is the next generation technology for all-optical signal processing and biomedical applications. This new edition has been thoroughly updated to incorporate these key technology developments.The bo

  5. Optical fibers for communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloge, D

    1974-02-01

    The transparency of glass fibers in the visible and near infrared-improved beyond all expectations by recent breakthroughs-seems now sufficient to transmit optical signals unprocessed over miles. No wonder that efforts have intensified all over the world to utilize fibers in future communication systems. Materials research and fabrication are the fields where present progress is most rapid. New ways of preform preparation by deposition, doping, or diffusion are being studied and found to offer improvements and versatility. As far as materials are concerned, fused silica has shown the lowest bulk losses and hence receives the most interest, but many glasses are being studied as well. As new processes become available and record lows in fiber loss are being reached, propagation theory is finding new challenges as well. On the one hand, multimode fibers seem desirable with respect to transmitter compatibility, splicing, and fabrication tolerances. On the other hand, the signal distortion caused by mode delay differences in multimode fibers can be considerable and requires equalization-inherent in the fiber or at the fiber end. Beyond that, the wavelength dependence of the refractive index produces dispersion effects serious enough to be of importance. Thinking ahead, one is confronted with the question of fiber handling, strength, and life. The technology of making cables and splices from a brittle material like glass is in its infancy, and we can only indicate the extent of these difficult problems ahead.

  6. Fiber reinforced engineering plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Rodney E. Jacobson; Karl D. Sears; John H. Underwood

    2001-01-01

    Although natural fiber reinforced commodity thermoplastics have a wide range of nonstructural applications in the automotive and decking industries, there have been few reports of cellulosic fiber-reinforced engineering thermoplastics. The commonly held belief has been that the only thermoplastics amenable to natural-fibre reinforcement are limited to low-melting (...

  7. Multimode optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot-Astruc, Marianne; Molin, Denis; Sillard, Pierre

    2014-11-04

    A depressed graded-index multimode optical fiber includes a central core, an inner depressed cladding, a depressed trench, an outer depressed cladding, and an outer cladding. The central core has an alpha-index profile. The depressed claddings limit the impact of leaky modes on optical-fiber performance characteristics (e.g., bandwidth, core size, and/or numerical aperture).

  8. Super capacitor with fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph Collin; Kaschmitter, James

    2015-02-17

    An electrical cell apparatus includes a first current collector made of a multiplicity of fibers, a second current collector spaced from the first current collector; and a separator disposed between the first current collector and the second current collector. The fibers are contained in a foam.

  9. Fiber Sensor Technology Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotate, Kazuo

    2006-08-01

    Fiber sensor technologies are overviewed. Since the early 1970s, this field has been developed, on the basis of the same devices and photonic principles as fiber communication technologies. Besides simple configurations, in which the fiber acts only as a data transmission line, sophisticated configurations have also been developed, in which the fiber is used as a device to realize unique sensing mechanisms. The fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) is a good example, and has been developed as an absolute rotation sensor used, for example, for navigation and/or attitude control applications. Compared with traditional spinning-mass gyroscopes, the FOG has advantages, such as a short warming-up time, a light weight, and easy handling. A Japanese satellite, which was launched in August 2005 with a mission to observe the aurora, is controlled with a FOG. The FOG has also been used in consumer applications, such as the camera stabilizer, radio-controlled (RC) helicopter navigation, and the control of humanoid robots. Recently, distributed and multiplexed sensing schemes, in particular, have been studied and developed, in which a long fiber acts like a “nerve” for feeling the strain and/or the temperature distribution along the fiber. Performances of artificial nerve systems have markedly improved within the last couple of years, in spatial resolution and measurement speed. By embedding the “fiber-optic nerve system” in aircraft wings, bridges and tall buildings, these materials and structures can sense damage to prevent disasters.

  10. High-density multicore fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takenaga, K.; Matsuo, S.; Saitoh, K.

    2016-01-01

    High-density single-mode multicore fibers were designed and fabricated. A heterogeneous 30-core fiber realized a low crosstalk of −55 dB. A quasi-single-mode homogeneous 31-core fiber attained the highest core count as a single-mode multicore fiber.......High-density single-mode multicore fibers were designed and fabricated. A heterogeneous 30-core fiber realized a low crosstalk of −55 dB. A quasi-single-mode homogeneous 31-core fiber attained the highest core count as a single-mode multicore fiber....

  11. What is dietary fiber?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosky, L

    2000-01-01

    Dietary fiber consists of the remnants of the edible plant cell, polysaccharides, lignin, and associated substances resistant to digestion (hydrolysis) by human alimentary enzymes. This physiological definition has been translated into a chemical method (AOAC Method 985.29), which has recently been shown to miss substances of 10, 11, and 12 degrees of polymerization. It also fails to precipitate some hydrolysis-resistant oligosaccharides which contain many physiological properties expected in dietary fiber, such as inulin and oligofructose, indigestible dextrin (Fibersol-2), galactooligosaccharides and the synthetic polymer polydextrose. The Executive Board of the American Association of Cereal Chemists has appointed a committee to explore the possibility of expanding the definition or chemical methodology for dietary fiber to accommodate components that are not hydrolyzed by human alimentary enzymes, yet have the physiological attributes normally associated with dietary fiber. However, the present review suggests that the current definition is sufficient, along with new methodology, to detect recently discovered components of the dietary fiber complex.

  12. Fiber optic hydrophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Davis, D.T.

    1994-05-10

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is disclosed. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optical fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends. 2 figures.

  13. Green insulation: hemp fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2011-09-15

    Indian hemp (Cannabis indica) is known for its psychotropic values and it is banned in most countries. However, industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa) is known for its tough fibers. Several manufactures in Europe including, small niche players, have been marketing hemp insulation products for several years. Hemp is a low environmental impact material. Neither herbicide nor pesticide is used during the growth of hemp. The fibers are extracted in a waste-free and chemical-free mechanical process. Hemp can consume CO2 during its growth. In addition, hemp fiber can be disposed of harmlessly by composting or incineration at the end of its life. Hemp fibers are processed and treated only minimally to resist rot and fungal activity. There is little health risk when producing and installing the insulation, thanks to the absence of toxic additive. Its thermal resistance is comparable to mineral wool. But the development and marketing of hemp fibers may be restricted in North America.

  14. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... applications, and places emphasis on the development of polarization maintaining (PM) HC-PCF. The polarization cross-coupling characteristics of PM HC-PCF are very different from those of conventional PM fibers. The former fibers have the advantage of suffering far less from stress-field fluctuations...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  15. Fiber optic hydrophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Paul J.; Davis, Donald T.

    1994-01-01

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optic fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends.

  16. Raman fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book serves as a comprehensive, up-to-date reference about this cutting-edge laser technology and its many new and interesting developments. Various aspects and trends of Raman fiber lasers are described in detail by experts in their fields. Raman fiber lasers have progressed quickly in the past decade, and have emerged as a versatile laser technology for generating high power light sources covering a spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. The technology is already being applied in the fields of telecommunication, astronomy, cold atom physics, laser spectroscopy, environmental sensing, and laser medicine. This book covers various topics relating to Raman fiber laser research, including power scaling, cladding and diode pumping, cascade Raman shifting, single frequency operation and power amplification, mid-infrared laser generation, specialty optical fibers, and random distributed feedback Raman fiber lasers. The book will appeal to scientists, students, and technicians seeking to understand the re...

  17. Bite force measurement based on fiber Bragg grating sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padma, Srivani; Umesh, Sharath; Asokan, Sundarrajan; Srinivas, Talabattula

    2017-10-01

    The maximum level of voluntary bite force, which results from the combined action of muscle of mastication, joints, and teeth, i.e., craniomandibular structure, is considered as one of the major indicators for the functional state of the masticatory system. Measurement of voluntary bite force provides useful data for the jaw muscle function and activity along with assessment of prosthetics. This study proposes an in vivo methodology for the dynamic measurement of bite force employing a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor known as bite force measurement device (BFMD). The BFMD developed is a noninvasive intraoral device, which transduces the bite force exerted at the occlusal surface into strain variations on a metal plate. These strain variations are acquired by the FBG sensor bonded over it. The BFMD developed facilitates adjustment of the distance between the biting platform, which is essential to capture the maximum voluntary bite force at three different positions of teeth, namely incisor, premolar, and molar sites. The clinically relevant bite forces are measured at incisor, molar, and premolar position and have been compared against each other. Furthermore, the bite forces measured with all subjects are segregated according to gender and also compared against each other.

  18. High fiber-low matrix composites: kenaf fiber/polypropylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand R. Sanadi; J.F. Hunt; D.F. Caulfield; G. Kovacsvolgyi; B. Destree

    2002-01-01

    Considerable interest has been generated in the use of lignocellulosic fibers and wastes (both agricultural and wood based) as fillers and reinforcements in thermoplastics. In general, present technologies limit fiber loading in thermoplastics to about 60 percent by weight of fiber. To produce high fiber content composites for commercial use while maintaining adequate...

  19. Planar fiber-optic chips for broadband spectroscopic interrogation of thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Brooke M; Shallcross, R Clayton; Jang, Jinuk; Armstrong, Neal R; Mendes, Sergio B

    2007-06-01

    A planar fiber-optic chip (FOC) has been developed using side-polished optical fibers and characterized for broadband absorbance and fluorescence detection of molecular films. FOC technology combines the sensitivity of an attenuated total reflection (ATR) element with the ease of use of fiber-optic-based spectrometers and light sources to create an improved platform for spectroscopic analysis of molecular adsorbates. A multi-mode optical fiber (core diameter = 50 mum, numerical aperture = 0.22, stepped refractive index profile) mounted in a glass V-groove block was side-polished to create a planar platform that allows access to the evanescent field escaping from the fiber core. For this generation of FOC technology, the exposed evanescent field has an interaction length of approximately 17.2 mm. The FOC platform was independently characterized through measurements of thin-film and bulk absorbing samples. The device performance was compared to the existing ATR technology and methods for increasing sensitivity of the FOC were investigated and validated. Additionally, we have demonstrated the ability of the FOC to both evanescently excite and collect fluorescence through guided modes of the optical fiber for a surface-confined luminescent semiconductor nanoparticle film (4 nm diameter, ligand capped, CdSe core). The FOC described here with a supported planar interface can facilitate the use of conventional planar deposition technologies and provide a robust planar platform that is amenable for incorporation into various sensor technologies.

  20. Fiber Pulling Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.; OBrien, Sue; Adcock, Leonard

    1998-01-01

    The fiber optics industry has grown into a multi-billion marketplace that will continue to grow into the 21st century. Optical fiber communications is currently dominated by silica glass technology. Successful efforts to improve upon the low loss transmission characteristics of silica fibers have propelled the technology into the forefront of the communications industry. However, reaching the theoretical transmission capability of silica fiber through improved processing has still left a few application areas in which other fiber systems can provide an influential role due to specific characteristics of high theoretical transmission in the 2 - 3 micron wavelength region. One of the other major materials used for optical fibers is the systems based upon Heavy Metal Fluoride Glass (HMFG). Commercial interest is driven primarily by the potential for low loss repeaterless infrared fibers. An example of the major communications marketplace which would benefit from the long distance repeaterless capability of infrared fibers is the submarine cables which link the continents. When considering commercial interests, optical fiber systems provide a healthy industrial position which continues to expand. Major investments in the systems used for optical fiber communications have continued to increase each year and are predicted to continue well into the next century. Estimates of 8.5% compounded annually are predicted through 1999 for the North American market and 1 1 % worldwide. The growth for the optical fiber cable itself is expected to continue between 44 and 50 per cent of the optical fiber communications budget through 1999. The total budget in 1999 world-wide is expected to be in the neighborhood of $9 billion. Another survey predicts that long haul telecommunications represents 15% of a world-wide fiber optics market in 1998. The actual amount allotted to cable was not specified. However, another market research had predicted that the cable costs alone represents more

  1. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  2. Kinetics of stress fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachowiak, Matthew R; O'Shaughnessy, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Stress fibers are contractile cytoskeletal structures, tensile actomyosin bundles which allow sensing and production of force, provide cells with adjustable rigidity and participate in various processes such as wound healing. The stress fiber is possibly the best characterized and most accessible multiprotein cellular contractile machine. Here we develop a quantitative model of the structure and relaxation kinetics of stress fibers. The principal experimentally known features are incorporated. The fiber has a periodic sarcomeric structure similar to muscle fibers with myosin motor proteins exerting contractile force by pulling on actin filaments. In addition the fiber contains the giant spring-like protein titin. Actin is continuously renewed by exchange with the cytosol leading to a turnover time of several minutes. In order that steady state be possible, turnover must be regulated. Our model invokes simple turnover and regulation mechanisms: actin association and dissociation occur at filament ends, while actin filament overlap above a certain threshold in the myosin-containing regions augments depolymerization rates. We use the model to study stress fiber relaxation kinetics after stimulation, as observed in a recent experimental study where some fiber regions were contractile and others expansive. We find that two distinct episodes ensue after stimulation: the turnover-overlap system relaxes rapidly in seconds, followed by the slow relaxation of sarcomere lengths in minutes. For parameter values as they have been characterized experimentally, we find the long time relaxation of sarcomere length is set by the rate at which actin filaments can grow or shrink in response to the forces exerted by the elastic and contractile elements. Consequently, the stress fiber relaxation time scales inversely with both titin spring constant and the intrinsic actin turnover rate. The model's predicted sarcomere velocities and contraction-expansion kinetics are in good

  3. Kinetics of stress fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, Matthew R; O' Shaughnessy, Ben [Department of Chemical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)], E-mail: bo8@columbia.edu

    2008-02-15

    Stress fibers are contractile cytoskeletal structures, tensile actomyosin bundles which allow sensing and production of force, provide cells with adjustable rigidity and participate in various processes such as wound healing. The stress fiber is possibly the best characterized and most accessible multiprotein cellular contractile machine. Here we develop a quantitative model of the structure and relaxation kinetics of stress fibers. The principal experimentally known features are incorporated. The fiber has a periodic sarcomeric structure similar to muscle fibers with myosin motor proteins exerting contractile force by pulling on actin filaments. In addition the fiber contains the giant spring-like protein titin. Actin is continuously renewed by exchange with the cytosol leading to a turnover time of several minutes. In order that steady state be possible, turnover must be regulated. Our model invokes simple turnover and regulation mechanisms: actin association and dissociation occur at filament ends, while actin filament overlap above a certain threshold in the myosin-containing regions augments depolymerization rates. We use the model to study stress fiber relaxation kinetics after stimulation, as observed in a recent experimental study where some fiber regions were contractile and others expansive. We find that two distinct episodes ensue after stimulation: the turnover-overlap system relaxes rapidly in seconds, followed by the slow relaxation of sarcomere lengths in minutes. For parameter values as they have been characterized experimentally, we find the long time relaxation of sarcomere length is set by the rate at which actin filaments can grow or shrink in response to the forces exerted by the elastic and contractile elements. Consequently, the stress fiber relaxation time scales inversely with both titin spring constant and the intrinsic actin turnover rate. The model's predicted sarcomere velocities and contraction-expansion kinetics are in good

  4. Optical fiber spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Weixin; Tian Guocheng; Ye Guoan; Zhou Zhihong; Cheng Weiwei; Huang Lifeng; Liu Suying; Tang Yanji; Hu Jingxin; Zhao Yonggang

    1998-12-01

    A method called 'Two Arm's Photo out and Electricity Send-back' is introduced. UV-365 UV/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer has been reequipped by this way with 5 meters long optical fiber. Another method called 'One Arm's Photo out and Photo Send-back' is also introduced. λ 19 UV/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer has been reequipped by this way with 10 meters long optical fiber. Optical fiber spectrophotometer can work as its main set. So it is particularly applicable to radio activity work

  5. QUARTZ FIBER ELECTROSCOPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, R.P.

    1957-09-17

    An instrument carried unobtrusively about the person such as in a finger ring to indicate when that person has been exposed to an unusual radiation hazard is described. A metallized quartz fiber is electrically charged to indicate a full scale reading on an etched glass background. The quartz fiber and the scale may be viewed through a magnifying lens for ease of reading. Incident radiation will ionize gaseous particles in the sealed structure thereby allowing the charge to leak off the quartz fiber with its resulting movement across the scale proportionally indicating the radiation exposure.

  6. The importance of team work of cytologist and surgeon in preoperative diagnosis of intraoral minor salivary gland tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostović, Karmen Trutin; Luksić, Ivica; Virag, Miso; Macan, Darko; Müllers, Danko; Manojlović, Spomenka

    2012-11-01

    Tumours arising from oral minor salivary glands may exhibit an overlap of clinical and morphological features that may produce diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. The aim of this study is to asses the value of fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in differentiation of benign and malignant tumours and to render a specific diagnosis. We evaluated the team work of surgeon and cytologist to improve diagnostic accuracy. Two steps are important for accuracy: sampling aspirate that should be done together by surgeon and cytologist and cytological microscopic analysis of the smears that should be performed by an experienced cytologist. The study included 132 patients with intraoral minor salivary gland tumours between 2002 and 2011. Adequate material was obtained from 121 (91.7%) patients. FNAC was usually performed by cytologist in a team with maxillofacial surgeon at cytology department that is more convenient for preparing the samples and especially for ROSE procedure (rapid-on site evaluation) of smears. In such a way the cytologist checked the adequacy of samples and decided whether some ancillary techniques should be used and therefore repeat FNAC. A total of 82 patients underwent surgery, 40 with malignant and 42 with benign tumours. Preoperative cytological diagnoses were compared with histopathological ones using histopathology as a gold standard. The most common benign tumour was pleomorphic adenoma and among malignant tumours adenoid cystic carcinoma. The most commonly affected site was the palate. The team work of surgeon and cytologist achieved specificity of 95.1%, sensitivity of 97.6% and diagnostic accuracy of 96.3%. We can conclude that although subclassification of some tumour types of salivary glands remains poor, FNAC is invaluable in patient triage and therefore should be considered in the first line investigations of these lesions by the cytologist and surgeon.

  7. An Arch-Shaped Intraoral Tongue Drive System with Built-in Tongue-Computer Interfacing SoC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangue Park

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a new arch-shaped intraoral Tongue Drive System (iTDS designed to occupy the buccal shelf in the user’s mouth. The new arch-shaped iTDS, which will be referred to as the iTDS-2, incorporates a system-on-a-chip (SoC that amplifies and digitizes the raw magnetic sensor data and sends it wirelessly to an external TDS universal interface (TDS-UI via an inductive coil or a planar inverted-F antenna. A built-in transmitter (Tx employs a dual-band radio that operates at either 27 MHz or 432 MHz band, according to the wireless link quality. A built-in super-regenerative receiver (SR-Rx monitors the wireless link quality and switches the band if the link quality is below a predetermined threshold. An accompanying ultra-low power FPGA generates data packets for the Tx and handles digital control functions. The custom-designed TDS-UI receives raw magnetic sensor data from the iTDS-2, recognizes the intended user commands by the sensor signal processing (SSP algorithm running in a smartphone, and delivers the classified commands to the target devices, such as a personal computer or a powered wheelchair. We evaluated the iTDS-2 prototype using center-out and maze navigation tasks on two human subjects, which proved its functionality. The subjects’ performance with the iTDS-2 was improved by 22% over its predecessor, reported in our earlier publication.

  8. Applying psychological theory to evidence-based clinical practice: identifying factors predictive of taking intra-oral radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Debbie; Pitts, Nigel B; Eccles, Martin; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Johnston, Marie; Steen, Nick; Glidewell, Liz; Thomas, Ruth; Maclennan, Graeme; Clarkson, Jan E; Walker, Anne

    2006-10-01

    This study applies psychological theory to the implementation of evidence-based clinical practice. The first objective was to see if variables from psychological frameworks (developed to understand, predict and influence behaviour) could predict an evidence-based clinical behaviour. The second objective was to develop a scientific rationale to design or choose an implementation intervention. Variables from the Theory of Planned Behaviour, Social Cognitive Theory, Self-Regulation Model, Operant Conditioning, Implementation Intentions and the Precaution Adoption Process were measured, with data collection by postal survey. The primary outcome was the number of intra-oral radiographs taken per course of treatment collected from a central fee claims database. Participants were 214 Scottish General Dental Practitioners. At the theory level, the Theory of Planned Behaviour explained 13% variance in the number of radiographs taken, Social Cognitive Theory explained 7%, Operant Conditioning explained 8%, Implementation Intentions explained 11%. Self-Regulation and Stage Theory did not predict significant variance in radiographs taken. Perceived behavioural control, action planning and risk perception explained 16% of the variance in number of radiographs taken. Knowledge did not predict the number of radiographs taken. The results suggest an intervention targeting predictive psychological variables could increase the implementation of this evidence-based practice, while influencing knowledge is unlikely to do so. Measures which predicted number of radiographs taken also predicted intention to take radiographs, and intention accounted for significant variance in behaviour (adjusted R(2)=5%: F(1,166)=10.28, ptheory-based approach enabled the creation of a methodology that can be replicated for identifying factors predictive of clinical behaviour and for the design and choice of interventions to modify practice as new evidence emerges.

  9. Influence of thickness increase of intraoral autopolymerizing hard denture base liners on the temperature rise during the polymerization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimiou, Anna Maria; Michalakis, Konstantinos; Pissiotis, Argirios

    2014-06-01

    Increasing the thickness of intraoral autopolymerizing hard denture base liners may result in a temperature rise and a burning sensation for patients. The purpose of the study was to determine whether increasing the thickness of hard autopolymerizing reline resin increases the temperature of the basal seat area of a denture during the polymerization process. Four polyethyl methacrylate and 1 polymethyl methacrylate autopolymerizing reline resin products of 3 different thicknesses were tested. A cobalt-chromium edentulous maxillary cast was used to obtain 150 stone casts, 50 for each thickness of 1, 2, and 3 mm (n=10). Polystyrene record bases were filled with the autopolymerizing reline resin mixture and placed on the cobalt-chromium cast, which was mounted on a reline index, to serve as denture substitutes. Two thermal probes were used to monitor the temperature rise, which was recorded at 30-second intervals until no further increase was noted. Collected data were subjected to a 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey honestly significant difference test (α=.05). The mean temperature increase for the chairside denture reline procedure ranged from 39.45°C for the 1-mm thickness to 46.10°C for the 3-mm thickness. The 2-way ANOVA found significant differences (Pbase liner produced a significantly higher (P<.001) exothermic reaction than the other materials included in this study. One of the polyethyl methacrylate resins presented a higher exothermic reaction than the polymethyl methacrylate product at a 3-mm thickness, but the difference was not statistically significant. The polymethyl methacrylate resin presented the highest mean time to reach the maximum temperature for all 3 thicknesses. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of a mucoadhesive fenretinide patch for local intraoral delivery: a strategy to reintroduce fenretinide for oral cancer chemoprevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holpuch, Andrew S.; Phelps, Maynard P.; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H.; Chen, Wei; Koutras, George M.; Han, Byungdo B.; Warner, Blake M.; Pei, Ping; Seghi, Garrett A.; Tong, Meng; Border, Michael B.; Fields, Henry W.; Stoner, Gary D.; Larsen, Peter E.; Liu, Zhongfa; Schwendeman, Steven P.; Mallery, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic delivery of fenretinide in oral cancer chemoprevention trials has been largely unsuccessful due to dose-limiting toxicities and subtherapeutic intraoral drug levels. Local drug delivery, however, provides site-specific therapeutically relevant levels while minimizing systemic exposure. These studies evaluated the pharmacokinetic and growth-modulatory parameters of fenretinide mucoadhesive patch application on rabbit buccal mucosa. Fenretinide and blank-control patches were placed on right/left buccal mucosa, respectively, in eight rabbits (30 min, q.d., 10 days). No clinical or histological deleterious effects occurred. LC-MS/MS analyses of post-treatment samples revealed a delivery gradient with highest fenretinide levels achieved at the patch-mucosal interface (no metabolites), pharmacologically active levels in fenretinide-treated oral mucosa (mean: 5.65 μM; trace amounts of 4-oxo-4-HPR) and undetectable sera levels. Epithelial markers for cell proliferation (Ki-67), terminal differentiation (transglutaminase 1—TGase1) and glucuronidation (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase1A1—UGT1A1) exhibited fenretinide concentration-specific relationships (elevated TGase1 and UGT1A1 levels 5μM) relative to blank-treated epithelium. All fenretinide-treated tissues showed significantly increased intraepithelial apoptosis (TUNEL) positivity, implying activation of intersecting apoptotic and differentiation pathways. Human oral mucosal correlative studies showed substantial interdonor variations in levels of the enzyme (cytochrome P450 3A4—CYP3A4) responsible for conversion of fenretinide to its highly active metabolite, 4-oxo-4-HPR. Complementary in vitro assays in human oral keratinocytes revealed fenretinide and 4-oxo-4-HPR’s preferential suppression of DNA synthesis in dysplastic as opposed to normal oral keratinocytes. Collectively, these data showed that mucoadhesive patch-mediated fenretinide delivery is a viable strategy to reintroduce a compound known to

  11. In vivo determination of tooth mobility after fixed orthodontic appliance therapy with a novel intraoral measurement device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konermann, Anna; Al-Malat, R; Skupin, J; Keilig, L; Dirk, C; Karanis, R; Bourauel, C; Jäger, A

    2017-05-01

    Valid measurement systems recording tooth mobility upon displacement within the subtle range of physiological strains are missing. Here, we introduce a novel in vivo measurement device and demonstrate a first clinical application by monitoring tooth mobility changes during retention after fixed multibracket appliance therapy. Tooth mobility was measured in vivo on 21 patients (11 female, 10 male; mean age 16.1 ± 3.1 years) by displacing the upper first incisor 0.2 mm lingually for 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10 s with the novel intraoral device. Measurements were recorded directly after, as much as 2, 7, and 14 days and up to 6 months after appliance debonding. Device performance was precise and valid in clinical use. Data revealed significant interindividual varying tooth mobility, which was very high during the first 2 days after appliance removal. After 1 week, mobility values decreased, but were generally higher upon short loadings compared to long ones. After 3 months, tooth mobility was significantly lower than directly after debonding. Interestingly, males exhibited significantly less mobility than females. Our work is the first using an in vivo measurement device capable of performing and recording tooth displacements within this delicate range and in such precision. Furthermore, our findings elucidate tooth mobility changes after multibracket treatment, giving important information for retention periods. Establishment of this novel measurement device in clinical use is an important improvement when approaching the complexity of tooth mobility in vivo regarding different issues like orthodontics, periodontal disease, or bruxism.

  12. Anatomically Based Outcome Predictors of Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Intraoral Splint Devices: A Systematic Review of Cephalometric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarda-Nardini, Luca; Manfredini, Daniele; Mion, Marta; Heir, Gary; Marchese-Ragona, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this review is to summarize data from the literature on the predictive value of anatomy-based parameters, as identified by cephalometry, for the efficacy of mandibular advancement devices (MAD) for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: Articles were initially selected based on their titles or abstracts. Full articles were then retrieved and further scrutinized according to predetermined criteria. Reference lists of selected articles were searched for any missed publications. The selected articles were methodologically evaluated. Results: Of an initial 311 references, 13 were selected that assessed correlations between polysomnographic and cephalometric variables. The majority of studies demonstrated a correlation between treatment effectiveness and features as determined by cephalometric analysis, such as the mandibular plane angle, hyoid bone distance to mandible, antero-posterior diameter of the maxilla, tongue area, cranial base, and soft palate. Conclusions: The mandibular plane angle and the distance between hyoid bone and mandibular plane was found to have a predictive value for MAD effectiveness in OSA patients. However, the relative weak and somewhat inconsistent cephalometric data suggest that decisions based solely on these factors cannot be recommended, especially because an integrated analysis of other risk factors (e.g., age, sex, BMI) should also be taken into account. Citation: Guarda-Nardini L, Manfredini D, Mion M, Heir G, Marchese-Ragona R. Anatomically based outcome predictors of treatment for obstructive sleep apnea with intraoral splint devices: a systematic review of cephalometric studies. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(11):1327–1334. PMID:25979102

  13. Analysis of Shade Matching in Natural Dentitions Using Intraoral Digital Spectrophotometer in LED and Filtered LED Light Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitrarsu, Vijai Krishnan; Chidambaranathan, Ahila Singaravel; Balasubramaniam, Muthukumar

    2017-10-31

    To evaluate the shade matching capabilities in natural dentitions using Vita Toothguide 3D-Master and an intraoral digital spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade Advance 4.0) in various light sources. Participants between 20 and 40 years old with natural, unrestored right maxillary central incisors, no history of bleaching, orthodontic treatment, or malocclusion and no rotations were included. According to their shades, subjects were randomly selected and grouped into A1, A2, and A3. A total of 100 participants (50 male and 50 female) in each group were chosen for this study. Shade selection was made between 10 am and 2 pm for all light sources. The same examiner selected the shade of natural teeth with Vita Toothguide 3D-Master under natural light within 2 minutes. Once the Vita Toothguide 3D-Masterwas matched with the maxillary right central incisor, the L*, a*, and b* values, chroma, and hue were recorded with Vita Easyshade Advance 4.0 by placing it on the shade tab under the same light source. The values were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test with SPSS v22.0 software. The mean ∆E* ab values for shades A1, A2, and A3 for groups 1, 2, and 3 were statistically significantly different from each other (p spectrophotometer showed statistically significant differences in shade matching compared to Vita Toothguide 3D-Master. Incandescent light showed more accurate shade matching than the filtered LED, LED, and daylight. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. Evaluation of the effect scan pattern has on the trueness and precision of six intraoral digital impression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennito, Anthony S; Evans, Zachary P; Lauer, Abigail W; Patel, Ravi B; Ludlow, Mark E; Renne, Walter G

    2018-03-01

    Clinicians have been slow to adopt digital impression technologies due possibly to perceived technique sensitivities involved in data acquisition. This research has two aims: determine whether scan pattern and sequence affects the accuracy of the three-dimensional (3D) model created from this digital impression and to compare the 5 imaging systems with regards to their scanning accuracy for sextant impressions. Six digital intraoral impression systems were used to scan a typodont sextant with optical properties similar to natural teeth. The impressions were taken using five different scan patterns and the resulting digital models were overlayed on a master digital model to determine the accuracy of each scanner performing each scan pattern. Furthermore, regardless of scan pattern, each digital impression system was evaluated for accuracy to the other systems in this same manner. No differences of significance were noted in the accuracy of 3D models created using six distinct scan patterns with one exception involving the CEREC Omnicam. Planmeca Planscan was determined to be the truest scanner while 3Shape Trios was determined to be the most precise for sextant impression making. Scan pattern does not significantly affect the accuracy of the resulting digital model for sextant scanning. Companies who make digital impression systems often recommend a scan pattern specific for their system. However, every clinical scanning scenario is different and may require a different approach. Knowing how important scan pattern is with regards to accuracy would be helpful for guiding a growing number of practitioners who are utilizing this technology. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A 3 years retrospective study of survival for zirconia-based single crowns fabricated from intraoral digital impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherlone, Enrico; Mandelli, Federico; Capparè, Paolo; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Traini, Tonino; Ferrini, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical performance of glass-ceramic/zirconia crowns fabricated using intraoral digital impressions - a retrospective study with a three-year follow-up. 70 consecutive patients with a total of 86 glass-ceramic/zirconia crowns were treated by a single clinician using standardized clinical and laboratory protocols. A complete digital workflow was adopted for the purpose except for the veneering procedure for the glass-ceramic crowns. Occlusal adjustments were made before the ceramic glazing procedure. Before cementation, all abutments where carefully cleaned with a 70% alcoholic solution and air dried. Cementation was performed using dual-curing, self-adhesive resin cement. Patients were re-examined after 12, 24 and 36 months, to assess crown chipping/fractures. After the three-year follow-up, none of the zirconia-based restoration was lost ("apparent" survival rate 100%) otherwise, the chipping rate of the veneering material increased from 9.3% after 12 months, to 14% after 24 months to 30.2% after 36 months. As a consequence, the "real" success rate after 3 years was 69.8%. After 3 years the success rate of zirconia-based crowns was 69.8%, while the incidence of the chipping was 30.2%. Assuming an exponential increase in chipping rate between 12 and 36 months it can be argued that, among others, the fatigue-mechanism could be advocated as the main factor for the failure of glass-ceramic veneered zirconia especially after 24 months. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduced Gravity Zblan Optical Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    2000-01-01

    Two optical fiber pullers have been designed for pulling ZBLAN optical fiber in reduced gravity. One fiber puller was designed, built and flown on board NASA's KC135 reduced gravity aircraft. A second fiber puller has been designed for use on board the International Space Station.

  17. Comparison of fiber length analyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don Guay; Nancy Ross Sutherland; Walter Rantanen; Nicole Malandri; Aimee Stephens; Kathleen Mattingly; Matt Schneider

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, several fiber new fiber length analyzers have been developed and brought to market. The new instruments provide faster measurements and the capability of both laboratory and on-line analysis. Do the various fiber analyzers provide the same length, coarseness, width, and fines measurements for a given fiber sample? This paper provides a comparison of...

  18. Tunable femtosecond Cherenkov fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Svane, Ask Sebastian; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate electrically-tunable femtosecond Cherenkov fiber laser output at the visible range. Using an all-fiber, self-starting femtosecond Yb-doped fiber laser as the pump source and nonlinear photonic crystal fiber link as the wave-conversion medium, ultrafast, milliwatt-level, tunable...

  19. Fiber optics: A research paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drone, Melinda M.

    1987-01-01

    Some basic aspects concerning fiber optics are examined. Some history leading up to the development of optical fibers which are now used in the transmission of data in many areas of the world is discussed. Basic theory of the operation of fiber optics is discussed along with methods for improving performance of the optical fiber through much research and design. Splices and connectors are compared and short haul and long haul fiber optic networks are discussed. Fiber optics plays many roles in the commercial world. The use of fiber optics for communication applications is emphasized.

  20. Fiber Laser Array

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simpson, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    ...., field-dependent, loss within the coupled laser array. During this program, Jaycor focused on the construction and use of an experimental apparatus that can be used to investigate the coherent combination of an array of fiber lasers...

  1. Low-fiber diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diet - clear liquid Diet - full liquid Diverticulitis and diverticulosis - discharge Ileostomy and your child Ileostomy and your ... Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Crohn's Disease Dietary Fiber Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis Ostomy Ulcerative Colitis Browse the Encyclopedia ...

  2. Simulating Optical Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Dale

    1988-01-01

    Described is a demonstration of Snell's law using a laser beam and an optical fiber. Provided are the set-up method of the demonstration apparatus and some practical suggestions including "index matching" technique using vaseline. (YP)

  3. Photonic Crystal Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kristiansen, Rene E

    2005-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Crystal Fibre A/S as follows: Crystal Fibre will conduct research and development of large mode area, dual clad multi-core Yb-doped photonic crystal fiber...

  4. Fiber Optics: No Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A campus computer center at Hofstra University (New York) that holds 70 terminals for student use was first a gymnasium, then a language laboratory. Strands of fiber optics are used for the necessary wiring. (MLF)

  5. Fiber optic gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng (Inventor); Buric, Michael P. (Inventor); Swinehart, Philip R. (Inventor); Maklad, Mokhtar S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gas sensor includes an in-fiber resonant wavelength device provided in a fiber core at a first location. The fiber propagates a sensing light and a power light. A layer of a material is attached to the fiber at the first location. The material is able to absorb the gas at a temperature dependent gas absorption rate. The power light is used to heat the material and increases the gas absorption rate, thereby increasing sensor performance, especially at low temperatures. Further, a method is described of flash heating the gas sensor to absorb more of the gas, allowing the sensor to cool, thereby locking in the gas content of the sensor material, and taking the difference between the starting and ending resonant wavelengths as an indication of the concentration of the gas in the ambient atmosphere.

  6. Fiber Optic Bragg Gratings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Battiato, James

    1998-01-01

    Coupled mode theory was used to model reflection fiber gratings. The effects of experimental parameters on grating characteristics were modeled for both uniform and non-uniform grating profiles using this approach...

  7. Robust Fiber Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goettler, Richard

    2002-01-01

    The highly desired ceramic matrix composite is the one in which the high strength and strain-to-failure is achieved through judicious selection of a fiber coating that can survive the high-temperature...

  8. Cerenkov fiber sampling calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrington, K.; Kefford, D.; Kennedy, J.; Pisani, R.; Sanzeni, C.; Segall, K.; Wall, D.; Winn, D.R.; Carey, R.; Dye, S.; Miller, J.; Sulak, L.; Worstell, W.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Savin, A.; Shmakov, K.; Tarkovsky, E.

    1994-01-01

    Clear optical fibers were used as a Cerenkov sampling media in Pb (electromagnetic) and Cu (hadron) absorbers in spaghetti calorimeters, for high rate and high radiation dose experiments, such as the forward region of high energy colliders. The fiber axes were aligned close to the direction of the incident particles (1 degree--7 degree). The 7 λ deep hadron tower contained 2.8% by volume 1.5 mm diameter core clear plastic fibers. The 27 radiation length deep electromagnetic towers had packing fractions of 6.8% and 7.2% of 1 mm diameter core quartz fibers as the active Cerenkov sampling medium. The energy resolution on electrons and pions, energy response, pulse shapes and angular studies are presented

  9. Fiber optics standard dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Weik, Martin H

    1997-01-01

    Fiber Optics Vocabulary Development In 1979, the National Communications System published Technical InfonnationBulle­ tin TB 79-1, Vocabulary for Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications, written by this author. Based on a draft prepared by this author, the National Communications System published Federal Standard FED-STD-1037, Glossary of Telecommunications Terms, in 1980 with no fiber optics tenns. In 1981, the first edition of this dictionary was published under the title Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications Standard Dictionary. In 1982, the then National Bureau of Standards, now the National Institute of Standards and Technology, published NBS Handbook 140, Optical Waveguide Communications Glossary, which was also published by the General Services Admin­ istration as PB82-166257 under the same title. Also in 1982, Dynamic Systems, Inc. , Fiberoptic Sensor Technology Handbook, co-authored and edited by published the this author, with an extensive Fiberoptic Sensors Glossary. In 1989, the handbook w...

  10. Multibeam fiber laser cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Hansen, Klaus Schütt; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    2009-01-01

    of single mode fiber laser power. Burr free cuts in 1 mm steel and aluminum and in 1 and 2 mm AISI 304 stainless steel is demonstrated over a wide range of cutting rates. The industrial realization of this approach is foreseen to be performed by either beam patterning by diffractive optical elements......The appearance of the high power high brilliance fiber laser has opened for new possibilities in laser materials processing. In laser cutting this laser has demonstrated high cutting performance compared to the dominating Cutting laser, the CO2 laser. However, quality problems in fiber...... to control the melt flow out of the cut kerf resulting in improved cut quality in metal cutting. The beam patterns in this study are created by splitting up beams from two single mode fiber lasers and combining these beams into a pattern in the cut kerf. The results are obtained with a total of 550 W...

  11. Effect of using an intra-oral camera as a reinforcement tool for plaque control in a supervised toothbrushing program: An interventional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Machale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Supervised toothbrushing program at schools have indicated limited improvement in oral hygiene among children. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate whether the use of an intra-oral camera as a reinforcement tool in a supervised tooth brushing program at school can improve plaque control. Materials and Methods: A double-blind, parallel, two arm interventional study was conducted among 120 school children from 2 schools, aged 12-year in Pune. The study group received an intervention of supervised toothbrushing and reinforcement sessions for 30 days using intra-oral camera. The control group received only supervised toothbrushing. Evaluation for plaque control was performed at the end of 30 days, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months. Analysis of co-variance was used to find the intergroup difference at different time intervals. Analysis of variance was used to find the intragroup differences of the plaque scores. Post hoc Bonferroni test was used to find the pairwise changes in plaque scores between different time intervals. Results: In the study group, the mean plaque score was reduced to a significant extent from baseline to 30 days and 3 months (P < 0.05 and then the plaque score remained stable until the end of 12 months. While in the control group, the plaque score increased compared to baseline. There was a statistically significant difference between the mean plaque scores of study and control group at each time interval (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Intra-oral camera can be effectively used as a reinforcement tool in supervised toothbrushing program at school for achieving higher plaque reduction.

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of small volume cone beam computed tomography and intraoral periapical radiography for the detection of simulated external inflammatory root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durack, C; Patel, S; Davies, J; Wilson, R; Mannocci, F

    2011-02-01

    To compare in an ex vivo model the ability of digital intraoral radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to detect simulated external inflammatory root resorption lesions, and to investigate the effect of altering the degree of rotation of the CBCT scanners X-ray source and imaging detector on the ability to detect the same lesions. Small and large simulated external inflammatory resorption (EIR) lesions were created on the roots of 10 mandibular incisor teeth from three human mandibles. Small volume CBCT scans with 180° and 360° of X-ray source rotation and periapical radiographs, using a digital photostimulable phosphor plate system, were taken prior to and after the creation of the EIR lesions. The teeth were relocated in their original sockets during imaging. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis and kappa tests of the reproducibility of the imaging techniques were carried out and sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were also determined for each technique. The overall area under the ROC curve (Az value) for intraoral radiography was 0.665, compared to Az values of 0.984 and 0.990 for 180° and 360° CBCT, respectively (Pradiography (Pperiapical radiography. The intra- and inter-examiner agreement was significantly better for CBCT than it was for intraoral radiography (Pperiapical radiographs (Pperiapical radiography. Small volume CBCT operating with 360° of rotation of the X-ray source and detector is no better at detecting small, artificially created EIR cavities than the same device operating with 180° of rotation. © 2010 International Endodontic Journal.

  13. Shear Bond Strength of Intraoral Laser Welding and its Effect on Intrapulpal Temperature Rise in Primary Teeth: An in Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglarci, Cahide; Yildiz, Esma; Isman, Eren; Kazak, Mine

    2016-03-01

    This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of conventional welding (CW) and intraoral laser welding (LW) on fixed space maintainers (SMs), and investigated the intrapulpal temperature change (ITC) during LW. Lasers have been used for intraoral welding. The SBS test used 26 molar bands divided into two groups, CW and LW. Stainless steel wires were welded to the middle of the buccal and lingual aspects of all the bands, using an Nd:YAG laser for the LW group and silver solder and flux soldering media for the CW group. The samples, fixed to acrylic resin blocks, were subjected to shear testing. In the ITC test, 25 exfoliated primary second molar teeth were used to adapt molar bands. J-type thermocouple wire was positioned in the pulp chamber. ITCs were determined during Nd:YAG laser welding of stainless steel wires to the bands. Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine differences in SBS between the groups. ITCs were analyzed by paired t test. The SBS between groups showed significant differences (LW: 489.47 ± 135.70; CW: 49.71 ± 17.76; p < 0.001). The mean ITC during LW was 3.64 ± 0.79 (min: 2.4; max: 5.10). None of the samples' ITCs exceeded the critical threshold value (5.5 °C). LW obtained a higher-strength joint than CW. ITCs during LW do not present a thermal risk to primary teeth. The intraoral use of LW for SMs in primary teeth is recommended in terms of strength and ITCs.

  14. Evaluation of surface radiation dose to the thyroid gland and the gonads during routine full-mouth intraoral periapical and maxillary occlusal radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheyl Sheikh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The quantitative aspects of radiation doses to critical organs can help the dental professionals to take the necessary radiation protective measures as deemed necessary and can help the general public to allay radiation exposure fear in dental radiography, if any. Our study determines the surface radiation dose to thyroid and gonads in full-mouth intraoral periapical (IOPA and maxillary occlusal radiography.Materials and Methods: A total number of 120 subjects participated in the study. The surface radiation dose was estimated to the thyroid gland and the gonads in full-mouth IOPA radiography using 10 IOPA (E speed films and in maxillary occlusal radiography. The measurements were calculated using a digital pocket dosimeter (PD-4507.Results: The average dose at the thyroid gland level during full-mouth intraoral and maxillary occlusal radiography was estimated to be 10.93 mRads (1.093 Χ 10 -2 mGy and 0.4 mRads (4.0 Χ 10 -2 mGy, respectively. The average surface radiation dose at the gonadal region during a full mouth intraoral and maxillary occlusal radiography was estimated to be 1.5 mRads (1.5 Χ 10 -2 mGy and 0.15 mRads (1.5 Χ 10 -3 mGy, respectively. Conclusion: Our results suggest that although the radiation exposure doses to critical organs namely thyroid and gonads is within the safe limits still precautionary measures for these organs are advocated.

  15. In-line Fiber Polarizer

    OpenAIRE

    Perumalsamy, Priya

    1998-01-01

    Polarizers and polarization devices are important components in fiber optic communication and sensor systems. There is a growing need for efficient low loss components that are compatible with optical fibers. An all fiber in-line polarizer is a more desirable alternative that could be placed at appropriate intervals along communication links. An in-line fiber polarizer was fabricated and tested. The in-line fiber polarizer operates by coupling optical energy propagatin...

  16. Radiation Damage of Quartz Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Hagopian, V

    1999-01-01

    Quartz fibers are used in high energy physics experiments as the active medium in high radiation area calorimetry. Quartz fibers are also used in the transmission of optical signals. Even though quartz does not damage by moderate amounts of irradiation, the clad of the fibers and the protective coating ( buffer) do damage reducing light transmission. Various types of quartz fibers have been irradiated and measured for light transmission. The most radiation hard quartz fibers are those with qu...

  17. Fiber optics welder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R.W.; Robichaud, R.E.

    A system is described for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45/sup 0/ angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  18. Fiber optic detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  19. Extending fiber resources : fiber loading recycled fiber and mechanical pulps for lightweight, high opacity paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguerite Sykes; John Klungness; Freya Tan; Mathew Stroika; Said Abubakr

    1999-01-01

    Production of a lightweight, high opacity printing paper is a common goal of papermakers using virgin or recycled fibers. Fiber loading is an innovative, commercially viable process that can substantially upgrade and extend most types of wood fibers. Fiber loading, a process carried out at high consistency and high alkalinity, precipitates calcium carbonate (PCC) in...

  20. [To bite or to scan? Dental impressions with alginate, PVS or -intra-oral scanning; processing time and patient comfort. A pilotstudy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darroudi, M; Ariens, Z P A; Zinsmeister, V Z; Breuning, K H

    2017-02-01

    In recent years technology has enabled dental professionals to make digital dental models using intra-oral scanners. In a study involving 10 test cases, a comparison was made between the digital impression technique and 2 -conventional impression techniques, using alginate and Polivinyl Syloxane™. With the 3 different techniques, dental impressions were made of the lower and upper arches; the processing time required for each and the differences in patient comfort were recorded. The individuals in the test cases experienced no difference in comfort between the alginate and the digital impression. The impression technique involving Polivinyl Syloxane™ was experienced as less comfortable. The digital impression technique appeared to be the most time consuming.

  1. Effects of Intraoral Ageing on Ultimate Tensile Strength and Surface Topography of Superelastic NiTi Wires from Two Different Manufacturers: A Comparative in vivo Study

    OpenAIRE

    A Pravin Devaprasad; T R Chandrasekaran

    2012-01-01

    Aim : The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the ultimate tensile strength/fracture resistance of superelastic NiTi wires from two manufacturers 3M Unitek and American orthodontics in as received condition, after 3 months and 6 months of intraoral use. The wires would also be evaluated for surface characteristics under a scanning electron microscope. Materials and methods: Superelastic NiTi wires of 0.016" from 3M Unitek were categorized as group I and from American orthodon...

  2. FIBER OPTIC LIGHTING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir BATUR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently there have been many important and valuable developments in the communication industry. The huge increase in the sound, data and visual communications has caused a parallel increase in the demand for systems with wider capacity, higher speed and higher quality. Communication systems that use light to transfer data are immensely increased. There have recently many systems in which glass or plastic fiber cables were developed for light wave to be transmitted from a source to a target place. Fiber optic systems, are nowadays widely used in energy transmission control systems, medicine, industry and lighting. The basics of the system is, movement of light from one point to another point in fiber cable with reflections. Fiber optic lighting systems are quite secure than other lighting systems and have flexibility for realizing many different designs. This situation makes fiber optics an alternative for other lighting systems. Fiber optic lighting systems usage is increasing day-by-day in our life. In this article, these systems are discussed in detail.

  3. Electrospun amplified fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-03-11

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm(-1)). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics.

  4. Cellulosic Fibers: Effect of Processing on Fiber Bundle Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Madsen, Bo; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2011-01-01

    A range of differently processed cellulosic fibers from flax and hemp plants were investigated to study the relation between processing of cellulosic fibers and fiber bundle strength. The studied processing methods are applied for yarn production and include retting, scutching, carding, and cotto......A range of differently processed cellulosic fibers from flax and hemp plants were investigated to study the relation between processing of cellulosic fibers and fiber bundle strength. The studied processing methods are applied for yarn production and include retting, scutching, carding...

  5. Optical fiber stripper positioning apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Richard W.; Sanchez, Jr., Amadeo

    1990-01-01

    An optical fiber positioning apparatus for an optical fiber stripping device is disclosed which is capable of providing precise axial alignment between an optical fiber to be stripped of its outer jacket and the cutting blades of a stripping device. The apparatus includes a first bore having a width approximately equal to the diameter of an unstripped optical fiber and a counter bore axially aligned with the first bore and dimensioned to precisely receive a portion of the stripping device in axial alignment with notched cutting blades within the stripping device to thereby axially align the notched cutting blades of the stripping device with the axis of the optical fiber to permit the notched cutting blades to sever the jacket on the optical fiber without damaging the cladding on the optical fiber. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus further includes a fiber stop which permits determination of the length of jacket to be removed from the optical fiber.

  6. Natural Fiber Composites: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westman, Matthew P.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Laddha, Sachin; Kafentzis, Tyler A.

    2010-03-07

    The need for renewable fiber reinforced composites has never been as prevalent as it currently is. Natural fibers offer both cost savings and a reduction in density when compared to glass fibers. Though the strength of natural fibers is not as great as glass, the specific properties are comparable. Currently natural fiber composites have two issues that need to be addressed: resin compatibility and water absorption. The following preliminary research has investigated the use of Kenaf, Hibiscus cannabinus, as a possible glass replacement in fiber reinforced composites.

  7. Carbon fiber electrometer for dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piltingsrud, H.V.

    1976-01-01

    An electrometer for conventional pocket radiation dosimeters is disclosed in which the moving element of the electrometer is a carbon fiber. The fiber is spun from polyacrylonitrile homopolymer yarn and has a diameter of approximately 7 microns before carbonization. The polyacrylonitrile homopolymer fiber is conventionally preoxidized at approximately 270 0 C before conventional carbonization at approximately 1200 0 C. The resulting working fiber has a round cross sectional diameter of approximately 4 microns and a modulus of elasticity of approximately 15,000,000 psi. The fiber is mounted in a conventionally loop shaped electrometer frame by crimping the ends of the fiber into tabs on the frame. 2 claims, 5 figures

  8. Comparison between intraoral indirect and conventional film-based imaging for the detection of dental root fractures: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintaku, Werner H; Venturin, Jaqueline S; Noujeim, Marcel; Dove, Stephen B

    2013-12-01

    Digital intraoral radiographic systems have been rapidly replacing conventional dental X-ray films for diagnosis of dental diseases. Current scientific literature supports the use of these digital systems for the detection of dental caries, periodontal bone loss, and periapical pathologies. However, relatively few studies have been published addressing the detection of dental root fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare the intraoral F-speed film (Insight) with two photostimulable phosphor (PSP) indirect digital systems (ScanX and Digora Optime) for the detection of simulated dental root fractures. Ten raters evaluated images acquired from 10 dry human cadaver mandibles under optimal viewing conditions. These data were analyzed by a 5-point receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for statistical differences. Sensitivity and specificity of these systems were also assessed. Since statistically significant difference between the systems was not observed, the results of this study agreeably support indirect digital PSP plates as an alternative to the evaluated conventional film for the detection of dental root fractures. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. A preliminary report on patient acceptance of a novel intra-oral lubricating device for the management of radiotherapy-related xerostomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Andrew Y L; McMillan, Anne S; Pow, Edmond H N; Leung, Katherine C M; Luk, Henry W K

    2005-09-01

    Management of radiotherapy-related xerostomia is difficult. Saliva substitutes are helpful but the effects are short-lived. The purpose of the study was to develop a prototype intra-oral lubricating device for the management of radiotherapy-related xerostomia and to evaluate patient acceptance. An intra-oral lubricating device was fabricated that incorporated a reservoir in the palatal vault and permitted slow release of saliva substitute by the patient. Preliminary clinical testing was done in five patients with radiotherapy-related xerostomia. A measure incorporating seven questions was used to explore patient acceptance. The device was simple to fabricate using materials available in a technical laboratory. All patients were able to wear the device for at least 4 h per day throughout the test period. The device was considered easy to use and clean. Some impairment of speech and chewing was noted although this appeared to be related to the bulkiness of the reservoir. General oral comfort was improved due to the lubricating effect. The bulk of the reservoir was reduced as a consequence of patient feedback. The design addressed key problems associated with previous lubricating systems. Patient reports on oral functioning with the device in situ provided pivotal information on the device's utility.

  10. An in vivo study to correlate the relationship of the extraoral and intraoral anatomical landmarks with the occlusal plane in dentulous subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ruchi; Shigli, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    The occlusal plane position is considered to be the primary link between esthetic and function. To evaluate the relationship between extraoral and intraoral soft tissue landmarks with the occlusal plane in dentulous subjects on both sides and to check for any variations. An in vivo study and 100 subjects with all healthy permanent teeth in normal arch and alignment were selected from Modern Dental College and Research Centre, Indore. Three custom made instruments (occlusal plane analyzer, buccinator groove relator, and level analyzer) were indigenously designed to check parallelism of the interpupillary line, ala-tragus line, buccinator groove with the occlusal plane. Relation of retromolar pad with the occlusal plane was checked with the metallic scale. Chi-square test. In 20.0% subjects, the occlusal plane was parallel to the interpupillary line. The posterior reference point for ala-tragus line was middle point on right side in 56% and left side in 58% subjects. Intraorally, right side 59% and left side 62% subjects had the occlusal plane at the same level as that of buccinator groove. Right side 48% and left side 45% subjects showed occlusal plane at the middle one-third of retromolar pad. The occlusal plane is not generally parallel to interpupillary line. The occlusal plane is parallel to the ala-tragus line with middle point of tragus as posterior reference point on right and left sides. Both sides, the buccinator groove and the middle one-third retromolar pad are coinciding with occlusal plane level.

  11. Anisotropic elliptic optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Soon Ahm

    1991-05-01

    The exact characteristic equation for an anisotropic elliptic optical fiber is obtained for odd and even hybrid modes in terms of infinite determinants utilizing Mathieu and modified Mathieu functions. A simplified characteristic equation is obtained by applying the weakly guiding approximation such that the difference in the refractive indices of the core and the cladding is small. The simplified characteristic equation is used to compute the normalized guide wavelength for an elliptical fiber. When the anisotropic parameter is equal to unity, the results are compared with the previous research and they are in close agreement. For a fixed value normalized cross-section area or major axis, the normalized guide wavelength lambda/lambda(sub 0) for an anisotropic elliptic fiber is small for the larger value of anisotropy. This condition indicates that more energy is carried inside of the fiber. However, the geometry and anisotropy of the fiber have a smaller effect when the normalized cross-section area is very small or very large.

  12. Fiber ball imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jens H; Russell Glenn, G; Helpern, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    By modeling axons as thin cylinders, it is shown that the inverse Funk transform of the diffusion MRI (dMRI) signal intensity obtained on a spherical shell in q-space gives an estimate for a fiber orientation density function (fODF), where the accuracy improves with increasing b-value provided the signal-to-noise ratio is sufficient. The method is similar to q-ball imaging, except that the Funk transform of q-ball imaging is replaced by its inverse. We call this new approach fiber ball imaging. The fiber ball method is demonstrated for healthy human brain, and fODF estimates are compared to diffusion orientation distribution function (dODF) approximations obtained with q-ball imaging. The fODFs are seen to have sharper features than the dODFs, reflecting an enhancement of the higher degree angular frequencies. The inverse Funk transform of the dMRI signal intensity data provides a simple and direct method of estimating a fODF. In addition, fiber ball imaging leads to an estimate for the ratio of the fraction of MRI visible water confined to the intra-axonal space divided by the square root of the intra-axonal diffusivity. This technique may be useful for white matter fiber tractography, as well as other types of microstructural modeling of brain tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Strain Wave Acquisition by a Fiber Optic Coherent Sensor for Impact Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Sbarufatti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel fiber optic sensing technology for high frequency dynamics detection is proposed in this paper, specifically tailored for structural health monitoring applications based on strain wave analysis, for both passive impact identification and active Lamb wave monitoring. The sensing solution relies on a fiber optic-based interferometric architecture associated to an innovative coherent detection scheme, which retrieves in a completely passive way the high-frequency phase information of the received optical signal. The sensing fiber can be arranged into different layouts, depending on the requirement of the specific application, in order to enhance the sensor sensitivity while still ensuring a limited gauge length if punctual measures are required. For active Lamb wave monitoring, this results in a sensing fiber arranged in multiple loops glued on an aluminum thin panel in order to increase the phase signal only in correspondence to the sensing points of interest. Instead, for passive impact identification, the required sensitivity is guaranteed by simply exploiting a longer gauge length glued to the structure. The fiber optic coherent (FOC sensor is exploited to detect the strain waves emitted by a piezoelectric transducer placed on the aluminum panel or generated by an impulse hammer, respectively. The FOC sensor measurements have been compared with both a numerical model based on Finite Elements and traditional piezoelectric sensors, confirming a good agreement between experimental and simulated results for both active and passive impact monitoring scenarios.

  14. Strain Wave Acquisition by a Fiber Optic Coherent Sensor for Impact Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarufatti, Claudio; Beligni, Alessio; Gilioli, Andrea; Ferrario, Maddalena; Mattarei, Marco; Martinelli, Mario; Giglio, Marco

    2017-07-13

    A novel fiber optic sensing technology for high frequency dynamics detection is proposed in this paper, specifically tailored for structural health monitoring applications based on strain wave analysis, for both passive impact identification and active Lamb wave monitoring. The sensing solution relies on a fiber optic-based interferometric architecture associated to an innovative coherent detection scheme, which retrieves in a completely passive way the high-frequency phase information of the received optical signal. The sensing fiber can be arranged into different layouts, depending on the requirement of the specific application, in order to enhance the sensor sensitivity while still ensuring a limited gauge length if punctual measures are required. For active Lamb wave monitoring, this results in a sensing fiber arranged in multiple loops glued on an aluminum thin panel in order to increase the phase signal only in correspondence to the sensing points of interest. Instead, for passive impact identification, the required sensitivity is guaranteed by simply exploiting a longer gauge length glued to the structure. The fiber optic coherent (FOC) sensor is exploited to detect the strain waves emitted by a piezoelectric transducer placed on the aluminum panel or generated by an impulse hammer, respectively. The FOC sensor measurements have been compared with both a numerical model based on Finite Elements and traditional piezoelectric sensors, confirming a good agreement between experimental and simulated results for both active and passive impact monitoring scenarios.

  15. Low-loss infrared fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, J. A.

    1980-12-01

    This final report describes research on low-loss fiber waveguides for use in future long-distance fiber links. The goal of the program is to develop non-oxide-containing fibers with losses as low as 10 to the minus 3rd power dB/km. This work is part of an overall technology assessment to determine the feasibility of fabricating such ultra low loss optical fibers. The approach being used to develop these very transparent waveguides is to fabricate fiber from IR transmitting crystalline materials. The materials studied were the alkali and thallium halides. We found that we could not successfully apply our extrusion technology, developed for the thallium halides, to fabricate alkali halide fibers. Extruded KCl or CsI fibers, for example, always had poor surface quality due to surface cracks (fish-scale appearance). We therefore abandoned extrusion methods for the alkali halides in favor of other fiber fabrication techniques. An alternative technique used was single crystal (SC) fiber growth. SC fibers represent a potentially ideal waveguide because they are free from mechanical defects (such as strain fields associated with grain boundaries in extruded polycrystalline fibers) and thus should have less scattering losses than polycrystalline waveguides. To make SC fibers we used an inverted Czochralski growth technique and applied the method to KC1. By the end of the program we had not yet produced any SC KCl fiber, but we expect to do so shortly.

  16. Graphene fiber: a new trend in carbon fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen Xu; Chao Gao

    2015-01-01

    New fibers with increased strength and rich functionalities have been untiringly pursued by materials researchers. In recent years, graphene fiber has arisen as a new carbonaceous fiber with high expectations in terms of mechanical and functional performance. In this review, we elucidated the concept of sprouted graphene fibers, including strategies for their fabrication and their basic structural attributes. We examine the rapid advances in the promotion of mechanical/functional properties o...

  17. Higher Order Mode Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Israelsen, Stine Møller

    . In the second part of the thesis, a new scheme for constructing chirped microbend long period gratings is presented. The method presents a versatile platform for tailoring the chirp to the phase matching profile of the targeted HOM conversion in the fiber under test. The scheme introduces the ability......This PhD thesis considers higher order modes (HOMs) in optical fibers. That includes their excitation and characteristics. Within the last decades, HOMs have been applied both for space multiplexing in optical communications, group velocity dispersion management and sensing among others......-radial polarization as opposed to the linear polarization of the LP0X modes. The effect is investigated numerically in a double cladding fiber with an outer aircladding using a full vectorial modesolver. Experimentally, the bowtie modes are excited using a long period grating and their free space characteristics...

  18. Optical fiber switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    Optical fiber switches operated by electrical activation of at least one laser light modulator through which laser light is directed into at least one polarizer are used for the sequential transport of laser light from a single laser into a plurality of optical fibers. In one embodiment of the invention, laser light from a single excitation laser is sequentially transported to a plurality of optical fibers which in turn transport the laser light to separate individual remotely located laser fuel ignitors. The invention can be operated electro-optically with no need for any mechanical or moving parts, or, alternatively, can be operated electro-mechanically. The invention can be used to switch either pulsed or continuous wave laser light.

  19. Fiber wireless networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmalathas, A.; Bakaul, M.; Lim, C.; Novak, D.; Waterhouse, R.

    2005-11-01

    Broadband wireless networks based on a number of new frequency windows at higher microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies have been actively pursued to provide ultra-high bandwidth services over a wireless networks. These networks will have a large number of antenna base-stations with high throughput. Significant reductions in antenna base-station complexity can be achieved if most of the signal routing and switching functions centralized at a central office in the network. In such a network, fiber feed networks can be effectively deployed to provide high bandwidth interconnections between multiple antenna base-stations and the central office. With wavelength division multiplexing, efficient optical fiber feed network architectures could be realised to provide interconnection to a large number of antenna base-stations. In this paper, we present an over view of our recent research into system technologies for fiber wireless networks.

  20. Fiber optic calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudy, C.; Bayliss, S.; Bracken, D.; Bush, J.; Davis, P.

    1998-01-01

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using fiber for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processing to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microradian (μrad) to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 radians (rad) of phase shift per milliwatt of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% 240 Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium

  1. Fiber optic calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudy, C.R.; Bayliss, S.C.; Bracken, D.S.; Bush, I.J.; Davis, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using optical fibers for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processing to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microrad to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 rad of phase shift per mW of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% 240 Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium

  2. Fiber Optic Calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudy, C.; Bayliss, S.; Bracken, D.; Bush, J.; Davis, P.

    1997-01-01

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using optical fibers for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processes to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microradian (microrad) to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 radians (rad) of phase shift per milliwatt of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% 240 Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium

  3. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo

  4. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard C

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO 2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC) solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo properties, electrical

  5. K3-fibered Calabi-Yau threefolds II, singular fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    In part I of this paper we constructed certain fibered Calabi-Yaus by a quotient construction in the context of weighted hypersurfaces. In this paper look at the case of K3 fibrations more closely and study the singular fibers which occur. This differs from previous work since the fibrations we discuss have constant modulus, and the singular fibers have torsion monodromy.

  6. Nonlinear fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind

    2012-01-01

    Since the 4e appeared, a fast evolution of the field has occurred. The 5e of this classic work provides an up-to-date account of the nonlinear phenomena occurring inside optical fibers, the basis of all our telecommunications infastructure as well as being used in the medical field. Reflecting the big developments in research, this new edition includes major new content: slow light effects, which offers a reduction in noise and power consumption and more ordered network traffic-stimulated Brillouin scattering; vectorial treatment of highly nonlinear fibers; and a brand new chapter o

  7. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  8. Optical fiber rotation sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, William K; Kelley, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Optical Fiber Rotation Sensing is the first book devoted to Interferometric Fiber Optic Gyros (IFOG). This book provides a complete overview of IFOGs, beginning with a historical review of IFOG development and including a fundamental exposition of basic principles, a discussion of devices and components, and concluding with industry reports on state-of-the-art activity. With several chapters contributed by principal developers of this solid-state device, the result is an authoritative work which will serve as the resource for researchers, students, and users of IFOGs.* * State-of-t

  9. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...

  10. Fiber and Prebiotics: Mechanisms and Health Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Slavin, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    The health benefits of dietary fiber have long been appreciated. Higher intakes of dietary fiber are linked to less cardiovascular disease and fiber plays a role in gut health, with many effective laxatives actually isolated fiber sources. Higher intakes of fiber are linked to lower body weights. Only polysaccharides were included in dietary fiber originally, but more recent definitions have included oligosaccharides as dietary fiber, not based on their chemical measurement as dietary fiber b...

  11. Advances on Optical Fiber Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mescia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review paper some recent advances on optical fiber sensors are reported. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG, long period gratings (LPGs, evanescent field and hollow core optical fiber sensors are mentioned. Examples of recent optical fiber sensors for the measurement of strain, temperature, displacement, air flow, pressure, liquid-level, magnetic field, and the determination of methadone, hydrocarbons, ethanol, and sucrose are briefly described.

  12. Monolithically Integrated Fiber Optic Coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    single fused fiber 52 and drawn into ferrule 54 in order to provide an output as a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) or photonic bandgap ( PBG ) fiber 56...the reduced diameter air-silica photonic crystal fiber 56 (PCF) or photonic band gap ( PBG ), which is connected by a continuous transition of the... PBG 56 with a negative index of refraction includes metamaterials of superlattices formed by metal nanoparticles. The binary superlattices are

  13. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  14. In-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Libo; Yang, Jun; Liu, Zhihai; Sun, Jiaxing

    2006-09-15

    A novel fiber-optic in-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer has been proposed and demonstrated. It consists of a segment of two-core fiber with a mirrored fiber end. The sensing characteristics based on the two-core fiber bending, corresponding to the shift of the phase of the two-core in-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer, are investigated.

  15. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprehn, Gregory A.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Sandler, Pamela H.

    1997-01-01

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency.

  16. Optical fibers for FTTH application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzowski, Bartlomiej; Tosik, Grzegorz; Lisik, Zbigniew; Bedyk, Michal; Kubiak, Andrzej

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the specifics of FTTH (Fiber To The Home) networks in terms of requirements for optical fibers has been presented. Optical fiber samples used in FTTH applications acquired from the worldwide leading manufacturers were subjected to small diameter mandrel wraps tests. The detailed procedures of performed tests and the measurement results has been presented.

  17. Neuroanatomic Fiber Orientation Maps (FOMs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axer, Hubertus; Jantzen, Jan; Grässel, David

    2002-01-01

    A new neuroanatomic method is described which allows to map the orientation of central nervous fibers in gross histological sections. Polarised light is used to calculate the angle of inclination and direction of the fibers in each pixel. Serial fiber orientation maps (FOMs) can be aligned and 3D...

  18. Thermal properties of Fiber ropes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossolini, Elena; Nielsen, Ole Wennerberg; Oland, Espen

    There is a trend within the oil and gas market to shift from steel wire ropes to fiber ropes for lifting, hoisting and mooring applications. The cost of fiber ropes is about 2-3 times that of steel wire ropes, but the natural buoyancy of fiber ropes reduces the overall weight resulting in smaller...

  19. Fabrication of Optical Fiber Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Miguel V.

    In this paper we present the main research activities of the Laboratorio de Fibras Opticas del Instituto de Ciencia de los Materiales de la Universidad de Valencia. We show some of the main results obtained for devices based on tapered fibers, fiber Bragg gratings, acousto-optic effects and photonic crystal fibers.

  20. Carbon fiber counting. [aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for characterizing the number and lengths of carbon fibers accidentally released by the burning of composite portions of civil aircraft structure in a jet fuel fire after an accident. Representative samplings of carbon fibers collected on transparent sticky film were counted from photographic enlargements with a computer aided technique which also provided fiber lengths.