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Sample records for intraoperative brain-shift monitor

  1. Validation of model-based brain shift correction in neurosurgery via intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ma; Frisken, Sarah F.; Weis, Jared A.; Clements, Logan W.; Unadkat, Prashin; Thompson, Reid C.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Miga, Michael I.

    2017-03-01

    The quality of brain tumor resection surgery is dependent on the spatial agreement between preoperative image and intraoperative anatomy. However, brain shift compromises the aforementioned alignment. Currently, the clinical standard to monitor brain shift is intraoperative magnetic resonance (iMR). While iMR provides better understanding of brain shift, its cost and encumbrance is a consideration for medical centers. Hence, we are developing a model-based method that can be a complementary technology to address brain shift in standard resections, with resource-intensive cases as referrals for iMR facilities. Our strategy constructs a deformation `atlas' containing potential deformation solutions derived from a biomechanical model that account for variables such as cerebrospinal fluid drainage and mannitol effects. Volumetric deformation is estimated with an inverse approach that determines the optimal combinatory `atlas' solution fit to best match measured surface deformation. Accordingly, preoperative image is updated based on the computed deformation field. This study is the latest development to validate our methodology with iMR. Briefly, preoperative and intraoperative MR images of 2 patients were acquired. Homologous surface points were selected on preoperative and intraoperative scans as measurement of surface deformation and used to drive the inverse problem. To assess the model accuracy, subsurface shift of targets between preoperative and intraoperative states was measured and compared to model prediction. Considering subsurface shift above 3 mm, the proposed strategy provides an average shift correction of 59% across 2 cases. While further improvements in both the model and ability to validate with iMR are desired, the results reported are encouraging.

  2. Intraoperative Imaging Modalities and Compensation for Brain Shift in Tumor Resection Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siming Bayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative brain shift during neurosurgical procedures is a well-known phenomenon caused by gravity, tissue manipulation, tumor size, loss of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, and use of medication. For the use of image-guided systems, this phenomenon greatly affects the accuracy of the guidance. During the last several decades, researchers have investigated how to overcome this problem. The purpose of this paper is to present a review of publications concerning different aspects of intraoperative brain shift especially in a tumor resection surgery such as intraoperative imaging systems, quantification, measurement, modeling, and registration techniques. Clinical experience of using intraoperative imaging modalities, details about registration, and modeling methods in connection with brain shift in tumor resection surgery are the focuses of this review. In total, 126 papers regarding this topic are analyzed in a comprehensive summary and are categorized according to fourteen criteria. The result of the categorization is presented in an interactive web tool. The consequences from the categorization and trends in the future are discussed at the end of this work.

  3. Potential predictors for the amount of intra-operative brain shift during deep brain stimulation surgery

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    Datteri, Ryan; Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Konrad, Peter E.; Neimat, Joseph S.; D'Haese, Pierre-François; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2011-03-01

    A number of groups have reported on the occurrence of intra-operative brain shift during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. This has a number of implications for the procedure including an increased chance of intra-cranial bleeding and complications due to the need for more exploratory electrodes to account for the brain shift. It has been reported that the amount of pneumocephalus or air invasion into the cranial cavity due to the opening of the dura correlates with intraoperative brain shift. Therefore, pre-operatively predicting the amount of pneumocephalus expected during surgery is of interest toward accounting for brain shift. In this study, we used 64 DBS patients who received bilateral electrode implantations and had a post-operative CT scan acquired immediately after surgery (CT-PI). For each patient, the volumes of the pneumocephalus, left ventricle, right ventricle, third ventricle, white matter, grey matter, and cerebral spinal fluid were calculated. The pneumocephalus was calculated from the CT-PI utilizing a region growing technique that was initialized with an atlas-based image registration method. A multi-atlas-based image segmentation method was used to segment out the ventricles of each patient. The Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software package was utilized to calculate the volumes of the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), white matter and grey matter. The volume of individual structures had a moderate correlation with pneumocephalus. Utilizing a multi-linear regression between the volume of the pneumocephalus and the statistically relevant individual structures a Pearson's coefficient of r = 0.4123 (p = 0.0103) was found. This study shows preliminary results that could be used to develop a method to predict the amount of pneumocephalus ahead of the surgery.

  4. Framework for a low-cost intra-operative image-guided neuronavigator including brain shift compensation

    OpenAIRE

    Bucki, Marek; Lobos, Claudio; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology to address the problem of brain tissue deformation referred to as 'brain-shift'. This deformation occurs throughout a neurosurgery intervention and strongly alters the accuracy of the neuronavigation systems used to date in clinical routine which rely solely on pre-operative patient imaging to locate the surgical target, such as a tumour or a functional area. After a general description of the framework of our intra-operative image-guided system, we desc...

  5. Framework for a low-cost intra-operative image-guided neuronavigator including brain shift compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucki, M; Lobos, C; Payan, Y

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology to address the problem of brain tissue deformation referred to as 'brain-shift'. This deformation occurs throughout a neurosurgery intervention and strongly alters the accuracy of the neuronavigation systems used to date in clinical routine which rely solely on pre-operative patient imaging to locate the surgical target, such as a tumour or a functional area. After a general description of the framework of our intra-operative image-guided system, we describe a procedure to generate patient specific finite element meshes of the brain and propose a biomechanical model which can take into account tissue deformations and surgical procedures that modify the brain structure, like tumour or tissue resection.

  6. Integration of intraoperative stereovision imaging for brain shift visualization during image-guided cranial procedures

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    Schaewe, Timothy J.; Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Simon, David A.

    2014-03-01

    Dartmouth and Medtronic Navigation have established an academic-industrial partnership to develop, validate, and evaluate a multi-modality neurosurgical image-guidance platform for brain tumor resection surgery that is capable of updating the spatial relationships between preoperative images and the current surgical field. A stereovision system has been developed and optimized for intraoperative use through integration with a surgical microscope and an image-guided surgery system. The microscope optics and stereovision CCD sensors are localized relative to the surgical field using optical tracking and can efficiently acquire stereo image pairs from which a localized 3D profile of the exposed surface is reconstructed. This paper reports the first demonstration of intraoperative acquisition, reconstruction and visualization of 3D stereovision surface data in the context of an industry-standard image-guided surgery system. The integrated system is capable of computing and presenting a stereovision-based update of the exposed cortical surface in less than one minute. Alternative methods for visualization of high-resolution, texture-mapped stereovision surface data are also investigated with the objective of determining the technical feasibility of direct incorporation of intraoperative stereo imaging into future iterations of Medtronic's navigation platform.

  7. Intraoperative cranial nerve monitoring.

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    Harper, C Michel

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of intraoperative monitoring is to preserve function and prevent injury to the nervous system at a time when clinical examination is not possible. Cranial nerves are delicate structures and are susceptible to damage by mechanical trauma or ischemia during intracranial and extracranial surgery. A number of reliable electrodiagnostic techniques, including nerve conduction studies, electromyography, and the recording of evoked potentials have been adapted to the study of cranial nerve function during surgery. A growing body of evidence supports the utility of intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerve nerves during selected surgical procedures.

  8. Intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring-guided surgery for treating supratentorial cavernomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang-Ye; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Xu, Bai-Nan

    2016-09-01

    To determine the beneficial effects of intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring-guided surgery for treating supratentorial cavernomas. Twelve patients with 13 supratentorial cavernomas were prospectively enrolled and operated while using a 1.5 T intraoperative MRI, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring. All cavernomas were deeply located in subcortical areas or involved critical areas. Intraoperative high-field MRIs were obtained for the intraoperative "visualization" of surrounding eloquent structures, "brain shift" corrections, and navigational plan updates. All cavernomas were successfully resected with guidance from intraoperative MRI, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring. In 5 cases with supratentorial cavernomas, intraoperative "brain shift" severely deterred locating of the lesions; however, intraoperative MRI facilitated precise locating of these lesions. During long-term (>3 months) follow-up, some or all presenting signs and symptoms improved or resolved in 4 cases, but were unchanged in 7 patients. Intraoperative high-field MRI, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring are helpful in surgeries for the treatment of small deeply seated subcortical cavernomas.

  9. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring for the anaesthetist

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-15

    Nov 15, 2012 ... ... nerve tracts, and by understanding how anaesthetic agents affect the various ... of the physiologically sensitive nervous system and different ... Keywords: evoked potentials, intraoperative monitoring, brain mapping. Abstract.

  10. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring for the anaesthetist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) has become the gold standard for the monitoring of functional nervous tissue and mapping of eloquent brain tissue during neurosurgical procedures. The multimodal use of somatosensory-evoked potentials and motor-evoked potentials ensures adequate monitoring of ...

  11. [Threefold intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring of vestibular neurectomy].

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    Hausler, R; Kasper, A

    1991-01-01

    A threefold intraoperative monitoring of facial nerve, auditory nerve and vestibular nerve function was performed in 14 cases of retrosigmoidal neurectomy. The facial nerve was monitoring with a pressure transducer placed against the cheek (Opalarm system). The auditory nerve was monitored with acoustically (click) evoked early potentials and the vestibular nerve was monitored with electrically evoked vestibular potentials obtained by direct stimulation (biphasic current pulses of 0.75-mA p-p, 100 us, 20/s) of the exposed vestibular nerve in the cerebellopontine angle before, during and after neurectomy. A characteristic vertex negative peak having a latency of approximately 2 ms and approximately 0.5 uV amplitude was obtained between a forehead and an ipsilateral ear lobe electrode (2 x 1,000 averaged responses over 10 ms) before the neurectomy. This response disappeared after selective vestibular nerve section proximal to the stimulation site. A diminished response amplitude was measured after incomplete nerve section. Simultaneous acoustic masking had no influence on the vestibular potential. The 14 operated patients became all free of vertiginous spells and drop-attacks except one patient who developed a contralateral Menière's. Facial nerve function remained normal in all. Hearing preservation was obtained in 12 patients (86%). The threefold intraoperative monitoring has turned out to be an additional safety factor for facial and auditory nerve preservation and, thanks to the recording of vestibular potentials, it increased the efficiency of vestibular neurectomy.

  12. Intraoperative nerve monitoring in laryngotracheal surgery.

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    Bolufer, Sergio; Coves, María Dolores; Gálvez, Carlos; Villalona, Gustavo Adolfo

    Laryngotracheal surgery has an inherent risk of injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLN). These complications go from minor dysphonia to even bilateral vocal cord paralysis. The intraoperative neuromonitoring of the RLN was developed in the field of thyroid surgery, in order to preserve nerve and vocal cord function. However, tracheal surgery requires in-field intubation of the distal trachea, which limits the use of nerve monitoring using conventional endotracheal tube with surface electrodes. Given these challenges, we present an alternative method for nerve monitoring during laryngotracheal surgery through the insertion of electrodes within the endolaryngeal musculature by bilateral puncture. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. [Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging-guided functional neuronavigation plus intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring for microsurgical resection of lesions involving hand motor area].

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    Miao, Xing-lu; Chen, Zhi-juan; Yang, Wei-dong; Wang, Zeng-guang; Yu, Qing; Yue, Shu-yuan; Zhang, Jian-ning

    2013-01-15

    To explore the methods and applications of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI)-guided functional neuronavigation plus intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) for microsurgical resection of lesions involving hand motor area. A total of 16 patients with brain lesions adjacent to hand motor area were recruited from January 2011 to April 2012. All of them underwent neuronavigator-assisted microsurgery. Also IONM was conducted to further map hand motor area and epileptogenic focus. High-field iMRI was employed to update the anatomical and functional imaging date and verify the extent of lesion resection. Brain shifting during the functional neuronavigation was corrected by iMRI in 5 patients. Finally, total lesion resection was achieved in 13 cases and subtotal resection in 3 cases. At Months 3-12 post-operation, hand motor function improved (n = 10) or remained unchanged (n = 6). None of them had persistent neurological deficit. The postoperative seizure improvement achieved Enge II level or above in 9 cases of brain lesions complicated with secondary epilepsy. Intraoperative MRI, functional neuronavigation and neurophysiological monitoring technique are complementary in microsurgery of brain lesions involving hand motor area. Combined use of these techniques can obtain precise location of lesions and hand motor functional structures and allow a maximum resection of lesion and minimization of postoperative neurological deficits.

  14. [Cost analysis of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM)].

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    Kombos, T; Suess, O; Brock, M

    2002-01-01

    A number of studies demonstrate that a significant reduction of postoperative neurological deficits can be achieved by applying intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) methods. A cost analysis of IOM is imperative considering the strained financial situation in the public health services. The calculation model presented here comprises two cost components: material and personnel. The material costs comprise consumer goods and depreciation of capital goods. The computation base was 200 IOM cases per year. Consumer goods were calculated for each IOM procedure respectively. The following constellation served as a basis for calculating personnel costs: (a) a medical technician (salary level BAT Vc) for one hour per case; (b) a resident (BAT IIa) for the entire duration of the measurement, and (c) a senior resident (BAT Ia) only for supervision. An IOM device consisting of an 8-channel preamplifier, an electrical and acoustic stimulator and special software costs 66,467 euros on the average. With an annual depreciation of 20%, the costs are 13,293 euros per year. This amounts to 66.46 euros per case for the capital goods. For reusable materials a sum of 0.75 euro; per case was calculated. Disposable materials were calculate for each procedure respectively. Total costs of 228.02 euro; per case were,s a sum of 0.75 euros per case was calculated. Disposable materials were calculate for each procedure respectively. Total costs of 228.02 euros per case were, calculated for surgery on the peripheral nervous system. They amount to 196.40 euros per case for spinal interventions and to 347.63 euros per case for more complex spinal operations. Operations in the cerebellopontine angle and brain stem cost 376.63 euros and 397.33 euros per case respectively. IOM costs amount to 328.03 euros per case for surgical management of an intracranial aneurysm and to 537.15 euros per case for functional interventions. Expenses run up to 833.63 euros per case for operations near the

  15. Neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring of the vestibulocochlear nerve.

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    Simon, Mirela V

    2011-12-01

    Neurosurgical procedures involving the skull base and structures within can pose a significant risk of damage to the brain stem and cranial nerves. This can have life-threatening consequences and/or result in devastating neurologic deficits. Over the past decade, intraoperative neurophysiology has significantly evolved and currently offers a great tool for live monitoring of the integrity of nervous structures. Thus, dysfunction can be identified early and prompt modification of the surgical management or operating conditions, leads to avoidance of permanent structural damage.Along these lines, the vestibulocochlear nerve (CN VIII) and, to a greater extent, the auditory pathways as they pass through the brain stem are especially at risk during cerebelopontine angle (CPA), posterior/middle fossa, or brain stem surgery. CN VIII can be damaged by several mechanisms, from vascular compromise to mechanical injury by stretch, compression, dissection, and heat injury. Additionally, cochlea itself can be significantly damaged during temporal bone drilling, by noise, mechanical destruction, or infarction, and because of rupture, occlusion, or vasospasm of the internal auditory artery.CN VIII monitoring can be successfully achieved by live recording of the function of one of its parts, the cochlear or auditory nerve (AN), using the brain stem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs), electrocochleography (ECochG), and compound nerve action potentials (CNAPs) of the cochlear nerve.This is a review of these techniques, their principle, applications, methodology, interpretation of the evoked responses, and their change from baseline, within the context of surgical and anesthesia environments, and finally the appropriate management of these changes.

  16. Intraoperative monitoring technician: a new member of the surgical team.

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    Brown, Molly S; Brown, Debra S

    2011-02-01

    As surgery needs have increased, the traditional surgical team has expanded to include personnel from radiology and perfusion services. A new surgical team member, the intraoperative monitoring technician, is needed to perform intraoperative monitoring during procedures that carry a higher risk of central and peripheral nerve injury. Including the intraoperative monitoring technician on the surgical team can create challenges, including surgical delays and anesthesia care considerations. When the surgical team members, including the surgeon, anesthesia care provider, and circulating nurse, understand and facilitate this new staff member's responsibilities, the technician is able to perform monitoring functions that promote the smooth flow of the surgical procedure and positive patient outcomes. Copyright © 2011 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pygopagus Conjoined Twins: A Neurophysiologic Intraoperative Monitoring Schema.

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    Cromeens, Barrett P; McKinney, Jennifer L; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Governale, Lance S; Brown, Judy L; Henry, Christina M; Levitt, Marc A; Wood, Richard J; Besner, Gail E; Islam, Monica P

    2017-03-01

    Conjoined twins occur in up to 1 in 50,000 live births with approximately 18% joined in a pygopagus configuration at the buttocks. Twins with this configuration display symptoms and carry surgical risks during separation related to the extent of their connection which can include anorectal, genitourinary, vertebral, and neural structures. Neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring for these cases has been discussed in the literature with variable utility. The authors present a case of pygopagus twins with fused spinal cords and imperforate anus where the use of neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring significantly impacted surgical decision-making in division of these critical structures.

  18. Intraoperative Functional Mapping and Monitoring during Glioma Surgery

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    SAITO, Taiichi; MURAGAKI, Yoshihiro; MARUYAMA, Takashi; TAMURA, Manabu; NITTA, Masayuki; OKADA, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Glioma surgery represents a significant advance with respect to improving resection rates using new surgical techniques, including intraoperative functional mapping, monitoring, and imaging. Functional mapping under awake craniotomy can be used to detect individual eloquent tissues of speech and/or motor functions in order to prevent unexpected deficits and promote extensive resection. In addition, monitoring the patient’s neurological findings during resection is also very useful for maximizing the removal rate and minimizing deficits by alarming that the touched area is close to eloquent regions and fibers. Assessing several types of evoked potentials, including motor evoked potentials (MEPs), sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) and visual evoked potentials (VEPs), is also helpful for performing surgical monitoring in patients under general anesthesia (GA). We herein review the utility of intraoperative mapping and monitoring the assessment of neurological findings, with a particular focus on speech and the motor function, in patients undergoing glioma surgery. PMID:25744346

  19. SEP Montage Variability Comparison during Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Christine; Lolis, Athena Maria; Beric, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring is performed to provide real-time assessment of the neural structures that can be at risk during spinal surgery. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) are the most commonly used modality for intraoperative monitoring. SEP stability can be affected by many factors during the surgery. This study is a prospective review of SEP recordings obtained during intraoperative monitoring of instrumented spinal surgeries that were performed for chronic underlying neurologic and neuromuscular conditions, such as scoliosis, myelopathy, and spinal stenosis. We analyzed multiple montages at the baseline, and then followed their development throughout the procedure. Our intention was to examine the stability of the SEP recordings throughout the surgical procedure on multiple montages of cortical SEP recordings, with the goal of identifying the appropriate combination of the least number of montages that gives the highest yield of monitorable surgeries. Our study shows that it is necessary to have multiple montages for SEP recordings, as it reduces the number of non-monitorable cases, improves IOM reliability, and therefore could reduce false positives warnings to the surgeons. Out of all the typical montages available for use, our study has shown that the recording montage Cz-C4/Cz-C3 (Cz-Cc) is the most reliable and stable throughout the procedure and should be the preferred montage followed throughout the surgery.

  20. Glioma surgery using intraoperative tractography and MEP monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maesawa, Satoshi; Nakahara, Norimoto; Watanabe, Tadashi; Fujii, Masazumi; Yoshida, Jun

    2009-01-01

    In surgery of gliomas in motor-eloquent locations, it is essential to maximize resection while minimizing motor deficits. We attempted to identify the cortico-spinal tract (CST) by intraoperative-diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography, combined with electrophysiological mapping using direct subcortical stimulation during tumor resection. Our techniques and preliminary results are reported. Tumors were removed from twelve patients with gliomas in and around the CST using high-field intraoperative MRI and neuronavigation system (BrainSUITE). DTI-based tractography was implemented for navigation of CST pre-and intraoperatively. When the CST was close to the manipulating area, direct subcortical stimulation was performed, and motor evoked potential (MEP)-responses were examined. Locations of CST indicated by pre- and intraoperative tractography (pre- or intra-CST-tractography), and locations identified by subcortical stimulation were recorded, and those correlations were examined. Imaging and functional outcomes were reviewed. Total resections were achieved in 10 patients (83.4%). Two patients developed transient deterioration of motor function (16.6%), and permanent paresis was seen in one (8.3%). The distance from intra-CST-tractography to corresponding sites by subcortical stimulation was 4.5 mm in average (standard deviation (SD)=4.2), and significantly shorter than from pre-CST-tractography. That distance correlated significantly with the intensity of subcortical stimulation. We observed that intraoperative DTI-tractography demonstrated the location of the pyramidal tract more accurately than preoperative one. The combination of intraoperative tractgraphy and MEP monitoring enhanced the quality of surgery for gliomas in motor-eloquent area. (author)

  1. Intraoperative Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Monitoring in a Patient with Contralateral Vocal Fold Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bub-Se Na

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury can develop following cervical or thoracic surgery; however, few reports have described intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring. Consensus regarding the use of this technique during thoracic surgery is lacking. We used intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring in a patient with contralateral vocal cord paralysis who was scheduled for completion pneumonectomy. This case serves as an example of intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring during thoracic surgery and supports this indication for its use.

  2. Neurophysiological intraoperative monitoring during an optic nerve schwannoma removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Juan, Daniel; Escanio Cortés, Manuel; Tena-Suck, Martha; Orozco Garduño, Adolfo Josué; López Pizano, Jesús Alejandro; Villanueva Domínguez, Jonathan; Fernández Gónzalez-Aragón, Maricarmen; Gómez-Amador, Juan Luis

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports the case of a patient with optic nerve schwannoma and the first use of neurophysiological intraoperative monitoring of visual evoked potentials during the removal of such tumor with no postoperative visual damage. Schwannomas are benign neoplasms of the peripheral nervous system arising from the neural crest-derived Schwann cells, these tumors are rarely located in the optic nerve and the treatment consists on surgical removal leading to high risk of damage to the visual pathway. Case report of a thirty-year-old woman with an optic nerve schwannoma. The patient underwent surgery for tumor removal on the left optic nerve through a left orbitozygomatic approach with intraoperative monitoring of left II and III cranial nerves. We used Nicolet Endeavour CR IOM (Carefusion, Middleton WI, USA) to performed visual evoked potentials stimulating binocularly with LED flash goggles with the patient´s eyes closed and direct epidural optic nerve stimulation delivering rostral to the tumor a rectangular current pulse. At follow up examinations 7 months later, the left eye visual acuity was 20/60; Ishihara score was 8/8 in both eyes; the right eye photomotor reflex was normal and left eye was mydriatic and arreflectic; optokinetic reflex and ocular conjugate movements were normal. In this case, the epidural direct electrical stimulation of optic nerve provided stable waveforms during optic nerve schwannoma resection without visual loss.

  3. Intra-operative hearing monitoring methods in middle ear surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ren

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is a condition affecting millions of people worldwide. Conductive hearing loss (CHL is mainly caused by middle ear diseases. The low frequency area is the pivotal part of speech frequencies and most frequently impaired in patients with CHL. Among various treatments of CHL, middle ear surgery is efficient to improve hearing. However, variable success rates and possible needs for prolonged revision surgery still frustrate both surgeons and patients. Nowadays, increasing numbers of researchers explore various methods to monitor the efficacy of ossicular reconstruction intraoperatively, including electrocochleography (ECochG, auditory brainstem response (ABR, auditory steady state response (ASSR, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE, subjective whisper test, and optical coherence tomography (OCT. Here, we illustrate several methods used clinically by reviewing the literature.

  4. Intraoperative monitoring of marginal mandibular nerve during neck dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirelli, Giancarlo; Bergamini, Pier Riccardo; Scardoni, Alessandro; Gatto, Annalisa; Boscolo Nata, Francesca; Marcuzzo, Alberto Vito

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of intraoperative nerve integrity monitoring (NIM) to prevent marginal mandibular nerve injuries during neck dissection. This prospective study compared 36 patients undergoing NIM-assisted neck dissection from July 2014 to March 2015 to a cohort of 35 patients subjected to neck dissection over an identical period of time before the technique was introduced. We also assessed possible correlations between marginal mandibular nerve injuries and other factors, such as anthropometric measurements, presence of clinical neck metastases, type of neck dissection, and site of primary tumor. The incidence of marginal mandibular nerve paralyses was significantly lower among the group of patients undergoing NIM-assisted neck dissection (P = .021). There was no significant difference in the duration of the procedure, and the technique resulted in a limited increase of cost. No other factor seemed to influence the onset of marginal mandibular nerve palsy. In our opinion, NIM is a valuable aid for preventing marginal mandibular nerve injuries during neck dissection. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Parotid tumours: clinical and oncologic outcomes after microscope-assisted parotidectomy with intraoperative nerve monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Carta, F.; N., Chuchueva; C., Gerosa; S., Sionis; R.A., Caria; R., Puxeddu

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Temporary and permanent facial nerve dysfunctions can be observed after parotidectomy for benign and malignant lesions. Intraoperative nerve monitoring is a recognised tool for the preservation of the nerve, while the efficacy of the operative microscope has been rarely stated. The authors report their experience on 198 consecutive parotidectomies performed on 196 patients with the aid of the operative microscope and intraoperative nerve monitoring. 145 parotidectomies were performed ...

  6. Medical Error Avoidance in Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring: The Communication Imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Stan; Holdefer, Robert; McAuliffe, John J; Sala, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    Error avoidance in medicine follows similar rules that apply within the design and operation of other complex systems. The error-reduction concepts that best fit the conduct of testing during intraoperative neuromonitoring are forgiving design (reversibility of signal loss to avoid/prevent injury) and system redundancy (reduction of false reports by the multiplication of the error rate of tests independently assessing the same structure). However, error reduction in intraoperative neuromonitoring is complicated by the dichotomous roles (and biases) of the neurophysiologist (test recording and interpretation) and surgeon (intervention). This "interventional cascade" can be given as follows: test → interpretation → communication → intervention → outcome. Observational and controlled trials within operating rooms demonstrate that optimized communication, collaboration, and situational awareness result in fewer errors. Well-functioning operating room collaboration depends on familiarity and trust among colleagues. Checklists represent one method to initially enhance communication and avoid obvious errors. All intraoperative neuromonitoring supervisors should strive to use sufficient means to secure situational awareness and trusted communication/collaboration. Face-to-face audiovisual teleconnections may help repair deficiencies when a particular practice model disallows personal operating room availability. All supervising intraoperative neurophysiologists need to reject an insular or deferential or distant mindset.

  7. The clinical practice of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in Shanghai Huashan Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Jin-song

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM is the gold standard of the intraoperative functional brain mapping. It employs various electrophysiological methods such as awake craniotomy, intraoperative somatosensory and motor evoked potentials monitoring, intraoperative cortical stimulation and sub-cortical stimulation to accurately map the cortical and sub-cortical nervous pathways so that the continuous assessment and real -time protection of the functional integrity of certain neural structures can be achieved during surgery. Based on decades of clinical practice, the Department of Neurosurgery of Shanghai Huashan Hospital has set up an "IONM clinical practice guideline" used in the institute. The clinical practice guideline covers technical and operation standards of IONM in all kinds of common neurosurgery diseases and does improve the clinical efficacy in neurosurgical procedures.

  8. Determination of surgical variables for a brain shift correction pipeline using an Android application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Rohan; Conley, Rebekah H.; Thompson, Reid C.; Clements, Logan W.; Miga, Michael I.

    2016-03-01

    Brain shift describes the deformation that the brain undergoes from mechanical and physiological effects typically during a neurosurgical or neurointerventional procedure. With respect to image guidance techniques, brain shift has been shown to compromise the fidelity of these approaches. In recent work, a computational pipeline has been developed to predict "brain shift" based on preoperatively determined surgical variables (such as head orientation), and subsequently correct preoperative images to more closely match the intraoperative state of the brain. However, a clinical workflow difficulty in the execution of this pipeline has been acquiring the surgical variables by the neurosurgeon prior to surgery. In order to simplify and expedite this process, an Android, Java-based application designed for tablets was developed to provide the neurosurgeon with the ability to orient 3D computer graphic models of the patient's head, determine expected location and size of the craniotomy, and provide the trajectory into the tumor. These variables are exported for use as inputs for the biomechanical models of the preoperative computing phase for the brain shift correction pipeline. The accuracy of the application's exported data was determined by comparing it to data acquired from the physical execution of the surgeon's plan on a phantom head. Results indicated good overlap of craniotomy predictions, craniotomy centroid locations, and estimates of patient's head orientation with respect to gravity. However, improvements in the app interface and mock surgical setup are needed to minimize error.

  9. Rating of intra-operative neuro-monitoring results in operative correction of the spinal deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Skripnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the work was filing the electrophysiological phenomena observed in the process of intra-operative neuromonitoring followed by development of the results’ scale of intra-operative neuro-physiological testing of the pyramidal tract. Materials and мethods. The selection for evaluation included data of 147 protocols of intra-operative neuromonitoring in 135 patients (53 males, 82 females, aged from 1 y. 5 m. to 52 years (14,1±0,7 years with spinal deformities of different etiology who underwent instrumentation spinal correction followed by fixation of thoracic / thoracolumbar spine segments using various variants of internal systems of trans-pedicular fixation. Intra-operative neuro-monitoring was performed using system «ISIS IOM» (Inomed Medizintechnik GmbH, Germany. The changes of motor evoked potentials were evaluated according to this scale. Results. Five types of pyramidal system reaction to operative invasion were revealed. According to neurophysiological criteria three grades of the risk of neurological disorders development during operative spinal deformity correction and, correspondingly, three levels of anxiety for the surgeon were defined. Conclusion. Intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring is the effective highly technological instrument to prevent neurological disorders in the spinal deformity. Offered rating scale of the risk of neurological complications gives the possibility to highlight three levels of anxiety during operative invasion.

  10. Repeated sugammadex reversal of muscle relaxation during lumbar spine surgery with intraoperative neurophysiological multimodal monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errando, C L; Blanco, T; Díaz-Cambronero, Ó

    2016-11-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during spine surgery is usually acomplished avoiding muscle relaxants. A case of intraoperative sugammadex partial reversal of the neuromuscular blockade allowing adequate monitoring during spine surgery is presented. A 38 year-old man was scheduled for discectomy and vertebral arthrodesis throughout anterior and posterior approaches. Anesthesia consisted of total intravenous anesthesia plus rocuronium. Intraoperatively monitoring was needed, and the muscle relaxant reverted twice with low dose sugammadex in order to obtain adequate responses. The doses of sugammadex used were conservatively selected (0.1mg/kg boluses increases, total dose needed 0.4mg/kg). Both motor evoqued potentials, and electromyographic responses were deemed adequate by the neurophysiologist. If muscle relaxation was needed in the context described, this approach could be useful to prevent neurological sequelae. This is the first study using very low dose sugammadex to reverse rocuronium intraoperatively and to re-establish the neuromuscular blockade. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Parotid tumours: clinical and oncologic outcomes after microscope-assisted parotidectomy with intraoperative nerve monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, F; Chuchueva, N; Gerosa, C; Sionis, S; Caria, R A; Puxeddu, R

    2017-10-01

    Temporary and permanent facial nerve dysfunctions can be observed after parotidectomy for benign and malignant lesions. Intraoperative nerve monitoring is a recognised tool for the preservation of the nerve, while the efficacy of the operative microscope has been rarely stated. The authors report their experience on 198 consecutive parotidectomies performed on 196 patients with the aid of the operative microscope and intraoperative nerve monitoring. 145 parotidectomies were performed for benign lesions and 53 for malignancies. Thirteen patients treated for benign tumours experienced temporary (11 cases) or permanent facial palsy (2 cases, both of House-Brackmann grade II). Ten patients with malignant tumour presented with preoperative facial nerve weakness that did not improve after treatment. Five and 6 patients with malignant lesion without preoperative facial nerve deficit experienced postoperative temporary and permanent weakness respectively (the sacrifice of a branch of the nerve was decided intraoperatively in 2 cases). Long-term facial nerve weakness after parotidectomy for lesions not directly involving or originating from the facial nerve (n = 185) was 2.7%. Patients treated for benign tumours of the extra facial portion of the gland without inflammatory behaviour (n = 91) had 4.4% facial nerve temporary weakness rate and no permanent palsy. The combined use of the operative microscope and intraoperative nerve monitoring seems to guarantee facial nerve preservation during parotidectomy. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  12. Retractor-induced brain shift compensation in image-guided neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2013-03-01

    In image-guided neurosurgery, intraoperative brain shift significantly degrades the accuracy of neuronavigation that is solely based on preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR). To compensate for brain deformation and to maintain the accuracy in image guidance achieved at the start of surgery, biomechanical models have been developed to simulate brain deformation and to produce model-updated MR images (uMR) to compensate for brain shift. To-date, most studies have focused on shift compensation at early stages of surgery (i.e., updated images are only produced after craniotomy and durotomy). Simulating surgical events at later stages such as retraction and tissue resection are, perhaps, clinically more relevant because of the typically much larger magnitudes of brain deformation. However, these surgical events are substantially more complex in nature, thereby posing significant challenges in model-based brain shift compensation strategies. In this study, we present results from an initial investigation to simulate retractor-induced brain deformation through a biomechanical finite element (FE) model where whole-brain deformation assimilated from intraoperative data was used produce uMR for improved accuracy in image guidance. Specifically, intensity-encoded 3D surface profiles at the exposed cortical area were reconstructed from intraoperative stereovision (iSV) images before and after tissue retraction. Retractor-induced surface displacements were then derived by coregistering the surfaces and served as sparse displacement data to drive the FE model. With one patient case, we show that our technique is able to produce uMR that agrees well with the reconstructed iSV surface after retraction. The computational cost to simulate retractor-induced brain deformation was approximately 10 min. In addition, our approach introduces minimal interruption to the surgical workflow, suggesting the potential for its clinical application.

  13. Strategy of Surgical Resection for Glioma Based on Intraoperative Functional Mapping and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAMURA, Manabu; MURAGAKI, Yoshihiro; SAITO, Taiichi; MARUYAMA, Takashi; NITTA, Masayuki; TSUZUKI, Shunsuke; ISEKI, Hiroshi; OKADA, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of papers have pointed out the relationship between aggressive resection of gliomas and survival prognosis. For maximum resection, the current concept of surgical decision-making is in “information-guided surgery” using multimodal intraoperative information. With this, anatomical information from intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and navigation, functional information from brain mapping and monitoring, and histopathological information must all be taken into account in the new perspective for innovative minimally invasive surgical treatment of glioma. Intraoperative neurofunctional information such as neurophysiological functional monitoring takes the most important part in the process to acquire objective visual data during tumor removal and to integrate these findings as digitized data for intraoperative surgical decision-making. Moreover, the analysis of qualitative data and threshold-setting for quantitative data raise difficult issues in the interpretation and processing of each data type, such as determination of motor evoked potential (MEP) decline, underestimation in tractography, and judgments of patient response for neurofunctional mapping and monitoring during awake craniotomy. Neurofunctional diagnosis of false-positives in these situations may affect the extent of resection, while false-negatives influence intra- and postoperative complication rates. Additionally, even though the various intraoperative visualized data from multiple sources contribute significantly to the reliability of surgical decisions when the information is integrated and provided, it is not uncommon for individual pieces of information to convey opposing suggestions. Such conflicting pieces of information facilitate higher-order decision-making that is dependent on the policies of the facility and the priorities of the patient, as well as the availability of the histopathological characteristics from resected tissue. PMID:26185825

  14. Intraoperative hemodynamic monitoring during liver transplantation: goals and devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Peter; Frederiksen, H J; Secher, N H

    2010-01-01

    With the introduction of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) almost 40 years ago, changes in the cardiovascular system that manifest during the different phases of the operation combined, sometimes with massive hemorrhage in likely critically ill patients have been a challenge. Here hemodynamic...... monitoring of the patients during OLT is addressed with focus on maintaining the patients' central blood volume (CBV) and methods and devices that can serve that purpose are listed. It is considered that a stable CBV maintains cerebral blood flow and oxygenation and thereby the well-being of the patient......, while even a small reduction in blood pressure affects cerebral blood flow and oxygenation if it reflects a reduced CBV and thereby cardiac output. In that regard it is accepted that for the patient going through OLT cardiac output (~8 L/min-1) and also venous oxygen saturation (~85%) are larger than...

  15. Surgery for traumatic facial nerve paralysis: does intraoperative monitoring have a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashram, Yasmine A; Badr-El-Dine, Mohamed M K

    2014-09-01

    The use of intraoperative facial nerve (FN) monitoring during surgical decompression of the FN is underscored because surgery is indicated when the FN shows more than 90 % axonal degeneration. The present study proposes including intraoperative monitoring to facilitate decision taking and provide prognostication with more accuracy. This prospective study was conducted on ten patients presenting with complete FN paralysis due to temporal bone fracture. They were referred after variable time intervals for FN exploration and decompression. Intraoperative supramaximal electric stimulation (2-3 mA) of the FN was attempted in all patients both proximal and distal to the site of injury. Postoperative FN function was assessed using House-Brackmann (HB) scale. All patients had follow-up period ranging from 7 to 42 months. Three different patterns of neurophysiological responses were characterized. Responses were recorded proximal and distal to the lesion in five patients (pattern 1); only distal to the lesion in two patients (pattern 2); and neither proximal nor distal to the lesion in three patients (pattern 3). Sporadic, mechanically elicited EMG activity was recorded in eight out of ten patients. Patients with pattern 1 had favorable prognosis with postoperative function ranging between grade I and III. Pattern 3 patients showing no mechanically elicited activity had poor prognosis. Intraoperative monitoring affects decision taking during surgery for traumatic FN paralysis and provides prognostication with sufficient accuracy. The detection of mechanically elicited EMG activity is an additional sign predicting favorable outcome. However, absence of responses did not alter surgeon decision when the nerve was found evidently intact.

  16. Real Time Intraoperative Monitoring of Blood Loss with a Novel Tablet Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharareh, Behnam; Woolwine, Spencer; Satish, Siddarth; Abraham, Peter; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Real-time monitoring of blood loss is critical in fluid management. Visual estimation remains the standard of care in estimating blood loss, yet is demonstrably inaccurate. Photometric analysis, which is the referenced “gold-standard” for measuring blood loss, is both time-consuming and costly. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a novel tablet-monitoring device for measurement of Hb loss during orthopaedic procedures. Methods : This is a prospective study of 50 patients in a consecutive series of joint arthroplasty cases. The novel System with Feature Extraction Technology was used to measure the amount of Hb contained within surgical sponges intra-operatively. The system’s measures were then compared with those obtained via gravimetric method and photometric analysis. Accuracy was evaluated using linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis. Results : Our results showed a significant positive correlation between Triton tablet system and photometric analysis with respect to intra-operative hemoglobin and blood loss at 0.92 and 0.91, respectively. Discussion : This novel system can accurately determine Hb loss contained within surgical sponges. We believe that this user-friendly software can be used for measurement of total intraoperative blood loss and thus aid in a more accurate fluid management protocols during orthopaedic surgical procedures. PMID:26401167

  17. Selective pelvic autonomic nerve stimulation with simultaneous intraoperative monitoring of internal anal sphincter and bladder innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneist, W; Kauff, D W; Koch, K P; Schmidtmann, I; Heimann, A; Hoffmann, K P; Lang, H

    2011-01-01

    Pelvic autonomic nerve preservation avoids postoperative functional disturbances. The aim of this feasibility study was to develop a neuromonitoring system with simultaneous intraoperative verification of internal anal sphincter (IAS) activity and intravesical pressure. 14 pigs underwent low anterior rectal resection. During intermittent bipolar electric stimulation of the inferior hypogastric plexus (IHP) and the pelvic splanchnic nerves (PSN), electromyographic signals of the IAS and manometry of the urinary bladder were observed simultaneously. Stimulation of IHP and PSN as well as simultaneous intraoperative monitoring could be realized with an adapted neuromonitoring device. Neurostimulation resulted in either bladder or IAS activation or concerted activation of both. Intravesical pressure increase as well as amplitude increase of the IAS neuromonitoring signal did not differ significantly between stimulation of IHP and PSN [6.0 cm H(2)O (interquartile range [IQR] 3.5-9.0) vs. 6.0 cm H(2)O (IQR 3.0-10.0) and 12.1 μV (IQR 3.0-36.7) vs. 40.1 μV (IQR 9.0-64.3)] (p > 0.05). Pelvic autonomic nerve stimulation with simultaneous intraoperative monitoring of IAS and bladder innervation is feasible. The method may enable neuromonitoring with increasing selectivity for pelvic autonomic nerve preservation. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Stereovision-based integrated system for point cloud reconstruction and simulated brain shift validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Clements, Logan W; Luo, Ma; Narasimhan, Saramati; Thompson, Reid C; Dawant, Benoit M; Miga, Michael I

    2017-07-01

    Intraoperative soft tissue deformation, referred to as brain shift, compromises the application of current image-guided surgery navigation systems in neurosurgery. A computational model driven by sparse data has been proposed as a cost-effective method to compensate for cortical surface and volumetric displacements. We present a mock environment developed to acquire stereoimages from a tracked operating microscope and to reconstruct three-dimensional point clouds from these images. A reconstruction error of 1 mm is estimated by using a phantom with a known geometry and independently measured deformation extent. The microscope is tracked via an attached tracking rigid body that facilitates the recording of the position of the microscope via a commercial optical tracking system as it moves during the procedure. Point clouds, reconstructed under different microscope positions, are registered into the same space to compute the feature displacements. Using our mock craniotomy device, realistic cortical deformations are generated. When comparing our tracked microscope stereo-pair measure of mock vessel displacements to that of the measurement determined by the independent optically tracked stylus marking, the displacement error was [Formula: see text] on average. These results demonstrate the practicality of using tracked stereoscopic microscope as an alternative to laser range scanners to collect sufficient intraoperative information for brain shift correction.

  19. [Dynamics of lagophthalmos depending on facial nerve repair and its intraoperative monitoring in neurosurgical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnikova, T V; Serova, N K; Shimansky, V N

    2014-01-01

    Over 200 patients with acoustic neuromas and over 100 patients with posterior cranial fossa meningiomas are annually operated on at the N.N. Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute. Intraoperative monitoring of the facial nerve function is used in most patients with tumors of the posterior cranial fossa to identify the facial nerve in the surgical wound. If the anatomical integrity of the facial nerve in the cranial cavity cannot be retained, facial nerve repair is performed to restore the facial muscle function. Intraoperative electrical stimulation of the facial nerve has a great prognostic significance to evaluate the dynamics of lagophthalmos in the late postoperative period and to select the proper method for lagophthalmos correction. When the facial nerve was reinnervated by the descending branch or trunk of the hypoglossal nerve, sufficient eyelid closure was observed only in 3 patients out of 17.

  20. Usefulness of Intraoperative Monitoring of Visual Evoked Potentials in Transsphenoidal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    KAMIO, Yoshinobu; SAKAI, Naoto; SAMESHIMA, Tetsuro; TAKAHASHI, Goro; KOIZUMI, Shinichiro; SUGIYAMA, Kenji; NAMBA, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative visual outcome is a major concern in transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). Intraoperative visual evoked potential (VEP) monitoring has been reported to have little usefulness in predicting postoperative visual outcome. To re-evaluate its usefulness, we adapted a high-power light-stimulating device with electroretinography (ERG) to ascertain retinal light stimulation. Intraoperative VEP monitoring was conducted in TSSs in 33 consecutive patients with sellar and parasellar tumors under total venous anesthesia. The detectability rates of N75, P100, and N135 were 94.0%, 85.0%, and 79.0%, respectively. The mean latencies and amplitudes of N75, P100, and N135 were 76.8 ± 6.4 msec and 4.6 ± 1.8 μV, 98.0 ± 8.6 msec and 5.0 ± 3.4 μV, and 122.1 ± 16.3 msec and 5.7 ± 2.8 μV, respectively. The amplitude was defined as the voltage difference from N75 to P100 or P100 to N135. The criterion for amplitude changes was defined as a > 50% increase or 50% decrease in amplitude compared to the control level. The surgeon was immediately alerted when the VEP changed beyond these thresholds, and the surgical manipulations were stopped until the VEP recovered. Among the 28 cases with evaluable VEP recordings, the VEP amplitudes were stable in 23 cases and transiently decreased in 4 cases. In these 4 cases, no postoperative vision deterioration was observed. One patient, whose VEP amplitude decreased without subsequent recovery, developed vision deterioration. Intraoperative VEP monitoring with ERG to ascertain retinal light stimulation by the new stimulus device was reliable and feasible in preserving visual function in patients undergoing TSS. PMID:25070017

  1. Intraoperative functional MRI as a new approach to monitor deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Sorger, Bettina; Girnus, Ralf; Lasek, Kathrin; Schulte, Oliver; Krug, Barbara; Lackner, Klaus; Maarouf, Mohammad; Sturm, Volker; Wedekind, Christoph; Bunke, Juergen

    2004-01-01

    This article deals with technical aspects of intraoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for monitoring the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in a patient with Parkinson's disease. Under motor activation, therapeutic high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus was accompanied by an activation decrease in the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex and the ipsilateral cerebellum. Furthermore, an activation increase in the contralateral basal ganglia and insula region were detected. These findings demonstrate that fMRI constitutes a promising clinical application for investigating brain activity changes induced by DBS. (orig.)

  2. Intraoperative monitoring of lower cranial nerves in skull base surgery: technical report and review of 123 monitored cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topsakal, Cahide; Al-Mefty, Ossama; Bulsara, Ketan R; Williford, Veronica S

    2008-01-01

    The fundamental goal of skull base surgery is tumor removal with preservation of neurological function. Injury to the lower cranial nerves (LCN; CN 9-12) profoundly affects a patient's quality of life. Although intraoperative cranial nerve monitoring (IOM) is widely practiced for other cranial nerves, literature addressing the LCN is scant. We examined the utility of IOM of the LCN in a large patient series. One hundred twelve patients underwent 123 skull base operations with IOM between January 1994 to December 1999. The vagus nerve (n=37), spinal accessory nerve (n=118), and the hypoglossal nerve (n=83) were monitored intraoperatively. Electromyography (EMG) and compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) were recorded from the relevant muscles after electrical stimulation. This data was evaluated retrospectively. Patients who underwent IOM tended to have larger tumors with more intricate involvement of the lower cranial nerves. Worsening of preoperative lower cranial nerve function was seen in the monitored and unmonitored groups. With the use of IOM in the high risk group, LCN injury was reduced to a rate equivalent to that of the lower risk group (p>0.05). The immediate feedback obtained with IOM may prevent injury to the LCN due to surgical manipulation. It can also help identify the course of a nerve in patients with severely distorted anatomy. These factors may facilitate gross total tumor resection with cranial nerve preservation. The incidence of high false positive and negative CMAP and the variability in CMAP amplitude and threshold can vary depending on individual and technical factors.

  3. Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring for Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches to the Skull Base: A Technical Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harminder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during endoscopic, endonasal approaches to the skull base is both feasible and safe. Numerous reports have recently emerged from the literature evaluating the efficacy of different neuromonitoring tests during endonasal procedures, making them relatively well-studied. The authors report on a comprehensive, multimodality approach to monitoring the functional integrity of at risk nervous system structures, including the cerebral cortex, brainstem, cranial nerves, corticospinal tract, corticobulbar tract, and the thalamocortical somatosensory system during endonasal surgery of the skull base. The modalities employed include electroencephalography, somatosensory evoked potentials, free-running and electrically triggered electromyography, transcranial electric motor evoked potentials, and auditory evoked potentials. Methodological considerations as well as benefits and limitations are discussed. The authors argue that, while individual modalities have their limitations, multimodality neuromonitoring provides a real-time, comprehensive assessment of nervous system function and allows for safer, more aggressive management of skull base tumors via the endonasal route.

  4. Usefulness of intraoperative electromyographic monitoring of oculomotor and abducens nerves during skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Yi; Li, Ming-Chu; Liang, Jian-Tao; Bao, Yu-Hai; Chen, Ge; Guo, Hong-Chuan; Ling, Feng

    2017-10-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring of the extraocular cranial nerve (EOCN) is not commonly performed because of technical difficulty and risk, reliability of the result and predictability of the postoperative function of the EOCN. We performed oculomotor nerve (CN III) and abducens nerve (CN VI) intraoperative monitoring in patients with skull base surgery by recording the spontaneous muscle activity (SMA) and compound muscle action potential (CMAP). Two types of needle electrodes of different length were percutaneously inserted into the extraocular muscles with the free-hand technique. We studied the relationships between the SMA and CMAP and postoperative function of CN III and CN VI. A total of 23 patients were included. Nineteen oculomotor nerves and 22 abducens nerves were monitored during surgery, respectively. Neurotonic discharge had a positive predictive value of less than 50% and negative predictive value of more than 80% for postoperative CN III and CN VI dysfunction. The latency of patients with postoperative CN III dysfunction was 2.79 ± 0.13 ms, longer than that with intact CN III function (1.73 ± 0.11 ms). One patient had transient CN VI dysfunction, whose CMAP latency (2.54 ms) was longer than that of intact CN VI function (2.11 ± 0.38 ms). There was no statistically significant difference between patients with paresis and with intact function. The method of intraoperative monitoring of EOCNs described here is safe and useful to record responses of SMA and CMAP. Neurotonic discharge seems to have limited value in predicting the postoperative function of CN III and CN VI. The onset latency of CMAP longer than 2.5 ms after tumor removal is probably relevant to postoperative CN III and CN VI dysfunction. However, a definite quantitative relationship has not been found between the amplitude and stimulation intensity of CMAP and the postoperative outcome of CN III and CN VI.

  5. Preventing lower cranial nerve injuries during fourth ventricle tumor resection by utilizing intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Faisal R; Minhas, Mazhar; Jane, John

    2012-12-01

    We present two cases illustrating the benefit of utilizing intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) for prevention of injuries to the lower cranial nerves during fourth ventricle tumor resection surgeries. Multiple cranial nerve nuclei are located on the floor of the fourth ventricle with a high risk of permanent damage. Two male patients (ages 8 and 10 years) presented to the emergency department and had brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans showing brainstem/fourth ventricle tumors. During surgery, bilateral posterior tibial and median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs); four-limb and cranial nerves transcranial electrical motor evoked potentials (TCeMEPs); brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAERs); and spontaneous electromyography (s-EMG) were recorded. Electromyography (EMG) was monitored bilaterally from cranial nerves V VII, IX, X, XI, and XII. Total intravenous anesthesia was used. Neuromuscular blockade was used only for initial intubation. Pre-incision baselines were obtained with good morphology of waveforms. After exposure the floor of the fourth ventricle was mapped by triggered-EMG (t-EMG) using 0.4 to 1.0 mA. In both patients the tumor was entangled with cranial nerves VII to XII on the floor of the fourth ventricle. The surgeon made the decision not to resect the tumor in one case and limited the resection to 70% of the tumor in the second case on the basis of neurophysiological monitoring. This decision was made to minimize any post-operative neurological deficits due to surgical manipulation of the tumor involving the lower cranial nerves. Intraoperative spontaneous and triggered EMG was effectively utilized in preventing injuries to cranial nerves during surgical procedures. All signals remained stable during the surgical procedure. Postoperatively both patients were well with no additional cranial nerve weakness. At three months follow-up, the patients continued to have no deficits.

  6. Intra-operative monitoring of the common peroneal nerve during total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, A J; Thomas, M

    1994-01-01

    We present a method allowing intra-operative monitoring of the common peroneal nerve during total knee arthroplasty using a magnetic stimulator. Previous reports have shown no pre-operative method successful in selecting those patients prone to develop a post-operative palsy. The device, placed beneath the lumbar spine, stimulates the cauda equina; common peroneal nerve function is assessed via the response in extensor digitorum brevis. There is a loss of signal from the nerve with the use of a tourniquet 25 min following its application. The protocol therefore requires that a tourniquet is used at least only for fixation of the prosthetic components. The method is quick, safe, non-invasive and reproducible, and is of use both in at-risk patients and in research work. Images Figure 6. PMID:7837197

  7. Availability of anesthetic effect monitoring: utilization, intraoperative management and time to extubation in liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, R; Hudcova, J; Bonney, I; Cepeda, M S

    2010-12-01

    Titration of volatile anesthetics to anesthetic effect monitoring using the bispectral index (BIS) has been shown to decrease anesthetic requirements and facilitate recovery from anesthesia unrelated to liver transplantation (OLT). To determine whether availability of such monitoring influences its utilization pattern and affect anesthetic care and outcomes in OLT, we conducted a retrospective analysis in recipients with and without such monitoring. We evaluated annual BIS utilization over a period of 7 years, and compared 41 BIS-monitored patients to 42 controls. All received an isoflurane/air/oxygen and opioid-based anesthetic with planned postoperative ventilation. Data collection included age, body mass index (BMI), gender, Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, and time to extubation (TtE). Mean preanhepatic, anhepatic, and postanhepatic end-tidal isoflurane concentrations were compared, as well as BIS values for each phase of OLT using the Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, respectively. The use of anesthetic effect monitoring when available increased steadily from 15% of cases in the first year to almost 93% by year 7. There was no significant difference in age, gender, BMI, MELD, or TtE between groups. The BIS group received less inhalational anesthetic during each phase of OLT compared to the control group. However, this difference was statistically significant only during the anhepatic phase (P = .026), and was clinically not impressive. Within the BIS group, the mean BIS value was 38.74 ± 5.25 (mean ± standard deviation), and there was no difference for the BIS value between different transplant phases. Availability of anesthetic effect monitoring as an optional monitoring tool during OLT results in its increasing utilization by anesthesia care teams over time. However, unless integrated into an intraoperative algorithm and an early extubation protocol for fast tracking of OLT recipients, this utilization does not appear to provide

  8. Perils of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring: analysis of "false-negative" results in spine surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamkus, Arvydas A; Rice, Kent S; McCaffrey, Michael T

    2018-02-01

    Although some authors have published case reports describing false negatives in intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM), a systematic review of causes of false-negative IONM results is lacking. The objective of this study was to analyze false-negative IONM findings in spine surgery. This is a retrospective cohort analysis. A cohort of 109 patients with new postoperative neurologic deficits was analyzed for possible false-negative IONM reporting. The causes of false-negative IONM reporting were determined. From a cohort of 62,038 monitored spine surgeries, 109 consecutive patients with new postoperative neurologic deficits were reviewed for IONM alarms. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring alarms occurred in 87 of 109 surgeries. Nineteen patients with new postoperative neurologic deficits did not have an IONM alarm and surgeons were not warned. In addition, three patients had no interpretable IONM baseline data and no alarms were possible for the duration of the surgery. Therefore, 22 patients were included in the study. The absence of IONM alarms during these 22 surgeries had different origins: "true" false negatives where no waveform changes meeting the alarm criteria occurred despite the appropriate IONM (7); a postoperative development of a deficit (6); failure to monitor the pathway, which became injured (5); the absence of interpretable IONM baseline data which precluded any alarm (3); and technical IONM application issues (1). Overall, the rate of IONM method failing to predict the patient's outcome was very low (0.04%, 22/62,038). Minimizing false negatives requires the application of a proper IONM technique with the limitations of each modality considered in their selection and interpretation. Multimodality IONM provides the most inclusive information, and although it might be impractical to monitor every neural structure that can be at risk, a thorough preoperative consideration of available IONM modalities is important. Delayed

  9. Intraoperative monitoring for spinal radiculomedullary artery aneurysm occlusion treatment: What, when, and how long?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landriel, Federico; Baccanelli, Matteo; Hem, Santiago; Vecchi, Eduardo; Bendersky, Mariana; Yampolsky, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Spinal radiculomedullary artery aneurysms are extremely rare. Treatment should be tailored to clinical presentation, distal aneurysm flow, and lesion anatomical features. When a surgical occlusion is planned, it is necessary to evaluate whether intraoperative monitoring (IOM) should be considered as an indispensable tool to prevent potential spinal cord ischemia. We present a patient with symptoms and signs of spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage resulting from the rupture of a T4 anterior radiculomedullary aneurysm who underwent open surgical treatment under motor evoked potential (MEP) monitoring. Due to the aneurysmal fusiform shape and preserved distal flow, the afferent left anterior radiculomedullary artery was temporarily clipped; 2 minutes after the clamping, the threshold stimulation level rose higher than 100 V, and at minute 3, MEPs amplitude became attenuated over 50%. This was considered as a warning criteria to leave the vessel occlusion. The radiculomedullary aneurysm walls were reinforced and wrapped with muscle and fibrin glue to prevent re-bleeding. The patient awoke from general anesthesia without focal neurologic deficit and made an uneventful recovery with complete resolution of her symptoms and signs. This paper attempts to build awareness of the possibility to cause or worsen a neurological deficit if a radiculomedullary aneurysm with preserved distal flow is clipped or embolized without an optimal IOM control. We report in detail MEP monitoring during the occlusion of a unilateral T4 segmental artery that supplies an anterior radiculomedullary artery aneurysm.

  10. Effectiveness of Intraoperative Parathyroid Monitoring (ioPTH) in predicting a multiglandular or malignant parathyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrinja, C; Santandrea, G; Giacca, M; Stenner, Elisabetta; Ruscio, Maurizio; de Manzini, Nicolò

    2017-05-01

    The main goal of our study was to confirm the usefulness of intra-operative parathyroid hormone (PTH) monitoring (ioPTH) when using minimally invasive techniques for treatment of sporadic Primary hyperparathyroidism (pHTP). Furthermore, we aimed to evaluate if ioPTH monitoring may help to predict the etiology of primary hyperparathyroidism, especially in malignant or multiglandular parathyroid disease. A retrospective review of 125 consecutive patients with pHPT who underwent parathyroidectomy between 2001 and 2016 at the Department of General Surgery was performed. For each patient, the specific preoperative work-up consisted of: high-resolution US of the neck by a skilled sonographer, sestamibi parathyroid scan, laryngoscopy, and serum measurement of PTH, serum calcium levels, and serum 25(OH)D levels. The study included 125 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for pHPT. At the histological examination, we registered 113 patients with simple adenomatous pathology (90,4%), 5 atypical adenomas (4%), 3 cases of parathyroid carcinoma (2,4%),, , and 4 histological exams of different nature (3,2%). Overall, 6 cases (4,8%) of multiglandular disease were found. We reported 10 cases (8%) of recurrent/persistent hyperparathyroidism: 1/10 in a patient affected by atypical adenoma, 9/10 in patients with benign pathology. Regarding these 10 cases, in three (30%) patients, ioPTH wasn't dosed (only frozen section (FS) exam was taken), in 5 cases (50%) ioPTH dropped more than 50% compared to basal value (false negative results), and in 2 (20%) cases, ioPTH did not drop >50% from the first samples taken, the extemporary exam had confirmed the presence of adenoma and the probable second hyperfunctioning adenoma was not found. IoPTH determinations ensure operative success of surgical resection in almost all hyperfunctioning tissue; in particular it is very important during minimally invasive parathyroidectomy, as it allows avoiding bilateral neck exploration. The use of io

  11. [Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in Spain: its beginnings, current situation and future prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Donate, V E; Perez-Lorensu, P J; Garcia-Garcia, A; Asociacion de Monitorizacion Intraquirurgica Neurofisiologica Espanola Amine, Asociacion de Monitorizacion Intraquirurgica Neurofisiologica Espanola Amine; Sociedad Espanola de Neurofisiologia Clinica Senfc, Sociedad Espanola de Neurofisiologia Clinica Senfc; Grupo de Trabajo de Monitorizacion Neurofisiologica Intraoperatoria de la Senfc, Grupo de Trabajo de Monitorizacion Neurofisiologica Intraoperatoria de la Senfc

    2018-05-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) is nowadays another tool within the operating room that seeks to avoid neurological sequels derived from the surgical act. The Spanish Neurophysiological Intra-Surgical Monitoring Association (AMINE) in collaboration with the Spanish Society of Clinical Neurophysiology (SENFC), and the IONM Working Group of the SENFC has been collecting data in order to know the current situation of the IONM in Spain by hospitals, autonomous communities including the autonomous cities of Ceuta and Melilla, the opinions of the specialists in clinical neurophysiology involved in this topic and further forecasts regarding IONM. The data was gathered from November 2015 to May 2016 through telephone contact and/or email with specialists in clinical neurophysiology of the public National Health System, and through a computerized survey that also includes private healthcare centers. With the data obtained, from the perspective of AMINE and the SENFC we consider that nowadays the field of medicine covered by IONM is considerably large and it is foreseen that it will continue to grow. Therefore, a greater number of specialists in Clinical Neurophysiology will be required, as well as the need for specific training within the specialty that involves increasing the training period of MIRs based on competencies due to the increase in techniques/procedures, as well as its complexity.

  12. Automatic Adjustments of a Trans-oesophageal Ultrasound Robot for Monitoring Intra-operative Catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangyi; Housden, James; Singh, Davinder; Rhode, Kawal

    2017-12-01

    3D trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TOE) has become a powerful tool for monitoring intra-operative catheters used during cardiac procedures in recent years. However, the control of the TOE probe remains as a manual task and therefore the operator has to hold the probe for a long period of time and sometimes in a radiation environment. To solve this problem, an add-on robotic system has been developed for holding and manipulating a commercial TOE probe. This paper focuses on the application of making automatic adjustments to the probe pose in order to accurately monitor the moving catheters. The positioning strategy is divided into an initialization step based on a pre-planning method and a localized adjustments step based on the robotic differential kinematics and related image servoing techniques. Both steps are described in the paper along with simulation experiments performed to validate the concept. The results indicate an error less than 0.5 mm for the initialization step and an error less than 2 mm for the localized adjustments step. Compared to the much bigger live 3D image volume, it is concluded that the methods are promising. Future work will focus on evaluating the method in the real TOE scanning scenario.

  13. Use of rapid sampling microdialysis for intraoperative monitoring of bowel ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeba, S; Corcoles, E P; Hanna, G B; Hanna, B G; Pareskevas, P; Aziz, O; Boutelle, M G; Darzi, A

    2008-09-01

    Intestinal ischemia is a major cause of anastomotic leak and death and remains a clinical challenge as the physician relies on several nonspecific signs, biologic markers, and radiologic studies to make the diagnosis. This study used rapid sampling online microdialysis to evaluate the biochemical changes occurring in a segment of human bowel during and after resection, and assessed for the feasibility and reproducibility of this technique in monitoring intestinal ischemia. A custom made, rapid sampling online microdialysis analyzer was used to monitor the changes in the bowel wall of specimens being resected intraoperatively. Two patients were recruited for the pilot study to optimize the analyzer and seven patients undergoing colonic resections were recruited for the data collection and analysis. The concentration of glucose in the extracellular bowel wall fluid decreased transiently after division of individual feeding arteries followed by a rebound increase in the concentration back to baseline concentrations. After completion of resection, glucose concentrations continued to decrease while lactate concentrations increased constantly. Rapid sampling microdialysis was feasible in the clinical environment. These results suggest that tissue responds to ischemic insult by mobilizing glucose stores which later decrease again, whereas lactate concentrations constantly increased.

  14. Bio-Mechanical Model of the Brain for a Per-Operative Image-Guided Neuronavigator Compensating for "Brain-Shift" Deformations

    OpenAIRE

    Bucki, Marek; Lobos, Claudio; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    International audience; In this paper we present a methodology to address the problem of brain tissue deformation referred to as 'brain-shift'. This deformation occurs throughout a neurosurgery intervention and strongly alters the accuracy of the neuronavigation systems used to date in clinical routine which rely solely on pre-operative patient imaging to locate the surgical target, such as a tumour or a functional area. After a general description of the framework of our intra-operative imag...

  15. [Anaesthetic management of excision of a cervical intraspinal tumor with intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring in a pregnant woman at 29 weeks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Domínguez, R; González-González, G; Rubio-Romero, R; Federero-Martínez, F; Jiménez, I

    2016-05-01

    The intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is a technique used to test and monitor nervous function. This technique has become essential in some neurosurgery interventions, since it avoids neurological injuries during surgery and reduces morbidity. The experience of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is limited in some clinical cases due to the low incidence of pregnant women undergoing a surgical procedure. A case is presented of a 29-weeks pregnant woman suffering from a cervical intraspinal tumour with intense pain, which required surgery. The collaboration of a multidisciplinary team composed of anaesthesiologists, neurosurgeons, neurophysiologists and obstetricians, the continuous monitoring of the foetus, the intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, and maintaining the neurophysiological and utero-placental variables were crucial for the proper development of the surgery. According to our experience and the limited publications in the literature, no damaging effects of this technique were detected at maternal-foetal level. On the contrary, it brings important benefits during the surgery and for the final result. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Intra-operative parathyroid hormone monitoring through central laboratory is accurate in renal secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulpio, Carlo; Bossola, Maurizio; Di Stasio, Enrico; Pepe, Gilda; Nure, Eda; Magalini, Sabina; Agnes, Salvatore

    2016-05-01

    The usefulness, the methods and the criteria of intra-operative monitoring of the parathyroid hormone (ioPTH) during parathyroidectomy (PTX) for renal secondary hyperparathyroidism (rSHPT) in patients on chronic hemodialysis remain still matter of debate. The present study aimed to evaluate the ability of a low cost central-laboratory second generation PTH assay to predict an incomplete resection of parathyroid glands (PTG). The ioPTH decay was determined In 42 consecutive patients undergoing PTX (15 subtotal and 27 total without auto-transplant of PTG) for rSHPT. The ioPTH monitoring included five samples: pre-intubation, post-manipulation of PTG and at 10, 20 and 30min post-PTG excision. The patients with PTH exceeding the normal value (65pg/ml) at the first postoperative week, 6 and 12months were classified as persistent rSHPT. The concentrations of ioPTH declined significantly over time in patients who received total or subtotal PTX; however, no difference was found between the two types of PTX. Irrespective of the type of PTX and the number of PTG removed, combining the absolute and percentage of ioPTH decay at 30min after PTG excision, we found high sensitivity (100%), specificity (92%), negative predictive value (100%) and accuracy (93%) in predicting the persistence of rSHPT. The monitoring of the ioPTH decline by a low cost central-laboratory second generation assay is extremely accurate in predicting the persistence of disease in patients on maintenance hemodialysis undergoing surgery for rSHPT. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensing System (WINCS) for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Christopher J; Johnson, David M; Winter, Bruce A; Whitlock, Sidney V; Kressin, Kenneth R; Horne, April E; Robinson, Justin C; Bledsoe, Jonathan M; Tye, Susannah J; Chang, Su-Youne; Agnesi, Filippo; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Covey, Daniel; Shon, Young-Min; Bennet, Kevin E; Garris, Paul A; Lee, Kendall H

    2009-01-01

    The Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensing System (WINCS) measures extracellular neurotransmitter concentration in vivo and displays the data graphically in nearly real time. WINCS implements two electroanalytical methods, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) and fixed-potential amperometry (FPA), to measure neurotransmitter concentrations at an electrochemical sensor, typically a carbon-fiber microelectrode. WINCS comprises a battery-powered patient module and a custom software application (WINCSware) running on a nearby personal computer. The patient module impresses upon the electrochemical sensor either a constant potential (for FPA) or a time-varying waveform (for FSCV). A transimpedance amplifier converts the resulting current to a signal that is digitized and transmitted to the base station via a Bluetooth radio link. WINCSware controls the operational parameters for FPA or FSCV, and records the transmitted data stream. Filtered data is displayed in various formats, including a background-subtracted plot of sequential FSCV scans - a representation that enables users to distinguish the signatures of various analytes with considerable specificity. Dopamine, glutamate, adenosine and serotonin were selected as analytes for test trials. Proof-of-principle tests included in vitro flow-injection measurements and in vivo measurements in rat and pig. Further testing demonstrated basic functionality in a 3-Tesla MRI unit. WINCS was designed in compliance with consensus standards for medical electrical device safety, and it is anticipated that its capability for real-time intraoperative monitoring of neurotransmitter release at an implanted sensor will prove useful for advancing functional neurosurgery.

  18. Intraoperative Mapping and Monitoring for Rootlets of the Lower Cranial Nerves Related to Vocal Cord Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Akiyama, Yukinori; Mikami, Takeshi; Komatsu, Katsuya; Sugino, Toshiya; Suzuki, Kengo; Kanno, Aya; Ohtaki, Shunya; Noshiro, Shouhei; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Damage to the motor division of the lower cranial nerves that run into the jugular foramen leads to hoarseness, dysphagia, and the risk of aspiration pneumonia; therefore, its functional preservation during surgical procedures is important. Intraoperative mapping and monitoring of the motor rootlets at the cerebellomedullary cistern using endotracheal tube electrodes is a safe and effective procedure to prevent its injury. To study the location of the somatic and autonomic motor fibers of the lower cranial nerves related to vocal cord movement. Twenty-four patients with pathologies at the cerebellopontine lesion were studied. General anesthesia was maintained with fentanyl and propofol. A monopolar stimulator was used at amplitudes of 0.05 to 0.1 mA. Both acoustic and visual signals were displayed as vocalis muscle electromyographic activity using endotracheal tube surface electrodes. The average number of rootlets was 7.4 (range, 5-10); 75% of patients had 7 or 8 rootlets. As many as 6 rootlets (2-4 in most cases) were responsive in each patient. In 23 of the 24 patients, the responding rootlets congregated on the caudal side. The maximum electromyographic response was predominantly in the most caudal or second most caudal rootlet in 79%. The majority of motor fibers of the lower cranial nerves run through the caudal part of the rootlets at the cerebellomedullary cistern, and the maximal electromyographic response was elicited at the most caudal or second most caudal rootlet. EMG, electromyographic.

  19. [Does intraoperative nerve monitoring reduce the rate of recurrent nerve palsies during thyroid surgery?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, W; Dralle, H; Hamelmann, W; Thomusch, O; Sekulla, C; Meyer, Th; Timm, S; Thiede, A

    2002-05-01

    Two different aspects of the influence of neuromonitoring on the possible reduction of post-operative recurrent laryngeal nerve palsies require critical examination: the nerve identification and the monitoring of it's functions. Due to the additional information from the EMG signals, neuromonitoring is the best method for identifying the nerves as compared to visual identification alone. There are still no randomized studies available that compare the visual and electrophysiological recurrent laryngeal nerve detection in thyroid operations with respect to the postoperative nerve palsies. Nevertheless, comparisons with historical collectives show that a constant low nerve-palsy-rate was achieved with electrophysiological detection in comparison to visual detection. The rate of nerve identification is normally very high and amounts to 99 % in our own patients. The data obtained during the "Quality assurance of benign and malignant Goiter" study show that in hemithyreoidectomy and subtotal resection, lower nerve-palsy-rates are achieved with neuromonitoring as compared to solely visual detection. Following subtotal resection, this discrepancy becomes even statistically significant. While monitoring the nerve functions with the presently used neuromonitoring technique, it is possible to observe the EMG-signal remaining constant or decreasing in volume. Assuming that a constant neuromonitoring signal represents a normal vocal cord, our evaluation shows that there is a small percentage of false negative and positive results. Looking at the permanent recurrent nerve palsy rates, this method has a specificity of 98 %, a sensitivity of 100 %, a positive prognostic value of 10 %, and a negative prognostic value of 100 %. Although an altered neuromonitoring signal can be taken as a clear indication of eventual nerve damage, an absolutely reliable statement about the postoperative vocal cord function is presently not possible with intraoperative neuromonitoring.

  20. Intermittent Intraoperative Neural Monitoring Technology in Minimally Invasive Video-Assisted Thyroidectomy: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Hu; Zhai, Yifei; Qin, Jianwu; Song, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative neural monitoring (IONM) technology was applied in minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy (MIVAT) to explore its safety and effectiveness. Data were collected retrospectively from October 2009 to August 2011. Inclusion criteria included the following: (1) benign thyroid nodule with maximum diameter less than 4.0 cm by preoperative ultrasound evaluation; (2) no previous thyroid surgeries; (3) no cervical radiation history; (4) normal function of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) examined by preoperative laryngoscopy; (5) patients who did not accept to take a "wait and see" follow-up strategy. Enrolled patients were randomly allocated into NIM group and control group. 46 patients were enrolled in NIM group, and 51 patients were enrolled in control group. All surgeries in NIM group were performed successfully, and majority of tracheal intubations were placed with one attempt. 47 RLNs in NIM group and 60 RLNs in control group were exposed. The time of RLN locating was 6.06 ± 1.48 min in NIM group and 6.92 ± 1.34 min in control group (p = .02). The time of RLN tracing and exposing was 28.96 ± 4.75 min in NIM group and 32.17 ± 5.56 min in control group (p = .02). 1 case of temporary RLN paralysis was observed in both groups, and no permanent RLN paralysis was reported. The application of intermittent IONM in MIVAT is feasible. Intermittent IONM can help reduce the time of RLN locating and the time of RLN tracing and exposing.

  1. The impact on post-operative shoulder function of intraoperative nerve monitoring of cranial nerve XI during modified radical neck dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanišnik, Boštjan; Žitnik, Lidija; Levart, Primož; Žargi, Miha; Rodi, Zoran

    2016-12-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of the cranial nerve XI (CN XI) may decrease shoulder disability following modified radical neck dissection. Prospective study was designed comparing results of Constant Shoulder Score (CSS), Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and EMG score of the trapezius muscle (mT) before and after surgery. One side of the neck was monitored during surgery with intraoperative nerve monitor. EMG scores of the mT 6 months postoperatively were statistically better on monitored as compared to the non-monitored side of the neck (p = 0.041), while the differences of the CSS and SPADI were not statistically significant. Patients with better EMG scores of the mT at 6 weeks recuperated better and with smaller decrease of the CSS. Intraoperative monitoring is beneficial at the beginning of the surgeon's learning curve and in the process of familiarizing with anatomical variation of the CN XI.

  2. Enhancement of the bulbocavernosus reflex during intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring through the use of double train stimulation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Stanley; Chiri, Chala A; Wroblewski, Jill; Transfeldt, Ensor E

    2007-02-01

    Electrophysiological bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) testing, during surgeries in which the constituent neural components are at risk, might supplement other low sacral (S2-4) stimulation/recording techniques. However, intraoperative BCR is not always reliably implemented. We proposed to analyze BCR signals in five surgical patients monitored with the novel application of double train stimulation (DTS) to determine if the potential could be enhanced. We prospectively planned a regime of DTS BCR with a series of intertrain delays in five monitored patients at risk for low sacral neural injury. Patients were maintained with propofol, opiate infusion, and low inhalant anesthesia without muscle relaxant. Cutaneous sensory nerves of the penis (or clitoris) were stimulated using two consecutive pulse trains (DTS). Intertrain delays were 75, 100, 125, 150, 175, 200, and 250 ms. For BCR recording, uncoated paired wires were inserted into the external anal sphincter (EAS) bilaterally. For each trial, waveform amplitude, duration, and turn count measures for the first (single train) and second (double train) response were recorded. Percent increase/decrease of the second train response compared to the first train response was calculated. There was at least a 30% increase in measures of amplitude, turn count, and duration of the second train response in 22/28, 22/28, and 14/28 of the total trials respectively. There was an insufficient number of independent observations to determine statistical significance. Intraoperative BCR is currently obtained with some difficulty using pulse train stimulation. Our preliminary evidence has identified BCR waveform enhancement using DTS and suggests that the reliability of intraoperative BCR acquisition may be further improved by the addition of this technique. Our data are insufficient to define the best intertrain interval.

  3. A service for monitoring the quality of intraoperative cone beam CT images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heckel Frank

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, operating rooms (ORs have transformed into integrated operating rooms, where devices are able to communicate, exchange data, or even steer and control each other. However, image data processing is commonly done by dedicated workstations for specific clinical use-cases. In this paper, we propose a concept for a dynamic service component for image data processing on the example of automatic image quality assessment (AQUA of intraoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images. The service is build using the Open Surgical Communication Protocol (OSCP and the standard for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM. We have validated the proposed concept in an integrated demonstrator OR.

  4. Intra-operative neurophysiological mapping and monitoring during brain tumour surgery in children: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Angela; Tramontano, Vincenzo; Basaldella, Federica; Arcaro, Chiara; Squintani, Giovanna; Sala, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Over the past decade, the reluctance to operate in eloquent brain areas has been reconsidered in the light of the advent of new peri-operative functional neuroimaging techniques and new evidence from neuro-oncology. To maximise tumour resection while minimising morbidity should be the goal of brain surgery in children as much as it is in adults, and preservation of brain functions is critical in the light of the increased survival and the expectations in terms of quality of life. Intra-operative neurophysiology is the gold standard to localise and preserve brain functions during surgery and is increasingly used in paediatric neurosurgery. Yet, the developing nervous system has peculiar characteristics in terms of anatomical and physiological maturation, and some technical aspects need to be tailored for its use in children, especially in infants. This paper will review the most recent advances in the field of intra-operative neurophysiology (ION) techniques during brain surgery, focussing on those aspects that are relevant to the paediatric neurosurgery practice.

  5. Dorsal rhizotomy for children with spastic diplegia of cerebral palsy origin: usefulness of intraoperative monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoulis, George; Brînzeu, Andrei; Sindou, Marc

    2018-04-13

    OBJECTIVE The utility of intraoperative neuromonitoring (ION), namely the study of muscle responses to radicular stimulation, remains controversial. The authors performed a prospective study combining ventral root (VR) stimulation for mapping anatomical levels and dorsal root (DR) stimulation as physiological testing of metameric excitability. The purpose was to evaluate to what extent the intraoperative data led to modifications in the initial decisions for surgical sectioning established by the pediatric multidisciplinary team (i.e., preoperative chart), and thus estimate its practical usefulness. METHODS Thirteen children with spastic diplegia underwent the following surgical protocol. First, a bilateral intradural approach was made to the L2-S2 VRs and DRs at the exit from or entry to their respective dural sheaths, through multilevel interlaminar enlarged openings. Second, stimulation-just above the threshold-of the VR at 2 Hz to establish topography of radicular myotome distribution, and then of the DR at 50 Hz as an excitability test of root circuitry, with independent identification of muscle responses by the physiotherapist and by electromyographic recordings. The study aimed to compare the final amounts of root sectioning-per radicular level, established after intraoperative neuromonitoring guidance-with those determined by the multidisciplinary team in the presurgical chart. RESULTS The use of ION resulted in differences in the final percentage of root sectioning for all root levels. The root levels corresponding to the upper lumbar segments were modestly excitable under DR stimulation, whereas progressively lower root levels displayed higher excitability. The difference between root levels was highly significant, as evaluated by electromyography (p = 0.00004) as well as by the physiotherapist (p = 0.00001). Modifications were decided in 11 of the 13 patients (84%), and the mean absolute difference in the percentage of sectioning quantity per radicular

  6. Intraoperative laser speckle contrast imaging for monitoring cerebral blood flow: results from a 10-patient pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lisa M.; Weber, Erica L.; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Kappeler, Kaelyn L.; Fox, Douglas J.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2012-02-01

    Monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) during neurosurgery can provide important physiological information for a variety of surgical procedures. Although multiple intraoperative vascular monitoring technologies are currently available, a quantitative method that allows for continuous monitoring is still needed. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is an optical imaging method with high spatial and temporal resolution that has been widely used to image CBF in animal models in vivo. In this pilot clinical study, we adapted a Zeiss OPMI Pentero neurosurgical microscope to obtain LSCI images by attaching a camera and a laser diode. This LSCI adapted instrument has been used to acquire full field flow images from 10 patients during tumor resection procedures. The patient's ECG was recorded during acquisition and image registration was performed in post-processing to account for pulsatile motion artifacts. Digital photographs confirmed alignment of vasculature and flow images in four cases, and a relative change in blood flow was observed in two patients after bipolar cautery. The LSCI adapted instrument has the capability to produce real-time, full field CBF image maps with excellent spatial resolution and minimal intervention to the surgical procedure. Results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of using LSCI to monitor blood flow during neurosurgery.

  7. Utility of intra-operative ultrasound in choosing the appropriate site for blood pressure monitoring in Takayasu′s arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Krishnamurthy Narasimha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Takayasu′s arteritis (TA is rare, chronic progressive, pan-endarteritis involving the aorta and its main branches, with a specific predilection for young Asian women. Anaesthesia for TA patients is complicated by their severe uncontrolled hypertension, extreme arterial blood pressure differentials, aortic regurgitation (AR, end-organ dysfunction, stenosis/aneurysms of major blood vessels and difficulties encountered in monitoring arterial blood pressure. We present the usefulness of ultrasound during anaesthetic management of a 35-year-old woman posted for emergency caesarean section due to intra-uterine growth retardation, foetal tachycardia in active labour, who was already diagnosed to have TA along with moderate AR and uncontrolled hypertension, using epidural technique. The use of intra-operative doppler helped resolve the initial dilemma about the diagnosis and treatment of the differential blood pressure between the affected and the normal upper limb in the absence of prior arteriogram.

  8. The role of the neurophysiological intraoperative monitoring to prevention of postoperative neurological complication in the surgical treatment of scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Khit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bearing in mind that the technique of surgical treatment of scoliosis and skills are high enough, iatrogenic spinal cord injury is still one of the most feared complication of scoliosis surgery. It is well known that the function of the spinal cord may be estimated by combining somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP and motor evoked potentials (MEP. We have retrospectively evaluated the results of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM in a large population of patients underwent surgical treatment of spinal deformity. Intraoperative neuromonitoring SSEP and transcranial electrostimulation (TES – MEP in conjunction with the assessment of the correct position of the screws was performed in 142 consecutive cases, i. e. all patients who had undergone surgical treatment of idiopathic (127 pts, congenital (10 pts or neurogenic (5 pts scoliosis. A neurophysiological “alarm” was defined as a decrease in amplitude (uni- or bilateral of at least 50 % for SEPs and of 70 % for TES-MEP compared with baseline. Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA in 138 cases was achieved by infusion of propofol (8–16 mg / kg / h and in 4 cases by halogenate anesthesia – sevoflurane (0.4–1.8 MAC. Seven patients (4.9 % were reported intraoperative neurophysiological parameters significant changes that require action by the surgeons and anesthetists, with deterioration of ostoperative neurologic status in one case. Of these three cases, the amplitude drop SSEPs and TESMEPs-was due, to the pharmacological aspects of anesthetic management, in the other four cases – with surgical procedures (response halo-traction – 1 case, mechanical damage of sheath of the spinal cord by pliers Kerrison – 1case, overcorrection – 2 cases. In five cases (3.5 % required reposting of pedicle screws (1–2 levels. Only one patient (0.7 % had a persistent postoperative neurological disorder (neuropathic pain, respectively from a level of re-reposition of

  9. Quantification of the proportion of motor neurons recruited by transcranial electrical stimulation during intraoperative motor evoked potential monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Shunji; Yamada, Hiroshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Minamide, Akihito; Nakagawa, Yukihiro; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Munehito

    2013-12-01

    Transcranial motor evoked potentials (TcMEPs) are widely used to monitor motor function during spinal surgery. However, they are much smaller and more variable in amplitude than responses evoked by maximal peripheral nerve stimulation, suggesting that a limited number of spinal motor neurons to the target muscle are excited by transcranial stimulation. The aim of this study was to quantify the proportion of motor neurons recruited during TcMEP monitoring under general anesthesia. In twenty patients who underwent thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery with TcMEP monitoring, the triple stimulation technique (TST) was applied to the unilateral upper arm intraoperatively. Total intravenous anesthesia was employed. Trains of four stimuli were delivered with maximal intensity and an inter-pulse interval of 1.5 ms. TST responses were recorded from the abductor digiti minimi muscle, and the negative peak amplitude and area were measured and compared between the TST test (two collisions between transcranial and proximal and distal peripheral stimulation) and control response (two collisions between two proximal and one distal peripheral stimulation). The highest degree of superimposition of the TST test and control responses was chosen from several trials per patient. The average ratios (test:control) were 17.1 % (range 1.8-38 %) for the amplitudes and 21.6 % (range 2.9-40 %) for the areas. The activity of approximately 80 % of the motor units to the target muscle cannot be detected by TcMEP monitoring. Therefore, changes in evoked potentials must be interpreted cautiously when assessing segmental motor function with TcMEP monitoring.

  10. 133Xe blood flow monitoring during arteriovenous malformation resection: a case of intraoperative hyperperfusion with subsequent brain swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, W.L.; Solomon, R.A.; Prohovnik, I.; Ornstein, E.; Weinstein, J.; Stein, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using the i.v. 133Xe technique was carried out during resection of a right temporooccipital arteriovenous malformation (AVM) with ipsilateral middle and posterior cerebral arterial supply. Intraoperatively, a rCBF detector was in place over the right frontotemporal area, about 5 to 6 cm from the border of the AVM. Anesthesia was 0.75% isoflurane in oxygen and nitrous oxide. After dural exposure, the rCBF was 27 ml/100 g/min at a pCO2 of 29 mm Hg and a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 90 mm Hg. The pCO2 was then elevated to 40 mm Hg, and the rCBF was increased to 55 ml/100 g/min at a MAP of 83 mm Hg. After AVM removal, the rCBF rose to 50 ml/100 g/min at a pCO2 of 27 mm Hg and a MAP of 75 mm Hg. The pCO2 was elevated to 33 mm Hg and the rCBF increased to 86 ml/100 g/min at a MAP of 97 mm Hg. During skin closure, the rCBF was 94 ml/100 g/min at a pCO2 of 26 mm Hg and a MAP of 97 mm Hg. The patient was neurologically normal postoperatively except for a mild, new visual field defect. After 2 to 3 days, the patient gradually developed lethargy, confusion, and nausea with relatively normal blood pressure. An angiogram revealed residual enlargement of the posterior cerebral artery feeding vessel. Computed tomography showed edema extending from the area of AVM resection as far as the frontal region, producing a significant midline shift anteriorly. Intraoperative rCBF monitoring revealed significant hyperperfusion after AVM resection, which was associated with signs and symptoms of the normal perfusion pressure breakthrough syndrome

  11. Classifying Multiple Types of Hand Motions Using Electrocorticography During Intraoperative Awake Craniotomy & Seizure Monitoring Processes - Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao eXie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, some case studies were conducted toclassify several kinds of hand motions from electrocorticography(ECoG signals during intraoperative awake craniotomy &extraoperative seizure monitoring processes. Four subjects (P1,P2 with intractable epilepsy during seizure monitoring and P3,P4 with brain tumor during awake craniotomy participatedin the experiments. Subjects performed three types of handmotions (Grasp, Thumb-finger motion and Index-finger motioncontralateral to the motor cortex covered with ECoG electrodes.Two methods were used for signal processing. Method I:autoregressive (AR model with burg method was applied toextract features, and additional waveform length (WL featurehas been considered, finally the linear discriminative analysis(LDA was used as the classifier. Method II: stationary subspaceanalysis (SSA was applied for data preprocessing, and thecommon spatial pattern (CSP was used for feature extractionbefore LDA decoding process. Applying method I, the threeclassaccuracy of P1□P4 were 90.17%, 96.00%, 91.77% and92.95% respectively. For method II, the three-class accuracy ofP1□P4 were 72.00%, 93.17%, 95.22% and 90.36% respectively.This study verified the possibility of decoding multiple handmotion types during an awake craniotomy, which is the firststep towards dexterous neuroprosthetic control during surgicalimplantation, in order to verify the optimal placement of electrodes.The accuracy during awake craniotomy was comparableto results during seizure monitoring. This study also indicatedthat ECoG was a promising approach for precise identificationof eloquent cortex during awake craniotomy, and might forma promising BCI system that could benefit both patients andneurosurgeons.

  12. Classifying multiple types of hand motions using electrocorticography during intraoperative awake craniotomy and seizure monitoring processes—case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tao; Zhang, Dingguo; Wu, Zehan; Chen, Liang; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    In this work, some case studies were conducted to classify several kinds of hand motions from electrocorticography (ECoG) signals during intraoperative awake craniotomy & extraoperative seizure monitoring processes. Four subjects (P1, P2 with intractable epilepsy during seizure monitoring and P3, P4 with brain tumor during awake craniotomy) participated in the experiments. Subjects performed three types of hand motions (Grasp, Thumb-finger motion and Index-finger motion) contralateral to the motor cortex covered with ECoG electrodes. Two methods were used for signal processing. Method I: autoregressive (AR) model with burg method was applied to extract features, and additional waveform length (WL) feature has been considered, finally the linear discriminative analysis (LDA) was used as the classifier. Method II: stationary subspace analysis (SSA) was applied for data preprocessing, and the common spatial pattern (CSP) was used for feature extraction before LDA decoding process. Applying method I, the three-class accuracy of P1~P4 were 90.17, 96.00, 91.77, and 92.95% respectively. For method II, the three-class accuracy of P1~P4 were 72.00, 93.17, 95.22, and 90.36% respectively. This study verified the possibility of decoding multiple hand motion types during an awake craniotomy, which is the first step toward dexterous neuroprosthetic control during surgical implantation, in order to verify the optimal placement of electrodes. The accuracy during awake craniotomy was comparable to results during seizure monitoring. This study also indicated that ECoG was a promising approach for precise identification of eloquent cortex during awake craniotomy, and might form a promising BCI system that could benefit both patients and neurosurgeons. PMID:26483627

  13. Orthostatic Dysregulation during Postural Change on the Dental Chair and Intraoperative Monitoring by Heart Rate Variability Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Momota

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first case report of orthostatic dysregulation (OD manifested during postural change on the dental chair and intraoperatively monitored by heart rate variability (HRV analysis. OD-associated autonomic dysfunction is induced by postural changes and easily leads to disturbance in circulatory dynamics; however, most dental practices have not yet realized the importance of managing OD. We measured autonomic activity in a patient with OD during dental therapy and assessed the clinical significance of HRV analysis for OD. The patient was a 17-year-old Japanese female. She was diagnosed with impacted wisdom teeth and had no previous history of a distinct systemic disease. A surgical procedure to extract the teeth was safely performed under both local anesthesia and sedation with nitrous oxide and midazolam. After the surgery, her postural change to sitting induced orthostatic hypotension. HRV variables showed parasympathetic dominance due to the upright position. Subsequently, her posture was returned to supine, and atropine sulfate administration for the immediate treatment of OD returned her blood pressure to normal levels. HRV variables showed relative sympathetic dominance due to an atropine-derived parasympathetic blockade. HRV analysis revealed OD-associated autonomic dysfunction and should become a standard tool for safe and secure dental management of OD.

  14. Development of the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, Jonathan M; Kimble, Christopher J; Covey, Daniel P; Blaha, Charles D; Agnesi, Filippo; Mohseni, Pedram; Whitlock, Sidney; Johnson, David M; Horne, April; Bennet, Kevin E; Lee, Kendall H; Garris, Paul A

    2009-10-01

    Emerging evidence supports the hypothesis that modulation of specific central neuronal systems contributes to the clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and motor cortex stimulation (MCS). Real-time monitoring of the neurochemical output of targeted regions may therefore advance functional neurosurgery by, among other goals, providing a strategy for investigation of mechanisms, identification of new candidate neurotransmitters, and chemically guided placement of the stimulating electrode. The authors report the development of a device called the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS) for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring during functional neurosurgery. This device supports fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) for real-time, spatially and chemically resolved neurotransmitter measurements in the brain. The FSCV study consisted of a triangle wave scanned between -0.4 and 1 V at a rate of 300 V/second and applied at 10 Hz. All voltages were compared with an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The CFM was constructed by aspirating a single carbon fiber (r = 2.5 mum) into a glass capillary and pulling the capillary to a microscopic tip by using a pipette puller. The exposed carbon fiber (that is, the sensing region) extended beyond the glass insulation by approximately 100 microm. The neurotransmitter dopamine was selected as the analyte for most trials. Proof-of-principle tests included in vitro flow injection and noise analysis, and in vivo measurements in urethane-anesthetized rats by monitoring dopamine release in the striatum following high-frequency electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle. Direct comparisons were made to a conventional hardwired system. The WINCS, designed in compliance with FDA-recognized consensus standards for medical electrical device safety, consisted of 4 modules: 1) front-end analog circuit for FSCV (that is, current-to-voltage transducer); 2

  15. Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System-based amperometric detection of dopamine, adenosine, and glutamate for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnesi, Filippo; Tye, Susannah J; Bledsoe, Jonathan M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Kimble, Christopher J; Sieck, Gary C; Bennet, Kevin E; Garris, Paul A; Blaha, Charles D; Lee, Kendall H

    2009-10-01

    In a companion study, the authors describe the development of a new instrument named the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS), which couples digital telemetry with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine. In the present study, the authors describe the extended capability of the WINCS to use fixed potential amperometry (FPA) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine, as well as glutamate and adenosine. Compared with other electrochemical techniques such as FSCV or high-speed chronoamperometry, FPA offers superior temporal resolution and, in combination with enzyme-linked biosensors, the potential to monitor nonelectroactive analytes in real time. The WINCS design incorporated a transimpedance amplifier with associated analog circuitry for FPA; a microprocessor; a Bluetooth transceiver; and a single, battery-powered, multilayer, printed circuit board. The WINCS was tested with 3 distinct recording electrodes: 1) a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) to measure dopamine; 2) a glutamate oxidase enzyme-linked electrode to measure glutamate; and 3) a multiple enzyme-linked electrode (adenosine deaminase, nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase) to measure adenosine. Proof-of-principle analyses included noise assessments and in vitro and in vivo measurements that were compared with similar analyses by using a commercial hardwired electrochemical system (EA161 Picostat, eDAQ; Pty Ltd). In urethane-anesthetized rats, dopamine release was monitored in the striatum following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of ascending dopaminergic fibers in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). In separate rat experiments, DBS-evoked adenosine release was monitored in the ventrolateral thalamus. To test the WINCS in an operating room setting resembling human neurosurgery, cortical glutamate release in response to motor cortex stimulation (MCS) was monitored using a large-mammal animal model, the pig. The

  16. Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System–based amperometric detection of dopamine, adenosine, and glutamate for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnesi, Filippo; Tye, Susannah J.; Bledsoe, Jonathan M.; Griessenauer, Christoph J.; Kimble, Christopher J.; Sieck, Gary C.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Garris, Paul A.; Blaha, Charles D.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2009-01-01

    Object In a companion study, the authors describe the development of a new instrument named the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS), which couples digital telemetry with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine. In the present study, the authors describe the extended capability of the WINCS to use fixed potential amperometry (FPA) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine, as well as glutamate and adenosine. Compared with other electrochemical techniques such as FSCV or high-speed chronoamperometry, FPA offers superior temporal resolution and, in combination with enzyme-linked biosensors, the potential to monitor nonelectroactive analytes in real time. Methods The WINCS design incorporated a transimpedance amplifier with associated analog circuitry for FPA; a microprocessor; a Bluetooth transceiver; and a single, battery-powered, multilayer, printed circuit board. The WINCS was tested with 3 distinct recording electrodes: 1) a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) to measure dopamine; 2) a glutamate oxidase enzyme-linked electrode to measure glutamate; and 3) a multiple enzyme-linked electrode (adenosine deaminase, nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase) to measure adenosine. Proof-of-principle analyses included noise assessments and in vitro and in vivo measurements that were compared with similar analyses by using a commercial hardwired electrochemical system (EA161 Picostat, eDAQ; Pty Ltd). In urethane-anesthetized rats, dopamine release was monitored in the striatum following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of ascending dopaminergic fibers in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). In separate rat experiments, DBS-evoked adenosine release was monitored in the ventrolateral thalamus. To test the WINCS in an operating room setting resembling human neurosurgery, cortical glutamate release in response to motor cortex stimulation (MCS) was monitored using a large-mammal animal

  17. Intraoperative facial motor evoked potentials monitoring with transcranial electrical stimulation for preservation of facial nerve function in patients with large acoustic neuroma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bai-yun; TIAN Yong-ji; LIU Wen; LIU Shu-ling; QIAO Hui; ZHANG Jun-ting; JIA Gui-jun

    2007-01-01

    Background Although various monitoring techniques have been used routinely in the treatment of the lesions in the skull base, iatrogenic facial paresis or paralysis remains a significant clinical problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intraoperative facial motor evoked potentials monitoring with transcranial electrical stimulation on preservation of facial nerve function.Method From January to November 2005, 19 patients with large acoustic neuroma were treated using intraoperative facial motor evoked potentials monitoring with transcranial electrical stimulation (TCEMEP) for preservation of facial nerve function. The relationship between the decrease of MEP amplitude after tumor removal and the postoperative function of the facial nerve was analyzed.Results MEP amplitude decreased more than 75% in 11 patients, of which 6 presented significant facial paralysis (H-B grade 3), and 5 had mild facial paralysis (H-B grade 2). In the other 8 patients, whose MEP amplitude decreased less than 75%, 1 experienced significant facial paralysis, 5 had mild facial paralysis, and 2 were normal.Conclusions Intraoperative TCEMEP can be used to predict postoperative function of the facial nerve. The decreased MEP amplitude above 75 % is an alarm point for possible severe facial paralysis.

  18. Vertebral Column Resection for Kyphoscoliosis in a Patient with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: An Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring Alert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Faisal R; Al Eissa, Sami; Sayegh, Samir; Al Helal, Fahad; Al-Sharif, Shomoukh A; Annaim, Monerah M; Muhammad, Sheryar; Aziz, Tanweer

    2016-08-31

    A 16-year-old male patient with Ehler-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and a back deformity since birth presented with severe kyphoscoliosis. The patient was neurologically intact but had respiratory and cardiac insufficiencies. A two-stage vertebral column resection (VCR) at T9-T10 with multiple level fusion with multimodality intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) was planned.  During the first stage, pedicle screws were placed at multiple spinal levels above and below the VCR level. Upper and lower somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), transcranial electrical motor evoked potentials (TCeMEP), and electromyography were monitored continuously and showed no significant changes. The second stage was performed one week later. Baseline SSEP and TCeMEP responses were present in all extremities. The surgeon was informed of a sudden 70% amplitude drop in TCeMEP in the lower limbs with stable SSEP after ligating one of the left nerves/vessels fully stretching the spinal cord. The surgeon removed the ligation, and an improvement in motor responses followed. Surgery proceeded with the highest levels of caution. Later, there was a sudden loss of TCeMEP and SSEP in the lower limbs bilaterally. The correction was released, mean arterial pressure was increased, and intravenous dexamethasone was administered. The surgical correction was aborted, and the decision was made to close the site. Lower SSEP and TCeMEP responses remained absent until closing, while upper SSEP and TCeMEP responses remained stable. A wake-up test was done after closing. The patient moved his upper limbs but was unable to move his lower limbs bilaterally. The patient was sent for a magnetic resonance imaging scan while intubated and then sent to the intensive care unit. At 24 hours and 36 hours post-operation, the patient had no sensory and motor function below the T8 level. Forty-eight hours post-operation, the patient started to feel sensory stimuli at the T10 level. At one week post-operation, the

  19. Long-term effectiveness of localization studies and intraoperative parathormone monitoring in patients undergoing reoperative parathyroidectomy for persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Punam P; Farra, Josefina C; Allan, Bassan J; Lew, John I

    2015-07-01

    Reoperative parathyroidectomy (RPTX) for persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism is associated with a high rate of operative failure. The long-term effectiveness of RPTX using localization studies and intraoperative parathormone monitoring (IPM) was examined. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from patients undergoing targeted RPTX with IPM for persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism was performed. Persistent hyperparathyroidism was defined as elevated calcium and parathormone (PTH) levels above normal range less than 6 months after parathyroidectomy. Recurrent hyperparathyroidism was defined as elevated calcium and PTH levels greater than 6 months after successful parathyroidectomy. Sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) for sestamibi, surgeon-performed ultrasound, intraoperative PTH dynamics, and surgical outcomes were evaluated. Of the 1,064 patients, 69 patients underwent 72 RPTXs with localizing studies and IPM. Sestamibi (n = 69) had a sensitivity of 74% and a PPV of 83%, whereas surgeon-performed ultrasound (n = 38) had a sensitivity of 55% and a PPV of 76%. IPM had a sensitivity of 100% and a PPV of 98%. An intraoperative PTH drop greater than or equal to 50% was predictive of operative success (P < .01). Overall, operative success and recurrence were 94% and 1.4%, with a mean patient follow-up of 59 ± 12.8 months. RPTX can be performed in a targeted approach using preoperative localization studies and IPM, leading to a low rate of complications and a high rate of long-term operative success. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Intraoperative electrocorticography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Alcaraz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG is the recording of electrophysiological activity from electrodes placed directly on the exposed surface of brain, during surgery for epilepsy and tumor resection. The ECoG is helpful in defining the seizure onset and spread within the cortical surface and delineation of the interface between epileptogenic zones and functional cortex substance of the brain. Intraoperative ECoG is an invasive procedure, it is performed during surgery mostly commonly during awake craniotomy but at times during general anaesthesia. As most anesthetic agents will affect ECoG, they should be minimized or stopped prior to any recording. Activation of intraoperative epileptiform activity may also be required if there are no spontaneous discharges. The appropriate management of the anesthetic during the time of ECoG is critical for its success. There are limitations and some controversies to all the uses of intraoperative ECoG, thus each center will set their own indications, criteria, and protocols.

  1. A CT-ultrasound-coregistered augmented reality enhanced image-guided surgery system and its preliminary study on brain-shift estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C H; Hsieh, C H; Lee, J D; Huang, W C; Lee, S T; Wu, C T; Sun, Y N; Wu, Y T

    2012-01-01

    With the combined view on the physical space and the medical imaging data, augmented reality (AR) visualization can provide perceptive advantages during image-guided surgery (IGS). However, the imaging data are usually captured before surgery and might be different from the up-to-date one due to natural shift of soft tissues. This study presents an AR-enhanced IGS system which is capable to correct the movement of soft tissues from the pre-operative CT images by using intra-operative ultrasound images. First, with reconstructing 2-D free-hand ultrasound images to 3-D volume data, the system applies a Mutual-Information based registration algorithm to estimate the deformation between pre-operative and intra-operative ultrasound images. The estimated deformation transform describes the movement of soft tissues and is then applied to the pre-operative CT images which provide high-resolution anatomical information. As a result, the system thus displays the fusion of the corrected CT images or the real-time 2-D ultrasound images with the patient in the physical space through a head mounted display device, providing an immersive augmented-reality environment. For the performance validation of the proposed system, a brain phantom was utilized to simulate brain-shift scenario. Experimental results reveal that when the shift of an artificial tumor is from 5mm ∼ 12mm, the correction rates can be improved from 32% ∼ 45% to 87% ∼ 95% by using the proposed system.

  2. The value of intraoperative sonography in low grade glioma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Athanasios K; Anokhin, Maxim; Vavruska, Jan; Mahvash, Mehran; Scholz, Martin

    2015-04-01

    There is a number of different methods to localize a glioma intraoperatively. Neuronavigation, intraoperative MRI, 5-aminolevulinic acid, as well as intraoperative sonography. Every method has its advantages and disadvantages. Low grade gliomas do not show a specific signal with 5-aminolevulinic acid and are difficult to distinguish macroscopically from normal tissue. In the present study we stress out the importance of intraoperative diagnostic ultrasound for localization of low grade gliomas. We retrospectively evaluated the charts and MRIs of 34 patients with low grade gliomas operated in our department from 2011 until December 2014. The efficacy of ultrasound as an intraoperative navigational tool was assessed. In 15 patients ultrasound was used and in 19 not. Only histologically proven low grades gliomas (astrocytomas grade II) were evaluated. In none of the patients where ultrasound (combined with neuronavigation) was used (N=15) to find the tumors, the target was missed, whereas the exclusive use of neuronavigation missed the target in 5 of 19 cases of small subcortical low grade gliomas. Intraoperative ultrasound is an excellent tool in localizing low grade gliomas intraoperatively. It is an inexpensive, real time neuronavigational tool, which overcomes brain shift. Even when identifying the tumors with ultrasound is very reliable, the extend of resection and the decision to remove any residual tumor with the help of ultrasound is at the moment unreliable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurosurgery and brain shift: review of the state of the art and main contributions of robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Correa-Arana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review about neurosurgery, robotic assistants in this type of procedure, and the approach to the problem of brain tissue displacement, including techniques for obtaining medical images. It is especially focused on the phenomenon of brain displacement, commonly known as brain shift, which causes a loss of reference between the preoperative images and the volumes to be treated during image-guided surgery. Hypothetically, with brain shift prediction and correction for the neuronavigation system, minimal invasion trajectories could be planned and shortened. This would reduce damage to functional tissues and possibly lower the morbidity and mortality in delicate and demanding medical procedures such as the removal of a brain tumor. This paper also mentions other issues associated with neurosurgery and shows the way robotized systems have helped solve these problems. Finally, it highlights the future perspectives of neurosurgery, a branch of medicine that seeks to treat the ailments of the main organ of the human body from the perspective of many disciplines.

  4. Transcranial electric stimulation for intraoperative motor evoked potential monitoring: dependence of required stimulation current on interstimulus interval value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joksimovic, Boban; Szelenyi, Andrea; Seifert, Volker; Damjanovic, Aleksandar; Damjanovic, Aleksandra; Rasulic, Lukas

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the relationship between stimulus intensity by constant current transcranial electric stimulation and interstimulus interval (ISI) for eliciting muscle motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in three different hand muscles and the tibialis anterior muscles. We tested intraoperatively different monophasic constant current pulses and ISIs in 22 patients with clinically normal motor function. Motor thresholds of contralateral muscle MEPs were determined at 0.5 milliseconds (ms) pulse duration and ISIs of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 10 ms using a train of 2, 3, and 5 monophasic constant current pulses of 62 to 104 mA before craniotomy and after closure of the dura mater. The lowest stimulation threshold to elicit MEPs in the examined muscles was achieved with a train of 5 pulses (ISI: 3 ms) before craniotomy, which was statistically significant compared with 2 pulses (ISI: 3 ms) as well as 3 pulses (ISIs: 3 and 10 ms). An ISI of 3 ms gave the lowest motor thresholds with statistical significance compared with the ISIs of 4 ms (2 pulses) and of 1 ms (3 pulses). All current intensity (mA) and ISI (ms) relationship graphs had a trend of the exponential function as y = a + bx + c ρ (x), where y is intensity (mA) and x is ISI (ms). The minimum of the function was determined for each patient and each muscle. The difference was statistically significant between 3 and 5 pulses before craniotomy and between 3 and 5 pulses and 2 and 5 pulses after closure of the dura mater. In adult neurosurgical patients with a normal motor status, a train of 5 pulses and an ISI of 3 ms provide the lowest motor thresholds. We provided evidence of the dependence of required stimulation current on ISI. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. The use of intraoperative monitoring and treatment of symptomatic microemboli in carotid artery stenting: case report and discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangi, P.S.; Clifton, A. [St Georges Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Atkinson Morley Wing, Tooting, London (United Kingdom); Markus, H.S.; Punter, M.N.M. [St Georges University of London, Centre for Clinical Neuroscience, Cranmer Terrace, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-15

    Carotid artery stenting is a recently introduced treatment in symptomatic atherosclerotic carotid artery disease with acceptable complication rates. The major risk is perioperative embolic stroke. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) can be used to identify embolic signals and guide therapy. We present a case of symptomatic embolization in a 72-year-old female following carotid stent deployment complicated by haemodynamic changes. Despite concurrent dual antiplatelet medication significant symptomatic embolization occurred even after restoration of the blood pressure, and modulation of the rate of embolization was achieved using dextran-40 guided by TCD monitoring. The patient recovered from an initially profound hemiparesis and dysphasia to minor sensory changes. Microemboli are common following carotid artery stenting and there appears to be a threshold phenomenon associated with prolonged embolization and progression to cerebral infarction. TCD can be used to detect particulate microemboli and therefore may be useful in guiding antithrombotic therapy in this setting. Dextran-40 has been shown to reduce the embolic load following carotid endarterectomy and was used to good effect in this patient in terms of both embolic load and clinical outcome. This is the first case of embolization following carotid stenting successfully treated with dextran-40, and offers a further option for therapeutic intervention in microembolism detected by TCD and stresses the importance of perioperative monitoring of embolic load for postoperative stroke risk. (orig.)

  6. Continuous monitoring of arterial blood gases and pH during intraoperative rapid blood administration using a Paratrend sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vretzakis, G; Papaziogas, B; Matsaridou, E; Vasiliadou, G; Papadopoulos, G; Patsialas, C; Kostopoulou, F

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of rapid transfusion of packed red cells on the arterial blood gases and acid-base status of the recipient. We studied 16 patients (mean age 66.3+/-9.9 years) who received rapid transfusion of 632.8+/-287.2 g of packed red cells in CPDA-1, stored before use for a period of 15.2+/-4.4 days. During transfusion, monitoring of pH, PCO2 and PO2 was continuous using an intra-arterial multiparameter sensor (Paratrend 7, Biomedical Sensors, UK). The rate of the transfusion was 73.1+/-9.6 g/min and the duration of observation was 35.8+/-12.8 min. Arterial pH decreased from 7.446+/-0.023 to 7.385+/-0.034 (pDelta pH and delta PCO2 showed significant correlation to the weight and the age of the transfused blood (pPO2 were not specific and our clinical impression was that they were related to unmeasured parameters. Our findings suggest that the fall in pH and the elevation in PCO2 which occur during rapid transfusion of packed red cells may go undetected or be misinterpreted if the acid-base status of the recipient is not monitored continuously. These alterations are mainly of metabolic character and depend on the amount and age of the transfused component. Our data suggest that arterial sampling is essential during massive transfusions.

  7. Comparison of false-negative/positive results of intraoperative evoked potential monitoring between no and partial neuromuscular blockade in patients receiving propofol/remifentanil-based anesthesia during cerebral aneurysm clipping surgery: A retrospective analysis of 685 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jin, Seok-Joon; Karm, Myong-Hwan; Moon, Young-Jin; Jeong, Hye-Won; Kim, Jae-Won; Ha, Seung-Il; Kim, Joung-Uk

    2016-08-01

    Although the elicited responses of motor evoked potential (MEP) monitoring are very sensitive to suppression by anesthetic agents and muscle relaxants, the use of neuromuscular blockade (NMB) during MEP monitoring is still controversial because of serious safety concerns and diagnostic accuracy. Here, we evaluated the incidence of unacceptable movement and compared false-negative MEP results between no and partial NMB during cerebral aneurysm clipping surgery. We reviewed patient medical records for demographic data, anesthesia regimen, neurophysiology event logs, MEP results, and clinical outcomes. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the intraoperative use of NMB: no NMB group (n = 276) and partial NMB group (n = 409). We compared the diagnostic accuracy of MEP results to predict postoperative outcomes between both groups. Additionally, we evaluated unwanted patient movement during MEP monitoring in both groups. Of the 685 patients, 622 (90.8%) manifested no intraoperative changes in MEP and no postoperative motor deficits. Twenty patients showed postoperative neurologic deficits despite preserved intraoperative MEP. False-positive MEP results were 3.6% in the no NMB group and 3.9% in the partial NMB group (P = 1.00). False-negative MEP results were 1.1% in the no NMB group and 4.2% in the partial NMB group (P = 0.02). No spontaneous movement or spontaneous respiration was observed in either group. Propofol/remifentanil-based anesthesia without NMB decreases the stimulation intensity of MEPs, which may reduce the false-negative ratio of MEP monitoring during cerebral aneurysm surgery. Our anesthetic protocol enabled reliable intraoperative MEP recording and patient immobilization during cerebral aneurysm clipping surgery.

  8. P32INCREASED PERCENTAGE RESECTION OF TUMOUR VOLUME USING NEURONAVIGATIONAL 3D INTRAOPERATIVE ULTRASOUND: A SINGLE UNIT EXPERIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Vaqas, B.; O'Neill, K.; Awad, M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The use of intraoperative 3D navigational ultrasound (Sonowand) offers a relatively inexpensive method of obtaining imaging of intrinsic brain tumours during resection which takes in account brain shift during surgery and also allows better visualisation of the tumour margin to help control resection. We designed a study to measure the volume of tumour resection in 25 consecutive Sonowand cases compared to 25 matched non-ultrasound guided controls. METHOD: A retrospective consec...

  9. Brain tumors in eloquent areas: A European multicenter survey of intraoperative mapping techniques, intraoperative seizures occurrence, and antiepileptic drug prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spena, Giannantonio; Schucht, Philippe; Seidel, Kathleen; Rutten, Geert-Jan; Freyschlag, Christian Franz; D'Agata, Federico; Costi, Emanule; Zappa, Francesca; Fontanella, Marco; Fontaine, Denys; Almairac, Fabien; Cavallo, Michele; De Bonis, Pasquale; Conesa, Gerardo; Foroglou, Nicholas; Gil-Robles, Santiago; Mandonnet, Emanuel; Martino, Juan; Picht, Thomas; Viegas, Catarina; Wager, Michel; Pallud, Johan

    2017-04-01

    Intraoperative mapping and monitoring techniques for eloquent area tumors are routinely used world wide. Very few data are available regarding mapping and monitoring methods and preferences, intraoperative seizures occurrence and perioperative antiepileptic drug management. A questionnaire was sent to 20 European centers with experience in intraoperative mapping or neurophysiological monitoring for the treatment of eloquent area tumors. Fifteen centers returned the completed questionnaires. Data was available on 2098 patients. 863 patients (41.1%) were operated on through awake surgery and intraoperative mapping, while 1235 patients (58.8%) received asleep surgery and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring or mapping. There was great heterogeneity between centers with some totally AW oriented (up to 100%) and other almost totally ASL oriented (up to 92%) (31% SD). For awake surgery, 79.9% centers preferred an asleep-awake-asleep anesthesia protocol. Only 53.3% of the centers used ECoG or transcutaneous EEG. The incidence of intraoperative seizures varied significantly between centers, ranging from 2.5% to 54% (p mapping technique and the risk of intraoperative seizures. Moreover, history of preoperative seizures can significantly increase the risk of intraoperative seizures (p mapping and monitoring protocols and the management of peri- and intraoperative seizures. This data can help identify specific aspects that need to be investigated in prospective and controlled studies.

  10. Intraoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower Junior, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    A briefly history of intraoperative radiotherapy is presented. The equipment used is described and the treatment with superficial X-ray beams, orthovoltage X-ray beams and megavoltage electron beams are discussed. The effect on normal tissues and the clinical use of intraoperative radiotherapy in several Kind of cancer is studied. (M.A.C.) [pt

  11. Low-field magnetic resonance imaging for intraoperative use in neurosurgery: a 5-year experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimsky, Christopher; Ganslandt, Oliver; Buchfelder, Michael; Fahlbusch, Rudolf; Tomandl, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and point out the indications of intraoperative MR imaging in neurosurgical procedures. The MR imaging was performed using a 0.2-T scanner which was located in a radiofrequency-shielded operating theater. Three major setups for intraoperative imaging were possible: inside the scanner; at the 5-Gauss line; or in an adjacent operating theater. Additionally, in lesions adjacent to eloquent brain areas microscope- and pointer-based neuronavigation with integrated functional data was applied. Three hundred ten patients were investigated in the previous 5 years, among them gliomas (n=95), pituitary tumors (n=81), and 39 non-lesional cases in whom resective or disconnective epilepsy surgery was carried out. We did not observe any adverse effects due to intraoperative MR imaging. Image quality was sufficient to evaluate the extent of the tumor resection in the majority of cases. The main indications for intraoperative MR imaging were the evaluation of the extent of a resection in glioma, ventricular tumor, pituitary tumor, and in epilepsy surgery. Intraoperative MR imaging offers the possibility of further tumor removal during the same surgical procedure in case of tumor remnants, increasing the rate of complete tumor removal. Furthermore, the effects of brain shift, which would lead to inaccurate neuronavigation, can be compensated for by an update of the neuronavigation system with intraoperative MR image data. (orig.)

  12. Spinal infection: Evaluation with MR imaging and intraoperative spinal US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan Post, M.J.; Montalvo, B.M.; Quencer, R.M.; Katz, B.H.; Green, B.A.; Elsmont, F.

    1987-01-01

    MR spine images and/or intraoperative US scans in 15 patients were reviewed retrospectively and correlated with clinical and pathologic data to determine the diagnostic value of these modalities in spinal infection. In osteomyelitis and retrospinal abscess MR imaging was definitive; in myelitis it was positive but nonspecific. In epidural abscess concomitant with meningitis, myelography with CT and intraoperative US were superior to MR imaging. Intraoperative US could be used to distinguish these processes and to monitor surgical decompression. The authors recommend that MR imaging be performed at the screening examination in cases of spinal infection, accompanied by intraoperative US in all surgical cases

  13. [Intraoperative multidimensional visualization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, J; Kauffels, A; Grade, M; Alves, F; Kühn, P; Ghadimi, B M

    2016-12-01

    Modern intraoperative techniques of visualization are increasingly being applied in general and visceral surgery. The combination of diverse techniques provides the possibility of multidimensional intraoperative visualization of specific anatomical structures. Thus, it is possible to differentiate between normal tissue and tumor tissue and therefore exactly define tumor margins. The aim of intraoperative visualization of tissue that is to be resected and tissue that should be spared is to lead to a rational balance between oncological and functional results. Moreover, these techniques help to analyze the physiology and integrity of tissues. Using these methods surgeons are able to analyze tissue perfusion and oxygenation. However, to date it is not clear to what extent these imaging techniques are relevant in the clinical routine. The present manuscript reviews the relevant modern visualization techniques focusing on intraoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging as well as augmented reality, fluorescence imaging and optoacoustic imaging.

  14. Neuronavigation for arteriovenous malformation surgery by intraoperative three-dimensional ultrasound angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiesen, Tiit; Peredo, Inti; Edner, Göran; Kihlström, Lars; Svensson, Mikael; Ulfarsson, Elfar; Andersson, Tommy

    2007-04-01

    Neuronavigational devices have traditionally used preoperative imaging with limited possibilities for adjustment to brain shift and intraoperative manipulation of the surgical lesions. We have used an intraoperative imaging and navigation system that uses navigation on intraoperatively acquired three-dimensional ultrasound data, as well as preoperatively acquired magnetic resonance imaging scans and magnetic resonance angiograms. The usefulness of this system for arteriovenous malformation (AVM) surgery was evaluated prospectively. Nine consecutive patients with Spetzler Grade 1 (n = 3), 2 (n = 3), 3(n = 2) or 4 (n = 1) AVMs underwent operation using this intraoperative imaging and navigation system. The system provides real-time rendering of three-dimensional angiographic data and can visualize such projections in a stereoscopic (virtual reality) manner using special glasses. The experiences with this technology were analyzed and the outcomes assessed. Angiographic reconstructions of three-dimensional images were obtained before and after resection. Conventional navigation on the basis of preoperative magnetic resonance angiography was helpful to secure positioning of the bone flap; stereoscopic visualization of the same data represented a powerful means to construct a mental three-dimensional picture of the extent of the AVM and the feeder anatomy even before skin incision. Intraoperative ultrasound corresponded well to the intraoperative findings and allowed confirmation of feeding vessels in surrounding gyri and rapid identification of the perinidal dissection planes, regardless of brain shift. The latter feature was particularly helpful because the intraoperative navigational identification of surgical planes leads to minimal exploration into the nidus or dissection at a greater distance from the malformation. Application of the system was thought to increase surgical confidence. In two patients, postresection ultrasound prompted additional nidus removal

  15. Continuous intraoperative monitoring of pelvic autonomic nerves during TME to prevent urogenital and anorectal dysfunction in rectal cancer patients (NEUROS): a randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauff, D. W.; Kronfeld, K; Gorbulev, S; Wachtlin, D; Lang, H; Kneist, W

    2016-01-01

    Urinary, sexual and anorectal sequelae are frequent after rectal cancer surgery and were found to be related to intraoperative neurogenic impairment. Neuromonitoring methods have been developed to identify and preserve the complex pelvic autonomic nervous system in order to maintain patients’ quality of life. So far no randomized study has been published dealing with the role of neuromonitoring in rectal cancer surgery. NEUROS is a prospective two-arm randomized controlled multicenter clinical trial comparing the functional outcome in rectal cancer patients undergoing total mesorectal excision (TME) with and without pelvic intraoperative neuromonitoring (pIONM). A total of 188 patients will be included. Primary endpoint is the urinary function measured by the International Prostate Symptom Score. Secondary endpoints consist of sexual, anorectal functional outcome and safety, especially oncologic safety and quality of TME. Sexual function is assessed in females with the Female Sexual Function Index and in males with the International Index of Erectile Function. For evaluation of anorectal function the Wexner-Vaizey score is used. Functional evaluation is scheduled before radiochemotherapy (if applicable), preoperatively (baseline), before hospital discharge, 3 and 6 months after stoma closure and 12 months after surgery. For assessment of safety adverse events, the rates of positive resection margins and quality of mesorectum are documented. This study will provide high quality evidence on the efficacy of pIONM aiming for improvement of functional outcome in rectal cancer patients undergoing TME. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01585727. Registration date is 04/25/2012

  16. Intraoperative tractography and neuronavigation of the pyramidal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimsky, C.; Ganslandt, O.; Weigel, D.; Keller, B. von; Stadlbauer, A.; Akutsu, H.; Hammen, T.; Buchfelder, M.

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) based fiber tracking was applied to visualize the course of the pyramidal tract in the surgical field by microscope-based navigation. In 70 patients with lesions adjacent to the pyramidal tract, DTI data were integrated in a navigational setup. Diffusion data (b=0) were rigidly registered with standard T1-weighted 3-D images. Fiber tracking was performed applying a tensor-deflection algorithm using a multiple volume of interest approach as seed regions for tracking. fMRI data identifying the motor gyrus were applied as selection criteria to define the fibers of interest. After tracking, a 3-D object was generated representing the pyramidal tract. In selected cases, the intraoperative image data (1.5 T intraoperative MRI) were used to update the navigation system. In all patients the pyramidal tract could be visualized in the operative field applying the heads-up display of the operating microscope. In 8 patients (11%) a new or aggravated postoperative paresis could be observed, which was transient in 5 of them; thus, only in 3 patients (4.2%) was there a new permanent neurological deficit. Intraoperative imaging depicted a shifting of the pyramidal tract which amounted up to 15 mm; even the direction of shifting was variable and could not be predicted before surgery, so that mathematical models trying to predict brain shift behaviour are of restricted value only. DTI fiber tracking data can be reliably integrated into navigational systems providing intraoperative visualization of the pyramidal tract. This technique allowed the resection of lesions adjacent to the pyramidal tract with low morbidity. (author)

  17. Intraoperative ultrasound in neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco, J.; Manzanares, R.; Fernandez, L.; Hernando, A.; Ramos, M. del Mar; Garcia, R.

    1996-01-01

    The present work is a review of the major indications for intraoperative ultrasound in the field of neurosurgery, stressing the exploratory method and describing what we consider to be the most illustrative cases. We attempt to provide a thorough view of this constantly developing technique which, despite its great practical usefulness, may be being underemployed. (Author) 47 refs

  18. Protocol for the "Michigan Awareness Control Study": A prospective, randomized, controlled trial comparing electronic alerts based on bispectral index monitoring or minimum alveolar concentration for the prevention of intraoperative awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avidan Michael S

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of intraoperative awareness with explicit recall is 1-2/1000 cases in the United States. The Bispectral Index monitor is an electroencephalographic method of assessing anesthetic depth that has been shown in one prospective study to reduce the incidence of awareness in the high-risk population. In the B-Aware trial, the number needed to treat in order to prevent one case of awareness in the high-risk population was 138. Since the number needed to treat and the associated cost of treatment would be much higher in the general population, the efficacy of the Bispectral Index monitor in preventing awareness in all anesthetized patients needs to be clearly established. This is especially true given the findings of the B-Unaware trial, which demonstrated no significant difference between protocols based on the Bispectral Index monitor or minimum alveolar concentration for the reduction of awareness in high risk patients. Methods/Design To evaluate efficacy in the general population, we are conducting a prospective, randomized, controlled trial comparing the Bispectral Index monitor to a non-electroencephalographic gauge of anesthetic depth. The total recruitment for the study is targeted for 30,000 patients at both low and high risk for awareness. We have developed a novel algorithm that is capable of real-time analysis of our electronic perioperative information system. In one arm of the study, anesthesia providers will receive an electronic page if the Bispectral Index value is >60. In the other arm of the study, anesthesia providers will receive a page if the age-adjusted minimum alveolar concentration is Discussion Awareness during general anesthesia is a persistent problem and the role of the Bispectral Index monitor in its prevention is still unclear. The Michigan Awareness Control Study is the largest prospective trial of awareness prevention ever conducted. Trial Registration Clinical Trial NCT00689091

  19. Preoperative magnetic resonance and intraoperative ultrasound fusion imaging for real-time neuronavigation in brain tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, F; Del Bene, M; Mattei, L; Lodigiani, L; DeBeni, S; Kolev, V; Vetrano, I; Solbiati, L; Sakas, G; DiMeco, F

    2015-04-01

    Brain shift and tissue deformation during surgery for intracranial lesions are the main actual limitations of neuro-navigation (NN), which currently relies mainly on preoperative imaging. Ultrasound (US), being a real-time imaging modality, is becoming progressively more widespread during neurosurgical procedures, but most neurosurgeons, trained on axial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices, lack specific US training and have difficulties recognizing anatomic structures with the same confidence as in preoperative imaging. Therefore real-time intraoperative fusion imaging (FI) between preoperative imaging and intraoperative ultrasound (ioUS) for virtual navigation (VN) is highly desirable. We describe our procedure for real-time navigation during surgery for different cerebral lesions. We performed fusion imaging with virtual navigation for patients undergoing surgery for brain lesion removal using an ultrasound-based real-time neuro-navigation system that fuses intraoperative cerebral ultrasound with preoperative MRI and simultaneously displays an MRI slice coplanar to an ioUS image. 58 patients underwent surgery at our institution for intracranial lesion removal with image guidance using a US system equipped with fusion imaging for neuro-navigation. In all cases the initial (external) registration error obtained by the corresponding anatomical landmark procedure was below 2 mm and the craniotomy was correctly placed. The transdural window gave satisfactory US image quality and the lesion was always detectable and measurable on both axes. Brain shift/deformation correction has been successfully employed in 42 cases to restore the co-registration during surgery. The accuracy of ioUS/MRI fusion/overlapping was confirmed intraoperatively under direct visualization of anatomic landmarks and the error was surgery and is less expensive and time-consuming than other intraoperative imaging techniques, offering high precision and

  20. Intraoperative lung ultrasound: A clinicodynamic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Mittal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the era of evidence-based medicine, ultrasonography has emerged as an important and indispensable tool in clinical practice in various specialties including critical care. Lung ultrasound (LUS has a wide potential in various surgical and clinical situations for timely and easy detection of an impending crisis such as pulmonary edema, endobronchial tube migration, pneumothorax, atelectasis, pleural effusion, and various other causes of desaturation before it clinically ensues to critical level. Although ultrasonography is frequently used in nerve blocks, airway handling, and vascular access, LUS for routine intraoperative monitoring and in crisis management still necessitates recognition. After reviewing the various articles regarding the use of LUS in critical care, we found, that LUS can be used in various intraoperative circumstances similar to Intensive Care Unit with some limitations. Except for few attempts in the intraoperative detection of pneumothorax, LUS is hardly used but has wider perspective for routine and crisis management in real-time. If anesthesiologists add LUS in their routine monitoring armamentarium, it can assist to move a step ahead in the dynamic management of critically ill and high-risk patients.

  1. Identification of the pyramidal tract by neuronavigation based on intraoperative magnetic resonance tractography: correlation with subcortical stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozzao, Alessandro; Romano, Andrea; Calabria, Luigi Fausto; Coppola, Valeria; Fantozzi, Luigi Maria [University of Rome Sapienza, Department of Neuroradiology, Rome (Italy); Angelini, Albina; D' Andrea, Giancarlo; Mastronardi, Luciano; Ferrante, Luigi [University of Rome Sapienza, Department of Neurosurgery, Rome (Italy)

    2010-10-15

    To demonstrate the accuracy of magnetic resonance tractography (MRT) in localizing the cortical spinal tract (CST) close to brain tumours by using intraoperative electric subcortical stimulation. Nine patients with intra-axial brain tumours underwent neurosurgery. Planning was based on analysis of the course of streamlines compatible with the CST. After tumour removal, intraoperative MRT was reacquired. Sites at various distance from the CST were repeatedly stimulated to assess whether registered motor evoked potential (MEP) could be elicited. All patients were assessed clinically both pre- and postoperatively. The motor function was preserved in all patients. In all patients intraoperative MRT demonstrated shift of the bundle position caused by the surgical procedure. The distance between the estimated intraoperative CST and the point of elicited MEP was 1 cm or less in all nine patients. At distances greater than 2 cm, no patient reported positive MEP. Intraoperative MRT is a reliable technique for localization of CST. In all patients MEP were elicited by direct subcortical electrical stimulation at a distance below 1 cm from the CST as represented by MRT. Brain shifting might impact this evaluation since CST position may change during surgery in the range of 8 mm. (orig.)

  2. Identification of the pyramidal tract by neuronavigation based on intraoperative magnetic resonance tractography: correlation with subcortical stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzao, Alessandro; Romano, Andrea; Calabria, Luigi Fausto; Coppola, Valeria; Fantozzi, Luigi Maria; Angelini, Albina; D'Andrea, Giancarlo; Mastronardi, Luciano; Ferrante, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    To demonstrate the accuracy of magnetic resonance tractography (MRT) in localizing the cortical spinal tract (CST) close to brain tumours by using intraoperative electric subcortical stimulation. Nine patients with intra-axial brain tumours underwent neurosurgery. Planning was based on analysis of the course of streamlines compatible with the CST. After tumour removal, intraoperative MRT was reacquired. Sites at various distance from the CST were repeatedly stimulated to assess whether registered motor evoked potential (MEP) could be elicited. All patients were assessed clinically both pre- and postoperatively. The motor function was preserved in all patients. In all patients intraoperative MRT demonstrated shift of the bundle position caused by the surgical procedure. The distance between the estimated intraoperative CST and the point of elicited MEP was 1 cm or less in all nine patients. At distances greater than 2 cm, no patient reported positive MEP. Intraoperative MRT is a reliable technique for localization of CST. In all patients MEP were elicited by direct subcortical electrical stimulation at a distance below 1 cm from the CST as represented by MRT. Brain shifting might impact this evaluation since CST position may change during surgery in the range of 8 mm. (orig.)

  3. The Art of Intraoperative Glioma Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Z Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A major dilemma in brain tumor surgery is the identification of tumor boundaries to maximize tumor excision and minimize postoperative neurological damage. Gliomas, especially low-grade tumors, and normal brain have a similar color and texture which poses a challenge to the neurosurgeon. Advances in glioma resection techniques combine the experience of the neurosurgeon and various advanced technologies. Intraoperative methods to delineate gliomas from normal tissue consist of 1 image-based navigation, 2 intraoperative sampling, 3 electrophysiological monitoring, and 4 enhanced visual tumor demarcation. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed. A combination of these methods is becoming widely accepted in routine glioma surgery. Gross total resection in conjunction with radiation, chemotherapy, or immune/gene therapy may increase the rates of cure in this devastating disease.

  4. [Intraoperative floppy iris syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazal, Z

    2007-04-01

    In the year 2005, Chang and Cambell described unusual reaction of the iris during the cataract surgery in patients treated with tamsulosine. This was named as IFIS, an acronym for the Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome. In its advanced stage, the syndrome is characterized by insufficient mydfiasis before the surgery, narrowing of the pupil during the surgery, its impossible dilatation during the surgery by means of stretching, unusual elasticity of the pupilar margin, surging and fluttering iris with tendency to prolapse. The same manifestations we observed in our patients and we confirm the direct connection with tamsulosine hydrochloride treatment. Tamsulosine is the antagonist of alpha 1A adrenergic receptors whose are present, except in the smooth musculature of the prostate gland and the urinary bladder, in the iris dilator as well. At the same time we observed this syndrome rarely in some patients not using tamsulosine. In most cases, these patients were treated with antipsychotic drugs.

  5. Near-Infrared Intraoperative Chemiluminescence Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Büchel, Gabriel E.

    2016-08-03

    Intraoperative imaging technologies recently entered the operating room, and their implementation is revolutionizing how physicians plan, monitor, and perform surgical interventions. In this work, we present a novel surgical imaging reporter system: intraoperative chemiluminescence imaging (ICI). To this end, we have leveraged the ability of a chemiluminescent metal complex to generate near-infrared light upon exposure to an aqueous solution of Ce4+ in the presence of reducing tissue or blood components. An optical camera spatially resolves the resulting photon flux. We describe the construction and application of a prototype imaging setup, which achieves a detection limit as low as 6.9pmolcm-2 of the transition-metal-based ICI agent. As a proof of concept, we use ICI for the invivo detection of our transition metal tracer following both systemic and subdermal injections. The very high signal-to-noise ratios make ICI an interesting candidate for the development of new intraoperative imaging technologies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Near-Infrared Intraoperative Chemiluminescence Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Bü chel, Gabriel E.; Carney, Brandon; Shaffer, Travis M.; Tang, Jun; Austin, Christine; Arora, Manish; Zeglis, Brian M.; Grimm, Jan; Eppinger, Jö rg; Reiner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative imaging technologies recently entered the operating room, and their implementation is revolutionizing how physicians plan, monitor, and perform surgical interventions. In this work, we present a novel surgical imaging reporter system: intraoperative chemiluminescence imaging (ICI). To this end, we have leveraged the ability of a chemiluminescent metal complex to generate near-infrared light upon exposure to an aqueous solution of Ce4+ in the presence of reducing tissue or blood components. An optical camera spatially resolves the resulting photon flux. We describe the construction and application of a prototype imaging setup, which achieves a detection limit as low as 6.9pmolcm-2 of the transition-metal-based ICI agent. As a proof of concept, we use ICI for the invivo detection of our transition metal tracer following both systemic and subdermal injections. The very high signal-to-noise ratios make ICI an interesting candidate for the development of new intraoperative imaging technologies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A Preliminary Experience with Use of Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Thalamic Glioma Surgery: A Case Series of 38 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuan; Xu, Xinghua; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Qun; Ma, Xiaodong; Chen, Xiaolei; Sun, Guochen; Zhang, Jiashu; Jiang, Jinli; Xu, Bainan; Zhang, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Thalamic gliomas are rare tumors that constitute 1%-5% of all central nervous system tumors. Despite advanced techniques and equipment, surgical resection remains challenging because of the vital structures adjacent to the tumor. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) might play an active role during brain tumor surgery because it compensates for brain shift or operation-induced hemorrhage, which are challenging issues for neurosurgeons. We reviewed 38 patients treated surgically under intraoperative MRI guidance between January 2008 and July 2015 at our center. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative MRI scans were reviewed. Preoperative and postoperative motor power, morbidity and mortality, resection rate, surgical approach, pathologic results, and patient demographics were also reviewed. Mean patient age was 37 years ± 18; 12 patients were included in the low-grade group, and 26 patients were included in the high-grade group. Under intraoperative MRI guidance, the gross total resection rate was increased from 16 (42.1%) to 26 (68.4%), and the near-total or subtotal resection rate was increased from 5 (13.2%) to 9 (23.7%). Hematoma formation was discovered in 3 patients on intraoperative MRI scan; each patient underwent a hemostatic operation immediately. With improvements in neurosurgical techniques and equipment, surgical resection is considered feasible in patients with thalamic gliomas. Intraoperative MRI may be helpful in achieving the maximal resection rate with minimal surgical-related morbidity. However, because of severe disease progression, the overall prognosis is unfavorable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intraoperative Secondary Insults During Orthopedic Surgery in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algarra, Nelson N; Lele, Abhijit V; Prathep, Sumidtra; Souter, Michael J; Vavilala, Monica S; Qiu, Qian; Sharma, Deepak

    2017-07-01

    Secondary insults worsen outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, data on intraoperative secondary insults are sparse. The primary aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of intraoperative secondary insults during orthopedic surgery after moderate-severe TBI. We also examined the impact of intraoperative secondary insults on postoperative head computed tomographic scan, intracranial pressure (ICP), and escalation of care within 24 hours of surgery. We reviewed medical records of TBI patients 18 years and above with Glasgow Coma Scale score Secondary insults examined were: systemic hypotension (systolic blood pressurehypertension (ICP>20 mm Hg), cerebral hypotension (cerebral perfusion pressure40 mm Hg), hypocarbia (end-tidal CO2hypertension), hyperglycemia (glucose>200 mg/dL), hypoglycemia (glucose38°C). A total of 78 patients (41 [18 to 81] y, 68% male) met the inclusion criteria. The most common intraoperative secondary insults were systemic hypotension (60%), intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypotension (50% and 45%, respectively, in patients with ICP monitoring), hypercarbia (32%), and hypocarbia (29%). Intraoperative secondary insults were associated with worsening of head computed tomography, postoperative decrease of Glasgow Coma Scale score by ≥2, and escalation of care. After Bonferroni correction, association between cerebral hypotension and postoperative escalation of care remained significant (Psecondary insults were common during orthopedic surgery in patients with TBI and were associated with postoperative escalation of care. Strategies to minimize intraoperative secondary insults are needed.

  9. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy in oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Keshtgar, Mohammed; Wenz, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy is a major advance in the management of cancer patients. With an emphasis on practical aspects, this book offers an ideal introduction to this innovative  technology for clinicians.

  10. Intraoperative glucose management in children < 1 year or < 10 kg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The intraoperative management of intravenous dextrose administration and blood glucose monitoring was at the discretion of the attending anaesthetists. Data collected included patient demographics, period of starvation, dose of dextrose administered and blood glucose measurements taken. Results: Nine infants had at ...

  11. Dapsone Induced Methaemoglobinemia: Early Intraoperative Detection by Pulse Oximeter Desaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Rafiq

    2008-01-01

    Case signifies the importance of knowledge of any preoperative drug intake and its anaesthetic implications. Also patients on dapsone therapy especially children should be monitored for methaemoglobin levels. Since children with immune thrombocy-topenic purpura are being treated with dapsone these days and many of these patients would be planned for splenectomy, monitoring of preoperative methaemoglobin levels and methaemoglobinemia as a cause of intraoperative pulse oximeter desaturation should be kept in mind.

  12. Impact of Virtual and Augmented Reality Based on Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Functional Neuronavigation in Glioma Surgery Involving Eloquent Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guo-Chen; Wang, Fei; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Yu, Xin-Guang; Ma, Xiao-Dong; Zhou, Ding-Biao; Zhu, Ru-Yuan; Xu, Bai-Nan

    2016-12-01

    The utility of virtual and augmented reality based on functional neuronavigation and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for glioma surgery has not been previously investigated. The study population consisted of 79 glioma patients and 55 control subjects. Preoperatively, the lesion and related eloquent structures were visualized by diffusion tensor tractography and blood oxygen level-dependent functional MRI. Intraoperatively, microscope-based functional neuronavigation was used to integrate the reconstructed eloquent structure and the real head and brain, which enabled safe resection of the lesion. Intraoperative MRI was used to verify brain shift during the surgical process and provided quality control during surgery. The control group underwent surgery guided by anatomic neuronavigation. Virtual and augmented reality protocols based on functional neuronavigation and intraoperative MRI provided useful information for performing tailored and optimized surgery. Complete resection was achieved in 55 of 79 (69.6%) glioma patients and 20 of 55 (36.4%) control subjects, with average resection rates of 95.2% ± 8.5% and 84.9% ± 15.7%, respectively. Both the complete resection rate and average extent of resection differed significantly between the 2 groups (P virtual and augmented reality based on functional neuronavigation and intraoperative MRI can facilitate resection of gliomas involving eloquent areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, J; Filipescu, D; Kozek-Langenecker, S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (p......RBC) and blood products transfused intraoperatively, and to describe factors determining transfusion throughout Europe. METHODS: We did a prospective observational cohort study enrolling 5803 patients in 126 European centres that received at least one pRBC unit intraoperatively, during a continuous three month...... period in 2013. RESULTS: The overall intraoperative transfusion rate was 1.8%; 59% of transfusions were at least partially initiated as a result of a physiological transfusion trigger- mostly because of hypotension (55.4%) and/or tachycardia (30.7%). Haemoglobin (Hb)- based transfusion trigger alone...

  14. Intraoperative mechanical ventilation: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lorenzo; Costantino, Federico; Orefice, Giulia; Chandrapatham, Karthikka; Pelosi, Paolo

    2017-10-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a cornerstone of the intraoperative management of the surgical patient and is still mandatory in several surgical procedures. In the last decades, research focused on preventing postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs), both improving risk stratification through the use of predictive scores and protecting the lung adopting so-called protective ventilation strategies. The aim of this review was to give an up-to-date overview of the currently suggested intraoperative ventilation strategies, along with their pathophysiologic rationale, with a focus on challenging conditions, such as obesity, one-lung ventilation and cardiopulmonary bypass. While anesthesia and mechanical ventilation are becoming increasingly safe practices, the contribution to surgical mortality attributable to postoperative lung injury is not negligible: for these reasons, the prevention of PPCs, including the use of protective mechanical ventilation is mandatory. Mechanical ventilation should be optimized providing an adequate respiratory support while minimizing unwanted negative effects. Due to the high number of surgical procedures performed daily, the impact on patients' health and healthcare costs can be relevant, even when new strategies result in an apparently small improvement of outcome. A protective intraoperative ventilation should include a low tidal volume of 6-8 mL/kg of predicted body weight, plateau pressures ideally below 16 cmH2O, the lowest possible driving pressure, moderate-low PEEP levels except in obese patients, laparoscopy and long surgical procedures that might benefit of a slightly higher PEEP. The work of the anesthesiologist should start with a careful preoperative visit to assess the risk, and a close postoperative monitoring.

  15. INTRAOPERATIVE PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY FOR PERITONEAL MESOTHELIOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Results of application of a new technology of intraoperative photodynamic therapy (IOFDT in patients with peritoneal mesothelioma developed at P. Herzen Moscow Oncology Research Institute are presented. The study included 8 patients. 3 patients underwent surgery in various amount: 1 – limited peritonectomy in the volume of tumor foci resection and resection of a large omentum, 1 – limited peritonectomy in the volume of tumor foci resection and atypical resection of the right lobe of the liver, 1 – only resection of the large omentum due to the fact that the tumor was located only in a large omentum and no signs of lesions of the parietal peritoneum was revealed by intraoperative revision. Surgical intervention in these patients was concluded by IOPDT. The remaining 5 patients underwent only IOPDT. After the treatment, two patients underwent additional courses of laparoscopic IOPDT. Of the 8 patients enrolled in the study, 4 died from the underlying disease, 1 from cardiovascular disease with recurrence of the disease, 1 from cardiovascular disease without signs of recurrence, 2 were monitored for 6 months and 146 months (12 years. Thus, in the group of patients with peritoneal mesothelioma, the maximum observation period was 146.44 months, the median survival was 48.4 months, the total specific 1-year survival was 85.7±13.2%, the three-year survival was 68.5±18.6%, the 5-year survival was 45.7 ± 22.4 %. The average life expectancy after treatment of patients with repeated courses of laparoscopic IOPDT was 87 months, without repeated courses – 35.8 months. Thus, life expectancy was higher in patients with repeated courses of laparoscopic IOPDT. Small sample size caused to the rarity of this pathology does not allow for statistically significant conclusions. However, the results of the study indicate the prospects of multi-course intraoperative photodynamic therapy in patients with peritoneal mesothelioma.

  16. Intraoperative radiotherapy - Current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunderson, Leonard L.; Willett, Christopher G.; Harrison, Louis B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Intraoperative irradiation (IORT) in its broadest sense refers to the delivery of irradiation at the time of an operation. This refresher course will discuss the use of both electrons (IOERT) and high dose rate brachytherapy (IOHDR) in conjunction with surgical exploration and resection ± external irradiation/chemotherapy. Both IORT methods have evolved with similar philosophies as an attempt to achieve higher effective doses of irradiation while dose limiting structures are surgically displaced. The rationale for each is supported by excellent local control ± survival results achieved with brachytherapy alone or as a boost to external irradiation in organ preservation efforts in traditional sites (head and neck, breast, gynecologic) wherein a boost dose could be delivered to smaller volumes than could usually be accomplished with external irradiation alone. IOERT has been a tool in modern radiotherapy in Japan since the 1960's and in the U.S. since the mid 1970's. Results from randomized and nonrandomized trials will be presented in the refresher course with major emphasis on GI sites (gastric, pancreas, colorectal) since the data is more mature. While the largest clinical experience with IOERT (± external irradiation/chemotherapy, maximal resection) has been with gastrointestinal cancers in adults, moderate experience has also been obtained with locally advanced retroperitoneal sarcomas and recurrent genitourinary and gynecologic cancers. With primary colorectal cancers that are unresectable for cure or for locally recurrent colorectal cancers, both local control and long-term survival appear to be improved with the aggressive combinations including IOERT when compared to results achieved with conventional treatment. When residual disease exists after resection of gastric cancers, IOERT ± external radiation has achieved optimistic survival results in trials in Japan, the U.S., Spain and China. With locally unresectable pancreatic cancer, an

  17. Vascular Structure Identification in Intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisee Ilunga-Mbuyamba

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a method of vascular structure identification in intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS data is presented. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used in brain tumor surgery to investigate in real time the current status of cerebral structures. The use of an ultrasound contrast agent enables to highlight tumor tissue, but also surrounding blood vessels. However, these structures can be used as landmarks to estimate and correct the brain shift. This work proposes an alternative method for extracting small vascular segments close to the tumor as landmark. The patient image dataset involved in brain tumor operations includes preoperative contrast T1MR (cT1MR data and 3D intraoperative contrast enhanced ultrasound data acquired before (3D-iCEUS s t a r t and after (3D-iCEUS e n d tumor resection. Based on rigid registration techniques, a preselected vascular segment in cT1MR is searched in 3D-iCEUS s t a r t and 3D-iCEUS e n d data. The method was validated by using three similarity measures (Normalized Gradient Field, Normalized Mutual Information and Normalized Cross Correlation. Tests were performed on data obtained from ten patients overcoming a brain tumor operation and it succeeded in nine cases. Despite the small size of the vascular structures, the artifacts in the ultrasound images and the brain tissue deformations, blood vessels were successfully identified.

  18. Intraoperative ultrasound in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greif, Franklin; Aranovich, David; Hananel, Nissim; Knizhnik, Mikhail; Belenky, Alexander

    2009-09-01

    To assess the accuracy of intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) as a localizing technique for colorectal resections, and its impact on surgical management. Twenty-five patients (15 men and 10 women; mean age, 74.4 years) with early cancers (p T1), or polyps, not amenable to endoscopic removal were selected. IOUS was used as a sole method of intraoperative localization. Its performance was evaluated through review of preoperative colonoscopy reports, intraoperative findings, histopathology reports, and clinical follow-up. The lesions were situated in the cecum (n = 5), ascending colon (n = 3), transverse colon (n = 4), descending colon (n = 7), and rectum (n = 6). IOUS technique allowed correct localization in 24 of 25 patients, visualization of the bowel wall, and its penetration by malignant tumors. In rectal lesions, IOUS showed clearly the tumor and its margin, which facilitated performance sphincter-sparing procedure. In patients with small polyps and early cancers of colon and rectum, IOUS may be effectively used as a sole method of intraoperative localization and provide additional information that may alter decision making with regard to surgical technique. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Early Experience with Combining Awake Craniotomy and Intraoperative Navigable Ultrasound for Resection of Eloquent Region Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Shetty, Prakash

    2017-03-01

    Introduction  Optimal resection of tumors in eloquent locations requires a combination of intraoperative imaging and functional monitoring during surgery. Combining awake surgery with intraoperative magnetic resonanceis logistically challenging. Navigable ultrasound (US) is a useful alternative in such cases. Methods  A total of 22 subjects with eloquent tumors were operated on (1 intended biopsy and 21 intended radical resections) using combined modality three-dimensional (3D) US and awake craniotomy with intraoperative clinical monitoring. We describe the technical details for these cases specifically addressing the feasibility of combining the two modalities. Results  US was used for resection control in 18 cases. There were technical limitations in three cases. Transient intraoperative worsening was encountered in eight, necessitating premature termination of the procedure. All patients tolerated the awake procedure well. Mean duration of the surgery was 3.2 hours. Radical resections were obtained in 14 of 18 where this was intended and in 12 of the 13 where there was no adverse intraoperative monitoring event prompting premature termination of the resection. Conclusions  Combining awake surgery with 3DUS is feasible and beneficial. It does not entail any additional surgical workflow modification or patient discomfort. This combined modality intraoperative monitoring can be beneficial for eloquent region tumors. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Intraoperative Sentinel Lymph Node Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Richard; Christensen, Anders; Java, Kapil

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intraoperative analysis of sentinel lymph nodes would enhance the care of early-stage oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We determined the frequency and extent of cytokeratin 19 (CK19) expression in OSCC primary tumours and surrounding tissues to explore the feasibility of a "clinic......-ready" intraoperative diagnostic test (one step nucleic acid amplification-OSNA, sysmex). METHODS: Two cohorts were assembled: cohort 1, OSCC with stage and site that closely match cases suitable for sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB); cohort 2, HNSCC with sufficient fresh tumour tissue available for the OSNA assay (>50......% of tumours. Discordance between different techniques indicated that OSNA was more sensitive than qRT-PCR or RNA-ISH, which in turn were more sensitive than IHC. OSNA results showed CK19 expression in 80% of primary cases, so if used for diagnosis of lymph node metastasis would lead to a false-negative result...

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in a low-field intraoperative scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulder, Michael; Azmi, Hooman; Biswal, Bharat

    2003-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used for preoperative planning and intraoperative surgical navigation. However, most experience to date has been with preoperative images acquired on high-field echoplanar MRI units. We explored the feasibility of acquiring fMRI of the motor cortex with a dedicated low-field intraoperative MRI (iMRI). Five healthy volunteers were scanned with the 0.12-tesla PoleStar N-10 iMRI (Odin Medical Technologies, Israel). A finger-tapping motor paradigm was performed with sequential scans, acquired alternately at rest and during activity. In addition, scans were obtained during breath holding alternating with normal breathing. The same paradigms were repeated using a 3-tesla MRI (Siemens Corp., Allandale, N.J., USA). Statistical analysis was performed offline using cross-correlation and cluster techniques. Data were resampled using the 'jackknife' process. The location, number of activated voxels and degrees of statistical significance between the two scanners were compared. With both the 0.12- and 3-tesla imagers, motor cortex activation was seen in all subjects to a significance of p < 0.02 or greater. No clustered pixels were seen outside the sensorimotor cortex. The resampled correlation coefficients were normally distributed, with a mean of 0.56 for both the 0.12- and 3-tesla scanners (standard deviations 0.11 and 0.08, respectively). The breath holding paradigm confirmed that the expected diffuse activation was seen on 0.12- and 3-tesla scans. Accurate fMRI with a low-field iMRI is feasible. Such data could be acquired immediately before or even during surgery. This would increase the utility of iMRI and allow for updated intraoperative functional imaging, free of the limitations of brain shift. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Intraoperative neurophysiology of the conus medullaris and cauda equina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothbauer, Karl F; Deletis, Vedran

    2010-02-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiological techniques are becoming routine tools for neurosurgical practice. Procedures affecting the lumbosacral nervous system are frequent in adult and pediatric neurosurgery. This review provides an overview of the techniques utilized in cauda and conus operations. Two basic methodologies of intraoperative neurophysiological testing are utilized during surgery in the lumbosacral spinal canal. Mapping techniques help identify functional neural structures, namely, nerve roots and their respective spinal levels. Monitoring is referred to as the technology to continuously assess the functional integrity of pathways and reflex circuits. For mapping direct electrical stimulation of a structure within the surgical field and recording at a distant site, usually a muscle is the most commonly used setup. Sensory nerve roots or spinal cord areas can be mapped by stimulation of a distant sensory nerve or skin area and recording from a structure within the surgical field. Continuous monitoring of the motor system is done with motor evoked potentials. These are evoked by transcranial electrical stimulation and recorded from lower extremity and sphincter muscles. Presence or absence of muscle responses are the monitored parameters. To monitor the sensory pathways, sensory potentials evoked by tibial, peroneal, or pudendal nerve stimulation and recorded from the dorsal columns with a spinal electrode or as cortical responses from scalp electrodes are used. Amplitudes and latencies of these responses are measured for interpretation. The bulbocavernosus reflex, with stimulation of the pudendal nerve and recording from the external anal sphincter, is used for continuous monitoring of the reflex circuitry. The presence of absence of this response is the pertinent parameter monitored. Stimulation of individual dorsal nerve roots is used to identify those segments that generate spastic activity and which may be cut during selective dorsal rhizotomy

  3. 部分肌松下多组颅神经监护在小脑桥脑角区肿瘤切除术患者中的应用%Intraoperative cranial nerves monitoring under partial neuromuscular relaxation during cerebellopontine angle tumor resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张军; 杨程; 顾华华; 梁伟民

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of multiple cranial nerves monitoring under partial neuromuscular relaxation during cerebellopontine angle(CPA)tumor resection.Methods Seventy elective patients undergoing CPA tumor resection via microneurosurgery were randomly allocated to 2 equal groups: Group FN receiving intraoperative facial nerve(NF)monitoring and Group MN receiving monitoring of multiple nerves:trigeminal nerve,glossopharyngeal nerve,accessory nerve or hypoglossal nerve other than the FN which were considered at risk by the neurosurgeon preoperatively.The manipulation procedure were modified according to cranial nerves monitoring and neuromuscular relaxation was maintained at train of four stimulation(TOF)=3 by continuous vencronium infusion during the acoustic neuroma resection.The function of the cranial nerves monitored were evaluated preoperatively and 8 days postoperativelv.Results Discernable and legible images of electromyographic wave complex were obtained during cranial nerve mapping and monitoring under intraoperative partial neuromuscular relaxation form all the patients.The facial nerve function of 4 patients exacerbated(from H-B grade Ⅰ-Ⅱ to gradeⅢ-Ⅳ)in both groups,and one new glossopharyngeal nerve function deficiency was found in Group FN,and one new hypoglossal nerve function deficiency was found in Group MN postoperatively.Conclusion Intraoperative cranial nenves monitoring under partial neuromuscular relaxation is feasible.Multiple cranial nerves combined with facial nerve monitoring seems unable to increase the short-term protective effects of nerve function after CPA tumor resection.%目的 评价全身麻醉下小脑桥脑角区肿瘤切除术患者中,在部分肌松条件下多组颅神经监护的效率.方法 70例择期行小脑桥脑角区肿瘤显微手术患者,随机分为两组,一组术中只进行面神经监护(FN组,n=35),另一组则除了面神经外,尚监护三叉神经、舌咽神经或

  4. Minimalism through intraoperative functional mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, M S

    1996-01-01

    Intraoperative stimulation mapping may be used to avoid unnecessary risk to functional regions subserving language and sensori-motor pathways. Based on the data presented here, language localization is variable in the entire population, with only certainty existing for the inferior frontal region responsible for motor speech. Anatomical landmarks such as the anterior temporal tip for temporal lobe language sites and the posterior aspect of the lateral sphenoid wing for the frontal lobe language zones are unreliable in avoiding postoperative aphasias. Thus, individual mapping to identify essential language sites has the greatest likelihood of avoiding permanent deficits in naming, reading, and motor speech. In a similar approach, motor and sensory pathways from the cortex and underlying white matter may be reliably stimulated and mapped in both awake and asleep patients. Although these techniques require an additional operative time and equipment nominally priced, the result is often gratifying, as postoperative morbidity has been greatly reduced in the process of incorporating these surgical strategies. The patients quality of life is improved in terms of seizure control, with or without antiepileptic drugs. This avoids having to perform a second costly operative procedure, which is routinely done when extraoperative stimulation and recording is done via subdural grids. In addition, an aggressive tumor resection at the initial operation lengthens the time to tumor recurrence and often obviates the need for a subsequent reoperation. Thus, intraoperative functional mapping may be best alluded to as a surgical technique that results in "minimalism in the long term".

  5. Transsphenoidal pituitary resection with intraoperative MR guidance: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolizzi, Richard S., Jr.; Schwartz, Richard B.; Hsu, Liangge; Wong, Terence Z.; Black, Peter M.; Martin, Claudia; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    1999-05-01

    The use of intraoperative MR image guidance has the potential to improve the precision, extent and safety of transsphenoidal pituitary resections. At Brigham and Women's Hospital, an open-bore configuration 0.5T MR system (SIGNA SP, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) has been used to provide image guidance for nine transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma resections. The intraoperative MR system allowed the radiologist to direct the surgeon toward the sella turcica successfully while avoiding the cavernous sinus, optic chiasm and other sensitive structures. Imaging performed during the surgery monitored the extent of resection and allowed for removal of tumor beyond the surgeon's view in five cases. Dynamic MR imaging was used to distinguish residual tumor from normal gland and postoperative changes permitting more precise tumor localization. A heme-sensitive long TE gradient echo sequence was used to evaluate for the presence of hemorrhagic debris. All patients tolerated the procedure well without significant complications.

  6. INTRAOPERATIVE PREDONATION CONTRIBUTES TO BLOOD SAVING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHONBERGER, JPAM; BREDEE, JJ; TJIAN, D; EVERTS, PAM; WILDEVUUR, CRH

    1993-01-01

    The merits of reinfusing prebypass-removed autologous blood (intraoperative predonation) to salvage blood and improve postoperative hemostasis are still debated, specifically for patients at a higher risk for bleeding. To evaluate the effect of intraoperative predonation on the platelet count, blood

  7. Intraoperative digital angiography: Peripheral vascular applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, K.; Reifsteck, J.E.; Binet, E.F.; Fleisher, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Intraoperative digital angiography is the procedure of choice for the peripheral vascular surgeon who wishes to evaluate his results before terminating anesthesia. Two operating suites at the John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital are equipped with permanent ceiling-mounted Philips C-arm fluoroscopes and share an ADAC 4100 digital angiographic system. In the last 18 months, 40 peripheral vascular intraoperative digital angiographic procedures have been performed, in all but two cases using direct arterial puncture. In 65% of cases, the intraoperative study showed no significant abnormality. In 12.5%, minor abnormalities not requiring reoperation were seen. In 22.5% of cases, the intraoperative digital angiogram revealed a significant abnormality requiring immediate operative revision. None of the patients who underwent reoperation experienced postoperative sequelae. Intraoperative digital angiography is useful in identifying complications of peripheral vascular operations

  8. Intraoperative radiotherapy in breast cancer: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro Hidalgo, Sabrina A.

    2013-01-01

    A literature review was performed on intraoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer. The strength and attractiveness is established of techniques of partial irradiation in the treatment of breast cancer. The benefit is originated to restrict the area immediate of radiotherapy to the tumor bed or quadrant index and identifying the benefit of being applied during the radiotherapy while surgical lumpectomy. The impact of local recurrence has been established using intraoperative radiotherapy. The advantages of intraoperative radiotherapy was compared in the management of the conservative surgery in early stages of breast cancer with external radiotherapy. Different methods of intraoperative radiotherapy have been compared and individual impact on local recurrence ranges. Intraoperative radiotherapy has had many advantages: radiobiological, technical, clinical, psychological and economical in the handling of conservative surgery in early stages of breast cancer, compared with external radiotherapy [es

  9. Intraoperative radiotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Akira; Iida, Koyo; Sato, Shigehiro; Sakata, Suo

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with pancreatic carcinoma, 23 (82 %) of whom had Stage III or IV, received intraoperative radiotherapy (IOR) with curative or non-curative surgery. Electron beams (10 to 18 MeV) with doses of 20 to 40 Gy were delivered to the tumor. Eight of 26 patients with unresectable tumor had postoperative external irradiation of 10.5 to 50 Gy. Abdominal and back pain relief was achieved after IOR in 12 (71 %) and in 6 (60 %) of the 26 patients, respectively. Appetite was promoted in 11 patients. In the case of unresectable carcinoma, survival time tended to prolong in the 8 patients receiving both IOR and postoperative external irradiation. One patient developed perforation of the colon probably caused by IOR. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Practicality of intraoperative teamwork assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phitayakorn, Roy; Minehart, Rebecca; Pian-Smith, May C M; Hemingway, Maureen W; Milosh-Zinkus, Tanya; Oriol-Morway, Danika; Petrusa, Emil

    2014-07-01

    High-quality teamwork among operating room (OR) professionals is a key to efficient and safe practice. Quantification of teamwork facilitates feedback, assessment, and improvement. Several valid and reliable instruments are available for assessing separate OR disciplines and teams. We sought to determine the most feasible approach for routine documentation of teamwork in in-situ OR simulations. We compared rater agreement, hypothetical training costs, and feasibility ratings from five clinicians and two nonclinicians with instruments for assessment of separate OR groups and teams. Five teams of anesthesia or surgery residents and OR nurses (RN) or surgical technicians were videotaped in simulations of an epigastric hernia repair where the patient develops malignant hyperthermia. Two anesthesiologists, one OR clinical RN specialist, one educational psychologist, one simulation specialist, and one general surgeon discussed and then independently completed Anesthesiologists' Non-Technical Skills, Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons, Scrub Practitioners' List of Intraoperative Non-Technical Skills, and Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery forms to rate nontechnical performance of anesthesiologists, surgeons, nurses, technicians, and the whole team. Intraclass correlations of agreement ranged from 0.17-0.85. Clinicians' agreements were not different from nonclinicians'. Published rater training was 4 h for Anesthesiologists' Non-Technical Skills and Scrub Practitioners' List of Intraoperative Non-Technical Skills, 2.5 h for Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons, and 15.5 h for Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery. Estimated costs to train one rater to use all instruments ranged from $442 for a simulation specialist to $6006 for a general surgeon. Additional training is needed to achieve higher levels of agreement; however, costs may be prohibitive. The most cost-effective model for real-time OR teamwork assessment may be to use a simulation technician

  11. Minimally invasive neurosurgery within a 0.5 tesla intraoperative magnetic resonance scanner using an off-line neuro-navigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mursch, K; Gotthardt, T; Kröger, R; Bublat, M; Behnke-Mursch, J

    2005-08-01

    We evaluated an advanced concept for patient-based navigation during minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures. An infrared-based, off-line neuro-navigation system (LOCALITE, Bonn, Germany) was applied during operations within a 0.5 T intraoperative MRI scanner (iMRI) (Signa SF, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI, USA) in addition to the conventional real-time system. The three-dimensional (3D) data set was acquired intraoperatively and up-dated when brain-shift was suspected. Twenty-three patients with subcortical lesions were operated upon with the aim to minimise the operative trauma. Small craniotomies (median diameter 30 mm, mean diameter 27 mm) could be placed exactly. In all cases, the primary goal of the operation (total resection or biopsy) was achieved in a straightforward procedure without permanent morbidity. The navigation system could be easily used without technical problems. In contrast to the real-time navigation mode of the MR system, the higher quality as well as the real-time display of the MR images reconstructed from the 3D reference data provided sufficient visual-manual coordination. The system combines the advantages of conventional neuro-navigation with the ability to adapt intraoperatively to the continuously changing anatomy. Thus, small and/or deep lesions can be operated upon in straightforward minimally invasive operations.

  12. Hydrodynamic study of syringomyelia by MRI and intraoperative ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritake, Kouzo; Takaya, Mikio; Minamikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Masatsune; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Minami, Shunsuke

    1989-01-01

    Syringomyelic cavities were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in eleven patients with special reference to the hemodynamic contribution to the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. They were also studied intraoperatively with ultrasonography (USG) in five patients. Syrinx cavities combined with lumbosacral lipomyelomeningocele or with spinal stenosis did not present a flow-void phenomenon reflecting pulsatile movements of syrinx fluid. On serial MRI study in those the patients, enlargement of the syrinx cavity was not observed. Syrinx cavities occupying the caudal part of the spinal cord did not develop either. These cases were not treated surgically but followed conservatively. On the other hand, the flow-void sign in the syrinx cavities was present on MRI in patients who also had Chiari type I or type II malformations. They were treated with a syringo-subarachnoid shunt. In these cases, intraoperative USG disclosed marked fluctuation of syrinx cavity size synchronous with the motions of pulmonary ventilation. In all of them, clinical signs and symptoms improved postoperatively to various degrees. These results suggest that both the flow-void sign in the syrinx cavity on MRI and marked fluctaution of cavity size on intraoperative USG are indications for the shunt operation and support William's revised theory (1987). Fluctuation of cystic cavity size synchronous with ventilation suggests that venous pressure in the spinal subarachnoid space contributes to the pathogenesis of syringomyelic cavities. Further analysis of the fluctuation of cystic cavities by video monitoring will provide further information on the etiology and other clinical problems of syringomyelia. (author)

  13. Incidence of intraoperative hypothermia: adopting protocol for its prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Qahtani, Ali S.; Messahel, Farouk M.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the incidence of hypothermia during surgical procedures when adequate methods of preserving normothermia are applied .For this was a study in which patients ASA I-IV presented for surgery at the Armed Forces Hospital, Wadi Al- Dawasir, kingdom of Saudi Arabia ,during the period from July 2000 to February 2003 in whom body core temprature was between 35-37C ,were included. Ambient temperature of the operating room was thermostatically adjusted to record 26C and 24C if patents were < 10 year-old or above .Depending on type of surgery ;the patients were provided with space blankents and were lying on warm mattresses. Fluid or blood warmers and forced-air surface were used when needed for this. = Aggressive measures must be adopted to preserve normothermia as prevention of intraoperative hypothermia improves patients outcome .All patients shoud have their body temprature monitored during surgery .However application of available methods of keeping normothermia reduces the the incidence of intraoperative hypothermia but does not abolish it completely . Hypothermia patients should be closely moniterd during gradual rewarming preferably in the intensive care setting. A protocol for prevention of intraoperative hypothermia must be adopted by all operating theatres. (author)

  14. How do pediatric anesthesiologists define intraoperative hypotension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafiu, Olubukola O; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Morris, Michelle; Chimbira, Wilson T; Malviya, Shobha; Reynolds, Paul I; Tremper, Kevin K

    2009-11-01

    Although blood pressure (BP) monitoring is a recommended standard of care by the ASA, and pediatric anesthesiologists routinely monitor the BP of their patients and when appropriate treat deviations from 'normal', there is no robust definition of hypotension in any of the pediatric anesthesia texts or journals. Consequently, what constitutes hypotension in pediatric anesthesia is currently unknown. We designed a questionnaire-based survey of pediatric anesthesiologists to determine the BP ranges and thresholds used to define intraoperative hypotension (IOH). Members of the Society of Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) and the Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists (APA) of Great Britain and Ireland were contacted through e-mail to participate in this survey. We asked a few demographic questions and five questions about specific definitions of hypotension for different age groups of patients undergoing inguinal herniorraphy, a common pediatric surgical procedure. The overall response rate was 56% (483/860), of which 76% were SPA members. Majority of the respondents (72%) work in academic institutions, while 8.9% work in institutions with fewer than 1000 annual pediatric surgical caseload. About 76% of respondents indicated that a 20-30% reduction in baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) indicates significant hypotension in children under anesthesia. Most responders (86.7%) indicated that they use mean arterial pressure or SBP (72%) to define IOH. The mean SBP values for hypotension quoted by SPA members was about 5-7% lower across all pediatric age groups compared to values quoted by APA members (P = 0.001 for all age groups). There is great variability in the BP parameters used and the threshold used for defining and treating IOH among pediatric anesthesiologists. The majority of respondents considered a 20-30% reduction from baseline in SBP as indicative of significant hypotension. Lack of a consensus definition for a common clinical condition like IOH could have

  15. Intraoperative Ultrasound for Peripheral Nerve Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsey, Matthew; Wilson, Thomas J; Henning, Phillip Troy; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2017-10-01

    Offering real-time, high-resolution images via intraoperative ultrasound is advantageous for a variety of peripheral nerve applications. To highlight the advantages of ultrasound, its extraoperative uses are reviewed. The current intraoperative uses, including nerve localization, real-time evaluation of peripheral nerve tumors, and implantation of leads for peripheral nerve stimulation, are reviewed. Although intraoperative peripheral nerve localization has been performed previously using guide wires and surgical dyes, the authors' approach using ultrasound-guided instrument clamps helps guide surgical dissection to the target nerve, which could lead to more timely operations and shorter incisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Intraoperative radiotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasue, Mitsunori; Yasui, Kenzo; Morimoto, Takeshi; Miyaishi, Seiichi; Morita, Kozo

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six patients were given intraoperative radiotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas between April 1980 and March 1986. Twenty-six of those with well-advanced cancer underwent palliative intraoperative radiotherapy of their main primary lesions (1,500 to 3,000 rads). Fourteen of the 19 patients in this group who had intractable back pain before surgery achieved relief within one week after treatment. Of the remaining 10 patients who underwent pancreatectomy and received adjuvant intraoperative radiotherapy (2,000 to 3,000 rads), two remain clinically free of disease five years and six months and four years and six months after palliative distal pancreatectomy. (author)

  17. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor E. R. Harris

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT for early stage breast cancer is a technique for partial breast irradiation. There are several technologies in clinical use to perform breast IORT. Regardless of technique, IORT generally refers to the delivery of a single dose of radiation to the periphery of the tumor bed in the immediate intraoperative time frame, although some protocols have performed IORT as a second procedure. There are two large prospective randomized trials establishing the safety and efficacy of breast IORT in early stage breast cancer patients with sufficient follow-up time on thousands of women. The advantages of IORT for partial breast irradiation include: direct visualization of the target tissue ensuring treatment of the high-risk tissue and eliminating the risk of marginal miss; the use of a single dose coordinated with the necessary surgical excision thereby reducing omission of radiation and the selection of mastectomy for women without access to a radiotherapy facility or unable to undergo several weeks of daily radiation; favorable toxicity profiles; patient convenience and cost savings; radiobiological and tumor microenvironment conditions which lead to enhanced tumor control. The main disadvantage of IORT is the lack of final pathologic information on the tumor size, histology, margins, and nodal status. When unexpected findings on final pathology such as positive margins or positive sentinel nodes predict a higher risk of local or regional recurrence, additional whole breast radiation may be indicated, thereby reducing some of the convenience and low-toxicity advantages of sole IORT. However, IORT as a tumor bed boost has also been studied and appears to be safe with acceptable toxicity. IORT has potential efficacy advantages related to overall survival related to reduced cardiopulmonary radiation doses. It may also be very useful in specific situations, such as prior to oncoplastic reconstruction to improve accuracy of

  18. “Awake” intraoperative functional MRI (ai-fMRI) for mapping the eloquent cortex: Is it possible in awake craniotomy?☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Han; Wu, Jin-Song; Yao, Cheng-Jun; Zhuang, Dong-Xiao; Qiu, Tian-Ming; Jia, Wen-Bin; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    As a promising noninvasive imaging technique, functional MRI (fMRI) has been extensively adopted as a functional localization procedure for surgical planning. However, the information provided by preoperative fMRI (pre-fMRI) is hampered by the brain deformation that is secondary to surgical procedures. Therefore, intraoperative fMRI (i-fMRI) becomes a potential alternative that can compensate for brain shifts by updating the functional localization information during craniotomy. However, previous i-fMRI studies required that patients be under general anesthesia, preventing the wider application of such a technique as the patients cannot perform tasks unless they are awake. In this study, we propose a new technique that combines awake surgery and i-fMRI, named “awake” i-fMRI (ai-fMRI). We introduced ai-fMRI to the real-time localization of sensorimotor areas during awake craniotomy in seven patients. The results showed that ai-fMRI could successfully detect activations in the bilateral primary sensorimotor areas and supplementary motor areas for all patients, indicating the feasibility of this technique in eloquent area localization. The reliability of ai-fMRI was further validated using intraoperative stimulation mapping (ISM) in two of the seven patients. Comparisons between the pre-fMRI-derived localization result and the ai-fMRI derived result showed that the former was subject to a heavy brain shift and led to incorrect localization, while the latter solved that problem. Additionally, the approaches for the acquisition and processing of the ai-fMRI data were fully illustrated and described. Some practical issues on employing ai-fMRI in awake craniotomy were systemically discussed, and guidelines were provided. PMID:24179766

  19. Intraoperative EMG monitoring for protection of the posterior cranial nerves nucleus%术中肌电监测对累及第四脑室底面肿瘤切除中后组脑神经核团的保护研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    漆松涛; 刘文; 张喜安; 方陆雄; 潘军; 杨开军

    2009-01-01

    Objective In order to protect the posterior cranial nerves nucleus,the intraoperative EMG monintoring was used during the surgical resection of brain tumors related to the forth ventrical floor.Method 23 brain tumors were surgically removed in our hospital from February 2007 to April 2008, which including 8 case of medulloblastoms, 7 enpendymomas, 3 brain stem gliomas.All the tumors were microsurgical removed and intraoperative EMG monitoring was applied during the operation. The dates of the posterior cranial nerves function,the surgical procedure and EMG monitor changes were analyzed in order to find their relationship.Results 17 tumors were totally removed and 6 subtotally removed.The patients posterior cranial nerves function were protected well in 6 cases, 13 cases of slight dysfunction and 4 cases of moderate dysfunction.There was no serious damage in our group.The myoelectricity induced by the posterior cranial nerve nucleus stimulation could be recorded successfully under normal anesthesia condition.Conclusion The intraoperative EMG monitoring could avoid posterior cranial nerves nucleus damage and provide objective judgment for resection strategy of tumors related to the forth ventrical floor.%目的 探讨术中肌电监测在累及第四脑室底面肿瘤切除术中,后组脑神经核团的保护作用.方法 2007年2月至2008年4月治疗23例累及第四脑室底面的肿瘤,其中巨大髓母细胞瘤8例,室管膜瘤7例,脑干起源外生性胶质瘤3例,脑干背侧血管网状细胞瘤2例,脑干海绵状血管瘤3例.全部患者通过显微手术切除肿瘤,术中全程监测后组脑神经肌电活动.对患者术后脑神经功能状态、手术过程和监测情况分析.结果 肿瘤全切除17例,次全切除6例,无后组脑神经功能障碍6例,轻度后组腩神经损伤13例,中度后组腩神经损伤4例,无严重损伤者.术中全部患者在正常麻醉和肌松药状态下,可以稳定引出各种刺激诱发的后组脑神

  20. Analysis of 1014 consecutive operative cases to determine the utility of intraoperative neurophysiological data

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Namath Syed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) during neurosurgical procedures has become the standard of care at tertiary care medical centers. While prospective data regarding the clinical utility of IOM are conspicuously lacking, retrospective analyses continue to provide useful information regarding surgeon responses to reported waveform changes. Methods: Data regarding clinical presentation, operative course, IOM, and postoperative neurological examination were compiled...

  1. The Efficacy of Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring Using Transcranial Electrically Stimulated Muscle-evoked Potentials (TcE-MsEPs) for Predicting Postoperative Segmental Upper Extremity Motor Paresis After Cervical Laminoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yasushi; Manabe, Hideki; Izumi, Bunichiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Kazumi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro

    2016-05-01

    Prospective study. To investigate the efficacy of transcranial electrically stimulated muscle-evoked potentials (TcE-MsEPs) for predicting postoperative segmental upper extremity palsy following cervical laminoplasty. Postoperative segmental upper extremity palsy, especially in the deltoid and biceps (so-called C5 palsy), is the most common complication following cervical laminoplasty. Some papers have reported that postoperative C5 palsy cannot be predicted by TcE-MsEPs, although others have reported that it can be predicted. This study included 160 consecutive cases that underwent open-door laminoplasty, and TcE-MsEP monitoring was performed in the biceps brachii, triceps brachii, abductor digiti minimi, tibialis anterior, and abductor hallucis. A >50% decrease in the wave amplitude was defined as an alarm point. According to the monitoring alarm, interventions were performed, which include steroid administration, foraminotomies, etc. Postoperative deltoid and biceps palsy occurred in 5 cases. Among the 155 cases without segmental upper extremity palsy, there were no monitoring alarms. Among the 5 deltoid and biceps palsy cases, 3 had significant wave amplitude decreases in the biceps during surgery, and palsy occurred when the patients awoke from anesthesia (acute type). In the other 2 cases in which the palsy occurred 2 days after the operation (delayed type), there were no significant wave decreases. In all of the cases, the palsy was completely resolved within 6 months. The majority of C5 palsies have been reported to occur several days after surgery, but some of them have been reported to occur immediately after surgery. Our results demonstrated that TcE-MsEPs can predict the acute type, whereas the delayed type cannot be predicted. A >50% wave amplitude decrease in the biceps is useful to predict acute-type segmental upper extremity palsy. Further examination about the interventions for monitoring alarm will be essential for preventing palsy.

  2. [Selective intraoperative cholangiography in laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickuth, D; Leutloff, U

    1995-01-01

    Routine use of intraoperative cholangiography during laparoscopic cholecystectomy is still widely advocated and standard in many departments; however, it is controversial. We have developed a new diagnostic strategy for the detection of bile duct stones. The concept is based on an ultrasound examination and on screening for the presence of six risk indicators of choledocholithiasis. A total of 120 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were prospectively screened for the presence of these six risk indicators: history of jaundice, history of pancreatitis, hyperbilirubinemia, hyperamylasemia, dilated bile duct, and unclear ultrasound findings. The sensitivity of ultrasound and intraoperative cholangiography in diagnosing bile duct stones was also evaluated. For the detection of bile duct stones, the sensitivity was 77% for ultrasound and 100% for intraoperative cholangiography. Twenty percent of all patients had at least one risk indicator. The presence of a risk indicator correlated significantly with the presence of choledocholithiasis (P concept, we would have avoided 80% of intraoperative cholangiographies without missing a stone in the bile duct. This study lends further support to the view that routine use of intraoperative cholangiography is not necessary.

  3. Trends in Intraoperative Testing During Cochlear Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Joshua Cody; Cox, Matthew D; Hollowoa, Blake; Bonilla-Velez, Juliana; Trinidade, Aaron; Dornhoffer, John L

    2018-03-01

    No consensus guidelines exist regarding intraoperative testing during cochlear implantation and wide variation in practice habits exists. The objective of this observational study was to survey otologists/neurotologists to understand practice habits and overall opinion of usefulness of intraoperative testing. Cross-sectional survey. A web-based survey was sent to 194 practicing Otologists/Neurotologists. Questions included practice setting and experience, habits with respect to electrodes used, intraoperative testing modalities used, overall opinion of intraoperative testing, and practice habits in various scenarios. Thirty-nine of 194 (20%) completed the survey. For routine patients, ECAPs and EIs were most commonly used together (38%) while 33% do not perform testing at all. Eighty-nine percent note that testing "rarely" or "never" changes management. Fifty-one percent marked the most important reason for testing is the reassurance provided to the family and/or the surgeon. Intraoperative testing habits and opinions regarding testing during cochlear implantation vary widely among otologic surgeons. The majority of surgeons use testing but many think there is minimal benefit and that surgical decision-making is rarely impacted. The importance of testing may change as electrodes continue to evolve.

  4. Intraoperative radiotherapy for cancer of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manabe, Tadao; Nagai, Toshihiro; Tobe, Takayoshi; Shibamoto, Yuta; Takahashi, Masaharu; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    1985-01-01

    Seven patients treated by intraoperative radiotherapy for cancer of the pancreas were evaluated. Three patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy for cancer of the head of the pancreas received a dose of 2,500--3,000 rad (6--10 MeV Betatron) intraoperatively with or without external beam irradiation at a dose of 2,520 rad (10 MeV lineac X-ray). One patient developed radiation pancreatitis and died 0.8 month after surgery. Autopsy revealed the degeneration of cancer cells in the involved superior mesenteric artery. One died of hepatic metastasis 8.5 months after surgery, however, recurrence was not found in the irradiation field. The other patient who had external beam irradiation combined with intraoperative radiotherapy is alive 7.5 months after surgery. Four patients with unresectable cancer of the body of the pancreas received a dose of 2,500--3,000 rad (13--18 MeV Betatron) intraoperatively with or without external beam irradiation at a dose of 1,500--5,520 rad (10 MeV lineac X-ray). One patient died of peritonitis carcinomatosa 3.0 months after surgery. One patient died of DIC 0.6 month after surgery. Two patients are alive 1.0 and 6.5 months after surgery. In these patients with intraoperative radiotherapy for unresectable cancer of the pancreas, remarkable effects on relief of pain and shrinkage of tumor were obtained. Further pursuit of intraoperative and external beam radiotherapies in combination with pancreatectomy should be indicated in an attempt to prolong survival of patient with cancer of the pancreas. (author)

  5. Real-Time Ultrasound-Guided Catheter Navigation for Approaching Deep-Seated Brain Lesions: Role of Intraoperative Neurosonography with and without Fusion with Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjila, Sunil; Karhade, Aditya; Phi, Ji Hoon; Scott, R Michael; Smith, Edward R

    2017-01-01

    Brain shift during the exposure of cranial lesions may reduce the accuracy of frameless stereotaxy. We describe a rapid, safe, and effective method to approach deep-seated brain lesions using real-time intraoperative ultrasound placement of a catheter to mark the dissection trajectory to the lesion. With Institutional Review Board approval, we retrospectively reviewed the radiographic, pathologic, and intraoperative data of 11 pediatric patients who underwent excision of 12 lesions by means of this technique. Full data sets were available for 12 lesions in 11 patients. Ten lesions were tumors and 2 were cavernous malformations. Lesion locations included the thalamus (n = 4), trigone (n = 3), mesial temporal lobe (n = 3), and deep white matter (n = 2). Catheter placement was successful in all patients, and the median time required for the procedure was 3 min (range 2-5 min). There were no complications related to catheter placement. The median diameter of surgical corridors on postresection magnetic resonance imaging was 6.6 mm (range 3.0-12.1 mm). Use of real-time ultrasound guidance to place a catheter to aid in the dissection to reach a deep-seated brain lesion provides advantages complementary to existing techniques, such as frameless stereotaxy. The catheter insertion technique described here provides a quick, accurate, and safe method for reaching deep-seated lesions. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Intra-operative radiotherapy in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, J.P.; Braillon, G.; Sentenac, I.; Calvo, F.; Dubois, J.B.; Saint-Aubert, B.; Guillemin, C.; Roussel, A.

    1991-01-01

    This article is about a treatment used more and more frequently in the world, for some neoplasms: Intra-operative radiotherapy under electron beams. The main neoplasms concerned by this treatment are the stomach, pancreas, rectum, bladder, uterus cervix neoplasms and peritoneal sarcoma [fr

  7. Intraoperative and recovery room outcome | Edomwonyi | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To identify and quantitate anaesthesia related complications in the intraoperative period and in the post anaesthesia recovery room. Design: A prospective study. Setting: University of Benin Teaching Hospital; a University - affiliated tertiary centre. Subjects: Patients scheduled for elective and emergency surgery ...

  8. INTRAOPERATIVE PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY FOR METASTATIC PERITONEAL TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Suleimanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review is devoted to the cytoreductive treatment of malignant tumors of the abdominal organs. The actuality of the issue is determined both by increase of the incidence of abdominal cancer in Russia and in majority of developed countries and by high rate diagnosis on late stages of disease. The methods of treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis, based on possible effects on the secondary peritoneal tumors after surgical cytoreduction to reduce the risk of local recurrence and disease progression are described. These methods of additional intraoperative specific antitumor action include intraoperative radiation therapy, hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy, intraoperative photodynamic therapy characterized by differences in difficulty of performance, mechanisms of effect on tumor and healthy tissues, efficiency. Benefits, opportunities and possibilities of application of intraoperative photodynamic therapy (IOPDT for secondary peritoneal tumors are described in details, the results of a number of domestic and foreign clinical studies are shown, the successful application of intraoperative photodynamic therapy in clinical oncology, which allows reducing the risk of secondary tumor lesions of the peritoneum significantly, is demonstrated. Photodynamic therapy – a method with high efficiency and almost no side effects and complications, based on the ability of photosensitizer to accumulate selectively and retain in the high proliferative tissues. The advantages of this type of treatment of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis are a selective effect on the peritoneal carcinomatosis and on visually detected tumor tissue, high efficiency in patients with malignant tumors of the abdominal cavity and pelvis combined with surgical cytoreduction, minimal effect on normal organs and tissues of the patient, well tolerated procedure.

  9. Is current clinical practice modified about intraoperative breast irradiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Michela; Franchelli, Simonetta; Panizza, Renzo; Massa, Tiberio

    2016-04-01

    After the results obtained in the two randomized clinical trial, the ELIOT trial and the TARGIT-A trial, a heated debate is going on concerning the question of applying intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) instead of postoperative whole breast irradiation (WBI) after breast conservative treatment. Currently, many centers are applying the IORT following the strict selection criteria dictated by the working groups American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) and monitoring the oncological outcome together with radiation toxicity on breast tissue. The clinical experience of the Geneva University Hospital regarding the use of the Intrabeam system is evaluated and compared with current evidences.

  10. Intraoperative measurement of parathyroid hormone: A Copernican revolution in the surgical treatment of hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioviale, Maria Concetta; Damiano, Giuseppe; Altomare, Roberta; Maione, Carolina; Buscemi, Salvatore; Buscemi, Giuseppe; Lo Monte, Attilio Ignazio

    2016-04-01

    Intraoperative parathyroid hormone (PTH) monitoring in the setting of the operating room represents a valuable example of the rationale use of the laboratory diagnostic in a patient-oriented approach. Rapid intraoperative PTH (ioPTH) assay is a valid tool for an accurate evaluation of the success of parathyroid surgery. The reliability of the user-friendly portable systems as well as the collaboration between operators and surgical staff allow the one-site monitoring of the ioPTH decrements on the course of the surgical management of hyperparathyroidism. The rapid answer provided by an effective decrement of PTH during parathyroidectomy contributes dramatically to the efficacy of parathyroid surgery and the reduction of the number of re-operations. Therefore the dose of ioPTH is a valid and reliable support for the success of the intervention of parathyroidectomy at controlled costs. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring team's communiqué with anesthesia professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Tewari

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Based on our institutions' protocol and algorithm for intervention during IONM-supported surgeries, our findings of resolution in alerts and notifications indicate that successful communications between the two teams could potentially lead to improved anesthetic care and patient safety.

  12. Tolerance of bile duct to intraoperative irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, W.F.; Tepper, J.; Travis, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    In order to determine the effects of intraoperative radiation therapy of the bile duct and surrounding tissues, seven adult dogs were subjected to laparotomy and intraoperative irradiation with 11 MeV electrons. Two animals were treated at each dose level of 2000, 3000, and 4500 rads. A single dog which received a laparotomy and sham irradiation served as a control. The irradiation field consisted of a 5 cm diameter circle encompassing the extrahepatic bile duct, portal vein, hepatic artery, and lateral duodenal wall. The animals were followed clinically for mor than 18 months after treatment, and autopsies were performed on dogs that died to assess radiation-induced complications or tissue damage. All dogs developed fibrosis and mural thickening of the common duct, which appeared by 6 weeks following irradiation and which was dose-related, being mild at low doses and more severe at high doses. Hepatic changes were seen as early as 6 weeks after irradiation, consisting of periportal inflammation and fibrosis. The hepatic changes appeared earliest at the highest doses. Frank biliary cirrhosis eventually developed at all dose levels. Duodenal fibrosis appeared in the irradiation portal, being most severe at the highest doses and in some animals resulting in duodenal obstruction. No changes were observed in irradiated portions of portal vein and hepatic artery at any dose level. It was concluded that intraoperative radiation therapy delivered to the region of the common duct leads to ductal fibrosis, partial biliary obstruction with secondary hepatic changes, and duodenal fibrosis if bowel wall is included in the field. Clinical use of intraoperative radiation therapy to the bile duct in humans may require routine use of biliary and duodenal bypass to prevent obstructive complications

  13. Experimental and clinical studies with intraoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, W.F.; Kinsella, T.; Tepper, J.; Travis, E.L.; Rosenberg, S.A.; Glatstein, E.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of normal tissue tolerance to intraoperative radiotherapy were done upon 65 dogs subjected to laparotomy and 11 million electron volt electron irradiation in doses ranging from zero to 5,000 rads. Results of studies indicated that intact aorta and vena cava tolerate up to 5,000 rads without loss of structural integrity. Ureteral fibrosis and stenosis develop at doses of 3,000 rads or more. Arterial anastomoses heal after doses of 4,500 rads, but fibrosis can lead to occlusion. Intestinal suture lines heal after doses of 4,500 rads. Bile duct fibrosis and stenosis develop at doses of 2,000 rads or more. Biliary-enteric anastomoses fail to heal at any dose level. A clinical trial of intraoperative radiotherapy combined with radical surgery was performed upon 20 patients with advanced malignant tumors which were considered unlikely to be cured by conventional therapies and which included carcinomas of the stomach, carcinomas of the pancreas, carcinomas involving the hilus of the liver, retroperitoneal sarcomas and osteosarcomas of the pelvis. All patients underwent resection of gross tumor, followed by intraoperative irradiation of the tumor bed and regional nodal basins. Some patients received additional postoperative external beam radiotherapy. Treatment mortality for combined operation and radiotherapy occurred in four of 20 patients. Postoperative complications occurred in four of the 16 surviving patients. Local tumor control was achieved in 11 of the 16 surviving patients, with an over-all median follow-up period of 18 months. The clinical trial suggested that intraoperative radiotherapy is a feasible adjunct to resection in locally advanced tumors, that the resulting mortality and morbidity is similar to that expected from operation alone and that local tumor control may be improved

  14. Intraoperative dynamic dosimetry for prostate implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todor, D A [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Zaider, M [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Cohen, G N [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Worman, M F [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Zelefsky, M J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States)

    2003-05-07

    This paper describes analytic tools in support of a paradigm shift in brachytherapy treatment planning for prostate cancer - a shift from standard pre-planning to intraoperative planning using dosimetric feedback based on the actual deposited seed positions within the prostate. The method proposed is guided by several desiderata: (a) bringing both planning and evaluation in the operating room (i.e. make post-implant evaluation superfluous) therefore making rectifications - if necessary - still achievable; (b) making planning and implant evaluation consistent by using the same imaging system (ultrasound); and (c) using only equipment commonly found in a hospital operating room. The intraoperative dosimetric evaluation is based on the fusion between ultrasound images and 3D seed coordinates reconstructed from fluoroscopic projections. Automatic seed detection and registration of the fluoroscopic and ultrasound information, two of the three key ingredients needed for the intraoperative dynamic dosimetry optimization (IDDO), are explained in detail. The third one, the reconstruction of 3D coordinates from projections, was reported in a previous article. The algorithms were validated using a custom-designed phantom with non-radioactive (dummy) seeds. Also, fluoroscopic images were taken at the conclusion of an actual permanent prostate implant and compared with data on the same patient obtained from radiographic-based post-implant evaluation. To offset the effect of organ motion the comparison was performed in terms of the proximity function of the two seed distributions. The agreement between the intra- and post-operative seed distributions was excellent.

  15. Multispectral open-air intraoperative fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrooz, Ali; Waterman, Peter; Vasquez, Kristine O; Meganck, Jeff; Peterson, Jeffrey D; Faqir, Ilias; Kempner, Joshua

    2017-08-01

    Intraoperative fluorescence imaging informs decisions regarding surgical margins by detecting and localizing signals from fluorescent reporters, labeling targets such as malignant tissues. This guidance reduces the likelihood of undetected malignant tissue remaining after resection, eliminating the need for additional treatment or surgery. The primary challenges in performing open-air intraoperative fluorescence imaging come from the weak intensity of the fluorescence signal in the presence of strong surgical and ambient illumination, and the auto-fluorescence of non-target components, such as tissue, especially in the visible spectral window (400-650 nm). In this work, a multispectral open-air fluorescence imaging system is presented for translational image-guided intraoperative applications, which overcomes these challenges. The system is capable of imaging weak fluorescence signals with nanomolar sensitivity in the presence of surgical illumination. This is done using synchronized fluorescence excitation and image acquisition with real-time background subtraction. Additionally, the system uses a liquid crystal tunable filter for acquisition of multispectral images that are used to spectrally unmix target fluorescence from non-target auto-fluorescence. Results are validated by preclinical studies on murine models and translational canine oncology models.

  16. Clinical toxicity of peripheral nerve to intraoperative radiotherapy in a canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, Peter A. S.; DeLuca, Anne Marie; Bacher, John D.; Hampshire, Victoria A.; Terrill, Richard E.; Anderson, William J.; Kinsella, Timothy J.; Sindelar, William F.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical late effects of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) on peripheral nerve were investigated in a foxhound model. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 1987, 40 animals underwent laparotomy with intraoperative radiotherapy of doses from 0-75 Gy administered to the right lumbosacral plexus. Subsequently, all animals were monitored closely and sacrificed to assess clinical effects to peripheral nerve. This analysis reports final clinical results of all animals, with follow-up to 5 years. Results: All animals treated with ≥ 25 Gy developed ipsilateral neuropathy. An inverse relationship was noted between intraoperative radiotherapy dose and time to neuropathy, with an effective dose for 50% paralysis (ED 50 ) of 17.2 Gy. One of the animals treated with 15 Gy IORT developed paralysis, after a much longer latency than the other animals. Conclusions: Doses of 15 Gy delivered intraoperatively may be accompanied by peripheral neuropathy with long-term follow-up. This threshold is less than that reported with shorter follow-up. The value of ED 50 determined here is in keeping with data from other animal trials, and from clinical trials in humans

  17. Intraoperative floppy iris and prevalence of intraoperative complications: results from ophthalmic surgery outcomes database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, David E; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Luis A; Chomsky, Amy; Daly, Mary K; Baze, Elizabeth; Lawrence, Mary

    2014-06-01

    To estimate the prevalence of untoward events during cataract surgery with the use of pupillary expansion devices and intraoperative floppy iris (IFIS). Retrospective analysis of 4923 cataract surgery cases from the Veterans Affairs Ophthalmic Surgical Outcomes Data Project. Outcomes from 5 Veterans Affairs medical centers were analyzed, including use of alpha-blockers (both selective and nonselective), IFIS, intraoperative iris trauma, intraoperative iris prolapse, posterior capsular tear, anterior capsule tear, intraoperative vitreous prolapse, and use of pupillary expansion devices. P values were calculated using the χ(2) test. A total of 1254 patients (25.5%) took alpha-blockers preoperatively (selective, 587; nonselective, 627; both, 40). Of these 1254 patients, 428 patients (34.1%) had documented IFIS. However, 75.2% of patients with IFIS (428/569) had taken alpha-blockers preoperatively (P < .00001). A total of 430 patients (8.7%) had a pupillary expansion device used during their cataract surgery, of which 186 patients (43.4%) had IFIS (P < .0001). Eighty-six patients with IFIS had at least 1 intraoperative complication and 39 patients with IFIS had more than 1 intraoperative complication (P < .001). The use of either selective or nonselective alpha-antagonists preoperatively demonstrated a significant risk of IFIS. Nonselective alpha-antagonists caused IFIS at a higher prevalence than previously reported. This study did demonstrate statistically significant increased odds of surgical complications in patients with IFIS vs those without IFIS in all groups (those taking selective and nonselective alpha-antagonists and also those not taking medications). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Intraoperative intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure for predicting surgical outcome in severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Hsin Tsai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative intracranial pressure (ICP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP were evaluated for use as prognostic indicators after surgery for severe traumatic brain injury (TBI, and threshold ICP and CPP values were determined to provide guidelines for patient management. This retrospective study reviewed data for 66 patients (20 females and 46 males aged 13–83 years (average age, 48 years who had received decompressive craniectomy and hematoma evacuation for severe TBI. The analysis of clinical characteristics included Glascow Coma Scale score, trauma mechanism, trauma severity, cerebral hemorrhage type, hematoma thickness observed on computed tomography scan, Glasgow Outcome Scale score, and mortality. Patients whose treatment included ICP monitoring had significantly better prognosis (p < 0.001 and significantly lower mortality (p = 0.016 compared to those who did not receive ICP monitoring. At all three major steps of the procedure, i.e., creation of the burr hole, evacuation of the hematoma, and closing of the wound, intraoperative ICP and CPP values significantly differed. The ICP and CPP values were also significantly associated with surgical outcome in the severe TBI patients. Between hematoma evacuation and wound closure, ICP and CPP values differed by 6.8 ± 4.5 and 6.5 ± 4.6 mmHg, respectively (mean difference, 6 mmHg. Intraoperative thresholds were 14 mmHg for ICP and 56mmH for CPP. Monitoring ICP and CPP during surgery improves management of severe TBI patients and provides an early prognostic indicator. During surgery for severe TBI, early detection of increased ICP is also crucial for enabling sufficiently early treatment to improve surgical outcome. However, further study is needed to determine the optimal intraoperative ICP and CPP thresholds before their use as subjective guidelines for managing severe TBI patients.

  19. Dosage effect of rocuronium on intraoperative neuromonitoring in patients undergoing thyroid surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yang-dong; Liang, Feng; Chen, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different concentrations of rocuronium bromide used for anesthesia induction during thyroid surgery on the intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring was evaluated. One hundred patients undergoing thyroid operation were randomized into five groups (20 patients per group). Patients in group I were operated and monitored without the use of rocuronium bromide. Patients in groups II-V were respectively injected with 0.5x, 1x, 1.5x, and 2x ED95 rocuronium bromide intravenously. The time from injecting the rocuronium bromide to the beginning of tube insertion was recorded, the conditions of tracheal intubation were evaluated, and the changes in blood pressure and pulse during the intubation process were monitored. Vagus nerve/recurrent laryngeal nerve evoked muscle potential was monitored using the NIM-Response3.0 nerve electromyography monitor. The amplitude of electromyography signal was recorded every 5 min during 30 min after successful tracheal intubation. The tracheal intubation success rate was 100% in all groups. Compared with group I, intubating condition scores (Cooper scores) in the patients of groups II-V were higher (P rocuronium bromide during the anesthesia induction can improve the tracheal tube conditions without affecting the intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring. The use of 1x ED95 rocuronium bromide induction was associated with the best results.

  20. Tolerance of retroperitoneal structures to intraoperative radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, W.F.; Tepper, J.; Travis, E.L.; Terrill, R.

    1982-01-01

    In conjunction with the clinical development of intraoperative radiotherapy, a study was undertaken in dogs to define the tolerance of normal anatomic structures in the retroperitoneum to radiation delivered during operation. Twenty adult dogs were subjected to laparotomy and intraoperative 11 MeV electron irradiation in single doses ranging from 0.to 5000 rad. Animals were followed regularly with clinical observation, blood count, serum chemistries, pyelography, and angiography. Animals were sacrificed and autopsied at regular intervals up to 12 months following treatment to assess radiation-induced complications or tissue damage. Irradiation field in all dogs consisted of a 4 X 15 cm rectangle extending in the retroperitoneum from the level of the renal vessels to the bifurcation of aorta and vena cava. The field included aorta, vena cava, inferior portion of left kidney, and distal portion of left ureter. No complications or histologic changes occurred in any animal given doses of 2000 rad, with a follow-up in excess of 18 months. A dose of 3000 rad was well tolerated, except for left ureteral occlusion in one animal. Mild vascular fibrosis was present inthe aorta and vena cava, and significant ureteral fibrosis developed by six months after doses of 4000 or 5000 rad. All animals that received 5000 rad died of radiation-related complications, including ureteral obstruction and rectal perforation. It was concluded that major vessels tolerate intraoperative irradiation well up to and including 3000 rad and that no clinically significant vascular problems develop after 4000 and 5000 rad, although some fibrosis does occur. The ureter and kidney appear to be the most radiosensitive structures inthe retroperitoneum, showing progressive changes at 300 rad or greater and showing the potential for serious complications after doses of 4000 rad or more

  1. Study on intraoperative radiotherapy of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uozumi, Akimasa

    1990-01-01

    Effects of a single large dose radiation on the brain of dogs were investigated for the purpose of determining the optimal dose and radiation field in intraoperative radiotherapy. The right parietal lobe of dogs (three groups, four dogs in each) were radiated at the dose of 30, 40 and 50 Gy respectively at the depth of 1.5 cm by 11 Nev electron beam with field size of 2 cm. CT and histopathological study were performed 2, 6, 12 and 24 months after radiation. L-hemiparesis developed 14 months after radiation in the 30 Gy group and 8 months in the 40 Gy group, 6 months in the 50 Gy group. All animals in the 40 Gy and 50 Gy groups died before 15 months of radiation. CT showed delayed radiation necrosis in all groups. Brain swelling and ventricular displacement in the radiated hemisphere and contralateral ventricular dilatation were depicted on plain CT. Diffuse heterogeneous contrast enhancement (CE) was observed on CE-CT. CT revealed disappearance of radiation necrosis in the 30 Gy group 24 months of radiation, suggesting that radiation necrosis may be dependent on the term after radiation. Histological findings of radiation necrosis were similar in all animals, and the vascular change preceding the parechymal necrosis was not observed. This supports the theory that the vascular alternation dose not play a major role in the production of radiation necrosis. The necrotic area grossly reflected the isodose curve and was observed in the radiation field with 15 to 20 Gy at the depth of 3 to 4.5 cm. Thus, the intraoperative radiotherapy should be planned on the basis of two such factors as electron beam energy and the field size, and the area out of the target should not be radiated at the dose of more than 15 Gy. The author believes that the information would contribute to safer and more effective application of intraoperative radiotherapy on malignant brain tumors. (J.P.N.) 63 refs

  2. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seunghoon; Kim, Sehui; Kim, Jeehyun; Lee, Changho; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong

    2013-01-01

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo

  3. Intraoperative radiation therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsutani, Masao; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Tadayoshi

    1986-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IOR) is quite applicable for radioresistant malignant gliomas, because of precise demarcations of the treatment volume under direct vision, minimum damage to surrounding normal tissues, and a high target absorbed dose of 1500 to 2000 rad. Fifteen patients with glioblatoma were treated with IOR, and the 2-year survival rate was 61.1 %. The result apparently indicate that areas adjacent to the margin of almost complete removal should be irradated with a sufficient dose to sterilize the remaining malignant remnants, and IOR is one of the logical treatment modalities for local control of malignant gliomas. (author)

  4. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seunghoon, E-mail: hsh860504@gmail.com; Kim, Sehui, E-mail: sehui0916@nate.com; Kim, Jeehyun, E-mail: jeehk@knu.ac.kr, E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Changho, E-mail: ch31037@postech.edu; Jeon, Mansik, E-mail: msjeon@postech.edu [Department of Creative IT Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chulhong, E-mail: jeehk@knu.ac.kr, E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu [Department of Creative IT Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14221 (United States)

    2013-11-11

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  5. Versatile intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery and radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yrjänä, S K; Katisko, J P; Ojala, R O; Tervonen, O; Schiffbauer, H; Koivukangas, J

    2002-03-01

    Several models for the application of intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging (IMRI) have recently been reported, most of them unique. Two fundamental issues need to be addressed: optimal use of the scanner to ensure a wide base for research, development and clinical application, and an organisational model that facilitates such use. While in our setting the IMRI project was initiated by the neurosurgeons, the need for wider use of the facilities was recognised since the beginning of the planning phase in 1996. An organisational model was developed that allowed for development of neurosurgical applications, radiological imaging, and radiological interventions and for the research and development work of the vendor. A resistive 0.23 T MR scanner was installed in a dedicated operating room environment. Unique to this scanner is the ability to turn off the magnet, allowing for normal OR activities and devices, and to turn on the magnet as needed with a relatively short six-minute ramp up time. A staged surgical technique was perfected, allowing for transfer of data to the neuronavigator outside the scanner during surgery. In neurosurgery, IMRI was used as one part of a neuronavigational system that included ultrasound imaging, intra-operative cortical stimulation during awake procedures, electrocorticography and two neuronavigators. 34 neurosurgical cases included 27 brain tumour resections, 5 brain tumour biopsies, 1 extirpation of an arterio-venous malformation, and 1 haematoma evacuation. The scanner could also be used for normal clinical imaging where obese patients, children, claustophobic patients and postoperative control examinations were the major groups. The radiologists performed 110 interventions, including bone and abdominal biopsies, nerve root infiltrations and local pain therapies, with the optical needle tracking system under continuous MRI guidance. The organisational model allowed frequent use of the facilities for both neurosurgery and radiology

  6. Low-grade Glioma Surgery in Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Results of a Multicenter Retrospective Assessment of the German Study Group for Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburger, Jan; Merkel, Andreas; Scherer, Moritz; Schwartz, Felix; Gessler, Florian; Roder, Constantin; Pala, Andrej; König, Ralph; Bullinger, Lars; Nagel, Gabriele; Jungk, Christine; Bisdas, Sotirios; Nabavi, Arya; Ganslandt, Oliver; Seifert, Volker; Tatagiba, Marcos; Senft, Christian; Mehdorn, Maximilian; Unterberg, Andreas W; Rössler, Karl; Wirtz, Christian Rainer

    2016-06-01

    The ideal treatment strategy for low-grade gliomas (LGGs) is a controversial topic. Additionally, only smaller single-center series dealing with the concept of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) have been published. To investigate determinants for patient outcome and progression-free-survival (PFS) after iMRI-guided surgery for LGGs in a multicenter retrospective study initiated by the German Study Group for Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging. A retrospective consecutive assessment of patients treated for LGGs (World Health Organization grade II) with iMRI-guided resection at 6 neurosurgical centers was performed. Eloquent location, extent of resection, first-line adjuvant treatment, neurophysiological monitoring, awake brain surgery, intraoperative ultrasound, and field-strength of iMRI were analyzed, as well as progression-free survival (PFS), new permanent neurological deficits, and complications. Multivariate binary logistic and Cox regression models were calculated to evaluate determinants of PFS, gross total resection (GTR), and adjuvant treatment. A total of 288 patients met the inclusion criteria. On multivariate analysis, GTR significantly increased PFS (hazard ratio, 0.44; P surgery. Patients with accidentally left tumor remnants showed a similar prognosis compared with patients harboring only partially resectable tumors. Use of high-field iMRI was significantly associated with GTR. However, the field strength of iMRI did not affect PFS. EoR, extent of resectionFLAIR, fluid-attenuated inversion recoveryGTR, gross total resectionIDH1, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1iMRI, intraoperative magnetic resonance imagingLGG, low-grade gliomaMGMT, methylguanine-deoxyribonucleic acid methyltransferasenPND, new permanent neurological deficitOS, overall survivalPFS, progression-free survivalSTR, subtotal resectionWHO, World Health Organization.

  7. Intraoperative intrinsic optical imaging of human somatosensory cortex during neurosurgical operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsushige; Nariai, Tadashi; Momose-Sato, Yoko; Kamino, Kohtaro

    2017-07-01

    Intrinsic optical imaging as developed by Grinvald et al. is a powerful technique for monitoring neural function in the in vivo central nervous system. The advent of this dye-free imaging has also enabled us to monitor human brain function during neurosurgical operations. We briefly describe our own experience in functional mapping of the human somatosensory cortex, carried out using intraoperative optical imaging. The maps obtained demonstrate new additional evidence of a hierarchy for sensory response patterns in the human primary somatosensory cortex.

  8. Intraoperative Scintigraphy Using a Large Field-of-View Portable Gamma Camera for Primary Hyperparathyroidism: Initial Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C. Hall

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated a novel technique, intraoperative 99 mTc-Sestamibi (MIBI imaging (neck and excised specimen (ES, using a large field-of-view portable gamma camera (LFOVGC, for expediting confirmation of MIBI-avid parathyroid adenoma removal. Methods. Twenty patients with MIBI-avid parathyroid adenomas were preoperatively administered MIBI and intraoperatively imaged prior to incision (neck and immediately following resection (neck and/or ES. Preoperative and intraoperative serum parathyroid hormone monitoring (IOPTH and pathology (path were also performed. Results. MIBI neck activity was absent and specimen activity was present in 13/20 with imaging after initial ES removal. In the remaining 7/20 cases, residual neck activity and/or absent ES activity prompted excision of additional tissue, ultimately leading to complete hyperfunctioning tissue excision. Postexcision LFOVGC ES imaging confirmed parathyroid adenoma resection 100% when postresection imaging qualitatively had activity (ES and/or no activity (neck. The mean ± SEM time saving using intraoperative LFOVGC data to confirm resection versus first IOPTH or path result would have been 22.0 ± 2 minutes (specimen imaging and 26.0 ± 3 minutes (neck imaging. Conclusion. Utilization of a novel real-time intraoperative LFOVGC imaging approach can provide confirmation of MIBI-avid parathyroid adenoma removal appreciably faster than IOPTH and/or path and may provide a valuable adjunct to parathyroid surgery.

  9. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhri, Asim F. [Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Siddiqui, Adeel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); St. Jude Children' s Hospital, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. (orig.)

  10. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhri, Asim F.; Siddiqui, Adeel; Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A.

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. (orig.)

  11. Intraoperative irradiation in advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, G.; Goldson, A.L.; Ashayeri, E.; Petrilli, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional treatment of cervical cancer, such as radical hysterectomy with lymphadenectomy or pelvic exenteration, is limited to the pelvis. Standard radio-therapeutic treatment is a combination of external-beam radiotherapy to the pelvis and intracavitary applications. However, there is a group of patients for whom external radiotherapy alone has limitations. This group consists primarily of patients with large pelvic lymph nodes containing metastatic cancer, metastatically involved paraaortic lymph nodes outside the usual pelvic radiation field, or large central tumors with parametrial involvement. In patients with cancer of the cervix, the incidence of metastasis to paraaortic lymph nodes is high. Attempts to treat paraaortic nodes with external radiotherapy have resulted in high complication rates because the treatment field includes the highly sensitive gastrointestinal tract. External radiation therapy after retroperitoneal exploration of lymph nodes does not seem to improve survival. In an attempt to circumvent the morbidity and mortality associated with conventional external-beam irradiation, the authors initiated a pilot study of intraoperative electron-beam irradiation of the paraaortic nodes and of the large metastatic lymph nodes in the pelvis. The intraoperative boost was followed by conventional fractionated external-beam irradiation. The theoretical advantages of this procedure include a higher radiation tumor dose without a concomitant increase in treatment morbidity and mortality

  12. Intraoperative radio-frequency capacitive hyperthermia and radiation therapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, M.; Yamashita, T.; Hashida, I.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have initiated intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) and intraoperative radio-frequency capacitive hyperthermia (IOHT) for unresectable pancreatic cancer. After gastric (corpus) resection, IORT and IOHT were conducted and gastro-duodenostomy was performed IORT was delivered with 12 meV electron (25 Gy) and 10 MV Linac x-ray (7.5 Gy). IOHT was done with 13.56 MHz capacitive equipment aiming 43 0 C for over 30 min along with concurrent administration of 500 mg 5-FU. Five cases were heated by the conventional method and two additional cases were heated with a newly fabricated applicator. Attained temperatures monitored directly from tumor were 38.5 0 C-44.3 0 C (over 43 0 C in four cases, 40 0 C in one case, and below 40 0 C in two cass.) Pain relief was achieved in most cases. Using the new applicators, the authors could avoid unexpected hot spots and insufficient heating

  13. The Resection Map : A proposal for intraoperative hepatectomy guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamata, P.; Jalote-Parmar, A.; Lamata, F.; Declerck, J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective - To propose a new concept of an intra-operative 3D visualisation system to support hepatectomies. This system aims at improving the transfer of pre-operative planning into the intra-operative stage, both in laparoscopic and open approaches. Materials and methods - User (surgeon) centred

  14. Overview of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiino, Akihiko; Matsuda, Masayuki

    2002-01-01

    This review describes usefulness, prospect and present problems of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery. MRI equipments for the surgery have to have a wide, open space and have those magnets of short cylindrical, biplanar (clam shell), dual air core superconducting solenoidal (double doughnut) and targeted FOV (field of view) type. Devices required for the surgery are specific and in author's facility, they are classified into 4 zones depending on the region of their use. Application of the surgery involves biopsy, drainage of cyst and abscess, hematoma evacuation, nerve block, thermotherapy (interstitial laser, RF ablation, focused untrasonic and cryosurgery), local drug therapy, chemoablation, vascular intervention and tumor extraction, of which actual procedures and pictures are presented together with, in particular, MR-guided thermotherapy, ablation therapy of brain tumors, endoscopic surgery and minimally invasive therapy of the spine. A navigation software, 3D SlicerTM system, is introduced for interventional imaging. Safety measures are emphasized for the operation. (K.H.)

  15. Overview of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiino, Akihiko; Matsuda, Masayuki [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    This review describes usefulness, prospect and present problems of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery. MRI equipments for the surgery have to have a wide, open space and have those magnets of short cylindrical, biplanar (clam shell), dual air core superconducting solenoidal (double doughnut) and targeted FOV (field of view) type. Devices required for the surgery are specific and in author's facility, they are classified into 4 zones depending on the region of their use. Application of the surgery involves biopsy, drainage of cyst and abscess, hematoma evacuation, nerve block, thermotherapy (interstitial laser, RF ablation, focused untrasonic and cryosurgery), local drug therapy, chemoablation, vascular intervention and tumor extraction, of which actual procedures and pictures are presented together with, in particular, MR-guided thermotherapy, ablation therapy of brain tumors, endoscopic surgery and minimally invasive therapy of the spine. A navigation software, 3D SlicerTM system, is introduced for interventional imaging. Safety measures are emphasized for the operation. (K.H.)

  16. Intraoperative radiotherapy. Clinical experiences and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, F.A.; Santos, M. (Clinica Universitaria, Dept. of Oncology, Service of Radiotherapy, Pamplona (Spain)); Brady, L.W. (Hahnemann Univ., Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)) (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This monograph reports on the largest clinical series to date in which intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) has been used in mulitdisciplinary treatment programs for tumors of various sites and differing histological sybtype. It represents the product of 5 years' intensive work by physicians active at a leading European institution. The findings are supplemented by a thorough review of the data presented worldwide during the last two decades. The results in this book are meticulously presented and focus on the most important features of clinical research reports based on phase I-II studies (toxicity, local tumor control, and survival data). The tumor sites and histologies analyzed are: head and neck cancer, lung cancer, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, colorectal cancer, bladder cancer, gynecologic cancer, soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities, retroperitoneal and other central soft issue sarcomas, Ewing's sarcoma, osteosarcoma, and intracranial tumors. (orig./MG) With 60 figs.

  17. Intra-operative radiation treatment of cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, J.B.; Joyeux, H.; Solassol, C.; Pujol, H.

    1986-01-01

    Intra-operative radiation treatment (I.O.R.T.) is concerning the treatment either of an unresectable tumor or of tumor bed after complete excision of a primary tumor and its first draining lymph nodes. We describe X-ray and electrons techniques and we discuss the delivered doses according to experimental and clinical data. According to the residual disease (macroscopic or microscopic), to the healthy tissues in the target volume, and the histological type, single doses from 20 Gy to 40 Gy can be delivered. Our preliminary results are reported: 25 patients with resectable tumors of the cardia, the stomach and the pancreas, 5 patients with pelvic recurrences of colon and rectum carcinomas. Therapeutic results of the I.O.R.T. providing from the literature are discussed. The I.O.R.T. indications are defined as palliative (unresectable tumors) and curative (irradiation of tumor bed after complete excision of the tumor) [fr

  18. Intraoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced refractory cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Mitsuyuki; Takahashi, Masaji; Ono, Koji; Dodo, Yoshihiro; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1983-05-01

    Clinical results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IOR) in carcinoma of the stomach and prostate, and malignant soft tissue tumors are reported. The 5-year survival rate was found to be increased by IOR in stages II-IV gastric cancer. From the analysis of the clinical results of prostatic cancer, a single dose of 3,500 rad was considered to be a potential curative dose for the tumor less than 3 cm in diameter. The local recurrence rate of patients with malignant soft tissue tumors who received a single dose ranging from 3,000 to 4,500 rad was 5.9 and the 5-year survival rate was 64.6 %.

  19. Brain mapping in tumors: intraoperative or extraoperative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffau, Hugues

    2013-12-01

    In nontumoral epilepsy surgery, the main goal for all preoperative investigation is to first determine the epileptogenic zone, and then to analyze its relation to eloquent cortex, in order to control seizures while avoiding adverse postoperative neurologic outcome. To this end, in addition to neuropsychological assessment, functional neuroimaging and scalp electroencephalography, extraoperative recording, and electrical mapping, especially using subdural strip- or grid-electrodes, has been reported extensively. Nonetheless, in tumoral epilepsy surgery, the rationale is different. Indeed, the first aim is rather to maximize the extent of tumor resection while minimizing postsurgical morbidity, in order to increase the median survival as well as to preserve quality of life. As a consequence, as frequently seen in infiltrating tumors such as gliomas, where these lesions not only grow but also migrate along white matter tracts, the resection should be performed according to functional boundaries both at cortical and subcortical levels. With this in mind, extraoperative mapping by strips/grids is often not sufficient in tumoral surgery, since in essence, it allows study of the cortex but cannot map subcortical pathways. Therefore, intraoperative electrostimulation mapping, especially in awake patients, is more appropriate in tumor surgery, because this technique allows real-time detection of areas crucial for cerebral functions--eloquent cortex and fibers--throughout the resection. In summary, rather than choosing one or the other of different mapping techniques, methodology should be adapted to each pathology, that is, extraoperative mapping in nontumoral epilepsy surgery and intraoperative mapping in tumoral surgery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  20. Best practices to optimize intraoperative photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaujoux, Sébastien; Ceribelli, Cecilia; Goudard, Geoffrey; Khayat, Antoine; Leconte, Mahaut; Massault, Pierre-Philippe; Balagué, Julie; Dousset, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    Intraoperative photography is used extensively for communication, research, or teaching. The objective of the present work was to define, using a standardized methodology and literature review, the best technical conditions for intraoperative photography. Using either a smartphone camera, a bridge camera, or a single-lens reflex (SLR) camera, photographs were taken under various standard conditions by a professional photographer. All images were independently assessed blinded to technical conditions to define the best shooting conditions and methods. For better photographs, an SLR camera with manual settings should be used. Photographs should be centered and taken vertically and orthogonal to the surgical field with a linear scale to avoid error in perspective. The shooting distance should be about 75 cm using an 80-100-mm focal lens. Flash should be avoided and scialytic low-powered light should be used without focus. The operative field should be clean, wet surfaces should be avoided, and metal instruments should be hidden to avoid reflections. For SLR camera, International Organization for Standardization speed should be as low as possible, autofocus area selection mode should be on single point AF, shutter speed should be above 1/100 second, and aperture should be as narrow as possible, above f/8. For smartphone, use high dynamic range setting if available, use of flash, digital filter, effect apps, and digital zoom is not recommended. If a few basic technical rules are known and applied, high-quality photographs can be taken by amateur photographers and fit the standards accepted in clinical practice, academic communication, and publications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Intraoperative radiotherapy in primary rectal cancer; Intraoperative Radiotherapie des primaeren Rektumkarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mund, Christian

    2013-06-17

    According to the results of several studies intraoperative radiotherapy seems to influence local control for primary rectal cancer in UICC-Stage II / III positively, though recommendations in therapy cannot be given as studies of high evidence level do not exist. As IORT is rarely available and makes patient recruitment difficult, prospective randomised trials have not been carried out yet. This emphasizes the importance of non-randomised trials for an evaluation of IORT. A comparison of 21 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who had been treated with intraoperative radiation therapy and 21 similar cases without an application of IORT could not show any significant improvements in prognosis (recurrences, metastases and disease-specific survival). Nevertheless the employment of intraoperative radiation showed a trend in improvement of local control. This hast been shown by several other studies before. Thus the application of IORT in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer is considered a useful part in multimodal treatment and should further be evaluated in specialized centres. In case-control studies 1:1-matching leads to a good comparability of groups and renders conclusions of high internal validity possible. To gain a sufficient power, this type of trials should however primarily be carried out by centres with a high number of cases.

  2. Effects of steal-prone anatomy on intraoperative myocardial ischemia. The SPI Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, J M; Hollenberg, M; O'Kelly, B F; Kao, A; Mangano, D T

    1992-11-01

    Our study objective was to determine whether the presence of steal-prone anatomy conferred an increased risk in the development of intraoperative myocardial ischemia. Coronary artery steal of collateral blood flow has been demonstrated for many vasodilators, including isoflurane, the most commonly used inhalational anesthetic agent in the United States. It has been postulated that patients with steal-prone anatomy (total occlusion of one coronary artery that is supplied distally by collateral flow from another coronary artery with a > or = 50% stenosis) may be particularly at risk for the development of intraoperative myocardial ischemia when an anesthetic with a vasodilator property is being administered. We evaluated the risk of myocardial ischemia under isoflurane anesthesia (vs. a high dose narcotic technique using sufentanil) using continuous intraoperative electrocardiography and transesophageal echocardiography in patients with and without steal-prone anatomy undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Sixty-two (33%) of the 186 patients had steal-prone anatomy: in 5 (8%) the collateral-supplying vessel was > or = 50% to 69% stenosed, in 24 (39%) it was > or = 70% to 89% stenosed and in 33 (53%) it was > or = 90% stenosed. The incidence of ischemia (transesophageal echocardiography or intraoperative electrocardiography, or both) was similar in patients with and without steal-prone coronary anatomy (18 [29%] of 62 patients vs. 39 [31%] of 124 patients, p = 0.87, 95% confidence interval = -0.13 to 0.17). The incidence of intraoperative ischemia was similar in patients who received isoflurane or sufentanil anesthesia (20 [32%] of 62 patients vs. 37 [30%] of 124 patients, p = 0.87). The incidence of tachycardia and hypotension was low (increases in heart rate = 9.8%, and decreases in systolic blood pressure = 10.8% of total monitoring time during the prebypass period compared with preoperative baseline values). The incidence of adverse cardiac outcome was

  3. Multimodal correlation and intraoperative matching of virtual models in neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceresole, Enrico; Dalsasso, Michele; Rossi, Aldo

    1994-01-01

    The multimodal correlation between different diagnostic exams, the intraoperative calibration of pointing tools and the correlation of the patient's virtual models with the patient himself, are some examples, taken from the biomedical field, of a unique problem: determine the relationship linking representation of the same object in different reference frames. Several methods have been developed in order to determine this relationship, among them, the surface matching method is one that gives the patient minimum discomfort and the errors occurring are compatible with the required precision. The surface matching method has been successfully applied to the multimodal correlation of diagnostic exams such as CT, MR, PET and SPECT. Algorithms for automatic segmentation of diagnostic images have been developed to extract the reference surfaces from the diagnostic exams, whereas the surface of the patient's skull has been monitored, in our approach, by means of a laser sensor mounted on the end effector of an industrial robot. An integrated system for virtual planning and real time execution of surgical procedures has been realized.

  4. SU-F-T-80: A Mobile Application for Intra-Operative Electron Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, C; Crowley, E; Wolfgang, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IORT) poses a unique set of challenges for treatment planning. Planning must be performed in a busy operating room environment over a short timeframe often with little advance knowledge of the treatment depth or applicator size. Furthermore, IORT accelerators can have a large number of possible applicators, requiring extensive databooks that must be searched for the appropriate dosimetric parameters. The goal of this work is to develop a software tool to assist in the planning process that is suited to the challenges faced in the IORT environment. Methods: We developed a mobile application using HTML5 and Javascript that can be deployed to tablet devices suitable for use in the operating room. The user selects the desired treatment parameters cone diameter, bevel angle, and energy (a total of 141 datasets) and desired bolus. The application generates an interactive display that allows the user to dynamically select points on the depth-dose curve and to visualize the shape of the corresponding isodose contours. The user can indicate a prescription isodose line or depth. The software performs a monitor unit calculation and generates a PDF report. Results: We present our application, which is now used routinely in our IORT practice. It has been employed successfully in over 23 cases. The interactivity of the isodose distributions was found to be of particular use to physicians who are less-frequent IORT users, as well as for the education of residents and trainees. Conclusion: This software has served as a useful tool in IORT planning, and demonstrates the need for treatment planning tools that are designed for the specialized challenges encountered in IORT. This software is the subject of a license agreement with the IntraOp Medical Corporation. This software is the subject of a license agreement between Massachusetts General Hospital / Partners Healthcare and the IntraOp Medical Corporation. CLW is consulting on

  5. Intraoperative Frontal Alpha-Band Power Correlates with Preoperative Neurocognitive Function in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles M. Giattino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Each year over 16 million older Americans undergo general anesthesia for surgery, and up to 40% develop postoperative delirium and/or cognitive dysfunction (POCD. Delirium and POCD are each associated with decreased quality of life, early retirement, increased 1-year mortality, and long-term cognitive decline. Multiple investigators have thus suggested that anesthesia and surgery place severe stress on the aging brain, and that patients with less ability to withstand this stress will be at increased risk for developing postoperative delirium and POCD. Delirium and POCD risk are increased in patients with lower preoperative cognitive function, yet preoperative cognitive function is not routinely assessed, and no intraoperative physiological predictors have been found that correlate with lower preoperative cognitive function. Since general anesthesia causes alpha-band (8–12 Hz electroencephalogram (EEG power to decrease occipitally and increase frontally (known as “anteriorization”, and anesthetic-induced frontal alpha power is reduced in older adults, we hypothesized that lower intraoperative frontal alpha power might correlate with lower preoperative cognitive function. Here, we provide evidence that such a correlation exists, suggesting that lower intraoperative frontal alpha power could be used as a physiological marker to identify older adults with lower preoperative cognitive function. Lower intraoperative frontal alpha power could thus be used to target these at-risk patients for possible therapeutic interventions to help prevent postoperative delirium and POCD, or for increased postoperative monitoring and follow-up. More generally, these results suggest that understanding interindividual differences in how the brain responds to anesthetic drugs can be used as a probe of neurocognitive function (and dysfunction, and might be a useful measure of neurocognitive function in older adults.

  6. Intraoperative Inducibility of Atrial Fibrillation Does Not Predict Early Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanters, Eva A H; Teuwen, Christophe P; Yaksh, Ameeta; Kik, Charles; van der Does, Lisette J M E; Mouws, Elisabeth M J P; Knops, Paul; van Groningen, Nicole J; Hokken, Thijmen; Bogers, Ad J J C; de Groot, Natasja M S

    2018-03-10

    Early postoperative atrial fibrillation (EPoAF) is associated with thromboembolic events, prolonged hospitalization, and development of late PoAF (LPoAF). It is, however, unknown if EPoAF can be predicted by intraoperative AF inducibility. The aims of this study are therefore to explore (1) the value of intraoperative inducibility of AF for development of both EPoAF and LPoAF and (2) the predictive value of de novo EPoAF for recurrence of LPoAF. Patients (N=496, 75% male) undergoing cardiothoracic surgery for coronary and/or valvular heart disease were included. AF induction was attempted by atrial pacing, before extracorporeal circulation. All patients were on continuous rhythm monitoring until discharge to detect EPoAF. During a follow-up period of 2 years, LPoAF was detected by ECGs and Holter recordings. Sustained AF was inducible in 56% of patients. There was no difference in patients with or without AF before surgery ( P =0.159), or between different types of surgery ( P =0.687). In patients without a history of AF, incidence of EPoAF and LPoAF was 37% and 2%, respectively. EPoAF recurred in 58% patients with preoperative AF, 53% developed LPoAF. There were no correlations between intraoperative inducibility and EPoAF or LPoAF ( P >0.05). EPoAF was not correlated with LPoAF in patients without a history of AF ( P =0.116), in contrast to patients with AF before surgery ( P <0.001). Intraoperative AF inducibility does not predict development of either EPoAF or LPoAF. In patients with AF before surgery, EPoAF is correlated with LPoAF recurrences. This correlation is absent in patients without AF before surgery. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  7. Intraoperative electrocortical stimulation of Brodman area 4: a 10-year analysis of 255 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brock Mario

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain tumor surgery is limited by the risk of postoperative neurological deficits. Intraoperative neurophysiological examination techniques, which are based on the electrical excitability of the human brain cortex, are thus still indispensable for surgery in eloquent areas such as the primary motor cortex (Brodman Area 4. Methods This study analyzed the data obtained from a total of 255 cerebral interventions for lesions with direct contact to (121 or immediately adjacent to (134 Brodman Area 4 in order to optimize stimulation parameters and to search for direct correlation between intraoperative potential changes and specific surgical maneuvers when using monopolar cortex stimulation (MCS for electrocortical mapping and continuous intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring. Results Compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs were recorded from the thenar muscles and forearm flexors in accordance with the large representational area of the hand and forearm in Brodman Area 4. By optimizing the stimulation parameters in two steps (step 1: stimulation frequency and step 2: train sequence MCS was successful in 91% (232/255 of the cases. Statistical analysis of the parameters latency, potential width and amplitude showed spontaneous latency prolongations and abrupt amplitude reductions as a reliable warning signal for direct involvement of the motor cortex or motor pathways. Conclusion MCS must be considered a stimulation technique that enables reliable qualitative analysis of the recorded potentials, which may thus be regarded as directly predictive. Nevertheless, like other intraoperative neurophysiological examination techniques, MCS has technical, anatomical and neurophysiological limitations. A variety of surgical and non-surgical influences can be reason for false positive or false negative measurements.

  8. SU-F-T-80: A Mobile Application for Intra-Operative Electron Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C [Brigham and Women’s Hospital & Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Crowley, E; Wolfgang, J [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IORT) poses a unique set of challenges for treatment planning. Planning must be performed in a busy operating room environment over a short timeframe often with little advance knowledge of the treatment depth or applicator size. Furthermore, IORT accelerators can have a large number of possible applicators, requiring extensive databooks that must be searched for the appropriate dosimetric parameters. The goal of this work is to develop a software tool to assist in the planning process that is suited to the challenges faced in the IORT environment. Methods: We developed a mobile application using HTML5 and Javascript that can be deployed to tablet devices suitable for use in the operating room. The user selects the desired treatment parameters cone diameter, bevel angle, and energy (a total of 141 datasets) and desired bolus. The application generates an interactive display that allows the user to dynamically select points on the depth-dose curve and to visualize the shape of the corresponding isodose contours. The user can indicate a prescription isodose line or depth. The software performs a monitor unit calculation and generates a PDF report. Results: We present our application, which is now used routinely in our IORT practice. It has been employed successfully in over 23 cases. The interactivity of the isodose distributions was found to be of particular use to physicians who are less-frequent IORT users, as well as for the education of residents and trainees. Conclusion: This software has served as a useful tool in IORT planning, and demonstrates the need for treatment planning tools that are designed for the specialized challenges encountered in IORT. This software is the subject of a license agreement with the IntraOp Medical Corporation. This software is the subject of a license agreement between Massachusetts General Hospital / Partners Healthcare and the IntraOp Medical Corporation. CLW is consulting on

  9. A non-docking intraoperative electron beam applicator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palta, J.R.; Suntharalingam, N.

    1989-01-01

    A non-docking intraoperative radiation therapy electron beam applicator system for a linear accelerator has been designed to minimize the mechanical, electrical, and tumor visualization problems associated with a docking system. A number of technical innovations have been used in the design of this system. These include: (a) a new intraoperative radiation therapy cone design that gives a better dose uniformity in the treatment volume at all depths; (b) a collimation system which reduces the leakage radiation dose to tissues outside the intraoperative radiation therapy cone; (c) a non-docking system with a translational accuracy of 2 mm and a rotational accuracy of 0.5 degrees; and (d) a rigid clamping system for the cones. A comprehensive set of dosimetric characteristics of the intraoperative radiation therapy applicator system is presented

  10. Disparities between resident and attending surgeon perceptions of intraoperative teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butvidas, Lynn D; Anderson, Cheryl I; Balogh, Daniel; Basson, Marc D

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to assess attending surgeon and resident recall of good and poor intraoperative teaching experiences and how often these experiences occur at present. By web-based survey, we asked US surgeons and residents to describe their best and worst intraoperative teaching experiences during training and how often 26 common intraoperative teaching behaviors occur in their current environment. A total of 346 residents and 196 surgeons responded (51 programs; 26 states). Surgeons and residents consistently identified trainee autonomy, teacher confidence, and communication as positive, while recalling negatively contemptuous, arrogant, accusatory, or uncommunicative teachers. Residents described intraoperative teaching behaviors by faculty as substantially less frequent than faculty self-reports. Neither sex nor seniority explained these results, although women reported communicative behaviors more frequently than men. Although veteran surgeons and current trainees agree on what constitutes effective and ineffective teaching in the operating room, they disagree on how often these behaviors occur, leaving substantial room for improvement. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Value of intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferenschild, Floris T. J.; Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J. M. E.; Graveland, Wilfried J.; Marinelli, Andreas W. K. S.; van der Sijp, Joost R.; Wiggers, Theo; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to analyze the results of a multimodality treatment using preoperative radiotherapy, followed by surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: Between 1987 and 2002, 123 patients with initial unresectable

  12. Presurgical mapping with magnetic source imaging. Comparisons with intraoperative findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T.P.L.; Ferrari, P.; Perry, D.; Rowley, H.A.; Berger, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    We compare noninvasive preoperative mapping with magnetic source imaging to intraoperative cortical stimulation mapping. These techniques were directly compared in 17 patients who underwent preoperative and postoperative somatosensory mapping of a total of 22 comparable anatomic sites (digits, face). Our findings are presented in the context of previous studies that used magnetic source imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging as noninvasive surrogates of intraoperative mapping for the identification of sensorimotor and language-specific brain functional centers in patients with brain tumors. We found that magnetic source imaging results were reasonably concordant with intraoperative mapping findings in over 90% of cases, and that concordance could be defined as 'good' in 77% of cases. Magnetic source imaging therefore provides a viable, if coarse, identification of somatosensory areas and, consequently, can guide and reduce the time taken for intraoperative mapping procedures. (author)

  13. Intraoperative contamination influences wound discharge and periprosthetic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobben, Bas A. S.; Engelsma, Yde; Neut, Danielle

    Intraoperative bacterial contamination increases risk for postoperative wound-healing problems and periprosthetic infection, but to what extent remains unclear. We asked whether bacterial contamination of the instruments and bone during primary prosthesis insertion was associated with prolonged

  14. Intraoperative management of ETT and LMA cufi pressures: a survey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-07-16

    Jul 16, 2008 ... A study done by Stein et al. highlighted the inability of advanced life support ... Conclusion. There is increasing importance placed on quality assurance ... pressures – the worrying reality: a comparative audit of intra-operative.

  15. Association between intraoperative hypotension and myocardial injury after vascular surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waes, JAR; Van Klei, Wilton A.; Wijeysundera, Duminda N.; Van Wolfswinkel, Leo; Lindsay, Thomas F.; Beattie, W. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Background: Postoperative myocardial injury occurs frequently after noncardiac surgery and is strongly associated with mortality. Intraoperative hypotension (IOH) is hypothesized to be a possible cause. The aim of this study was to determine the association between IOH and postoperative myocardial

  16. Intraoperative contamination influences wound discharge and periprosthetic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobben, Bas A. S.; Engelsma, Yde; Neut, Danielle

    2006-01-01

    Intraoperative bacterial contamination increases risk for postoperative wound-healing problems and periprosthetic infection, but to what extent remains unclear. We asked whether bacterial contamination of the instruments and bone during primary prosthesis insertion was associated with prolonged

  17. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography in congenital heart diseases surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozores Suarez, Francisco Javier; Perez de Ordaz, Luis Bravo

    2010-01-01

    The intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography is very used in pediatric cardiovascular surgery. The aim of present paper was to determine its impact on the surgery immediate results after a previous experience of authors with this type of procedure

  18. Sentinel lymph node biopsy: An audit of intraoperative assessment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-07-02

    Jul 2, 2015 ... Sentinel lymph node biopsy: An audit of ... cytotechnology service ... To audit results from intraoperative assessment of sentinel lymph node ..... out, and turnaround time in gynecologic cytology quality assurance: Findings.

  19. Results of intraoperative radiotherapy for pancreatic cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Atsushi; Shinozaki, Jun; Noda, Masanobu

    1991-01-01

    Reported are the results and observations of the authors who, from July 1986 through December 1989, have used electron beam intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) on 20 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancers, said number including 3 patients given a resection. In 14 of the 17 unresected patients, a chief symptom was pain, and 8 patients were given a celiac plexus block at the same time. The results and observations are given below. Life-threatening complications occurred in two patients, i.e., an insufficient pancreatojejunostomy, and a perforative peritonitis. In 12 of 13 evaluable patients, pain control was achieved for a mean period of 5 months, indicating that an IORT with celiac plexus block may be useful for palliation. In the resected patients, the mean survival time was 6 months, whereas in the unresected patients, the mean survival time was 7 months. The common cause of death in the unresected patients was a metastatic dissemination. Finally, in 3 of the 5 unresected patients, marked effects such as massive fibrosis were seen in the pancreatic tumor on autopsy. (author)

  20. Intraoperative radiation therapy for malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Noboru; Yamada, Hiromu; Andoh, Takashi; Hirata, Toshifumi; Nishimura, Yasuaki; Miwa, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Kotoyuki; Yanagawa, Shigeo [Gifu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1991-11-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) was used as part of the initial therapy for malignant glioma in 32 of 73 patients with histologically verified anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III astrocytoma) and glioblastoma multiforme. The initial treatment for all cases was subtotal or total tumor resection combined with external irradiation and chemotherapy. IORT was performed 1 week after tumor resection, with doses of 10-50 Gy (mean 26.7 Gy) in one session. Fourteen of 32 cases had IORT two times because of tumor recurrence. The IORT patients had survival rates at 24 and 36 months after initial treatment of 57.1 and 33.5% (median survival 26.2 months). The other 41 patients had 23.6 and 13.1% survivals (median survival 20.7 months), which were significantly lower (p<0.01). Tumor recurrence within the original lesion site was suspected because of clinical condition, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging studies in 65.6% of the IORT group (21 cases) 12 months after initial treatment. Twenty cases of death in the IORT group, including five autopsy cases, demonstrated regional tumor recurrence with a high incidence of intraventricular tumor invasion. The authors consider IORT is beneficial for selected malignant glioma patients, including tumor recurrence, because of prolonged survival. (author).

  1. Perspectives in Intraoperative Diagnostics of Human Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Tyurikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amongst large a variety of oncological diseases, malignant gliomas represent one of the most severe types of tumors. They are also the most common type of the brain tumors and account for over half of the astrocytic tumors. According to different sources, the average life expectancy of patients with various glioblastomas varies between 10 and 12 months and that of patients with anaplastic astrocytic tumors between 20 and 24 months. Therefore, studies of the physiology of transformed glial cells are critical for the development of treatment methods. Modern medical approaches offer complex procedures, including the microsurgical tumor removal, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, supplemented with photodynamic therapy and immunotherapy. The most radical of them is surgical resection, which allows removing the largest part of the tumor, reduces the intracranial hypertension, and minimizes the degree of neurological deficit. However, complete removal of the tumor remains impossible. The main limitations are insufficient visualization of glioma boundaries, due to its infiltrative growth, and the necessity to preserve healthy tissue. This review is devoted to the description of advantages and disadvantages of modern intraoperative diagnostics of human gliomas and highlights potential perspectives for development of their treatment.

  2. Intraoperative Assessment of Tricuspid Valve Function After Conservative Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revuelta, J.M.; Gomez-Duran, C.; Garcia-Rinaldi, R.; Gallagher, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    It is desirable to repair coexistent tricuspid valve pathology at the time of mitral valve corrections. Conservative tricuspid repair may consist of commissurotomy, annuloplasty, or both. It is important that the repair be appropriate or tricuspid valve replacement may be necessary. A simple reproducible method of intraoperative testing for tricuspid valve insufficiency has been developed and used in 25 patients. Fifteen patients have been recatheterized, and the correlation between the intraoperative and postoperative findings has been consistent. PMID:15226931

  3. Lumbar Lordosis of Spinal Stenosis Patients during Intraoperative Prone Positioning

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Su-Keon; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Song, Kyung-Sub; Park, Byung-Moon; Lim, Sang-Youn; Jang, Geun; Lee, Beom-Seok; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of spondylolisthesis on lumbar lordosis on the OSI (Jackson; Orthopaedic Systems Inc.) frame. Restoration of lumbar lordosis is important for maintaining sagittal balance. Physiologic lumbar lordosis has to be gained by intraoperative prone positioning with a hip extension and posterior instrumentation technique. There are some debates about changing lumbar lordosis on the OSI frame after an intraoperative prone position. We evaluated the effect of spondyloli...

  4. Intraoperative ultrasonography in detection of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Kronborg, Ole; Fenger, Claus

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to compare diagnostic accuracies of measuring liver enzymes, preoperative ultrasonography, surgical examination, and intraoperative ultrasonography for detection of liver metastases from colorectal cancer. METHODS: Blind, prospective comparisons of diagnostic...... examinations mentioned above were performed in 295 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer. An experienced ultrasonologist performed the preoperative examinations, and results were unknown to the other experienced ultrasonologist who performed the intraoperative examinations. The latter, also was unaware...

  5. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging to update interactive navigation in neurosurgery: method and preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, C R; Bonsanto, M M; Knauth, M; Tronnier, V M; Albert, F K; Staubert, A; Kunze, S

    1997-01-01

    We report on the first successful intraoperative update of interactive image guidance based on an intraoperatively acquired magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) date set. To date, intraoperative imaging methods such as ultrasound, computerized tomography (CT), or MRI have not been successfully used to update interactive navigation. We developed a method of imaging patients intraoperatively with the surgical field exposed in an MRI scanner (Magnetom Open; Siemens Corp., Erlangen, Germany). In 12 patients, intraoperatively acquired 3D data sets were used for successful recalibration of neuronavigation, accounting for any anatomical changes caused by surgical manipulations. The MKM Microscope (Zeiss Corp., Oberkochen, Germany) was used as navigational system. With implantable fiducial markers, an accuracy of 0.84 +/- 0.4 mm for intraoperative reregistration was achieved. Residual tumor detected on MRI was consequently resected using navigation with the intraoperative data. No adverse effects were observed from intraoperative imaging or the use of navigation with intraoperative images, demonstrating the feasibility of recalibrating navigation with intraoperative MRI.

  6. Intraoperative complications in pediatric neurosurgery: review of 1807 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lindert, Erik J; Arts, Sebastian; Blok, Laura M; Hendriks, Mark P; Tielens, Luc; van Bilsen, Martine; Delye, Hans

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimal literature exists on the intraoperative complication rate of pediatric neurosurgical procedures with respect to both surgical and anesthesiological complications. The aim of this study, therefore, was to establish intraoperative complication rates to provide patients and parents with information on which to base their informed consent and to establish a baseline for further targeted improvement of pediatric neurosurgical care. METHODS A clinical complication registration database comprising a consecutive cohort of all pediatric neurosurgical procedures carried out in a general neurosurgical department from January 1, 2004, until July 1, 2012, was analyzed. During the study period, 1807 procedures were performed on patients below the age of 17 years. RESULTS Sixty-four intraoperative complications occurred in 62 patients (3.5% of procedures). Intraoperative mortality was 0.17% (n = 3). Seventy-eight percent of the complications (n = 50) were related to the neurosurgical procedures, whereas 22% (n = 14) were due to anesthesiology. The highest intraoperative complication rates were for cerebrovascular surgery (7.7%) and tumor surgery (7.4%). The most frequently occurring complications were cerebrovascular complications (33%). CONCLUSIONS Intraoperative complications are not exceptional during pediatric neurosurgical procedures. Awareness of these complications is the first step in preventing them.

  7. Intraoperative MRI to control the extent of brain tumor surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauth, M.; Sartor, K.; Wirtz, C.R.; Tronnier, V.M.; Staubert, A.; Kunze, S.

    1998-01-01

    Intraoperative MRI definitely showed residual tumor in 6 of the 18 patients and resulted in ambiguous findings in 3 patients. In 7 patients surgery was continued. Early postoperative MRI showed residual tumor in 3 patients and resulted in uncertain findings in 2 patients. The rate of patients in whom complete removal of enhancing tumor could be achieved was 50% at the time of the intraoperative MR examination and 72% at the time of the early postoperative MR control. The difference in proportion of patients with 'complete tumor removal' between the groups who had been operated on using neuronavigation (NN) and intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) and those who had been operated on using only modern neurosurgical techniques except NN and ioMRI was statistically highly significant (Fisher exact test; P=0.008). Four different types of surgically induced contrast enhancement were observed. These phenomena carry different confounding potentials with residual tumor. Conclusion: Our preliminary experience with intraoperative MRI in patients with enhancing intraaxial tumors is encouraging. Combined use of neuronavigation and intraoperative MRI was able to increase the proportion of patients in whom complete removal of the enhancing parts of the tumor was achieved. Surgically induced enhancement requires careful analysis of the intraoperative MRI in order not to confuse it with residual tumor. (orig.) [de

  8. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and intraoperative blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haelst, Ingrid M M; van Klei, Wilton A; Doodeman, Hieronymus J; Kalkman, Cor J; Egberts, Toine C G

    2012-02-01

    The influence of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on blood pressure is poorly understood. We hypothesized that if SSRIs have an influence on blood pressure, this might become manifest in changes in intraoperative blood pressure. We aimed to study the association between perioperative use of SSRIs and changes in intraoperative blood pressure by measuring the occurrence of intraoperative hyper- and hypotension. We conducted a retrospective observational follow-up study among patients who underwent elective primary total hip arthroplasty. The index group included users of SSRIs. The reference group included a random sample (ratio 1:3) of nonusers of an antidepressant agent. The outcome was the occurrence of intraoperative hypo- and hypertensive episodes (number, mean and total duration, and area under the curve (AUC)). The outcome was adjusted for confounding factors using regression techniques. The index group included 20 users of an SSRI. The reference group included 60 nonusers. Users of SSRIs showed fewer intraoperative hypotensive episodes, a shorter mean and total duration, and a smaller AUC when compared to the reference group. After adjustment for confounders, SSRI use was associated with a significantly shorter total duration of hypotension: mean difference of -29.4 min (95% confidence interval (CI) -50.4 to -8.3). Two users of an SSRI and two patients in the reference group had a hypertensive episode. Continuation of treatment with SSRIs before surgery was associated with a briefer duration of intraoperative hypotension.

  9. Intraoperative adverse events can be compensated by technical performance in neonates and infants after cardiac surgery: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Meena; Karamichalis, John M; Liu, Hua; del Nido, Pedro; Pigula, Frank; Thiagarajan, Ravi; Bacha, Emile A

    2011-11-01

    Our objective was to define the relationship between surgical technical performance score, intraoperative adverse events, and major postoperative adverse events in complex pediatric cardiac repairs. Infants younger than 6 months were prospectively followed up until discharge from the hospital. Technical performance scores were graded as optimal, adequate, or inadequate based on discharge echocardiograms and need for reintervention after initial surgery. Case complexity was determined by Risk Adjustment in Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) category, and preoperative illness severity was assessed by Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM) III score. Intraoperative adverse events were prospectively monitored. Outcomes were analyzed using nonparametric methods and a logistic regression model. A total of 166 patients (RACHS 4-6 [49%]), neonates [50%]) were observed. Sixty-one (37%) had at least 1 intraoperative adverse event, and 47 (28.3%) had at least 1 major postoperative adverse event. There was no correlation between intraoperative adverse events and RACHS, preoperative PRISM III, technical performance score, or postoperative adverse events on multivariate analysis. For the entire cohort, better technical performance score resulted in lower postoperative adverse events, lower postoperative PRISM, and lower length of stay and ventilation time (P events, including surgical revisions, provided technical performance score is at least adequate. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intraoperative HDR brachytherapy for rectal cancer using a flexible intraoperative template: standard plans versus individual planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Hanssens, Patrick E.J.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2004-01-01

    HDR intraoperative brachytherapy (IOBT) is applied to locally advanced rectal tumors using a 5 mm thick flexible intraoperative template (FIT). To reduce the procedure time, treatment planning is performed using standard plans that neglect the curvature of the FIT. We have calculated the individual treatment plan, based on the real geometry of the FIT, and the dose at clips placed during surgery. A mean treatment dose of 9.55±0.21 Gy was found for the individual plan, compared to the prescribed 10 Gy (P<0.0001). The mean central dose was 10.03±0.10 Gy in the standard plan and 9.20±0.32 Gy in the individual plan (P<0.0001). The mean dose at the corners of the FIT was 10.3 Gy in the standard plan and ranged between 10.3 and 10.5 Gy in the individual plan. In 63% of the clips, the dose was larger than 15.0 Gy, which is equivalent to a gap between the FIT and the target smaller than 5 mm. In 18% of the clips, the dose was smaller than 13.0 Gy indicating that locally the gap was larger than 5 mm. Clinical practice will have to prove if these small dose deviations influence the clinical outcome

  11. Intraoperative radiation therapy for malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Noboru; Yamada, Hiromu; Andoh, Takashi; Takada, Mitsuaki; Hirata, Toshifumi; Funakoshi, Takashi; Doi, Hidetaka; Yanagawa, Shigeo [Gifu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1989-04-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IOR) is an ideal means of exterminating residual tumor after surgical resection. In this study, the clinical results of IOR using a Scanditronix Microtron MM-22 were evaluated in 14 patients with malignant glioma, five of whom had recurrent tumors. Between July, 1985 and October, 1986, 11 patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GB) were irradiated 18 times (mean, 1.6 times/case), and three with astrocytoma (Kernohan grade III) underwent IOR once each. The target-absorbed dose at 1 to 2 cm deeper than the tumor resection surface was 15 to 50 Gy. During irradiation, a cotton bolus was placed in the dead space after over 91% of the tumor had been resected. As a rule, external irradiation therapy was also given postoperatively at a dose of 30 to 52 Gy. One patient died of pneumonia and disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome 1 month postoperatively. The 1- and 2-year survival rates of the ramaining 13 patients were 84.6% and 61.5%, respectively; among the 10 with GB, they were 80% and 50%. Generally, the smaller the tumor size, the better the results. There were no adverse effects, despite the dose 15 to 50 Gy applied temporally to the tumor bed. IOR was especially effective against small, localized tumors, but was not always beneficial in cases of large tumors, particularly those with a contralateral focus. The improved survival rate in this series demonstrates that IOR is significantly effective in the 'induction of remission' following surgical excision of malignant gliomas. (author).

  12. Automated intraoperative calibration for prostate cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuiran Chen, Thomas; Heffter, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Pinter, Csaba; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate cancer brachytherapy relies on an accurate spatial registration between the implant needles and the TRUS image, called ''calibration''. The authors propose a new device and a fast, automatic method to calibrate the brachytherapy system in the operating room, with instant error feedback. Methods: A device was CAD-designed and precision-engineered, which mechanically couples a calibration phantom with an exact replica of the standard brachytherapy template. From real-time TRUS images acquired from the calibration device and processed by the calibration system, the coordinate transformation between the brachytherapy template and the TRUS images was computed automatically. The system instantly generated a report of the target reconstruction accuracy based on the current calibration outcome. Results: Four types of validation tests were conducted. First, 50 independent, real-time calibration trials yielded an average of 0.57 ± 0.13 mm line reconstruction error (LRE) relative to ground truth. Second, the averaged LRE was 0.37 ± 0.25 mm relative to ground truth in tests with six different commercial TRUS scanners operating at similar imaging settings. Furthermore, testing with five different commercial stepper systems yielded an average of 0.29 ± 0.16 mm LRE relative to ground truth. Finally, the system achieved an average of 0.56 ± 0.27 mm target registration error (TRE) relative to ground truth in needle insertion tests through the template in a water tank. Conclusions: The proposed automatic, intraoperative calibration system for prostate cancer brachytherapy has achieved high accuracy, precision, and robustness.

  13. Optically neuronavigated ultrasonography in an intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katisko, Jani P A; Koivukangas, John P

    2007-04-01

    To develop a clinically useful method that shows the corresponding planes of intraoperative two-dimensional ultrasonography and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans determined with an optical neuronavigator from an intraoperative three-dimensional MRI scan data set, and to determine the qualitative and the quantitative spatial correspondence between the ultrasonography and MRI scans. An ultrasound probe was interlinked with an ergonomic and MRI scan-compatible ultrasonography probe tracker to the optical neuronavigator used in a low-field intraoperative MRI scan environment for brain surgery. Spatial correspondence measurements were performed using a custom-made ultrasonography/MRI scan phantom. In this work, instruments to combine intraoperatively collected ultrasonography and MRI scan data with an optical localization method in a magnetic environment were developed. The ultrasonography transducer tracker played an important role. Furthermore, a phantom for ultrasonography and MRI scanning was produced. This is the first report, to our knowledge, regarding the possibility of combining the two most important intraoperative imaging modalities used in neurosurgery, ultrasonography and MRI scanning, to guide brain tumor surgery. The method was feasible and, as shown in an illustrative surgical case, has direct clinical impact on image-guided brain surgery. The spatial deviation between the ultrasonography and the MRI scans was, on average, 1.90 +/- 1.30 mm at depths of 0 to 120 mm from the ultrasonography probe. The overall result of this work is a unique method to guide the neurosurgical operation with neuronavigated ultrasonography imaging in an intraoperative MRI scanning environment. The relevance of the method is emphasized in minimally invasive neurosurgery.

  14. Intraoperative neuromonitoring alerts that reverse with intervention: treatment paradox and what to do about it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Stanley A; Holdefer, Robert N

    2014-04-01

    Intervention-mediated recovery from adversely changed evoked potential recordings may provide evidence for improved outcomes during neurophysiological intraoperative monitoring. However, these reversible signal changes (RSCs) are ambiguous because the patient's neurologic status cannot be known either at signal decline or after intervention. This article describes methods to reduce this ambiguity. Randomized control trials are not always possible or ethical. Recent thought on grading evidence has acknowledged that guidelines first described by Sir Austin Bradford Hill may support evidence for causation. Causality guidelines identified RSCs most likely to be truly positive in three reported studies. Diagnostic statistics were revised accordingly. A range of revised positive predictive values and likelihood ratios was calculated in the three studies, using causality guidelines. The revised data were similar to those reported for other diagnostic tests used in medicine. The RSCs may be assessed using causality guidelines for more accurate reporting of diagnostic statistics while preserving information related to surgical intervention and recovery that is lost with end of surgery diagnostics or when RSCs are ignored. A method is described for including RSCs in diagnostic statistics. This approach will more readily permit assessment of the value of neurophysiological intraoperative monitoring in prediction and prevention of neurologic deficits.

  15. A realidade do uso da monitorização neurofisiológica intraoperatória entre os cirurgiões de coluna brasileiros La realidad del uso del monitoreo neurofisiológico intraoperatorio entre los cirujanos de columna brasileños The reality of using intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring among Brazilian spine surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Back Netto

    2012-12-01

    neurocirujanos, y el 58 % son ortopedistas. La mayoría, el 72,3 %, relató que ya hacen uso del MNIO, mientras solamente el 29,6 % utilizan este procedimiento rutinariamente. De estos, 39 % son ortopedistas. Entre los neurocirujanos, la mayoría (84 % relataron no utilizar MNIO como rutina. En los casos de deformidades, el 85,7 % de los profesionales dijeron que utilizan rutinariamente el MNIO; el 68,10 % respondieron que no tienen fácil acceso al MNIO, siendo que el 10% de ellos actúan en la región Centro-oeste del país y el 11% en el Nordeste. De los que reportaron la facilidad de acceso al procedimiento, el 77 % actúa en la región Sureste. La edad media de los participantes fue de 41,9 % años, mediana de 39,0, desviación estándar del 11,3 e intervalo de confianza de 1,3. Con respecto al tiempo de formación médica, la media fue de 17,8 años, con mediana de 14,0 e intervalo de confianza de 1,2. En duración de la práctica en cirugía espinal se encontró que el 56,3% tienen menos que 10 años de práctica. CONCLUSIÓN: La mayoría de los cirujanos de columna han hecho uso del MNIO, pero pocos lo utilizan como rutina. La región sureste es donde se encuentra mayor facilidad de acceso al MNIO, a diferencia de las regiones Centro-oeste y Nordeste.OBJECTIVE: To assess the use of intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring (MNIO by Brazilian spine surgeons. METHOD: Data collection was conducted through a questionnaire applied to 307 spine surgeons during the 11º Congresso de Cirurgia Espinhal e XIII Congresso da Sociedade Brasileira de Coluna. RESULTS: Of the surgeons interviewed, 42% are neurosurgeons and 58% are orthopedists. Most of them (72.3% reported that have already used MNIO, however, only 29.6% use this procedure routinely. 39% of them are orthopedists. Among neurosurgeons, most (84% reported not using MNIO routinely. In cases of deformity, 85.7% of the professionals said they use routinely the MNIO. 68. 1% answered that did not have easy access to MNIO, of

  16. Intellijoint HIP®: a 3D mini-optical navigation tool for improving intraoperative accuracy during total hip arthroplasty

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    Paprosky WG

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Wayne G Paprosky,1,2 Jeffrey M Muir3 1Department of Orthopedics, Section of Adult Joint Reconstruction, Department of Orthopedics, Rush University Medical Center, Rush–Presbyterian–St Luke’s Medical Center, Chicago, 2Central DuPage Hospital, Winfield, IL, USA; 3Intellijoint Surgical, Inc, Waterloo, ON, Canada Abstract: Total hip arthroplasty is an increasingly common procedure used to address degenerative changes in the hip joint due to osteoarthritis. Although generally associated with good results, among the challenges associated with hip arthroplasty are accurate measurement of biomechanical parameters such as leg length, offset, and cup position, discrepancies of which can lead to significant long-term consequences such as pain, instability, neurological deficits, dislocation, and revision surgery, as well as patient dissatisfaction and, increasingly, litigation. Current methods of managing these parameters are limited, with manual methods such as outriggers or calipers being used to monitor leg length; however, these are susceptible to small intraoperative changes in patient position and are therefore inaccurate. Computer-assisted navigation, while offering improved accuracy, is expensive and cumbersome, in addition to adding significantly to procedural time. To address the technological gap in hip arthroplasty, a new intraoperative navigation tool (Intellijoint HIP® has been developed. This innovative, 3D mini-optical navigation tool provides real-time, intraoperative data on leg length, offset, and cup position and allows for improved accuracy and precision in component selection and alignment. Benchtop and simulated clinical use testing have demonstrated excellent accuracy, with the navigation tool able to measure leg length and offset to within <1 mm and cup position to within <1° in both anteversion and inclination. This study describes the indications, procedural technique, and early accuracy results of the Intellijoint HIP

  17. Indocyanine green for intraoperative localization of ureter.

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    Siddighi, Sam; Yune, Junchan Joshua; Hardesty, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    Intraurethral injection of indocyanine green (ICG; Akorn, Lake Forest, IL) and visualization under near-infrared (NIR) light allows for real-time delineation of the ureter. This technology can be helpful to prevent iatrogenic ureteral injury during pelvic surgery. Patients were scheduled to undergo robot-assisted laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy. Before the robotic surgery started, the tip of a 6-F ureteral catheter was inserted into the ureteral orifice. Twenty-five milligrams of ICG was dissolved in 10-mL of sterile water and injected through the open catheter. The same procedure was repeated on the opposite side. The ICG reversibly stained the inside lining of the ureter by binding to proteins on urothelial layer. During the course of robotic surgery, the NIR laser on the da Vinci Si surgical robot (Intuitive Surgical, Inc, Sunnyvale, CA) was used to excite ICG molecules, and infrared emission was captured by the da Vinci filtered lens system and electronically converted to green color. Thus, the ureter fluoresced green, which allowed its definitive identification throughout the entire case. In all cases of >10 patients, we were able to visualize bilateral ureters with this technology, even though there was some variation in brightness that depended on the depth of the ureter from the peritoneal surface. For example, in a morbidly obese patient, the ureters were not as bright green. There were no intraoperative or postoperative adverse effects attributable to ICG administration for up to 2 months of observation. In our experience, this novel method of intraurethral ICG injection was helpful to identify the entire course of ureter and allowed a safe approach to tissues that were adjacent to the urinary tract. The advantage of our technique is that it requires the insertion of just the tip of ureteral catheter. Despite our limited cohort of patients, our findings are consistent with previous reports of the excellent safety profile of intravenous and intrabiliary ICG

  18. The use of intraoperative computed tomography navigation in pituitary surgery promises a better intraoperative orientation in special cases

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    Stefan Linsler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The safety of endoscopic skull base surgery can be enhanced by accurate navigation in preoperative computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Here, we report our initial experience of real-time intraoperative CT-guided navigation surgery for pituitary tumors in childhood. Materials and Methods: We report the case of a 15-year-old girl with a huge growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma with supra- and perisellar extension. Furthermore, the skull base was infiltrated. In this case, we performed an endonasal transsphenoidal approach for debulking the adenoma and for chiasma decompression. We used an MRI neuronavigation (Medtronic Stealth Air System which was registered via intraoperative CT scan (Siemens CT Somatom. Preexisting MRI studies (navigation protocol were fused with the intraoperative CT scans to enable three-dimensional navigation based on MR and CT imaging data. Intraoperatively, we did a further CT scan for resection control. Results: The intraoperative accuracy of the neuronavigation was excellent. There was an adjustment of <1 mm. The navigation was very helpful for orientation on the destroyed skull base in the sphenoid sinus. After opening the sellar region and tumor debulking, we did a CT scan for resection control because the extent of resection was not credible evaluable in this huge infiltrating adenoma. Thereby, we were able to demonstrate a sufficient decompression of the chiasma and complete resection of the medial part of the adenoma in the intraoperative CT images. Conclusions: The use of intraoperative CT/MRI-guided neuronavigation for transsphenoidal surgery is a time-effective, safe, and technically beneficial technique for special cases.

  19. Intraoperative use of ultrasonography by small subcortical lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoff, Sl.; Gabrovski, St.; Krustev, E.; Poptodorov, G.; Gabrovski, N.; Uzunov, K.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present the possibilities for use of intraoperative ultrasound (US) diagnostics as a method of image guided surgical navigation in neurosurgery. During an US scan of normal and pathologically changed tissues as well as volume taking lesion images are received in real time intraoperative display allowing dynamic control of the surgical radicalism and at the same time minimal invasiveness to the neural structures. Intraoperative ultrasound with real-time display characteristics finds a very wide application: subcortical and deeply localized tumour lesions, haematomas, large and giant aneurysms, arteriovenous (AV) malformations, spinal tumours and cysts. The real time dynamic scan is based on the B-mod. This method is founded on the US characteristic of reflecting in a different manner at the borderline of two mediums with different density as well as tissues with various physical and chemical characteristics. The reflection is partially absorbed depending on the acoustic impedance of the biologic field. We use a LOGIC200PRO unit with two probes I-type and T-type having a 'wedge of space' - 35 mm and working frequencies of 6 MHz and 7 MHz appropriate for visualizing lesions at a depth of 25 to 60 mm.The advantages of the Intraoperative US diagnostics are: non-invasiveness; real time display - i.e. presents the imminent intraoperative changes; it is a good alternative to other image-guided technologies; accessible price of the US unit

  20. Selected versus routine use of intraoperative cholangiography during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickuth, D

    1995-12-01

    Routine use of intraoperative cholangiography during laparoscopic cholecystectomy is still widely advocated and standard in many departments, however, this is discussed controversially. We have developed a new diagnostic strategy to detect bile duct stones. The concept is based on an ultrasound examination and on a screening for the presence of six risk indicators of choledocholithiasis. 120 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were prospectively screened for the presence of six risk indicators of choledocholithiasis: history of jaundice; history of pancreatitis; hyperbilirubinemia; hyperamylasemia; dilated bile duct; unclear ultrasound findings. The sensitivity of ultrasound and of intraoperative cholangiography in diagnosing bile duct stones was also evaluated. For the detection of bile duct stones, the sensitivity was 77% for ultrasound and 100% for intraoperative cholangiography. 20% of all patients had at least one risk indicator. The presence of a risk indicator correlated significantly with the presence of choledocholithiasis (p concept, we would have avoided 80% of intraoperative cholangiographies without missing a stone in the bile duct. This study lends further support to the view that the routine use of intraoperative cholangiography in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not necessary.

  1. Role of scrape cytology in the intraoperative diagnosis of tumor

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    Kolte Sachin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Rapid diagnosis of surgically removed specimens has created many controversies and a single completely reliable method has not yet been developed. Histopathology of a paraffin section remains the ultimate gold standard in tissue diagnosis. Frozen section is routinely used by the surgical pathology laboratories for intraoperative diagnosis. The use of either frozen section or cytological examination alone has an acceptable rate (93-97% of correct diagnosis, with regard to interpretation of benign versus malignant. Aim : To evaluate the utility of scrape cytology for the rapid diagnosis of surgically removed tumors and its utilisation for learning cytopathology. Materials and Methods : 75 surgically removed specimens from various organs and systems were studied. Scrapings were taken from each specimen before formalin fixation and stained by modified rapid Papanicolaou staining. Results : Of the 75 cases studied, 73 could be correctly differentiated into benign and malignant tumors, with an accuracy rate of 97.3%. Conclusions : Intraoperative scrape cytology is useful for intraoperative diagnosis of tumor, where facilities for frozen section are not available. The skill and expertise developed by routinely practicing intraoperative cytology can be applied to the interpretation of fine needle aspirate smears. Thus, apart from its diagnostic role, intraoperative cytology can become a very useful learning tool in the field of cytopathology.

  2. [Factors related to intraoperative retinal breaks in macular hole surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, K; Ogino, N; Demizu, S; Atsumi, K; Kurihara, H; Iwaki, M; Ishigooka, H; Tachi, N

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the factors of intraoperative retinal breaks in macular hole surgery. This study included 558 eyes of 506 patients who underwent idiopathic macular hole surgery by one surgeon. Multiple regression was performed using the variables of gender, age, affected eye, lens status, stage, duration of symptoms, hole size, axial length, and lattice degeneration. The rate of retinal breaks was higher in stage 3 (16.0%) than in stage 4 (8.2%) (p = 0.014). In eyes with lattice degeneration intraoperative retinal breaks occurred in about 40% of the cases. Major factors were as follows: lattice degeneration (r = 0.24, p lattice degeneration, and gender (r = -0.18, p = 0.035) in eyes of stage 4 without lattice degeneration. The factors of intraoperative retinal breaks in macular hole surgery were lattice degeneration in all eyes and stage 3 in eyes without lattice degeneration. The high incidence of intraoperative retinal breaks in stage 3 was mainly due to the occurrence of posterior vitreous detachment. Male gender was a significant factor associated with intraoperative retinal breaks.

  3. Intraoperative parathyroid hormone assay-cutting the Gordian knot

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    Chandralekha Tampi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyperparathyroidism is treated by surgical excision of the hyperfunctioning parathyroid gland. In case of adenoma the single abnormal gland is removed, while in hyperplasias, a subtotal excision, that is, three-and-a-half of the four glands are removed. This therapeutic decision is made intraoperatively through frozen section evaluation and is sometimes problematic, due to a histological overlap between hyperplasia and the adenoma. The intraoperative parathyroid hormone (IOPTH assay, propogated in recent years, offers an elegant solution, with a high success rate, due to its ability to identify the removal of all hyperfunctioning parathyroid tissue. Aim: To study the feasibility of using IOPTH in our setting. Materials and Methods: Seven patients undergoing surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism had their IOPTH levels evaluated, along with the routine frozen and paraffin sections. Results: All seven patients showed more than a 50% intraoperative fall in serum PTH after excision of the abnormal gland. This was indicative of an adenoma and was confirmed by histopathological examination and normalization of serum calcium postoperatively. Conclusion: The intraoperative parathyroid hormone is a sensitive and specific guide to a complete removal of the abnormal parathyroid tissue. It can be incorporated without difficulty as an intraoperative guide and is superior to frozen section diagnosis in parathyroid surgery.

  4. Intraoperative adverse events associated with extremely preterm cesarean deliveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertholdt, Charline; Menard, Sophie; Delorme, Pierre; Lamau, Marie-Charlotte; Goffinet, François; Le Ray, Camille

    2018-05-01

    At the same time as survival is increasing among premature babies born before 26 weeks of gestation, the rates of cesarean deliveries before 26 weeks is also rising. Our purpose was to compare the frequency of intraoperative adverse events during cesarean deliveries in two gestational age groups: 24-25 weeks and 26-27 weeks. This single-center retrospective cohort study included all women with cesarean deliveries performed before 28 +0 weeks from 2007 through 2015. It compared the frequency of intraoperative adverse events between two groups: those at 24-25 weeks of gestation and at 26-27 weeks. Intraoperative adverse events were a classical incision, transplacental incision, difficulty in fetal extraction (explicitly mentioned in the surgical report), postpartum hemorrhage (≥500 mL of blood loss), and injury to internal organs. A composite outcome including at least one of these events enabled us to analyze the risk factors for intraoperative adverse events with univariate and multivariable analysis. Stratified analyses by the indication for the cesarean were performed. We compared 74 cesarean deliveries at 24-25 weeks of gestation and 214 at 26-27 weeks. Intraoperative adverse events occurred at higher rates in the 24-25-week group (63.5 vs. 30.8%, p cesarean. These results should help obstetricians and women making decisions about cesarean deliveries at these extremely low gestational ages. © 2018 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  5. Intraoperative and early postoperative complications of manual sutureless cataract extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Yasir; Zia, Sohail; Baig Mirza, Aneeq Ullah

    2014-04-01

    To determine the intraoperative and early postoperative complications of manual sutureless cataract extraction. Case series. Redo Eye Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from January 2009 to December 2010. Three hundred patients of cataract through purposive non-probability sampling were selected. The patients underwent manual sutureless cataract surgery (MSCS) by single experienced surgeon and intraoperative complications were documented. The surgical technique was modified to deal with any intraoperative complications accordingly. Patients were examined on the first postoperative day and on the first postoperative week for any postoperative complications. The data was entered in Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 13.0 and the results were calculated in frequencies. Among the 300 cases, 81.3% surgeries went uneventful whereas 18.6% had some complication. The common intraoperative complications were superior button-hole formation in 5%; posterior capsular rent in 5% and premature entry with iris prolapse in 3% cases. Postoperatively, the commonly encountered complications were striate keratopathy in 9.6% and hyphema 9%. At first week follow-up, 4% had striate keratopathy and 0.6% had hyphema. Striate keratopathy resolved with topical medication on subsequent follow-up. A total of 9 cases (3%) underwent second surgery: 2 cases for lens matter wash, 2 cases for hyphema and 5 cases needed suturing of wound for shallow anterior chamber due to wound leak. Superior button-hole formation, posterior capsular rent and premature entry were the common intraoperative complications of MSCS whereas the common early postoperative complications were striate keratopathy and hyphema.

  6. Successful Management of Phaeochromocytoma using Preoperative Oral Labetalol and Intraoperative Magnesium Sulphate; Report of four cases

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    Sanath Kumar B. S.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Phaeochromocytoma is a rare neuroendocrine catecholamine-secreting tumour. This type of tumour poses multidimensional anaesthetic challenges as it has an unpredictable clinical course during surgical resection. The alpha-blocking agent phenoxybenzamine remained the mainstay in preoperative preparation before the introduction of beta-blocking agents. We report four cases operated between 2009–2012 at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman. The cases were prepared with oral labetalol, as the alpha-blocking drug phenoxybenzamine was not immediately available. Responses to simulated stress were tested in the theatre before surgery. Anaesthesia was induced under invasive arterial pressure monitoring and magnesium sulphate infusion. Rare intraoperative surges in blood pressure during tumour manipulation were treated with sodium nitroprusside infusions and phentolamine boluses. All of the patients had an uneventful postoperative recovery. Preoperative treatment with labetalol has rarely been reported and can be considered as a potential therapeutic option with optimal patient monitoring if phenoxybenzamine is unavailable.

  7. Intraoperative ultrasonography for presumed brain metastases: a case series study

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    Helder Picarelli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastases (BM are one of the most common intracranial tumors and surgical treatment can improve both the functional outcomes and patient survival, particularly when systemic disease is controlled. Image-guided BM resection using intraoperative exams, such as intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS, can lead to better surgical results. METHODS: To evaluate the use of IOUS for BM resection, 20 consecutives patients were operated using IOUS to locate tumors, identify their anatomical relationships and surgical cavity after resection. Technical difficulties, complications, recurrence and survival rates were noted. RESULTS: IOUS proved effective for locating, determining borders and defining the anatomical relationships of BM, as well as to identify incomplete tumor resection. No complications related to IOUS were seen. CONCLUSION: IOUS is a practical supporting method for the resection of BM, but further studies comparing this method with other intraoperative exams are needed to evaluate its actual contribution and reliability.

  8. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for neurosurgery – An anaesthesiologist's challenge

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    Rajashree U Gandhe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-guided neurosurgery has gained popularity over the years globally. These surgeries require a dedicated operating room and MRI-compatible anaesthesia equipment. The anaesthesiologist providing care in this setup needs to be experienced and vigilant to ensure patient safety. Strict adherence to MRI safety checklists and regular personnel training would avoid potential accidents and life-threatening emergencies. Teamwork, good communication, preprocedure planning, and familiarity with the surroundings are very important for safe care and good outcomes. We performed a literature search in Google Scholar, PubMed and Cochrane databases for original and reviewed articles for the origins, development and applications of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgical procedures. Much of the research has emphasised on the surgical indications than the anaesthetic challenges faced during intraoperative MRI guided surgery. The purpose of this review is to discuss the anaesthetic concerns specific to this unique environment.

  9. Intraoperative cyclorotation and pupil centroid shift during LASIK and PRK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, Julio; Brucks, Matthew; Zimmerman, Grenith; Bekendam, Peter; Bacon, Gregory; Schmid, Kristin

    2012-05-01

    To determine the degree of cyclorotation and centroid shift in the x and y axis that occurs intraoperatively during LASIK and photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Intraoperative cyclorotation and centroid shift were measured in 63 eyes from 34 patients with a mean age of 34 years (range: 20 to 56 years) undergoing either LASIK or PRK. Preoperatively, an iris image of each eye was obtained with the VISX WaveScan Wavefront System (Abbott Medical Optics Inc) with iris registration. A VISX Star S4 (Abbott Medical Optics Inc) laser was later used to measure cyclotorsion and pupil centroid shift at the beginning of the refractive procedure and after flap creation or epithelial removal. The mean change in intraoperative cyclorotation was 1.48±1.11° in LASIK eyes and 2.02±2.63° in PRK eyes. Cyclorotation direction changed by >2° in 21% of eyes after flap creation in LASIK and in 32% of eyes after epithelial removal in PRK. The respective mean intraoperative shift in the x axis and y axis was 0.13±0.15 mm and 0.17±0.14 mm, respectively, in LASIK eyes, and 0.09±0.07 mm and 0.10±0.13 mm, respectively, in PRK eyes. Intraoperative centroid shifts >100 μm in either the x axis or y axis occurred in 71% of LASIK eyes and 55% of PRK eyes. Significant changes in cyclotorsion and centroid shifts were noted prior to surgery as well as intraoperatively with both LASIK and PRK. It may be advantageous to engage iris registration immediately prior to ablation to provide a reference point representative of eye position at the initiation of laser delivery. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Presurgical mapping with functional MRI. Comparative study with transcranial magnetic stimulation and intraoperative mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminogo, Makio; Morikawa, Minoru; Ishimaru, Hideki; Ochi, Makoto; Onizuka, Masanori; Shirakawa, Yasushi; Takahashi, Haruki; Shibata, Shobu [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-05-01

    The thumb movement was evoked by transcranical magnetic stimulation (TCS) for the mapping of the motor cortex. After the placement of the marker determined by TCS on the scalp, fMRI under motor tasks consisting of repetitive grasping was performed. For motor cortex activation, an axial oblique plane to maximize gray matter sampling in the rolandic cortex was employed in order to compare these different mapping techniques more precisely. Sixteen patients with brain tumors were included in this study. In nine patients, fMRI disclosed activation in one restricted gyrus or in the localized area around one restricted sulcus. Of these nine patients, preoperative TCS mapping corresponded closely with fMRI in six, while in the remaining three, the TCS marker fell between 1 and 2 cm apart from the fMRI-activated area. However, in these three patients, intraoperative electrocortical stimulation corresponded with the preoperative mapping with fMRI. In six patients, contiguous two gyri were activated by motor tasks. The TCS marker was disclosed on one of the two activated gyri. Of these six patients, the position of the TCS marker and fMRI-activated site corresponded with each other in four cases. They were found on the same gyrus but there was 1.0-2.0 cm distance between them in two cases. Intraoperative somatosensory evoked potential was monitored in two of these six cases. They corresponded well with the mapping by fMRI and TCS together. In only one patient, no significant activation area was obtained by fMRI because of excessive head motion during motor tasks. The TCS maker in this patients was identical with intraoperative electro-cortical stimulation mapping. (K.H.)

  11. Presurgical mapping with functional MRI. Comparative study with transcranial magnetic stimulation and intraoperative mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminogo, Makio; Morikawa, Minoru; Ishimaru, Hideki; Ochi, Makoto; Onizuka, Masanori; Shirakawa, Yasushi; Takahashi, Haruki; Shibata, Shobu

    1999-01-01

    The thumb movement was evoked by transcranical magnetic stimulation (TCS) for the mapping of the motor cortex. After the placement of the marker determined by TCS on the scalp, fMRI under motor tasks consisting of repetitive grasping was performed. For motor cortex activation, an axial oblique plane to maximize gray matter sampling in the rolandic cortex was employed in order to compare these different mapping techniques more precisely. Sixteen patients with brain tumors were included in this study. In nine patients, fMRI disclosed activation in one restricted gyrus or in the localized area around one restricted sulcus. Of these nine patients, preoperative TCS mapping corresponded closely with fMRI in six, while in the remaining three, the TCS marker fell between 1 and 2 cm apart from the fMRI-activated area. However, in these three patients, intraoperative electrocortical stimulation corresponded with the preoperative mapping with fMRI. In six patients, contiguous two gyri were activated by motor tasks. The TCS marker was disclosed on one of the two activated gyri. Of these six patients, the position of the TCS marker and fMRI-activated site corresponded with each other in four cases. They were found on the same gyrus but there was 1.0-2.0 cm distance between them in two cases. Intraoperative somatosensory evoked potential was monitored in two of these six cases. They corresponded well with the mapping by fMRI and TCS together. In only one patient, no significant activation area was obtained by fMRI because of excessive head motion during motor tasks. The TCS maker in this patients was identical with intraoperative electro-cortical stimulation mapping. (K.H.)

  12. Characteristics and intraoperative treatments associated with head and neck free tissue transfer complications and failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, William R; McSwain, Julie R; McEvoy, Matthew D; Wolf, Bethany; Algendy, Abdalrahman A; Parks, Matthew D; Murray, John L; Reeves, Scott T

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the association between perioperative patient characteristics and treatment modalities (eg, vasopressor use and volume of fluid administration) with complications and failure rates in patients undergoing head and neck free tissue transfer (FTT). A retrospective review of medical records. Perioperative hospitalization for head and neck FTT at 1 tertiary care medical center between January 1, 2009, and October 31, 2011. Consecutive patients (N=235) who underwent head and neck FTT. Demographic, patient characteristic, and intraoperative data were extracted from medical records. Complication and failure rates within the first 30 days were collected In a multivariate analysis controlling for age, sex, ethnicity, reason for receiving flap, and type and volume of fluid given, perioperative complication was significantly associated with surgical blood loss (P=.019; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.16), while the rate of intraoperative fluid administration did not reach statistical significance (P=.06; 95% CI, 0.99-1.28). In a univariate analysis, FTT failure was significantly associated with reason for surgery (odds ratio, 5.40; P=.03; 95% CI, 1.69-17.3) and preoperative diagnosis of coronary artery disease (odds ratio, 3.60; P=.03; 95% CI, 1.16-11.2). Intraoperative vasopressor administration was not associated with either FTT complication or failure rate. FTT complications were associated with surgical blood loss but not the use of vasoactive drugs. For patients undergoing FTT, judicious monitoring of blood loss may help stratify the risk of complication and failure. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  13. Ten years of intraoperative floppy iris syndrome in the era of α-blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Al-Ali, Badereddin; Radmayr, Christian; Weber, Maria; Horninger, Wolfgang; Findl, Oliver; Plas, Eugen

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The use of alpha-1 receptor antagonists in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has created a problem in ophthalmic surgery, the so-called intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS). This consists of a billowing iris, insufficient pupillary dilation with progressive intraoperative miosis, and protrusion of iris tissue through the tunnel and side port incision that are made for access to the anterior chamber during surgery. IFIS presents particular difficulties in cataract surgery which is carried out through the pupil with manipulations in the immediate vicinity of the iris. The complications range from poor visibility of the operative field to iris damage with the surgical instruments and to rupture of the posterior capsule, with loss of lens material into the vitreous body. Material and methods A comprehensive literature review was performed using MEDLINE with MeSH terms and keywords ‘benign prostatic hyperplasia’, ‘intraoperative floppy iris syndrome’, ‘adrenergic alpha-antagonist’ and ‘cataract surgery’. In addition, reference lists from identified publications were reviewed to identify reports and studies of interest from 2001 to 2017. Results The A total of 95% of experienced ophthalmologic surgeons reported that systematic treatment with tamsulosin represents a challenging surgical condition increasing the risk of complications. Alpha-blockers are commonly prescribed, with 1,079,505 packages of tamsulosin prescribed each month in 2014 in Austria. Dose modification may be one way to reduce the risk of IFIS. A lower incidence of IFIS was reported in patients on tamsulosin in Japan, but the recommended dosage was lower than that used in Europe and the US (0.2 mg vs. 0.4 mg). Conclusions We showed that not all patients taking tamsulosin experience IFIS. Moreover, larger investigations with a prospective design are needed, including studies to monitor the pre- and post-therapeutic ophthalmologic changes under tamsulosin

  14. Intraoperative ultrasound to facilitate removal of a submucosal foreign body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew E; Riffat, Faruque; Berman, Laurence H; Jani, Piyush

    2014-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with a history of fish bone ingestion and poorly localized symptoms was seen. His clinical examination was unremarkable, but CT demonstrated a foreign body deeply embedded within his tongue. Intraoperative ultrasound (US) guidance facilitated identification of a bone, allowing a needle to be placed as a guide to dissection. Repeat US scanning through the incision permitted precisely targeted surgery. CT and US are the most effective imaging techniques for localizing fish bones. Intraoperative US can be used to accurately locate a submucosal fish bone in mobile tissue such as the tongue, and focused, image-guided dissection can reduce surgical tissue trauma. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery with Intraoperative Image-Guided Navigation

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    Terrence T. Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present our perioperative minimally invasive spine surgery technique using intraoperative computed tomography image-guided navigation for the treatment of various lumbar spine pathologies. We present an illustrative case of a patient undergoing minimally invasive percutaneous posterior spinal fusion assisted by the O-arm system with navigation. We discuss the literature and the advantages of the technique over fluoroscopic imaging methods: lower occupational radiation exposure for operative room personnel, reduced need for postoperative imaging, and decreased revision rates. Most importantly, we demonstrate that use of intraoperative cone beam CT image-guided navigation has been reported to increase accuracy.

  16. Intravenous dexmedetomidine infusion in adult patients undergoing open nephrolithotomy: Effects on intraoperative hemodynamics and blood loss; a random

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa A. Rashwan

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine infusion in patients undergoing open nephrolithotomy under general anesthesia was associated with intraoperative hemodynamic stability, which decreases intraoperative blood loss and the need for intraoperative blood transfusion.

  17. Effects of intraoperative irradiation and intraoperative hyperthermia on canine sciatic nerve: neurologic and electrophysiologic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Gillette, Sharon M.; Powers, Barbara E.; Stukel, Therese A.; LaRue, Susan M.; Gillette, Edward L.; Borak, Thomas B.; Scott, Robert J.; Weiss, Julia; Colacchio, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Late radiation injury to peripheral nerve may be the limiting factor in the clinical application of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). The combination of IORT with intraoperative hyperthermia (IOHT) raises specific concerns regarding the effects on certain normal tissues such as peripheral nerve, which might be included in the treatment field. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of IORT alone to the effect of IORT combined with IOHT on peripheral nerve in normal beagle dogs. Methods and Materials: Young adult beagle dogs were randomized into five groups of three to five dogs each to receive IORT doses of 16, 20, 24, 28, or 32 Gy to 5 cm of surgically exposed right sciatic nerve using 6 MeV electrons and six groups of four to five dogs each received IORT doses of 0, 12, 16, 20, 24, or 28 Gy simultaneously with 44 deg. C of IOHT for 60 min. IOHT was performed using a water circulating hyperthermia device with a multichannel thermometry system on the surgically exposed sciatic nerve. Neurologic and electrophysiologic examinations were done before and monthly after treatment for 24 months. Electrophysiologic studies included electromyographic (EMG) examinations of motor function, as well as motor nerve conduction velocities studies. Results: Two years after treatment, the effective dose for 50% complication (ED 50 ) for limb paresis in dogs exposed to IORT only was 22 Gy. The ED 50 for paresis in dogs exposed to IORT combined with IOHT was 15 Gy. The thermal enhancement ratio (TER) was 1.5. Electrophysiologic studies showed more prominent changes such as EMG abnormalities, decrease in conduction velocity and amplitude of the action potential, and complete conduction block in dogs that received the combination of IORT and IOHT. The latency to development of peripheral neuropathies was shorter for dogs exposed to the combined treatment. Conclusion: The probability of developing peripheral neuropathies in a large animal model was higher

  18. The effect of preoperative Lugol's iodine on intraoperative bleeding in patients with hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz Yilmaz

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Preoperative Lugol solution treatment was found to be a significant independent determinant of intraoperative blood loss. Moreover, preoperative Lugol solution treatment decreased the rate of blood flow, and intraoperative blood loss during thyroidectomy.

  19. INTRAOPERATIVE IRRADIATION OF THE CANINE PANCREAS - SHORT-TERM EFFECTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HEIJMANS, HJ; MEHTA, DM; KLEIBEUKER, JH; SLUITER, WJ; OLDHOFF, J; HOEKSTRA, HJ

    1993-01-01

    Intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IORT) is clinically used as a potential adjunctive treatment to surgery of locally advanced pancreatic and gastric cancer. The tolerance of the pancreas to IORT was studied in 15 adult beagles, divided in 3 groups of 5 beagles in which 25, 30 or 35 Gy IORT

  20. Intraoperative cell salvage in South Africa: Feasible, beneficial and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More than one CS blood unit was available for transfusion in 66% of cases. No additional staff were required to operate the Cell Saver, which was successfully used by medical officers. Conclusions. This study showed that intraoperative CS use is feasible, has potential patient benefit by reducing blood bank blood ...

  1. Intraoperative Death During Cervical Spinal Surgery: A Retrospective Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jeffrey C; Buser, Zorica; Fish, David E; Lord, Elizabeth L; Roe, Allison K; Chatterjee, Dhananjay; Gee, Erica L; Mayer, Erik N; Yanez, Marisa Y; McBride, Owen J; Cha, Peter I; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A retrospective multicenter study. Routine cervical spine surgeries are typically associated with low complication rates, but serious complications can occur. Intraoperative death is a very rare complication and there is no literature on its incidence. The purpose of this study was to determine the intraoperative mortality rates and associated risk factors in patients undergoing cervical spine surgery. Twenty-one surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network participated in the study. Medical records of patients who received cervical spine surgery from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2011, were reviewed to identify occurrence of intraoperative death. A total of 258 patients across 21 centers met the inclusion criteria. Most of the surgeries were done using the anterior approach (53.9%), followed by posterior (39.1%) and circumferential (7%). Average patient age was 57.1 ± 13.2 years, and there were more male patients (54.7% male and 45.3% female). There was no case of intraoperative death. Death during cervical spine surgery is a very rare complication. In our multicenter study, there was a 0% mortality rate. Using an adequate surgical approach for patient diagnosis and comorbidities may be the reason how the occurrence of this catastrophic adverse event was prevented in our patient population.

  2. Intraoperative colonic irrigation in the management of left sided ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To evaluate the safety and benefits of antegrade intraoperative colonic irrigation (lavage) and primary anastomosis, after colonic resection, in the treatment of left sided large bowel emergencies. Design: A prospective descriptive study. Setting: Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria. Participants: Thirty ...

  3. Fusion of intraoperative force sensoring, surface reconstruction and biomechanical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhl, S.; Bodenstedt, S.; Küderle, C.; Suwelack, S.; Kenngott, H.; Müller-Stich, B. P.; Dillmann, R.; Speidel, S.

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is medically complex and can heavily benefit from computer assistance. One way to help the surgeon is to integrate preoperative planning data into the surgical workflow. This information can be represented as a customized preoperative model of the surgical site. To use it intraoperatively, it has to be updated during the intervention due to the constantly changing environment. Hence, intraoperative sensor data has to be acquired and registered with the preoperative model. Haptic information which could complement the visual sensor data is still not established. In addition, biomechanical modeling of the surgical site can help in reflecting the changes which cannot be captured by intraoperative sensors. We present a setting where a force sensor is integrated into a laparoscopic instrument. In a test scenario using a silicone liver phantom, we register the measured forces with a reconstructed surface model from stereo endoscopic images and a finite element model. The endoscope, the instrument and the liver phantom are tracked with a Polaris optical tracking system. By fusing this information, we can transfer the deformation onto the finite element model. The purpose of this setting is to demonstrate the principles needed and the methods developed for intraoperative sensor data fusion. One emphasis lies on the calibration of the force sensor with the instrument and first experiments with soft tissue. We also present our solution and first results concerning the integration of the force sensor as well as accuracy to the fusion of force measurements, surface reconstruction and biomechanical modeling.

  4. Pre- and intraoperative volume determination of craniopharyngioma cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgi, P.; Strauss, L.; Sturm, V.; Ostertag, H.; Sinn, H.; Rommel, T.

    1980-08-01

    Exact cystic volume measurement is a prerequisite to proper /sup 90/Y dosage in the therapy of intracavitary monocystic craniopharyngiomas. The method of intraoperative volume measurement by a radionuclide dilution technique is compared to results abtained by preoperative using computer tomography. Both methods gave congruous results. It is pointed out that gamma camera scintigrams are essential for the early detection of complications.

  5. Appropriateness of Intra-Operative Blood Transfusion In Children at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The decision to transfuse intra-operatively is based on preoperative haemoglobin (Hb), estimated blood loss and physiological variables. The visual estimate of blood loss is notoriously unreliable especially with small volumes of blood losses in children. Objectives :We sought therefore to determine the ...

  6. The diagnostic dilemma of intraoperative hyperpyrexia in a malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Intraoperative fever, Malaria, Malignant hyperthermia. ... paludisme devront être examiné et soigné de paludisme s'il est indiqué d'une manière préopératoire même s'il est ... West African Journal of Medicine Vol.22(1) 2003: 98-100 ...

  7. Video-rate optical flow corrected intraoperative functional fluorescence imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Maximilian; Glatz, Juergen; Ermolayev, Vladimir; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    Intraoperative fluorescence molecular imaging based on targeted fluorescence agents is an emerging approach to improve surgical and endoscopic imaging and guidance. Short exposure times per frame and implementation at video rates are necessary to provide continuous feedback to the physician and

  8. Intraoperative seizures and seizures outcome in patients underwent awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yang; Peizhi, Zhou; Xiang, Wang; Yanhui, Liu; Ruofei, Liang; Shu, Jiang; Qing, Mao

    2016-11-25

    Awake craniotomies (AC) could reduce neurological deficits compared with patients under general anesthesia, however, intraoperative seizure is a major reason causing awake surgery failure. The purpose of the study was to give a comprehensive overview the published articles focused on seizure incidence in awake craniotomy. Bibliographic searches of the EMBASE, MEDLINE,were performed to identify articles and conference abstracts that investigated the intraoperative seizure frequency of patients underwent AC. Twenty-five studies were included in this meta-analysis. Among the 25 included studies, one was randomized controlled trials and 5 of them were comparable studies. The pooled data suggested the general intraoperative seizure(IOS) rate for patients with AC was 8%(fixed effect model), sub-group analysis identified IOS rate for glioma patients was 8% and low grade patients was 10%. The pooled data showed early seizure rates of AC patients was 11% and late seizure rates was 35%. This systematic review and meta-analysis shows that awake craniotomy is a safe technique with relatively low intraoperative seizure occurrence. However, few RCTs were available, and the acquisition of further evidence through high-quality RCTs is highly recommended.

  9. Intraoperative Deaths at Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nine cases of intraoperative deaths were recorded. Most of the deaths occurred among the gravely ill, inadequately prepared patients and patients whose operations were done in the late hours of the night. Conclusion: This tragedy is preventable by paying meticulous attention to details and careful patient selection and ...

  10. Comparative Study Of Intra-Operative Pelvimetry With Calipers And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pelvic measurement of patients who have had a caesarean section was done using Pelvic Calipers (intra-operative) and x-ray methods. In the former method, during Caesarean sections and after closure of the lower uterine segment incision, a pair of pelvic calipers was used to measure the true conjugate of the pelvis.

  11. Intra-operative parathyroid hormone measurements – experience of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Surgery is the treatment of choice for symptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism. The majority of research concerning intra-operative parathyroid hormone (ioPTH) measurements is conducted in university hospitals. Whether ioPTH measurements are feasible and useful in predicting the presence of remaining ...

  12. Intraoperative neurophysiological responses in epileptic patients submitted to hippocampal and thalamic deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukiert, Arthur; Cukiert, Cristine Mella; Argentoni-Baldochi, Meire; Baise, Carla; Forster, Cássio Roberto; Mello, Valeria Antakli; Burattini, José Augusto; Lima, Alessandra Moura

    2011-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used in an increasing frequency for treatment of refractory epilepsy. Acute deep brain macrostimulation intraoperative findings were sparsely published in the literature. We report on our intraoperative macrostimulation findings during thalamic and hippocampal DBS implantation. Eighteen patients were studied. All patients underwent routine pre-operative evaluation that included clinical history, neurological examination, interictal and ictal EEG, high resolution 1.5T MRI and neuropsychological testing. Six patients with temporal lobe epilepsy were submitted to hippocampal DBS (Hip-DBS); 6 patients with focal epilepsy were submitted to anterior thalamic nucleus DBS (AN-DBS) and 6 patients with generalized epilepsy were submitted to centro-median thalamic nucleus DBS (CM-DBS). Age ranged from 9 to 40 years (11 males). All patients were submitted to bilateral quadripolar DBS electrode implantation in a single procedure, under general anesthesia, and intraoperative scalp EEG monitoring. Final electrode's position was checked postoperatively using volumetric CT scanning. Bipolar stimulation using the more proximal and distal electrodes was performed. Final standard stimulation parameters were 6Hz, 4V, 300μs (low frequency range: LF) or 130Hz, 4V, 300μs (high frequency range: HF). Bilateral recruiting response (RR) was obtained after unilateral stimulation in all patients submitted to AN and CM-DBS using LF stimulation. RR was widespread but prevailed over the fronto-temporal region bilaterally, and over the stimulated hemisphere. HF stimulation led to background slowing and a DC shift. The mean voltage for the appearance of RR was 4V (CM) and 3V (AN). CM and AN-DBS did not alter inter-ictal spiking frequency or morphology. RR obtained after LF Hip-DBS was restricted to the stimulated temporal lobe and no contralateral activation was noted. HF stimulation yielded no visually recognizable EEG modification. Mean intensity for initial

  13. Physics-based shape matching for intraoperative image guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwelack, Stefan, E-mail: suwelack@kit.edu; Röhl, Sebastian; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Reichard, Daniel; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Speidel, Stefanie [Institute for Anthropomatics and Robotics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Adenauerring 2, Karlsruhe 76131 (Germany); Santos, Thiago dos; Maier-Hein, Lena [Computer-assisted Interventions, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Wagner, Martin; Wünscher, Josephine; Kenngott, Hannes; Müller, Beat P. [General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Soft-tissue deformations can severely degrade the validity of preoperative planning data during computer assisted interventions. Intraoperative imaging such as stereo endoscopic, time-of-flight or, laser range scanner data can be used to compensate these movements. In this context, the intraoperative surface has to be matched to the preoperative model. The shape matching is especially challenging in the intraoperative setting due to noisy sensor data, only partially visible surfaces, ambiguous shape descriptors, and real-time requirements. Methods: A novel physics-based shape matching (PBSM) approach to register intraoperatively acquired surface meshes to preoperative planning data is proposed. The key idea of the method is to describe the nonrigid registration process as an electrostatic–elastic problem, where an elastic body (preoperative model) that is electrically charged slides into an oppositely charged rigid shape (intraoperative surface). It is shown that the corresponding energy functional can be efficiently solved using the finite element (FE) method. It is also demonstrated how PBSM can be combined with rigid registration schemes for robust nonrigid registration of arbitrarily aligned surfaces. Furthermore, it is shown how the approach can be combined with landmark based methods and outline its application to image guidance in laparoscopic interventions. Results: A profound analysis of the PBSM scheme based on in silico and phantom data is presented. Simulation studies on several liver models show that the approach is robust to the initial rigid registration and to parameter variations. The studies also reveal that the method achieves submillimeter registration accuracy (mean error between 0.32 and 0.46 mm). An unoptimized, single core implementation of the approach achieves near real-time performance (2 TPS, 7–19 s total registration time). It outperforms established methods in terms of speed and accuracy. Furthermore, it is shown that the

  14. Lumbar Lordosis of Spinal Stenosis Patients during Intraoperative Prone Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Keon; Song, Kyung-Sub; Park, Byung-Moon; Lim, Sang-Youn; Jang, Geun; Lee, Beom-Seok; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of spondylolisthesis on lumbar lordosis on the OSI (Jackson; Orthopaedic Systems Inc.) frame. Restoration of lumbar lordosis is important for maintaining sagittal balance. Physiologic lumbar lordosis has to be gained by intraoperative prone positioning with a hip extension and posterior instrumentation technique. There are some debates about changing lumbar lordosis on the OSI frame after an intraoperative prone position. We evaluated the effect of spondylolisthesis on lumbar lordosis after an intraoperative prone position. Methods Sixty-seven patients, who underwent spinal fusion at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of Gwangmyeong Sungae Hospital between May 2007 and February 2012, were included in this study. The study compared lumbar lordosis on preoperative upright, intraoperative prone and postoperative upright lateral X-rays between the simple stenosis (SS) group and spondylolisthesis group. The average age of patients was 67.86 years old. The average preoperative lordosis was 43.5° (± 14.9°), average intraoperative lordosis was 48.8° (± 13.2°), average postoperative lordosis was 46.5° (± 16.1°) and the average change on the frame was 5.3° (± 10.6°). Results Among all patients, 24 patients were diagnosed with simple spinal stenosis, 43 patients with spondylolisthesis (29 degenerative spondylolisthesis and 14 isthmic spondylolisthesis). Between the SS group and spondylolisthesis group, preoperative lordosis, intraoperative lordosis and postoperative lordosis were significantly larger in the spondylolisthesis group. The ratio of patients with increased lordosis on the OSI frame compared to preoperative lordosis was significantly higher in the spondylolisthesis group. The risk of increased lordosis on frame was significantly higher in the spondylolisthesis group (odds ratio, 3.325; 95% confidence interval, 1.101 to 10.039; p = 0.033). Conclusions Intraoperative lumbar lordosis on the OSI frame with a prone

  15. Categorization of intraoperative ureteroscopy complications using modified Satava classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepeler, Abdulkadir; Resorlu, Berkan; Sahin, Tolga; Sarikaya, Selcuk; Bayindir, Mirze; Oguz, Ural; Armagan, Abdullah; Unsal, Ali

    2014-02-01

    To review our experience with ureteroscopy (URS) in the treatment of ureteral calculi and stratify intraoperative complications of URS according to the modified Satava classification system. We performed a retrospective analysis of 1,208 patients (672 males and 536 females), with a mean age of 43.1 years (range 1-78), who underwent ureteroscopic procedures for removal of ureteral stones. Intraoperative complications were recorded according to modified Satava classification system. Grade 1 complications included incidents without consequences for the patient; grade 2 complications, which are treated intraoperatively with endoscopic surgery (grade 2a) or required endoscopic re-treatment (grade 2b); and grade 3 complications included incidents requiring open or laparoscopic surgery. The stones were completely removed in 1,067 (88.3%) patients after primary procedure by either simple extraction or after fragmentation. The overall incidence of intraoperative complications was 12.6%. The most common complications were proximal stone migration (3.9%), mucosal injury (2.8%), bleeding (1.9%), inability to reach stone (1.8%), malfunctioning or breakage of instruments (0.8%), ureteral perforation (0.8%) and ureteral avulsion (0.16%). According to modified Satava classification system, there were 4.5% grade 1; 4.4% grade 2a; 3.2% grade 2b; and 0.57% grade 3 complications. We think that modified Satava classification is a quick and simple system for describing the severity of intraoperative URS complications and this grading system will facilitate a better comparison for the surgical outcomes obtained from different centers.

  16. Intraoperative and Early Postoperative Complications of Manual Sutureless Cataract Extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Y.; Zia, S.; Mirza, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the intraoperative and early postoperative complications of manual sutureless cataract extraction. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Redo Eye Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from January 2009 to December 2010. Methodology: Three hundred patients of cataract through purposive non-probability sampling were selected. The patients underwent manual sutureless cataract surgery (MSCS) by single experienced surgeon and intraoperative complications were documented. The surgical technique was modified to deal with any intraoperative complications accordingly. Patients were examined on the first postoperative day and on the first postoperative week for any postoperative complications. The data was entered in Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 13.0 and the results were calculated in frequencies. Results: Among the 300 cases, 81.3% surgeries went uneventful whereas 18.6% had some complication. The common intraoperative complications were superior button-hole formation in 5%; posterior capsular rent in 5% and premature entry with iris prolapse in 3% cases. Postoperatively, the commonly encountered complications were striate keratopathy in 9.6% and hyphema 9%. At first week follow-up, 4% had striate keratopathy and 0.6% had hyphema. Striate keratopathy resolved with topical medication on subsequent follow-up. A total of 9 cases (3%) underwent second surgery: 2 cases for lens matter wash, 2 cases for hyphema and 5 cases needed suturing of wound for shallow anterior chamber due to wound leak. Conclusion: Superior button-hole formation, posterior capsular rent and premature entry were the common intraoperative complications of MSCS whereas the common early postoperative complications were striate keratopathy and hyphema. (author)

  17. Effects of intraoperative irradiation (IORT) and intraoperative hyperthermia (IOHT) on canine sciatic nerve : Histopathological and morphometric studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vujaskovic, Z; Powers, BE; Paardekoper, G; Gillette, SM; Gillette, EL; Colacchio, TA

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Peripheral neuropathies have emerged as the major dose-limiting complication reported after intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). The combination of IORT with hyperthermia may further increase the risk of peripheral nerve injury. The objective of this study was to evaluate

  18. [Fusion of MRI, fMRI and intraoperative MRI data. Methods and clinical significance exemplified by neurosurgical interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moche, M; Busse, H; Dannenberg, C; Schulz, T; Schmitgen, A; Trantakis, C; Winkler, D; Schmidt, F; Kahn, T

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this work was to realize and clinically evaluate an image fusion platform for the integration of preoperative MRI and fMRI data into the intraoperative images of an interventional MRI system with a focus on neurosurgical procedures. A vertically open 0.5 T MRI scanner was equipped with a dedicated navigation system enabling the registration of additional imaging modalities (MRI, fMRI, CT) with the intraoperatively acquired data sets. These merged image data served as the basis for interventional planning and multimodal navigation. So far, the system has been used in 70 neurosurgical interventions (13 of which involved image data fusion--requiring 15 minutes extra time). The augmented navigation system is characterized by a higher frame rate and a higher image quality as compared to the system-integrated navigation based on continuously acquired (near) real time images. Patient movement and tissue shifts can be immediately detected by monitoring the morphological differences between both navigation scenes. The multimodal image fusion allowed a refined navigation planning especially for the resection of deeply seated brain lesions or pathologies close to eloquent areas. Augmented intraoperative orientation and instrument guidance improve the safety and accuracy of neurosurgical interventions.

  19. Computer-assisted intraoperative visualization of dental implants. Augmented reality in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploder, O.; Wagner, A.; Enislidis, G.; Ewers, R.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, a recently developed computer-based dental implant positioning system with an image-to-tissue interface is presented. On a computer monitor or in a head-up display, planned implant positions and the implant drill are graphically superimposed on the patient's anatomy. Electromagnetic 3D sensors track all skull and jaw movements; their signal feedback to the workstation induces permanent real-time updating of the virtual graphics' position. An experimental study and a clinical case demonstrates the concept of the augmented reality environment - the physician can see the operating field and superimposed virtual structures, such as dental implants and surgical instruments, without loosing visual control of the operating field. Therefore, the operation system allows visualization of CT planned implantposition and the implementation of important anatomical structures. The presented method for the first time links preoperatively acquired radiologic data, planned implant location and intraoperative navigation assistance for orthotopic positioning of dental implants. (orig.) [de

  20. Intraoperative and external beam radiotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma; Intraoperative und perkutane Radiotherapie des Pankreaskarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eble, M.J. [Abt. Klinische Radiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Maurer, U. [Klinikum der Stadt Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    1996-05-01

    Therapeutic strategies in the treatment of pancreatic carcinoma are based on the high number of non-resectable cancers, the high relative radioresistance and the high distant metastases rate. Even in curatively resected carcinomas, a locally effective treatment modality is needed because of the risk of microscopical residual disease in the peripancreatic tissue. The efficacy of radiotherapy is dose dependent. Based on an analysis of published data a dose of more than 50 Gy is recommended, resulting in a high morbidity rate with external beam radiotherapy alone. The use of intraoperative radiotherapy allows locally restricted dose escalation without increased perioperative morbidity. In adjuvant and in primary treatment, local tumor control was improved (70-90%). With palliative intent, pain relief was obtained rapidly in over 60% of patients and led to improved patient performance. As a result of the high distant metastases rate, even in curatively resected carcinomas, the overall prognosis could not be significantly improved. Further dose escalation is limited by the increasing incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (20-30%). (orig.) [Deutsch] Therapiestrategien beim Pankreaskarzinom werden bestimmt durch den hohen Anteil primaer nicht resektabler Karzinome, der hohen relativen Strahlenresistenz und der hohen Fernmetastasierungsrate. Selbst kurativ resezierte Karzinome erfordern durch ihre hohe lokale Tumorzellpersistenz eine lokal effektive adjuvante Behandlungsmassnahme. Die Effektivitaet einer Radiotherapie ist dosisabhaengig. Aus der Analyse publizierter Daten wird eine Dosis von >50 Gy, welche bei der alleinigen perkutanen Bestrahlung mit einer hohen Morbiditaet verbunden ist, empfohlen. Mit der intraoperativen Radiotherapie ist eine lokal begrenzte Dosiseskalation ohne erhoehte perioperative Morbiditaet moeglich. Sowohl in der adjuvanten als auch in der primaeren Behandlung kann die lokale Tumorkontrolle deutlich verbessert werden (70-90%). Unter

  1. Intraoperative /sup 99m/Tc bone imaging in the treatment of benign osteoblastic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sty, J.; Simons, G.

    1982-01-01

    Benign bone tumors can be successfully treated by local resection with the use of intraoperative bone imaging. Intraoperative bone imaging provided accurate localization of an osteoid osteoma in a patella of a 16-year-old girl when standard radiographs failed to demonstrate the lesion. In a case of osteoblastoma of the sacrum in a 12-year old girl, intraoperative scanning was used repeatedly to guide completeness of resection. In these cases in which routine intraoperative radiographs would have failed, intraoperative scanning proved to be essential for success

  2. Intraoperative language localization in multilingual patients with gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Lorenzo; Acerbi, Francesco; Giussani, Carlo; Baratta, Pietro; Taccone, Paolo; Songa, Valeria; Fava, Marica; Stocchetti, Nino; Papagno, Costanza; Gaini, Sergio M

    2006-07-01

    Intraoperative localization of speech is problematic in patients who are fluent in different languages. Previous studies have generated various results depending on the series of patients studied, the type of language, and the sensitivity of the tasks applied. It is not clear whether languages are mediated by multiple and separate cortical areas or shared by common areas. Globally considered, previous studies recommended performing a multiple intraoperative mapping for all the languages in which the patient is fluent. The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of performing an intraoperative multiple language mapping in a group of multilingual patients with a glioma undergoing awake craniotomy for tumor removal and to describe the intraoperative cortical and subcortical findings in the area of craniotomy, with the final goal to maximally preserve patients' functional language. Seven late, highly proficient multilingual patients with a left frontal glioma were submitted preoperatively to a battery of tests to evaluate oral language production, comprehension, and repetition. Each language was tested serially starting from the first acquired language. Items that were correctly named during these tests were used to build personalized blocks to be used intraoperatively. Language mapping was undertaken during awake craniotomies by the use of an Ojemann cortical stimulator during counting and oral naming tasks. Subcortical stimulation by using the same current threshold was applied during tumor resection, in a back and forth fashion, and the same tests. Cortical sites essential for oral naming were found in 87.5% of patients, those for the first acquired language in one to four sites, those for the other languages in one to three sites. Sites for each language were distinct and separate. Number and location of sites were not predictable, being randomly and widely distributed in the cortex around or less frequently over the tumor area. Subcortical stimulations found

  3. Newer techniques for intravascular and intraoperative neurointerventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashida, R.T.; Halbach, V.V.; Hieshima, G.B.; Yang, P.

    1987-01-01

    A videotape demonstrating newer techniques used in intravascular and intraoperative embolization procedures will be presented. The authors discuss the use of some of the newer embolic agents, real-time digital subtraction angiography, roadmapping techniques, and the use of microcatheters and steerable micro guide wires, which has greatly facilitated neurovascullar embolization procedures and enhanced patient safety. A number of actual intraoperative and intravascular cases will be shown demonstrating treatment of vascular malformations of the brain and spinal cord, carotid cavernous sinus fistulas, aneurysms and dural arteriovenous malformations. The indications for treatment, patient selection, technical preparation and newer methodologies and approaches to complex vascular lesions of the brain and spinal cord are discussed in detail

  4. Principles for Management of Intraoperative Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gukop, Philemon; Chandrasekaran, Vankatachalam

    2015-12-01

    Intraoperative Type A aortic dissection is a rare pathology with incidence of 0.06-0.32%. It is associated with a high mortality between 30-50%. Some associated risk factors, including hypertension, enlarged aorta, peripheral vascular disease, advanced age, atheroma, and high arterial pressure on cardiopulmonary bypass, have been identified. Modification of these risk factors could reduce the incidence of this event. Prompt diagnosis and management, with the aid of intraoperative trans-esophageal echocardiography and/or epi-aortic ultrasound has been shown to reduce the mortality to 17%. We illustrate the principles of management of this pathology with the case of a 62-year-old female who developed acute Type A aortic dissection while undergoing minimally invasive mitral valve repair.

  5. A meta-analysis of intraoperative factors associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 95% 1.9-26), new onset atrial fibrillation (OR 6.6, 95% CI 2.5-20), hypothermia (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-5) and remote ischaemic preconditioning (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.07-0.67). None of these studies controlled for blood transfusion. Conclusion: Both surgical and haemodynamic intraoperative events significantly increased the ...

  6. Intraoperative Assessment of Tricuspid Valve Function After Conservative Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Revuelta, J.M.; Gomez-Duran, C.; Garcia-Rinaldi, R.; Gallagher, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    It is desirable to repair coexistent tricuspid valve pathology at the time of mitral valve corrections. Conservative tricuspid repair may consist of commissurotomy, annuloplasty, or both. It is important that the repair be appropriate or tricuspid valve replacement may be necessary. A simple reproducible method of intraoperative testing for tricuspid valve insufficiency has been developed and used in 25 patients. Fifteen patients have been recatheterized, and the correlation between the intra...

  7. Recurrent intraoperative silent ST depression responding to phenylephrine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P M Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative myocardial ischemia is attributed to decreased myocardial oxygen supply. We present an unusual case of recurrent, symptomless inferior wall ischemia in an apparently healthy male with no history of coronary artery disease after a spinal block. The recurring episodes were linked to tachycardia and presented with significant ST depression in Lead II with reciprocal elevation in lead aVL. The episodes responded to phenylephrine and subsided without residual sequelae.

  8. Premedication with oral Dextromethorphan reduces intra-operative Morphine requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Talakoub

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intra-operative pain has adverse effects on hemodynamic parameters. Due to complications of opioids for pain relief, using non-opioids medication is preferred. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of oral dextrometorphan premedication on intra-operative Morphine requirement. Methods: After approval of the Ethics committee and informed consent, 40 adult patients who stand in American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status I and II, under general anesthesia for elective laparatomy were selected and classified in two equal groups randomly. In group A, oral dextromethorphan (60mg was administered at 10 PM and 6 AM preoperatively. In group B, placebo (dextrose was administered. After induction of general anesthesia and before skin incision, intravenous morphine (0.01 mg/kg was administered. During surgery, when systolic blood pressure or heart rate was increased more than 20% of the preoperative baseline, 0.01 mg/kg morphine was administered. At the end of surgery, the totally prescribed morphine (mg/kg and maximal increase in systolic, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate relative to the baseline values were calculated and statistically compared with student’s t-test. Results: The mean dose of administered morphine during surgery was significantly less in group A than group B (P<0.0001. Also, Maximal increase in systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure was significantly less in group A (p<0.003, p<0.004, p<0.0001, respectively. There was no significant difference in maximal heart rate increase between two groups (p<0.114. Conclusion: Oral dextromethorphan premedication may decrease intra-operative morphine requirement and reduce maximal increase in systolic and mean arterial blood pressure during surgery. Key words: Dextromethorphan, Morphine, Intra-operative, Premedication Hemodynamic

  9. Intraoperative radionuclide study and colonoscopy in gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navab, F.; Westbrook, K.C.; Slaton, G.; Boyd, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Tc-99m labeled red cell imaging is used in the diagnosis and localization of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. A patient in whom a preoperative scan was positive in the right paraumbilical region is discussed. Intraoperative Tc-99m labeled red cell imaging was used in conjunction with colonoscopy, and the site of active bleeding was found in the proximal transverse colon, which had been displaced downward because of adhesions

  10. Intraoperative perception and sensation in laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivannaboon, Sabong; Chansue, Ekktet

    2004-04-01

    To investigate intraoperative perception and sensation during Laser in situ Keratomileusis (LASIK). Sixty patients with uneventful LASIK were included. All procedures were performed by one surgeon with one technique. Any patient with intra-operative complications was excluded. The patients were asked to fill in the subjective evaluation form regarding their perception and sensation during the operation. Twenty-nine patients (48%) reported no pain and twenty-six patients (43%) reported no burning sensation during the surgery. Nineteen patients (32%) reported no light perception during the suction period of microkeratome. There was no correlation between duration of the suction and no light perception (R2 0.01). Thirty-four patients (56%) reported no trouble in maintaining visual fixation at the red light during the laser treatment. Ten patients (16%) reported they could clearly see the movement during the surgery and 5 out of 10 patients (50% of 16%) reported visual frightening. Fifty cases (84%) reported no visual frightening during the surgery after reassurance of the visual experience by the surgeon before the surgery. Patients undergoing LASIK may experience different visual perceptions. Reassurance of the intraoperative perception and sensation before the surgery can reduce the visual frightening.

  11. Intraoperative Cerebral Glioma Characterization with Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Prada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS is a dynamic and continuous modality providing real-time view of vascularization and flow distribution patterns of different organs and tumors. Nevertheless its intraoperative use for brain tumors visualization has been performed few times, and a thorough characterization of cerebral glioma had never been performed before. Aim. To perform the first characterization of cerebral glioma using CEUS and to possibly achieve an intraoperative differentiation of different gliomas. Methods. We performed CEUS in an off-label setting in 69 patients undergoing surgery for cerebral glioma. An intraoperative qualitative analysis was performed comparing iCEUS with B-mode imaging. A postprocedural semiquantitative analysis was then performed for each case, according to EFSUMB criteria. Results were related to histopathology. Results. We observed different CE patterns: LGG show a mild, dotted CE with diffuse appearance and slower, delayed arterial and venous phase. HGG have a high CE with a more nodular, nonhomogeneous appearance and fast perfusion patterns. Conclusion. Our study characterizes for the first time human brain glioma with CEUS, providing further insight regarding these tumors’ biology. CEUS is a fast, safe, dynamic, real-time, and economic tool that might be helpful during surgery in differentiating malignant and benign gliomas and refining surgical strategy.

  12. Intraoperative Hypoglossal Nerve Mapping During Carotid Endarterectomy: Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Atsuhiro; Saga, Isako; Ishikawa, Mami

    2018-05-01

    Hypoglossal nerve deficit is a possible complication caused by carotid endarterectomy (CEA). The accidental injury of the hypoglossal nerve during surgery is one of the major reasons for permanent hypoglossal nerve palsy. In this study, we investigated the usefulness of intraoperative mapping of the hypoglossal nerve to identify this nerve during CEA. Five consecutive patients who underwent CEA for the treatment of symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis were studied. A hand-held probe was used to detect the hypoglossal nerve in the operative field, and the tongue motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded. The tongue MEPs were obtained in all the patients. The invisible hypoglossal nerve was successfully identified without any difficulty when the internal carotid artery was exposed. Intraoperative mapping was particularly useful for identifying the hypoglossal nerve when the hypoglossal nerve passed beneath the posterior belly of the digastric muscle. In 1 of 2 cases, MEP was also elicited when the ansa cervicalis was stimulated, although the resulting amplitude was much smaller than that obtained by direct stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve. Postoperatively, none of the patients presented with hypoglossal nerve palsy. Intraoperative hypoglossal nerve mapping enabled us to locate the invisible hypoglossal nerve during the exposure of the internal carotid artery accurately without retracting the posterior belly of the digastric muscle and other tissues in the vicinity of the internal carotid artery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intraoperative radiotherapy in combined treatment of sinonasal malignant tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, V. A.; Gribova, O. V.; Vasiljev, R. V.; Choynzonov, E. L.; Shtin, V. I.; Shiianova, A. A.; Surkova, P. V.; Starceva, Zh. A.; Shilova, O. G.

    2017-09-01

    Obvious advantage of IORT (intraoperative radiotherapy) is that the radiation source is delivered directly to the bed of the tumor during surgery, thus avoiding the negative impact on the skin, subcutaneous tissue and reducing the risk of fibrosis. Sinonasal tumors—a convenient object for intraoperative radiotherapy application (surface location, relatively small size tumors, good operational access). The surface location and comparatively small size of neoplasms, good operational access provide an efficient and accurate transfer of the electron beam to the postoperative cavity to increase the irradiation dose in the areas of the most probable recurrence, which makes the tumors of this localization a convenient object for the use of the intraoperative radiation therapy. The treatment was conducted using a mobile compact betatron (MIB-6E), 10-12 Gy single dose. IORT session extends surgery period by 30 min. There were no pathological clinical and laboratory reactions on IORT in the early postoperative period. Carrying out the procedure is possible in various standard operating rooms. It does not require special security measures for the patients and the staff. IORT with the help of electron beam allows avoiding post-radiation reactions and achieving a 5-year—disease-free survival of 66% of the patients. IORT session is possible through a minimal incision during organ preservation surgeries. Evident economic feasibility provides the prospects of applying IORT in the clinical practice.

  14. Intraoperative ultrasonography of liver, bile ducts and pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Mendes de Oliveira Cerri

    Full Text Available The use of intraoperative ultrasonography (IOUS to evaluate liver, bile ducts and pancreatic disease, as compared to the results of preoperative ultrasonography and CT, is discussed. Forty-two patients who underwent abdominal surgery for suspected hepatobiliary and/or pancreatic disease were studied. The intraoperative study was carried out with a portable apparatus (Aloka 500, Japan, using 5.0 MHz and 7.5 MHz linear sterile transducers. The main indications for IOUS were the search for and/or evaluation of primary hepatic masses,hepatic abscesses or metastases, obstructive jaundice, or neuroendocrine tumors. In 15 cases (38.5 percent from the hepatobiliary group and in 7 cases (58.3 percent from the pancreatic group, a difference between preoperative and intraoperative findings was observed. The main difference was observed in relation to the number and size of hepatic and pancreatic lesions. The relationship between the lesions and the vascular structures was evaluated through IOUS. The method was also used to guide surgical procedures such as biopsies, the alcoholization of nodules, and the drainage of abscesses. IOUS plays an important role in detecting small hepatic and pancreatic nodules, in the assessment of anatomical relationships between the lesions and the vascular structures, and in the performance of interventionist procedures.

  15. Dacryocystorhinostomy without intubation with intraoperative mitomycin-c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.; Channa, S.; Memon, M.S.; Niazi, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the success rate and complications of intraoperative Mitomycin-C in dacryocystorhinostomy surgery. This study included total 90 eyes of 90 patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria.The surgical procedure of external DCR done with intraoperative Mitomycin-C with a neurosurgical cottonoid soaked with 0.2mg/ml. Mitomycin C was applied to the anastomosed flaps and osteotomy site for 10 minutes, without Silicon tube intubation. Surgery was done under local as well as general anesthesia. Patients were followed for 6 months. Out of 90 patients included in this study, only 2 patients complained of persistent epiphora after 6 months follow-up and were labeled as failed DCR. Remaining 88 had either no tearing or significant improvement of tearing after 6 months follow up and patent lacrimal system by syringing without pressure. Success rate in this procedure was 97.77% (p-value< 0.001). This study showed very high rate of success. Only complication noted was excessive nasal bleeding which was easily controlled. Intraoperative Mitomycin-C application in external DCR is safe, effective, cheap adjunct that helps to achieve good results of DCR surgery. (author)

  16. Intraoperative panoramic image using alignment grid, is it accurate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apivatthakakul, T; Duanghakrung, M; Luevitoonvechkit, S; Patumasutra, S

    2013-07-01

    Minimally invasive orthopedic trauma surgery relies heavily on intraoperative fluoroscopic images to evaluate the quality of fracture reduction and fixation. However, fluoroscopic images have a narrow field of view and often cannot visualize the entire long bone axis. To compare the coronal femoral alignment between conventional X-rays to that achieved with a new method of acquiring a panoramic intraoperative image. Twenty-four cadaveric femurs with simple diaphyseal fractures were fixed with an angulated broad DCP to create coronal plane malalignment. An intraoperative alignment grid was used to help stitch different fluoroscopic images together to produce a panoramic image. A conventional X-ray of the entire femur was then performed. The coronal plane angulation in the panoramic images was then compared to the conventional X-rays using a Wilcoxon signed rank test. The mean angle measured from the panoramic view was 173.9° (range 169.3°-178.0°) with median of 173.2°. The mean angle measured from the conventional X-ray was 173.4° (range 167.7°-178.7°) with a median angle of 173.5°. There was no significant difference between both methods of measurement (P = 0.48). Panoramic images produced by stitching fluoroscopic images together with help of an alignment grid demonstrated the same accuracy at evaluating the coronal plane alignment of femur fractures as conventional X-rays.

  17. Intraoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satomura, Kisaku; Inamoto, Shun; Honda, Kazuo; Takahashi, Masaji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1982-12-01

    Clinical results of intraoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer were reported. One hundred and five cases of gastric cancer were treated by intraoperative radiotherapy. Whatever the stage of the patient was, 3-year survival rate was found to be better in the radiotherapy group than that of the control group (treated surgical resection only). Five year survival rate of the stages III and IV in the radiotherapy group was better than the control group. Unfavorable side effects were observed in 4 cases out of 105 cases. In one case, penetration of postoperative peptic ulcer into the irradiated aortic wall was found by autopsy. Two cases of bile duct stenosis and one case of ileus due to acutely developed peritonitis carcinomatosa were experienced. In conclusion, intraoperative radiotherapy immediately after surgical resection for the treatment of gastric cancer was found to be an effective method. The most effective application of the method appears to be to cases of stage II and III without liver metastasis and peritoneal disseminations (H/sub 0/P/sub 0/, M, A).

  18. Intraoperative CT with integrated navigation system in spinal neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zausinger, S.; Heigl, T.; Scheder, B.; Schnell, O.; Tonn, J.C.; Uhl, E.; Morhard, D.

    2007-01-01

    For spinal surgery navigational system images are usually acquired before surgery with patients positioned supine. The aim of this study was to evaluate prospectively navigated procedures in spinal surgery with data acquisition by intraoperative computed tomography (iCT). CT data of 38 patients [thoracolumbar instability (n = 24), C1/2 instability (n = 6), cervicothoracic stabilization (n = 7), disk herniation (n = 1)] were acquired after positioning the patient in prone position. A sliding gantry 24 detector row CT was used for image acquisition. Data were imported to the frameless infrared-based neuronavigation station. A postprocedural CT was obtained to assess the extent of decompression and the accuracy of instrumentation. Intraoperative registration revealed computed accuracy 2 mm in 9/158 screws (5.6%), allowing immediate correction in five screws without any damage to vessels or nerves. There were three transient complications with clinical improvement in all patients. Intraoperative CT in combination with neuronavigation provides high accuracy of screw placement and thus safety for patients undergoing spinal stabilization. The procedure is rapid and easy to perform and - by replacing pre- and postoperative imaging-is not associated with additional exposure to radiation. (orig.)

  19. Can we trust intraoperative culture results in nonunions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Michael P; Altman, Daniel T; Altman, Gregory T; Sewecke, Jeffrey J; Ehrlich, Garth D; Hu, Fen Z; Nistico, Laura; Melton-Kreft, Rachel; Gause, Trent M; Costerton, John W

    2014-07-01

    To identify the presence of bacterial biofilms in nonunions comparing molecular techniques (multiplex polymerase chain reaction and mass spectrometry, fluorescent in situ hybridization) with routine intraoperative cultures. Thirty-four patients with nonunions were scheduled for surgery and enrolled in this ongoing prospective study. Intraoperative specimens were collected from removed implants, surrounding tissue membrane, and local soft tissue followed by standard culture analysis, Ibis's second generation molecular diagnostics (Ibis Biosystems), and bacterial 16S rRNA-based fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Confocal microscopy was used to visualize the tissue specimens reacted with the FISH probes, which were chosen based on the Ibis analysis. Thirty-four patient encounters were analyzed. Eight were diagnosed as infected nonunions by positive intraoperative culture results. Ibis confirmed the presence of bacteria in all 8 samples. Ibis identified bacteria in a total of 30 of 34 encounters, and these data were confirmed by FISH. Twenty-two of 30 Ibis-positive samples were culture-negative. Four samples were negative by all methods of analysis. No samples were positive by culture, but negative by molecular techniques. Our preliminary data indicate that molecular diagnostics are more sensitive for identifying bacteria than cultures in cases of bony nonunion. This is likely because of the inability of cultures to detect biofilms and bacteria previously exposed to antibiotic therapy. Diagnostic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  20. An audit of intraoperative frozen section in Johor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, J J

    2004-03-01

    A 4-year-review was carried out on intraoperative frozen section consultations in Sultanah Aminah Hospital, Johor Bahru. Two hundred and fifteen specimens were received from 79 patients in the period between January 1999 and December 2002. An average of 2.72 specimens per patient was received. The overall diagnostic accuracy was high, 97.56%. The diagnoses were deferred in 4.65% of the specimens. False positive diagnoses were made in 3 specimens (1.46%) and false negative diagnoses in 2 specimens (0.98%). This gave an error rate of 2.44%. The main cause of error was incorrect interpretation of the pathologic findings. In the present study, frozen sections showed good sensitivity (97.98%) and specificity (97.16%). Despite its limitations, frozen section is still generally considered to be an accurate mode of intraoperative consultation to assist the surgeon in deciding the best therapeutic approach for his patient at the operating table. The use of frozen section with proper indications was cost-effective as it helped lower the number of reoperations. An audit of intraoperative frozen section from time to time serves as part of an ongoing quality assurance program and should be recommended where the service is available.

  1. MONITORING DEPTH OF ANAESTHESIA USING PRST SCORE AND BISPECTRAL INDEX

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul; Sowmya; Rangalakshmi; Roshan Kumar; Karthik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Intraoperative awareness is a frightening experience for any patient for it has long term psychological consequences. Among the various tools available for monitoring depth of anaesthesia, Bispectral index monitoring (BIS) is one of the recent and widely accepted techniques. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : The present study was carried out ...

  2. Intraoperative definition of bottom-of-sulcus dysplasia using intraoperative ultrasound and single depth electrode recording - A technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dorothea; Carney, Patrick; Archer, John S; Fitt, Gregory J; Jackson, Graeme D; Bulluss, Kristian J

    2018-02-01

    Bottom of sulcus dysplasias (BOSDs) are localized focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) centred on the bottom of a sulcus that can be highly epileptogenic, but difficult to delineate intraoperatively. We report on a patient with refractory epilepsy due to a BOSD, successfully resected with the aid of a multimodal surgical approach using neuronavigation based on MRI and PET, intraoperative ultrasound (iUS) and electrocorticography (ECoG) using depth electrodes. The lesion could be visualized on iUS showing an increase in echogenicity at the grey-white matter junction. IUS demonstrated the position of the depth electrode in relation to the lesion. Depth electrode recording showed almost continuous spiking. Thus, intraoperative imaging and electrophysiology helped confirm the exact location of the lesion. Post-resection ultrasound demonstrated the extent of the resection and depth electrode recording did not show any epileptiform activity. Thus, both techniques helped assess completeness of resection. The patient has been seizure free since surgery. Using a multimodal approach including iUS and ECoG is a helpful adjunct in surgery for BOSD and may improve seizure outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Individualized treatment of craniovertebral junction malformation guided by intraoperative computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianfeng; Wang, Peng; Chen, LiFeng; Ma, Xiaodong; Bu, Bo; Yu, Xinguang

    2012-04-01

    This study was designed to report our preliminary experience of intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) using a mobile scanner with integrated neuronavigation system (NNS). The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility and potential utility of iCT with integrated NNS in individualized treatment of craniovertebral junction malformation (CVJM). The surgical management of congenital craniovertebral anomalies is complex due to the relative difficulty in accessing the region, critical relationships of neurovascular structures, and the intricate biomechanical issues involved. We reported our first 19 complex CVJM cases including 11 male and 8 female patients from January, 2009 to June, 2009 (mean age, 33.9 y; age range, 13 to 58 y). A sliding gantry 40-slice CT scanner was installed in a preexisting operating room. Image data was transferred directly from the scanner into the NNS using an automated registration system. We applied this technology to transoral odontoidectomy in 17 patients. Moreover, with the extra help of iCT integrated with NNS, odontoidectomy through posterior midline approach, and transoral atlantal lateral mass resection were, for the first time, performed for treatment of complex CVJM. NNS was found to correlate well with the intraoperative findings, and the recalibration was uneven in all cases with an accuracy of 1.6 mm (1.6: 1.2 to 2.0). All patients were clinically evaluated by Nurick grade criteria, and neurological deficits were monitored after 3 months of surgery. Fifteen patients (79%) were improved by at least 1 Nurick grade, whereas the grade did not change in 4 patients (21%). iCT scanning with integrated NNS was both feasible and beneficial for the surgical management of complex CVJM. In this unusual patient population, the technique seemed to be valuable in negotiating complex anatomy and achieving a safe and predictable decompression.

  4. Intraoperative neuronavigation integrated high resolution 3D ultrasound for brainshift and tumor resection control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The link between the neurosurgeon’s knowledge and the scientific improvements made a dramatic change in the field expressed both in impressive drop in the mortality and morbidity rates that were operated in the beginning of the XXth century and in operating with high rates of success cases that were considered inoperable in the past. Neuronavigation systems have been used for many years on surgical orientation purposes especially for small, deep seated lesions where the use of neuronavigation is correlated with smaller corticotomies and with the extended use of transulcal approaches. The major problem of neuronavigation, the brainshift once the dura is opened can be solved either by integrated ultrasound or intraoperative MRI which is out of reach for many neurosurgical departments. METHOD: The procedure of neuronavigation and ultrasonic localization of the tumor is described starting with positioning the patient in the visual field of the neuronavigation integrated 3D ultrasonography system to the control of tumor resection by repeating the ultrasonographic scan in the end of the procedure. DISCUSSION: As demonstrated by many clinical trials on gliomas, the more tumor removed, the better long term control of tumor regrowth and the longer survival with a good quality of life. Of course, no matter how aggressive the surgery, no new deficits are acceptable in the modern era neurosurgery. There are many adjuvant methods for the neurosurgeon to achieve this maximal and safe tumor removal, including the 3T MRI combined with tractography and functional MRI, the intraoperative neuronavigation and neurophysiologic monitoring in both anesthetized and awake patients. The ultrasonography integrated in neuronavigaton comes as a welcomed addition to this adjuvants to help the surgeon achieve the set purpose. CONCLUSION: With the use of this real time imaging device, the common problem of brainshift encountered with the neuronavigation systems

  5. Association of intraoperative tissue oxygenation with suspected risk factors for tissue hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruit, R J; Schwarte, L A; Hakenberg, O W; Scheeren, T W L

    2013-10-01

    Tissue hypoxia may cause organ dysfunction, but not much is known about tissue oxygenation in the intraoperative setting. We studied microcirculatory tissue oxygen saturation (StO₂) to determine representative values for anesthetized patients undergoing urological surgery and to test the hypothesis that StO₂ is associated with known perioperative risk factors for morbidity and mortality, conventionally monitored variables, and hypotension requiring norepinephrine. Using near-infrared spectroscopy, we measured StO₂ on the thenar eminence in 160 patients undergoing open urological surgery under general anesthesia (FiO2 0.35-0.4), and calculated its correlations with age, risk level for general perioperative complications and mortality (high if age ≥70 and procedure is radical cystectomy), mean arterial pressure (MAP), hemoglobin concentration (Hb), central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO₂), and norepinephrine use. The time averaged StO₂ was 86 ± 6 % (mean ± SD). In the multivariate analysis, Hb [standardized coefficient (SC) 0.21, p = 0.003], ScvO₂ (SC 0.53, p SStO₂ was partly dependent on MAP only when this was below 65 mmHg (lowest MAP SC 0.20, p = 0.006, MAP area under the curve <65 mmHg SC 0.03, p = 0.02). Finally, StO₂ was slightly lower in patients requiring norepinephrine (85 ± 6 vs. 89 ± 6 %, p = 0.001). Intraoperative StO₂ in urological patients was comparable to that of healthy volunteers breathing room air as reported in the literature and correlated with known perioperative risk factors. Further research should investigate its association with outcome and the effect of interventions aimed at optimizing StO₂.

  6. Intraoperative Vascular Neuromonitoring in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Pilot Study Using Combined Laser-Doppler Spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Emilija; Bischoff, Barbara; Wolf, Dennis; Schmitt, Hubert J; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y; Roessler, Karl; Buchfelder, Michael; Sommer, Björn

    2017-11-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cerebral microcirculation in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may predict the postoperative neurologic outcome. In this pilot study, we examined the value of a novel noninvasive real-time measurement technique for detecting changes in local microcirculation. We used the O2C (Oxygen to see) laser-Doppler spectrophotometry system in 14 patients with Hunt & Hess grade 2-5 SAH who underwent microsurgical cerebral aneurysm clipping. A subdural probe recorded capillary venous oxygenation (SO 2 ), relative hemoglobin concentration, blood cell velocity, and blood flow at a tissue depth of 7 mm. Data were recorded immediately before dural closure. We also recorded somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) with median and tibial nerve stimulation. Results were compared with neurologic performance, as measured on the modified Rankin Scale, at the day of discharge from the hospital and 12 months thereafter. Patient functional outcomes after discharge and 12 months were correlated with pathological decreased flow and increased SO 2 values. In 6 of 8 patients, microcirculatory monitoring parameters indicated ischemia during surgery, as shown by electrophysiological SEP changes and infarction detected on the postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan. Pathological SEP results correlated closely with infarct demarcation as seen on CT. Our results indicate the potential benefit of intraoperative combined laser-Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry for predicting postoperative clinical outcomes in this small patient sample. Larger-cohort testing is needed to verify our findings and show the possible merits of this novel method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnosing periprosthetic infection: false-positive intraoperative Gram stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oethinger, Margret; Warner, Debra K; Schindler, Susan A; Kobayashi, Hideo; Bauer, Thomas W

    2011-04-01

    Intraoperative Gram stains have a reported low sensitivity but high specificity when used to help diagnose periprosthetic infections. In early 2008, we recognized an unexpectedly high frequency of apparent false-positive Gram stains from revision arthroplasties. The purpose of this report is to describe the cause of these false-positive test results. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of all intraoperative Gram stains submitted from revision arthroplasty cases during a 3-month interval using microbiologic cultures of the same samples as the gold standard. Methods of specimen harvesting, handling, transport, distribution, specimen processing including tissue grinding/macerating, Gram staining, and interpretation were studied. After a test modification, results of specimens were prospectively collected for a second 3-month interval, and the sensitivity and specificity of intraoperative Gram stains were calculated. The retrospective review of 269 Gram stains submitted from revision arthroplasties indicated historic sensitivity and specificity values of 23% and 92%, respectively. Systematic analysis of all steps of the procedure identified Gram-stained but nonviable bacteria in commercial broth reagents used as diluents for maceration of periprosthetic membranes before Gram staining and culture. Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing showed mixed bacterial DNA. Evaluation of 390 specimens after initiating standardized Millipore filtering of diluent fluid revealed a reduced number of positive Gram stains, yielding 9% sensitivity and 99% specificity. Clusters of false-positive Gram stains have been reported in other clinical conditions. They are apparently rare related to diagnosing periprosthetic infections but have severe consequences if used to guide treatment. Even occasional false-positive Gram stains should prompt review of laboratory methods. Our observations implicate dead bacteria in microbiologic reagents as potential sources of false-positive Gram

  8. Intraoperative HDR implant boost for breast cancer (preliminary results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, I.; Torre, M. de la; Gonzalez, E.; Bourel, V.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: In spite of the fact that it is been discussed whether or not a boost is necessary for all conservative treated breast cancer patients, it is a generalized radiotherapy practice. Since september 1993 we developed a breast conservative protocol for early stage breast cancer (T1-T2) with intraoperative HDR implant boost. Side effects, cosmetic results and recurrence rates are reviewed. Method and Material: From September 1993 we treated 55 patients with intraoperative HDR implant boost to the lumpectomy site for clinical T1 or T2 invasive breast cancer, followed by external megavoltage radiotherapy to the entire breast. We used the Nucletron microselectron HDR remote afterloading system with flexible implant tubes. The geometric distribution of the tubes was performed according to the 'Paris' configuration. Each implant was evaluated by calculating the dose-volume natural histograms. The HDR fractionation schedule consists of three fractions of 4.5Gy each given at least 48 hs apart, and starting between 48-72hs from surgical procedure. The external radiotherapy to the entire breast started one week after the completion of brachytherapy, using conventional fractionation of 5 fractions per week, 1,8Gy per fraction up to 45-50Gy. Results: So far there is not any local recurrence, but medium follow up is only 18 months. We did not observe any acute damage and the cosmetic outcome was 60% excellent, 30% good and 10% acceptable. Two patients developed localized fibrosis, in both the implant involved the submamary fold. Conclusion: The intraoperative implant is the most accurate way to localize the lumpectomy site, to define the target volume, decrease the total treatment time and avoid a second anesthetic procedure without delaying the inpatient time or the initial wound healing process

  9. [Intraoperative choledochoscopy usefulness in the treatment of difficult biliary stones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuendis-Velázquez, A; Rojano-Rodríguez, M E; Morales-Chávez, C E; González Angulo-Rocha, A; Fernández-Castro, E; Aguirre-Olmedo, I; Torres-Ruiz, M F; Orellana-Parra, J C; Cárdenas-Lailson, L E

    2014-01-01

    Choledocholithiasis presents in 5-10% of the patients with biliary lithiasis. Numerous treatment algorithms have been considered for this disease, however, up to 10% of these therapeutic procedures may fail. Intraoperative choledochoscopy has become a useful tool in the treatment of patients with difficult-to-manage choledocholithiasis. To determine the usefulness of intraoperative choledochoscopy in the laparoendoscopic treatment of difficult stones that was carried out in our service. A cross-sectional study was conducted. The case records were reviewed of the patients that underwent intraoperative choledochoscopy during biliary tree exploration plus laparoscopic choledochoduodenal anastomosis within the time frame of March 1, 2011 and May 31, 2012, at the Hospital General Dr. Manuel Gea González. Transabdominal choledochoscopies were performed with active stone extraction when necessary, followed by peroral choledochoscopies through the recently formed bilioenteric anastomosis. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and measures of central tendency. The mean age was 71 years, 57% of the patients were women, and the ASA III score predominated. Active extraction of stones with 7 to 35mm diameters was carried out in 4 of the cases and the absence of stones in the biliary tract was corroborated in all the patients. The mean surgery duration was 18 minutes (range: 4 to 45min). Choledochoscopy is a safe and effective minimally invasive procedure for the definitive treatment of difficult stones. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Pediatric awake craniotomy and intra-operative stimulation mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, James A; Khan, Osaama H; Taylor, Michael; Dirks, Peter; Der, Tara; Carter Snead Iii, O; Weiss, Shelly; Ochi, Ayako; Drake, James; Rutka, James T

    2014-11-01

    The indications for operating on lesions in or near areas of cortical eloquence balance the benefit of resection with the risk of permanent neurological deficit. In adults, awake craniotomy has become a versatile tool in tumor, epilepsy and functional neurosurgery, permitting intra-operative stimulation mapping particularly for language, sensory and motor cortical pathways. This allows for maximal tumor resection with considerable reduction in the risk of post-operative speech and motor deficits. We report our experience of awake craniotomy and cortical stimulation for epilepsy and supratentorial tumors located in and around eloquent areas in a pediatric population (n=10, five females). The presenting symptom was mainly seizures and all children had normal neurological examinations. Neuroimaging showed lesions in the left opercular (n=4) and precentral or peri-sylvian regions (n=6). Three right-sided and seven left-sided awake craniotomies were performed. Two patients had a history of prior craniotomy. All patients had intra-operative mapping for either speech or motor or both using cortical stimulation. The surgical goal for tumor patients was gross total resection, while for all epilepsy procedures, focal cortical resections were completed without any difficulty. None of the patients had permanent post-operative neurologic deficits. The patient with an epileptic focus over the speech area in the left frontal lobe had a mild word finding difficulty post-operatively but this improved progressively. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 27 months. Pediatric awake craniotomy with intra-operative mapping is a precise, safe and reliable method allowing for resection of lesions in eloquent areas. Further validations on larger number of patients will be needed to verify the utility of this technique in the pediatric population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Alpha antagonists and intraoperative floppy iris syndrome: A spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif A Issa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Sharif A Issa, Omar H Hadid, Oliver Baylis, Margaret DayanDepartment of Ophthalmology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, UKBackground: To determine occurrence of features of intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS during cataract surgery in patients taking systemic alpha-antagonists (AA.Methods: We prospectively studied patients on AA and who underwent phacoemulsification. The following were recorded: pupil diameter preoperatively, iris flaccidity, iris prolapse and peroperative miosis.Results: We studied 40 eyes of 31 subjects. Mean age was 78 years. Overall, 14 eyes (13 patients showed signs of IFIS: 9/13 (69% eyes of patients on tamsulosin, 1/18 (6% eyes in the doxazosin group, 2/2 prazosin patients, 1/4 eyes in the indoramin group, and 1/2 eyes in two patients on a combination of doxazosin and tamsulosin. Most cases (92% had only one or two signs of IFIS. Bilateral cataract surgery was undertaken in 9 patients but only one patient (on tamsulosin had features of IFIS in both eyes, while 4 patients (2 on tamsulosin and 2 on other AA showed signs of IFIS in one eye only, and 4 patients did not show IFIS in either eye.Conclusion: Most AA were associated with IFIS, but it tends to present as a spectrum of signs rather than full triad originally described. Tamsulosin was most likely to be associated with IFIS; however, its intake does not necessarily mean that IFIS will occur. For patients on AA, the behavior of the iris intraoperatively in one eye is a poor predictor of the other eye. Surgeons should anticipate the occurrence of IFIS in any patient on AA.Keywords: alpha blocker, alpha antagonist, cataract surgery, intraoperative floppy iris syndrome, tamsulosin.

  12. Microdebrider tonsillectomy associated with more intraoperative blood loss than electrocautery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansifer, Kyle J; Szramowski, Molly G; Barazsu, Lindsay; Buchinsky, Farrel J

    2012-10-01

    To describe and compare the intraoperative blood loss in children who underwent tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy during a transition from using electrocautery to a microdebrider. Retrospective case series of a single pediatric otolaryngologist at an urban general hospital. Patients aged 2-20 years who had tonsillectomy, adenoidectomy, or adenotonsillectomy over a 12 month period were included. Tonsillectomy was performed by microdebrider or electrocautery and adenoidectomy was performed by microdebrider, curette, or suction electrocautery. Total intraoperative blood loss was measured and compared between surgical techniques. Of the 148 patients, 109 had tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy and 39 had adenoidectomy alone. The mean blood loss was 47 ml or 1.8 ± 1.6 ml/kg and the maximum blood loss was 11 ml/kg. Adenoid curette and adenoid microdebrider yielded similar blood loss but were associated with more bleeding than suction electrocautery (Pelectrocautery tonsillectomy (mean of 2.6 ± 2.2 ml/kg versus 1.2 ± 1.2 ml/kg, P=0.0002). Eighteen percent of adenotonsillectomy patients lost greater than 5% of calculated circulating blood volume (95% CI, 9.8-26). Linear regression models did not show an association between the amount of blood loss and patient age, clinical indication, or the surgeon's experience with the microdebrider (P>0.05). Microdebrider tonsillectomy is associated with more intraoperative bleeding than electrocautery tonsillectomy. Approximately twice as much blood was lost with the microdebrider, but the absolute increase was insignificant from a hemodynamic perspective. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevention of intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks by lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage during surgery for pituitary macroadenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Gautam U; Oldfield, Edward H

    2012-06-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid leakage is a major complication of transsphenoidal surgery. An intraoperative CSF leak, which occurs in up to 50% of pituitary tumor cases, is the only modifiable risk factor for postoperative leaks. Although several techniques have been described for surgical repair when an intraoperative leak is noted, none has been proposed to prevent an intraoperative CSF leak. The authors postulated that intraoperative CSF drainage would diminish tension on the arachnoid, decrease the rate of intraoperative CSF leakage during surgery for larger tumors, and reduce the need for surgical repair of CSF leaks. The results of 114 transsphenoidal operations for pituitary macroadenoma performed without intraoperative CSF drainage were compared with the findings from 44 cases in which a lumbar subarachnoid catheter was placed before surgery to drain CSF at the time of dural exposure and tumor removal. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage reduced the rate of intraoperative CSF leakage from 41% to 5% (p drainage reduced the need for operative repair (from 32% to 5%, p drainage during transsphenoidal surgery for macroadenomas reduces the rate of intraoperative CSF leaks. This preventative measure obviated the need for surgical repair of intraoperative CSF leaks using autologous fat graft placement, other operative techniques, postoperative lumbar drainage, and/or reoperation in most patients and is associated with minimal risks.

  14. Intraoperative computed tomography with integrated navigation system in spinal stabilizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zausinger, Stefan; Scheder, Ben; Uhl, Eberhard; Heigl, Thomas; Morhard, Dominik; Tonn, Joerg-Christian

    2009-12-15

    STUDY DESIGN.: A prospective interventional case-series study plus a retrospective analysis of historical patients for comparison of data. OBJECTIVE.: To evaluate workflow, feasibility, and clinical outcome of navigated stabilization procedures with data acquisition by intraoperative computed tomography. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Routine fluoroscopy to assess pedicle screw placement is not consistently reliable. Our hypothesis was that image-guided spinal navigation using an intraoperative CT-scanner can improve the safety and precision of spinal stabilization surgery. METHODS.: CT data of 94 patients (thoracolumbar [n = 66], C1/2 [n = 12], cervicothoracic instability [n = 16]) were acquired after positioning the patient in the final surgical position. A sliding gantry 40-slice CT was used for image acquisition. Data were imported to a frameless infrared-based neuronavigation workstation. Intraoperative CT was obtained to assess the accuracy of instrumentation and, if necessary, the extent of decompression. All patients were clinically evaluated by Odom-criteria after surgery and after 3 months. RESULTS.: Computed accuracy of the navigation system reached /=2 mm without persistent neurologic or vascular damage in 20/414 screws (4.8%) leading to immediate correction of 10 screws (2.4%). Control-iCT changed the course of surgery in 8 cases (8.5% of all patients). The overall revision rate was 8.5% (4 wound revisions, 2 CSF fistulas, and 2 epidural hematomas). There was no reoperation due to implant malposition. According to Odom-criteria all patients experienced a clinical improvement. A retrospective analysis of 182 patients with navigated thoracolumbar transpedicular stabilizations in the preiCT era revealed an overall revision rate of 10.4% with 4.4% of patients requiring screw revision. CONCLUSION.: Intraoperative CT in combination with neuronavigation provides high accuracy of screw placement and thus safety for patients undergoing spinal stabilization

  15. Visualization strategies for major white matter tracts for intraoperative use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimsky, C.; Ganslandt, O.; Buchfelder, M. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Neurocenter; Enders, F.; Merhof, D. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Neurocenter; Hammen, T. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Neurocenter; Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Neurology

    2006-03-15

    Streamline representation of major fiber tract systems along with high-resolution anatomical data provides a reliable orientation for the neurosurgeon. For intraoperative visualization of these data either on navigation screens near the surgical field or directly in the surgical field applying heads-up displays of operating microscopes, wrapping of all streamlines of interest to render an individual object representing the whole fiber bundle is the most suitable representation. Integration of fiber tract data into a neuronavigation setup allows removal of tumors adjacent to eloquent brain areas with low morbidity. (orig.)

  16. Visualization strategies for major white matter tracts for intraoperative use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimsky, C.; Ganslandt, O.; Buchfelder, M.; Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen; Enders, F.; Merhof, D.; Hammen, T.; Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen

    2006-01-01

    Streamline representation of major fiber tract systems along with high-resolution anatomical data provides a reliable orientation for the neurosurgeon. For intraoperative visualization of these data either on navigation screens near the surgical field or directly in the surgical field applying heads-up displays of operating microscopes, wrapping of all streamlines of interest to render an individual object representing the whole fiber bundle is the most suitable representation. Integration of fiber tract data into a neuronavigation setup allows removal of tumors adjacent to eloquent brain areas with low morbidity. (orig.)

  17. Non-radiographic intraoperative fluorescent cholangiography is feasible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Schytt; Schulze, Svend; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Intraoperative fluorescent cholangiography (IFC) with concomitant fluorescent angiography was recently developed for non-invasive identification of the anatomy during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The objective of this study was to assess the time required for routine-use of IFC...... hepatic duct was identified by IFC in all patients. In 29 of the 35 patients (83%; 95% confidence interval: 71-96%), the cystic artery was visualised by fluorescent angiography. No adverse effects or complications were recorded. CONCLUSION: Routine-use of IFC with fluorescent angiography during...

  18. A CASE OF GRANISETRON ASSOCIATED INTRAOPERATIVE CARDIAC ARREST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Harbi, Mohammed; Al Rifai, Derar; Al Habeeb, Hassan; Wambi, Freddie; Geldhof, Georges; Dimitriou, Vassilios

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of intraoperative severe bradycardia that resulted in asystole and cardiac arrest shortly after (granisetron 1mg for postoperative nausea and vomiting prophylaxis, that occurred in a female patient who underwent an elective total thyroidectomy. After two cycles of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation, spontaneous circulation and sinus rhythm returned successfully. Postoperatively, the patient was diagnosed with a drug-induced long QT syndrome. At the time of the event, granisetron was the only medication administered. Furthermore, there was no reason to suspect electrolyte abnormalities. We explore the association of the onset of severe sinus bradycardia with the intravenous administration of granisetron.

  19. Intraoperative radiotherapy of malignant pancreatic tumors - first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurnher, S.; Glaser, K.; Url, M.; Frommhold, H.; Bodner, E.

    1987-02-01

    Thirteen patients suffering from adenocarcinomas of the pancreas were submitted to an intraoperative fast electron 'boost' therapy with or without percutaneous photon irradiation. A duodeno-cephalo-pancreatectomy with subsequent irradiation of the tumor bed could be performed in three patients. Ten patients were inoperable because of advanced tumors and formation of metastases. The average survival is 6.5 months, at present six patients are alive without major troubles. An analgetic effect was obtained in ten patients. The first results are encouraging with respect to local control, the little acute and chronic morbidity, and palliation achieved in advances stages.

  20. Intraoperative radiotherapy of malignant pancreatic tumors - first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurnher, S.; Glaser, K.; Url, M.; Frommhold, H.; Bodner, E.; Innsbruck Univ.

    1987-01-01

    Thirteen patients suffering from adenocarcinomas of the pancreas were submitted to an intraoperative fast electron 'boost' therapy with or without percutaneous photon irradiation. A duodeno-cephalo-pancreatectomy with subsequent irradiation of the tumor bed could be performed in three patients. Ten patients were inoperable because of advanced tumors and formation of metastases. The average survival is 6.5 months, at present six patients are alive without major troubles. An analgetic effect was obtained in ten patients. The first results are encouraging with respect to local control, the little acute and chronic morbidity, and palliation achieved in advances stages. (orig.) [de

  1. Intraoperative neuropathology of glioma recurrence: cell detection and classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abas, Fazly S.; Gokozan, Hamza N.; Goksel, Behiye; Otero, Jose J.; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative neuropathology of glioma recurrence represents significant visual challenges to pathologists as they carry significant clinical implications. For example, rendering a diagnosis of recurrent glioma can help the surgeon decide to perform more aggressive resection if surgically appropriate. In addition, the success of recent clinical trials for intraoperative administration of therapies, such as inoculation with oncolytic viruses, may suggest that refinement of the intraoperative diagnosis during neurosurgery is an emerging need for pathologists. Typically, these diagnoses require rapid/STAT processing lasting only 20-30 minutes after receipt from neurosurgery. In this relatively short time frame, only dyes, such as hematoxylin and eosin (H and E), can be implemented. The visual challenge lies in the fact that these patients have undergone chemotherapy and radiation, both of which induce cytological atypia in astrocytes, and pathologists are unable to implement helpful biomarkers in their diagnoses. Therefore, there is a need to help pathologists differentiate between astrocytes that are cytologically atypical due to treatment versus infiltrating, recurrent, neoplastic astrocytes. This study focuses on classification of neoplastic versus non-neoplastic astrocytes with the long term goal of providing a better neuropathological computer-aided consultation via classification of cells into reactive gliosis versus recurrent glioma. We present a method to detect cells in H and E stained digitized slides of intraoperative cytologic preparations. The method uses a combination of the `value' component of the HSV color space and `b*' component of the CIE L*a*b* color space to create an enhanced image that suppresses the background while revealing cells on an image. A composite image is formed based on the morphological closing of the hue-luminance combined image. Geometrical and textural features extracted from Discrete Wavelet Frames and combined to classify

  2. Clinical experience with intraoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Takahashi, Masaharu; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    1988-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was performed on 20 patients with colorectal cancer. IORT with a single dose of 20 to 40 Gy was delivered to the residual tumor, tumor bed, and/or lymphnode regions. Although most of the patients had advanced lesions, local control was achieved in 67 % of the patients when IORT was combined with tumor resection, and 4 patients survived more than 5 years. There were no serious complications, except for contracture or atrophy of the psoas muscle seen in 2 patients. IORT combined with external beam radiotherapy should be a useful adjuvant therapy to surgery for locally advanced colorectal cancer. (author)

  3. Intraoperative Anaphylaxis to Inj Ceftriaxone: Here We Go Again

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit G Bhagwat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaphylactic reactions to intraoperative antibiotics are rare events and reactions after a negative intradermal skin testing are even rarer. We are reporting a case of grade V anaphylactic reaction to ceftriaxone, which occurred inspite of a negative skin testing preoperatively. Despite of the treatment along the established guidelines, patient suffered hypoxic brain damage ultimately having a fatal outcome 7 days later. This case highlights the limits of the screening test done preoperatively for antibiotic sensitivity and also the difficulty in resuscitating anaphylactic reac-tions when patient is on B blocker and under spinal anaesthesia.

  4. Evaluation of stroke volume variation obtained by arterial pulse contour analysis to predict fluid responsiveness intraoperatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, D; Kabon, B; Marschalek, C; Chiari, A; Pestel, G; Kaider, A; Fleischmann, E; Hetz, H

    2009-09-01

    Fluid management guided by oesophageal Doppler monitor has been reported to improve perioperative outcome. Stroke volume variation (SVV) is considered a reliable clinical predictor of fluid responsiveness. Consequently, the aim of the present trial was to evaluate the accuracy of SVV determined by arterial pulse contour (APCO) analysis, using the FloTrac/Vigileo system, to predict fluid responsiveness as measured by the oesophageal Doppler. Patients undergoing major abdominal surgery received intraoperative fluid management guided by oesophageal Doppler monitoring. Fluid boluses of 250 ml each were administered in case of a decrease in corrected flow time (FTc) to 10%. The ability of SVV to predict fluid responsiveness was assessed by calculation of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Twenty patients received 67 fluid boluses. Fifty-two of the 67 fluid boluses administered resulted in fluid responsiveness. SVV achieved an area under the ROC curve of 0.512 [confidence interval (CI) 0.32-0.70]. A cut-off point for fluid responsiveness was found for SVV > or =8.5% (sensitivity: 77%; specificity: 43%; positive predictive value: 84%; and negative predictive value: 33%). This prospective, interventional observer-blinded study demonstrates that SVV obtained by APCO, using the FloTrac/Vigileo system, is not a reliable predictor of fluid responsiveness in the setting of major abdominal surgery.

  5. Improvement of limb salvage procedure using intraoperative radiotherapy for osteosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Toru; Iwasaki, Katsuo; Kamishiro,; Toshiyuki,; Hayashi, Yasuyuki [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1992-10-01

    Clinical outcome of limb salvage procedure combined with intraoperative irradiation was investigated in 6 patients with osteosarcoma in the distal part of femur (n=4) and proximal part of tibia (n=2). They ranged in age from 12 to 54 years, with a mean of 22.5. First, a lesion was separated from the surrounding soft tissue with curatively wide margin. Osteotomy was performed at the portion of diaphysis. After irradiation field was setted up by lifting the lesion, and was exposed to doses ranging from 60 Gy to 85 Gy of intraoperative irradiation, soft tissue and fragile tumor tissue, excluding joint capsule and ligament, were removed as soon as possible. Finally, bone was jointed by means of inner fixation or bone grafting. They had a median follow-up of one year and four months after surgery. Although superficial wound infection and delayed wound adhesion were encountered as postoperative complications in one and two patients, respectively, these were all healed. None of the patients had local recurrence. The ability of salvaged limb was excellent in one, good in 3, and fair in 2 patients. Because both of the two patients with sarcoma in the proximal part of tibia had excellent and good limb ability, this procedure was considered useful especially for sarcoma in the proximal part of tibia. (N.K.).

  6. Integrating multimodal information for intraoperative assistance in neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenmann U.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer-assisted planning of complex neurosurgical interventions benefits from a variety of specific functions and tools. However, commercial planning- and neuronavigation systems are rather restrictive concerning the availability of innovative methods such as novel imaging modalities, fiber tracking algorithms or electrical dipole mapping. In this respect there is a demand for modular neurosurgical planning systems offering flexible interfaces for easy enhancement. Furthermore all relevant planning information should be available within neuron-avigation. In this work we present a planning system providing these capabilities and its suitability and application in a clinical setting. Our Multimodal Planning System (MOPS 3D offers a variety of tools such as definition of trajectories for minimally invasive surgery, segmentation of ROIs, integration of functional information from atlas maps or magnetoencephalography. It also supplies plugin interfaces for future extensions. For intraoperative application MOPS is coupled with the neuronavigation system Brainlab Vector Vision Cranial/ENT (VVC. We evaluated MOPS in the Department of Neurosurgery at the University Hospital Heidelberg. Surgical planning and navigation was performed in 5 frequently occurring clinical cases. The time necessary for planning was between 5 and 15 minutes including data import, segmentation and planning tasks. The additional information intraoperatively provided by MOPS 3D was highly appreciated by the neurosurgeons and the performance was satisfactory.

  7. A case of lumbar pain after intraoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Wakako; Ogino, Takashi; Murakami, Koji; Nawano, Shigeru; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ryu, Munemasa; Kawano, Nariaki

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings after intraoperative radiotherapy. A 53-year-old woman with cancer of the papilla of Vater was treated with pancreatoduodenectomy and 20 Gy of intraoperative radiotherapy by electron beam to the tumor bed. Three months later the patient complained of lumbar pain. A change of signal intensity on MRI was detected in the anterior half of the vertebral body within the irradiated field. The signal was of high intensity but was not enhanced by Gd-DTPA on T1-weighted images, was isointense on T2-weighted images and of low intensity with the fat-suppression method. The radiation dose to the lumbar spine and the surrounding soft tissue was calculated to be 16 Gy. Histologic changes in bone after irradiation may include depletion of bone marrow cells and fat degeneration. The MRI findings were compatible with these changes. The radiation dose that can be tolerated by soft tissue is lower than that tolerated by bone. Therefore, late radiation injury of the soft tissue might have been the cause of the patient's lumbar pain. (author)

  8. Improvement of limb salvage procedure using intraoperative radiotherapy for osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Toru; Iwasaki, Katsuo; Kamishiro; Toshiyuki; Hayashi, Yasuyuki

    1992-01-01

    Clinical outcome of limb salvage procedure combined with intraoperative irradiation was investigated in 6 patients with osteosarcoma in the distal part of femur (n=4) and proximal part of tibia (n=2). They ranged in age from 12 to 54 years, with a mean of 22.5. First, a lesion was separated from the surrounding soft tissue with curatively wide margin. Osteotomy was performed at the portion of diaphysis. After irradiation field was setted up by lifting the lesion, and was exposed to doses ranging from 60 Gy to 85 Gy of intraoperative irradiation, soft tissue and fragile tumor tissue, excluding joint capsule and ligament, were removed as soon as possible. Finally, bone was jointed by means of inner fixation or bone grafting. They had a median follow-up of one year and four months after surgery. Although superficial wound infection and delayed wound adhesion were encountered as postoperative complications in one and two patients, respectively, these were all healed. None of the patients had local recurrence. The ability of salvaged limb was excellent in one, good in 3, and fair in 2 patients. Because both of the two patients with sarcoma in the proximal part of tibia had excellent and good limb ability, this procedure was considered useful especially for sarcoma in the proximal part of tibia. (N.K.)

  9. Tumors in dogs exposed to experimental intraoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Laskin, William B.; De Luca, Anne Marie; Barnes, Margaret; Kinsella, Timothy J.; Sindelar, William F.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The frequency of radiation-induced neoplasms was determined in dogs enrolled in the National Cancer Institute canine trials of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: Twelve protocols assessing normal tissue response to IORT involved 238 dogs in a 15-year trial. Eighty-one dogs were followed for > 24 months postoperatively and were assessed for tumor development; 59 of these animals received IORT. Results: Twelve tumors occurred in the 59 dogs receiving IORT. Nine were in the IORT portals and were considered to be radiation induced. No tumors occurred in 13 sham animals or in 9 animals treated with external beam radiotherapy alone. The frequency of radiation-induced malignancies in dogs receiving IORT was 15%, and was 25% in animals receiving ≥ 25 Gy IORT. Frequency of all tumors, including spontaneous lesions, was 20%. Conclusions: Intraoperative radiotherapy contributed to a high frequency of sarcoma induction in these dogs. Unknown to date in humans involved in clinical trials of IORT, this potential complication should be looked for as long-term survivors are followed

  10. Compact Intraoperative MRI: Stereotactic Accuracy and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Daniel; Lin, Dishen; Salas, Sussan; Kohn, Nina; Schulder, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Intraoperative imaging must supply data that can be used for accurate stereotactic navigation. This information should be at least as accurate as that acquired from diagnostic imagers. The aim of this study was to compare the stereotactic accuracy of an updated compact intraoperative MRI (iMRI) device based on a 0.15-T magnet to standard surgical navigation on a 1.5-T diagnostic scan MRI and to navigation with an earlier model of the same system. The accuracy of each system was assessed using a water-filled phantom model of the brain. Data collected with the new system were compared to those obtained in a previous study assessing the older system. The accuracy of the new iMRI was measured against standard surgical navigation on a 1.5-T MRI using T1-weighted (W) images. The mean error with the iMRI using T1W images was lower than that based on images from the 1.5-T scan (1.24 vs. 2.43 mm). T2W images from the newer iMRI yielded a lower navigation error than those acquired with the prior model (1.28 vs. 3.15 mm). Improvements in magnet design can yield progressive increases in accuracy, validating the concept of compact, low-field iMRI. Avoiding the need for registration between image and surgical space increases navigation accuracy. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Stereoscopic Integrated Imaging Goggles for Multimodal Intraoperative Image Guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Mela

    Full Text Available We have developed novel stereoscopic wearable multimodal intraoperative imaging and display systems entitled Integrated Imaging Goggles for guiding surgeries. The prototype systems offer real time stereoscopic fluorescence imaging and color reflectance imaging capacity, along with in vivo handheld microscopy and ultrasound imaging. With the Integrated Imaging Goggle, both wide-field fluorescence imaging and in vivo microscopy are provided. The real time ultrasound images can also be presented in the goggle display. Furthermore, real time goggle-to-goggle stereoscopic video sharing is demonstrated, which can greatly facilitate telemedicine. In this paper, the prototype systems are described, characterized and tested in surgeries in biological tissues ex vivo. We have found that the system can detect fluorescent targets with as low as 60 nM indocyanine green and can resolve structures down to 0.25 mm with large FOV stereoscopic imaging. The system has successfully guided simulated cancer surgeries in chicken. The Integrated Imaging Goggle is novel in 4 aspects: it is (a the first wearable stereoscopic wide-field intraoperative fluorescence imaging and display system, (b the first wearable system offering both large FOV and microscopic imaging simultaneously,

  12. Use of auditory evoked potentials for intra-operative awareness in anesthesia: a consciousness-based conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xuebao; Suo, Puxia; Yuan, Xin; Yao, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    Auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) have been used as a measure of the depth of anesthesia during the intra-operative process. AEPs are classically divided, on the basis of their latency, into first, fast, middle, slow, and late components. The use of auditory evoked potential has been advocated for the assessment of Intra-operative awareness (IOA), but has not been considered seriously enough to universalize it. It is because we have not explored enough the impact of auditory perception and auditory processing on the IOA phenomena as well as on the subsequent psychological impact of IOA on the patient. More importantly, we have seldom tried to look at the phenomena of IOP from the perspective of consciousness itself. This perspective is especially important because many of IOA phenomena exist in the subconscious domain than they do in the conscious domain of explicit recall. Two important forms of these subconscious manifestations of IOA are the implicit recall phenomena and post-operative dreams related to the operation. Here, we present an integrated auditory consciousness-based model of IOA. We start with a brief description of auditory awareness and the factors affecting it. Further, we proceed to the evaluation of conscious and subconscious information processing by auditory modality and how they interact during and after intra-operative period. Further, we show that both conscious and subconscious auditory processing affect the IOA experience and both have serious psychological implications on the patient subsequently. These effects could be prevented by using auditory evoked potential during monitoring of anesthesia, especially the mid-latency auditory evoked potentials (MLAERs). To conclude our model with present hypothesis, we propose that the use of auditory evoked potential should be universal with general anesthesia use in order to prevent the occurrences of distressing outcomes resulting from both conscious and subconscious auditory processing during

  13. Comparação entre o teste de despertar e a monitoração neurofisiológica intra-operatória com potencial evocado somato-sensitivo nas cirurgias de escoliose Comparación entre el teste de despertar y la monitorización neurofisiológica intraoperatoria con potencial evocado somato sensorial en las cirugías de escoliosis Comparison between the wake-up test and the intra-operative neurophysiologic monitoring with somato-sensitive evoked potentials in surgery for scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Barros Puertas

    2009-03-01

    , entre el período de enero de 1985 ha mayo de 2001. Los procedimientos fueron divididos en dos grupos, siendo 80 pacientes operados sin monitoración intra-operatória, utilizado la prueba del despertar, en el período de enero de 1985 a enero de 1998. A partir de mayo de 1998 las cirugías comenzaron a ser supervisadas con monitoración del potencial evocado somato-sensitivo (PESS para la prevención de lesión neurológica, formando así un segundo grupo de 31 pacientes. RESULTADOS: en el primer grupo, un paciente presento lesión neurológica irreversible y cuatro pacientes tuvieron lesión neurológica reversible. Entre los 31 pacientes, com monitoración neurofisiológica somato sensitiva, ocho pacientes presentaron lesión neurológica reversible evidenciada en el intra-operatório, sin ninguna repercusión clínica después del procedimiento. CONCLUSIÓN: los actuales resultados sugieren la eficacia de la monitoración intra-operatória, con el potencial evocado somato-sensitivo, para la prevención de lesiones neurológicas, en las cirugías correctivas de curvas rígidas de escoliosis idiopática.OBJECTIVE: the objective of this study is to compare the incidence of neurological injuries in corrective surgeries for rigid curves of idiopathic scoliosis using only the wake-up test and using the intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring with somato sensitive evoked potentials. METHODS: we performed 111 surgeries to correct idiopathic scoliosis, with rigid curves through instrumentation and posterior fusion in the period January 1985 to May 2001. The procedures were divided into two groups, with 80 patients operated without the intra-operative monitoring, using only the wake-up test, from January 1985 to January 1998. From May 1998 the surgeries began to be monitored with somato-sensitive evoked potential (PESS for prevention of neurological damage, forming a second group of 31 patients. RESULTS: in the first group, one patient had irreversible neurological damage

  14. Intraoperative three-dimensional fluoroscopy after transpedicular positioning of Kirschner-wire versus conventional intraoperative biplanar fluoroscopic control: A retrospective study of 345 patients and 1880 pedicle screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design: Retrospective study. Objective: The aim was to find out whether intraoperative three-dimensional imaging after transpedicular positioning of Kirschner wire (K-wire in lumbar and thoracic posterior instrumentation procedures is of benefit to the patients and if this technique is accurately enough to make a postoperative screw position control through computer tomography (CT dispensable. Patients and Methods: Lumbar and thoracic posterior instrumentation procedures conducted at our department between 2002 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups: group A, including patients who underwent intraoperative three-dimensional scan after transpedicular positioning of the K-wire and group B, including patients who underwent only intraoperative biplanar fluoroscopy. An early postoperative CT of the instrumented section was done in all cases to assess the screw position. The rate of immediate intraoperative correction of the K-wires in cases of mal-positioning, as well as the rate of postoperative screw revisions, was measured. Results: In general, 345 patients (1880 screws were reviewed and divided into two groups; group A with 225 patients (1218 screws and group B with 120 patients (662 screws. One patient (0.44% (one screw [0.082%] of group A underwent postoperative screw correction while screw revisions were necessary in 14 patients (11.7% (28 screws [4.2%] of group B. Twenty-three patients (10.2% (28 K-wires [2.3%] of group A underwent intraoperative correction due to primary intraoperative detected K-wire mal-position. None of the corrected K-wires resulted in a corresponding neurological deficit. Conclusion: Three-dimensional imaging after transpedicular K-wire positioning leads to solid intraoperative identification of misplaced K-wires prior to screw placement and reduces screw revision rates compared with conventional fluoroscopic control. When no clinical deterioration emerges, a

  15. Intra-operative blood transfusion among adult surgical patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This retrospective study was designed to audit the pattern of intra-operative whole blood transfusion among adult surgical patients over a two-year period. Data were collected on the rate of intra-operative transfusion, estimated blood loss, units of donor blood transfused, pattern of use of autologous blood and circumstances ...

  16. Is Intraoperative Diffusion tensor Imaging at 3.0T Comparable to Subcortical Corticospinal tract Mapping?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ostrý, S.; Belšan, T.; Otáhal, Jakub; Beneš, V.; Netuka, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 5 (2013), s. 797-807 ISSN 0148-396X Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : corticospinal tract * intraoperative tractography * intraoperative image distortion * motor -evoked potentials * subcortical mapping Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.031, year: 2013

  17. Intra-operative removal of chest tube in video-assisted thoracoscopic procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa M. El-Badry

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Intra-operative removal of chest tube during VATS procedures was a safe technique in well selected patients with an intra-operative successful air-leak test with radiological and clinical follow-up. This technique provided lesser post-operative pain with shorter hospital stay.

  18. Study on intraoperative radiotherapy applying hyperthermia together with radiation sensitizers for progressive local carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, M; Takahashi, M; Ono, K; Hiraoka, M [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1980-08-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer, colonic cancer, pancreatic cancer, cancer of the biliary tract, prostatic carcinoma, cerebral tumor, tumor of soft tissues, and osteosarcoma and its clinical results were described. Basic and clinical studies on effects of both hyperthermia and radiation sensitizers to elevate radiation sensitivity were also described, because effects of intraoperative radiotherapy were raised by applying hyperthermia and hypoxic cell sensitizers.

  19. Utility of Intraoperative Neuromonitoring during Minimally Invasive Fusion of the Sacroiliac Joint

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, Michael; Birkholz, Denise; MacBarb, Regina; Capobianco, Robyn; Woods, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Retrospective case series. Objective. To document the clinical utility of intraoperative neuromonitoring during minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion for patients diagnosed with sacroiliac joint dysfunction (as a direct result of sacroiliac joint disruptions or degenerative sacroiliitis) and determine stimulated electromyography thresholds reflective of favorable implant position. Summary of Background Data. Intraoperative neuromonitoring is a well-accepted adjunct...

  20. Intraoperative hypothermia and its clinical outcomes in patients undergoing general anesthesia: National study in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yi

    Full Text Available Inadvertent intraoperative hypothermia (core temperature 2 h (OR = 2.60, 95% CI 2.09-3.24.The incidence of intraoperative hypothermia in China is high, and the rate of active warming of patients during operation is low. Hypothermia is associated with more postoperative shivering, increased ICU admissions, and longer postoperative hospital days.

  1. INTRAOPERATIVE MOTIVE FOR PERFORMING A LAPAROSCOPIC APPENDECTOMY ON A POSTOPERATIVE HISTOLOGICAL PROVEN NORMAL APPENDIX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotboom, T.; Hamminga, J. T. H.; Hofker, H. S.; Heineman, E.; Haveman, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diagnostic laparoscopy is the ultimate tool to evaluate the appendix. However, the intraoperative evaluation of the appendix is difficult, as the negative appendectomy rate remains 12%-18%. The aim of this study is to analyze the intraoperative motive for performing a laparoscopic

  2. Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescent imaging during robotic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Antonio Luiz de Vasconcellos; Schraibman, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The intraoperative identification of certain anatomical structures because they are small or visually occult may be challenging. The development of minimally invasive surgery brought additional difficulties to identify these structures due to the lack of complete tactile sensitivity. A number of different forms of intraoperative mapping have been tried. Recently, the near-infrared fluorescence imaging technology with indocyanine green has been added to robotic platforms. In addition, this technology has been tested in several types of operations, and has advantages such as safety, low cost and good results. Disadvantages are linked to contrast distribution in certain clinical scenarios. The intraoperative near-infrared fluorescent imaging is new and promising addition to robotic surgery. Several reports show the utility of this technology in several different procedures. The ideal dose, time and site for dye injection are not well defined. No high quality evidence-based comparative studies and long-term follow-up outcomes have been published so far. Initial results, however, are good and safe. RESUMO A identificação intraoperatória de certas estruturas anatômicas, por seu tamanho ou por elas serem ocultas à visão, pode ser desafiadora. O desenvolvimento da cirurgia minimamente invasiva trouxe dificuldades adicionais, pela falta da sensibilidade tátil completa. Diversas formas de detecção intraoperatória destas estruturas têm sido tentadas. Recentemente, a tecnologia de fluorescência infravermelha com verde de indocianina foi associada às plataformas robóticas. Além disso, essa tecnologia tem sido testada em uma variedade de cirurgias, e suas vantagens parecem estar ligadas a baixo custo, segurança e bons resultados. As desvantagens estão associadas à má distribuição do contraste em determinados cenários. A imagem intraoperatória por fluorescência infravermelha é uma nova e promissora adição à cirurgia robótica. Diversas séries mostram

  3. Intraoperative performance and postoperative outcomes of microcoaxial phacoemulsification. Observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasavada, Viraj; Vasavada, Vaishali; Raj, Shetal M; Vasavada, Abhay R

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the intraoperative performance and postoperative outcomes after microcoaxial phacoemulsification. Iladevi Cataract & IOL Research Centre, Ahmedabad, India. A prospective observational case series comprised 84 eyes with age-related uncomplicated cataract having microcoaxial phacoemulsification through a 2.2 mm clear corneal incision by a standard surgical technique. Phacoemulsification parameters (Infiniti Vision System, Alcon) were microburst width, 30 ms; preset power, 50%; vacuum, 650 mm Hg; aspiration flow rate, 25 cc/minute. A single-piece Alcon AcrySof intraocular lens was implanted with the C cartridge (Alcon) cartridge. The incision was measured at the end of surgery. Observations included surgical time (from commencement of sculpting to end of epinucleus removal), cumulative dissipated energy (CDE), wound burns, intraoperative complications, postoperative increase in mean central corneal thickness (CCT) at 1 day and 1 month, mean % decrease in endothelial cell density (ECD), absolute mean change in coefficient of variation (cv) 3 months, and uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) at 1 day. Data were analyzed using a 1-sample t test with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The mean follow up was 3 months +/- 0.3 (SD). The mean incision size at the end of surgery was 2.3 +/- .09 mm; mean surgical time, 4.5 +/- 1.5 minutes; and mean CDE, 2.3 +/- 2.2 seconds. No wound burns or other intraoperative complications occurred. The postoperative CCT increased by a mean of 16 microm at 1 day (95% CI, 8-25; P = .66;) and by a mean of 3.14 microm at 1 month (95% CI, 2.26-4.05; P = .92). The ECD decreased by a mean of 5.8% (95% CI, 6.8-3.5; P = .82) and the mean coefficient of variation, by 3.3 (95% CI, 4.5-2.0; P = .65). At 1 day, the UCVA was 20/20 in 29% of cases, 20/20 to 20/40 in 58%, and 20/40 to 20/50 in 12%. Microcoaxial phacoemulsification was safely and effectively performed, achieving consistent and satisfactory postoperative outcomes.

  4. Intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IOEBRT) for carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Konski, A.A.; Merrick, H.W. III; Bronn, D.G.; Schifeling, D.; Kamen, C.

    1991-01-01

    The abdominal cavities of 50 patients were explored in a specially constructed intraoperative radiotherapy operating amphitheater at the Medical College of Ohio. Twenty-six patients were treated with intraoperative and postoperative precision high dose external beam therapy, 12 with intraoperative irradiation but no external beam therapy, and 12 with palliative surgery alone. All but two patients completed the postoperative external beam radiation therapy as initially prescribed. The median survival time for patients treated with palliative surgery alone was 4 months, and that for patients treated with intraoperative radiotherapy without external beam therapy was 3.5 months. Patients undergoing intraoperative irradiation and external beam radiation therapy had a median survival time of 10.5 months. Four patients died within 30 days of surgery and two patients died of gastrointestinal hemorrhage 5 months posttreatment

  5. Intra-operative radiotherapy of malignant tumors: Past, present and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeron, J.J.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.; Ganem, G.

    1986-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy consists of electron or photon radiation which is used during the operative procedure. The treatment field is arranged very precisely after critical organs have been previously arranged out of the field. The target volume includes the remaining tumor which could not be removed surgically, and the surrounding tumor bed which is also felt to be high risk for recurrence. It is preferable to have as little tumor remaining as possible before the intra-operative treatment radiation is given. Intra-operative radiotherapy was developed less than a quarter century ago in Japon, and it was later used in U.S.A. The accumulated experience in Japan and U.S.A. is rewieved here. Intra-operative radiotherapy has only recently been introduced to France. The biology, physics and medical and technical problems of intra-operative therapy are discussed [fr

  6. Ventilator waveforms on anesthesia machine: a simple tool for intraoperative mapping of phrenic nerve and mid-cervical roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoulis, George; Papagrigoriou, Eirini; Sindou, Marc

    2015-12-01

    A crucial aspect of surgery on the supraclavicular region, lateral neck, and mid-cervical vertebral region is the identification and sparing of the phrenic nerve and cervical (C4) root that are responsible for diaphragmatic innervation. Therefore intraoperative mapping of these nerve structures can be useful for difficult cases. Electrical stimulation with simultaneous observation of the ventilator waveforms of the anesthesia machine provides an effective method for the precise intraoperative mapping of these structures. In the literature, there is only one publication reporting the use of one of the waveforms (capnography) for this purpose. Capnography and pressure-time waveforms, two mandatory curves in anesthesiological monitoring, were studied under electrical stimulation of the phrenic nerve (one patient) and the C4 root (eight patients). The aim was to detect changes that would verify diaphragmatic contraction. No modifications in anesthesia or surgery and no additional maneuvers were required. In all patients, stimulation was followed by identifiable changes in the two waveforms, compatible with diaphragmatic contraction: acute reduction in amplitude on capnography and repetitive saw-like elevations on pressure-time curve. Frequency of patterns on pressure-time curve coincided with the frequency of stimulation; therefore the two recordings were complementary. This simple method proved effective in identifying the neural structures responsible for diaphragmatic function. We therefore suggest that it should be employed in the various types of surgery where these structures are at risk.

  7. [Intraoperative detection of the sentinel lymph nodes in lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopov, A L; Papayan, G V; Chistyakov, I V

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of the scientific data was made. It was used the literature devoted to the intraoperative visualization of the sentinel lymph nodes in patients with lung cancer. Correct detection of such lymph nodes with following pathologic investigation allowed limiting the volume of lympho-dissection in a number of patients. There is the possibility of maximal in-depth study of the sentinel lymph nodes by purposeful application of most sensible pathologic and molecular methods for detection their micrometastatic lesions. At the same time the treatment strategy and prognosis could be determined. The authors present the results of an application of dye techniques, radioactive preparation and fluorescence imaging for sentinel lymph node detection. Advantages and disadvantages of the methods are shown in the article. There are validated the prospects of technical development, study of information value of new applications and the most perspective method of fluorescence indocyanine green visualization by lymph outflow.

  8. Intraoperative Assessment of Esophagogastric Junction Distensibility During Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHaan, Reece K; Frelich, Matthew J; Gould, Jon C

    2016-04-01

    We sought to characterize the changes in esophagogastric junction (EGJ) distensibility during Heller Myotomy with Dor fundoplication using the EndoFLIP device. Intraoperative distensibility measurements on 14 patients undergoing Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication were conducted over an 18-month period. Minimum esophageal diameter, cross-sectional areas, and distensibility index were measured at 30 and 40 mL catheter volumes before myotomy, postmyotomy, and following Dor fundoplication. Distensibility index is defined as the narrowest cross-sectional area divided by the corresponding pressure expressed in mm/mm Hg. Heller myotomy was found to lead to significant changes in the distensibility characteristics of the EGJ. Minimum esophageal diameter and EGJ distensibility increased significantly with Heller myotomy.

  9. Videoscopic Heller Myotomy with Intraoperative Endoscopy Promotes Optimal Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomston, Mark; Brady, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Minimally invasive surgical techniques are applicable to achalasia, but the optimum approach to intraoperative assessment of adequacy of myotomy remains unestablished. We set out to show that videoscopic Heller myotomy with concurrent endoscopy ensures adequacy of myotomy while limiting postoperative clinically apparent reflux. Methods: Seventy-eight consecutive patients with achalasia underwent videoscopic Heller myotomy with concomitant endoscopy between 1992 and 1998. Fundoplication was not routinely undertaken. Results: Preoperative symptoms consisted of dysphagia (100%), emesis/regurgitation (68%), heartburn (58%), and postprandial chest pain (49%). Following myotomy, significant improvement (P Heller myotomy guides the extent and adequacy of myotomy. By utilizing a focused dissection with preservation of the natural antireflux mechanisms around the gastroesophageal junction and limiting the extent of myotomy along the cardia, postoperative reflux symptoms are minimized. We advocate concomitant endoscopy during Heller myotomy to guide myotomy and submit that routine fundoplication is clinically unnecessary. PMID:12113416

  10. Non-radiographic intraoperative fluorescent cholangiography is feasible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren S; Schulze, Svend; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Intraoperative fluorescent cholangiography (IFC) with concomitant fluorescent angiography was recently developed for non-invasive identification of the anatomy during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The objective of this study was to assess the time required for routine-use of IFC...... and to evaluate the success rate of the procedures. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 35 patients scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy and operated by the same surgeon were consecutively enrolled. A standardised protocol with IFC including angiography was performed during laparoscopic cholecystectomy...... hepatic duct was identified by IFC in all patients. In 29 of the 35 patients (83%; 95% confidence interval: 71-96%), the cystic artery was visualised by fluorescent angiography. No adverse effects or complications were recorded. CONCLUSION: Routine-use of IFC with fluorescent angiography during...

  11. Upper gastrointestinal tract injuries by intraoperative radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, I; Isawa, T; Satomi, T; Tazima, T [Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital (Japan)

    1981-08-01

    Twenty-one patients with unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas were treated by intraoperative irradiation with a large electron dose of 1500 - 3000 rads and upper gastrointestinal complications were encountered in five cases. All of those five cases were for carcinoma of the pancreatic head, and were seen for gastrointestinal tract injuries of the duodenum as follows, gastric ulcer in 2 cases, ulcer of the 1st duodenal portion in one case and ulcer with severe stenosis of the 2nd or 3rd duodenal portion in one case, respectively. Endoscopic features of these postirradiation gastrointestinal ulcers were characterized by deep, punched-out ulcers with grayish bases and sharp margins. Clinically these ulcers and stenosis were very difficult to treat, so by-pass operations were performed in two cases, resulting in prolonged survival.

  12. Intraoperative radiation in the canine para-aortic abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoopes, P.J.; Gillette, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty adult beagle dogs received intraoperatively delivered 6 MeV electrons to the para-aortic abdomen and bladder. The dogs were equally divided into 4 dose groups receiving 22 Gy, 30 Gy, 38.5 Gy and 47 Gy. The 5 cm x 8 cm radiation field included a variable portion of the left kidney, the left ureter, the abdominal aorta and vena cava, the base of the bladder and the left sciatic and femoral nerves. The lesions observed were fibroelastic proliferation of the aortic intima, severe renal atrophy and fibrosis, ureteral stenosis, bladder fibrosis and demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Histologic, morphometric and dose response analyses are compared with responses of dogs receiving more conventional fractionated doses to a total of 60 Gy, 70 Gy or 80 Gy x-ray in 6 weeks

  13. Postprocessing algorithm for automated analysis of pelvic intraoperative neuromonitoring signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegner Celine

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two dimensional pelvic intraoperative neuromonitoring (pIONM® is based on electric stimulation of autonomic nerves under observation of electromyography of internal anal sphincter (IAS and manometry of urinary bladder. The method provides nerve identification and verification of its’ functional integrity. Currently pIONM® is gaining increased attention in times where preservation of function is becoming more and more important. Ongoing technical and methodological developments in experimental and clinical settings require further analysis of the obtained signals. This work describes a postprocessing algorithm for pIONM® signals, developed for automated analysis of huge amount of recorded data. The analysis routine includes a graphical representation of the recorded signals in the time and frequency domain, as well as a quantitative evaluation by means of features calculated from the time and frequency domain. The produced plots are summarized automatically in a PowerPoint presentation. The calculated features are filled into a standardized Excel-sheet, ready for statistical analysis.

  14. Tolerance of canine anastomoses to intraoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepper, J.E.; Sindelar, W.; Travis, E.L.; Terrill, R.; Padikal, T.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation has been given intraoperatively to various abdominal structures in dogs, using a fixed horizontal 11 MeV electron beam at the Armed Forces Radiobiologic Research Institute. Animals were irradiated with single doses of 2000, 3000 and 4500 rad to a field which extended from the bifurcation of the aorta to the rib cage. All animals were irradiated during laparotomy under general anesthesia. Because the clinical use of intraoperative radiotherapy in cancer treatment will occasionally require irradiation of anastomosed large vessels and blind loops of bowel, the tolerance of aortic anastomoses and the suture lines of blind loops of jejunum to irradiation were studied. Responses in these experiments were scored at times up to one year after irradiation. In separate experiments both aortic and intestinal anastomoses were performed on each animal for evaluation of short term response. The dogs with aortic anastomoses showed adequate healing at all doses with no evidence of suture line weakening. On long-term follow-up one animal (2000 rad) had stenosis at the anastomosis and one animal (4500 rad) developed an arteriovenous fistula. Three of the animals that had an intestinal blind loop irradiated subsequently developed intussusception, with the irradiated loop acting as the lead point. One week after irradiation, bursting pressure of an intestinal blind loop was normal at 3000 rad, but markedly decreased at 4500 rad. No late complications were noted after the irradiation of the intestinal anastomosis. No late complicatons were observed after irradiation of intestinal anastomoses, but one needs to be cautious with regards to possible late stenosis at the site of an irradiated vascular anastomosis

  15. VATS intraoperative tattooing to facilitate solitary pulmonary nodule resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutros Cherif

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS has become routine and widely accepted for the removal of solitary pulmonary nodules of unknown etiology. Thoracosopic techniques continue to evolve with better instruments, robotic applications, and increased patient acceptance and awareness. Several techniques have been described to localize peripheral pulmonary nodules, including pre-operative CT-guided tattooing with methylene blue, CT scan guided spiral/hook wire placement, and transthoracic ultrasound. As pulmonary surgeons well know, the lung and visceral pleura may appear featureless on top of a pulmonary nodule. Case description This paper presents a rapid, direct and inexpensive approach to peripheral lung lesion resection by marking the lung parenchyma on top of the nodule using direct methylene blue injection. Methods In two patients with peripherally located lung nodules (n = 3 scheduled for VATS, we used direct methylene blue injection for intraoperative localization of the pulmonary nodule. Our technique was the following: After finger palpation of the lung, a spinal 25 gauge needle was inserted through an existing port and 0.1 ml of methylene blue was used to tattoo the pleura perpendicular to the localized nodule. The methylene blue tattoo immediately marks the lung surface over the nodule. The surgeon avoids repeated finger palpation, while lining up stapler, graspers and camera, because of the visible tattoo. Our technique eliminates regrasping and repalpating the lung once again to identify a non marked lesion. Results Three lung nodules were resected in two patients. Once each lesion was palpated it was marked, and the area was resected with security of accurate localization. All lung nodules were resected in totality with normal lung parenchymal margins. Our technique added about one minute to the operative time. The two patients were discharged home on the second postoperative day, with no morbidity. Conclusion

  16. Effects of intraoperative irradiation (IORT) and intraoperative hyperthermia (IOHT) on canine sciatic nerve: histopathological and morphometric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Powers, Barbara E.; Paardekoper, Gabriel; Gillette, Sharon M.; Gillette, Edward L.; Colacchio, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Peripheral neuropathies have emerged as the major dose-limiting complication reported after intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). The combination of IORT with hyperthermia may further increase the risk of peripheral nerve injury. The objective of this study was to evaluate histopathological and histomorphometric changes in the sciatic nerve of dogs, after IORT with or without hyperthermia treatment. Methods and Materials: Young adult beagle dogs were randomized into five groups of 3-5 dogs each to receive IORT doses of 16, 20, 24, 28, or 32 Gy. Six groups of 4-5 dogs each received IORT doses of 12, 16, 20, 24, or 28 Gy simultaneously with 44 deg. C of intraoperative hyperthermia (IOHT) for 60 min. One group of dogs acted as hyperthermia-alone controls. Two years after the treatment, dogs were euthanized, and histopathological and morphometric analyses were performed. Results: Qualitative histological analysis showed prominant changes such as focal necrosis, mineralization, fibrosis, and severe fiber loss in dogs which received combined treatment. Histomorphometric results showed a significantly higher decrease in axon and myelin and small blood vessels, with a corresponding increase in connective tissue in dogs receiving IORT plus hyperthermia treatment. The effective dose for 50% of nerve fiber loss (ED 50 ) in dogs exposed to IORT only was 25.3 Gy. The ED 50 for nerve fiber loss in dogs exposed to IORT combined with IOHT was 14.8 Gy. The thermal enhancement ratio (TER) was 1.7. Conclusion: The probability of developing peripheral neuropathies in a large animal model is higher when IORT is combined with IOHT, when compared to IORT application alone. To minimize the risk of peripheral neuropathy, clinical treatment protocols for the combination of IORT and hyperthermia should not assume a thermal enhancement ratio (TER) to be lower than 1.5

  17. Contemporary analysis of the intraoperative and perioperative complications of neurosurgical procedures performed in the sitting position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himes, Benjamin T; Mallory, Grant W; Abcejo, Arnoley S; Pasternak, Jeffrey; Atkinson, John L D; Meyer, Fredric B; Marsh, W Richard; Link, Michael J; Clarke, Michelle J; Perkins, William; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Historically, performing neurosurgery with the patient in the sitting position offered advantages such as improved visualization and gravity-assisted retraction. However, this position fell out of favor at many centers due to the perceived risk of venous air embolism (VAE) and other position-related complications. Some neurosurgical centers continue to perform sitting-position cases in select patients, often using modern monitoring techniques that may improve procedural safety. Therefore, this paper reports the risks associated with neurosurgical procedures performed in the sitting position in a modern series. METHODS The authors reviewed the anesthesia records for instances of clinically significant VAE and other complications for all neurosurgical procedures performed in the sitting position between January 1, 2000, and October 8, 2013. In addition, a prospectively maintained morbidity and mortality log of these procedures was reviewed for instances of subdural or intracerebral hemorrhage, tension pneumocephalus, and quadriplegia. Both overall and specific complication rates were calculated in relation to the specific type of procedure. RESULTS In a series of 1792 procedures, the overall complication rate related to the sitting position was 1.45%, which included clinically significant VAE, tension pneumocephalus, and subdural hemorrhage. The rate of any detected VAE was 4.7%, but the rate of VAE requiring clinical intervention was 1.06%. The risk of clinically significant VAE was highest in patients undergoing suboccipital craniotomy/craniectomy with a rate of 2.7% and an odds ratio (OR) of 2.8 relative to deep brain stimulator cases (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-70, p = 0.04). Sitting cervical spine cases had a comparatively lower complication rate of 0.7% and an OR of 0.28 as compared with all cranial procedures (95% CI 0.12-0.67, p < 0.01). Sitting cervical cases were further subdivided into extradural and intradural procedures. The rate of

  18. Intraoperative leak testing has no correlation with leak after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Monica; Zagzag, Jonathan; Patel, Karan; Magrath, Melissa; Somoza, Eduardo; Parikh, Manish S; Saunders, John K; Ude-Welcome, Aku; Schwack, Bradley F; Kurian, Marina S; Fielding, George A; Ren-Fielding, Christine J

    2016-03-01

    Staple line leak is a serious complication of sleeve gastrectomy. Intraoperative methylene blue and air leak tests are routinely used to evaluate for leak; however, the utility of these tests is controversial. We hypothesize that the practice of routine intraoperative leak testing is unnecessary during sleeve gastrectomy. A retrospective cohort study was designed using a prospectively collected database of seven bariatric surgeons from two institutions. All patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy from March 2012 to November 2014 were included. The performance of intraoperative leak testing and the type of test (air or methylene blue) were based on surgeon preference. Data obtained included BMI, demographics, comorbidity, presence of intraoperative leak test, result of test, and type of test. The primary outcome was leak rate between the leak test (LT) and no leak test (NLT) groups. SAS version 9.4 was used for univariate and multivariate analyses. A total of 1550 sleeve gastrectomies were included; most were laparoscopic (99.8%), except for one converted and two open cases. Routine intraoperative leak tests were performed in 1329 (85.7%) cases, while 221 (14.3%) did not have LTs. Of the 1329 cases with LTs, there were no positive intraoperative results. Fifteen (1%) patients developed leaks, with no difference in leak rate between the LT and NLT groups (1 vs. 1%, p = 0.999). After adjusting for baseline differences between the groups with a propensity analysis, the observed lack of association between leak and intraoperative leak test remained. In this cohort, leaks presented at a mean of 17.3 days postoperatively (range 1-67 days). Two patients with staple line leaks underwent repeat intraoperative leak testing at leak presentation, and the tests remained negative. Intraoperative leak testing has no correlation with leak due to laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and is not predictive of the later development of staple line leak.

  19. Hemifacial spasm : Intraoperative electromyographic monitoring as a guide for microvascular decompression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, JJA; Mustafa, MK; van Weerden, TW

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Microvascular decompression is the logical and well-accepted treatment of choice for hemifacial spasm (HFS). In experienced hands, good to excellent results can be obtained. However, sometimes the exact site of the vascular compression is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze

  20. Long-term evaluation of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring-assisted tethered cord surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulfer, S E; Drost, G; Lange, F; Journee, H L; Wapstra, F H; Hoving, E W

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with tethered spinal cord have been investigated for short-term effects after tethered spinal cord surgery in the past. However, little is known about the long-term effects in this patient group. In this retrospective, longitudinal, observational study, a patient sample of a

  1. Cardiocirculatory intraoperative assessment during single-shot caudal anaesthesia in children: comparison between levobupivacaine and ropivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gentili

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caudal block with levobupivacaine or ropivacaine is the most commonly used regional anaesthesia in children. Methods: The aim of study was to compare the cardiocirculatory profile induced in two matched groups of young patients, submitted to caudal anaesthesia with levobupivacaine or ropivacaine for an elective subumbilical surgery. Sixty children were enrolled: thirty received levopubivacaine 0.25% and thirty ropivacaine 0.2%. Intraoperative heart rate (HR, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP were monitored at following times: Ta0 (after anaesthesia induction, Ta1 (after caudal anaesthesia, Ta2 (five minutes later, Ta3 (ten minutes later, Ts1 (at surgical incision, Ts2, Ts3, Ts4, Ts5 (every 10 minutes during surgery, Taw (at the awakening. Results: In both groups the cardiocirculatory trend remained within normal ranges at all times considered, demonstrating the safety of the method with both drugs. Both groups showed a similar trend at the different monitoring times: low decrease in HR, SBP and DBP after caudal block, slight increase in parameters after skin incision, slight decrease during surgery, increase at awakening. Regarding SBP and DBP, the levobupivacaine group children generally showed higher levels compared to the ropivacaine group, especially for DBP. Conclusions: Paediatric caudal anaesthesia is an effective method with an very infrequent complication rate. Possible hypotheses for differing haemodynamic behaviour could include a stronger vasoconstriction reflex of innervated areas during caudal anaesthesia with levobupivacaine and a lower levobupivacaine induced block of the sympathetic fibers, related to different pharmacokinetic profile of low concentrations of the local anaesthetics used in paediatric epidural space.

  2. Quantitative analysis of intraoperative communication in open and laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevdalis, Nick; Wong, Helen W L; Arora, Sonal; Nagpal, Kamal; Healey, Andrew; Hanna, George B; Vincent, Charles A

    2012-10-01

    -risk procedure (average, 2 communications/min). In the observed cases, surgeons actively directed and led OR teams in the intraoperative phase. The lack of communication between surgeons and anesthesiologists ought to be evaluated further. Simple, inexpensive interventions shown to streamline intraoperative communication and teamworking (preoperative briefing, surgeons' mental practice) should be considered further.

  3. Intraoperative Tumor Perforation is Associated with Decreased 5-Year Survival in Colon Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, N S; Bendtsen, V O; Ingeholm, P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is a widely held belief that intraoperative tumor perforation in colon cancer impairs survival and causes local recurrence, although the prognostic importance remains unclear. AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of unintended intraoperative tumor perforation...... on postoperative mortality and long-term survival. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This national cohort study was based on data from a prospectively maintained nationwide colorectal cancer database. We included 16,517 colon cancer patients who were resected with curative intent from 2001 to 2012. RESULTS: Intraoperative...... tumor perforation produced a significantly impaired 5-year survival of 40% compared to 64% in non-perforated colon cancer. Intraoperative tumor perforation was an independent risk factor for death, hazard ratio 1.63 (95% confidence interval: 1.4-1.94), with a significantly increased 90-day postoperative...

  4. Single high dose intraoperative electrons for advanced stage pancreatic cancer: Phase I pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldson, A.L.; Ashaveri, E.; Espinoza, M.C.

    1981-01-01

    Phase I toxicity studies with intraoperative radiotherapy proved to be a feasible adjunct to surgery for unresectable malignancies of the pancreas at Howard University Hospital. There have been minimal side effects or complications related to the combination of limited surgical decompression and intraoperative radiotherapy alone. The toxic effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on normal tissues is being assessed on a dose volume basis. Doses of 2000 to 2500 rad in a single exposure to include the pancreas, regional nodes and duodenum are acceptable if the total treatment volume is less than or equal to 100 cm. The tumoricidal effects on the cancer are demonstratable when one reviews the pathological specimens that illustrate massive tumor necrosis and fibros replacement, but in all cases reviewed, viable cancer was noted. Intraoperative radiotherapy, therefore, represents a significant boost dose for resectable, partially resectable or non-resectable tumors when added to conventional external beam irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Preliminary clinical data and minimal toxicity justifies further investigation

  5. Utility of Indocyanine Green Fluorescence Imaging for Intraoperative Localization in Reoperative Parathyroid Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sound, Sara; Okoh, Alexis; Yigitbas, Hakan; Yazici, Pinar; Berber, Eren

    2015-10-27

    Due to the variations in anatomic location, the identification of parathyroid glands may be challenging. Although there have been advances in preoperative imaging modalities, there is still a need for an accurate intraoperative guidance. Indocyanine green (ICG) is a new agent that has been used for intraoperative fluorescence imaging in a number of general surgical procedures. Its utility for parathyroid localization in humans has not been reported in the literature. We report 3 patients who underwent reoperative neck surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism. Using a video-assisted technique with intraoperative ICG fluorescence imaging, the parathyroid glands were recognized and removed successfully in all cases. Surrounding soft tissue structures remained nonfluorescent, and could be distinguished from the parathyroid glands. This report suggests a potential utility of ICG imaging in intraoperative localization of parathyroid glands in reoperative neck surgery. Future work is necessary to assess its benefit for first-time parathyroid surgery. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Intraoperative haloperidol does not improve quality of recovery and postoperative analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Ebneshahidi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Intraoperative small-dose IV haloperidol is effective against post-operative nausea and vomiting with no significant effect on overall QoR. It may also attenuate the analgesic effects of morphine PCA.

  7. Pancreatectomy with intraoperative radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer. Implications of adjuvant radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hishinuma, Shoichi; Ogata, Yoshiro; Ozawa, Iwao; Matsui, Junichi [Tochigi Cancer Center (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Implications of adjuvant radiotherapy (intraoperative and postoperative) for pancreatic carcinoma were investigated. In the examination of autopsy, it was confirmed that local recurrence was controlled by irradiation, but frequency of local recurrence and liver metastasis was high, and the prognosis was poor. Local recurrence rate was 13.3% in 15 cases which had intraoperative irradiation of 30 Gy and 40% in 10 cases of irradiation under 30 Gy. After 1994, postoperative irradiation for whole liver was added to local intraoperative irradiation, and good results were obtained (10 of 19 cases are alive). Liver metastasis rate was 21.1% in whole liver irradiation group, and about 50% in other groups. Recently, local intraoperative irradiation of 30 Gy with whole liver irradiation of 22 Gy was adopted as standard adjuvant radiotherapy and better results were obtained. But it is too early to conclude their effects. (K.H.)

  8. Pancreatectomy with intraoperative radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer. Implications of adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishinuma, Shoichi; Ogata, Yoshiro; Ozawa, Iwao; Matsui, Junichi

    1999-01-01

    Implications of adjuvant radiotherapy (intraoperative and postoperative) for pancreatic carcinoma were investigated. In the examination of autopsy, it was confirmed that local recurrence was controlled by irradiation, but frequency of local recurrence and liver metastasis was high, and the prognosis was poor. Local recurrence rate was 13.3% in 15 cases which had intraoperative irradiation of 30 Gy and 40% in 10 cases of irradiation under 30 Gy. After 1994, postoperative irradiation for whole liver was added to local intraoperative irradiation, and good results were obtained (10 of 19 cases are alive). Liver metastasis rate was 21.1% in whole liver irradiation group, and about 50% in other groups. Recently, local intraoperative irradiation of 30 Gy with whole liver irradiation of 22 Gy was adopted as standard adjuvant radiotherapy and better results were obtained. But it is too early to conclude their effects. (K.H.)

  9. Intraoperative hyperventilation vs remifentanil during electrocorticography for epilepsy surgery - a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Troels W; Madsen, F F; Moltke, F B

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traditionally, intraoperative intracranial electroen-cephalography-recordings are limited to the detection of the irritative zone defined by interictal spikes. However, seizure patterns revealing the seizure onset zone are thought to give better localizing information, but are impract...

  10. [Microsurgery assisted by intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and neuronavigation for small lesions in deep brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhi-jun; Chen, Xiao-lei; Xu, Bai-nan; Sun, Zheng-hui; Sun, Guo-chen; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Fei; Wang, Yu-bo; Zhou, Ding-biao

    2012-01-03

    To explore the practicability of resecting small lesions in deep brain by intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) and neuronavigator-assisted microsurgery and its clinical efficacies. A total of 42 cases with small lesions in deep brain underwent intraoperative MRI and neuronavigator-assisted microsurgery. The drifting of neuronavigation was corrected by images acquired from intraoperative MR rescanning. All lesions were successfully identified and 40 cases totally removed without mortality. Only 3 cases developed new neurological deficits post-operatively while 2 of them returned to normal neurological functions after a follow-up duration of 3 months to 2 years. The application of intraoperative MRI can effectively correct the drifting of neuronavigation and enhance the accuracy of microsurgical neuronavigation for small lesions in deep brain.

  11. Intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS): a practical approach to medical and surgical considerations in cataract extractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storr-Paulsen, Allan; Nørregaard, Jens Christian; Børme, Kim Kamp

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. Intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS) during cataract surgery is characterized by iris fluttering, iris prolapse towards the incisions, and a progressive pupillary constriction leading to high rates of complications. The syndrome has been reported following the treatment of benign...

  12. Intra-operative probe for brain cancer: feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu Thi, M. H.; Charon, Y.; Duval, M. A.; Lefebvre, F.; Menard, L.; Pitre, S.; Pinot, L.; Siebert, R.

    2007-07-01

    The present work aims a new medical probe for surgeons devoted to brain cancers, in particular glioblastoma multiforme. Within the last years, our group has started the development of a new intra-operative beta imaging probe. More recently, we took an alternative approach for the same application: a fluorescence probe. In both cases the purpose is to differentiate normal from tumor brain tissue. In a first step, we developed set-ups capable to measure autofluorescence. They are based on a dedicated epi-fluorescence design and on specific fiber optic probes. Relative signal amplitude, spectral shape and fluorescence lifetime measurements are foreseen to distinguish normal and cancer tissue by analyzing fluorophores like NADH, lipopigments and porphyrines. The autofluorescence spectra are recorded in the 460-640 nm range with a low resolution spectrometer. For lifetime measurements a fast detector (APD) is used together with a TCSPC-carte. Intrinsic wavelength- and time-resolutions are a few nm and 200 ps, respectively. Different samples have been analyzed to validate our new detection system and to allow a first configuration of our medical fluorescence probe. First results from the tissue measurements are shown.

  13. Predictive factors for intraoperative excessive bleeding in Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, Kosho; Minami, Shigeki; Hayashida, Naomi; Sakimura, Chika; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    In Graves' disease, because a thyroid tends to have extreme vascularity, the amount of intraoperative blood loss (AIOBL) becomes significant in some cases. We sought to elucidate the predictive factors of the AIOBL. A total of 197 patients underwent thyroidectomy for Graves' disease between 2002 and 2012. We evaluated clinical factors that would be potentially related to AIOBL retrospectively. The median period between disease onset and surgery was 16 months (range: 1-480 months). Conventional surgery was performed in 125 patients, whereas video-assisted surgery was performed in 72 patients. Subtotal and near-total/total thyroidectomies were performed in 137 patients and 60 patients, respectively. The median weight of the thyroid was 45 g (range: 7.3-480.0 g). Univariate analysis revealed that the strongest correlation of AIOBL was noted with the weight of thyroid (p Graves' disease, and preparation for blood transfusion should be considered in cases where thyroids weigh more than 200 g. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  14. Study on radiation necrosis following intraoperative radiotherapy for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Takeshita, Nagayuki; Niwa, Kohkichi; Kamata, Noriko; Matsuda, Tadayoshi; Matsutani, Masao

    1989-01-01

    Ninety-five patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors were treated with the intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). In seven cases, surgery was performed a second time because of suspected of tumor recurrence, later found to be a radiation necrosis. Tumorous lesions were irradiated by IORT in the range of 15 Gy to 20 Gy together with external radiotherapy in the 30 Gy to 72 Gy range. In follow-up postcontrast CT studies, irregularly-shaped lesions appeared at the IORT site and increased in size with the perifocal low density area on subsequent scans. The images resembled those seen in tumor recurrence. Histopathologic changes seen during the follow-up surgery were thought to be mainly the result of radiation necrosis, though viable tumor cells at the marginal tumor site were one possible etiology. A coagulation necrosis with a fibrin exudate was observed in the IORT portal area and the vascular walls exhibited marked degeneration which is symptomatic of delayed radiation necrosis. Thus, post-IORT radiation necrosis is thought to be a direct reaction to this technique, and the delayed absorption of necrotic tissue to be a direct reaction to this technique, and the delayed absorption of necrotic tissue clearly indicates the possibility of adverse effects in its use for treatment of brain tumors. (author)

  15. Abscesses after appendectomy due to intraoperative loss of fecaliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, M.; Kreuzer, S.; Sacher, P.; Eich, G.F.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Fecaliths appear to predispose a patient to acute appendicitis, abscess formation, and perforation. The number of preoperative radiological evaluations is increasing, although children with suspected perforation still undergo surgery immediately. We report and discuss imaging findings and implications in children with acute appendicitis and fecalithis. Methods: Four children (3 girls, 1 boy; mean age 9 years) underwent surgery for acute appendicitis. Three children underwent sonography and plain radiography before surgery, 1 child was operated without radiological evaluation. After readmission, all 4 children underwent sonography and plain radiography before surgery. Results: In 3 patients a fecalith was diagnosed initially. After uneventful recovery all 4 patients had acute abdominal pain and readmission was necessary. In all 4 patients the escaped fecalith was demonstrated with sonography and plain radiography confirmed surgically. Conclusion: Discussion about the role of imaging in acute appendicitis has concentrated on the diagnostic yield of cross-section techniques. The importance of demonstrating a fecalith, prompting a more thorough intraoperative search has found little attention. The radiologist should also detect and localize a fecalith and should be aware of retained fecaliths as a cause of abscess formation after appendectomy. (orig.) [de

  16. Intraoperative visualization and assessment of electromagnetic tracking error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, Vinyas; Ungi, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; MacDonald, Andrew; Nanji, Sulaiman; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Electromagnetic tracking allows for increased flexibility in designing image-guided interventions, however it is well understood that electromagnetic tracking is prone to error. Visualization and assessment of the tracking error should take place in the operating room with minimal interference with the clinical procedure. The goal was to achieve this ideal in an open-source software implementation in a plug and play manner, without requiring programming from the user. We use optical tracking as a ground truth. An electromagnetic sensor and optical markers are mounted onto a stylus device, pivot calibrated for both trackers. Electromagnetic tracking error is defined as difference of tool tip position between electromagnetic and optical readings. Multiple measurements are interpolated into the thin-plate B-spline transform visualized in real time using 3D Slicer. All tracked devices are used in a plug and play manner through the open-source SlicerIGT and PLUS extensions of the 3D Slicer platform. Tracking error was measured multiple times to assess reproducibility of the method, both with and without placing ferromagnetic objects in the workspace. Results from exhaustive grid sampling and freehand sampling were similar, indicating that a quick freehand sampling is sufficient to detect unexpected or excessive field distortion in the operating room. The software is available as a plug-in for the 3D Slicer platforms. Results demonstrate potential for visualizing electromagnetic tracking error in real time for intraoperative environments in feasibility clinical trials in image-guided interventions.

  17. Small bowel enteroscopy and intraoperative enteroscopy for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B S; Wenger, J S; Waye, J D

    1991-02-01

    Intraoperative endoscopy (IOE) is accepted as the ultimate diagnostic procedure for completely evaluating the small bowel in patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Small bowel enteroscopy (SBE) has been reported useful in the nonsurgical evaluation of the small intestine in these patients, but findings may be limited because of incomplete small bowel intubation and a lack of tip deflection. Twenty-three patients underwent 25 SBE exams and subsequently had 25 IOE exams during surgical exploration for continued bleeding. Patients' bleeding histories averaged 2 yr, with an average transfusion requirement of 27 units. Findings on IOE were the same as with SBE in 17/22 (77%) of examinations. We conclude that SBE and IOE are comparable in depth of insertion and ability to detect small vascular ectasias. Both procedures missed pathology due to limited visibility and the evanescent nature of ectasias. Long-term success in abolishing bleeding with these combined techniques can be expected in 55% of these patients. SBE should precede surgery, since the finding of diffuse ectasias precludes any benefit from operative intervention.

  18. Intraoperative photodynamic treatment for high-grade gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, C.; Reyns, N.; Deleporte, P.; Mordon, S.; Vermandel, M.

    2017-02-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor. Its incidence is estimated at 5 to 7 new cases each year for 100 000 inhabitants. Despite reference treatment, including surgery, radiation oncology and chemotherapy, GBM still has a very poor prognosis (median survival of 15 months). Because of a systematic relapse of the tumor, the main challenge is to improve local control. In this context, PhotoDynamic Therapy (PDT) may offer a new treatment modality. GBM recurrence mainly occurs inside the surgical cavity borders. Thus, a new light applicator was designed for delivering light during a PDT procedure on surgical cavity borders after Fluorescence Guided Resection. This device combines an inflatable balloon and a light source. Several experimentations (temperature and impermeability tests, homogeneity of the light distribution and ex-vivo studies) were conducted to characterize the device. An abacus was created to determine illumination time from the balloon volume in order to reach a therapeutic fluence value inside the borders of the surgical cavity. According to our experience, cavity volumes usually observed in the neurosurgery department lead to an acceptable average lighting duration, from 20 to 40 minutes. Thus, extra-time needed for PDT remains suitable with anesthesia constraints. A pilot clinical trial is planned to start in 2017 in our institution. In view of the encouraging results observed in preclinical or clinical, this intraoperative PDT treatment can be easily included in the current standard of care.

  19. An appraisal of intraoperative radiotherapy for pancreas cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotoh, Mitsukazu; Monden, Morito; Sakon, Masato; Kanai, Toshio; Umeshita, Koji; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Mori, Takesada (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1993-03-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) which was originally used for unresectable cancer has been applied to the cases after pancreas resection. However, it has not been clarified which stages of patients will have the beneficial effect of IORT on their prognosis. In this study, IORT after pancreas resection was appraised on the basis of the patient prognosis. Seventy-two pancreatectomized patients including 6 patients of Stage I, 18 of Stage II, 25 of Stage III and 23 of Stage IV, which was determined by the general rules for cancer of the pancreas in Japan Pancreas Society were employed in this study. Four Stage III and 15 Stage IV patients were treated with IORT (25-30 Gy) after pancreatectomy. Ten of these patients underwent postoperative external beam radiotherapy (22-48 Gy). All but one Stage I patient were currently alive. The median survival time (MST) of Stage II were 908 days and 2 were alive over 5 years after operation. MST of Stage III without IORT was 310 pod and all died within 906 pod. In contrast, all four Stage III patients were currently alive without a sign of recurrence (3, 10, 15, 57 pom). All Stage IV patients died within 462 pod, while three patients treated with IORT were alive over this period. These data suggest IORT improves the prognosis of Stage III patients when combined with radical resection of the pancreas. But it is not the case with the more advanced cases, where systemic anticancer adjuvant therapy might be indicated. (author).

  20. Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasue, Mitsunori

    1988-01-01

    Between April 1980 and August 1987, a total of 54 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Thirty-five patients underwent IORT with palliative intent (Group I), and the remaining 19 underwent it as an adjuvant therapy for pancreatectomy (Group II). The dosage of electron beams ranged from 12 to 30 Gy in Group I and from 20 to 30 Gy in Group II. Intractable back pain that was observed in 25 patients was relieved in 20 patients (80 %) within one week after IORT. The median survival was 5.3 months in Group I and 9.4 months in Group II. The longest survival (6 years and 10 months) was attained in a patient undergoing absolute non-curative distal pancreatectomy, followed by 20 Gy of IORT. In comparing patients treated before and after the introduction of IORT, both survival rate and staying-home survival rate were significantly better in the era of IORT during which background factors were rather worse. (Namekawa, K.)

  1. Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasue, Mitsunori

    1988-04-01

    Between April 1980 and August 1987, a total of 54 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Thirty-five patients underwent IORT with palliative intent (Group I), and the remaining 19 underwent it as an adjuvant therapy for pancreatectomy (Group II). The dosage of electron beams ranged from 12 to 30 Gy in Group I and from 20 to 30 Gy in Group II. Intractable back pain that was observed in 25 patients was relieved in 20 patients (80 %) within one week after IORT. The median survival was 5.3 months in Group I and 9.4 months in Group II. The longest survival (6 years and 10 months) was attained in a patient undergoing absolute non-curative distal pancreatectomy, followed by 20 Gy of IORT. In comparing patients treated before and after the introduction of IORT, both survival rate and staying-home survival rate were significantly better in the era of IORT during which background factors were rather worse. (Namekawa, K.).

  2. Intra-operative radiation therapy in cancer of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, J.B.; Gu, S.D.; Saint-Aubert, B.; Joyeux, H.; Solassol, C.; Pujol, H.

    1991-01-01

    We report our experience concerning 22 pancreatic carcinoma bearing patients treated with intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT) after complete surgical excision: duodenopancreatectomy: 15 patients; isthmic and caudal pancreatectomy: 2 patients; total pancreatectomy: 5 patients. The dose delivered to the tumor bed was 20 Gy in 12 patients, 18 Gy in 3 patients and 15 Gy in 7 patients. Three patients died within the 1st month post-surgery from intercurrent diseases. Post-operative morbidity was not significantly modified by IORT as compared to purely surgical treated patients. Out of 19 evaluable patients, we observed local control in 16 patients (79.4%). Causes of death (15/19 patients) were: distant metastases with local control: 7 patients; in situ local failure: 3 patients; regional recurrence outside of the IORT fields: 2 patients; intercurrent diseases: 3 patients. Four patients are still alive without evolutive disease. The median overall survival is 6 months. The mean overall survival is 10.56 months. Excluding patients who died from complications and intercurrent diseases, the median survival is 10 mths and the mean survival 14.5 mths. These results emphasize the improvement in local control with IORT, but without significant improvement in survival which is dependent on local evolution and also systemic disease [fr

  3. Intraoperative colonic lavage and primary anastomosis in peritonitis and obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondo, S; Jaurrieta, E; Jorba, R; Moreno, P; Farran, L; Borobia, F; Bettonica, C; Poves, I; Ramos, E; Alcobendas, F

    1997-02-01

    The surgical management of left colonic emergencies has evolved in the past few decades. Recently, there has been increasing interest in resection with primary anastomosis in selected cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in outcome in patients with peritonitis or obstruction treated by resection, on-table lavage and primary anastomosis of the left colon. Between January 1992 and August 1995, 212 patients underwent emergency operation for a distal colonic lesion: 97 presented with peritonitis, 113 with obstruction and two with other indications. Intraoperative colonic lavage was performed in 37 patients with obstruction and in 24 with an acute intra-abdominal inflammatory process. The postoperative mortality rate was 5 per cent. The incidence of clinical anastomotic leakage was 5 per cent. Wound infection was observed in ten patients (16 per cent), more often in those with peritonitis (P = 0.03). The overall mean(s.d.) hospital stay was 15(9) days. Resection, on-table lavage and primary anastomosis constitute the operation of choice for selected patients with left colonic emergency.

  4. Experimental study on intraoperative irradiation for pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masanao; Asanuma, Yoshihiro; Shibata, Satoshi; Saitoh, Takashi; Koyama, Kenji; Watarai, Jiroh; Masuda, Hirotake

    1993-01-01

    For the treatment of pancreatic head cancer, pancreatoduodenectomy is followed by the intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). The present dose adopted ranged 20 to 30 Gy; however, the dose is believed to be insufficient for local control of adenocarcinoma cells. In this study, high dose IORT was performed using rabbit, so histological and nutritional changes were evaluated. Rabbits were divided into three groups: 30 Gy, 50 Gy, and 80 Gy. The radiation was performed with electron focusing the base of cranial mesenteric artery (SMA in human). The rabbits were sacrificed at intervals ranging from immediately to 4 years after irradiation. The earliest evidence of histological changes was the loss of endothelium, although it was repaired within 1 week. Fragmentation and reduplication of internal elastic lamina were observed after 1 week; however, the degree was not dose dependent. Damages of the media was observed in 50 and 80 Gy groups. That is, focal degeneration of smooth muscle cell was demonstrated in 50 Gy group and medial necrosis in 80 Gy group. Degeneration of ganglion cells was observed and its severity was dose-dependent. In 80 Gy group, diarrhea occurred more frequently compared with the other groups and body weight loss could not recover within 4 weeks. It is concluded that, since necrosis of aortic media and marked degeneration of ganglion cells are inevitable in 80 Gy group, IORT dose should be increased within 50 Gy. (author)

  5. Hydrogen peroxide test for intraoperative bile leak detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, V; Rao, Pankaj P; Naidu, C S; Sharma, Anuj K; Singh, A K; Sharma, Sanjay; Gaur, Amit; Kulkarni, S V; Pathak, N

    2017-07-01

    Bile leakage (BL) is a common complication following liver surgery, ranging from 3 to 27% in different series. To reduce the incidence of post-operative BL various BL tests have been applied since ages, but no method is foolproof and every method has their own limitations. In this study we used a relatively simpler technique to detect the BL intra-operatively. Topical application of 1.5% diluted hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) was used to detect the BL from cut surface of liver and we compared this with conventional saline method to know the efficacy. A total of 31 patients included all patients who underwent liver resection and donor hepatectomies as part of Living Donor Liver Transplantation. After complete liver resection, the conventional saline test followed by topical diluted 1.5% H 2 O 2 test was performed on all. A BL was demonstrated in 11 patients (35.48%) by the conventional saline method and in 19 patients (61.29%) by H 2 O 2 method. Statistically compared by Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed significant difference ( P  = 0.014) for minor liver resections group and ( P  = 0.002) for major liver resections group. The topical application of H 2 O 2 is a simple and effective method of detection of BL from cut surface of liver. It is an easy, non-invasive, cheap, less time consuming, reproducible, and sensitive technique with no obvious disadvantages.

  6. Response of canine esophagus to intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, W.F.; Hoekstra, H.J.; Kinsella, T.J.; Barnes, M.; DeLuca, A.M.; Tochner, Z.; Pass, H.I.; Kranda, K.C.; Terrill, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Tolerance of esophagus to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was investigated in dogs. Thirteen adult foxhounds were subjected to right thoractomy, mobilization of the intrathoracic esophagus, and IORT to a 6 cm full-thickness esophageal segment using 9 MeV electrons at doses of 0, 2,000, or 3,000 cGy. Dogs were followed clinically and were evaluated at regular intervals after treatment with fiberoptic esophagoscopy, barium swallows, and postmortem histologic evaluations. One sham-irradiated control dog showed no abnormalities during follow-up of 24 months. Seven dogs receiving 2,000 cGy IORT showed transient mild dysphagia and mild esophagitis, but no clinically or pathologically significant complications. Five dogs receiving 3,000 cGy demonstrated severe ulcerative esophagitis within 6 weeks of treatment which progressed to chronic ulcerative esophagitis with stricture formation by 9 months following IORT. One 3,000 cGy dog died at 13 months from an esophageal perforation. On the basis of a pilot experience using 13 experimental animals, it was concluded that intact canine esophagus tolerates IORT well to doses of 2,000 cGy, but doses of 3,000 cGy pose serious and potentially lethal risks. The clinical application of IORT to the treatment of human intrathoracic neoplasms requiring esophageal irradiation should be approached with caution, particularly at doses exceeding 2,000 cGy

  7. Intraoperative radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Almazan Ortega, Raquel; Guedea, Ferrran

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) has been considered for treatment of pancreas cancer since local recurrence rates are very high. This study assesses the efficacy and safety of IORT in pancreatic cancer. Materials and methods: We conducted a systematic review of scientific literature from January 1995 to February 2007, including Medline, Embase, ISI Web of Science and HTA (Health Technology Assessment). By applying a series of inclusion criteria, two independent reviewers selected those studies in which a minimum of 30 patients received IORT and which furnished survival results based on a minimum 3-month follow-up. Results: Fourteen papers were included, one was an IORT assessment report, 5 were cohort studies, and the remaining 8 were case series studies, 2 of which belonged to the same series. In general, these studies showed that IORT could slightly increase survival among patients with pancreatic cancer in localized stages. However, the results were not conclusively in favor of IORT in the case of pancreatic cancer in locally advanced and metastatic stages. There were no published studies that assessed quality of life. Conclusions: There is no clear evidence to indicate that IORT is more effective than other therapies in treating pancreatic cancer in locally advanced and metastatic stages

  8. Intraoperative mapping of language functions: a longitudinal neurolinguistic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmberger, Josef; Ruge, Maximilian; Kreth, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Briegel, Josef; Reulen, Hans-Juergen; Tonn, Joerg-Christian

    2008-10-01

    This prospective longitudinally designed study was conducted to evaluate language functions pre- and postoperatively in patients who underwent microsurgical treatment of tumors in close proximity to or within language areas and to detect those patients at risk for a postoperative aphasic disturbance. Between 1991 and 2005, 153 awake craniotomies with subsequent cortical mapping of language functions were performed in 149 patients. Language functions were assessed using a standardized test battery. Risk factors were obtained from multivariate logistic regression models. Language mapping was able to be performed in all patients, and complete tumor resection was achieved in 48.4%. Within 21 days after surgery a new language deficit (aphasic disturbance) was observed in 41 (32%) of the 128 cases without preoperative deficits. There were a total of 60 cases involving postoperative aphasic disturbances, including cases both with and without preoperative disturbances. Risk factors for postoperative aphasic disturbance were preoperative aphasia (planguage-positive sites within the tumor (planguage disturbances. A total of 17.6% of all cases demonstrated new postoperative language disturbances after 7 months. Risk factors for persistent aphasic disturbance were increased age (>40 years, planguage-relevant areas intraoperatively, even when they are located within the tumor. New postoperative deficits resolve in the majority of patients, which may be a result of cortical mapping as well as functional reorganization.

  9. Medical setup of intraoperative BNCT at JRR-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akutsu, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Matsumura, A.

    2000-01-01

    Since October 1999, we have been performing clinical trials of intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy (IOBNCT) using a mixed thermal-epithermal beam at the Japan Research Reactor No. 4 (JRR-4). For immediate pre-BNCT care, including administration of a boron compound as well as post-BNCT care, a collaborating neurosurgical department of the University of Tsukuba was prepared in the vicinity of JRR-4. Following craniotomy in the treatment room, anesthetized patients were transported into the irradiation room for BNCT. The boron concentration in tissue was measured by the PGA and ICP-AES methods. The long-term follow-up was done at the University of Tsukuba Hospital. IOBNCT is a complex clinical procedure, which requires sophisticated operating team and co-medical staffs and also cooperation with physicist team. IOBNCT is a complex clinical procedure requiring a high level of cooperation among the operating team, co-medical staff, and physicists. For the safe and successful performance of IOBNCT, we have made the program including critical pathway and prepared various equipments for IOBNCT. To ensure the safe and successful performance of IOBNCT, we developed a critical pathway for use during the procedure, and prepared various apparatus for IOBNCT. (author)

  10. Mammographic Findings after Intraoperative Radiotherapy of the Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, R.; Holmes, D.R.; Smith-Bronstein, V.S.; Villegas-Mendez, S.; Rayhanabad, J.; Sheth, P.; Rashtian, A.

    2012-01-01

    Intraoperative Radiotherapy (IORT) is a form of accelerated partial breast radiation that has been shown to be equivalent to conventional whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in terms of local cancer control. However, questions have been raised about the potential of f IORT to produce breast parenchymal changes that could interfere with mammographic surveillance of cancer recurrence. The purpose of this study was to identify, quantify, and compare the mammographic findings of patients who received IORT and EBRT in a prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial of women with early stage invasive breast cancer undergoing breast conserving therapy between July 2005 and December 2009. Treatment groups were compared with regard to the 1, 2 and 4-year incidence of 6 post-operative mammographic findings: architectural distortion, skin thickening, skin retraction, calcifications, fat necrosis, and mass density. Blinded review of 90 sets of mammograms of 15 IORT and 16 EBRT patients demonstrated a higher incidence of fat necrosis among IORT recipients at years 1, 2, and 4. However, none of the subjects were judged to have suspicious mammogram findings and fat necrosis did not interfere with mammographic interpretation.

  11. A basic study of intraoperative radiation on the stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Tetsuya

    1978-01-01

    In a basic study of intraoperative radiation on the stomach, adult dogs were laparotomized, and radiated on the stomach and gastroduodenal anastomosed part with an electron beam to 1,000 - 4,000 rads to observed its effects on hematologic and histologic findings. 1) No leukopenia occurred with the radiation, but secondary effects such as anemia and hypoproteinemia were noted. 2) On the gastric wall, the mucosa was most severely effected by the radiation, presenting such changes as erosion, atrophy, disappearance of glandular tissue, and fibrosis with the lapse of time. 3) The radiation on the stomach to 3,000 rads was followed by ulceration in one month, by the start of repair of the ulceration in three months, and by its healing in eight months. Histologic examination disclosed no evident damages to the blood vessels by the radiation. 4) Delayed healing of the anastomosed part was noted as an effect of the radiation on this part. 5) The findings in this experiment appear to suggest that the single tolerable dose of electron beam radiation on the stomach and the gastroduodenal anastomosed part should be 3,000 rads. (author)

  12. Intraoperative plus external beam irradiation in nonresectable lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arian-Schad, K.S.; Juettner, F.M.; Ratzenhofer, B.; Leitner, H.; Porsch, G.; Pinter, H.; Ebner, F.; Hackl, A.G.; Friehs, G.B.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1987, 24 patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), stage T 1-3 N 0-2 M 0 , have undergone lymph node dissection and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) to the primary with 10-20 Gy. Patient selection criteria were nonresectability based on severe cardiorespiratory impairment, no radiological evidence of distant metastases and a Karnofsky performance status of >80. In 18 patients the IORT procedure was followed by an external beam radiation series (EBR) including the tumor with 46 Gy and the regional lymph nodes with 45/56 Gy. The tumor response was assessed by CAT-scan volumetry before the institution of IORT, 4 weeks later, before the onset of EBR, 8 weeks after the combined treatment course and on a 3 months basis thereafter. Prospectively, MRI of the thorax with/without Gadolinium-DTPA was performed to examine contrast enhancement and signal behavior of the tumor, in an attempt to differentiate residual disease compared to therapy-related collateral damage. So far, 18 patients have completed the combined treatment course with a median follow-up of 11 months (range 4.5 to 25 months). The overall local response rate (CR and PR) was 88.2 per cent. In detail, 11 complete responses, 6 partial responses and one minimal response were observed. The overall and recurrent-free survival at 25 months was 49.6 per cent and 83.3 per cent, respectively. (author). 31 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  13. Intraoperative nuclear guidance in benign hyperparathyroidism and parathyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonjer, H.J.; Bruining, H.A.; Pols, H.A.P.; Herder, W.W. de; Eijck, C.H.J.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Krenning, E.P.

    1997-01-01

    The success of parathyroid surgery is determined by the identification and removal of all hyperactive parathyroid tissue. Ectopic location of parathyroid tumours and fibrosis due to previous operations can cause failure of parathyroidectomy. Parathyroid tumours accumulate and retain 2-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) labelled with technetium-99m. This study assesses the value of intra-operative localization of parathyroid tumours using a hand-held gamma detector in patients with hyperparathyroidism and parathyroid cancer. Twenty patients undergoing their first operations for hyperparathyroidism, 15 patients undergoing reoperations for either persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism and two patients with parathyroid cancer were studied. Radioactivity in the neck and the mediastinum was recorded by a gamma detector after administration of 370 MBq 99m Tc-MIBI. Surgical findings and postoperative serum levels of calcium were documented. The sensitivity of the gamma detector in identifying parathyroid tumours was 90.5% in first parathyroidectomies, 88.9% in reoperations for either persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism and 100% in parathyroid cancer. One false-positive result was due to a thyroid nodule. Hypercalcaemia ceased in all but one patient postoperatively. It is concluded that employment of the gamma detector is to be advocated in first parathyroidectomies when a parathyroid tumour cannot be discovered, in reoperations for either persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism and in surgery for parathyroid cancer. (orig.)

  14. Intraoperative music application in children and adolescents - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, P K; Spielmann, N; Buehrer, S; Schmidt, A R; Weiss, M; Schmitz, A

    2017-09-01

    Hospitalization, surgery and anaesthesia may lead to new-onset maladaptive behaviour, emotional distress and trauma. This pilot study aims to investigate the influence of intraoperatively applied music on post-operative behaviour in children and adolescents. Children with an ASA physical state classification of I or II, aged from 4 to 16 years and scheduled for elective circumcision or inguinal hernia repair under combined general and caudal anaesthesia were included. The children were randomized into two groups. They wore headphones during surgery, and were either exposed to music or not. All involved staff were blinded. Post-operative behaviour was documented by parents on day 7, 14 and 28 after surgery, using a questionnaire adapted from the "Post Hospitalization Behavioural Questionnaire" (PHBQ). Overall occurrence of at least one item indicating maladaptive behaviour was the primary outcome. Data are presented as median (interquartile range). In total, 135 children aged 6.6 (5.3-8.5) years, weighing 22 (19-29) kg, were included, with 112 completed questionnaires returned. Overall occurrence of at least one maladaptive item was lower in the music group, with a significantly lower incidence on day 7 (51% vs. 77% in controls; P music application in children undergoing minor surgical procedures may reduce the incidence of post-operative maladaptive behaviour within the first week. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. An appraisal of intraoperative radiotherapy for pancreas cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Mitsukazu; Monden, Morito; Sakon, Masato; Kanai, Toshio; Umeshita, Koji; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Mori, Takesada

    1993-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) which was originally used for unresectable cancer has been applied to the cases after pancreas resection. However, it has not been clarified which stages of patients will have the beneficial effect of IORT on their prognosis. In this study, IORT after pancreas resection was appraised on the basis of the patient prognosis. Seventy-two pancreatectomized patients including 6 patients of Stage I, 18 of Stage II, 25 of Stage III and 23 of Stage IV, which was determined by the general rules for cancer of the pancreas in Japan Pancreas Society were employed in this study. Four Stage III and 15 Stage IV patients were treated with IORT (25-30 Gy) after pancreatectomy. Ten of these patients underwent postoperative external beam radiotherapy (22-48 Gy). All but one Stage I patient were currently alive. The median survival time (MST) of Stage II were 908 days and 2 were alive over 5 years after operation. MST of Stage III without IORT was 310 pod and all died within 906 pod. In contrast, all four Stage III patients were currently alive without a sign of recurrence (3, 10, 15, 57 pom). All Stage IV patients died within 462 pod, while three patients treated with IORT were alive over this period. These data suggest IORT improves the prognosis of Stage III patients when combined with radical resection of the pancreas. But it is not the case with the more advanced cases, where systemic anticancer adjuvant therapy might be indicated. (author)

  16. Intraoperative echocardiography of a dislodged Björk-Shiley mitral valve disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M; Abe, T; Takeuchi, E; Watanabe, T; Tamaki, S

    1991-02-01

    The successful management of a patient who suffered an outlet strut fracture of a Björk-Shiley 60-degree convexo-concave mitral valve prosthesis is reported. Emergency operation was life-saving. Preoperative echocardiography assisted in making a prompt diagnosis, and intraoperative echocardiography allowed the detection and removal of the dislodged disc from the left ventricle at the time of the operation. The role of intraoperative echocardiography in the diagnosis of prosthetic strut fracture is emphasized.

  17. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging during surgery for pituitary adenomas: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchfelder, Michael; Schlaffer, Sven-Martin

    2012-12-01

    Surgery for pituitary adenomas still remains a mainstay in their treatment, despite all advances in sophisticated medical treatments and radiotherapy. Total tumor excision is often attempted, but there are limitations in the intraoperative assessment of the radicalism of tumor resection by the neurosurgeon. Standard postoperative imaging is usually performed with a few months delay from the surgical intervention. The purpose of this report is to review briefly the facilities and kinds of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for all physician and surgeons involved in the management of pituitary adenomas on the basis of current literature. To date, there are several low- and high-field magnetic resonance imaging systems available for intraoperative use and depiction of the extent of tumor removal during surgery. Recovery of vision and the morphological result of surgery can be largely predicted from the intraoperative images. A variety of studies document that depiction of residual tumor allows targeted attack of the remnant and extent the resection. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging offers an immediate feedback to the surgeon and is a perfect quality control for pituitary surgery. It is also used as a basis of datasets for intraoperative navigation which is particularly useful in any kind of anatomical variations and repeat operations in which primary surgery has distorted the normal anatomy. However, setting up the technology is expensive and some systems even require extensive remodeling of the operation theatre. Intraoperative imaging prolongs the operation, but may also depict evolving problems, such as hematomas in the tumor cavity. There are several artifacts in intraoperative MR images possible that must be considered. The procedures are not associated with an increased complication rate.

  18. Success of intraoperative scintigraphic detection to complete eradicate of persistent osteoid osteoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddam, A.; Bsiss, A.; BenRais, N.; Lahlou, A.; Essahli, Y.; Boufetal; Lamzaf, O.; El Yaacoubi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The osteoid osteoma is a small benign, painful, bony tumour in which the treatment consists of a complete surgical ablation. The cases of recurrence often correspond to an incomplete surgical ablation. We report, in this work, the advantage of isotopic intraoperative marking for an accurate and complete excision of the pathological lesion in a young patient, during his surgical resumption after the short-term failure of the first intervention, which was accomplished without intraoperative location, and completed with a literature review. (authors)

  19. Intraoperative radiotherapy in early stage breast cancer: potential indications and evidence to date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, A M

    2015-01-01

    Following early results of recent studies of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in the adjuvant treatment of patients with early breast cancer, the clinical utility of IORT is a subject of much recent debate within the breast oncology community. This review describes the intraoperative techniques available, the potential indications and the evidence to date pertaining to local control and toxicity. We also discuss any implications for current practice and future research. PMID:25734489

  20. Intraoperative hyperventilation vs remifentanil during electrocorticography for epilepsy surgery - a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Troels W; Madsen, F F; Moltke, F B

    2010-01-01

    different brain regions in the same patient. METHODS: Hyperventilation and ultra short acting opioid remifentanil were used separately as intraoperative precipitatants of seizure patterns, while recording from subdural and intraventricular electrodes in a patient with temporal lobe epilepsy. Two different...... ictal onset zones appeared in response to hyperventilation and remifentanil. Both zones were resected and the patient has remained essentially seizure free for 1 year. Furthermore, this is the first description of hyperventilation used as an intraoperative seizure precipitant in human focal epilepsy....

  1. Threshold dose for peripheral neuropathy following intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a large animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, T.J.; DeLuca, A.M.; Barnes, M.; Anderson, W.; Terrill, R.; Sindelar, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation injury to peripheral nerve is a dose-limiting toxicity in the clinical application of intraoperative radiotherapy, particularly for pelvic and retroperitoneal tumors. Intraoperative radiotherapy-related peripheral neuropathy in humans receiving doses of 20-25 Gy is manifested as a mixed motor-sensory deficit beginning 6-9 months following treatment. In a previous experimental study of intraoperative radiotherapy-related neuropathy of the lumbro-sacral plexus, an approximate inverse linear relationship was reported between the intraoperative dose (20-75 Gy range) and the time to onset of hind limb paresis (1-12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy). The principal histological lesion in irradiated nerve was loss of large nerve fibers and perineural fibrosis without significant vascular injury. Similar histological changes in irradiated nerves were found in humans. To assess peripheral nerve injury to lower doses of intraoperative radiotherapy in this same large animal model, groups of four adult American Foxhounds received doses of 10, 15, or 20 Gy to the right lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve using 9 MeV electrons. The left lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve were excluded from the intraoperative field to allow each animal to serve as its own control. Following treatment, a complete neurological exam, electromyogram, and nerve conduction studies were performed monthly for 1 year. Monthly neurological exams were performed in years 2 and 3 whereas electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were performed every 3 months during this follow-up period. With follow-up of greater than or equal to 42 months, no dog receiving 10 or 15 Gy IORT shows any clinical or laboratory evidence of peripheral nerve injury. However, all four dogs receiving 20 Gy developed right hind limb paresis at 8, 9, 9, and 12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy

  2. Intraoperative confocal microscopy in the visualization of 5-aminolevulinic acid fluorescence in low-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanai, Nader; Snyder, Laura A; Honea, Norissa J; Coons, Stephen W; Eschbacher, Jennifer M; Smith, Kris A; Spetzler, Robert F

    2011-10-01

    Greater extent of resection (EOR) for patients with low-grade glioma (LGG) corresponds with improved clinical outcome, yet remains a central challenge to the neurosurgical oncologist. Although 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA)-induced tumor fluorescence is a strategy that can improve EOR in gliomas, only glioblastomas routinely fluoresce following 5-ALA administration. Intraoperative confocal microscopy adapts conventional confocal technology to a handheld probe that provides real-time fluorescent imaging at up to 1000× magnification. The authors report a combined approach in which intraoperative confocal microscopy is used to visualize 5-ALA tumor fluorescence in LGGs during the course of microsurgical resection. Following 5-ALA administration, patients with newly diagnosed LGG underwent microsurgical resection. Intraoperative confocal microscopy was conducted at the following points: 1) initial encounter with the tumor; 2) the midpoint of tumor resection; and 3) the presumed brain-tumor interface. Histopathological analysis of these sites correlated tumor infiltration with intraoperative cellular tumor fluorescence. Ten consecutive patients with WHO Grades I and II gliomas underwent microsurgical resection with 5-ALA and intraoperative confocal microscopy. Macroscopic tumor fluorescence was not evident in any patient. However, in each case, intraoperative confocal microscopy identified tumor fluorescence at a cellular level, a finding that corresponded to tumor infiltration on matched histological analyses. Intraoperative confocal microscopy can visualize cellular 5-ALA-induced tumor fluorescence within LGGs and at the brain-tumor interface. To assess the clinical value of 5-ALA for high-grade gliomas in conjunction with neuronavigation, and for LGGs in combination with intraoperative confocal microscopy and neuronavigation, a Phase IIIa randomized placebo-controlled trial (BALANCE) is underway at the authors' institution.

  3. Usefulness of intraoperative ultra low-field magnetic resonance imaging in glioma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senft, Christian; Seifert, Volker; Hermann, Elvis; Franz, Kea; Gasser, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of a mobile, intraoperative 0.15-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner in glioma surgery. We analyzed our prospectively collected database of patients with glial tumors who underwent tumor resection with the use of an intraoperative ultra low-field MRI scanner (PoleStar N-20; Odin Medical Technologies, Yokneam, Israel/Medtronic, Louisville, CO). Sixty-three patients with World Health Organization Grade II to IV tumors were included in the study. All patients were subjected to postoperative 1.5-T imaging to confirm the extent of resection. Intraoperative image quality was sufficient for navigation and resection control in both high- and low-grade tumors. Primarily enhancing tumors were best detected on T1-weighted imaging, whereas fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences proved best for nonenhancing tumors. Intraoperative resection control led to further tumor resection in 12 (28.6%) of 42 patients with contrast-enhancing tumors and in 10 (47.6%) of 21 patients with noncontrast-enhancing tumors. In contrast-enhancing tumors, further resection led to an increased rate of complete tumor resection (71.2 versus 52.4%), and the surgical goal of gross total removal or subtotal resection was achieved in all cases (100.0%). In patients with noncontrast-enhancing tumors, the surgical goal was achieved in 19 (90.5%) of 21 cases, as intraoperative MRI findings were inconsistent with postoperative high-field imaging in 2 cases. The use of the PoleStar N-20 intraoperative ultra low-field MRI scanner helps to evaluate the extent of resection in glioma surgery. Further tumor resection after intraoperative scanning leads to an increased rate of complete tumor resection, especially in patients with contrast-enhancing tumors. However, in noncontrast- enhancing tumors, the intraoperative visualization of a complete resection seems less specific, when compared with postoperative 1.5-T MRI.

  4. Intraoperative positioning of the hindfoot with the hindfoot alignment guide: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigg, Arno; Jud, Lukas; Valderrabano, Victor

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study, intraoperative positioning of the hindfoot by visual means resulted in the wrong varus/valgus position by 8 degrees and a relatively large standard deviation of 8 degrees. Thus, new intraoperative means are needed to improve the precision of hindfoot surgery. We therefore sought a hindfoot alignment guide that would be as simple as the alignment guides used in total knee arthroplasty. A novel hindfoot alignment guide (HA guide) has been developed that projects the mechanical axis from the tibia down to the heel. The HA guide enables the positioning of the hindfoot in the desired varus/valgus position and in plantigrade position in the lateral plane. The HA guide was used intraoperatively from May through November 2011 in 11 complex patients with simultaneous correction of the supramalleolar, tibiotalar, and inframalleolar alignment. Pre- and postoperative Saltzman views were taken and the position was measured. The HA guide significantly improved the intraoperative positioning compared with visual means: The accuracy with the HA guide was 4.5 ± 5.1 degrees (mean ± standard deviation) and without the HA guide 9.4 ± 5.5 degrees (P guide (2 avoided osteotomies, 5 additional osteotomies). The HA guide helped to position the hindfoot intraoperatively with greater precision than visual means. The HA guide was especially useful for multilevel corrections in which the need for and the amount of a simultaneous osteotomy had to be evaluated intraoperatively. Level IV, case series.

  5. Intraoperative CT in the assessment of posterior wall acetabular fracture stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Brian; Jackson, Kelly; Ortega, Gil

    2014-04-01

    Posterior wall acetabular fractures that involve 10% to 40% of the posterior wall may or may not require an open reduction and internal fixation. Dynamic stress examination of the acetabular fracture under fluoroscopy has been used as an intraoperative method to assess joint stability. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the value of intraoperative ISO computed tomography (CT) examination using the Siemens ISO-C imaging system (Siemens Corp, Malvern, Pennsylvania) in the assessment of posterior wall acetabular fracture stability during stress examination under anesthesia. In 5 posterior wall acetabular fractures, standard fluoroscopic images (including anteroposterior pelvis and Judet radiographs) with dynamic stress examinations were compared with the ISO-C CT imaging system to assess posterior wall fracture stability during stress examination. After review of standard intraoperative fluoroscopic images under dynamic stress examination, all 5 cases appeared to demonstrate posterior wall stability; however, when the intraoperative images from the ISO-C CT imaging system demonstrated that 1 case showed fracture instability of the posterior wall segment during stress examination, open reduction and internal fixation was performed. The use of intraoperative ISO CT imaging has shown an initial improvement in the surgeon's ability to assess the intraoperative stability of posterior wall acetabular fractures during stress examination when compared with standard fluoroscopic images. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Microscope Integrated Intraoperative Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for Cataract Surgery: Uses and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudeep; Kummelil, Mathew Kurian; Kharbanda, Varun; Arora, Vishal; Nagappa, Somshekar; Shetty, Rohit; Shetty, Bhujang K

    2016-05-01

    To demonstrate the uses and applications of a microscope integrated intraoperative Optical Coherence Tomography in Micro Incision Cataract Surgery (MICS) and Femtosecond Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery (FLACS). Intraoperative real time imaging using the RESCAN™ 700 (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Oberkochen, Germany) was done for patients undergoing MICS as well as FLACS. The OCT videos were reviewed at each step of the procedure and the findings were noted and analyzed. Microscope Integrated Intraoperative Optical Coherence Tomography was found to be beneficial during all the critical steps of cataract surgery. We were able to qualitatively assess wound morphology in clear corneal incisions, in terms of subclinical Descemet's detachments, tears in the inner or outer wound lips, wound gaping at the end of surgery and in identifying the adequacy of stromal hydration, for both FLACS as well as MICS. It also enabled us to segregate true posterior polar cataracts from suspected cases intraoperatively. Deciding the adequate depth of trenching was made simpler with direct visualization. The final position of the intraocular lens in the capsular bag and the lack of bioadhesivity of hydrophobic acrylic lenses were also observed. Even though Microscope Integrated Intraoperative Optical Coherence Tomography is in its early stages for its application in cataract surgery, this initial assessment does show a very promising role for this technology in the future for cataract surgery both in intraoperative decision making as well as for training purposes.

  7. Utility of Intraoperative Neuromonitoring during Minimally Invasive Fusion of the Sacroiliac Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Michael; Birkholz, Denise; MacBarb, Regina; Capobianco, Robyn; Woods, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Retrospective case series. Objective. To document the clinical utility of intraoperative neuromonitoring during minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion for patients diagnosed with sacroiliac joint dysfunction (as a direct result of sacroiliac joint disruptions or degenerative sacroiliitis) and determine stimulated electromyography thresholds reflective of favorable implant position. Summary of Background Data. Intraoperative neuromonitoring is a well-accepted adjunct to minimally invasive pedicle screw placement. The utility of intraoperative neuromonitoring during minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion using a series of triangular, titanium porous plasma coated implants has not been evaluated. Methods. A medical chart review of consecutive patients treated with minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion was undertaken at a single center. Baseline patient demographics and medical history, intraoperative electromyography thresholds, and perioperative adverse events were collected after obtaining IRB approval. Results. 111 implants were placed in 37 patients. Sensitivity of EMG was 80% and specificity was 97%. Intraoperative neuromonitoring potentially avoided neurologic sequelae as a result of improper positioning in 7% of implants. Conclusions. The results of this study suggest that intraoperative neuromonitoring may be a useful adjunct to minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion in avoiding nerve injury during implant placement.

  8. Utility of Intraoperative Neuromonitoring during Minimally Invasive Fusion of the Sacroiliac Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Woods

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design. Retrospective case series. Objective. To document the clinical utility of intraoperative neuromonitoring during minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion for patients diagnosed with sacroiliac joint dysfunction (as a direct result of sacroiliac joint disruptions or degenerative sacroiliitis and determine stimulated electromyography thresholds reflective of favorable implant position. Summary of Background Data. Intraoperative neuromonitoring is a well-accepted adjunct to minimally invasive pedicle screw placement. The utility of intraoperative neuromonitoring during minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion using a series of triangular, titanium porous plasma coated implants has not been evaluated. Methods. A medical chart review of consecutive patients treated with minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion was undertaken at a single center. Baseline patient demographics and medical history, intraoperative electromyography thresholds, and perioperative adverse events were collected after obtaining IRB approval. Results. 111 implants were placed in 37 patients. Sensitivity of EMG was 80% and specificity was 97%. Intraoperative neuromonitoring potentially avoided neurologic sequelae as a result of improper positioning in 7% of implants. Conclusions. The results of this study suggest that intraoperative neuromonitoring may be a useful adjunct to minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion in avoiding nerve injury during implant placement.

  9. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging assessment of non-functioning pituitary adenomas during transsphenoidal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kunal S; Yao, Yong; Wang, Renzhi; Carter, Bob S; Chen, Clark C

    2016-04-01

    To review the utility of intraoperative imaging in facilitating maximal resection of non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFAs). We performed an exhaustive MEDLINE search, which yielded 5598 articles. Upon careful review of these studies, 31 were pertinent to the issue of interest. Nine studies examined whether intraoperative MRI (iMRI) findings correlated with the presence of residual tumor on MRI taken 3 months after surgical resection. All studies using iMRI of >0.15T showed a ≥90% concordance between iMRI and 3-month post-operative MRI findings. 24 studies (22 iMRI and 2 intraoperative CT) examined whether intraoperative imaging improved the surgeon's ability to achieve a more complete resection. The resections were carried out under microscopic magnification in 17 studies and under endoscopic visualization in 7 studies. All studies support the value of intraoperative imaging in this regard, with improved resection in 15-83% of patients. Two studies examined whether iMRI (≥0.3T) improved visualization of residual NFA when compared to endoscopic visualization. Both studies demonstrated the value of iMRI in this regard, particularly when the tumor is located lateral of the sella, in the cavernous sinus, and in the suprasellar space. The currently available literature supports the utility of intraoperative imaging in facilitating increased NFA resection, without compromising safety.

  10. Microanatomical bases for intraoperative division of the posterior communicating artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrovsky, N

    2002-11-01

    Micro-anatomical parameters of the hypoplastic posterior communicating artery (PCoA) are assessed and compared with the micro-anatomical parameters of the adult type PCoA. Based on the results obtained, the safest place is proposed for PCoA division during basilar tip aneurysm surgery via the pterional route. In 35 human cadaver brains, red coloured latex was injected and micro-anatomical dissection was performed. Seventy PCoA were found. Adult type PCoA was found in 29 cases (41.43%) with mean length 12.58 mm. Reduction of the PCoA diameter from its anterior to its posterior third by up to 20% was found in 27% and by more than 20% in 10% of the cases. The mean perforating vessel number was 8.17, distributed in each third: 3.48, 2.90 and 1.79, respectively. A hypoplastic PCoA was found in 33 cases (47.14%) with mean length 16.09 mm. The PCoA's diameter reduction by up to 20% was found in 24% and by more in 27% of the cases. In 6% of the cases an extreme reduction by up to 70% was observed. The mean perforating vessel (PV) number was 8.82, distributed in each third: 3.18, 3.36 and 2.27, respectively. Hypoplastic PCoA tends to be longer and with a more distinct diameter reduction from the anterior to the posterior third than the adult type PCoA. The PV anatomical parameters are similar for both groups. The posterior third of the PCoA seems to be the area where the risk of perforating vessel damage is the least when performing intra-operative PCoA division.

  11. [The use of intraoperative Doppler ultrasound in endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharipov, O I; Kutin, M A; Kalinin, P L; Fomichev, D V; Lukshin, V A; Kurnosov, A B

    2016-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound (DUS) has been widely used in neurosurgical practice to diagnose various cerebrovascular diseases. This technique is used in transsphenoidal surgery to identify the localization of intracranial arteries when making an approach or during tumor resection. To identify the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and/or basilar artery during endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery, we used a combined device on the basis of a click line curette («Karl Storz») and a 16 MHz Doppler probe (Lassamed). The technique was used in 51 patients during both standard transsphenoidal surgery (23 cases) and transsphenoidal tumor resection through an extended approach (28 cases). Doppler ultrasound was used in different situations: to determine a trajectory of the endonasal transsphenoidal approach in the absence of the normal anatomical landmarks (16 cases), to define the limits of safe resection of a tumor located in the laterosellar region (7), and to implement an extended transsphenoidal endoscopic approach (28). Intraoperative Doppler ultrasound enabled identification of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery in 45 cases and the basilar artery in 2 cases; a blood vessel was not found in 4 cases. Injury to the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery was observed only in 1 case. The use of the described combined device in transsphenoidal surgery turned Doppler ultrasound into an important and useful technique for visualization of the ICA within the tumor stroma as well as in the case of the changed skull base anatomy. Its use facilitates manipulations in a deep and narrow wound and enables inspection of the entire surface of the operative field in various planes, thereby surgery becomes safer due to the possibility of maximum investigation of the operative field.

  12. Intraoperative specimen radiography in patients with nonpalpable malignant breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmachtenberg, C.; Engelken, F.; Fischer, T.; Bick, U.; Poellinger, A.; Fallenberg, E.M. [Charite, Berlin (Germany). Radiology

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Specimen mammography of nonpalpable wire-localized breast lesions is the standard in breast-conserving surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of intraoperative 2-view specimen mammography in different cancer types. Materials and Methods: After ethics approval, 3 readers retrospectively evaluated margins on 266 2-view specimen radiographs. They determined the closest margin and the orientation. The results were correlated with the histopathology (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] and contingency coefficient [CC]) and compared (Wilcoxon test). Results: Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) was present in 115 (43 %), IDC in 75 (28 %), invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) in 57 (22 %) and rare cancers (CA) in 19 specimens (7 %). The sensitivity/specificity and positive/negative predictive value (P/NPV) of specimen mammography were 0.50/0.86 and 0.86/0.50 for CA, 0.42/0.68 and 0.48/0.63 for IDC, 0.36/0.81 and 0.69/0.51 for ILC, and 0.22/0.78 and 0.68/0.32 for IDC+DCIS. Readers correctly identified the orientation of the closest margin in at least one view in an average of 149 specimens (56 %). CCs were between 0.680 (IDC) and 0.912 (CA), suggesting a moderate correlation between radiographic and histological orientation. The correlations were worse for the radiographic and histological distances, with ICC ranging from 0.238 (ILC) to 0.475 (CA). The Wilcoxon test revealed overestimation of the radiographic margins compared to the histological ones for DCIS. Conclusion: Our results suggest that specimen radiography has relatively good overall specificity and good PPV, while the sensitivity and NPV are low for DCIS. A negative result on specimen radiography does not rule out histologically involved margins. (orig.)

  13. Accuracy of endoscopic intraoperative assessment of urologic stone size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nishant; Chew, Ben; Knudsen, Bodo; Lipkin, Michael; Wenzler, David; Sur, Roger L

    2014-05-01

    Endoscopic treatment of renal calculi relies on surgeon assessment of residual stone fragment size for either basket removal or for the passage of fragments postoperatively. We therefore sought to determine the accuracy of endoscopic assessment of renal calculi size. Between January and May 2013, five board-certified endourologists participated in an ex vivo artificial endoscopic simulation. A total of 10 stones (pebbles) were measured (mm) by nonparticipating urologist (N.D.P.) with electronic calibers and placed into separate labeled opaque test tubes to prevent visualization of the stones through the side of the tube. Endourologists were blinded to the actual size of the stones. A flexible digital ureteroscope with a 200-μm core sized laser fiber in the working channel as a size reference was placed through the ureteroscope into the test tube to estimate the stone size (mm). Accuracy was determined by obtaining the correlation coefficient (r) and constructing an Altman-Bland plot. Endourologists tended to overestimate actual stone size by a margin of 0.05 mm. The Pearson correlation coefficient was r=0.924, with a p-valuestones (stones (≥4 mm), r=0.911 vs r=0.666. Altman-bland plot analysis suggests that surgeons are able to accurately estimate stone size within a range of -1.8 to +1.9 mm. This ex vivo simulation study demonstrates that endoscopic assessment is reliable when assessing stone size. On average, there was a slight tendency to overestimate stone size by 0.05 mm. Most endourologists could visually estimate stone size within 2 mm of the actual size. These findings could be generalized to state that endourologists are accurately able to intraoperatively assess residual stone fragment size to guide decision making.

  14. Intraoperative radiotherapy in resected pancreatic cancer: feasibility and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coquard, Regis; Ayzac, Louis; Gilly, Francois-Noeel; Romestaing, Pascale; Ardiet, Jean-Michel; Sondaz, Chrystel; Sotton, Marie-Pierre; Sentenac, Irenee; Braillon, Georges; Gerard, Jean-Pierre

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the impact of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) combined with postoperative external beam irradiation in patients with pancreatic cancer treated with curative surgical resection. Materials and methods: From January 1986 to April 1995 25 patients (11 male and 14 female, median age 61 years) underwent a curative resection with IORT for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The tumour was located in the head of the pancreatic gland in 22 patients, in the body in two patients and in the tail in one patient. The pathological stage was pT1 in nine patients, pT2 in nine patients, pT3 in seven patients, pN0 in 14 patients and pN1 in 11 patients. All the patients were pM0. A pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed in 22 patients, a distal pancreatectomy was performed in two patients and a total pancreatectomy was performed in one patient. The resection was considered to be complete in 20 patients. One patient had microscopic residual disease and gross residual disease was present in four patients. IORT using electrons with a median energy of 12 MeV was performed in all the patients with doses ranging from 12 to 25 Gy. Postoperative EBRT was delivered to 20 patients (median dose 44 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil was given to seven patients. Results: The overall survival was 56% at 1 year, 20% at 2 years and 10% at 5 years. Nine local failures were observed. Twelve patients developed metastases without local recurrence. Twenty patients died from tumour progression and two patients died from early post-operative complications. Three patients are still alive; two patients in complete response at 17 and 94 months and one patient with hepatic metastases at 13 months. Conclusion: IORT after complete resection combined with postoperative external beam irradiation is feasible and well tolerated in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma

  15. Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy for the Management of Aggressive Fibromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeder, Falk; Timke, Carmen; Oertel, Susanne; Hensley, Frank W.; Bischof, Marc; Muenter, Marc W.; Weitz, Juergen; Buchler, Markus W.; Lehner, Burkhard; Debus, Juergen; Krempien, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed our experience with intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) followed by moderate doses of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after organ-sparing surgery in patients with primary or recurrent aggressive fibromatosis. Methods and Materials: Indication for IOERT and postoperative EBRT as an individual treatment approach to avoid mutilating surgical procedures was seen when complete surgical removal seemed to be unlikely or impossible. A total of 31 lesions in 30 patients were treated by surgery and IOERT with a median dose of 12 Gy. Median age was 31 years (range, 13-59 years). Resection status was close margin in six lesions, microscopically positive in 13, and macroscopically positive in 12. Median tumor size was 9 cm. In all, 25 patients received additional EBRT, with a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 36-54 Gy). Results: After a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 3-139 months), no disease-related deaths occurred. A total of five local recurrences were seen, resulting in actuarial 3-year local control rates of 82% overall and 91% inside the IOERT areas. Trends to improved local control were seen for older age (>31 years) and negative margins, but none of these factors reached significance. Perioperative complications were found in six patients, in particular as wound healing disturbances in five patients and venous thrombosis in one patient. Late toxicity was seen in five patients. Conclusion: Introduction of IOERT into a multimodal treatment approach in patients with aggressive fibromatosis is feasible with low toxicity and yielded good local control rates even in patients with microscopical or gross residual disease.

  16. Quantification of tumor fluorescence during intraoperative optical cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Ryan P; Keating, Jane J; DeJesus, Elizabeth M; Jiang, Jack X; Okusanya, Olugbenga T; Nie, Shuming; Holt, David E; Arlauckas, Sean P; Low, Phillip S; Delikatny, E James; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-11-13

    Intraoperative optical cancer imaging is an emerging technology in which surgeons employ fluorophores to visualize tumors, identify tumor-positive margins and lymph nodes containing metastases. This study compares instrumentation to measure tumor fluorescence. Three imaging systems (Spectropen, Glomax, Flocam) measured and quantified fluorescent signal-to-background ratios (SBR) in vitro, murine xenografts, tissue phantoms and clinically. Evaluation criteria included the detection of small changes in fluorescence, sensitivity of signal detection at increasing depths and practicality of use. In vitro, spectroscopy was superior in detecting incremental differences in fluorescence than luminescence and digital imaging (Ln[SBR] = 6.8 ± 0.6, 2.4 ± 0.3, 2.6 ± 0.1, p = 0.0001). In fluorescent tumor cells, digital imaging measured higher SBRs than luminescence (6.1 ± 0.2 vs. 4.3 ± 0.4, p = 0.001). Spectroscopy was more sensitive than luminometry and digital imaging in identifying murine tumor fluorescence (SBR = 41.7 ± 11.5, 5.1 ± 1.8, 4.1 ± 0.9, p = 0.0001), and more sensitive than digital imaging at detecting fluorescence at increasing depths (SBR = 7.0 ± 3.4 vs. 2.4 ± 0.5, p = 0.03). Lastly, digital imaging was the most practical and least time-consuming. All methods detected incremental differences in fluorescence. Spectroscopy was the most sensitive for small changes in fluorescence. Digital imaging was the most practical considering its wide field of view, background noise filtering capability, and sensitivity to increasing depth.

  17. Intraoperative radiation therapy for patients with pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Tetsuo; Itoh, Kei; Agawa, Senichiro; Ishihara, Yukio; Konishi, Toshiro

    2001-01-01

    We studied the efficacy and complications of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) in 40 subjects with unresected pancreatic carcinoma (Group A) and 8 with resected pancreatic carcinoma (Group B). These 2 groups were compared to groups not treated by IORT; 59 subjects with unresected pancreatic carcinoma (Group C) and 55 with resected pancreatic carcinoma (Group D). The 6-month survival in Group A was 55%, and 1-year survival 26% compared to 20% 6-month survival and 9% 1-year survival in Group C with a median survival of 7 months in Group A and 4 months in group C; all statistically significant. Pain control was 81.8% in Group A, reduction in tumor size was 50% and reduction of tumor marker, CA19-9 was 56.3% in Group A. Survival in Groups B and D did not differ significantly. The histological efficacy of IORT in Group A was confirmed in autopsy of fibrosis and scar formation in radiation fields of the pancreas. Two patients in Group B had major morbidity leading to death; 1 from leakage in the pancreatojejunal anastomosis accompanied by pancreatic necrosis and the other from duodenal perforation with rupture of the portal vein and hepatic artery. This study demonstrates the efficacy of IORT in patients with unresected pancreatic carcinoma. Prophylactic bypass and shielding of the residual pancreas with lead or reducing the IORT or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) dose should be considered in patients with unresected or resected pancreatic carcinoma, however, to prevent serious complications due to radiation injury of the duodenum and pancreas. (author)

  18. Glove and gown effects on intraoperative bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, William G; Cooper, Joshua M; Lippert, Dylan; Kablawi, Rawan O; Neiberg, Rebecca H; Sherertz, Robert J

    2014-03-01

    is also recommended to minimize intraoperative contamination.

  19. Intraoperative radiation therapy for carcinoma of the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Masashi; Takashima, Shigemitsu (Shikoku Cancer Center Hospital, Ehime (Japan)); Kataoka, Masaaki (and others)

    1991-12-01

    From May 1978 through December 1989, 54 patients with pancreatic carcinoma underwent electron beam intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Three died of perioperative complications within a month. Nineteen patients who had liver metastasis and/or peritoneal dissemination were treated with IORT with palliative intent. Of 14 patients having pain, 12 (85.7%) had pain relief, including 3 who were treated in combination with splanchnic nerve block. The remaining 32 patients were treated with curative intent for localized carcinoma (total tumor resection in 6, partial resection in 6, and no tumor resection in 20). When comparing these IORT-treated patients with the other 40 patients without IORT (total tumor resection in 13, partial resection in 9, and no tumor resection in 18), the survival was significantly longer in the IORT-treated group (p<0.05 during the 18th month) than the non-treated group. Twenty patients without tumor resection in the IORT-treated group survived significantly longer than the corresponding 18 patients in the non-treated group (p<0.05 during the 7th month). For 26 patients receiving IORT with partial tumor resection or without tumor resection, either additional external irradiation or IORT using a small field within a large field improved survival time significantly, as compared with IORT using a single field (p<0.05 during the 7th and 8th month). Of 19 patients having pain in the IORT treated group without tumor resection, pain relief was achieved in 18 patients (94.7%), including 2 who also had combination of splanchnic nerve block. For evaluable 26 patients surviving 6 months or longer, the most common adverse effect was gastrointestinal problems, such as gastric ulcer, duodenal stenosis, and duodenal perforation. In conclusion, IORT may contribute to pain relief and longer survival time for localized pancreatic carcinoma. (N.K.).

  20. Intraoperative specimen radiography in patients with nonpalpable malignant breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmachtenberg, C; Engelken, F; Fischer, T; Bick, U; Poellinger, A; Fallenberg, E M

    2012-07-01

    Specimen mammography of nonpalpable wire-localized breast lesions is the standard in breast-conserving surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of intraoperative 2-view specimen mammography in different cancer types. After ethics approval, 3 readers retrospectively evaluated margins on 266 2-view specimen radiographs. They determined the closest margin and the orientation. The results were correlated with the histopathology (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] and contingency coefficient [CC]) and compared (Wilcoxon test). Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) was present in 115 (43 %), IDC in 75 (28 %), invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) in 57 (22 %) and rare cancers (CA) in 19 specimens (7 %). The sensitivity/specificity and positive/negative predictive value (P/NPV) of specimen mammography were 0.50/0.86 and 0.86/0.50 for CA, 0.42/0.68 and 0.48/0.63 for IDC, 0.36/0.81 and 0.69/0.51 for ILC, and 0.22/0.78 and 0.68/0.32 for IDC+DCIS. Readers correctly identified the orientation of the closest margin in at least one view in an average of 149 specimens (56 %). CCs were between 0.680 (IDC) and 0.912 (CA), suggesting a moderate correlation between radiographic and histological orientation. The correlations were worse for the radiographic and histological distances, with ICC ranging from 0.238 (ILC) to 0.475 (CA). The Wilcoxon test revealed overestimation of the radiographic margins compared to the histological ones for DCIS. Our results suggest that specimen radiography has relatively good overall specificity and good PPV, while the sensitivity and NPV are low for DCIS. A negative result on specimen radiography does not rule out histologically involved margins. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Intraoperative specimen radiography in patients with nonpalpable malignant breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmachtenberg, C.; Engelken, F.; Fischer, T.; Bick, U.; Poellinger, A.; Fallenberg, E.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Specimen mammography of nonpalpable wire-localized breast lesions is the standard in breast-conserving surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of intraoperative 2-view specimen mammography in different cancer types. Materials and Methods: After ethics approval, 3 readers retrospectively evaluated margins on 266 2-view specimen radiographs. They determined the closest margin and the orientation. The results were correlated with the histopathology (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] and contingency coefficient [CC]) and compared (Wilcoxon test). Results: Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) was present in 115 (43 %), IDC in 75 (28 %), invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) in 57 (22 %) and rare cancers (CA) in 19 specimens (7 %). The sensitivity/specificity and positive/negative predictive value (P/NPV) of specimen mammography were 0.50/0.86 and 0.86/0.50 for CA, 0.42/0.68 and 0.48/0.63 for IDC, 0.36/0.81 and 0.69/0.51 for ILC, and 0.22/0.78 and 0.68/0.32 for IDC+DCIS. Readers correctly identified the orientation of the closest margin in at least one view in an average of 149 specimens (56 %). CCs were between 0.680 (IDC) and 0.912 (CA), suggesting a moderate correlation between radiographic and histological orientation. The correlations were worse for the radiographic and histological distances, with ICC ranging from 0.238 (ILC) to 0.475 (CA). The Wilcoxon test revealed overestimation of the radiographic margins compared to the histological ones for DCIS. Conclusion: Our results suggest that specimen radiography has relatively good overall specificity and good PPV, while the sensitivity and NPV are low for DCIS. A negative result on specimen radiography does not rule out histologically involved margins. (orig.)

  2. Intraoperative application of thermal camera for the assessment of during surgical resection or biopsy of human's brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastek, M.; Piatkowski, T.; Polakowski, H.; Kaczmarska, K.; Czernicki, Z.; Bogucki, J.; Zebala, M.

    2014-05-01

    Motivation to undertake research on brain surface temperature in clinical practice is based on a strong conviction that the enormous progress in thermal imaging techniques and camera design has a great application potential. Intraoperative imaging of pathological changes and functionally important areas of the brain is not yet fully resolved in neurosurgery and remains a challenge. A study of temperature changes across cerebral cortex was performed for five patients with brain tumors (previously diagnosed using magnetic resonance or computed tomography) during surgical resection or biopsy of tumors. Taking into account their origin and histology the tumors can be divided into the following types: gliomas, with different degrees of malignancy (G2 to G4), with different metabolic activity and various temperatures depending on the malignancy level (3 patients), hypervascular tumor associated with meninges (meningioma), metastatic tumor - lung cancer with a large cyst and noticeable edema. In the case of metastatic tumor with large edema and a liquid-filled space different temperature of a cerebral cortex were recorded depending on metabolic activity. Measurements have shown that the temperature on the surface of the cyst was on average 2.6 K below the temperature of surrounding areas. It has been also observed that during devascularization of a tumor, i.e. cutting off its blood vessels, the tumor temperature lowers significantly in spite of using bipolar coagulation, which causes additional heat emission in the tissue. The results of the measurements taken intra-operatively confirm the capability of a thermal camera to perform noninvasive temperature monitoring of a cerebral cortex. As expected surface temperature of tumors is different from surface temperature of tissues free from pathological changes. The magnitude of this difference depends on histology and the origin of the tumor. These conclusions lead to taking on further experimental research, implementation

  3. Temporary Intraoperative Porto-Caval Shunts in Piggy-Back Liver Transplantation Reduce Intraoperative Blood Loss and Improve Postoperative Transaminases and Renal Function: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratschke, Sebastian; Rauch, Alexandra; Albertsmeier, Markus; Rentsch, Markus; Kirschneck, Michaela; Andrassy, Joachim; Thomas, Michael; Hartwig, Werner; Figueras, Joan; Del Rio Martin, Juan; De Ruvo, Nicola; Werner, Jens; Guba, Markus; Weniger, Maximilian; Angele, Martin K

    2016-12-01

    The value of temporary intraoperative porto-caval shunts (TPCS) in cava-sparing liver transplantation is discussed controversially. Aim of this meta-analysis was to analyze the impact of temporary intraoperative porto-caval shunts on liver injury, primary non-function, time of surgery, transfusion of blood products and length of hospital stay in cava-sparing liver transplantation. A systematic search of MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE and PsycINFO retrieved a total of 909 articles, of which six articles were included. The combined effect size and 95 % confidence interval were calculated for each outcome by applying the inverse variance weighting method. Tests for heterogeneity (I 2 ) were also utilized. Usage of a TPCS was associated with significantly decreased AST values, significantly fewer transfusions of packed red blood cells and improved postoperative renal function. There were no statistically significant differences in primary graft non-function, length of hospital stay or duration of surgery. This meta-analysis found that temporary intraoperative porto-caval shunts in cava-sparing liver transplantation reduce blood loss as well as hepatic injury and enhance postoperative renal function without prolonging operative time. Randomized controlled trials investigating the use of temporary intraoperative porto-caval shunts are needed to confirm these findings.

  4. Routine intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography for pediatric open heart surgery: Is it justifiable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgamal, Mohamed-Adel F.; Najm, Hani K.; Abid-Allah, M.; Omran, Ahmad S.

    2007-01-01

    The routine use of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (IO TEE) in children is still debatable. The aim of this study was to determine the safety, benefit and the possible risk of the routine use of IO TEE. It was performed in all children under the age of 14 years with a complex congenital heart defects undergoing open heart surgery, from July 2001 to December 2002. Simple lesions such as secundum atrial septal defects or simple perimembraneous ventricular septal defects (VSD) and neonates less than 2.7 kg were excluded. All children underwent a pre-repair and post-repair complete IO TEE study. There were 112 children, 65 males and 47 females. Ages ranged from 4 days to 156 month, a median of 9 months. A full study was not done in three neonates (3%) because the probe could not be inserted in one, and because of airway compression resulting in desaturation in another two. A pre-repair study confirmed the preoperative transthoracic echocardiographic findings in 105 children (95%). Diagnostic discrepancy or unexpected lesions not reported preoperative were found in six children (5%). Of the 109 children who had full post-repair studies, 67 (60%) showed optimum repair with no residual lesions and 26 (23%) showed trivial or mild residual lesions accepted by the team. Going back on pump to fix moderate or severe residual lesions occurred in 16 (14%) children. In all of these children, the decision for going back on pump was prompted by the IO TEE examination alone. Mild complications occurred in two children (2%). Based on our results, we recommend the routine use of IO TEE. It is safe, has a low complication rate, adds additional information and has a high impact on the diagnosis of residual lesions required in the operating room. However, careful monitoring of the ventilation and airway pressure, particularly during probe insertion and manipulation in small children, is very essential. (author)

  5. Application of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis to Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Using Mobile Electron Linear Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocca, Mario; Cantone, Marie-Claire; Veronese, Ivan; Cattani, Federica; Pedroli, Guido; Molinelli, Silvia; Vitolo, Viviana; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) represents a prospective approach for risk assessment. A multidisciplinary working group of the Italian Association for Medical Physics applied FMEA to electron beam intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) delivered using mobile linear accelerators, aiming at preventing accidental exposures to the patient. Methods and Materials: FMEA was applied to the IORT process, for the stages of the treatment delivery and verification, and consisted of three steps: 1) identification of the involved subprocesses; 2) identification and ranking of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk probability number (RPN) scoring system, based on the product of three parameters (severity, frequency of occurrence and detectability, each ranging from 1 to 10); 3) identification of additional safety measures to be proposed for process quality and safety improvement. RPN upper threshold for little concern of risk was set at 125. Results: Twenty-four subprocesses were identified. Ten potential failure modes were found and scored, in terms of RPN, in the range of 42–216. The most critical failure modes consisted of internal shield misalignment, wrong Monitor Unit calculation and incorrect data entry at treatment console. Potential causes of failure included shield displacement, human errors, such as underestimation of CTV extension, mainly because of lack of adequate training and time pressures, failure in the communication between operators, and machine malfunctioning. The main effects of failure were represented by CTV underdose, wrong dose distribution and/or delivery, unintended normal tissue irradiation. As additional safety measures, the utilization of a dedicated staff for IORT, double-checking of MU calculation and data entry and finally implementation of in vivo dosimetry were suggested. Conclusions: FMEA appeared as a useful tool for prospective evaluation of patient safety in radiotherapy

  6. Projector-based augmented reality for intuitive intraoperative guidance in image-guided 3D interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krempien, Robert; Hoppe, Harald; Kahrs, Lüder; Daeuber, Sascha; Schorr, Oliver; Eggers, Georg; Bischof, Marc; Munter, Marc W; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study is to implement augmented reality in real-time image-guided interstitial brachytherapy to allow an intuitive real-time intraoperative orientation. The developed system consists of a common video projector, two high-resolution charge coupled device cameras, and an off-the-shelf notebook. The projector was used as a scanning device by projecting coded-light patterns to register the patient and superimpose the operating field with planning data and additional information in arbitrary colors. Subsequent movements of the nonfixed patient were detected by means of stereoscopically tracking passive markers attached to the patient. In a first clinical study, we evaluated the whole process chain from image acquisition to data projection and determined overall accuracy with 10 patients undergoing implantation. The described method enabled the surgeon to visualize planning data on top of any preoperatively segmented and triangulated surface (skin) with direct line of sight during the operation. Furthermore, the tracking system allowed dynamic adjustment of the data to the patient's current position and therefore eliminated the need for rigid fixation. Because of soft-part displacement, we obtained an average deviation of 1.1 mm by moving the patient, whereas changing the projector's position resulted in an average deviation of 0.9 mm. Mean deviation of all needles of an implant was 1.4 mm (range, 0.3-2.7 mm). The developed low-cost augmented-reality system proved to be accurate and feasible in interstitial brachytherapy. The system meets clinical demands and enables intuitive real-time intraoperative orientation and monitoring of needle implantation.

  7. Projector-Based Augmented Reality for Intuitive Intraoperative Guidance in Image-Guided 3D Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krempien, Robert; Hoppe, Harald; Kahrs, Lueder; Daeuber, Sascha; Schorr, Oliver; Eggers, Georg; Bischof, Marc; Munter, Marc W.; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to implement augmented reality in real-time image-guided interstitial brachytherapy to allow an intuitive real-time intraoperative orientation. Methods and Materials: The developed system consists of a common video projector, two high-resolution charge coupled device cameras, and an off-the-shelf notebook. The projector was used as a scanning device by projecting coded-light patterns to register the patient and superimpose the operating field with planning data and additional information in arbitrary colors. Subsequent movements of the nonfixed patient were detected by means of stereoscopically tracking passive markers attached to the patient. Results: In a first clinical study, we evaluated the whole process chain from image acquisition to data projection and determined overall accuracy with 10 patients undergoing implantation. The described method enabled the surgeon to visualize planning data on top of any preoperatively segmented and triangulated surface (skin) with direct line of sight during the operation. Furthermore, the tracking system allowed dynamic adjustment of the data to the patient's current position and therefore eliminated the need for rigid fixation. Because of soft-part displacement, we obtained an average deviation of 1.1 mm by moving the patient, whereas changing the projector's position resulted in an average deviation of 0.9 mm. Mean deviation of all needles of an implant was 1.4 mm (range, 0.3-2.7 mm). Conclusions: The developed low-cost augmented-reality system proved to be accurate and feasible in interstitial brachytherapy. The system meets clinical demands and enables intuitive real-time intraoperative orientation and monitoring of needle implantation

  8. Comprehensive evaluation of occupational radiation exposure to intraoperative and perioperative personnel from 18F-FDG radioguided surgical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.; Sarikaya, Ismet; Hall, Nathan C.; Knopp, Michael V.; White, William C.; Marsh, Steven G.; Hinkle, George H.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to comprehensively evaluate occupational radiation exposure to all intraoperative and perioperative personnel involved in radioguided surgical procedures utilizing 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG). Radiation exposure to surgeon, anesthetist, scrub technologist, circulating nurse, preoperative nurse, and postoperative nurse, using aluminum oxide dosimeters read by optically stimulated luminescence technology, was evaluated during ten actual radioguided surgical procedures involving administration of 18 F-FDG. Mean patient dosage of 18 F-FDG was 699 ± 181 MBq (range 451-984). Mean time from 18 F-FDG injection to initial exposure of personnel to the patient was shortest for the preoperative nurse (75 ± 63 min, range 0-182) followed by the circulating nurse, anesthetist, scrub technologist, surgeon, and postoperative nurse. Mean total time of exposure of the personnel to the patient was longest for the anesthetist (250 ± 128 min, range 69-492) followed by the circulating nurse, scrub technologist, surgeon, postoperative nurse, and preoperative nurse. Largest deep dose equivalent per case was received by the surgeon (164 ± 135 μSv, range 10-580) followed by the anesthetist, scrub technologist, postoperative nurse, circulating nurse, and preoperative nurse. Largest deep dose equivalent per hour of exposure was received by the preoperative nurse (83 ± 134 μSv/h, range 0-400) followed by the surgeon, anesthetist, postoperative nurse, scrub technologist, and circulating nurse. On a per case basis, occupational radiation exposure to intraoperative and perioperative personnel involved in 18 F-FDG radioguided surgical procedures is relatively small. Development of guidelines for monitoring occupational radiation exposure in 18 F-FDG cases will provide reassurance and afford a safe work environment for such personnel. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of Intraoperatively Built Custom Linked Seeds Versus Loose Seed Gun Applicator Technique Using Real-Time Intraoperative Planning for Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauls, A. Jason; Ashenafi, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Onicescu, Georgiana [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Clarke, Harry S. [Department of Urology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Marshall, David T., E-mail: marshadt@musc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report our dosimetric results using a novel push-button seed delivery system that constructs custom links of seeds intraoperatively. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2007, 43 patients underwent implantation using a gun applicator (GA), and from 2007 to 2008, 48 patientsunderwent implantation with a novel technique allowing creation of intraoperatively built custom links of seeds (IBCL). Specific endpoint analyses were prostate D90% (pD90%), rV100% > 1.3 cc, and overall time under anesthesia. Results: Final analyses included 91 patients, 43 GA and 48 IBCL. Absolute change in pD90% ({Delta}pD90%) between intraoperative and postoperative plans was evaluated. Using GA method, the {Delta}pD90% was -8.1Gy and -12.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. Similarly, the IBCL technique resulted in a {Delta}pD90% of -8.7Gy and -9.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. No statistically significant difference in {Delta}pD90% was found comparing methods. The GA method had two intraoperative and 10 postoperative rV100% >1.3 cc. For IBCL, five intraoperative and eight postoperative plans had rV100% >1.3 cc. For GA, the mean time under anesthesia was 75 min and 87 min for Pd-103 and I-125 implants, respectively. For IBCL, the mean time was 86 and 98 min for Pd-103 and I-125. There was a statistical difference between the methods when comparing mean time under anesthesia. Conclusions: Dosimetrically relevant endpoints were equivalent between the two methods. Currently, time under anesthesia is longer using the IBCL technique but has decreased over time. IBCL is a straightforward brachytherapy technique that can be implemented into clinical practice as an alternative to gun applicators.

  10. Safty and acute toxicities of intraoperative electron radiotherapy for patients with abdominal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Yirui; Feng Qinfu; Li Minghui

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the safety and acute toxicities of intraoperative electron radiotherapy for patients with abdominal tumors. Methods: From May 2008 to August 2009, 52 patients with abdominal tumors were treated with intraoperative electron radiotherapy, including 14 patients with breast cancer,19 with pancreatic cancer, 3 with cervical cancer, 4 with ovarian cancer, 6 with sarcoma, and 6 with other tumors. Fifteen patients were with recurrent tumors. The intraoperative radiotherapy was performed using Mobetron mobile electron accelerator, with total dose of 9 - 18 Gy. In all, 29, 4 and 19 patients received complete resection, palliative resection and surgical exploration, respectively. The complications during the operations and within 6 months after operations were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 (CTC 3.0). Results: The median duration of surgery was 190 minutes. Intraoperative complications were observed in 5 patients, including 3 with hemorrhage, 1 with hypotension,and 1 with hypoxaemia, all of which were treated conservatively. The median hospitalization time and time to take out stitches was 12 and 13 days, respectively. And the in-hospital mortality was 4% (2/52). Twenty-four patients suffered post-operative adverse events, including 3 postoperative infections. With a median follow-up time of 183 days, 20% of patients suffered from grade 3 to 5 adverse events, with hematological toxicities being the most common complication, followed by bellyache. Grade 1 and 2 toxicities which were definitely associated with intraoperative radiotherapy was 28% and 4%, respectively. None of grade 3 to 5 complications were proved to be caused by intraoperative radiotherapy. Conclusions: Intraoperative electron radiotherapy is well tolerable and could be widely used for patients with abdominal tumors, with a little longer time to take out stitches but without more morbidities and toxicities compared surgery alone. (authors)

  11. Cost analysis of prophylactic intraoperative cystoscopic ureteral stents in gynecologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, James; Fenton, Bradford; Jean, Geraldine Marie; Chae, Clara

    2011-12-01

    Prophylactic intraoperative ureteral stent placement is performed to decrease operative ureteric injury, though few data are available on the effectiveness of this procedure, and no data are available on its cost. To analyze the cost of prophylactic intraoperative cystoscopic ureteral stents in gynecologic surgery. All cases of prophylactic ureteral stent placement performed in gynecologic surgery during a 1-year period were identified and retrospectively reviewed through the electronic medical records database of Summa Health System. Costs were obtained through the Healthcare Cost Accounting System. The principles of cost-effective analysis were used (ie, explicit and detailed descriptions of costs and cost-effectiveness statistics). Importantly, we evaluated cost and not charges or financial model estimates. In addition, we obtained the contribution margins (ie, the hospital's net profit or loss) for prophylactic ureteral stent placement. Other gynecologic procedures were also analyzed. Among 792 major inpatient gynecologic procedures, 18 cases of prophylactic intraoperative ureteral stents were identified. Median costs were as follows: additional cost of prophylactic intraoperative ureteral stenting, $1580; additional cost of surgical resources, $770; cost of ureteral catheters, $427; cost of surgeons, $383. The contribution margins per case for various gynecologic surgical procedures were as follows: oophorectomy, $2804 profit; abdominal hysterectomy, $2649 profit; laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH), $1760 profit. When intraoperative ureteral stenting was added, the contribution margins changed to the following: oophorectomy, $782 profit; abdominal hysterectomy, $627 profit; LAVH, $262 loss. Overall, the contribution margin profit was decreased by about 85%, from $2400 to $380. Prophylactic intraoperative ureteral stenting in gynecologic surgery decreases a hospital's contribution margin. Because of the expense of this procedure, as well as

  12. What is the optimal management of an intra-operative air leak in a colorectal anastomosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchem, J B; Stafford, C; Francone, T D; Roberts, P L; Schoetz, D J; Marcello, P W; Ricciardi, R

    2018-02-01

    An airtight anastomosis on intra-operative leak testing has been previously demonstrated to be associated with a lower risk of clinically significant postoperative anastomotic leak following left-sided colorectal anastomosis. However, to date, there is no consistently agreed upon method for management of an intra-operative anastomotic leak. Therefore, we powered a noninferiority study to determine whether suture repair alone was an appropriate strategy for the management of an intra-operative air leak. This is a retrospective cohort analysis of prospectively collected data from a tertiary care referral centre. We included all consecutive patients with left-sided colorectal or ileorectal anastomoses and evidence of air leak during intra-operative leak testing. Patients were excluded if proximal diversion was planned preoperatively, a pre-existing proximal diversion was present at the time of surgery or an anastomosis was ultimately unable to be completed. The primary outcome measure was clinically significant anastomotic leak, as defined by the Surgical Infection Study Group at 30 days. From a sample of 2360 patients, 119 had an intra-operative air leak during leak testing. Sixty-eight patients underwent suture repair alone and 51 underwent proximal diversion or anastomotic reconstruction. The clinically significant leak rate was 9% (6/68; 95% CI: 2-15%) in the suture repair alone arm and 0% (0/51) in the diversion or reconstruction arm. Suture repair alone does not meet the criteria for noninferiority for the management of intra-operative air leak during left-sided colorectal anastomosis. Further repair of intra-operative air leak by suture repair alone should be reconsidered given these findings. Colorectal Disease © 2017 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. Monitoração intraoperatória com teste de estimulação eletromiográfica dos instrumentais de pacientes submetidos à correção cirúrgica de escoliose idiopática Seguimiento de estimulación intraoperatoria con electromiografía de los instrumentales de pacientes sometidos a corrección quirúrgica de la escoliosis idiopática Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring of patients undergoing idiopathic scoliosis surgical correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Pasqualini

    2010-09-01

    : retrospective study of the medical records of 32 patients submitted to surgery at the Spine Surgery Service of Instituto da Coluna, Jundiaí, São Paulo, Brazil, from 2004 to 2008. Ages ranged from 11 to 18 years, and the majority of the patients was female (93.75%. RESULTS: a correlation between positive clinical findings and pedicle screw malposition was found in six patients submitted to electromyographic stimulation instruments test, with no evidence of complications after correction of screw position. CONCLUSION: results confirm the efficacy of intraoperative monitoring.

  14. Intraoperative radiation therapy for locally advanced gynecological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddock, M.G.; Petersen, I.A.; Webb, M.J.; Wilson, T.O.; Podratz, K.C.; Gunderson, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate disease control and survival in patients with locally advanced gynecological malignancies who received intraoperative radiation therapy with electrons (IOERT) as a component of treatment. Methods and Materials: Between March 1983 and June 1995, 63 patients (pts) with locally advanced primary (9 pts) or recurrent (54 pts) gynecological malignancies received IOERT as a component of attempted curative therapy. The site of origin was uterine cervix in 40 pts, uterine corpus in 16 pts, vagina in 5 pts, and ovary in 2 pts. Thirty-eight patients with recurrent disease had been previously irradiated (median prior RT dose 5040 cGy, range 900-8400). External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was given to 43 of 63 pts either before or after IOERT (900-6570 cGy, median 4960 cGy). Chemotherapy was given to 21 pts prior to IOERT and following IOERT in 2 pts. IOERT doses ranged from 800 cGy to 2500 cGy with a median of 1750 cGy. The median IOERT dose was 2000 cGy in 20 patients with gross residual disease and 1500 cGy in 43 patients with microscopic residual disease. Endpoints included central control within the IOERT cone, local control, distant failure, disease free survival and overall survival. Variables evaluated for impact on disease outcome included tumor grade, primary site, prior RT, IOERT dose, EBRT dose, residual disease at time of IOERT, and use of chemotherapy. Results: Survival and disease control data are presented in the table below. There was no impact of any disease or treatment related variable on local or central failure. Pts with microscopic residual disease at the time of IOERT had significantly fewer distant metastases than pts with gross residual (5 yr 31% vs. 77%, p = 0.001) and improved survival (5 yr 37% vs. 10%, p = 0.02). Patients with recurrent disease after previous RT had survival and disease control rates which were similar to those seen in pts without priot RT. Toxicity ≥ grade 3 due to IOERT was observed in 11 pts (17%). Conclusion: A

  15. Influence of volume on intraoperatively irradiated canine ureters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, S.M.; Powers, B.E.; Thames, H.D.; Vujaskovic, Z.; LaRue, S.M.; Park, R.D.; Gillette, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is used to deliver high single doses of radiation to the tumor bed following surgical removal of various abdominal malignancies. The advantage of IORT is the ability to remove sensitive normal tissues from the treatment field and limit the volume of normal tissue irradiated. The purpose of this study was to determine dose-volume relationships for retroperitoneal tissues. Materials and methods: 134 adult beagle dogs were irradiated to the surgically exposed paraaortic area. Normal tissues included in the treatment field were aorta, peripheral nerve, ureter, bone and the muscle. Groups of 4 - 8 dogs were irradiated to doses ranging from 18 - 54 Gy for a 2x5 cm field, from 12 - 46 Gy for a 4x5 cm field, and 12 - 42 Gy to an 8x5 cm field. The radiations were done using 6 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator. Dogs were observed for three years after radiation at which time they were euthanatized, perfused and tissues taken for histologic and histomorphometric evaluation. Transverse sections of the ureter were taken from the proximal, middle and distal segments. Histologically, proximal portions of the ureters with greater than 5 times normal diameter were considered to have severe hydroureter. Ureteral strictures and hydroneophrosis were evaluated by excretory urograms. Excretory urograms were done prior to treatment and annually after treatment or prior to necropsy for each dog in the experiments. A grading system was devised for predicting ureteral stenosis based on ureteral and renal pelvic dilatation. Results: A strong dose and volume relationship was identified for ureteral injury using the mixture model analysis which takes into account latency as well as dose. Subsequent to earlier edema, fibrin and vessel damage, progressive fibrosis developed and likely caused uteral stricture resulting in hydroureter. Severe hydroureter was observed as early as three months. The ED 50 for hydroureter determined

  16. Intraoperative body temperature control: esophageal thermometer versus infrared tympanic thermometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Vanessa de Brito; Nascimento, Ariane de Souza

    2016-01-01

    To verify the correlation between temperature measurements performed using an infrared tympanic thermometer and an esophageal thermometer during the intraoperative period. A longitudinal study of repeated measures was performed including subjects aged 18 years or older undergoing elective oncologic surgery of the digestive system, with anesthesia duration of at least 1 hour. Temperature measurements were performed simultaneously by a calibrated esophageal thermometer and by a calibrated infrared tympanic thermometer, with laboratory reading precision of ±0.2ºC. The operating room temperature remained between 19 and 21ºC. The study included 51 patients, mostly men (51%), white (80.4%). All patients were kept warm by a forced-air heating system, for an average of 264.14 minutes (SD = 87.7). The two temperature measurements showed no different behavior over time (p = 0.2205), however, tympanic measurements were consistently 1.24°C lower (ptemperatura realizadas por meio de um termômetro timpânico por infravermelho e por um termômetro esofágico, durante o período intraoperatório. Realizou-se um estudo longitudinal, de medidas repetidas, incluindo sujeitos com idade igual ou superior a 18 anos, submetidos à cirurgia oncológica eletiva do sistema digestório, com duração da anestesia de, no mínimo, 1 hora. As medidas de temperatura eram realizadas, ao mesmo tempo, por meio de um termômetro esofágico calibrado e por termômetro timpânico por infravermelho calibrado, com precisão de leitura em laboratório de ±0,2ºC. A temperatura da sala operatória permaneceu entre 19 e 21ºC. Foram incluídos 51 pacientes, em sua maioria homens (51%), brancos (80,4%). Todos os pacientes foram aquecidos com o sistema de ar forçado aquecido, em média por 264,14 minutos (DP = 87,7). As duas medidas de temperatura não tiveram comportamento diferente ao longo do tempo (p = 0,2205), mas a medida timpânica foi consistentemente menor em 1,24°C (p temperaturas mais

  17. Intraoperative endoscopic ultrasound guidance for laparoscopic excision of invisible symptomatic deep intramural myomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urman, Bulent; Boza, Aysen; Ata, Baris; Aksu, Sertan; Arslan, Tonguc; Taskiran, Cagatay

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of intraoperative endoscopic ultrasound guidance for excision of symptomatic deep intramural myomas that are not otherwise visible at laparoscopy. Seventeen patients with symptomatic deep intramural myomas who underwent laparoscopic myomectomy with intraoperative endoscopic ultrasound guidance were followed up and reported. All myomas were removed successfully. The endometrium was breached in one patient. All patients were relieved of their symptoms and three patients presenting with infertility conceived. There were no short- or long-term complications associated with the procedure. One patient who had multiple myomas necessitated intravenous iron treatment prior to discharge. Laparoscopic removal of small symptomatic deep intramural myomas is facilitated by the use of intraoperative endoscopic ultrasound that enables exact localisation and correct placement of the serosal incision. Impact statement What is already known on this subject: When the myoma is symptomatic, compressing the endometrium, does not show serosal protrusion and is not amenable to hysteroscopic resection, laparoscopic surgery may become challenging. What do the results of this study add: The use of intraoperative endoscopic ultrasound under these circumstances may facilitate the procedure by accurate identification of the myoma and correct placement of the serosal incision. What are the implications of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research: Intraoperative ultrasound should be more oftenly used to accurately locate deep intramural myomas to the end of making laparoscopy feasible and possibly decreasing recurrence by facilitating removal of otherwise unidentifiable disease.

  18. Intraoperative Tension Pneumothorax in a Patient With Remote Trauma and Previous Tracheostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mavarez-Martinez MD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many trauma patients present with a combination of cranial and thoracic injury. Anesthesia for these patients carries the risk of intraoperative hemodynamic instability and respiratory complications during mechanical ventilation. Massive air leakage through a lacerated lung will result in inadequate ventilation and hypoxemia and, if left undiagnosed, may significantly compromise the hemodynamic function and create a life-threatening situation. Even though these complications are more characteristic for the early phase of trauma management, in some cases, such a scenario may develop even months after the initial trauma. We report a case of a 25-year-old patient with remote thoracic trauma, who developed an intraoperative tension pneumothorax and hemodynamic instability while undergoing an elective cranioplasty. The intraoperative patient assessment was made even more challenging by unexpected massive blood loss from the surgical site. Timely recognition and management of intraoperative pneumothorax along with adequate blood replacement stabilized the patient and helped avoid an unfavorable outcome. This case highlights the risks of intraoperative pneumothorax in trauma patients, which may develop even months after injury. A high index of suspicion and timely decompression can be life saving in this type of situation.

  19. Preparing Platelet-Rich Plasma with Whole Blood Harvested Intraoperatively During Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bin; Zhang, Zheng; Zhou, Ning-Feng; Huang, Yu-Feng; Bao, Yu-Jie; Wu, De-Sheng; Zhang, Ya-Dong

    2017-07-22

    BACKGROUND Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has gained growing popularity in use in spinal fusion procedures in the last decade. Substantial intraoperative blood loss is frequently accompanied with spinal fusion, and it is unknown whether blood harvested intraoperatively qualifies for PRP preparation. MATERIAL AND METHODS Whole blood was harvested intraoperatively and venous blood was collected by venipuncture. Then, we investigated the platelet concentrations in whole blood and PRP, the concentration of growth factors in PRP, and the effects of PRP on the proliferation and viability of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs). RESULTS Our results revealed that intraoperatively harvested whole blood and whole blood collected by venipuncture were similar in platelet concentration. In addition, PRP formulations prepared from both kinds of whole blood were similar in concentration of platelet and growth factors. Additional analysis showed that the similar concentrations of growth factors resulted from the similar platelet concentrations of whole blood and PRP between the two groups. Moreover, these two kinds of PRP formulations had similar effects on promoting cell proliferation and enhancing cell viability. CONCLUSIONS Therefore, intraoperatively harvested whole blood may be a potential option for preparing PRP spinal fusion.

  20. Intraoperative mapping of expressive language cortex using passive real-time electrocorticography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AmiLyn M. Taplin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this case report, we investigated the utility and practicality of passive intraoperative functional mapping of expressive language cortex using high-resolution electrocorticography (ECoG. The patient presented here experienced new-onset seizures caused by a medium-grade tumor in very close proximity to expressive language regions. In preparation of tumor resection, the patient underwent multiple functional language mapping procedures. We examined the relationship of results obtained with intraoperative high-resolution ECoG, extraoperative ECoG utilizing a conventional subdural grid, extraoperative electrical cortical stimulation (ECS mapping, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Our results demonstrate that intraoperative mapping using high-resolution ECoG is feasible and, within minutes, produces results that are qualitatively concordant to those achieved by extraoperative mapping modalities. They also suggest that functional language mapping of expressive language areas with ECoG may prove useful in many intraoperative conditions given its time efficiency and safety. Finally, they demonstrate that integration of results from multiple functional mapping techniques, both intraoperative and extraoperative, may serve to improve the confidence in or precision of functional localization when pathology encroaches upon eloquent language cortex.

  1. Tumor location and IDH1 mutation may predict intraoperative seizures during awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Tal; Grossman, Rachel; Sitt, Razi; Nossek, Erez; Yanaki, Raneen; Cagnano, Emanuela; Korn, Akiva; Hayat, Daniel; Ram, Zvi

    2014-11-01

    Intraoperative seizures during awake craniotomy may interfere with patients' ability to cooperate throughout the procedure, and it may affect their outcome. The authors have assessed the occurrence of intraoperative seizures during awake craniotomy in regard to tumor location and the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) status of the tumor. Data were collected in 137 consecutive patients who underwent awake craniotomy for removal of a brain tumor. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of the incidence of seizures based on the tumor location and its IDH1 mutation status, and then compared the groups for clinical variables and surgical outcome parameters. Tumor location was strongly associated with the occurrence of intraoperative seizures. Eleven patients (73%) with tumor located in the supplementary motor area (SMA) experienced intraoperative seizures, compared with 17 (13.9%) with tumors in the other three non-SMA brain regions (p awake craniotomy compared with patients who have a tumor in non-SMA frontal areas and other brain regions. The IDH1 mutation was more common in SMA region tumors compared with other brain regions, and may be an additional risk factor for the occurrence of intraoperative seizures.

  2. Development of a new compact intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging system: concept and initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Akio; Sameshima, Tetsuro; Sora, Shigeo; Kimura, Toshikazu; Nishimura, Kengo; Itoh, Hirotaka; Shibahashi, Keita; Shono, Naoyuki; Machida, Toru; Hara, Naoko; Mikami, Nozomi; Harihara, Yasushi; Kawate, Ryoichi; Ochiai, Chikayuki; Wang, Weimin; Oguro, Toshiki

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during surgery has been shown to improve surgical outcomes, but the current intraoperative MRI systems are too large to install in standard operating suites. Although 1 compact system is available, its imaging quality is not ideal. We developed a new compact intraoperative MRI system and evaluated its use for safety and efficacy. This new system has a magnetic gantry: a permanent magnet of 0.23 T and an interpolar distance of 32 cm. The gantry system weighs 2.8 tons and the 5-G line is within the circle of 2.6 m. We created a new field-of-view head coil and a canopy-style radiofrequency shield for this system. A clinical trial was initiated, and the system has been used in 44 patients. This system is significantly smaller than previous intraoperative MRI systems. High-quality T2 images could discriminate tumor from normal brain tissue and identify anatomic landmarks for accurate surgery. The average imaging time was 45.5 minutes, and no clinical complications or MRI system failures occurred. Floating organisms or particles were minimal (1/200 L maximum). This intraoperative, compact, low-magnetic-field MRI system can be installed in standard operating suites to provide relatively high-quality images without sacrificing safety. We believe that such a system facilitates the introduction of the intraoperative MRI.

  3. Intraoperative implant rod three-dimensional geometry measured by dual camera system during scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmingo, Remel Alingalan; Tadano, Shigeru; Abe, Yuichiro; Ito, Manabu

    2016-05-12

    Treatment for severe scoliosis is usually attained when the scoliotic spine is deformed and fixed by implant rods. Investigation of the intraoperative changes of implant rod shape in three-dimensions is necessary to understand the biomechanics of scoliosis correction, establish consensus of the treatment, and achieve the optimal outcome. The objective of this study was to measure the intraoperative three-dimensional geometry and deformation of implant rod during scoliosis corrective surgery.A pair of images was obtained intraoperatively by the dual camera system before rotation and after rotation of rods during scoliosis surgery. The three-dimensional implant rod geometry before implantation was measured directly by the surgeon and after surgery using a CT scanner. The images of rods were reconstructed in three-dimensions using quintic polynomial functions. The implant rod deformation was evaluated using the angle between the two three-dimensional tangent vectors measured at the ends of the implant rod.The implant rods at the concave side were significantly deformed during surgery. The highest rod deformation was found after the rotation of rods. The implant curvature regained after the surgical treatment.Careful intraoperative rod maneuver is important to achieve a safe clinical outcome because the intraoperative forces could be higher than the postoperative forces. Continuous scoliosis correction was observed as indicated by the regain of the implant rod curvature after surgery.

  4. Markerless registration for image guided surgery. Preoperative image, intraoperative video image, and patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihara, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Yuko

    1998-01-01

    Real-time and volumetric acquisition of X-ray CT, MR, and SPECT is the latest trend of the medical imaging devices. A clinical challenge is to use these multi-modality volumetric information complementary on patient in the entire diagnostic and surgical processes. The intraoperative image and patient integration intents to establish a common reference frame by image in diagnostic and surgical processes. This provides a quantitative measure during surgery, for which we have been relied mostly on doctors' skills and experiences. The intraoperative image and patient integration involves various technologies, however, we think one of the most important elements is the development of markerless registration, which should be efficient and applicable to the preoperative multi-modality data sets, intraoperative image, and patient. We developed a registration system which integrates preoperative multi-modality images, intraoperative video image, and patient. It consists of a real-time registration of video camera for intraoperative use, a markerless surface sampling matching of patient and image, our previous works of markerless multi-modality image registration of X-ray CT, MR, and SPECT, and an image synthesis on video image. We think these techniques can be used in many applications which involve video camera like devices such as video camera, microscope, and image Intensifier. (author)

  5. Laparoscopy vs robotics in surgical management of endometrial cancer: comparison of intraoperative and postoperative complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seror, Julien; Bats, Anne-Sophie; Huchon, Cyrille; Bensaïd, Chérazade; Douay-Hauser, Nathalie; Lécuru, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    To compare the rates of intraoperative and postoperative complications of robotic surgery and laparoscopy in the surgical treatment of endometrial cancer. Unicentric retrospective study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Tertiary teaching hospital. The study was performed from January 2002 to December 2011 and included patients with endometrial cancer who underwent laparoscopic or robotically assisted laparoscopic surgical treatment. Data collected included preoperative data, tumor characteristics, intraoperative data (route of surgery, surgical procedures, and complications), and postoperative data (early and late complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification, and length of hospital stay). Morbidity was compared between the 2 groups. The study included 146 patients, of whom 106 underwent laparoscopy and 40 underwent robotically assisted surgery. The 2 groups were comparable in terms of demographic and preoperative data. Intraoperative complications occurred in 9.4% of patients who underwent laparoscopy and in none who underwent robotically assisted surgery (p = .06). There was no difference between the 2 groups in terms of postoperative events. Robotically assisted surgery is not associated with a significant difference in intraoperative and postoperative complications, even when there were no intraoperative complications of robotically assisted surgery. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The application of preoperative functional MRI in neurosurgical treatment of intraoperative electrical stimulation for gliomas involving motor areas at 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zixiao; Dai Jianping; Li Shaowu; Li Changhong; Gao Peiyi; Jiang Tao; Sun Yilin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of preoperative blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) 3 T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify motor cortical areas in neurosurgical treatment of intraoperative electrical stimulation for gliomas involving motor areas. Methods: The study included 26 consecutive preoperative BOLD-fMRI sessions in patients with brain gliomas in or near senorimotor cortices. The bilateral hand movement fMRI paradigm was preformed in all patients. The BOLD data were analyzed by the workstation (Leonardo Syngo 2003A, Siemens)to obtain the BOLD-fMRI images, which were used to guide the preoperative neurosurgical planning. With guidance of preoperative mapping, all patients received microsurgery under anaesthesia retaining consciousness using intraoperative motor functional brain mapping with the method of direct electrical stimulations. The brain lesions were removed as far as possible in the case of eloquent areas preservation. The preoperative and postoperative KPS of all patients were operated to evaluate the state of patients. Results: The preoperative mappings of the hand area on primary sensorimotor cortex using BOLD-fMRI were obtained successfully in twenty-three of twenty-six patients. Under anaesthesia retaining consciousness, the primary motor area was monitored by the method of direct electrical stimulations with the guidance of preoperative BOLD-fMRI. There was good correlation between preoperative fMRI findings and intraoperative cortical stimulation. Furthermore, the preoperative mappings could make up for the un-monitored areas during operative cortical stimulation. For the 21 patients of the pre-KPS from 80.0 to 90.0, the pre-KPS and post-KPS are 85.7 and 95.2 respectively, and for the 5 patients of the pre-KPS from 40. 0 to 70.0, the pre-KPS and post-KPS are 68.0 and 90.0 respectively. Conclusion: The preoperative mapping of the hand area on primary sensorimotor cortex using BOLD-fMRI could non-invasively localize the

  7. Intraoperative glucose management in children < 1 year or < 10 kg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to analyse the current practice of ... The brain derives 90% of its energy from glucose during times of ... Paediatric Anaesthetists, recommend the use of an isotonic ... in small infants, and glucose is monitored in critically ill children or children ... This observational study was done following institutional review.

  8. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for locally advanced or recurrent renal cell carcinoma; Intraoperative Radiotherapie (IORT) lokal ausgedehnter und rezidivierter Nierenzellkarzinome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eble, M.J.; Wannenmacher, M. [Radiologische Klinik, Ruprecht-Karls-Univ. Heidelberg (Germany); Staehler, G. [Urologische Klinik, Ruprecht-Karls-Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    In a pilot study the role of intraoperative radiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced or recurrent renal cell cacinomas was analysed. From January 1992 to July 1994 11 patients with a primary (n=3) or recurrent renal cell carcinoma had IORT. One patient had complete resection and in 3 respectively 7 patients microscopically or macroscopically residual disease was left. Using 6 to 10 MeV, a single dose of 15 to 20 Gy was delivered to the fossa renalis and the corresponding paraaortic area. Based on three-dimensional treatment planning, additional external beam radiotherapy was given 3 to 4 weeks later (40 Gy, 2 Gy SD, 23 mV). After a mean follow-up of 24.3 months 5 patients had died of distant metastases (lung, liver, bone, mediastinum) with a mean survival time of 11.5 months. Mean disease-free interval was 6.4 months. One patient suffered from a second malignancy. Two patients are alive with distant metastases. Local tumor control in the entire group was 100%. The calculated 4-year overall and disease-free survival was 47% and 34%. The postoperative course was affected in 3 patients (abscess n=1, short dehiscence of the abdominal wound n=2). The gastrointestinal toxicity during external beam radiotherapy was low. No IORT-specific late adverse effects were observed. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] In einer Pilotstudie wurde die Wertigkeit der intraoperativen Radiotherapie bei lokal ausgedehnten primaeren oder rezidivierten Nierenzellkarzinomen ueberprueft. Von Januar 1992 bis Juli 1994 konnten bei elf Patienten mit einem primaeren (n=3) oder rezidivierten Nierenzellkarzinom intraoperativ mit 15 bis 20 Gy das Nierenlager und der Paraaortalraum bestrahlt werden. Ein Patient war vollstaendig reseziert, und bei drei bzw. sieben Patienten verblieben mikroskopische bzw. makroskopische Reste. Nach dreidimensionaler Planung wurde perkutan die Dosis mit 40 Gy aufgesaettigt (23 MV, 2 Gy ED). Nach einer mittleren Nachbeobachtung von 24,3 Monaten waren fuenf Patienten nach im

  9. Limitations of intraoperative adrenal remnant volume measurement in patients undergoing subtotal adrenalectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauckhoff, Michael; Stock, Karsten; Stock, Susanne; Lorenz, Kerstin; Sekulla, Carsten; Brauckhoff, Katrin; Thanh, Phuong Nguyen; Gimm, Oliver; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Dralle, Henning

    2008-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that a minimum of approximately one-third of one normal adrenal gland is required for sufficient adrenocortical stress capacity. Correlation between intraoperative measurement, determination of remnant size by computed tomography (CT), and adrenocortical stress capacity has not been examined so far. Twenty-two patients with familial pheochromocytoma (n=13), sporadic pheochromocytoma (n=3), and adrenocortical tumors (n=6) who underwent unilateral or bilateral subtotal adrenalectomy (STAE, 28 adrenal remnants) were prospectively studied. Patients were examined in a multi-slice CT to determine residual adrenal tissue and by ACTH test 4 days and 3 months postoperatively. There was a slight significant correlation between intraoperative and CT calculated volumes (r=0.77; pSTAE has limitations. CT gives larger volumes compared with intraoperative determination. For calculation of a volume-function correlation of residual adrenal tissue, in clinical practice, the determination of relative adrenal residual volume is acceptable.

  10. Preoperative Evaluation and Endovascular Procedure of Intraoperative Aneurysm Rupture During Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Bin-Shan, E-mail: binszha2013@163.com; Zhu, Hua-Gang, E-mail: huagzhu@yeah.net; Ye, Yu-Sheng, E-mail: yeyusheng@aliyun.com; Li, Yong-Sheng, E-mail: 872868848@qq.com; Zhang, Zhi-Gong, E-mail: zzgedward@sina.com; Xie, Wen-Tao, E-mail: 345344347@qq.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Department of Vascular Surgery (China)

    2017-03-15

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms are now routinely repaired with endovascular repair if anatomically feasible because of advantages in safety and recovery. However, intraoperative aneurysm rupture is a severe complication which may have an adverse effect on the outcome of treatment. Comprehensive preoperative assessment and considerate treatment are keys to success of endovascular aneurysm repair, especially during unexpected circumstances. Few cases have reported on intraoperative aortic rupture, which were successfully managed by endovascular treatment. Here, we present a rare case of an intraoperative aneurysm rupture during endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm with narrow neck and angulated aorta arch (coarctation-associated aneurysm), which was successfully treated using double access route approach and iliac limbs of infrarenal devices.Level of EvidenceLevel 5.

  11. Monte Carlo based simulation of LIAC intraoperative radiotherapy accelerator along with beam shaper applicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Heidarloo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative electron radiotherapy is one of the radiotherapy methods that delivers a high single fraction of radiation dose to the patient in one session during the surgery. Beam shaper applicator is one of the applicators that is recently employed with this radiotherapy method. This applicator has a considerable application in treatment of large tumors. In this study, the dosimetric characteristics of the electron beam produced by LIAC intraoperative radiotherapy accelerator in conjunction with this applicator have been evaluated through Monte Carlo simulation by MCNP code. The results showed that the electron beam produced by the beam shaper applicator would have the desirable dosimetric characteristics, so that the mentioned applicator can be considered for clinical purposes. Furthermore, the good agreement between the results of simulation and practical dosimetry, confirms the applicability of Monte Carlo method in determining the dosimetric parameters of electron beam  intraoperative radiotherapy

  12. Major intraoperative complications during video-assisted thoracoscopic anatomical lung resections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decaluwe, Herbert; Petersen, René Horsleben; Hansen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A multicentre evaluation of the frequency and nature of major intraoperative complications during video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) anatomical resections. METHODS: Six European centres submitted their series of consecutive anatomical lung resections with the intention to treat by VATS...... for technical reasons. In-hospital mortality was 1.4% (n = 43). Conversion to open thoracotomy was observed in 5.5% (n = 170), of whom 21.8% (n = 37) were for oncological reasons, 29.4% (n = 50) for technical reasons and 48.8% (n = 83) for complications. Vascular injuries were reported in 2.9% (n = 88) patients...... major surgery (n = 9) or immediate life-threatening complications (n = 17). Twenty-three percent of the in-hospital mortalities (n = 10/43) were related to major intraoperative complications. Eight pneumonectomies (five intraoperative and three postoperative at 0.3%) were a consequence of a major...

  13. Intraoperative Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging and Assessment of the Macula During Cataract Surgery: A Novel Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Koushik; Chawla, Rohan; Kumawat, Babulal; Sharma, Yog Raj

    2016-09-01

    The authors describe a technique to qualitatively analyze the posterior segment during cataract surgery using intraoperative optical coherence tomography (iOCT). Macular iOCT can be done before and after intraocular lens implantation after the media is rendered clear following phacoemulsification. A handheld irrigating planoconcave contact lens is placed over the cornea with the operating microscope in retroillumination mode. After focusing the microscope and upon getting a clear view of the posterior segment, iOCT is switched on, centered at the macula, and focused. This technique enables the surgeon to intraoperatively analyze and document the macular morphology and vitreoretinal interface. Potential uses of this technique include intraoperative decision-making regarding concurrent use of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents or steroids in cases with dense cataracts where preoperative OCT is difficult. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:846-847.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Intraoperative Ultrasound in Patients Undergoing Transsphenoidal Surgery for Pituitary Adenoma: Systematic Review [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Hani J; Vercauteren, Tom; Ourselin, Sebastien; Dorward, Neil L

    2017-10-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery is the gold standard for pituitary adenoma resection. However, despite advances in microsurgical and endoscopic techniques, some pituitary adenomas can be challenging to cure. We sought to determine whether, in patients undergoing transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenoma, intraoperative ultrasound is a safe and effective technologic adjunct. The PubMed database was searched between January 1996 and January 2016 to identify relevant publications that 1) featured patients undergoing transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenoma, 2) used intraoperative ultrasound, and 3) reported on safety or effectiveness. Reference lists were also checked, and expert opinions were sought to identify further publications. Ultimately, 10 studies were included, comprising 1 cohort study, 7 case series, and 2 case reports. One study reported their prototype probe malfunctioned, leading to false-positive results in 2 cases, and another study' prototype probe was too large to safely enter the sphenoid sinus in 2 cases. Otherwise, no safety issues directly related to use of intraoperative ultrasound were reported. In the only comparative study, remission occurred in 89.7% (61/68) of patients with Cushing disease in whom intraoperative ultrasound was used, compared with 83.8% (57/68) in whom it was not. All studies reported that surgeons anecdotally found intraoperative ultrasound helpful. Although there is limited and low-quality evidence available, the use of intraoperative ultrasound appears to be a safe and effective technologic adjunct to transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenoma. Advances in ultrasound technology may allow for more widespread use of such devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The utility of intraoperative ultrasound in modified radical neck dissection: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agcaoglu, Orhan; Aliyev, Shamil; Taskin, Halit Eren; Aksoy, Erol; Siperstein, Allan; Berber, Eren

    2014-04-01

    Although the value of surgeon-performed neck ultrasound (SPUS) for thyroid nodules has been validated, the utility of intraoperative ultrasound (US) in modified radical neck dissection (MRND) has not been reported in the literature. The aim of this study was to analyze the utility of intraoperative SPUS in assessing the completeness of MRND for thyroid cancer. Between 2007 and 2011, a total of 25 patients underwent MRND by 1 surgeon for thyroid cancer. All patients underwent intraoperative SPUS, which was repeated at the end of the neck dissection (completion US) to look for missed lymph nodes (LNs). There were 10 male and 15 female patients. Pathology included 23 papillary and 2 medullary carcinomas. The number of LNs removed per case was 23 ± 2, and the number of positive was LNs 5 ± 1. In 4 (16%) cases, intraoperative US detected 7 residual LNs, which would have been missed, if completion US were not done. These missed LNs were located in low-level IV (3 nodes), high-level II (2 nodes), and posterior level V (2 nodes) and measured 1.4 ± 0.2 cm. At follow-up, recurrence was seen in 2 (8%) patients, including a superior mediastinal recurrence in a patient with tall cell cancer and a jugular LN recurrence at level II in another patient with papillary thyroid cancer. This pilot study shows that intraoperative SPUS can help assess the completeness of MRND. According to our results, intraoperative completion US identifies LNs missed by palpation 16% of the time.

  16. Role of Intraoperative Radiographs in the Surgical Treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Christophe; Ilharreborde, Brice; Queinnec, Steffen; Mazda, Keyvan

    2016-03-01

    One of the main goals of scoliosis surgery is to obtain a balanced fused spine. Although preoperative planning remains essential, intraoperative posteroanterior radiographs are the only available tool during the procedure to verify shoulder and coronal spinal balance and, if necessary, adjust the construct. The aim of this study was to quantify the direct influence of intraoperative radiographs on the surgical procedure itself during correction of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data on a monocentric cohort of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients undergoing corrective surgery. A total 148 consecutive patients operated in the same department following the same validated preoperative planning method were included in this prospective radiologic study. The mean follow-up averaged 33 months. Frontal Cobb angles, T1 tilt, shoulder tilt, iliolumbar angle, and frontal balance were measured and compared on intraoperative, early postoperative, and latest follow-up radiographs. Any intraoperative modification of the correction performed after analysis of the intraoperative radiograph were recorded. The analysis of all radiologic parameters was possible in 90.5% of the cases. In 9.5% of the cases, shoulders could not be properly distinguished. Significant modifications on the upper thoracic curve to correct T1 tilt or shoulder balance were performed in 29% of the patients, and changes at the distal levels were recorded in 19%, underlining planification imperfections. On postoperative standing radiographs, the average coronal parameters were neutral, without loss of correction at follow-up. Intraoperative radiographs remain necessary to ensure compensation of the shortcomings of the modern preoperative planification method.

  17. Dose volume relationships for intraoperatively irradiated saphenous nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.; Powers, B.E.; Gillette, S.M.; Thames, H.D.; Childs, G.; Vujaskovic, Z.; LaRue, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is used to deliver high single doses of radiation to the tumor bed following surgical removal of various abdominal malignancies. The advantage of IORT is the ability to remove sensitive normal tissues from the treatment field and to limit the volume of normal tissue irradiated. The purpose of this study was to determine dose-volume relationships for retroperitoneal tissues. Materials and methods: 134 adult beagle dogs were irradiated to the surgically exposed paraaortic area. Normal tissues included in the treatment field were aorta, peripheral nerve, ureter, bone and muscle. Groups of 4 - 8 dogs were irradiated to doses ranging from 18 - 54 Gy for a 2x5 cm field, from 12 - 46 Gy for a 4x5 cm field, and 12 - 42 Gy to an 8x5 cm field. The radiations were done using 6 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator. Dogs were observed for three years after radiation. Electrophysiologic procedures were done prior to irradiation and annually following irradiation. The procedures included electromyography of the pelvic limb and paralumbar muscles supplied by the L1 to S1 spinal nerves to determine presence and degree of motor unit disease. Motor nerve conduction velocities of the proximal and distal sciatic nerves were determined. Sensory nerve conduction velocities of the saphenous nerve were also determined. Evoked lumbosacral and thoraco-lumbar spinal cord potentials were evaluated following stimulation of the left sciatic nerve. In addition to electrophysiologic studies, neurologic examinations were done prior to treatment and at six month intervals for the three year observation period. At the three year time period, dogs were euthanatized, sections of peripheral nerve taken, routinely processed, stained with Masson's trichrome and evaluated histomorphometrically using point count techniques. Results: Twenty-two dogs were euthanatized prior to the three year observation period due to peripheral nerve damage

  18. Intraoperative use of low-dose recombinant activated factor VII during thoracic aortic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Nicholas D; Bhattacharya, Syamal D; Williams, Judson B; Fosbol, Emil L; Lockhart, Evelyn L; Patel, Mayur B; Gaca, Jeffrey G; Welsby, Ian J; Hughes, G Chad

    2012-06-01

    Numerous studies have supported the effectiveness of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) for the control of bleeding after cardiac procedures; however safety concerns persist. Here we report the novel use of intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa in thoracic aortic operations, a strategy intended to improve safety by minimizing rFVIIa exposure. Between July 2005 and December 2010, 425 consecutive patients at a single referral center underwent thoracic aortic operations with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB); 77 of these patients received intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa (≤60 μg/kg) for severe coagulopathy after CPB. Propensity matching produced a cohort of 88 patients (44 received intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa and 44 controls) for comparison. Matched patients receiving intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa got an initial median dose of 32 μg/kg (interquartile range [IQR], 16-43 μg/kg) rFVIIa given 51 minutes (42-67 minutes) after separation from CPB. Patients receiving intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa demonstrated improved postoperative coagulation measurements (partial thromboplastin time 28.6 versus 31.5 seconds; p=0.05; international normalized ratio, 0.8 versus 1.2; pproduct transfusions (2.5 versus 5.0 units; p=0.05) compared with control patients. No patient receiving intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa required postoperative rFVIIa administration or reexploration for bleeding. Rates of stroke, thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, and other adverse events were equivalent between groups. Intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa led to improved postoperative hemostasis with no apparent increase in adverse events. Intraoperative rFVIIa administration in appropriately selected patients may correct coagulopathy early in the course of refractory blood loss and lead to improved safety through the use of smaller rFVIIa doses. Appropriately powered randomized studies are necessary to confirm the safety and efficacy of this approach. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons

  19. Extirpation of a cranial lesion radio guided by scintigraphy and intraoperative detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concha Julio, Enrique; Basuri, Luciano; Otayza, Felipe; Neubauer, Sonia; Mena, Ismael; Arteaga, Maria Paz

    2005-01-01

    A skull lesion may be difficult to localize, specially a small one that is not evident on the external surface. In this paper, we describe the localization and extirpation aided by intraoperative radio guidance of a 2 cm lesion compromising the internal aspect of the posterior temporal bone. The radiological expression of this lesion was poor, both on the plain radiograph's and on the computed tomography, making the intraoperative radiology and the navigation aided by computed tomography useless. The lesion was extirpated in block and the skull repaired. The biopsy confirmed a Paget's disease. There were not surgical complications (au)

  20. Histopathological effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on pancreas and adjacent tissues: a postmortem analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekstra, H.J.; Restrepo, C.; Kinsella, T.J.; Sindelar, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) has been utilized in the treatment of resectable and unresectable pancreatic carcinoma at the National Cancer Institute. Detailed autopsy analyses of the radiation effects on the pancreas and adjacent tissues were performed on 13 patients dying at various times following therapy. IORT can induce a progressive retroperitoneal fibrosis and fibrosis of the porta hepatis in patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma. In unresectable pancreatic carcinoma, the major expression of intraoperative irradiation with external beam irradiation is a progressive fibrosis of the pancreas with vascular sclerosis, nerve degeneration, atrophy of acinar cells, and atypical changes in the ducts of the pancreas, as well as degenerative changes of the pancreatic tumor

  1. Indocyanine green fluorescence angiography for intraoperative assessment of gastrointestinal anastomotic perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degett, Thea Helene; Andersen, Helene Schou; Gögenur, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Anastomotic leakage following gastrointestinal surgery remains a frequent and serious complication associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Indocyanine green fluorescence angiography (ICG-FA) is a newly developed technique to measure perfusion intraoperatively. The aim of this paper...... included in the review if they assessed anastomotic perfusion intraoperatively with ICG-FA in order to predict anastomotic leakage in humans. RESULTS: Of 790 screened papers 14 studies were included in this review. Ten studies (n = 916) involved patients with colorectal anastomoses and four studies (n...

  2. Intraoperative closure of infant multiple muscular ventricular septal defects with Amplatzer occluder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinfen; Gao Wei; Zhu Zhongqun; Chen Huiwen; Zhang Yuqi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To report the preliminary experience of intraoperative hybrid therapy for closure of multiple muscular ventricular septal defects (VSD) in a small infant. Methods: After median sternotomy, a AGA Amplatzer occluder was introduced through right ventricular surface to close 2 muscular ventricular septal defects under transesophageal echocardiographic guidance. Results: The infant survived after the treatment without residual shunting, and rehabilitated rapidly. Conclusions: Intraoperative hybrid therapy with combined surgical technique and interventional procedure for closure of multiple muscular VSD in small infant is a safe and effective method. (authors)

  3. Intraoperative Cochlear Implant Device Testing Utilizing an Automated Remote System: A Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Amanda R; Carlson, Matthew L; Sladen, Douglas P

    2018-03-01

    Intraoperative cochlear implant device testing provides valuable information regarding device integrity, electrode position, and may assist with determining initial stimulation settings. Manual intraoperative device testing during cochlear implantation requires the time and expertise of a trained audiologist. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the feasibility of using automated remote intraoperative cochlear implant reverse telemetry testing as an alternative to standard testing. Prospective pilot study evaluating intraoperative remote automated impedance and Automatic Neural Response Telemetry (AutoNRT) testing in 34 consecutive cochlear implant surgeries using the Intraoperative Remote Assistant (Cochlear Nucleus CR120). In all cases, remote intraoperative device testing was performed by trained operating room staff. A comparison was made to the "gold standard" of manual testing by an experienced cochlear implant audiologist. Electrode position and absence of tip fold-over was confirmed using plain film x-ray. Automated remote reverse telemetry testing was successfully completed in all patients. Intraoperative x-ray demonstrated normal electrode position without tip fold-over. Average impedance values were significantly higher using standard testing versus CR120 remote testing (standard mean 10.7 kΩ, SD 1.2 vs. CR120 mean 7.5 kΩ, SD 0.7, p automated testing with regard to the presence of open or short circuits along the array. There were, however, two cases in which standard testing identified an open circuit, when CR120 testing showed the circuit to be closed. Neural responses were successfully obtained in all patients using both systems. There was no difference in basal electrode responses (standard mean 195.0 μV, SD 14.10 vs. CR120 194.5 μV, SD 14.23; p = 0.7814); however, more favorable (lower μV amplitude) results were obtained with the remote automated system in the apical 10 electrodes (standard 185.4 μV, SD 11.69 vs. CR

  4. Donor disc attachment assessment with intraoperative spectral optical coherence tomography during descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Wylegala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography has already been proven to be useful for pre- and post-surgical anterior eye segment assessment, especially in lamellar keratoplasty procedures. There is no evidence for intraoperative usefulness of optical coherence tomography (OCT. We present a case report of the intraoperative donor disc attachment assessment with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in case of Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK surgery combined with corneal incisions. The effectiveness of the performed corneal stab incisions was visualized directly by OCT scan analysis. OCT assisted DSAEK allows the assessment of the accuracy of the Descemet stripping and donor disc attachment.

  5. Intraoperative care for aortic surgery using circulatory arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Suárez, Félix Ezequiel; Fernández Del Valle, David; González Alvarez, Adrián; Pérez-Lozano, Blanca

    2017-05-01

    The total circulatory arrest (CA) is necessary to achieve optimal surgical conditions in certain aortic pathologies, especially in those affecting the ascending aorta and aortic arch. During this procedure it is necessary to protect all the organs of ischemia, especially those of the central nervous system and for this purpose several strategies have been developed. The first and most important protective method is systemic hypothermia. The degree of hypothermia and the route of application have been evolving and currently tend to use moderate hypothermia (MH) (20.1-28 °C) associated with unilateral or bilateral selective cerebral perfusion methods. In this way the neurological results are better, the interval of security is greater and the times of extracorporeal circulation are smaller. Even so, it is necessary to take into account that there is the possibility of ischemia in the lower part of the body, especially of the abdominal viscera and the spinal cord, therefore the time of circulatory stop should be limited and not to exceed 80 minutes. Evidence of possible neurological drug protection is very weak and only mannitol, magnesium, and statins can produce some benefit. Inhalational anesthetics and some intravenous seem to have advantages, but more studies would be needed to test their long-term benefit. Other important parameters to be monitored during these procedures are blood glucose, anemia and coagulation disorders and acid-base balance. The recommended monitoring is common in complex cardiovascular procedures and it is of special importance the neurological monitoring that can be performed with several techniques, although currently the most used are Bispectral Index (BIS) and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS). It is also essential to monitor the temperature routinely at the nasopharyngeal and bladder level and it is important to control coagulation with rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM).

  6. The ultrastructure of tumor cells in patients with rectal cancer after pre-operative irradiation and intra-operative cryotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyinnik, Yu.O.; Kotenko, O.Je.; Nevzorov, V.P.; Chyibyisov, L.P.

    2000-01-01

    Electronic microscopy of the tumor cells was performed to confirm the efficacy of combined pre-operative gamma-therapy and intraoperative cryotherapy (CT). Pre-operative irradiation at the dose of 20 Gy accompanied by intra-operative cryotherapy caused the changes in the ultrastructure, the depth and degree of which allow to consider them destructive and irreversible

  7. The value of the intra-operative clinical mechanical axis measurement in open-wedge valgus high tibial osteotomies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, G.J.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; van Kampen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In high tibial osteotomies (HTO) the correction needs to be precise and intra-operative assessment is essential. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of the intra-operative clinical mechanical axis measurement and compare it to the post-operative weight bearing situation

  8. Intraoperative use of an open midfield MR scanner in the surgical treatment of cerebral gliomas; Intraoperative Nutzung eines offenen Mittelfeld-MRT waehrend der chirurgischen Therapie zerebraler Gliome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, J.P.; Schulz, T.; Dietrich, J.; Kahn, T. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Univ. Leipzig (Germany); Trantakis, C. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Univ. Leipzig (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intraoperative MRI guidance in achieving more gross-total resection in case of primary brain tumors. We studied 12 patients with low-grade glioma and 19 patients with high-grade glioma who underwent surgery within a vertically open 0.5T MR system. After initial imaging, the resection was stopped at the point in which the neurosurgeon considered the resection complete by viewing the operation field. At this time, intraoperative MRI was repeated (''first control'') to identify any residual tumor. Areas of tumor-suspected tissue were localized and resected, with the exception of tissue adjacent to eloquent areas. Final imaging was carried out before closing the craniotomy. Comparison of ''first control'' and final imaging revealed a decrease of residual tumor volume from 32% to 4.3% in low-grade gliomas, and from 29% to 10% in high-grade gliomas. Intraoperative MRI allows a clear optimization of microsurgical resection of both low-grade and high-grade gliomas. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Untersuchung war es, die Effektivitaet des Einsatzes der intraoperativen MRT bei der Resektion gliogener Hirntumoren zu pruefen. 12 Patienten mit niedriggradigem Gliom und 19 Patienten mit Glioblastom wurden in einem vertikal offenen 0,5-T-MRT operiert. Nach der initialen Bildgebung erfolgte die Resektion bis zu dem Zeitpunkt, an dem der Neurochirurg kein Tumorgewebe mehr im OP-Situs abgrenzen konnte. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt erfolgte eine erneute MRT (''= erste Kontrolle'') zur Visualisierung nur MR-tomographisch darstellbaren Resttumors. Solche Areale wurden im OP-Situs lokalisiert und mit Ausnahme von Strukturen in der Naehe eloquenter Hirnareale reseziert. Vor Verschluss des Schaedels erfolgte eine abschliessende MR-Kontrolle. Durch Einsatz der intraoperativen MRT konnte eine Absenkung des relativen Resttumorvolumens von 32% auf 4,3% bei niediggradigen Gliomen und

  9. Intraoperative digital radiography for diagnosis of non-palpable breast lesions; Digitale intraoperative Praeparateradiographie bei diagnostischen Exzisionen nicht palpabler Laesionen der Brust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekmann, F.; Grebe, S.; Hamm, B. [Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Bick, U. [Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Winzer, K.J. [Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral-, Gefaess- und Thoraxchirurgie; Paepke, S. [Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany). Abt. fuer Frauenheilkunde und Geburtshilfe

    2000-12-01

    Purpose: A procedure for performing intraoperative digital radiography of diagnostic breast specimens directly in the operating suite with teleradiologic assessment by a radiologist is presented. The efficiency of this procedure is compared with that of conventional magnification mammography performed in the radiology department. Material and Methods: Thirty-six specimen radiographs obtained by conventional magnification mammography were compared with 38 intraoperative digital magnification radiographs (DIMA Soft P42 prototype, Feinfocus Inc., Garbsen). The radiographs were assessed for lesion conspicuity and time savings for the surgeon, anesthesiologist, and radiologist. Results: The new procedure identified all 38 labeled pathological lesions, and the conventional technique likewise had a detection rate of 100% (36/36). The new technique resulted in considerable time savings for the surgeon and the radiologist. The duration of surgery was shorter and the time interval from removal of the specimen to reporting of the results was reduced from about 23 min to about 13 min. A single radiograph was sufficient for complete visualization of the specimen in all cases. Conclusion: Digital intraoperative specimen radiography considerably reduces the time of surgery depending on the local conditions and is highly accurate in locating a suspicious area within the tissue. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Es wird die Moeglichkeit vorgestellt, digitale intraoperative Praeparateradiographie bei diagnostischen Exzisionen direkt im OP-Trakt mit teleradiologischer Begutachtung durch den Radiologen durchzufuehren. Die Leistungsfaehigkeit des Verfahrens wurde mit der konventionellen Vergroesserungsmammographie im Roentgeninstitut verglichen. Material und Methode: Es wurden 36 Praeparateaufnahmen, die mit der herkoemmlichen konventionellen Vergroesserungsmammographie durchgefuehrt worden waren, mit 38 intraoperativen digitalen Vergroesserungsaufnahmen (DIMA Soft P42, Fa. Feinfocus, Garbsen

  10. Intraoperative Right Ventricular Fractional Area Change Is a Good Indicator of Right Ventricular Contractility: A Retrospective Comparison Using Two- and Three-Dimensional Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Tatsuyuki; Kamibayashi, Takahiko; Ota, Chiho; Carl Shibata, Sho; Iritakenishi, Takeshi; Sawa, Yoshiki; Fujino, Yuji

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative two-dimensional echocardiography is technically challenging, given the unique geometry of the right ventricle (RV). It was hypothesized that the RV fractional area change (RVFAC) could be used as a simple method to evaluate RV function during surgery. Therefore, the correlation between the intraoperative RVFAC and the true right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF), as measured using newly developed three-dimensional (3D) analysis software, was evaluated. Retrospective study. University hospital. Patients who underwent cardiac surgery with transesophageal echocardiography monitoring between March 2014 and June 2014. None. Sixty-two patients were included in this study. After the exclusion of poor imaging data and patients with arrhythmias, 54 data sets were analyzed. RVFAC was measured by one anesthesiologist during surgery, and full-volume 3D echocardiographic data were recorded simultaneously. The 3D data were analyzed postoperatively using off-line 3D analysis software by a second anesthesiologist, who was blinded to the RVFAC results. The mean RVFAC was 38.8% ± 8.7%, the mean RVEF was 41.4% ± 8.3%, and there was a good correlation between the RVFAC and the RVEF (r(2) = 0.638; prights reserved.

  11. Monte Carlo skin dose simulation in intraoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer using spherical applicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, F.; Ung, N. M.; Khandaker, M. U.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Saad, M.; Malik, R. Abdul; Bustam, A. Z.; Zaili, Z.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    The relatively new treatment modality electronic intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is gaining popularity, irradiation being obtained within a surgically produced cavity being delivered via a low-energy x-ray source and spherical applicators, primarily for early stage breast cancer. Due to the spatially dramatic dose-rate fall off with radial distance from the source and effects related to changes in the beam quality of the low keV photon spectra, dosimetric account of the Intrabeam system is rather complex. Skin dose monitoring in IORT is important due to the high dose prescription per treatment fraction. In this study, modeling of the x-ray source and related applicators were performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code. The dosimetric characteristics of the model were validated against measured data obtained using an ionization chamber and EBT3 film as dosimeters. By using a simulated breast phantom, absorbed doses to the skin for different combinations of applicator size (1.5-5 cm) and treatment depth (0.5-3 cm) were calculated. Simulation results showed overdosing of the skin (>30% of prescribed dose) at a treatment depth of 0.5 cm using applicator sizes larger than 1.5 cm. Skin doses were significantly increased with applicator size, insofar as delivering 12 Gy (60% of the prescribed dose) to skin for the largest sized applicator (5 cm diameter) and treatment depth of 0.5 cm. It is concluded that the recommended 0.5-1 cm distance between the skin and applicator surface does not guarantee skin safety and skin dose is generally more significant in cases with the larger applicators. Highlights: • Intrabeam x-ray source and spherical applicators were simulated and skin dose was calculated. • Skin dose for constant skin to applicator distance strongly depends on applicator size. • Use of larger applicators generally results in higher skin dose. • The recommended 0.5-1 cm skin to applicator distance does not guarantee skin

  12. A retrospective analysis on the relationship between intraoperative hypothermia and postoperative ileus after laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji-Won; Kim, Duk-Kyung; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Eun-Jee; Kim, Jea-Youn

    2018-01-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI) is an important factor prolonging the length of hospital stay following colorectal surgery. We retrospectively explored whether there is a clinically relevant association between intraoperative hypothermia and POI in patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery for malignancy within the setting of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program between April 2016 and January 2017 at our institution. In total, 637 patients were analyzed, of whom 122 (19.2%) developed clinically and radiologically diagnosed POI. Overall, 530 (83.2%) patients experienced intraoperative hypothermia. Although the mean lowest core temperature was lower in patients with POI than those without POI (35.3 ± 0.5°C vs. 35.5 ± 0.5°C, P = 0.004), the independence of intraoperative hypothermia was not confirmed based on multivariate logistic regression analysis. In addition to three variables (high age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index score, long duration of surgery, high maximum pain score during the first 3 days postoperatively), cumulative dose of rescue opioids used during the first 3 days postoperatively was identified as an independent risk factor of POI (odds ratio = 1.027 for each 1-morphine equivalent [mg] increase, 95% confidence interval = 1.014-1.040, P POI within an ERAS pathway, in which items other than thermal measures might offset its negative impact on POI. However, as it was associated with delayed discharge from the hospital, intraoperative maintenance of normothermia is still needed.

  13. THE REDUCED CANINE PANCREAS TO STUDY THE EFFECTS OF INTRAOPERATIVE RADIOTHERAPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HEIJMANS, HJ; MEHTA, D; KLEIBEUKER, JH; SLUITER, WJ; HOEKSTRA, HJ

    1993-01-01

    A canine model is described to study the tolerance of the pancreas to intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT). The canine pancreas is a horseshoe-shaped organ. To create a homogeneous delivery of IORT to the whole pancreas surgical manipulation is necessary which may induce pancreatitis. A resection of

  14. Laparoscopy Instructional Videos : The Effect of Preoperative Compared With Intraoperative Use on Learning Curves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekema, Theo H.; Talsma, Aaldert K.; Wevers, Kevin P.; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E. N.

    OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have shown that the use of intraoperative instructional videos has a positive effect on learning laparoscopic procedures. This study investigated the effect of the timing of the instructional videos on learning curves in laparoscopic skills training. DESIGN: After

  15. Effects of Intraoperative Fluid Management on Postoperative Outcomes : A Hospital Registry Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shin, Christina H; Long, Dustin R; McLean, Duncan; Grabitz, Stephanie D; Ladha, Karim; Timm, Fanny P; Thevathasan, Tharusan; Pieretti, Alberto; Ferrone, Cristina; Hoeft, Andreas; Scheeren, Thomas W L; Thompson, Boyd Taylor; Kurth, Tobias; Eikermann, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the dose-response relationship between intraoperative fluid administration and postoperative outcomes in a large cohort of surgical patients. BACKGROUND: Healthy humans may live in a state of fluid responsiveness without the need for fluid supplementation. Goal-directed protocols

  16. Treatment of intraoperative nasal cerebrospinal fluid leak of patients with hormone active pituitary adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Yu Grigoriev

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative nasal cerebrospinal fluid leak are common during the transnasal transsphenoidal interven tions. In certain cases, it is a feature of these interventions. However, its amplification needs a mandatory treatment. In this article, we describe the technique for closure dural defects that have developed during the transnasal removal of hormone active pituitary adenomas, using thrombin and fibrinogen containing colla genic sponge.

  17. Rapid intraoperative parathyroid hormone assay--more than just a comfort measure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanif, F

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Minimally invasive radio-guided parathyroidectomy (MIRP) has been embraced as an acceptable therapeutic approach to primary hyperparathyroidism. Preoperative sestamibi scanning has facilitated this technique. Here we evaluate the addition of a rapid intraoperative parathyroid hormone (iPTH) assay for patients undergoing MIRP. METHODS: A series of 51 patients underwent sestamibi localization of parathyroid glands followed by MIRP for primary hyperparathyroidism. Using peripheral venous samples, iPTH levels were measured prior to gland excision, as well as post-excision at 5, 10, and 15 minutes, taking a 50% reduction in iPTH level as indicative of complete excision. Next, changes in serum iPTH were compared with preoperative and postoperative changes in serum calcium, as well as levels of intraoperative ex-vivo radiation counts taken by hand-held gamma probe. RESULTS: In this series, a drop of greater than 50% in iPTH levels was observed in 94% of patients (n=48). Moreover, a significant drop in iPTH occurred within 10 minutes of excision in the majority (n=42) of cases (P<0.004). Changes in iPTH were comparable with the therapeutic reduction in calcium levels, as well as with the change in intraoperative ex-vivo gamma counts. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that the addition of an iPTH assay to MIRP provides a quick and reliable intraoperative diagnostic modality in confirming correct adenoma removal. Moreover, it precludes the requirement of frozen section.

  18. Dissociation of Subtraction and Multiplication in the Right Parietal Cortex: Evidence from Intraoperative Cortical Electrostimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaodan; Chen, Chuansheng; Pu, Song; Wu, Chenxing; Li, Yongnian; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Xinlin

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has consistently shown that the left parietal cortex is critical for numerical processing, but the role of the right parietal lobe has been much less clear. This study used the intraoperative cortical electrical stimulation approach to investigate neural dissociation in the right parietal cortex for subtraction and…

  19. Do Routine Preoperative and Intraoperative Urine Cultures Benefit Pediatric Vesicoureteral Reflux Surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Hettel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine if routine preoperative and intraoperative urine cultures (UCx are necessary in pediatric vesicoureteral (VUR reflux surgery by identifying their association with each other, preoperative symptoms, and surgical outcomes. Materials and Methods. A retrospective review of patients undergoing ureteral reimplant(s for primary VUR at a tertiary academic medical center between years 2000 and 2014 was done. Preoperative UCx were defined as those within 30 days before surgery. A positive culture was defined as >50,000 colony forming units of a single organism. Results. A total of 185 patients were identified and 87/185 (47.0% met inclusion criteria. Of those, 39/87 (45% completed a preoperative UCx. Only 3/39 (8% preoperative cultures returned positive, and all of those patients were preoperatively symptomatic. No preoperatively asymptomatic patients had positive preoperative cultures. Intraoperative cultures were obtained in 21/87 (24.1% patients; all were negative. No associations were found between preoperative culture results and intraoperative cultures or between culture result and postoperative complications. Conclusions. In asymptomatic patients, no associations were found between the completion of a preoperative or intraoperative UCx and surgical outcomes, suggesting that not all patients may require preoperative screening. Children presenting with symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI prior to ureteral reimplantation may benefit from preoperative UCx.

  20. Effective and efficient learning in the operating theater with intraoperative video-enhanced surgical procedure training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Det, M.J.; Meijerink, W.J.; Hoff, C.; Middel, B.; Pierie, J.P.

    INtraoperative Video Enhanced Surgical procedure Training (INVEST) is a new training method designed to improve the transition from basic skills training in a skills lab to procedural training in the operating theater. Traditionally, the master-apprentice model (MAM) is used for procedural training

  1. Numerical Characterization of Intraoperative and Chronic Electrodes in Deep Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra ePaffi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative electrode is used in the Deep Brain stimulation (DBS technique to pinpoint the brain target and to choose the best parameters for the stimulating signal. However, when the intraoperative electrode is replaced with the chronic one, the observed effects do not always coincide with predictions.To investigate the causes of such discrepancies, in this work, a 3D model of the basal ganglia has been considered and realistic models of both intraoperative and chronic electrodes have been developed and numerically solved.Results of simulations on the electric potential and the activating function along neuronal fibers show that the different geometries and sizes of the two electrodes do not change shapes and polarities of these functions, but only the amplitudes. A similar effect is caused by the presence of different tissue layers (edema or glial tissue in the peri-electrode space. On the contrary, a not accurate positioning of the chronic electrode with respect to the intraoperative one (electric centers not coincident may induce a complete different electric stimulation on some groups of fibers.

  2. In vivo intraoperative hypoglossal nerve stimulation for quantitative tongue motion analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alphen, M.J.A.; Eskes, M.; Smeele, L.E.; Balm, A.J.M.; Balm, Alfonsus Jacobus Maria; van der Heijden, Ferdinand

    2017-01-01

    This is the first study quantitatively measuring tongue motion in 3D after in vivo intraoperative neurostimulation of the hypoglossal nerve and its branches during a neck dissection procedure. Firstly, this study is performed to show whether this set-up is suitable for innervating different muscles

  3. Clinical implementation of intraoperative cone-beam CT in head and neck surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Barker, E.; Bachar, G.; Dixon, B. J.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    A prototype mobile C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been translated to a prospective clinical trial in head and neck surgery. The flat-panel CBCT C-arm was developed in collaboration with Siemens Healthcare, and demonstrates both sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility at low radiation dose (e.g., software based on the open-source Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). The CBCT C-arm has been successfully deployed in 15 head and neck cases and streamlined into the surgical environment using human factors engineering methods and expert feedback from surgeons, nurses, and anesthetists. Intraoperative imaging is implemented in a manner that maintains operating field sterility, reduces image artifacts (e.g., carbon fiber OR table) and minimizes radiation exposure. Image reviews conducted with surgical staff indicate bony detail and soft-tissue visualization sufficient for intraoperative guidance, with additional artifact management (e.g., metal, scatter) promising further improvements. Clinical trial deployment suggests a role for intraoperative CBCT in guiding complex head and neck surgical tasks, including planning mandible and maxilla resection margins, guiding subcranial and endonasal approaches to skull base tumours, and verifying maxillofacial reconstruction alignment. Ongoing translational research into complimentary image-guidance subsystems include novel methods for real-time tool tracking, fusion of endoscopic video and CBCT, and deformable registration of preoperative volumes and planning contours with intraoperative CBCT.

  4. Characterization of the detectability of an intraoperative minigammacamera; Caracterizacion de la detectabilidad de una minigammacamara intraoperatoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Jimenez, J.; Nunez Martinez, L. M. R.; Morillas Ruiz, J.; Pizarro Trigo, F.; Crespo Mesa, S.; Ros Lorda, M.A.

    2011-07-01

    Screening of the sentinel node is a technique which is widely used in Nuclear Medicine Services for its ability to reduce the morbidity associated lymphadenectomy. This intervention is particularly important that accurate detection of the probe uptake, The aim of this study is to evaluate all the factors that influence the detection image by introducing the contributions of intraoperative minigammacamera systems. (Author)

  5. Pacemaker and radiotherapy in breast cancer: is targeted intraoperative radiotherapy the answer in this setting?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshtgar, Mohammed RS; Eaton, David J; Reynolds, Claire; Pigott, Katharine; Davidson, Tim; Gauter-Fleckenstein, Benjamin; Wenz, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of an 83 year old woman with a cardiac pacemaker located close in distance to a subsequently diagnosed invasive ductal carcinoma of the left breast. Short range intraoperative radiotherapy was given following wide local excision and sentinel node biopsy. The challenges of using ionising radiation with pacemakers is also discussed

  6. Intraoperative discomfort associated with the use of a rotary or reciprocating system: a prospective randomized clinical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Cristine Gomes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this randomized, controlled, prospective clinical study was to evaluate patients' intraoperative discomfort during root canal preparations in which either multi-file rotary (Mtwo or single-file reciprocating (Reciproc systems were used. Materials and Methods Fifty-five adult patients, aged between 25 and 69 years old, with irreversible pulpitis or pulp necrosis participated in this study. Either the mesiobuccal or the distobuccal canals for maxillary molars and either the mesiobuccal or the mesiolingual canals for mandibular molars were randomly chosen to be instrumented with Mtwo multi-file rotary or Reciproc single-file reciprocating systems. Immediately after each canal instrumentation under anesthesia, patient discomfort was assessed using a 1 - 10 visual analog scale (VAS, ranging from ‘least possible discomfort’ (1 to ‘greatest possible discomfort’ (10. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine significant differences at p< 0.05. Results Little intraoperative discomfort was found in all cases. No statistically significant differences in intraoperative discomfort between the 2 systems were found (p = 0.660. Conclusions Root canal preparation with multi-file rotary or single-file reciprocating systems had similar and minimal effects on patients' intraoperative discomfort.

  7. Intra-Operative Indocyanine Green-Videoangiography (ICG-VA) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Fifteen consecutive patients with anterior circulation aneurysms who underwent craniotomy and clipping of the aneurysms were included in this study. Intraoperative ICG-VA was performed in all cases after exposure of the aneurysm and the branches in the vicinity of the aneurysm or the parent vessel before ...

  8. Intra-Operative Amylase Concentration in Peri-Pancreatic Fluid Predicts Pancreatic Fistula After Distal Pancreatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahm, C.B.; Reuver, P.R.; Hugh, T.J.; Pearson, A.; Gill, A.J.; Samra, J.S.; Mittal, A.

    2017-01-01

    Post-operative pancreatic fistula (POPF) is a potentially severe complication following distal pancreatectomy. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of intra-operative amylase concentration (IOAC) in peri-pancreatic fluid after distal pancreatectomy for the diagnosis of POPF.

  9. Utility of intraoperative diagnostic C-arm angiography for management of high grade subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhikui Wei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The accurate and efficient localization of underlying vascular lesions is crucial for prompt and definitive treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. To demonstrate the utility and feasibility of intraoperative C-arm angiography in cerebrovascular emergencies, we report five cases of high grade SAH and/or intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH where intraoperative diagnostic C-arm angiography was safely and effectively utilized. Initial evaluations of all patients included a non-contrast head CT scan, which was followed by urgent decompressive hemicraniectomy as a life-saving measure in the presence of markedly elevated intracranial pressure. Further diagnostic evaluations were performed intraoperatively using a multi-purpose C-arm angiography system. The C-arm angiography findings greatly aided the intraoperative planning and led to definitive treatments in four cases of SAH by elucidating the underlying neurovascular lesions. With this treatment strategy, two of the patients made moderately good recoveries from their SAH and/or ICH with a Glasgow outcome score (GOS of 4. Three of the patients expired despite maximal therapy mostly due to unfavorable presenting grade. These results suggest that C-arm angiography is a reasonable diagnostic and surgical planning tool for selected patients with high grade diffuse SAH who require immediate decompression.

  10. Risk-adapted targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A trial compared risk-adapted radiotherapy using single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) versus fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for breast cancer. We report 5-year results for local recurrence and the first analysis of overall survival....

  11. Current Concepts and Future Perspectives on Intraoperative Fluorescence Imaging in Cancer : Clinical Need

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    Progress with technology and regulatory approvals has recently allowed the successful clinical translation of fluorescence molecular imaging to intra-operative applications. Initial studies have demonstrated a promising outlook for imaging cancer micro-foci, margins and lymph-nodes. However, not all

  12. Effect of Intraoperative Mitomycin C on the Re-currence rate of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... effectif dans les cas recurrents. L'utilisation intra-operative du mitomycin C est fortement recommend après excision du pterygium du type primaire chez les Nigerian pour reduire le taux de recurrence. Mot clés: Pterygium, recurrence, mitomycin. West African Jnl of Pharmacology and Drug Research Vol.18 2002: 17-20 ...

  13. Prospective evaluation of intraoperative hemodynamics in liver transplantation with whole, partial and DCD grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sainz-Barriga, M; Reyntjens, K; Costa, M G; Scudeller, L; Rogiers, X; Wouters, P; de Hemptinne, B; Troisi, R I

    The interaction of systemic hemodynamics with hepatic flows at the time of liver transplantation (LT) has not been studied in a prospective uniform way for different types of grafts. We prospectively evaluated intraoperative hemodynamics of 103 whole and partial LT. Liver graft hemodynamics were

  14. Single-stage intraoperative transhepatic biliary stenting in patients with unresectable hepatobiliary pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yoshimi; Kubota, Keiichi; Kita, Junji; Katoh, Masato; Shimoda, Mitsugi; Sawada, Tokihiko; Iso, Yukihiro

    2013-02-01

    The current study was conducted to evaluate the safety and utility of intraoperative transhepatic biliary stenting (ITBS) in patients with unresectable malignant biliary obstruction (UMBO) diagnosed intraoperatively. In this study, 50 patients who underwent ITBS for UMBO between April 2001 and May 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. For 26 patients who underwent preoperative percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD), the expandable metallic stent (EMS) was inserted intraoperatively by the PTBD route in a single stage. For 24 patients, the intrahepatic bile ducts were intentionally dilated by injection of saline via the endoscopic nasobiliary drainage or the percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage route, and the puncture was performed under intraoperative ultrasound guidance followed by guidewire and catheter insertion. Thereafter, the EMS was placed in the same manner. The initial postoperative complications and long-term results of ITBS were evaluated. In all cases, ITBS was technically successful. Stenting alone was performed in 22 patients and stenting combined with other procedures in 28 patients. Hospital mortality occurred for three patients (6 %), and complication-related mortality occurred in two cases (4 %). There were nine cases (18 %) of postoperative complications. The median survival time was 179 days, and the EMS patency time was 137 days. During the follow-up period, EMS occlusion occurred in 23 cases (46 %). Best supportive care was a significant independent risk factor for early mortality within 100 days after ITBS (p = 0.020, odds ratio, 9.398). Single-stage ITBS is feasible for palliation of UMBO and seems to have a low complication rate.

  15. Kumar versus Olsen cannulation technique for intraoperative cholangiography : a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buddingh, K. Tim; Bosma, Ben M.; Samaniego-Cameron, Brenda; Hoedemaker, Henk O. ten Cate; Hofker, H. Sijbrand; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.

    There is resistance to routine intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) during cholecystectomy because it prolongs surgery and may be experienced as cumbersome. An alternative instrument may help to reduce these drawbacks and lower the threshold for IOC. This trial compared the Kumar cannulation

  16. Consistency of the preoperative and intraoperative diagnosis of benign vocal fold lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, PJP; de Jong, FICRS; Schutte, HK

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the preoperative and intraoperative diagnosis of benign vocal fold lesions for consistency. The diagnosis was made in 221 consecutive patients with benign vocal fold lesions for which a microlaryngoscopy was carried out in a general ENT-clinic.

  17. Intraoperative Subcortical Electrical Mapping of the Optic Tract in Awake Surgery Using a Virtual Reality Headset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerand, Edouard; Le Renard, Marc; Hue, Sophie; Lemée, Jean-Michel; Klinger, Evelyne; Menei, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Brain mapping during awake craniotomy is a well-known technique to preserve neurological functions, especially the language. It is still challenging to map the optic radiations due to the difficulty to test the visual field intraoperatively. To assess the visual field during awake craniotomy, we developed the Functions' Explorer based on a virtual reality headset (FEX-VRH). The impaired visual field of 10 patients was tested with automated perimetry (the gold standard examination) and the FEX-VRH. The proof-of-concept test was done during the surgery performed on a patient who was blind in his right eye and presenting with a left parietotemporal glioblastoma. The FEX-VRH was used intraoperatively, simultaneously with direct subcortical electrostimulation, allowing identification and preservation of the optic radiations. The FEX-VRH detected 9 of the 10 visual field defects found by automated perimetry. The patient who underwent an awake craniotomy with intraoperative mapping of the optic tract using the FEX-VRH had no permanent postoperative visual field defect. Intraoperative visual field assessment with the FEX-VRH during direct subcortical electrostimulation is a promising approach to mapping the optical radiations and preventing a permanent visual field defect during awake surgery for epilepsy or tumor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The intraoperative use of ultrasound facilitates significantly the arthroscopic debridement of calcific rotator cuff tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabeti, M; Schmidt, M; Ziai, P; Graf, A; Nemecek, E; Schueller-Weidekamm, C

    2014-05-01

    During arthroscopy, the localization of calcific deposit in patients suffering from calcifying tendinitis can be demanding and time consuming, frequently using ionizing radiation. Intraoperative ultrasound has been recently promoted, facilitating deposit localization and reducing radiation dose. In this prospective, randomized, controlled and clinical observer-blinded pilot trial, 20 patients with calcific tendinitis were operated. In group I, the deposit was localized conventionally. In group II, the deposit was localized using intraoperative ultrasound. The needle punctures to detect the deposit and operation times were noted. Patients were postoperatively evaluated after 2 and 6 weeks and 9 months. In group II, the needle punctures to detect the deposit were significantly lower than in group I (p < 0.0001). Operation time to localize the deposit was also significantly less in group II (p < 0.033). In both groups, patients improved significantly with increased shoulder function (p < 0.0001) and decreased pain (p < 0.0001) 2 weeks and 9 months (p < 0.001) after surgery. The difference between the groups was not significant. Excellent radiological findings were obtained in both groups after 9 months. Intraoperative US significantly facilitates the detection of calcific deposits during arthroscopic debridement by speeding up surgery and reducing the number of needle punctures. Hence, we have changed our method of detecting calcific deposits intraoperatively from fluoroscopy to ultrasound.

  19. Evaluation of measures to decrease intra-operative bacterial contamination in orthopaedic implant surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobben, BAS; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether behavioural and systemic measures wilt decrease intra-operative contamination during total hip or knee replacements. The influence of these measures on subsequent prolonged wound discharge, superficial surgical site infection and deep periprosthetic

  20. [Associated vessel heteromorphosis in laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision and solutions to intraoperative hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yurong; He, Jinjie; Li, Jun; Xu, Dong; Ding, Kefeng

    2018-03-25

    Vessel identification and dissection are the key processes of laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME). Vascular injury will lead to complications such as prolonged operative time, intraoperative hemorrhage and ischemia of anastomotic stoma. Superior mesenteric artery (SMA), superior mesenteric vein(SMV), gastrointestinal trunk, left colic artery(LCA), sigmoid artery and marginal vessels in the mesentery have been found with possibility of heteromorphosis, which requires better operative techniques. Surgeons should recognize those vessel heteromorphosis carefully during operations and adjust strategies to avoid intraoperative hemorrhage. Preoperative abdominal computed tomography angiography(CTA) with three-dimensional reconstruction can find vessel heteromorphosis within surgical area before operation. Adequate dissection of veins instead of violent separation will decrease intraoperative bleeding and be helpful for dealing with the potential hemorrhage. When intraoperative hemorrhage occurs, surgeons need to control the bleeding by simple compression or vascular clips depending on the different situations. When the bleeding can not be stopped by laparoscopic operation, surgeons should turn to open surgery without hesitation.

  1. Altered intraoperative cerebrovascular reactivity in brain areas of high-grade glioma recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierstra, Jorn; van Niftrik, Bas; Piccirelli, Marco; Burkhardt, Jan Karl; Pangalu, Athina; Kocian, Roman; Valavanis, Antonios; Weller, Michael; Regli, Luca; Bozinov, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Current MRI sequences are limited in identifying brain areas at risk for high grade glioma recurrence. We employed intraoperative 3-Tesla functional MRI to assess cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) after high-grade glioma resecti