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Sample records for intranscription factor binding

  1. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  2. Factor VIIa binding and internalization in hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortoe, G; Sorensen, B B; Petersen, L C

    2005-01-01

    The liver is believed to be the primary clearance organ for coagulation proteases, including factor VIIa (FVIIa). However, at present, clearance mechanisms for FVIIa in liver are unknown. To obtain information on the FVIIa clearance mechanism, we investigated the binding and internalization...... no effect. HEPG2 cells internalized FVIIa with a rate of 10 fmol 10(-5) cells h(-1). In contrast to HEPG2 cells, FVIIa binding to primary rat hepatocytes was completely independent of TF, and excess unlabeled FVIIa partly reduced the binding of 125I-FVIIa to rat hepatocytes. Further, compared with HEPG2...... cells, three- to fourfold more FVIIa bound to rat primary hepatocytes, and the bound FVIIa was internalized at a faster rate. Similar FVIIa binding and internalization profiles were observed in primary human hepatocytes. Plasma inhibitors had no effect on FVIIa binding and internalization in hepatocytes...

  3. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acute myeloid leukemia Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... collapse boxes. Description Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  5. Mouse models for core binding factor leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, D W L; Watanabe-Okochi, N; Wang, C Q; Tergaonkar, V; Osato, M

    2015-10-01

    RUNX1 and CBFB are among the most frequently mutated genes in human leukemias. Genetic alterations such as chromosomal translocations, copy number variations and point mutations have been widely reported to result in the malfunction of RUNX transcription factors. Leukemias arising from such alterations in RUNX family genes are collectively termed core binding factor (CBF) leukemias. Although adult CBF leukemias generally are considered a favorable risk group as compared with other forms of acute myeloid leukemia, the 5-year survival rate remains low. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanism for CBF leukemia is imperative to uncover novel treatment options. Over the years, retroviral transduction-transplantation assays and transgenic, knockin and knockout mouse models alone or in combination with mutagenesis have been used to study the roles of RUNX alterations in leukemogenesis. Although successful in inducing leukemia, the existing assays and models possess many inherent limitations. A CBF leukemia model which induces leukemia with complete penetrance and short latency would be ideal as a platform for drug discovery. Here, we summarize the currently available mouse models which have been utilized to study CBF leukemias, discuss the advantages and limitations of individual experimental systems, and propose suggestions for improvements of mouse models.

  6. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY

    2009-10-06

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  7. OCTAMER-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS: GENOMICS AND FUNCTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2013-01-01

    The Octamer-binding proteins (Oct) are a group of highly conserved transcription factors that specifically bind to the octamer motif (ATGCAAAT) and closely related sequences that are found in promoters and enhancers of a wide variety of both ubiquitously expressed and cell type-specific genes. Oct factors belong to the larger family of POU domain factors that are characterized by the presence of a highly conserved bipartite DNA binding domain, consisting of an amino-terminal specific subdomai...

  8. Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into annotated alignments. 841. J. Biosci. 32(5), August 2007. 1. Introduction. A majority of computational approaches that aim to predict transcription factor binding sites employ cross- species comparison to focus on conserved locations. Such a comparison helps in ...

  9. Novel Drosophila receptor that binds multiple growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, M.R.; Thompson, K.L.; Garcia, V.; Decker, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have recently reported the identification of a novel growth factor receptor from Drosophila cell cultures that has dual binding specificity for both insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This 100 kDa protein is also antigenically related to the cytoplasmic region of the mammalian EGF receptor-tyrosine kinase. They now report that this protein binds to mammalian nerve growth factor and human transforming growth factor alpha as well as insulin and EGF with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 10 -6 to 10 -8 M. The 100 kDa protein can be affinity-labeled with these 125 I-labeled growth factors after immunoprecipitation with anti-EGF receptor antiserum. These four growth factors appear to share a common binding site, as evidenced by their ability to block affinity labelling by 125 I-insulin. No significant binding to the 100 kDa protein was observed with platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, or glucagon. The 100 kDa Drosophila protein has a unique ligand-binding spectrum with no direct counterpart in mammalian cells and may represent an evolutionary precursor of the mammalian receptors for these growth factors

  10. Binding site graphs: a new graph theoretical framework for prediction of transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy E Reddy

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Computational prediction of nucleotide binding specificity for transcription factors remains a fundamental and largely unsolved problem. Determination of binding positions is a prerequisite for research in gene regulation, a major mechanism controlling phenotypic diversity. Furthermore, an accurate determination of binding specificities from high-throughput data sources is necessary to realize the full potential of systems biology. Unfortunately, recently performed independent evaluation showed that more than half the predictions from most widely used algorithms are false. We introduce a graph-theoretical framework to describe local sequence similarity as the pair-wise distances between nucleotides in promoter sequences, and hypothesize that densely connected subgraphs are indicative of transcription factor binding sites. Using a well-established sampling algorithm coupled with simple clustering and scoring schemes, we identify sets of closely related nucleotides and test those for known TF binding activity. Using an independent benchmark, we find our algorithm predicts yeast binding motifs considerably better than currently available techniques and without manual curation. Importantly, we reduce the number of false positive predictions in yeast to less than 30%. We also develop a framework to evaluate the statistical significance of our motif predictions. We show that our approach is robust to the choice of input promoters, and thus can be used in the context of predicting binding positions from noisy experimental data. We apply our method to identify binding sites using data from genome scale ChIP-chip experiments. Results from these experiments are publicly available at http://cagt10.bu.edu/BSG. The graphical framework developed here may be useful when combining predictions from numerous computational and experimental measures. Finally, we discuss how our algorithm can be used to improve the sensitivity of computational predictions of

  11. Transcription factor binding sites prediction based on modified nucleosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Talebzadeh

    Full Text Available In computational methods, position weight matrices (PWMs are commonly applied for transcription factor binding site (TFBS prediction. Although these matrices are more accurate than simple consensus sequences to predict actual binding sites, they usually produce a large number of false positive (FP predictions and so are impoverished sources of information. Several studies have employed additional sources of information such as sequence conservation or the vicinity to transcription start sites to distinguish true binding regions from random ones. Recently, the spatial distribution of modified nucleosomes has been shown to be associated with different promoter architectures. These aligned patterns can facilitate DNA accessibility for transcription factors. We hypothesize that using data from these aligned and periodic patterns can improve the performance of binding region prediction. In this study, we propose two effective features, "modified nucleosomes neighboring" and "modified nucleosomes occupancy", to decrease FP in binding site discovery. Based on these features, we designed a logistic regression classifier which estimates the probability of a region as a TFBS. Our model learned each feature based on Sp1 binding sites on Chromosome 1 and was tested on the other chromosomes in human CD4+T cells. In this work, we investigated 21 histone modifications and found that only 8 out of 21 marks are strongly correlated with transcription factor binding regions. To prove that these features are not specific to Sp1, we combined the logistic regression classifier with the PWM, and created a new model to search TFBSs on the genome. We tested the model using transcription factors MAZ, PU.1 and ELF1 and compared the results to those using only the PWM. The results show that our model can predict Transcription factor binding regions more successfully. The relative simplicity of the model and capability of integrating other features make it a superior method

  12. RNA binding specificity of Ebola virus transcription factor VP30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlereth, Julia; Grünweller, Arnold; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Becker, Stephan; Hartmann, Roland K

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor VP30 of the non-segmented RNA negative strand Ebola virus balances viral transcription and replication. Here, we comprehensively studied RNA binding by VP30. Using a novel VP30:RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we tested truncated variants of 2 potential natural RNA substrates of VP30 - the genomic Ebola viral 3'-leader region and its complementary antigenomic counterpart (each ∼155 nt in length) - and a series of other non-viral RNAs. Based on oligonucleotide interference, the major VP30 binding region on the genomic 3'-leader substrate was assigned to the internal expanded single-stranded region (∼ nt 125-80). Best binding to VP30 was obtained with ssRNAs of optimally ∼ 40 nt and mixed base composition; underrepresentation of purines or pyrimidines was tolerated, but homopolymeric sequences impaired binding. A stem-loop structure, particularly at the 3'-end or positioned internally, supports stable binding to VP30. In contrast, dsRNA or RNAs exposing large internal loops flanked by entirely helical arms on both sides are not bound. Introduction of a 5´-Cap(0) structure impaired VP30 binding. Also, ssDNAs bind substantially weaker than isosequential ssRNAs and heparin competes with RNA for binding to VP30, indicating that ribose 2'-hydroxyls and electrostatic contacts of the phosphate groups contribute to the formation of VP30:RNA complexes. Our results indicate a rather relaxed RNA binding specificity of filoviral VP30, which largely differs from that of the functionally related transcription factor of the Paramyxoviridae which binds to ssRNAs as short as 13 nt with a preference for oligo(A) sequences.

  13. Modeling Shear Induced Von Willebrand Factor Binding to Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chuqiao; Wei, Wei; Morabito, Michael; Webb, Edmund; Oztekin, Alparslan; Zhang, Xiaohui; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2017-11-01

    Von Willebrand factor (vWF) is a blood glycoprotein that binds with platelets and collagen on injured vessel surfaces to form clots. VWF bioactivity is shear flow induced: at low shear, binding between VWF and other biological entities is suppressed; for high shear rate conditions - as are found near arterial injury sites - VWF elongates, activating its binding with platelets and collagen. Based on parameters derived from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments, we developed a coarse-grain molecular model to simulate bond formation probability as a function of shear rate. By introducing a binding criterion that depends on the conformation of a sub-monomer molecular feature of our model, the model predicts shear-induced binding, even for conditions where binding is highly energetically favorable. We further investigate the influence of various model parameters on the ability to predict shear-induced binding (vWF length, collagen site density and distribution, binding energy landscape, and slip/catch bond length) and demonstrate parameter ranges where the model provides good agreement with existing experimental data. Our results may be important for understanding vWF activity and also for achieving targeted drug therapy via biomimetic synthetic molecules. National Science Foundation (NSF),Division of Mathematical Sciences (DMS).

  14. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  15. Identifying differential transcription factor binding in ChIP-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dai-Ying; Bittencourt, Danielle; Stallcup, Michael R; Siegmund, Kimberly D

    2015-01-01

    ChIP seq is a widely used assay to measure genome-wide protein binding. The decrease in costs associated with sequencing has led to a rise in the number of studies that investigate protein binding across treatment conditions or cell lines. In addition to the identification of binding sites, new studies evaluate the variation in protein binding between conditions. A number of approaches to study differential transcription factor binding have recently been developed. Several of these methods build upon established methods from RNA-seq to quantify differences in read counts. We compare how these new approaches perform on different data sets from the ENCODE project to illustrate the impact of data processing pipelines under different study designs. The performance of normalization methods for differential ChIP-seq depends strongly on the variation in total amount of protein bound between conditions, with total read count outperforming effective library size, or variants thereof, when a large variation in binding was studied. Use of input subtraction to correct for non-specific binding showed a relatively modest impact on the number of differential peaks found and the fold change accuracy to biological validation, however a larger impact might be expected for samples with more extreme copy number variations between them. Still, it did identify a small subset of novel differential regions while excluding some differential peaks in regions with high background signal. These results highlight proper scaling for between-sample data normalization as critical for differential transcription factor binding analysis and suggest bioinformaticians need to know about the variation in level of total protein binding between conditions to select the best analysis method. At the same time, validation using fold-change estimates from qRT-PCR suggests there is still room for further method improvement.

  16. Specific binding of atrial natriuretic factor in brain microvessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabrier, P.E.; Roubert, P.; Braquet, P.

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral capillaries constitute the blood-brain barrier. Studies of specific receptors (neurotransmitters or hormones) located on this structure can be performed by means of radioligand-binding techniques on isolated brain microvessels. The authors examined on pure bovine cerebral microvessel preparations the binding of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), using 125 I-labeled ANF. Saturation and competition experiments demonstrated the presence of a single class of ANF-binding sites with high affinity and with a binding capacity of 58 fmol/mg of protein. The binding of 125 I-labeled ANF to brain microvessels is specific, reversible, and time dependent, as is shown by association-dissociation experiments. The demonstration of specific ANF-binding sites on brain microvessels supposes a physiological role of ANF on brain microvasculature. The coexistence of ANF and angiotensin II receptors on this cerebrovascular tissue suggests that the two circulating peptides may act as mutual antagonists in the regulation of brain microcirculation and/or blood-brain barrier function

  17. Distinct patterns of epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Distinct patterns of epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding sites across promoters of sense-intronic long noncoding RNAs. Sourav Ghosh, Satish Sati, Shantanu Sengupta and Vinod Scaria. J. Genet. 94, 17–25. Gencode V9 lncRNA gene : 11004. Known lncRNA : 1175. Novel lncRNA : 5898. Putative lncRNA :.

  18. The next generation of transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Mathelier

    Full Text Available Finding where transcription factors (TFs bind to the DNA is of key importance to decipher gene regulation at a transcriptional level. Classically, computational prediction of TF binding sites (TFBSs is based on basic position weight matrices (PWMs which quantitatively score binding motifs based on the observed nucleotide patterns in a set of TFBSs for the corresponding TF. Such models make the strong assumption that each nucleotide participates independently in the corresponding DNA-protein interaction and do not account for flexible length motifs. We introduce transcription factor flexible models (TFFMs to represent TF binding properties. Based on hidden Markov models, TFFMs are flexible, and can model both position interdependence within TFBSs and variable length motifs within a single dedicated framework. The availability of thousands of experimentally validated DNA-TF interaction sequences from ChIP-seq allows for the generation of models that perform as well as PWMs for stereotypical TFs and can improve performance for TFs with flexible binding characteristics. We present a new graphical representation of the motifs that convey properties of position interdependence. TFFMs have been assessed on ChIP-seq data sets coming from the ENCODE project, revealing that they can perform better than both PWMs and the dinucleotide weight matrix extension in discriminating ChIP-seq from background sequences. Under the assumption that ChIP-seq signal values are correlated with the affinity of the TF-DNA binding, we find that TFFM scores correlate with ChIP-seq peak signals. Moreover, using available TF-DNA affinity measurements for the Max TF, we demonstrate that TFFMs constructed from ChIP-seq data correlate with published experimentally measured DNA-binding affinities. Finally, TFFMs allow for the straightforward computation of an integrated TF occupancy score across a sequence. These results demonstrate the capacity of TFFMs to accurately model DNA

  19. Structural Fingerprints of Transcription Factor Binding Site Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transforms are a powerful tool in the prediction of DNA sequence properties, such as the presence/absence of codons. We have previously compiled a database of the structural properties of all 32,896 unique DNA octamers. In this work we apply Fourier techniques to the analysis of the structural properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 and also to three sets of transcription factor binding sites within these chromosomes. We find that, for a given structural property, the structural property power spectra of chromosomes 21 and 22 are strikingly similar. We find common peaks in their power spectra for both Sp1 and p53 transcription factor binding sites. We use the power spectra as a structural fingerprint and perform similarity searching in order to find transcription factor binding site regions. This approach provides a new strategy for searching the genome data for information. Although it is difficult to understand the relationship between specific functional properties and the set of structural parameters in our database, our structural fingerprints nevertheless provide a useful tool for searching for function information in sequence data. The power spectrum fingerprints provide a simple, fast method for comparing a set of functional sequences, in this case transcription factor binding site regions, with the sequences of whole chromosomes. On its own, the power spectrum fingerprint does not find all transcription factor binding sites in a chromosome, but the results presented here show that in combination with other approaches, this technique will improve the chances of identifying functional sequences hidden in genomic data.

  20. Experimental strategies for studying transcription factor-DNA binding specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertz, Marcel; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2010-12-01

    Specific binding of transcription factors (TFs) determines in a large part the connectivity of gene regulatory networks as well as the quantitative level of gene expression. A multiplicity of both experimental and computational methods is currently used to discover and characterize the underlying TF-DNA interactions. Experimental methods can be further subdivided into in vitro- and in vivo-based approaches, each accenting different aspects of TF-binding events. In this review we summarize the flexibility and performance of a selection of both types of experimental methods. In conclusion, we argue that a serial combination of methods with different throughput and data type constitutes an optimal experimental strategy.

  1. Biophysical fitness landscapes for transcription factor binding sites.

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    Allan Haldane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic states and evolutionary trajectories available to cell populations are ultimately dictated by complex interactions among DNA, RNA, proteins, and other molecular species. Here we study how evolution of gene regulation in a single-cell eukaryote S. cerevisiae is affected by interactions between transcription factors (TFs and their cognate DNA sites. Our study is informed by a comprehensive collection of genomic binding sites and high-throughput in vitro measurements of TF-DNA binding interactions. Using an evolutionary model for monomorphic populations evolving on a fitness landscape, we infer fitness as a function of TF-DNA binding to show that the shape of the inferred fitness functions is in broad agreement with a simple functional form inspired by a thermodynamic model of two-state TF-DNA binding. However, the effective parameters of the model are not always consistent with physical values, indicating selection pressures beyond the biophysical constraints imposed by TF-DNA interactions. We find little statistical support for the fitness landscape in which each position in the binding site evolves independently, indicating that epistasis is common in the evolution of gene regulation. Finally, by correlating TF-DNA binding energies with biological properties of the sites or the genes they regulate, we are able to rule out several scenarios of site-specific selection, under which binding sites of the same TF would experience different selection pressures depending on their position in the genome. These findings support the existence of universal fitness landscapes which shape evolution of all sites for a given TF, and whose properties are determined in part by the physics of protein-DNA interactions.

  2. Biophysical fitness landscapes for transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, Allan; Manhart, Michael; Morozov, Alexandre V

    2014-07-01

    Phenotypic states and evolutionary trajectories available to cell populations are ultimately dictated by complex interactions among DNA, RNA, proteins, and other molecular species. Here we study how evolution of gene regulation in a single-cell eukaryote S. cerevisiae is affected by interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their cognate DNA sites. Our study is informed by a comprehensive collection of genomic binding sites and high-throughput in vitro measurements of TF-DNA binding interactions. Using an evolutionary model for monomorphic populations evolving on a fitness landscape, we infer fitness as a function of TF-DNA binding to show that the shape of the inferred fitness functions is in broad agreement with a simple functional form inspired by a thermodynamic model of two-state TF-DNA binding. However, the effective parameters of the model are not always consistent with physical values, indicating selection pressures beyond the biophysical constraints imposed by TF-DNA interactions. We find little statistical support for the fitness landscape in which each position in the binding site evolves independently, indicating that epistasis is common in the evolution of gene regulation. Finally, by correlating TF-DNA binding energies with biological properties of the sites or the genes they regulate, we are able to rule out several scenarios of site-specific selection, under which binding sites of the same TF would experience different selection pressures depending on their position in the genome. These findings support the existence of universal fitness landscapes which shape evolution of all sites for a given TF, and whose properties are determined in part by the physics of protein-DNA interactions.

  3. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins: a structural perspective

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    Briony eForbes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to -6 bind insulin-like growth factors-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II with high affinity. These binding proteins maintain IGFs in the circulation and direct them to target tissues, where they promote cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and survival via the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R. IGFBPs also interact with many other molecules, which not only influence their modulation of IGF action but also mediate IGF-independent activities that influence processes such as cell migration and apoptosis by influencing gene transcription.IGFBPs-1 to -6 are structurally similar proteins consisting of three distinct domains, N-terminal, Linker and C-terminal. There have been major advances in our understanding of IGFBP structure in the last decade and a half. While there is still no structure of an intact IGFBP to date, several structures of individual N- and C-domains have been solved. The structure of a complex of N-BP-4:IGF-I:C-BP-4 has also been solved, providing a detailed picture of the structural features of the IGF binding site and the mechanism of binding. Structural studies have also identified features important for interaction with extracellular matrix components and integrins. This review summarises structural studies reported so far and highlights features important for binding not only IGF but also other partners. It also highlights future directions in which structural studies will add to our knowledge of the role played by the IGFBP family in normal growth and development, as well as in disease.

  4. Comprehensive human transcription factor binding site map for combinatory binding motifs discovery.

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    Arnoldo J Müller-Molina

    Full Text Available To know the map between transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites is essential to reverse engineer the regulation process. Only about 10%-20% of the transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs have been reported. This lack of data hinders understanding gene regulation. To address this drawback, we propose a computational method that exploits never used TF properties to discover the missing TFBMs and their sites in all human gene promoters. The method starts by predicting a dictionary of regulatory "DNA words." From this dictionary, it distills 4098 novel predictions. To disclose the crosstalk between motifs, an additional algorithm extracts TF combinatorial binding patterns creating a collection of TF regulatory syntactic rules. Using these rules, we narrowed down a list of 504 novel motifs that appear frequently in syntax patterns. We tested the predictions against 509 known motifs confirming that our system can reliably predict ab initio motifs with an accuracy of 81%-far higher than previous approaches. We found that on average, 90% of the discovered combinatorial binding patterns target at least 10 genes, suggesting that to control in an independent manner smaller gene sets, supplementary regulatory mechanisms are required. Additionally, we discovered that the new TFBMs and their combinatorial patterns convey biological meaning, targeting TFs and genes related to developmental functions. Thus, among all the possible available targets in the genome, the TFs tend to regulate other TFs and genes involved in developmental functions. We provide a comprehensive resource for regulation analysis that includes a dictionary of "DNA words," newly predicted motifs and their corresponding combinatorial patterns. Combinatorial patterns are a useful filter to discover TFBMs that play a major role in orchestrating other factors and thus, are likely to lock/unlock cellular functional clusters.

  5. PTTG Binding Factor – a New Gene in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Watkins, Rachel J; Read, Martin L; Smith, Vicki E; Sharma, Neil; Reynolds, Gary M; Buckley, Laura; Doig, Craig; Campbell, Moray J; Lewy, Greg; Eggo, Margaret C; Loubiere, Laurence S; Franklyn, Jayne A; Boelaert, Kristien; McCabe, Christopher J

    2010-01-01

    PTTG Binding Factor (PBF; PTTG1IP) is a relatively uncharacterized oncoprotein whose function remains obscure. Because of the presence of putative oestrogen response elements (ERE) in its promoter, we assessed PBF regulation by oestrogen. PBF mRNA and protein expression were induced by both diethylstilbestrol and 17ß-estradiol in oestrogen receptor alpha (ERα) positive MCF-7 cells. Detailed analysis of the PBF promoter showed that the region −399 to −291 relative to the translational start si...

  6. Cooperative binding of transcription factors promotes bimodal gene expression response.

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    Pablo S Gutierrez

    Full Text Available In the present work we extend and analyze the scope of our recently proposed stochastic model for transcriptional regulation, which considers an arbitrarily complex cis-regulatory system using only elementary reactions. Previously, we determined the role of cooperativity on the intrinsic fluctuations of gene expression for activating transcriptional switches, by means of master equation formalism and computer simulation. This model allowed us to distinguish between two cooperative binding mechanisms and, even though the mean expression levels were not affected differently by the acting mechanism, we showed that the associated fluctuations were different. In the present generalized model we include other regulatory functions in addition to those associated to an activator switch. Namely, we introduce repressive regulatory functions and two theoretical mechanisms that account for the biphasic response that some cis-regulatory systems show to the transcription factor concentration. We have also extended our previous master equation formalism in order to include protein production by stochastic translation of mRNA. Furthermore, we examine the graded/binary scenarios in the context of the interaction energy between transcription factors. In this sense, this is the first report to show that the cooperative binding of transcription factors to DNA promotes the "all-or-none" phenomenon observed in eukaryotic systems. In addition, we confirm that gene expression fluctuation levels associated with one of two cooperative binding mechanism never exceed the fluctuation levels of the other.

  7. A systems biology approach to transcription factor binding site prediction.

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    Xiang Zhou

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The elucidation of mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks holds great promise for both basic and translational research and remains one the greatest challenges to systems biology. Recent reverse engineering methods deduce regulatory interactions from large-scale mRNA expression profiles and cross-species conserved regulatory regions in DNA. Technical challenges faced by these methods include distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions, associating transcription regulators with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, identifying non-linearly conserved binding sites across species, and providing realistic accuracy estimates.We address these challenges by closely integrating proven methods for regulatory network reverse engineering from mRNA expression data, linearly and non-linearly conserved regulatory region discovery, and TFBS evaluation and discovery. Using an extensive test set of high-likelihood interactions, which we collected in order to provide realistic prediction-accuracy estimates, we show that a careful integration of these methods leads to significant improvements in prediction accuracy. To verify our methods, we biochemically validated TFBS predictions made for both transcription factors (TFs and co-factors; we validated binding site predictions made using a known E2F1 DNA-binding motif on E2F1 predicted promoter targets, known E2F1 and JUND motifs on JUND predicted promoter targets, and a de novo discovered motif for BCL6 on BCL6 predicted promoter targets. Finally, to demonstrate accuracy of prediction using an external dataset, we showed that sites matching predicted motifs for ZNF263 are significantly enriched in recent ZNF263 ChIP-seq data.Using an integrative framework, we were able to address technical challenges faced by state of the art network reverse engineering methods, leading to significant improvement in direct-interaction detection and TFBS-discovery accuracy. We estimated the accuracy

  8. Imputation for transcription factor binding predictions based on deep learning.

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    Qian Qin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the cell-specific binding patterns of transcription factors (TFs is fundamental to studying gene regulatory networks in biological systems, for which ChIP-seq not only provides valuable data but is also considered as the gold standard. Despite tremendous efforts from the scientific community to conduct TF ChIP-seq experiments, the available data represent only a limited percentage of ChIP-seq experiments, considering all possible combinations of TFs and cell lines. In this study, we demonstrate a method for accurately predicting cell-specific TF binding for TF-cell line combinations based on only a small fraction (4% of the combinations using available ChIP-seq data. The proposed model, termed TFImpute, is based on a deep neural network with a multi-task learning setting to borrow information across transcription factors and cell lines. Compared with existing methods, TFImpute achieves comparable accuracy on TF-cell line combinations with ChIP-seq data; moreover, TFImpute achieves better accuracy on TF-cell line combinations without ChIP-seq data. This approach can predict cell line specific enhancer activities in K562 and HepG2 cell lines, as measured by massively parallel reporter assays, and predicts the impact of SNPs on TF binding.

  9. Understanding variation in transcription factor binding by modeling transcription factor genome-epigenome interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Despite explosive growth in genomic datasets, the methods for studying epigenomic mechanisms of gene regulation remain primitive. Here we present a model-based approach to systematically analyze the epigenomic functions in modulating transcription factor-DNA binding. Based on the first principles of statistical mechanics, this model considers the interactions between epigenomic modifications and a cis-regulatory module, which contains multiple binding sites arranged in any configurations. We compiled a comprehensive epigenomic dataset in mouse embryonic stem (mES cells, including DNA methylation (MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq, DNA hydroxymethylation (5-hmC-seq, and histone modifications (ChIP-seq. We discovered correlations of transcription factors (TFs for specific combinations of epigenomic modifications, which we term epigenomic motifs. Epigenomic motifs explained why some TFs appeared to have different DNA binding motifs derived from in vivo (ChIP-seq and in vitro experiments. Theoretical analyses suggested that the epigenome can modulate transcriptional noise and boost the cooperativity of weak TF binding sites. ChIP-seq data suggested that epigenomic boost of binding affinities in weak TF binding sites can function in mES cells. We showed in theory that the epigenome should suppress the TF binding differences on SNP-containing binding sites in two people. Using personal data, we identified strong associations between H3K4me2/H3K9ac and the degree of personal differences in NFκB binding in SNP-containing binding sites, which may explain why some SNPs introduce much smaller personal variations on TF binding than other SNPs. In summary, this model presents a powerful approach to analyze the functions of epigenomic modifications. This model was implemented into an open source program APEG (Affinity Prediction by Epigenome and Genome, http://systemsbio.ucsd.edu/apeg.

  10. Scoring functions for transcription factor binding site prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friberg Markus

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factor binding site (TFBS prediction is a difficult problem, which requires a good scoring function to discriminate between real binding sites and background noise. Many scoring functions have been proposed in the literature, but it is difficult to assess their relative performance, because they are implemented in different software tools using different search methods and different TFBS representations. Results Here we compare how several scoring functions perform on both real and semi-simulated data sets in a common test environment. We have also developed two new scoring functions and included them in the comparison. The data sets are from the yeast (S. cerevisiae genome. Our new scoring function LLBG (least likely under the background model performs best in this study. It achieves the best average rank for the correct motifs. Scoring functions based on positional bias performed quite poorly in this study. Conclusion LLBG may provide an interesting alternative to current scoring functions for TFBS prediction.

  11. Total Binding Affinity Profiles of Regulatory Regions Predict Transcription Factor Binding and Gene Expression in Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grassi

    Full Text Available Transcription factors regulate gene expression by binding regulatory DNA. Understanding the rules governing such binding is an essential step in describing the network of regulatory interactions, and its pathological alterations. We show that describing regulatory regions in terms of their profile of total binding affinities for transcription factors leads to increased predictive power compared to methods based on the identification of discrete binding sites. This applies both to the prediction of transcription factor binding as revealed by ChIP-seq experiments and to the prediction of gene expression through RNA-seq. Further significant improvements in predictive power are obtained when regulatory regions are defined based on chromatin states inferred from histone modification data.

  12. N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14, a novel insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 binding partner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chen; Yao, Guangyin; Zou, Minji; Chen, Guangyu; Wang, Min; Liu, Jingqian; Wang, Jiaxi; Xu, Donggang

    2007-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is known to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in IGF-dependent and IGF-independent manners, but the mechanism underlying IGF-independent effects is not yet clear. In a yeast two-hybrid assay, IGFBP-3 was used as the bait to screen a human fetal liver cDNA library for it interactors that may potentially mediate IGFBP-3-regulated functions. N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14 (GalNAc-T14), a member of the GalNAc-Tases family, was identified as a novel IGFBP-3 binding partner. This interaction involved the ricin-type beta-trefoil domain of GalNAc-T14. The interaction between IGFBP-3 and GalNAc-T14 was reconfirmed in vitro and in vivo, using GST pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation and mammalian two-hybrid assays. Our findings may provide new clues for further study on the mechanism behind the IGF-independent effects of IGFBP-3 promoting apoptosis. The role of GalNAc-T14 as an intracellular mediator of the effects of IGFBP-3 need to be verified in future studies

  13. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  14. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  15. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor promotes neuroblastoma differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaviglio, Angela L; Knelson, Erik H; Blobe, Gerard C

    2017-05-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma is characterized by undifferentiated neuroblasts and low schwannian stroma content. The tumor stroma contributes to the suppression of tumor growth by releasing soluble factors that promote neuroblast differentiation. Here we identify heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HBEGF) as a potent prodifferentiating factor in neuroblastoma. HBEGF mRNA expression is decreased in human neuroblastoma tumors compared with benign tumors, with loss correlating with decreased survival. HBEGF protein is expressed only in stromal compartments of human neuroblastoma specimens, with tissue from high-stage disease containing very little stroma or HBEGF expression. In 3 human neuroblastoma cell lines (SK-N-AS, SK-N-BE2, and SH-SY5Y), soluble HBEGF is sufficient to promote neuroblast differentiation and decrease proliferation. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans and heparin derivatives further enhance HBEGF-induced differentiation by forming a complex with the epidermal growth factor receptor, leading to activation of the ERK1/2 and STAT3 pathways and up-regulation of the inhibitor of DNA binding transcription factor. These data support a role for loss of HBEGF in the neuroblastoma tumor microenvironment in neuroblastoma pathogenesis.-Gaviglio, A. L., Knelson, E. H., Blobe, G. C. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor promotes neuroblastoma differentiation. © FASEB.

  16. Mathematical Modeling of Avidity Distribution and Estimating General Binding Properties of Transcription Factors from Genome-Wide Binding Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir A

    2017-01-01

    The shape of the experimental frequency distributions (EFD) of diverse molecular interaction events quantifying genome-wide binding is often skewed to the rare but abundant quantities. Such distributions are systematically deviated from standard power-law functions proposed by scale-free network models suggesting that more explanatory and predictive probabilistic model(s) are needed. Identification of the mechanism-based data-driven statistical distributions that provide an estimation and prediction of binding properties of transcription factors from genome-wide binding profiles is the goal of this analytical survey. Here, we review and develop an analytical framework for modeling, analysis, and prediction of transcription factor (TF) DNA binding properties detected at the genome scale. We introduce a mixture probabilistic model of binding avidity function that includes nonspecific and specific binding events. A method for decomposition of specific and nonspecific TF-DNA binding events is proposed. We show that the Kolmogorov-Waring (KW) probability function (PF), modeling the steady state TF binding-dissociation stochastic process, fits well with the EFD for diverse TF-DNA binding datasets. Furthermore, this distribution predicts total number of TF-DNA binding sites (BSs), estimating specificity and sensitivity as well as other basic statistical features of DNA-TF binding when the experimental datasets are noise-rich and essentially incomplete. The KW distribution fits equally well to TF-DNA binding activity for different TFs including ERE, CREB, STAT1, Nanog, and Oct4. Our analysis reveals that the KW distribution and its generalized form provides the family of power-law-like distributions given in terms of hypergeometric series functions, including standard and generalized Pareto and Waring distributions, providing flexible and common skewed forms of the transcription factor binding site (TFBS) avidity distribution function. We suggest that the skewed binding

  17. Meningococcal factor H-binding protein vaccines with decreased binding to human complement factor H have enhanced immunogenicity in human factor H transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Raffaella; Granoff, Dan M; Beernink, Peter T

    2013-11-04

    Factor H-binding protein (fHbp) is a component of a meningococcal vaccine recently licensed in Europe for prevention of serogroup B disease, and a second vaccine in clinical development. The protein specifically binds human factor H (fH), which down-regulates complement activation and enhances resistance to bactericidal activity. There are conflicting data from studies in human fH transgenic mice on whether binding of human fH to fHbp vaccines decreases immunogenicity, and whether mutant fHbp vaccines with decreased fH binding have enhanced immunogenicity. fHbp can be classified into two sub-families based on sequence divergence and immunologic cross-reactivity. Previous studies of mutant fHbp vaccines with low fH binding were from sub-family B, which account for approximately 60% of serogroup B case isolates. In the present study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of two mutant sub-family A fHbp vaccines containing single substitutions, T221A or D211A, which resulted in 15- or 30-fold lower affinity for human fH, respectively, than the corresponding control wild-type fHbp vaccine. In transgenic mice with high serum concentrations of human fH, both mutant vaccines elicited significantly higher IgG titers and higher serum bactericidal antibody responses than the control fHbp vaccine that bound human fH. Thus, mutations introduced into a sub-family A fHbp antigen to decrease fH binding can increase protective antibody responses in human fH transgenic mice. Collectively the data suggest that mutant fHbp antigens with decreased fH binding will result in superior vaccines in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  19. Chlamydial entry involves TARP binding of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Josh Lane

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to cells induces the secretion of the elementary body-associated protein TARP (Translocated Actin Recruiting Protein. TARP crosses the plasma membrane where it is immediately phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by unknown host kinases. The Rac GTPase is also activated, resulting in WAVE2 and Arp2/3-dependent recruitment of actin to the sites of chlamydia attachment. We show that TARP participates directly in chlamydial invasion activating the Rac-dependent signaling cascade to recruit actin. TARP functions by binding two distinct Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, Sos1 and Vav2, in a phosphotyrosine-dependent manner. The tyrosine phosphorylation profile of the sequence YEPISTENIYESI within TARP, as well as the transient activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K, appears to determine which GEF is utilized to activate Rac. The first and second tyrosine residues, when phosphorylated, are utilized by the Sos1/Abi1/Eps8 and Vav2, respectively, with the latter requiring the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Depletion of these critical signaling molecules by siRNA resulted in inhibition of chlamydial invasion to varying degrees, owing to a possible functional redundancy of the two pathways. Collectively, these data implicate TARP in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery, demonstrating a mechanism by which C.trachomatis invades non-phagocytic cells.

  20. Genome-scale study of the importance of binding site context for transcription factor binding and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronne Hans

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of mRNA transcription is controlled by transcription factors that bind to specific DNA motifs in promoter regions upstream of protein coding genes. Recent results indicate that not only the presence of a motif but also motif context (for example the orientation of a motif or its location relative to the coding sequence is important for gene regulation. Results In this study we present ContextFinder, a tool that is specifically aimed at identifying cases where motif context is likely to affect gene regulation. We used ContextFinder to examine the role of motif context in S. cerevisiae both for DNA binding by transcription factors and for effects on gene expression. For DNA binding we found significant patterns of motif location bias, whereas motif orientations did not seem to matter. Motif context appears to affect gene expression even more than it affects DNA binding, as biases in both motif location and orientation were more frequent in promoters of co-expressed genes. We validated our results against data on nucleosome positioning, and found a negative correlation between preferred motif locations and nucleosome occupancy. Conclusion We conclude that the requirement for stable binding of transcription factors to DNA and their subsequent function in gene regulation can impose constraints on motif context.

  1. Blood coagulation factor XIa binds specifically to a site on activated human platelets distinct from that for factor XI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, D.; Seaman, F.S.; Koshy, A.; Knight, L.C.; Walsh, P.N.

    1984-01-01

    Binding of 125 I-Factor XIa to platelets required the presence of high molecular weight kininogen, was enhanced when platelets were stimulated with thrombin, and reached a plateau after 4-6 min of incubation at 37 degrees C. Factor XIa binding was specific: 50- to 100-fold molar excesses of unlabeled Factor XIa prevented binding, whereas Factor XI, prekallikrein, Factor XIIa, and prothrombin did not. When washed erythrocytes, added at concentrations calculated to provide an equivalent surface area to platelets, were incubated with Factor XIa, only a low level of nonspecific, nonsaturable binding was detected. Factor XIa binding to platelets was partially reversible and was saturable at concentrations of added Factor XIa of 0.2-0.4 microgram/ml (1.25-2.5 microM). The number of Factor XIa binding sites on activated platelets was estimated to be 225 per platelet (range, 110-450). We conclude that specific, high affinity, saturable binding sites for Factor XIa are present on activated platelets, are distinct from those previously demonstrated for Factor XI, and require the presence of high molecular weight kininogen

  2. Transcriptome Profiling of Pediatric Core Binding Factor AML.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hao Hsu

    Full Text Available The t(8;21 and Inv(16 translocations disrupt the normal function of core binding factors alpha (CBFA and beta (CBFB, respectively. These translocations represent two of the most common genomic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients, occurring in approximately 25% pediatric and 15% of adult with this malignancy. Both translocations are associated with favorable clinical outcomes after intensive chemotherapy, and given the perceived mechanistic similarities, patients with these translocations are frequently referred to as having CBF-AML. It remains uncertain as to whether, collectively, these translocations are mechanistically the same or impact different pathways in subtle ways that have both biological and clinical significance. Therefore, we used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq to investigate the similarities and differences in genes and pathways between these subtypes of pediatric AMLs. Diagnostic RNA from patients with t(8;21 (N = 17, Inv(16 (N = 14, and normal karyotype (NK, N = 33 were subjected to RNA-seq. Analyses compared the transcriptomes across these three cytogenetic subtypes, using the NK cohort as the control. A total of 1291 genes in t(8;21 and 474 genes in Inv(16 were differentially expressed relative to the NK controls, with 198 genes differentially expressed in both subtypes. The majority of these genes (175/198; binomial test p-value < 10(-30 are consistent in expression changes among the two subtypes suggesting the expression profiles are more similar between the CBF cohorts than in the NK cohort. Our analysis also revealed alternative splicing events (ASEs differentially expressed across subtypes, with 337 t(8;21-specific and 407 Inv(16-specific ASEs detected, the majority of which were acetylated proteins (p = 1.5 x 10(-51 and p = 1.8 x 10(-54 for the two subsets. In addition to known fusions, we identified and verified 16 de novo fusions in 43 patients, including three fusions involving NUP98 in six

  3. Using TESS to predict transcription factor binding sites in DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    This unit describes how to use the Transcription Element Search System (TESS). This Web site predicts transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in DNA sequence using two different kinds of models of sites, strings and positional weight matrices. The binding of transcription factors to DNA is a major part of the control of gene expression. Transcription factors exhibit sequence-specific binding; they form stronger bonds to some DNA sequences than to others. Identification of a good binding site in the promoter for a gene suggests the possibility that the corresponding factor may play a role in the regulation of that gene. However, the sequences transcription factors recognize are typically short and allow for some amount of mismatch. Because of this, binding sites for a factor can typically be found at random every few hundred to a thousand base pairs. TESS has features to help sort through and evaluate the significance of predicted sites.

  4. Clumping factor A, von Willebrand factor-binding protein and von Willebrand factor anchor Staphylococcus aureus to the vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, J; Liesenborghs, L; Peetermans, M; Veloso, T R; Missiakas, D; Schneewind, O; Mancini, S; Entenza, J M; Hoylaerts, M F; Heying, R; Verhamme, P; Vanassche, T

    2017-05-01

    Essentials Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) binds to endothelium via von Willebrand factor (VWF). Secreted VWF-binding protein (vWbp) mediates S. aureus adhesion to VWF under shear stress. vWbp interacts with VWF and the Sortase A-dependent surface protein Clumping factor A (ClfA). VWF-vWbp-ClfA anchor S. aureus to vascular endothelium under shear stress. Objective When establishing endovascular infections, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) overcomes shear forces of flowing blood by binding to von Willebrand factor (VWF). Staphylococcal VWF-binding protein (vWbp) interacts with VWF, but it is unknown how this secreted protein binds to the bacterial cell wall. We hypothesized that vWbp interacts with a staphylococcal surface protein, mediating the adhesion of S. aureus to VWF and vascular endothelium under shear stress. Methods We studied the binding of S. aureus to vWbp, VWF and endothelial cells in a micro-parallel flow chamber using various mutants deficient in Sortase A (SrtA) and SrtA-dependent surface proteins, and Lactococcus lactis expressing single staphylococcal surface proteins. In vivo adhesion of bacteria was evaluated in the murine mesenteric circulation using real-time intravital vascular microscopy. Results vWbp bridges the bacterial cell wall and VWF, allowing shear-resistant binding of S. aureus to inflamed or damaged endothelium. Absence of SrtA and Clumping factor A (ClfA) reduced adhesion of S. aureus to vWbp, VWF and activated endothelial cells. ADAMTS-13 and an anti-VWF A1 domain antibody, when combined, reduced S. aureus adhesion to activated endothelial cells by 90%. Selective overexpression of ClfA in the membrane of Lactococcus lactis enabled these bacteria to bind to VWF and activated endothelial cells but only in the presence of vWbp. Absence of ClfA abolished bacterial adhesion to the activated murine vessel wall. Conclusions vWbp interacts with VWF and with the SrtA-dependent staphylococcal surface protein ClfA. The complex formed by

  5. Analysis of in vivo binding of yeast heat shock factor to promoter DNA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... Cooperative binding of Drosophila heat shock factor to arrays of a conserved 5 bp unit. Cell. 64: 585-593. Yamamoto A, Mizukami Y, Sakurai H (2005). Identification of a Novel. Class of Target Genes and a Novel Type of Binding Sequence of. Heat Shock Transcription Factor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J.

  6. Complement-Mediated Bactericidal Activity of Anti-Factor H Binding Protein Monoclonal Antibodies against the Meningococcus Relies upon Blocking Factor H Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Reason, Donald C.; Granoff, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    Binding of the complement-downregulating protein factor H (fH) to the surface of the meningococcus is important for survival of the organism in human serum. The meningococcal vaccine candidate factor H binding protein (fHbp) is an important ligand for human fH. While some fHbp-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) block binding of fH to fHbp, the stoichiometry of blocking in the presence of high serum concentrations of fH and its effect on complement-mediated bactericidal activity are unknown. To investigate this question, we constructed chimeric antibodies in which the human IgG1 constant region was paired with three murine fHbp-specific binding domains designated JAR 3, JAR 5, and MAb502. By surface plasmon resonance, the association rates for binding of all three MAbs to immobilized fHbp were >50-fold higher than that for binding of fH to fHbp, and the MAb dissociation rates were >500-fold lower than that for fH. While all three MAbs elicited similar C1q-dependent C4b deposition on live bacteria (classical complement pathway), only those antibodies that inhibited binding of fH to fHbp (JAR 3 and JAR 5) had bactericidal activity with human complement. MAb502, which did not inhibit fH binding, had complement-mediated bactericidal activity only when tested with fH-depleted human complement. When an IgG1 anti-fHbp MAb binds to sparsely exposed fHbp on the bacterial surface, there appears to be insufficient complement activation for bacteriolysis unless fH binding also is inhibited. The ability of fHbp vaccines to elicit protective antibodies, therefore, is likely to be enhanced if the antibody repertoire is of high avidity and includes fH-blocking activity. PMID:21708990

  7. Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Most current methods in this field adopt a multi-step ap proach that segregates the two aspects. Again, it is widely accepted that the ... In a simulated setting, we provide a proof of concept that the approach works given the ... We study how alignments and binding site predictions interplay at varying evolutionary distances ...

  8. Bookmarking by specific and nonspecific binding of FoxA1 pioneer factor to mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, Juan Manuel; Donahue, Greg; Becker, Justin S; He, Ximiao; Vinson, Charles; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2013-02-01

    While most transcription factors exit the chromatin during mitosis and the genome becomes silent, a subset of factors remains and "bookmarks" genes for rapid reactivation as cells progress through the cell cycle. However, it is unknown whether such bookmarking factors bind to chromatin similarly in mitosis and how different binding capacities among them relate to function. We compared a diverse set of transcription factors involved in liver differentiation and found markedly different extents of mitotic chromosome binding. Among them, the pioneer factor FoxA1 exhibits the greatest extent of mitotic chromosome binding. Genomically, ~15% of the FoxA1 interphase target sites are bound in mitosis, including at genes that are important for liver differentiation. Biophysical, genome mapping, and mutagenesis studies of FoxA1 reveals two different modes of binding to mitotic chromatin. Specific binding in mitosis occurs at sites that continue to be bound from interphase. Nonspecific binding in mitosis occurs across the chromosome due to the intrinsic chromatin affinity of FoxA1. Both specific and nonspecific binding contribute to timely reactivation of target genes post-mitosis. These studies reveal an unexpected diversity in the mechanisms by which transcription factors help retain cell identity during mitosis.

  9. Distinct phosphotyrosines on a growth factor receptor bind to specific molecules that mediate different signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantl, W J; Escobedo, J A; Martin, G A; Turck, C W; del Rosario, M; McCormick, F; Williams, L T

    1992-05-01

    The receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) binds two proteins containing SH2 domains, GTPase activating protein (GAP) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase). The sites on the receptor that mediate this interaction were identified by using phosphotyrosine-containing peptides representing receptor sequences to block specifically binding of either PI3-kinase or GAP. These results suggested that PI3-kinase binds two phosphotyrosine residues, each located in a 5 aa motif with an essential methionine at the fourth position C-terminal to the tyrosine. Point mutations at these sites caused a selective elimination of PI3-kinase binding and loss of PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis. Mutation of the binding site for GAP prevented the receptor from associating with or phosphorylating GAP, but had no effect on PI3-kinase binding and little effect on DNA synthesis. Therefore, GAP and PI3-kinase interact with the receptor by binding to different phosphotyrosine-containing sequence motifs.

  10. DNA-binding specificity and molecular functions of NAC transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi Asschenfeldt; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2005-01-01

    . The ability of NAC proteins to dimerize and to bind DNAwas analysed by structure-based mutagenesis. This identified two salt bridge-forming residues essential for NAC protein dimerization. Alteration of basic residues in a loop region containing several highly conserved residues abolished DNA binding. Thus....... Furthermore, NAC protein binding to the CaMV 35S promoter was shown to depend on sequences similar to the consensus of the selected oligonucleotides. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that NAC proteins bind DNA as homo- or heterodimers and that dimerization is necessary for stable DNA binding......The family of NAC (NAM/ATAF1,2/CUC2) transcription factors has been implicated in a wide range of plant processes, but knowledge on the DNA-binding properties of the family is limited. Using a reiterative selection procedure on random oligonucleotides, we have identified consensus binding sites...

  11. Evolving Transcription Factor Binding Site Models From Protein Binding Microarray Data

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-02-02

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. In this paper, we describe the PBM motif model building problem. We apply several evolutionary computation methods and compare their performance with the interior point method, demonstrating their performance advantages. In addition, given the PBM domain knowledge, we propose and describe a novel method called kmerGA which makes domain-specific assumptions to exploit PBM data properties to build more accurate models than the other models built. The effectiveness and robustness of kmerGA is supported by comprehensive performance benchmarking on more than 200 datasets, time complexity analysis, convergence analysis, parameter analysis, and case studies. To demonstrate its utility further, kmerGA is applied to two real world applications: 1) PBM rotation testing and 2) ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction. The results support the biological relevance of the models learned by kmerGA, and thus its real world applicability.

  12. Tenascin C promiscuously binds growth factors via its fifth fibronectin type III-like domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura De Laporte

    Full Text Available Tenascin C (TNC is an extracellular matrix protein that is upregulated during development as well as tissue remodeling. TNC is comprised of multiple independent folding domains, including 15 fibronectin type III-like (TNCIII domains. The fifth TNCIII domain (TNCIII5 has previously been shown to bind heparin. Our group has shown that the heparin-binding fibronectin type III domains of fibronectin (FNIII, specifically FNIII12-14, possess affinity towards a large number of growth factors. Here, we show that TNCIII5 binds growth factors promiscuously and with high affinity. We produced recombinant fragments of TNC representing the first five TNCIII repeats (TNCIII1-5, as well as subdomains, including TNCIII5, to study interactions with various growth factors. Multiple growth factors of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF family, the fibroblast growth factor (FGF family, the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β superfamily, the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGF-BPs, and neurotrophins were found to bind with high affinity to this region of TNC, specifically to TNCIII5. Surface plasmon resonance was performed to analyze the kinetics of binding of TNCIII1-5 with TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, NT-3, and FGF-2. The promiscuous yet high affinity of TNC for a wide array of growth factors, mediated mainly by TNCIII5, may play a role in multiple physiological and pathological processes involving TNC.

  13. Formation of IgE-binding factors by human T-cell hybridomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Huff, T F; Ishizaka, K

    1984-01-01

    Normal human T cells that proliferated in the presence of interleukin 2 (IL-2) formed IgE-binding factors when incubated with human IgE. These cells were then fused with a mutant of the human T-cell line CEM. Incubation of five hybridomas with human IgE or culture of the cells in IgE-coated wells resulted in the formation of IgE-binding factors. One hour of incubation with 10 micrograms of human IgE per ml was sufficient to induce the hybridomas to form IgE-binding factors. Polymerized IgE wa...

  14. Binding of von Willebrand factor to collagen type III: role of specific amino acids in the collagen binding domain of vWF and effects of neighboring domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plas, R. M.; Gomes, L.; Marquart, J. A.; Vink, T.; Meijers, J. C.; de Groot, P. G.; Sixma, J. J.; Huizinga, E. G.

    2000-01-01

    Binding of von Willebrand Factor (vWF) to sites of vascular injury is the first step of hemostasis. Collagen types I and III are important binding sites for vWF. We have previously determined the three-dimensional structure of the collagen binding A3 domain of vWF (Huizinga et al., Structure 1997;

  15. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  16. Human corpus luteum: presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and binding characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyagari, R.R.; Khan-Dawood, F.S.

    1987-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors are present in many reproductive tissues but have not been demonstrated in the human corpus luteum. To determine the presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and its binding characteristics, we carried out studies on the plasma cell membrane fraction of seven human corpora lutea (days 16 to 25) of the menstrual cycle. Specific epidermal growth factor receptors were present in human corpus luteum. Insulin, nerve growth factor, and human chorionic gonadotropin did not competitively displace epidermal growth factor binding. The optimal conditions for corpus luteum-epidermal growth factor receptor binding were found to be incubation for 2 hours at 4 degrees C with 500 micrograms plasma membrane protein and 140 femtomol 125 I-epidermal growth factor per incubate. The number (mean +/- SEM) of epidermal growth factor binding sites was 12.34 +/- 2.99 X 10(-19) mol/micrograms protein; the dissociation constant was 2.26 +/- 0.56 X 10(-9) mol/L; the association constant was 0.59 +/- 0.12 X 10(9) L/mol. In two regressing corpora lutea obtained on days 2 and 3 of the menstrual cycle, there was no detectable specific epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity. Similarly no epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity could be detected in ovarian stromal tissue. Our findings demonstrate that specific receptors for epidermal growth factor are present in the human corpus luteum. The physiologic significance of epidermal growth factor receptors in human corpus luteum is unknown, but epidermal growth factor may be involved in intragonadal regulation of luteal function

  17. DNA methylation changes are a late event in acute promyelocytic leukemia and coincide with loss of transcription factor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoofs, Till; Rohde, Christian; Hebestreit, Katja

    2013-01-01

    . Transcription factor-binding sites (eg, the c-myc-binding sites) were associated with low methylation. However, SUZ12- and REST-binding sites identified in embryonic stem cells were preferentially DNA hypermethylated in APL cells. Unexpectedly, PML-RARα-binding sites were also protected from aberrant DNA...

  18. Complex Relationship between Ligand Binding and Dimerization in the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Bessman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR plays pivotal roles in development and is mutated or overexpressed in several cancers. Despite recent advances, the complex allosteric regulation of EGFR remains incompletely understood. Through efforts to understand why the negative cooperativity observed for intact EGFR is lost in studies of its isolated extracellular region (ECR, we uncovered unexpected relationships between ligand binding and receptor dimerization. The two processes appear to compete. Surprisingly, dimerization does not enhance ligand binding (although ligand binding promotes dimerization. We further show that simply forcing EGFR ECRs into preformed dimers without ligand yields ill-defined, heterogeneous structures. Finally, we demonstrate that extracellular EGFR-activating mutations in glioblastoma enhance ligand-binding affinity without directly promoting EGFR dimerization, suggesting that these oncogenic mutations alter the allosteric linkage between dimerization and ligand binding. Our findings have important implications for understanding how EGFR and its relatives are activated by specific ligands and pathological mutations.

  19. Small Molecule Inhibitor of CBFβ-RUNX Binding for RUNX Transcription Factor Driven Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Illendula

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors have traditionally been viewed with skepticism as viable drug targets, but they offer the potential for completely novel mechanisms of action that could more effectively address the stem cell like properties, such as self-renewal and chemo-resistance, that lead to the failure of traditional chemotherapy approaches. Core binding factor is a heterodimeric transcription factor comprised of one of 3 RUNX proteins (RUNX1-3 and a CBFβ binding partner. CBFβ enhances DNA binding of RUNX subunits by relieving auto-inhibition. Both RUNX1 and CBFβ are frequently mutated in human leukemia. More recently, RUNX proteins have been shown to be key players in epithelial cancers, suggesting the targeting of this pathway could have broad utility. In order to test this, we developed small molecules which bind to CBFβ and inhibit its binding to RUNX. Treatment with these inhibitors reduces binding of RUNX1 to target genes, alters the expression of RUNX1 target genes, and impacts cell survival and differentiation. These inhibitors show efficacy against leukemia cells as well as basal-like (triple-negative breast cancer cells. These inhibitors provide effective tools to probe the utility of targeting RUNX transcription factor function in other cancers.

  20. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H

    2017-01-09

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Quantification of transcription factor-DNA binding affinity in a living cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, Sergey; Berg, Otto G; Wrange, Örjan

    2016-04-20

    The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) for specific binding of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR) to DNA was determined in vivo in Xenopus oocytes. The total nuclear receptor concentration was quantified as specifically retained [(3)H]-hormone in manually isolated oocyte nuclei. DNA was introduced by nuclear microinjection of single stranded phagemid DNA, chromatin is then formed during second strand synthesis. The fraction of DNA sites occupied by the expressed receptor was determined by dimethylsulphate in vivo footprinting and used for calculation of the receptor-DNA binding affinity. The forkhead transcription factor FoxA1 enhanced the DNA binding by GR with an apparent Kd of ∼1 μM and dramatically stimulated DNA binding by AR with an apparent Kd of ∼0.13 μM at a composite androgen responsive DNA element containing one FoxA1 binding site and one palindromic hormone receptor binding site known to bind one receptor homodimer. FoxA1 exerted a weak constitutive- and strongly cooperative DNA binding together with AR but had a less prominent effect with GR, the difference reflecting the licensing function of FoxA1 at this androgen responsive DNA element. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. JASPAR 2010: the greatly expanded open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Thongjuea, Supat; Kwon, Andrew T

    2009-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is the leading open-access database of matrix profiles describing the DNA-binding patterns of transcription factors (TFs) and other proteins interacting with DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Its fourth major release is the largest expansion of the core database...... to an active research community. As binding models are refined by newer data, the JASPAR database now uses versioning of matrices: in this release, 12% of the older models were updated to improved versions. Classification of TF families has been improved by adopting a new DNA-binding domain nomenclature...

  3. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed numerous risk loci associated with diverse diseases. However, identification of disease-causing variants within association loci remains a major challenge. Divergence in gene expression due to cis-regulatory variants in noncoding regions is central...... diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele...

  4. Cell-type specificity of ChIP-predicted transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håndstad Tony

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Context-dependent transcription factor (TF binding is one reason for differences in gene expression patterns between different cellular states. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identifies genome-wide TF binding sites for one particular context—the cells used in the experiment. But can such ChIP-seq data predict TF binding in other cellular contexts and is it possible to distinguish context-dependent from ubiquitous TF binding? Results We compared ChIP-seq data on TF binding for multiple TFs in two different cell types and found that on average only a third of ChIP-seq peak regions are common to both cell types. Expectedly, common peaks occur more frequently in certain genomic contexts, such as CpG-rich promoters, whereas chromatin differences characterize cell-type specific TF binding. We also find, however, that genotype differences between the cell types can explain differences in binding. Moreover, ChIP-seq signal intensity and peak clustering are the strongest predictors of common peaks. Compared with strong peaks located in regions containing peaks for multiple transcription factors, weak and isolated peaks are less common between the cell types and are less associated with data that indicate regulatory activity. Conclusions Together, the results suggest that experimental noise is prevalent among weak peaks, whereas strong and clustered peaks represent high-confidence binding events that often occur in other cellular contexts. Nevertheless, 30-40% of the strongest and most clustered peaks show context-dependent regulation. We show that by combining signal intensity with additional data—ranging from context independent information such as binding site conservation and position weight matrix scores to context dependent chromatin structure—we can predict whether a ChIP-seq peak is likely to be present in other cellular contexts.

  5. A New Mechanism for Mendelian Dominance in Regulatory Genetic Pathways: Competitive Binding by Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Adam H; Johnson, Norman A; Tulchinsky, Alexander Y

    2017-01-01

    We report a new mechanism for allelic dominance in regulatory genetic interactions that we call binding dominance. We investigated a biophysical model of gene regulation, where the fractional occupancy of a transcription factor (TF) on the cis-regulated promoter site it binds to is determined by binding energy (-ΔG) and TF dosage. Transcription and gene expression proceed when the TF is bound to the promoter. In diploids, individuals may be heterozygous at the cis-site, at the TF's coding region, or at the TF's own promoter, which determines allele-specific dosage. We find that when the TF's coding region is heterozygous, TF alleles compete for occupancy at the cis-sites and the tighter-binding TF is dominant in proportion to the difference in binding strength. When the TF's own promoter is heterozygous, the TF produced at the higher dosage is also dominant. Cis-site heterozygotes have additive expression and therefore codominant phenotypes. Binding dominance propagates to affect the expression of downstream loci and it is sensitive in both magnitude and direction to genetic background, but its detectability often attenuates. While binding dominance is inevitable at the molecular level, it is difficult to detect in the phenotype under some biophysical conditions, more so when TF dosage is high and allele-specific binding affinities are similar. A body of empirical research on the biophysics of TF binding demonstrates the plausibility of this mechanism of dominance, but studies of gene expression under competitive binding in heterozygotes in a diversity of genetic backgrounds are needed. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. The role of the DNA-binding One Zinc Finger (DOF) transcription factor family in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguero, Mélanie; Atif, Rana Muhammad; Ochatt, Sergio; Thompson, Richard D

    2013-08-01

    The DOF (DNA-binding One Zinc Finger) family of transcription factors is involved in many fundamental processes in higher plants, including responses to light and phytohormones as well as roles in seed maturation and germination. DOF transcription factor genes are restricted in their distribution to plants, where they are in many copies in both gymnosperms and angiosperms and also present in lower plants such as the moss Physcomitrella patens and in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which possesses a single DOF gene. DOF transcription factors bind to their promoter targets at the consensus sequence AAAG. This binding depends upon the presence of the highly conserved DOF domain in the protein. Depending on the target gene, DOF factor binding may activate or repress transcription. DOF factors are expressed in most if not all tissues of higher plants, but frequently appear to be functionally redundant. Recent next-generation sequencing data provide a more comprehensive survey of the distribution of DOF sequence classes among plant species and within tissue types, and clues as to the evolution of functions assumed by this transcription factor family. DOFs do not appear to be implicated in the initial differentiation of the plant body plan into organs via the resolution of meristematic zones, in contrast to MADS-box and homeobox transcription factors, which are found in other non-plant eukaryotes, and this may reflect a more recent evolutionary origin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Asap: a framework for over-representation statistics for transcription factor binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, Troels T; Frellsen, Jes; Moltke, Ida

    2008-01-01

    -founded choice. METHODOLOGY: We introduce a software package, Asap, for fast searching with position weight matrices that include several standard methods for assessing over-representation. We have compared the ability of these methods to detect over-represented transcription factor binding sites in artificial......BACKGROUND: In studies of gene regulation the efficient computational detection of over-represented transcription factor binding sites is an increasingly important aspect. Several published methods can be used for testing whether a set of hypothesised co-regulated genes share a common regulatory...... regime based on the occurrence of the modelled transcription factor binding sites. However there is little or no information available for guiding the end users choice of method. Furthermore it would be necessary to obtain several different software programs from various sources to make a well...

  8. Functional transcription factor target discovery via compendia of binding and expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Christopher J; Joshi, Anagha; Michoel, Tom

    2016-02-09

    Genome-wide experiments to map the DNA-binding locations of transcription-associated factors (TFs) have shown that the number of genes bound by a TF far exceeds the number of possible direct target genes. Distinguishing functional from non-functional binding is therefore a major challenge in the study of transcriptional regulation. We hypothesized that functional targets can be discovered by correlating binding and expression profiles across multiple experimental conditions. To test this hypothesis, we obtained ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data from matching cell types from the human ENCODE resource, considered promoter-proximal and distal cumulative regulatory models to map binding sites to genes, and used a combination of linear and non-linear measures to correlate binding and expression data. We found that a high degree of correlation between a gene's TF-binding and expression profiles was significantly more predictive of the gene being differentially expressed upon knockdown of that TF, compared to using binding sites in the cell type of interest only. Remarkably, TF targets predicted from correlation across a compendium of cell types were also predictive of functional targets in other cell types. Finally, correlation across a time course of ChIP-seq and RNA-seq experiments was also predictive of functional TF targets in that tissue.

  9. A screening system to identify transcription factors that induce binding site-directed DNA demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Maeda, Shiori; Furuhata, Erina; Shimizu, Yuri; Nishimura, Hajime; Kishima, Mami; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2017-12-08

    DNA methylation is a fundamental epigenetic modification that is involved in many biological systems such as differentiation and disease. We and others recently showed that some transcription factors (TFs) are involved in the site-specific determination of DNA demethylation in a binding site-directed manner, although the reports of such TFs are limited. Here, we develop a screening system to identify TFs that induce binding site-directed DNA methylation changes. The system involves the ectopic expression of target TFs in model cells followed by DNA methylome analysis and overrepresentation analysis of the corresponding TF binding motif at differentially methylated regions. It successfully identified binding site-directed demethylation of SPI1, which is known to promote DNA demethylation in a binding site-directed manner. We extended our screening system to 15 master TFs involved in cellular differentiation and identified eight novel binding site-directed DNA demethylation-inducing TFs (RUNX3, GATA2, CEBPB, MAFB, NR4A2, MYOD1, CEBPA, and TBX5). Gene ontology and tissue enrichment analysis revealed that these TFs demethylate genomic regions associated with corresponding biological roles. We also describe the characteristics of binding site-directed DNA demethylation induced by these TFs, including the targeting of highly methylated CpGs, local DNA demethylation, and the overlap of demethylated regions between TFs of the same family. Our results show the usefulness of the developed screening system for the identification of TFs that induce DNA demethylation in a site-directed manner.

  10. Binding efficiency of recombinant collagen-binding basic fibroblast growth factors (CBD-bFGFs) and their promotion for NIH-3T3 cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenxu; Zhou, Yulai; Chen, Li; Hu, Mingxin; Wang, Yu; Li, Linlong; Wang, Zongliang; Zhang, Peibiao

    2018-03-01

    The recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) containing collagen-binding domain (CBD) has been found to be a potential therapeutic factor in tissue regeneration. However, its binding efficiency and quantification remain uncertain. In this research, massive recombinant bFGFs with good bioactivity for enhancing the proliferation of NIH-3T3 cells were achieved. An ELISA-based quantitative method was set up to investigate the binding efficiency of CBD-bFGFs on collagen films. It indicated that the CBDs significantly increased the collagen-binding ability of bFGF (P < .05), with the optimum binding condition first determined to be in the pH range of 7.5-9.5 (P < .05). Then, the relevant equations to calculate the binding density of bFGF, C-bFGF, and V-bFGF were acquired. Analysis confirmed that the bioactivity of immobilized bFGFs was well correlated with the density of growth factor on collagen films. Based on this research, the density of growth factor is a logical and applicable dosage unit for quantification of binding efficiency of growth factors, rather than traditional concentration of soluble growth factors in tissue engineering applications. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Cooperative Serum Bactericidal Activity Between Human Antibodies to Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein and Neisserial Heparin Binding Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, David M.; Wong, Tracy T.; Granoff, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    A meningococcal group B vaccine containing multiple protein antigens including factor H binding protein (fHbp) and Neisserial heparin binding antigen (NHba) is in clinical development. The ability of antibodies against individual antigens to interact and augment protective immunity is unknown. We assayed human complement-mediated bactericidal activity (SBA) in stored sera from six immunized adults before and after depletion of antibodies to fHbp and/or NHba. All six subjects developed ≥4-fold increases in SBA titer against a test strain with fHbp in the variant 1 group with an amino acid sequence that matched the vaccine antigen (GMT 95 percent of the SBA was directed against fHbp. Four subjects developed ≥4-fold increases in SBA titer against a test strain with a heterologous fHbp variant 2 antigen and a homologous NHba amino acid sequence that matched the vaccine antigen (GMT bactericidal anti-fHbp variant 1 antiserum with a mouse anti-NHba antiserum also augmented the anti-NHba SBA titer against this test strain. For meningococcal vaccines that target relatively sparsely-exposed antigens such fHbp or NHba, non-bactericidal antibodies against individual antigens can cooperate and elicit SBA. PMID:21241734

  12. Prediction of transcription factor bindings sites affected by SNPs located at the osteopontin promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones-Orta, Marco Antonio; Avendaño-Vázquez, S Eréndira; Ivette Aparicio-Bautista, Diana; Coombes, Jason D; Weber, Georg F; Syn, Wing-Kin

    2017-10-01

    This data contains information related to the research article entitled "Osteopontin splice variants and polymorphisms in Cancer Progression and Prognosis" [1]. Here, we describe an in silico analysis of transcription factors that could have altered binding to their DNA target sequence as a result of SNPs in the osteopontin gene promoter. We concentrated on SNPs associated with cancer risk and development. The analysis was performed with PROMO v3.0.2 software which incorporates TRANSFACT v6.4 of. We also present a figure depicting the putative transcription factor binding according to genotype.

  13. The Role of Genome Accessibility in Transcription Factor Binding in Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio L C Gomes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ChIP-seq enables genome-scale identification of regulatory regions that govern gene expression. However, the biological insights generated from ChIP-seq analysis have been limited to predictions of binding sites and cooperative interactions. Furthermore, ChIP-seq data often poorly correlate with in vitro measurements or predicted motifs, highlighting that binding affinity alone is insufficient to explain transcription factor (TF-binding in vivo. One possibility is that binding sites are not equally accessible across the genome. A more comprehensive biophysical representation of TF-binding is required to improve our ability to understand, predict, and alter gene expression. Here, we show that genome accessibility is a key parameter that impacts TF-binding in bacteria. We developed a thermodynamic model that parameterizes ChIP-seq coverage in terms of genome accessibility and binding affinity. The role of genome accessibility is validated using a large-scale ChIP-seq dataset of the M. tuberculosis regulatory network. We find that accounting for genome accessibility led to a model that explains 63% of the ChIP-seq profile variance, while a model based in motif score alone explains only 35% of the variance. Moreover, our framework enables de novo ChIP-seq peak prediction and is useful for inferring TF-binding peaks in new experimental conditions by reducing the need for additional experiments. We observe that the genome is more accessible in intergenic regions, and that increased accessibility is positively correlated with gene expression and anti-correlated with distance to the origin of replication. Our biophysically motivated model provides a more comprehensive description of TF-binding in vivo from first principles towards a better representation of gene regulation in silico, with promising applications in systems biology.

  14. Cell binding fragments from a sponge proteoglycan-like aggregation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misevic, G N; Jumblatt, J E; Burger, M M

    1982-06-25

    The marine sponge Microciona prolifera aggregation factor (MAF) is a 2 X 10(7) dalton proteoglycan. MAF mediates species-specific cell-cell recognition through two functionally different sites: a Ca2+-independent species-specific cell binding site and a Ca2+-dependent MAF-MAF binding site. Dissociation procedures combined with protease treatment were used to produce cell-binding pieces from the large complex. The seven different sized fragments produced were all uronic acid-rich glycoproteins of the apparent molecular weights: 15 X 10(6), 2.5 X 10(5), 1.2 X 10(5), 7 X 10(4), 2.7 X 10(4), 5 X 10(3), and 3.6 X 10(3). Each of the fragments retained species-specific binding to Microciona cells and was also capable of inhibiting MAF-promoted cell aggregation. However, the fragments were unable to bind to MAF-conjugated agarose beads in the presence or absence of CA2+ ions. These three properties are those expected for the cell binding site of MAF. Since the binding affinity decreased linearly with decreasing molecular weight of the fragments, we believe that the cell binding sites in MAF may be highly polyvalent, although to fully support such a concept, a detailed chemical characterization of each of the fragments is needed. A high valency of cell binding sites would overcome a relatively low Ka for the single site and would thereby not only guarantee specificity but also explain the need for the large size of the proteoglycan complex found to mediate species-specific sponge aggregation.

  15. Genome-wide conserved consensus transcription factor binding motifs are hyper-methylated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Down Thomas A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation can regulate gene expression by modulating the interaction between DNA and proteins or protein complexes. Conserved consensus motifs exist across the human genome ("predicted transcription factor binding sites": "predicted TFBS" but the large majority of these are proven by chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq not to be biological transcription factor binding sites ("empirical TFBS". We hypothesize that DNA methylation at conserved consensus motifs prevents promiscuous or disorderly transcription factor binding. Results Using genome-wide methylation maps of the human heart and sperm, we found that all conserved consensus motifs as well as the subset of those that reside outside CpG islands have an aggregate profile of hyper-methylation. In contrast, empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs have a profile of hypo-methylation. 40% of empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs resided in CpG islands whereas only 7% of all conserved consensus motifs were in CpG islands. Finally we further identified a minority subset of TF whose profiles are either hypo-methylated or neutral at their respective conserved consensus motifs implicating that these TF may be responsible for establishing or maintaining an un-methylated DNA state, or whose binding is not regulated by DNA methylation. Conclusions Our analysis supports the hypothesis that at least for a subset of TF, empirical binding to conserved consensus motifs genome-wide may be controlled by DNA methylation.

  16. Probing transcription factor binding activity and downstream gene silencing in living cells with a DNA nanoswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Guo, Junling; Oppmann, Nicolas; Glab, Agata; Ricci, Francesco; Caruso, Frank; Cavalieri, Francesca

    2018-01-25

    Transcription factor DNA binding activity is of pivotal importance in living systems because of its primary involvement in the regulation of genetic machinery. The analysis of transient expression levels of transcription factors in response to a certain cell status is a powerful means for investigating cellular dynamics at the biomolecular level. Herein, a DNA-based molecular switch that enables probing of transcription factor DNA binding activity is directly used in living cells. We demonstrate that the DNA nanoswitch allows for dynamic fluorescence imaging of NF-κB and quantification of downstream gene silencing in real time. The present strategy is based on a functional DNA nanodevice that transduces, through a binding-induced conformational change, the recognition of a specific transcription factor into a fluorescent signal. In addition, stochastic optical resolution microscopy, a super-resolution microscopy technique, is used to track the internalization and intracellular trafficking of the DNA nanodevice with high spatial resolution. Overall, it has been shown that a rationally designed DNA nanodevice can be used to achieve rapid, simple, and cost-effective real-time determination of transcription factor binding activity and downstream gene silencing.

  17. Polysomes of Trypanosoma brucei: Association with Initiation Factors and RNA-Binding Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Klein

    Full Text Available We report here the results of experiments designed to identify RNA-binding proteins that might be associated with Trypanosoma brucei polysomes. After some preliminary mass spectrometry of polysomal fractions, we investigated the distributions of selected tagged proteins using sucrose gradients and immunofluorescence. As expected, the polysomal fractions contained nearly all annotated ribosomal proteins, the translation-associated protein folding complex, and many translation factors, but also many other abundant proteins. Results suggested that cap-binding proteins EIF4E3 and EIF4E4 were associated with both free and membrane-bound polysomes. The EIF4E binding partners EIF4G4 and EIF4G3 were present but the other EIF4E and EIF4G paralogues were not detected. The dominant EIF4E in the polysomal fraction is EIF4E4 and very few polysomal mRNAs are associated with EIF4G. Thirteen potential mRNA-binding proteins were detected in the polysomes, including the known polysome-associated protein RBP42. The locations of two of the other proteins were tested after epitope tagging: RBP29 was in the nucleus and ZC3H29 was in the cytoplasm. Quantitative analyses showed that specific association of an RNA-binding protein with the polysome fraction in sucrose gradients will not be detected if the protein is in more than 25-fold molar excess over its target binding sites.

  18. Crystal structure and DNA binding of the homeodomain of the stem cell transcription factor Nanog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Ralf; Ng, Calista Keow Leng; Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Stevens, Raymond C; Kolatkar, Prasanna R

    2008-02-22

    The transcription factor Nanog is an upstream regulator in early mammalian development and a key determinant of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. Nanog binds to promoter elements of hundreds of target genes and regulates their expression by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, we report the crystal structure of the murine Nanog homeodomain (HD) and analysis of its interaction with a DNA element derived from the Tcf3 promoter. Two Nanog amino acid pairs, unique among HD sequences, appear to affect the mechanism of nonspecific DNA recognition as well as maintain the integrity of the structural scaffold. To assess selective DNA recognition by Nanog, we performed electrophoretic mobility shift assays using a panel of modified DNA binding sites and found that Nanog HD preferentially binds the TAAT(G/T)(G/T) motif. A series of rational mutagenesis experiments probing the role of six variant residues of Nanog on its DNA binding function establish their role in affecting binding affinity but not binding specificity. Together, the structural and functional evidence establish Nanog as a distant member of a Q50-type HD despite having considerable variation at the sequence level.

  19. Crystal Structure and DNA Binding of the Homeodomain of the Stem Cell Transcription Factor Nanog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauch, Ralf; Ng, Calista Keow Leng; Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Stevens, Raymond C.; Kolatkar, Prasanna R. (GI-Singapore); (Scripps)

    2010-02-08

    The transcription factor Nanog is an upstream regulator in early mammalian development and a key determinant of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. Nanog binds to promoter elements of hundreds of target genes and regulates their expression by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, we report the crystal structure of the murine Nanog homeodomain (HD) and analysis of its interaction with a DNA element derived from the Tcf3 promoter. Two Nanog amino acid pairs, unique among HD sequences, appear to affect the mechanism of nonspecific DNA recognition as well as maintain the integrity of the structural scaffold. To assess selective DNA recognition by Nanog, we performed electrophoretic mobility shift assays using a panel of modified DNA binding sites and found that Nanog HD preferentially binds the TAAT(G/T)(G/T) motif. A series of rational mutagenesis experiments probing the role of six variant residues of Nanog on its DNA binding function establish their role in affecting binding affinity but not binding specificity. Together, the structural and functional evidence establish Nanog as a distant member of a Q50-type HD despite having considerable variation at the sequence level.

  20. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.; Tamás, Markus J.

    2015-12-28

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)]in vitroandin vivoand that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation.

  1. A Potential Structural Switch for Regulating DNA-Binding by TEAD Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Sun; Vonrhein, Clemens; Albarado, Diana; Raman, C S; Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2016-06-19

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors are essential for the normal development of eukaryotes and are the downstream effectors of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. Whereas our earlier work established the three-dimensional structure of the highly conserved DNA-binding domain using solution NMR spectroscopy, the structural basis for regulating the DNA-binding activity remains unknown. Here, we present the X-ray crystallographic structure and activity of a TEAD mutant containing a truncated L1 loop, ΔL1 TEAD DBD. Unexpectedly, the three-dimensional structure of the ΔL1 TEAD DBD reveals a helix-swapped homodimer wherein helix 1 is swapped between monomers. Furthermore, each three-helix bundle in the domain-swapped dimer is a structural homolog of MYB-like domains. Our investigations of the DNA-binding activity reveal that although the formation of the three-helix bundle by the ΔL1 TEAD DBD is sufficient for binding to an isolated M-CAT-like DNA element, multimeric forms are deficient for cooperative binding to tandemly duplicated elements, indicating that the L1 loop contributes to the DNA-binding activity of TEAD. These results suggest that switching between monomeric and domain-swapped forms may regulate DNA selectivity of TEAD proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nuclear mobility and mitotic chromosome binding: similarities between pioneer transcription factor FoxA and linker histone H1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaret, K S; Caravaca, J M; Tulin, A; Sekiya, T

    2010-01-01

    There exists a hierarchy by which transcription factors can engage their target sites in chromatin, in that a subset of factors can bind transcriptionally silent, nucleosomal DNA, whereas most factors cannot, and this hierarchy is reflected, at least in part, in the developmental function of the factors. For example, transcription factors possessing the Forkhead box (Fox) DNA-binding domain contain an overall fold resembling that of linker histone and thus are structured to bind DNA, site specifically, in a nucleosomal context. Where tested, Fox factors bind early in the developmental or physiological activation of target genes, thereby enabling the binding of other factors that cannot engage chromatin on their own. To investigate the basis for early chromatin binding, we have used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to analyze the mobility, in the live cell nucleus, of FoxA factors in comparison to linker histone and other transcription factors. We have further analyzed the factors for their ability to bind to chromatin in mitosis and thereby serve as epigenetic marks. The results indicate that the "pioneer" features of FoxA factors involve various chromatin-binding parameters seen in linker histones and that distinguish the factors with respect to their regulatory and mechanistic functions.

  3. AthaMap: from in silico data to real transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülow, Lorenz; Steffens, Nils Ole; Galuschka, Claudia; Schindler, Martin; Hehl, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    AthaMap generates a map for cis-regulatory sequences for the whole Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap was initially developed by matrix-based detection of putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) mostly determined from random binding site selection experiments. Now, also experimentally verified TFBS have been included for 48 different Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors (TF). Based on these sequences, 89,416 very similar putative TFBS were determined within the genome of A. thaliana and annotated to AthaMap. Matrix- and single sequence-based binding sites can be included in colocalization analysis for the identification of combinatorial cis-regulatory elements. As an example, putative target genes of the WRKY18 transcription factor that is involved in plant-pathogen interaction were determined. New functions of AthaMap include descriptions for all annotated Arabidopsis thaliana genes and direct links to TAIR, TIGR and MIPS. Transcription factors used in the binding site determination are linked to TAIR and TRANSFAC databases. AthaMap is freely available at http://www.athamap.de.

  4. The Role of Fibroblast Growth Factor Binding Protein 1 in Skin Carcinogenesis and Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Marcel Oliver; Garman, Khalid Ammar; Lee, Yong Gu

    2018-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-binding protein 1 (FGFBP1, FGF-BP) is a secreted chaperone that mobilizes paracrine-acting FGFs, stored in the extracellular matrix, and presents them to their cognate receptors. FGFBP1 enhances FGF signaling including angiogenesis during cancer progression, and is upregu...

  5. The neural cell adhesion molecule binds to fibroblast growth factor receptor 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Lauridsen, Jes B; Berezin, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) can bind to and activate fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). However, there are four major FGFR isoforms (FGFR1-FGFR4), and it is not known whether NCAM also interacts directly with the other three FGFR isoforms. In this study, we show by surface...

  6. Structural Characterization of a Novel HER2/neu Binding Ets Factor, ESX

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nunes, Christa

    1999-01-01

    ... be beneficial for the rational design of therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing HER2 receptor expression. We have described and cloned a new Ets transcription factor, ESX, and shown that it binds to the Ets response element of the HER2 promoter...

  7. Inducible super-enhancers are organized based on canonical signal-specific transcription factor binding elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojcsuk, Dóra; Nagy, Gergely; Balint, Balint L

    2017-04-20

    Super-enhancers are established through the interactions of several enhancers and a large number of proteins, including transcription factors and co-regulators; however, the formation of these interactions is poorly understood. By re-analysing previously published estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) ChIP-seq data sets derived from the MCF-7 cell line, we observed that in the absence of stimulation, future super-enhancers are represented by one or a few transcription factor binding event(s) and these extraordinary enhancers possess a response element largely specific to the ERα dimer. Upon hormonal stimulation, these primary binding sites are surrounded by a large amount of ERα and the critical components of active enhancers, such as P300 and MED1, and together with neighbouring sites bound by newly recruited ERα, they generate the functional super-enhancers. To further validate the role of canonical elements in super-enhancer formation, we investigated some additional signal-dependent transcription factors, confirming that certain, distinguished binding elements have a general organizer function. These results suggest that certain signal-specific transcription factors guide super-enhancer formation upon binding to strong response elements. These findings may reshape the current understanding of how these regulatory units assemble, highlighting the involvement of DNA elements instead of protein-protein interactions. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Binding of von Willebrand factor and plasma proteins to the eggshell of Schistosoma mansoni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewalick, Saskia; Hensbergen, Paul J; Bexkens, Michiel L; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M; de Groot, Philip G; Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Hellemond, Jaap J

    Schistosoma mansoni eggs have to cross the endothelium and intestinal wall to leave the host and continue the life cycle. Mechanisms involved in this essential step are largely unknown. Here we describe direct binding to the S. mansoni eggshell of von Willebrand factor and other plasma proteins

  9. Assessing the model transferability for prediction of transcription factor binding sites based on chromatin accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Zibetti, Cristina; Wan, Jun; Wang, Guohua; Blackshaw, Seth; Qian, Jiang

    2017-07-27

    Computational prediction of transcription factor (TF) binding sites in different cell types is challenging. Recent technology development allows us to determine the genome-wide chromatin accessibility in various cellular and developmental contexts. The chromatin accessibility profiles provide useful information in prediction of TF binding events in various physiological conditions. Furthermore, ChIP-Seq analysis was used to determine genome-wide binding sites for a range of different TFs in multiple cell types. Integration of these two types of genomic information can improve the prediction of TF binding events. We assessed to what extent a model built upon on other TFs and/or other cell types could be used to predict the binding sites of TFs of interest. A random forest model was built using a set of cell type-independent features such as specific sequences recognized by the TFs and evolutionary conservation, as well as cell type-specific features derived from chromatin accessibility data. Our analysis suggested that the models learned from other TFs and/or cell lines performed almost as well as the model learned from the target TF in the cell type of interest. Interestingly, models based on multiple TFs performed better than single-TF models. Finally, we proposed a universal model, BPAC, which was generated using ChIP-Seq data from multiple TFs in various cell types. Integrating chromatin accessibility information with sequence information improves prediction of TF binding.The prediction of TF binding is transferable across TFs and/or cell lines suggesting there are a set of universal "rules". A computational tool was developed to predict TF binding sites based on the universal "rules".

  10. Effect of positional dependence and alignment strategy on modeling transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quader Saad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many consensus-based and Position Weight Matrix-based methods for recognizing transcription factor binding sites (TFBS are not well suited to the variability in the lengths of binding sites. Besides, many methods discard known binding sites while building the model. Moreover, the impact of Information Content (IC and the positional dependence of nucleotides within an aligned set of TFBS has not been well researched for modeling variable-length binding sites. In this paper, we propose ML-Consensus (Mixed-Length Consensus: a consensus model for variable-length TFBS which does not exclude any reported binding sites. Methods We consider Pairwise Score (PS as a measure of positional dependence of nucleotides within an alignment of TFBS. We investigate how the prediction accuracy of ML-Consensus is affected by the incorporation of IC and PS with a particular binding site alignment strategy. We perform cross-validations for datasets of six species from the TRANSFAC public database, and analyze the results using ROC curves and the Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-ranks test. Results We observe that the incorporation of IC and PS in ML-Consensus results in statistically significant improvement in the prediction accuracy of the model. Moreover, the existence of a core region among the known binding sites (of any length is witnessed by the pairwise coexistence of nucleotides within the core length. Conclusions These observations suggest the possibility of an efficient multiple sequence alignment algorithm for aligning TFBS, accommodating known binding sites of any length, for optimal (or near-optimal TFBS prediction. However, designing such an algorithm is a matter of further investigation.

  11. Sequence2Vec: A novel embedding approach for modeling transcription factor binding affinity landscape

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Hanjun

    2017-07-26

    Motivation: An accurate characterization of transcription factor (TF)-DNA affinity landscape is crucial to a quantitative understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning endogenous gene regulation. While recent advances in biotechnology have brought the opportunity for building binding affinity prediction methods, the accurate characterization of TF-DNA binding affinity landscape still remains a challenging problem. Results: Here we propose a novel sequence embedding approach for modeling the transcription factor binding affinity landscape. Our method represents DNA binding sequences as a hidden Markov model (HMM) which captures both position specific information and long-range dependency in the sequence. A cornerstone of our method is a novel message passing-like embedding algorithm, called Sequence2Vec, which maps these HMMs into a common nonlinear feature space and uses these embedded features to build a predictive model. Our method is a novel combination of the strength of probabilistic graphical models, feature space embedding and deep learning. We conducted comprehensive experiments on over 90 large-scale TF-DNA data sets which were measured by different high-throughput experimental technologies. Sequence2Vec outperforms alternative machine learning methods as well as the state-of-the-art binding affinity prediction methods.

  12. Sequence2Vec: a novel embedding approach for modeling transcription factor binding affinity landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hanjun; Umarov, Ramzan; Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Li, Yu; Song, Le; Gao, Xin

    2017-11-15

    An accurate characterization of transcription factor (TF)-DNA affinity landscape is crucial to a quantitative understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning endogenous gene regulation. While recent advances in biotechnology have brought the opportunity for building binding affinity prediction methods, the accurate characterization of TF-DNA binding affinity landscape still remains a challenging problem. Here we propose a novel sequence embedding approach for modeling the transcription factor binding affinity landscape. Our method represents DNA binding sequences as a hidden Markov model which captures both position specific information and long-range dependency in the sequence. A cornerstone of our method is a novel message passing-like embedding algorithm, called Sequence2Vec, which maps these hidden Markov models into a common nonlinear feature space and uses these embedded features to build a predictive model. Our method is a novel combination of the strength of probabilistic graphical models, feature space embedding and deep learning. We conducted comprehensive experiments on over 90 large-scale TF-DNA datasets which were measured by different high-throughput experimental technologies. Sequence2Vec outperforms alternative machine learning methods as well as the state-of-the-art binding affinity prediction methods. Our program is freely available at https://github.com/ramzan1990/sequence2vec. xin.gao@kaust.edu.sa or lsong@cc.gatech.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. [Role of implantation-related factors, stathmin and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 in reproductive endocrinology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogo, Hiroshi; Yoshie, Mikihiro; Kutsukake, Masahiko; Tamura, Kazuhiro

    2008-04-01

    Successful implantation and placentation require that trophoblasts adhere to the uterine epithelium and penetrate the decidualized endometrium. However, the biochemical mechanisms of the establishment of pregnancy including these phenomena have not yet to be definitively elucidated. We have found that stathmin, a cytosolic phosphoprotein that regulates microtubule dynamics, and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-related protein 1 (IGFBP-rP1, now called IGF-binding protein 7) were highly expressed in the endometrium around the time of implantation and decidualization. In this article, we review our recent findings of the research regarding the functions of these implantation-associated proteins in endocrine physiology and pharmacology. Analysis of the expression of both factors in rodent and human uterus has revealed that both factors are crucial for the process of endometrial stromal cell differentiation.

  14. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 delays replicative senescence of human fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micutkova, Lucia; Diener, Thomas; Li, Chen

    2011-01-01

    extracellular proteins with significantly different abundance in conditioned media from young and senescent fibroblasts. Among these was insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 (IGFBP-6), which was chosen for further analysis. When IGFBP-6 gene expression was downregulated, cell proliferation was inhibited...... and apoptotic cell death was increased. Furthermore, downregulation of IGFBP-6 led to premature entry into cellular senescence. Since IGFBP-6 overexpression increased cellular lifespan, the data suggest that IGFBP-6, in contrast to other IGF binding proteins, is a negative regulator of cellular senescence...

  15. A Common Structural Motif in the Binding of Virulence Factors to Bacterial Secretion Chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilic,M.; Vujanac, M.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella invasion protein A (SipA) is translocated into host cells by a type III secretion system (T3SS) and comprises two regions: one domain binds its cognate type III secretion chaperone, InvB, in the bacterium to facilitate translocation, while a second domain functions in the host cell, contributing to bacterial uptake by polymerizing actin. We present here the crystal structures of the SipA chaperone binding domain (CBD) alone and in complex with InvB. The SipA CBD is found to consist of a nonglobular polypeptide as well as a large globular domain, both of which are necessary for binding to InvB. We also identify a structural motif that may direct virulence factors to their cognate chaperones in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria. Disruption of this structural motif leads to a destabilization of several chaperone-substrate complexes from different species, as well as an impairment of secretion in Salmonella.

  16. Identification and Structural Basis of Binding to Host Lung Glycogen by Streptococcal Virulence Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammerts van Bueren,A.; Higgins, M.; Wang, D.; Burke, R.; Boraston, A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to recognize host glycans is often essential to their virulence. Here we report structure-function studies of previously uncharacterized glycogen-binding modules in the surface-anchored pullulanases from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpuA) and Streptococcus pyogenes (PulA). Multivalent binding to glycogen leads to a strong interaction with alveolar type II cells in mouse lung tissue. X-ray crystal structures of the binding modules reveal a novel fusion of tandem modules into single, bivalent functional domains. In addition to indicating a structural basis for multivalent attachment, the structure of the SpuA modules in complex with carbohydrate provides insight into the molecular basis for glycogen specificity. This report provides the first evidence that intracellular lung glycogen may be a novel target of pathogenic streptococci and thus provides a rationale for the identification of the streptococcal {alpha}-glucan-metabolizing machinery as virulence factors.

  17. ADAM 12, a disintegrin metalloprotease, interacts with insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Z; Xu, Wei; Loechel, F

    2000-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 binds the insulin-like growth factors with high affinity and modulates their actions. Proteolytic cleavage of IGFBP-3 may regulate insulin-like growth factor bioavailability. IGFBP-3 is extensively degraded in serum during pregnancy; however......, as yet the pregnancy-specific protease, or proteases, have not been identified. We utilized a yeast two-hybrid assay and a human placental cDNA library to investigate IGFBP-3-interacting proteins. A disintegrin and metalloprotease-12 (ADAM 12), a member of a family of metalloprotease disintegrins...... protein. To verify the interaction between ADAM 12 and IGFBP-3, an expression construct containing an ADAM 12-S cDNA was transfected into COS-1 cells. Co-precipitation was observed when conditioned medium was analyzed by immunoprecipitation with an antibody against either ADAM 12 or IGFBP-3 followed...

  18. Cycle modulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 in human endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corleta H.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrium is one of the fastest growing human tissues. Sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone, in interaction with several growth factors, control its growth and differentiation. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 interacts with cell surface receptors and also with specific soluble binding proteins. IGF-binding proteins (IGF-BP have been shown to modulate IGF-1 action. Of six known isoforms, IGF-BP-1 has been characterized as a marker produced by endometrial stromal cells in the late secretory phase and in the decidua. In the current study, IGF-1-BP concentration and affinity in the proliferative and secretory phase of the menstrual cycle were measured. Endometrial samples were from patients of reproductive age with regular menstrual cycles and taking no steroid hormones. Cytosolic fractions were prepared and binding of 125I-labeled IGF-1 performed. Cross-linking reaction products were analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (7.5% followed by autoradiography. 125I-IGF-1 affinity to cytosolic proteins was not statistically different between the proliferative and secretory endometrium. An approximately 35-kDa binding protein was identified when 125I-IGF-1 was cross-linked to cytosol proteins. Secretory endometrium had significantly more IGF-1-BP when compared to proliferative endometrium. The specificity of the cross-linking process was evaluated by the addition of 100 nM unlabeled IGF-1 or insulin. Unlabeled IGF-1 totally abolished the radioactivity from the band, indicating specific binding. Insulin had no apparent effect on the intensity of the labeled band. These results suggest that IGF-BP could modulate the action of IGF-1 throughout the menstrual cycle. It would be interesting to study this binding protein in other pathologic conditions of the endometrium such as adenocarcinomas and hyperplasia.

  19. Molecular determinants of epidermal growth factor binding: a molecular dynamics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Sanders

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that plays a role in multiple cellular processes. Activation of EGFR requires binding of a ligand on the extracellular domain to promote conformational changes leading to dimerization and transphosphorylation of intracellular kinase domains. Seven ligands are known to bind EGFR with affinities ranging from sub-nanomolar to near micromolar dissociation constants. In the case of EGFR, distinct conformational states assumed upon binding a ligand is thought to be a determining factor in activation of a downstream signaling network. Previous biochemical studies suggest the existence of both low affinity and high affinity EGFR ligands. While these studies have identified functional effects of ligand binding, high-resolution structural data are lacking. To gain a better understanding of the molecular basis of EGFR binding affinities, we docked each EGFR ligand to the putative active state extracellular domain dimer and 25.0 ns molecular dynamics simulations were performed. MM-PBSA/GBSA are efficient computational approaches to approximate free energies of protein-protein interactions and decompose the free energy at the amino acid level. We applied these methods to the last 6.0 ns of each ligand-receptor simulation. MM-PBSA calculations were able to successfully rank all seven of the EGFR ligands based on the two affinity classes: EGF>HB-EGF>TGF-α>BTC>EPR>EPG>AR. Results from energy decomposition identified several interactions that are common among binding ligands. These findings reveal that while several residues are conserved among the EGFR ligand family, no single set of residues determines the affinity class. Instead we found heterogeneous sets of interactions that were driven primarily by electrostatic and Van der Waals forces. These results not only illustrate the complexity of EGFR dynamics but also pave the way for structure-based design of

  20. Transforming growth factor beta stimulation of biglycan gene expression is potentially mediated by sp1 binding factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Anne-Marie; Xie, Zhongjian; Young, Marian Frances

    2004-01-01

    Biglycan is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan which is localized in the extracellular matrix of bone and other specialized connective tissues. Both biglycan mRNA and protein are up-regulated by transforming growth factor-beta(1) (TGF-beta(1)) and biglycan appears to influence TGF-beta(1) activity...... promoter upstream from the transcriptional start site, which contained several binding sites for the transcription factor Sp1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with nuclear extracts from MG-63 cells showed binding of both Sp1 and Sp3 to a site at -216 to -208. When the biglycan promoter construct....... In this study, we have investigated the mechanism by which TGF-beta(1), TGF-beta(2) and TGF-beta(3) stimulate biglycan mRNA expression in the osteoblastic cell line MG-63. The cells were transfected with a series of deletional human biglycan promoter constructs and a region in the biglycan 5' DNA was found...

  1. N1421K mutation in the glycoprotein Ib binding domain impairs ristocetin- and botrocetin-mediated binding of von Willebrand factor to platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanke, E.; Kristoffersson, A.C.; Isaksson, C.

    2008-01-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD) is a common inheritable bleeding disorder caused by deficiency of von Willebrand Factor (VWF), which is involved in platelet adhesion and aggregation. We report a family consisting of three patients with VWD characterized by an apparently normal multimeric pattern......-mediated binding of plasma VWF to GPIb were reduced in the patients. In vitro mutagenesis and expression in COS-7 cells confirmed the impairment of the mutant in botrocetin- and ristocetin-mediated VWF binding to GPIb. VWF collagen binding capacity was unaffected in plasma from the heterozygous individuals as well...

  2. N1421K mutation in the glycoprotein Ib binding domain impairs ristocetin- and botrocetin-mediated binding of von Willebrand factor to platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanke, E.; Kristoffersson, A.C.; Isaksson, C.

    2008-01-01

    , moderately decreased plasma factor VIII (FVIII) and VWF levels, and disproportionately low-plasma VWF:RCo levels. The patients were found to be heterozygous for the novel N1421K mutation, caused by a 4263C > G transversion in exon 28 of the VWF gene coding for the A1 domain. Botrocetin- and ristocetin-mediated...... binding of plasma VWF to GPIb were reduced in the patients. In vitro mutagenesis and expression in COS-7 cells confirmed the impairment of the mutant in botrocetin- and ristocetin-mediated VWF binding to GPIb. VWF collagen binding capacity was unaffected in plasma from the heterozygous individuals as well...

  3. Characterization of a Calmodulin-binding Transcription Factor from Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangpeng Leng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA is a calmodulin-binding transcription factor that has a broad range of functions from sensory mechanisms to regulating many growth and developmental processes. In this study, we isolated four strawberry ( genes using HMMER and BLAST analysis. The chromosome scaffold locations of these genes in the strawberry genome were determined and the protein domain and motif organization [CG-1, transcription factor immunoglobulin, ankyrin (ANK repeats, calmodulin-binding IQ motif of FaCAMTAs were also assessed. All FaCAMTAs were predicted to be Ca- and calmodulin-binding proteins. The expression profiles of genes were measured in different tissues and revealed distinct gene expression patterns under heat, cold, and salt stress. These data not only contribute to a better understanding of the complex regulation of the gene family but also provide evidence supporting the role of in multiple signaling pathways involved in stress responses. This investigation can provide useful information for further study.

  4. Altered [125I]epidermal growth factor binding and receptor distribution in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanney, L.B.; Stoscheck, C.M.; Magid, M.; King, L.E. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Stimulation of growth and differentiation of human epidermis by epidermal growth factor (EGF) is mediated by its binding to specific receptors. Whether EGF receptors primarily mediate cell division or differentiation in hyperproliferative disease such as psoriasis vulgaris is unclear. To study the pathogenesis of psoriasis, 4-mm2 punch biopsy specimens of normal, uninvolved, and involved psoriatic skin were assayed for EGF receptors by autoradiographic, immunohistochemical, and biochemical methods. Using autoradiographic and immunohistochemical methods, basal keratinocytes were found to contain the greatest number of EGF binding sites and immunoreactive receptors as compared to the upper layers of the epidermis in both normal epidermis and psoriatic skin. No EGF receptor differences between normal and psoriatic epidermis were observed in this layer. In the upper layers of the epidermis, a 2-fold increase in EGF binding capacity was observed in psoriatic skin as compared with normal thin or thick skin. Biochemical methods indicated that [ 125 I]EGF binding was increased in psoriatic epidermis as compared with similar thickness normal epidermis when measured on a protein basis. Epidermal growth factor was shown to increase phosphorylation of the EGF receptor in skin. EGF receptors retained in the nonmitotic stratum spinosum and parakeratotic stratum corneum may reflect the incomplete, abnormal differentiation that occurs in active psoriatic lesions. Alternatively, retained EGF receptors may play a direct role in inhibiting cellular differentiation in the suprabasal layers

  5. Detection of growth factor binding to gelatin and heparin using a photonic crystal optical biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Abby W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Chan, Leo L., E-mail: lylchan@hotmail.com [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Nexcelom Bioscience, Lawrence, MA 01843 (United States); Sendemir-Urkmez, Aylin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Cunningham, Brian T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Jamison, Russell D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); School of Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Drug-carrier interactions are important to protein controlled release systems to protect the protein from denaturation and ensure properly timed release. A novel photonic crystal biosensor was used to investigate a gelatin-protein controlled release system to determine the amount of protein bound to the carrier at physiological conditions. The Biomolecular Interaction Detection (BIND) system reflects a narrow band of wavelengths when white light is shone incident to the grating. As mass is deposited onto the surface, the peak wavelength value is shifted due to changes in the optical density of the biosensor. The BIND system was used to detect the binding of growth factors onto acidic gelatin, basic gelatin, and heparin on the sensor surface. Through a series of experiments, including functionalizing the sensor, adjusting the ionic strength of the solution, adjusting the substrate concentration, and minimizing non-specific signal, the adsorption of the gelatins and heparin on the sensor was enhanced. The binding interaction of recombinant human transforming growth factor (rhTGF)-{beta}1 and bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP)-2 with the two types of gelatin and heparin were investigated. The strength of the interaction between rhTGF-{beta}1 and the substrates is in the following order: heparin > acidic gelatin > basic gelatin. RhBMP-2 bound to the substrates but with less intensity than TGF-{beta}1: heparin > basic gelatin > acidic gelatin. This work provides support for the controlled release mechanism through degradation of the gelatin carrier.

  6. Binding of complement factor H to PorB3 and NspA enhances resistance of Neisseria meningitidis to anti-factor H binding protein bactericidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Pajon, Rolando; Ram, Sanjay; Granoff, Dan M

    2015-04-01

    Among 25 serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis clinical isolates, we identified four (16%) with high factor H binding protein (FHbp) expression that were resistant to complement-mediated bactericidal activity of sera from mice immunized with recombinant FHbp vaccines. Two of the four isolates had evidence of human FH-dependent complement downregulation independent of FHbp. Since alternative complement pathway recruitment is critical for anti-FHbp bactericidal activity, we hypothesized that in these two isolates binding of FH to ligands other than FHbp contributes to anti-FHbp bactericidal resistance. Knocking out NspA, a known meningococcal FH ligand, converted both resistant isolates to anti-FHbp susceptible isolates. The addition of a nonbactericidal anti-NspA monoclonal antibody to the bactericidal reaction also increased anti-FHbp bactericidal activity. To identify a role for FH ligands other than NspA or FHbp in resistance, we created double NspA/FHbp knockout mutants. Mutants from both resistant isolates bound 10-fold more recombinant human FH domains 6 and 7 fused to Fc than double knockout mutants prepared from two sensitive meningococcal isolates. In light of recent studies showing functional FH-PorB2 interactions, we hypothesized that PorB3 from the resistant isolates recruited FH. Allelic exchange of porB3 from a resistant isolate to a sensitive isolate increased resistance of the sensitive isolate to anti-FHbp bactericidal activity (and vice versa). Thus, some PorB3 variants functionally bind human FH, which in the presence of NspA enhances anti-FHbp resistance. Combining anti-NspA antibodies with anti-FHbp antibodies can overcome resistance. Meningococcal vaccines that target both NspA and FHbp are likely to confer greater protection than either antigen alone. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Effect of glycoPEGylation on factor VIIa binding and internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, P; Ghosh, S; Ezban, M; Pendurthi, U R; Vijaya Mohan Rao, L

    2010-03-01

    Recombinant coagulation factor VIIa (rFVIIa), which is widely used for treatment of bleeding episodes in haemophilia patients with inhibitors, is cleared from the circulation relatively fast with a plasma half-life of 2-4 h. PEGylation is an established and clinically proven strategy for prolonging the circulatory life-time of bio-therapeutic proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of glycoPEGylation of rFVIIa on rFVIIa binding to its cellular receptors and its subsequent internalization. rFVIIa and glycoPEGylated rFVIIa were labeled with (125)I and the radio-iodinated proteins were used to monitor rFVIIa binding and uptake in endothelial cells and fibroblasts. FVIIa-TF activity at the cell surface was analyzed by a factor X activation assay. Modification of rFVIIa with PEG impaired rFVIIa binding to both endothelial cell protein C receptor and tissue factor (TF) on cell surfaces. The internalization of PEGylated rFVIIa in endothelial cells and fibroblasts was markedly lower compared to the internalization of rFVIIa in these cells. PEGylated rFVIIa was able to activate factor X on TF expressing cell surfaces at a rate similar to that of unmodified rFVIIa when the cells were not subjected to multiple washings to remove the free ligand. General effects such as steric hindrance or changes in electrostatic binding properties of the modified rFVIIa to its receptors are probably responsible for this impairment rather than a loss of specific recognition of the receptors, which could explain near normal activation of factor X by glycoPEGylated rFVIIa on TF expressing cells while its uptake is reduced.

  8. Mapping Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu residues involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Ove; Andersen, C; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde

    1996-01-01

    Two residues of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA were identified and subjected to mutational analysis. Lys-89 and Asn-90 were each replaced by either Ala or Glu. The four single mutants were denoted K89A, K89E, N90A, and N90E, respectively. The mutants......-tRNA, which suggested an important role of Lys-89 and Asn-90 in tRNA binding. Furthermore, our results indicate helix B to be an important target site for nucleotide exchange factor EF-Ts. Also the mutants His-66 to Ala and His-118 to either Ala or Glu were characterized in an in vitro translation assay...

  9. The relationship between transcription initiation RNAs and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taft Ryan J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription initiation RNAs (tiRNAs are nuclear localized 18 nucleotide RNAs derived from sequences immediately downstream of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII transcription start sites. Previous reports have shown that tiRNAs are intimately correlated with gene expression, RNA polymerase II binding and behaviors, and epigenetic marks associated with transcription initiation, but not elongation. Results In the present work, we show that tiRNAs are commonly found at genomic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF binding sites in human and mouse, and that CTCF sites that colocalize with RNAPII are highly enriched for tiRNAs. To directly investigate the relationship between tiRNAs and CTCF we examined tiRNAs originating near the intronic CTCF binding site in the human tumor suppressor gene, p21 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A gene, also known as CDKN1A. Inhibition of CTCF-proximal tiRNAs resulted in increased CTCF localization and increased p21 expression, while overexpression of CTCF-proximal tiRNA mimics decreased CTCF localization and p21 expression. We also found that tiRNA-regulated CTCF binding influences the levels of trimethylated H3K27 at the alternate upstream p21 promoter, and affects the levels of alternate p21 (p21alt transcripts. Extending these studies to another randomly selected locus with conserved CTCF binding we found that depletion of tiRNA alters nucleosome density proximal to sites of tiRNA biogenesis. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that tiRNAs modulate local epigenetic structure, which in turn regulates CTCF localization.

  10. Insulin-Insulin-like Growth Factors Hybrids as Molecular Probes of Hormone:Receptor Binding Specificity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížková, Květoslava; Chrudinová, Martina; Povalová, Anna; Selicharová, Irena; Collinsová, Michaela; Vaněk, Václav; Brzozowski, A. M.; Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 21 (2016), s. 2903-2913 ISSN 0006-2960 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19018S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : alanine scanning mutagenesis * high-affinity binding * type 1 IGF receptor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.938, year: 2016 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/acs.biochem.6b00140

  11. Small yet effective: The Ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated Amphiphilic Repression (EAR) motif

    OpenAIRE

    Kagale, Sateesh; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The Ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated Amphiphilic Repression (EAR) motif is a small yet distinct regulatory motif that is conserved in many plant transcriptional regulator (TR) proteins associated with diverse biological functions. We have previously established a list of high-confidence Arabidopsis EAR repressors, the EAR repressome, comprising 219 TRs belonging to 21 different TR families. This class of proteins and the sequence context of the EAR motif exhibited a high ...

  12. The dyad palindromic glutathione transferase P enhancer binds multiple factors including AP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diccianni, M B; Imagawa, M; Muramatsu, M

    1992-10-11

    Glutathione Transferase P (GST-P) gene expression is dominantly regulated by an upstream enhancer (GPEI) consisting of a dyad of palindromically oriented imperfect TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate)-responsive elements (TRE). GPEI is active in AP1-lacking F9 cells as well in AP1-containing HeLa cells. Despite GPEI's similarity to a TRE, c-jun co-transfection has only a minimal effect on transactivation. Antisense c-jun and c-fos co-transfection experiments further demonstrate the lack of a role for AP1 in GPEI mediated trans-activation in F9 cells, although endogenously present AP1 can influence GPEI in HeLa cells. Co-transfection of delta fosB with c-jun, which forms an inactive c-Jun/delta FosB heterodimer that binds TRE sequences, inhibits GPEI-mediated transcription in AP1-lacking F9 cells as well as AP1-containing HeLa cells. These data suggest novel factor(s) other than AP1 are influencing GPEI. Binding studies reveal multiple nucleoproteins bind to GPEI. These factors are likely responsible for the high level of GPEI-mediated transcription observed in the absence of AP1 and during hepatocarcinogenesis.

  13. Sperm and Spermatids Contain Different Proteins and Bind Distinct Egg Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Teperek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spermatozoa are more efficient at supporting normal embryonic development than spermatids, their immature, immediate precursors. This suggests that the sperm acquires the ability to support embryonic development during spermiogenesis (spermatid to sperm maturation. Here, using Xenopus laevis as a model organism, we performed 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially expressed proteins between sperm and spermatids in order to identify factors that could be responsible for the efficiency of the sperm to support embryonic development. Furthermore, benefiting from the availability of egg extracts in Xenopus, we also tested whether the chromatin of sperm could attract different egg factors compared to the chromatin of spermatids. Our analysis identified: (1 several proteins which were present exclusively in sperm; but not in spermatid nuclei and (2 numerous egg proteins binding to the sperm (but not to the spermatid chromatin after incubation in egg extracts. Amongst these factors we identified many chromatin-associated proteins and transcriptional repressors. Presence of transcriptional repressors binding specifically to sperm chromatin could suggest its preparation for the early embryonic cell cycles, during which no transcription is observed and suggests that sperm chromatin has a unique protein composition, which facilitates the recruitment of egg chromatin remodelling factors. It is therefore likely that the acquisition of these sperm-specific factors during spermiogenesis makes the sperm chromatin suitable to interact with the maternal factors and, as a consequence, to support efficient embryonic development.

  14. Insights into structural and functional diversity of Dof (DNA binding with one finger) transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Malviya, N; Kushwaha, H; Nasim, J; Bisht, N C; Singh, V K; Yadav, D

    2015-03-01

    The structural, functional and in-silico studies of Dof transcription factor attempted so far reveals immense opportunity to analyze the plant genomes in terms of number of Dof genes and discuss in light of the evolution. The multiple functions of Dof genes needs to explored for crop improvement. Transcription factors play a very vital role in gene regulation at transcriptional level and are being extensively studied across phylas. In recent years, sequencing of plant genomes has led to genome-wide identification and characterizations of diverse types of plant-specific transcription factor gene family providing key insights into their structural and functional diversity. The DNA binding with one finger (Dof), a class belonging to C2H2-type zinc finger family proteins, is a plant-specific transcription factor having multiple roles such as seed maturation and germination, phytohormone and light-mediated regulation and plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Dof proteins are present across plant lineage, from green algae to higher angiosperm, and represent a unique class of transcription factor having bifunctional binding activities, with both DNA and proteins, to regulate the complex transcriptional machinery in plant cells. The structural and functional diversity of the Dof transcription factor family along with the bioinformatics analysis highlighting the phylogeny of Dof families is reviewed in light of its importance in plant biotechnology for crop improvement.

  15. Number of active transcription factor binding sites is essential for the Hes7 oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Angelis Martin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is commonly accepted that embryonic segmentation of vertebrates is regulated by a segmentation clock, which is induced by the cycling genes Hes1 and Hes7. Their products form dimers that bind to the regulatory regions and thereby repress the transcription of their own encoding genes. An increase of the half-life of Hes7 protein causes irregular somite formation. This was shown in recent experiments by Hirata et al. In the same work, numerical simulations from a delay differential equations model, originally invented by Lewis, gave additional support. For a longer half-life of the Hes7 protein, these simulations exhibited strongly damped oscillations with, after few periods, severely attenuated the amplitudes. In these simulations, the Hill coefficient, a crucial model parameter, was set to 2 indicating that Hes7 has only one binding site in its promoter. On the other hand, Bessho et al. established three regulatory elements in the promoter region. Results We show that – with the same half life – the delay system is highly sensitive to changes in the Hill coefficient. A small increase changes the qualitative behaviour of the solutions drastically. There is sustained oscillation and hence the model can no longer explain the disruption of the segmentation clock. On the other hand, the Hill coefficient is correlated with the number of active binding sites, and with the way in which dimers bind to them. In this paper, we adopt response functions in order to estimate Hill coefficients for a variable number of active binding sites. It turns out that three active transcription factor binding sites increase the Hill coefficient by at least 20% as compared to one single active site. Conclusion Our findings lead to the following crucial dichotomy: either Hirata's model is correct for the Hes7 oscillator, in which case at most two binding sites are active in its promoter region; or at least three binding sites are active, in which

  16. Dictyostelium cells bind a secreted autocrine factor that represses cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Jonathan E

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dictyostelium cells secrete the proteins AprA and CfaD. Cells lacking either AprA or CfaD proliferate faster than wild type, while AprA or CfaD overexpressor cells proliferate slowly, indicating that AprA and CfaD are autocrine factors that repress proliferation. CfaD interacts with AprA and requires the presence of AprA to slow proliferation. To determine if CfaD is necessary for the ability of AprA to slow proliferation, whether AprA binds to cells, and if so whether the binding requires the presence of CfaD, we examined the binding and effect on proliferation of recombinant AprA. Results We find that the extracellular accumulation of AprA increases with cell density and reaches a concentration of 0.3 μg/ml near a stationary cell density. When added to wild-type or aprA- cells, recombinant AprA (rAprA significantly slows proliferation at 0.1 μg/ml and higher concentrations. From 4 to 64 μg/ml, the effect of rAprA is at a plateau, slowing but not stopping proliferation. The proliferation-inhibiting activity of rAprA is roughly the same as that of native AprA in conditioned growth medium. Proliferating aprA- cells show saturable binding of rAprA to 92,000 ± 11,000 cell-surface receptors with a KD of 0.03 ± 0.02 μg/ml. There appears to be one class of binding site, and no apparent cooperativity. Native AprA inhibits the binding of rAprA to aprA- cells with a Ki of 0.03 μg/ml, suggesting that the binding kinetics of rAprA are similar to those of native AprA. The proliferation of cells lacking CrlA, a cAMP receptor-like protein, or cells lacking CfaD are not affected by rAprA. Surprisingly, both cell types still bind rAprA. Conclusion Together, the data suggest that AprA functions as an autocrine proliferation-inhibiting factor by binding to cell surface receptors. Although AprA requires CfaD for activity, it does not require CfaD to bind to cells, suggesting the possibility that cells have an AprA receptor and a Cfa

  17. Dictyostelium cells bind a secreted autocrine factor that represses cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jonathan M; Bakthavatsalam, Deenadayalan; Phillips, Jonathan E; Gomer, Richard H

    2009-02-02

    Dictyostelium cells secrete the proteins AprA and CfaD. Cells lacking either AprA or CfaD proliferate faster than wild type, while AprA or CfaD overexpressor cells proliferate slowly, indicating that AprA and CfaD are autocrine factors that repress proliferation. CfaD interacts with AprA and requires the presence of AprA to slow proliferation. To determine if CfaD is necessary for the ability of AprA to slow proliferation, whether AprA binds to cells, and if so whether the binding requires the presence of CfaD, we examined the binding and effect on proliferation of recombinant AprA. We find that the extracellular accumulation of AprA increases with cell density and reaches a concentration of 0.3 microg/ml near a stationary cell density. When added to wild-type or aprA- cells, recombinant AprA (rAprA) significantly slows proliferation at 0.1 microg/ml and higher concentrations. From 4 to 64 microg/ml, the effect of rAprA is at a plateau, slowing but not stopping proliferation. The proliferation-inhibiting activity of rAprA is roughly the same as that of native AprA in conditioned growth medium. Proliferating aprA- cells show saturable binding of rAprA to 92,000 +/- 11,000 cell-surface receptors with a KD of 0.03 +/- 0.02 microg/ml. There appears to be one class of binding site, and no apparent cooperativity. Native AprA inhibits the binding of rAprA to aprA- cells with a Ki of 0.03 mug/ml, suggesting that the binding kinetics of rAprA are similar to those of native AprA. The proliferation of cells lacking CrlA, a cAMP receptor-like protein, or cells lacking CfaD are not affected by rAprA. Surprisingly, both cell types still bind rAprA. Together, the data suggest that AprA functions as an autocrine proliferation-inhibiting factor by binding to cell surface receptors. Although AprA requires CfaD for activity, it does not require CfaD to bind to cells, suggesting the possibility that cells have an AprA receptor and a CfaD receptor, and activation of both receptors is

  18. MeDReaders: a database for transcription factors that bind to methylated DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guohua; Luo, Ximei; Wang, Jianan; Wan, Jun; Xia, Shuli; Zhu, Heng; Qian, Jiang; Wang, Yadong

    2018-01-04

    Understanding the molecular principles governing interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and DNA targets is one of the main subjects for transcriptional regulation. Recently, emerging evidence demonstrated that some TFs could bind to DNA motifs containing highly methylated CpGs both in vitro and in vivo. Identification of such TFs and elucidation of their physiological roles now become an important stepping-stone toward understanding the mechanisms underlying the methylation-mediated biological processes, which have crucial implications for human disease and disease development. Hence, we constructed a database, named as MeDReaders, to collect information about methylated DNA binding activities. A total of 731 TFs, which could bind to methylated DNA sequences, were manually curated in human and mouse studies reported in the literature. In silico approaches were applied to predict methylated and unmethylated motifs of 292 TFs by integrating whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) and ChIP-Seq datasets in six human cell lines and one mouse cell line extracted from ENCODE and GEO database. MeDReaders database will provide a comprehensive resource for further studies and aid related experiment designs. The database implemented unified access for users to most TFs involved in such methylation-associated binding actives. The website is available at http://medreader.org/. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. A Parzen window-based approach for the detection of locally enriched transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbon, Alexis; Kumagai, Yutaro; Teraguchi, Shunsuke; Amada, Karlou Mar; Akira, Shizuo; Standley, Daron M

    2013-01-21

    Identification of cis- and trans-acting factors regulating gene expression remains an important problem in biology. Bioinformatics analyses of regulatory regions are hampered by several difficulties. One is that binding sites for regulatory proteins are often not significantly over-represented in the set of DNA sequences of interest, because of high levels of false positive predictions, and because of positional restrictions on functional binding sites with regard to the transcription start site. We have developed a novel method for the detection of regulatory motifs based on their local over-representation in sets of regulatory regions. The method makes use of a Parzen window-based approach for scoring local enrichment, and during evaluation of significance it takes into account GC content of sequences. We show that the accuracy of our method compares favourably to that of other methods, and that our method is capable of detecting not only generally over-represented regulatory motifs, but also locally over-represented motifs that are often missed by standard motif detection approaches. Using a number of examples we illustrate the validity of our approach and suggest applications, such as the analysis of weaker binding sites. Our approach can be used to suggest testable hypotheses for wet-lab experiments. It has potential for future analyses, such as the prediction of weaker binding sites. An online application of our approach, called LocaMo Finder (Local Motif Finder), is available at http://sysimm.ifrec.osaka-u.ac.jp/tfbs/locamo/.

  20. Changes at the nuclear lamina alter binding of pioneer factor Foxa2 in aged liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Holly; Singh, Larry N; Patrick, Marissa A; Price, Andrew J; Osorio, Fernando G; López-Otín, Carlos; Bochkis, Irina M

    2018-02-27

    Increasing evidence suggests that regulation of heterochromatin at the nuclear envelope underlies metabolic disease susceptibility and age-dependent metabolic changes, but the mechanism is unknown. Here, we profile lamina-associated domains (LADs) using lamin B1 ChIP-Seq in young and old hepatocytes and find that, although lamin B1 resides at a large fraction of domains at both ages, a third of lamin B1-associated regions are bound exclusively at each age in vivo. Regions occupied by lamin B1 solely in young livers are enriched for the forkhead motif, bound by Foxa pioneer factors. We also show that Foxa2 binds more sites in Zmpste24 mutant mice, a progeroid laminopathy model, similar to increased Foxa2 occupancy in old livers. Aged and Zmpste24-deficient livers share several features, including nuclear lamina abnormalities, increased Foxa2 binding, de-repression of PPAR- and LXR-dependent gene expression, and fatty liver. In old livers, additional Foxa2 binding is correlated to loss of lamin B1 and heterochromatin (H3K9me3 occupancy) at these loci. Our observations suggest that changes at the nuclear lamina are linked to altered Foxa2 binding, enabling opening of chromatin and de-repression of genes encoding lipid synthesis and storage targets that contribute to etiology of hepatic steatosis. © 2018 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Generation of a synthetic mammalian promoter library by modification of sequences spacing transcription factor binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Jens; Kusk, P.; Johansen, T.E.

    2002-01-01

    promoters. The JeT promoter was made by separating the included consensus boxes by the same distances in base pairs as found in the wild-type promoters, thus preserving transcription factor interaction. The resulting promoter was shown to drive reporter expression to high levels in enhanced green...... fluorescent protein and secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter assays. By replacing sequences separating the transcription factor binding sites with randomized sequences of the same length, sets of new promoters with different strengths, spanning a 10-fold range of transcriptional activity in cell culture...

  2. Storage of factor VIII variants with impaired von Willebrand factor binding in Weibel-Palade bodies in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartje van den Biggelaar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Point mutations resulting in reduced factor VIII (FVIII binding to von Willebrand factor (VWF are an important cause of mild/moderate hemophilia A. Treatment includes desmopressin infusion, which concomitantly increases VWF and FVIII plasma levels, apparently from storage pools containing both proteins. The source of these VWF/FVIII co-storage pools and the mechanism of granule biogenesis are not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied intracellular trafficking of FVIII variants implicated in mild/moderate hemophilia A together with VWF in HEK293 cells and primary endothelial cells. The role of VWF binding was addressed using FVIII variants displaying reduced VWF interaction. Binding studies using purified FVIII proteins revealed moderate (Arg2150His, Del2201, Pro2300Ser to severe (Tyr1680Phe, Ser2119Tyr VWF binding defects. Expression studies in HEK293 cells and primary endothelial cells revealed that all FVIII variants were present within VWF-containing organelles. Quantitative studies showed that the relative amount of FVIII storage was independent of various mutations. Substantial amounts of FVIII variants are co-stored in VWF-containing storage organelles, presumably by virtue of their ability to interact with VWF at low pH. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that the potential of FVIII co-storage with VWF is not affected in mild/moderate hemophilia A caused by reduced FVIII/VWF interaction in the circulation. These data support the hypothesis that Weibel-Palade bodies comprise the desmopressin-releasable FVIII storage pool in vivo.

  3. Occupancy classification of position weight matrix-inferred transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hollis Wright

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Computational prediction of Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBS from sequence data alone is difficult and error-prone. Machine learning techniques utilizing additional environmental information about a predicted binding site (such as distances from the site to particular chromatin features to determine its occupancy/functionality class show promise as methods to achieve more accurate prediction of true TFBS in silico. We evaluate the Bayesian Network (BN and Support Vector Machine (SVM machine learning techniques on four distinct TFBS data sets and analyze their performance. We describe the features that are most useful for classification and contrast and compare these feature sets between the factors. RESULTS: Our results demonstrate good performance of classifiers both on TFBS for transcription factors used for initial training and for TFBS for other factors in cross-classification experiments. We find that distances to chromatin modifications (specifically, histone modification islands as well as distances between such modifications to be effective predictors of TFBS occupancy, though the impact of individual predictors is largely TF specific. In our experiments, Bayesian network classifiers outperform SVM classifiers. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate good performance of machine learning techniques on the problem of occupancy classification, and demonstrate that effective classification can be achieved using distances to chromatin features. We additionally demonstrate that cross-classification of TFBS is possible, suggesting the possibility of constructing a generalizable occupancy classifier capable of handling TFBS for many different transcription factors.

  4. Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase PIN1 Directly Binds to and Stabilizes Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong-Jun Han

    Full Text Available Peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PIN1 regulates the functional activity of a subset of phosphoproteins through binding to phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and subsequently isomerization of the phosphorylated bonds. Interestingly, PIN1 is overexpressed in many types of malignancies including breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers. However, its oncogenic functions have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that PIN1 directly interacts with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α in human colon cancer (HCT116 cells. PIN1 binding to HIF-1α occurred in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We also found that PIN1 interacted with HIF-1α at both exogenous and endogenous levels. Notably, PIN1 binding stabilized the HIF-1α protein, given that their levels were significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. The stabilization of HIF-1α resulted in increased transcriptional activity, consequently upregulating expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, a major contributor to angiogenesis. Silencing of PIN1 or pharmacologic inhibition of its activity abrogated the angiogenesis. By utilizing a bioluminescence imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate that PIN1 inhibition dramatically reduced the tumor volume in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model and angiogenesis as well as hypoxia-induced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These results suggest that PIN1 interacting with HIF-1α is a potential cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic target.

  5. Analysis of genomic sequence motifs for deciphering transcription factor binding and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina eBoeva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation.

  6. Biophysical Models of Evolution: Application to Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhart, Michael; Haldane, Allan; Morozov, Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    There has been growing interest in understanding the physical driving forces of evolution at the molecular scale, in particular how biophysics determines the fitness landscapes that shape the evolution of DNA and proteins. To that end we study a model of molecular evolution that explicitly incorporates the underlying biophysics. Using population genetics, we derive a steady-state distribution of monomorphic populations evolving on an arbitrary fitness landscape. Compared to previous studies, we find this result is universal for a large class of population models and fully incorporates both stochastic effects and strong natural selection. This distribution can then be used to infer the underlying fitness landscape from genomic data. This model can be applied to a variety of systems, but we focus on transcription factor binding sites, which play a crucial role in gene regulatory networks. Since these sites must be bound for successful gene regulation, we consider a simple thermodynamic model of fitness as a function of the free energy for binding a transcription factor at the site. Using empirical energy matrices and genome-wide sets of binding sites from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we use this model to infer the role of DNA-protein interaction physics in evolution.

  7. Using an ensemble of statistical metrics to quantify large sets of plant transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Parsa; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Matthews, Benjamin F

    2013-04-11

    From initial seed germination through reproduction, plants continuously reprogram their transcriptional repertoire to facilitate growth and development. This dynamic is mediated by a diverse but inextricably-linked catalog of regulatory proteins called transcription factors (TFs). Statistically quantifying TF binding site (TFBS) abundance in promoters of differentially expressed genes can be used to identify binding site patterns in promoters that are closely related to stress-response. Output from today's transcriptomic assays necessitates statistically-oriented software to handle large promoter-sequence sets in a computationally tractable fashion. We present Marina, an open-source software for identifying over-represented TFBSs from amongst large sets of promoter sequences, using an ensemble of 7 statistical metrics and binding-site profiles. Through software comparison, we show that Marina can identify considerably more over-represented plant TFBSs compared to a popular software alternative. Marina was used to identify over-represented TFBSs in a two time-point RNA-Seq study exploring the transcriptomic interplay between soybean (Glycine max) and soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi). Marina identified numerous abundant TFBSs recognized by transcription factors that are associated with defense-response such as WRKY, HY5 and MYB2. Comparing results from Marina to that of a popular software alternative suggests that regardless of the number of promoter-sequences, Marina is able to identify significantly more over-represented TFBSs.

  8. Refrigeration-Induced Binding of von Willebrand Factor Facilitates Fast Clearance of Refrigerated Platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenchun; Druzak, Samuel A; Wang, Yingchun; Josephson, Cassandra D; Hoffmeister, Karin M; Ware, Jerry; Li, Renhao

    2017-12-01

    Apheresis platelets for transfusion treatment are currently stored at room temperature because after refrigeration platelets are rapidly cleared on transfusion. In this study, the role of von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the clearance of refrigerated platelets is addressed. Human and murine platelets were refrigerated in gas-permeable bags at 4°C for 24 hours. VWF binding, platelet signaling events, and platelet post-transfusion recovery and survival were measured. After refrigeration, the binding of plasma VWF to platelets was drastically increased, confirming earlier studies. The binding was blocked by peptide OS1 that bound specifically to platelet glycoprotein (GP)Ibα and was absent in VWF - / - plasma. Although surface expression of GPIbα was reduced after refrigeration, refrigeration-induced VWF binding under physiological shear induced unfolding of the GPIbα mechanosensory domain on the platelet, as evidenced by increased exposure of a linear epitope therein. Refrigeration and shear treatment also induced small elevation of intracellular Ca 2+ , phosphatidylserine exposure, and desialylation of platelets, which were absent in VWF -/- platelets or inhibited by OS1, which is a monomeric 11-residue peptide (CTERMALHNLC). Furthermore, refrigerated VWF -/- platelets displayed increased post-transfusion recovery and survival than wild-type ones. Similarly, adding OS1 to transgenic murine platelets expressing only human GPIbα during refrigeration improved their post-transfusion recovery and survival. Refrigeration-induced binding of VWF to platelets facilitates their rapid clearance by inducing GPIbα-mediated signaling. Our results suggest that inhibition of the VWF-GPIbα interaction may be a potential strategy to enable refrigeration of platelets for transfusion treatment. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Shiu, Shin-Han; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM) and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS) and DNA structure (DS) properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy) that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  10. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zing Tsung-Yeh Tsai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor (TF binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS and DNA structure (DS properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  11. Evolutionarily conserved domain of heat shock transcription factor negatively regulates oligomerization and DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Azumi; Enoki, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Noritaka; Sawai, Maki; Sakurai, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    Heat shock transcription factor (HSF) regulates the expression of genes encoding molecular chaperones and stress-responsive proteins. Conversion of HSF from a monomer to a homotrimer or heterotrimer is essential for its binding to heat shock elements (HSEs) comprised of inverted repeats of the pentamer nGAAn. Here, we constructed various human HSF1 derivatives and analyzed their transcriptional activity through the continuously and discontinuously arranged nGAAn units. We identified a short stretch of amino acids that inhibits the activation ability of HSF1, especially through discontinuous HSEs. This stretch is conserved in HSFs of various organisms, interacts with the hydrophobic repeat regions that mediate HSF oligomerization, and impedes homotrimer formation and DNA binding. This conserved domain plays an important role in maintaining HSF in an inactive monomeric form. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Roles for GTP-binding proteins in Vigna unguiculata responding to Nod factors or chitin elicitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, M.N.; Irving, H.R.

    2001-01-01

    μNod factors are lipo-chito-oligosaccharides secreted by Rhizobium to initiate deformation of legume root hairs and other changes such as increases in intracellular calcium in responsive root hairs. We studied the effects of Nod factors and G-protein modulators on root hair deformation and found significant deformation of root hairs after 30 min exposure to the compounds. Since G-proteins have been implicated in the root hair response to Nod factors in vivo, we examined the GTP-binding profiles of root microsomal membrane fractions isolated from the nodulation competent zone of the legume Vigna unguiculata. GTP competitively binds to microsomal membrane fractions labelled with [ 35 S]GTPγS with a high affinity, yielding a two-site displacement curve with displacement constants (K i ) of 0.58 μM and 0.16 μM. Competition with either ATP or GDP revealed a one-site displacement curve with K i of 4.14 and 11.7 μM respectively. To test if exposure to Nod factors affect the GTP-binding profile, we isolated microsomal membrane fractions from roots pretreated with either NodNGR[S] (from Rhizobium sp. NGR234) or the four-sugar, tetracetylchitotetraose (TACT) backbone of Nod factors. Pretreatment with NodNGR[S] results in an increased affinity for GTP of several hundred-fold. Roots pretreated with TACT also showed a similar but slightly smaller increase in affinity for GTP. To begin identification of possible candidates microsomal proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and GTP-binding proteins were probed with [ 35 S]GTPγS. Microsomal membrane factions isolated from roots pretreated with NodNGR[S] revealed two proteins (27 kDa and 25 kDa) with a higher affinity for GTPγS. Western blotting of the microsomal membrane preparation with anti-Rac antibodies also showed changes in Rac associated signal in microsomal membranes prepared from either NodNGR[S] or TACT pretreated roots. These results provide further support for a role for small, monomeric G-proteins in the Nod factor

  13. Ab initio identification of putative human transcription factor binding sites by comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Provero P

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding transcriptional regulation of gene expression is one of the greatest challenges of modern molecular biology. A central role in this mechanism is played by transcription factors, which typically bind to specific, short DNA sequence motifs usually located in the upstream region of the regulated genes. We discuss here a simple and powerful approach for the ab initio identification of these cis-regulatory motifs. The method we present integrates several elements: human-mouse comparison, statistical analysis of genomic sequences and the concept of coregulation. We apply it to a complete scan of the human genome. Results By using the catalogue of conserved upstream sequences collected in the CORG database we construct sets of genes sharing the same overrepresented motif (short DNA sequence in their upstream regions both in human and in mouse. We perform this construction for all possible motifs from 5 to 8 nucleotides in length and then filter the resulting sets looking for two types of evidence of coregulation: first, we analyze the Gene Ontology annotation of the genes in the set, searching for statistically significant common annotations; second, we analyze the expression profiles of the genes in the set as measured by microarray experiments, searching for evidence of coexpression. The sets which pass one or both filters are conjectured to contain a significant fraction of coregulated genes, and the upstream motifs characterizing the sets are thus good candidates to be the binding sites of the TF's involved in such regulation. In this way we find various known motifs and also some new candidate binding sites. Conclusion We have discussed a new integrated algorithm for the "ab initio" identification of transcription factor binding sites in the human genome. The method is based on three ingredients: comparative genomics, overrepresentation, different types of coregulation. The method is applied to a full-scan of the

  14. Steric and allosteric factors prevent simultaneous binding of transferrin-binding proteins A and B to transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Leslie P; Yu, Rong-hua; Calmettes, Charles; Yang, Xue; Moraes, Trevor F; Schriemer, David C; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2012-06-01

    The ability to acquire iron directly from host Tf (transferrin) is an adaptation common to important bacterial pathogens belonging to the Pasteurellaceae, Moraxellaceae and Neisseriaceae families. A surface receptor comprising an integral outer membrane protein, TbpA (Tf-binding protein A), and a surface-exposed lipoprotein, TbpB (Tf-binding protein B), mediates the iron acquisition process. TbpB is thought to extend from the cell surface for capture of Tf to initiate the process and deliver Tf to TbpA. TbpA functions as a gated channel for the passage of iron into the periplasm. In the present study we have mapped the effect of TbpA from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae on pTf (porcine Tf) using H/DX-MS (hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled to MS) and compare it with a previously determined binding site for TbpB. The proposed TbpA footprint is adjacent to and potentially overlapping the TbpB-binding site, and induces a structural instability in the TbpB site. This suggests that simultaneous binding to pTf by both receptors would be hindered. We demonstrate that a recombinant TbpB lacking a portion of its anchor peptide is unable to form a stable ternary TbpA-pTf-TbpB complex. This truncated TbpB does not bind to a preformed Tf-TbpA complex, and TbpA removes pTf from a preformed Tf-TbpB complex. Thus the results of the present study support a model whereby TbpB 'hands-off' pTf to TbpA, which completes the iron removal and transport process.

  15. Cloning, expression, and characterization of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) promoter binding factor, a transcription activator of the Acanthamoeba TBP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W; Bateman, E

    1995-12-01

    TATA-binding protein (TBP) gene promoter binding factor (TPBF) is a transactivator which binds to the TBP promoter element (TPE) sequence of the Acanthamoeba TBP gene promoter and stimulates transcription in vitro. We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding TPBF. TPBF is a polypeptide of 327 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 37 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence of TPBF shows no significant homology to other proteins. TPBF has two potential coiled-coil regions, a basic region, a proline-rich region, a histidine-rich N terminus, and a nuclear targeting sequence. The recombinant protein has an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa, identical with that of TPBF purified from Acanthamoeba. Recombinant TPBF is able to bind DNA and activate transcription with the same specificity as natural Acanthamoeba TPBF, demonstrating the authenticity of the clone. Mobility shift assays of co-translated TPBF polypeptides and chemical cross-linking demonstrate that TPBF is tetrameric in solution and when bound to DNA. Analyses of TPBF mutants show that Coiled-coil II is essential for DNA binding, but Coiled-coil I and the basic region are also involved. TPBF is thus a novel DNA-binding protein with functional similarity to the tumor suppressor protein p53.

  16. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication with artificial transcription factors targeting the highly conserved primer-binding site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eberhardy, Scott R.; Goncalves, Joao; Coelho, Sofia; Segal, David J.; Berkhout, Ben; Barbas, Carlos F.

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) primer-binding site (PBS) is a highly conserved region in the HIV genome and represents an attractive target for the development of new anti-HIV therapies. In this study, we designed four artificial zinc finger transcription factors to bind at or

  17. Prothrombotic skeletal muscle myosin directly enhances prothrombin activation by binding factors Xa and Va

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Hiroshi; Sinha, Ranjeet K.; Marchese, Patrizia; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.; Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; McCarty, Owen J. T.; Cohen, Mitchell J.

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that skeletal muscle myosins can directly influence blood coagulation and thrombosis, ex vivo studies of the effects of myosin on thrombogenesis in fresh human blood were conducted. Addition of myosin to blood augmented the thrombotic responses of human blood flowing over collagen-coated surfaces (300 s−1 shear rate). Perfusion of human blood over myosin-coated surfaces also caused fibrin and platelet deposition, evidencing myosin’s thrombogenicity. Myosin markedly enhanced thrombin generation in both platelet-rich plasma and platelet-poor plasma, indicating that myosin promoted thrombin generation in plasma primarily independent of platelets. In purified reaction mixtures composed only of factor Xa, factor Va, prothrombin, and calcium ions, myosin greatly enhanced prothrombinase activity. The Gla domain of factor Xa was not required for myosin’s prothrombinase enhancement. When binding of purified clotting factors to immobilized myosin was monitored using biolayer interferometry, factors Xa and Va each showed favorable binding interactions. Factor Va reduced by 100-fold the apparent Kd of myosin for factor Xa (Kd ∼0.48 nM), primarily by reducing koff, indicating formation of a stable ternary complex of myosin:Xa:Va. In studies to assess possible clinical relevance for this discovery, we found that antimyosin antibodies inhibited thrombin generation in acute trauma patient plasmas more than in control plasmas (P = .0004), implying myosin might contribute to acute trauma coagulopathy. We posit that myosin enhancement of thrombin generation could contribute either to promote hemostasis or to augment thrombosis risk with consequent implications for myosin’s possible contributions to pathophysiology in the setting of acute injuries. PMID:27421960

  18. Wheat germ poly(A) binding protein enhances the binding affinity of eukaryotic initiation factor 4F and (iso)4F for cap analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, C C; Balasta, M L; Ren, J; Goss, D J

    1998-02-17

    Most eukaryotic mRNAs contain a 5' cap (m7GppX) and a 3' poly(A) tail to increase synergistically the translational efficiency. Recently, the poly(A) binding protein (PABP) and cap-binding protein, eIF-4F, were found to interact [Le et al. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 16247-16255; Tarun and Sachs (1996) EMBO J. 15, 7168-7177]. These data suggest that PABP may exert its effect on translational efficiency either by increasing the formation of initiation factor-mRNA complex or by enhancing ribosome recycling. To investigate the functional consequences of these interactions, the fluorescent cap analogue, ant-m7GTP, which is an environmentally sensitive fluorescent probe [Ren and Goss (1996) Nucleic Acids Res. 24, 3629-3634] was used to investigate the cap-binding affinity. Our data show that the binding of eIF-(iso)4F or eIF-4F to cap analogue enhanced their binding affinity toward PABP approximately 40-fold. Similarly, the eIF-4F/PABP or eIF-(iso)4F/PABP complexes show a 40-fold enhancement of cap analogue binding as compared to eIF-4F or eIF-(iso)4F alone. At least part of the enhancement of the translational initiation by PABP can be accounted for by direct changes in cap-binding affinity. The interactions of these components also suggest a mechanism whereby the poly(A) tail is brought into close proximity with m7G cap. This effect was examined by fluorescence energy transfer, and it was determined that the PABP/eIF-4F complex could bind both poly(A) and 5' cap simultaneously.

  19. Characterization of a human coagulation factor Xa-binding site on Viperidae snake venom phospholipases A2 by affinity binding studies and molecular bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowda Veerabasappa T

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The snake venom group IIA secreted phospholipases A2 (SVPLA2, present in the Viperidae snake family exhibit a wide range of toxic and pharmacological effects. They exert their different functions by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phospholipids (PL at the membrane/water interface and by highly specific direct binding to: (i presynaptic membrane-bound or intracellular receptors; (ii natural PLA2-inhibitors from snake serum; and (iii coagulation factors present in human blood. Results Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR protein-protein interaction measurements and an in vitro biological test of inhibition of prothrombinase activity, we identify a number of Viperidae venom SVPLA2s that inhibit blood coagulation through direct binding to human blood coagulation factor Xa (FXa via a non-catalytic, PL-independent mechanism. We classify the SVPLA2s in four groups, depending on the strength of their binding. Molecular electrostatic potentials calculated at the surface of 3D homology-modeling models show a correlation with inhibition of prothrombinase activity. In addition, molecular docking simulations between SVPLA2 and FXa guided by the experimental data identify the potential FXa binding site on the SVPLA2s. This site is composed of the following regions: helices A and B, the Ca2+ loop, the helix C-β-wing loop, and the C-terminal fragment. Some of the SVPLA2 binding site residues belong also to the interfacial binding site (IBS. The interface in FXa involves both, the light and heavy chains. Conclusion We have experimentally identified several strong FXa-binding SVPLA2s that disrupt the function of the coagulation cascade by interacting with FXa by the non-catalytic PL-independent mechanism. By theoretical methods we mapped the interaction sites on both, the SVPLA2s and FXa. Our findings may lead to the design of novel, non-competitive FXa inhibitors.

  20. Transcription Factors Bind Thousands of Active and InactiveRegions in the Drosophila Blastoderm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao-Yong; MacArthur, Stewart; Bourgon, Richard; Nix, David; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Stapleton, Mark; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Ogawa, Nobuo; Inwood, William; Sementchenko, Victor; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan E.; Knowles, David W.; Gingeras, Tom; Speed, Terence P.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2008-01-10

    Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over forty well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly-bound regions are not involved in early

  1. Epidermal transformation leads to increased perlecan synthesis with heparin-binding-growth-factor affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tapanadechopone, P; Tumova, S; Jiang, X

    2001-01-01

    . Despite this, the heparan sulphate of RT101- and JB6-derived perlecan bound fibroblast growth factor-1, -2, -4 and -7 and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor with similar affinity. Therefore abundant tumour-derived perlecan may support the angiogenic responses seen in vivo and be a key player......Perlecan, a proteoglycan of basement membrane and extracellular matrices, has important roles in both normal biological and pathological processes. As a result of its ability to store and protect growth factors, perlecan may have crucial roles in tumour-cell growth and invasion. Since...... the biological functions of different types of glycosaminoglycan vary with cellular origin and structural modifications, we analysed the expression and biological functions of perlecan produced by a normal epidermal cell line (JB6) and its transformed counterpart (RT101). Expression of perlecan in tumorigenic...

  2. Nonfunctional variant 3 factor H binding proteins as meningococcal vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Stijn; Johnson, Steven; Jongerius, Ilse; Malik, Talat; Genovese, Alessia; Santini, Laura; Staunton, David; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael L; Pickering, Matthew C; Lea, Susan M; Tang, Christoph M

    2014-03-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human-specific pathogen and leading cause of meningitis and septicemia. Factor H binding protein (fHbp), a virulence factor which protects N. meningitidis from innate immunity by binding the human complement regulator factor H (fH) with high affinity, is also a key antigen in vaccines being developed to prevent meningococcal disease. fHbp can be divided into three variant groups (V1, V2, and V3) that elicit limited immunological cross-reactivity. The interaction of fH with fHbp could impair the immunogenicity of this antigen by hindering access to the antigenic epitopes in fHbp, providing the rationale for the development of nonfunctional fHbps as vaccine candidates. Here, we characterized the two nonfunctional V3 fHbps, fHbp(T286A) and fHbp(E313A), which each contains a single amino acid substitution that leads to a marked reduction in affinity for fH without affecting the folding of the proteins. The immunogenicity of the nonfunctional fHbps was assessed in transgenic mice expressing a single chimeric fH containing domains of human fH involved in binding to fHbp. No differences in anti-V3 fHbp antibody titers were elicited by the wild-type V3 fHbp, V3 fHbp(T286A), and V3 fHbp(E313A), demonstrating that the nonfunctional fHbps retain their immunogenicity. Furthermore, the nonfunctional V3 fHbps elicit serum bactericidal activity that is equivalent to or higher than that observed with the wild-type protein. Our findings provide the basis for the rational design of next-generation vaccines containing nonfunctional V3 fHbps.

  3. HOCOMOCO: A comprehensive collection of human transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2012-11-21

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site (TFBS) models are crucial for computational reconstruction of transcription regulatory networks. In existing repositories, a TF often has several models (also called binding profiles or motifs), obtained from different experimental data. Having a single TFBS model for a TF is more pragmatic for practical applications. We show that integration of TFBS data from various types of experiments into a single model typically results in the improved model quality probably due to partial correction of source specific technique bias. We present the Homo sapiens comprehensive model collection (HOCOMOCO, http://autosome.ru/HOCOMOCO/, http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/ hocomoco/) containing carefully hand-curated TFBS models constructed by integration of binding sequences obtained by both low- and high-throughput methods. To construct position weight matrices to represent these TFBS models, we used ChIPMunk software in four computational modes, including newly developed periodic positional prior mode associated with DNA helix pitch. We selected only one TFBS model per TF, unless there was a clear experimental evidence for two rather distinct TFBS models. We assigned a quality rating to each model. HOCOMOCO contains 426 systematically curated TFBS models for 401 human TFs, where 172 models are based on more than one data source. The Author(s) 2012.

  4. Does atrial natriuretic factor protect against right ventricular overload? II. Tissue binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, L.C.; Yen, S.; Sardella, G.L.; Hill, N.S.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have led us to hypothesize that the physiological significance of the diuretic and pulmonary vaso-relaxant effects of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is to protect the right heart. This study was designed to evaluate the relative importance of various peripheral tissues as sites of ANF action by tracing the temporal pattern of distribution of 125 I-ANF and quantitating the specific binding sites. An in vivo approach, utilizing trace amount of 125 I-ANF was adopted to simulate physiological conditions. 125 I-ANF injected either intravenously or intra-arterially was quickly bound to peripheral tissues with less than 5% remaining in the circulation after 1 min. The relative binding capacity was greatest in the lung, followed by the kidney, right ventricle, adrenal gland, and left ventricle. The magnitude of specific ANF binding sites per gram of tissue weight followed a similar order. The data demonstrate that ANF released under all circumstances is quickly bound to the target organs, particularly the lung and the kidney, and suggest that these two organs could be the most important target organs of ANF. This evidence provides further support for the proposed hypothesis that a major evolutionary role of ANF is the protection of the right ventricle from mechanical loads

  5. HOCOMOCO: a comprehensive collection of human transcription factor binding sites models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Schaefer, Ulf; Kasianov, Artem S.; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site (TFBS) models are crucial for computational reconstruction of transcription regulatory networks. In existing repositories, a TF often has several models (also called binding profiles or motifs), obtained from different experimental data. Having a single TFBS model for a TF is more pragmatic for practical applications. We show that integration of TFBS data from various types of experiments into a single model typically results in the improved model quality probably due to partial correction of source specific technique bias. We present the Homo sapiens comprehensive model collection (HOCOMOCO, http://autosome.ru/HOCOMOCO/, http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco/) containing carefully hand-curated TFBS models constructed by integration of binding sequences obtained by both low- and high-throughput methods. To construct position weight matrices to represent these TFBS models, we used ChIPMunk software in four computational modes, including newly developed periodic positional prior mode associated with DNA helix pitch. We selected only one TFBS model per TF, unless there was a clear experimental evidence for two rather distinct TFBS models. We assigned a quality rating to each model. HOCOMOCO contains 426 systematically curated TFBS models for 401 human TFs, where 172 models are based on more than one data source. PMID:23175603

  6. A novel method for improved accuracy of transcription factor binding site prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Khamis, Abdullah M.

    2018-03-20

    Identifying transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs) is important in the computational inference of gene regulation. Widely used computational methods of TFBS prediction based on position weight matrices (PWMs) usually have high false positive rates. Moreover, computational studies of transcription regulation in eukaryotes frequently require numerous PWM models of TFBSs due to a large number of TFs involved. To overcome these problems we developed DRAF, a novel method for TFBS prediction that requires only 14 prediction models for 232 human TFs, while at the same time significantly improves prediction accuracy. DRAF models use more features than PWM models, as they combine information from TFBS sequences and physicochemical properties of TF DNA-binding domains into machine learning models. Evaluation of DRAF on 98 human ChIP-seq datasets shows on average 1.54-, 1.96- and 5.19-fold reduction of false positives at the same sensitivities compared to models from HOCOMOCO, TRANSFAC and DeepBind, respectively. This observation suggests that one can efficiently replace the PWM models for TFBS prediction by a small number of DRAF models that significantly improve prediction accuracy. The DRAF method is implemented in a web tool and in a stand-alone software freely available at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/DRAF.

  7. The Influence of Adnectin Binding on the Extracellular Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, Roxana E.; Chen, Guodong; Ahn, Joomi; Houel, Stephane; Wei, Hui; Mo, Jingjie; Tao, Li; Cohen, Daniel; Xie, Dianlin; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul E.; Doyle, Michael L.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Engen, John R.

    2014-12-01

    The precise and unambiguous elucidation and characterization of interactions between a high affinity recognition entity and its cognate protein provides important insights for the design and development of drugs with optimized properties and efficacy. In oncology, one important target protein has been shown to be the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) through the development of therapeutic anticancer antibodies that are selective inhibitors of EGFR activity. More recently, smaller protein derived from the 10th type III domain of human fibronectin termed an adnectin has also been shown to inhibit EGFR in clinical studies. The mechanism of EGFR inhibition by either an adnectin or an antibody results from specific binding of the high affinity protein to the extracellular portion of EGFR (exEGFR) in a manner that prevents phosphorylation of the intracellular kinase domain of the receptor and thereby blocks intracellular signaling. Here, the structural changes induced upon binding were studied by probing the solution conformations of full length exEGFR alone and bound to a cognate adnectin through hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The effects of binding in solution were identified and compared with the structure of a bound complex determined by X-ray crystallography.

  8. GTRD: a database of transcription factor binding sites identified by ChIP-seq experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yevshin, Ivan; Sharipov, Ruslan; Valeev, Tagir; Kel, Alexander; Kolpakov, Fedor

    2017-01-04

    GTRD-Gene Transcription Regulation Database (http://gtrd.biouml.org)-is a database of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) identified by ChIP-seq experiments for human and mouse. Raw ChIP-seq data were obtained from ENCODE and SRA and uniformly processed: (i) reads were aligned using Bowtie2; (ii) ChIP-seq peaks were called using peak callers MACS, SISSRs, GEM and PICS; (iii) peaks for the same factor and peak callers, but different experiment conditions (cell line, treatment, etc.), were merged into clusters; (iv) such clusters for different peak callers were merged into metaclusters that were considered as non-redundant sets of TFBSs. In addition to information on location in genome, the sets contain structured information about cell lines and experimental conditions extracted from descriptions of corresponding ChIP-seq experiments. A web interface to access GTRD was developed using the BioUML platform. It provides: (i) browsing and displaying information; (ii) advanced search possibilities, e.g. search of TFBSs near the specified gene or search of all genes potentially regulated by a specified transcription factor; (iii) integrated genome browser that provides visualization of the GTRD data: read alignments, peaks, clusters, metaclusters and information about gene structures from the Ensembl database and binding sites predicted using position weight matrices from the HOCOMOCO database. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Specific membrane binding of factor VIII is mediated by O-phospho-L-serine, a moiety of phosphatidylserine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, G E; Drinkwater, D

    1993-09-21

    Phosphatidylserine, a negatively charged lipid, is exposed on the platelet membrane following cell stimulation, correlating with the expression of factor VIII receptors. We have explored the importance of the negative electrostatic potential of phosphatidylserine vs chemical moieties of phosphatidylserine for specific membrane binding of factor VIII. Fluorescein-labeled factor VIII bound to membranes containing 15% phosphatidic acid, a negatively charged phospholipid, with low affinity compared to phosphatidylserine-containing membranes. Binding was not specific as it was inhibited by other proteins in plasma. Factor VIII bound to membranes containing 10% phosphatidylserine in spite of a varying net charge provided by 0-15% stearylamine, a positively charged lipid. The soluble phosphatidylserine moiety, O-phospho-L-serine, inhibited factor VIII binding to phosphatidylserine-containing membranes with a Ki of 20 mM, but the stereoisomer, O-phospho-D-serine, was 5-fold less effective. Furthermore, binding of factor VIII to membranes containing synthetic phosphatidyl-D-serine was 5-fold less than binding to membranes containing phosphatidyl-L-serine. Membranes containing synthetic phosphatidyl-L-homoserine, differing from phosphatidylserine by a single methylene, supported high-affinity binding, but it was not specific as factor VIII was displaced by other plasma proteins. O-Phospho-L-serine also inhibited the binding of factor VIII to platelet-derived microparticles with a Ki of 20 mM, and the stereoisomer was 4-fold less effective. These results indicate that membrane binding of factor VIII is mediated by a stereoselective recognition O-phospho-L-serine of phosphatidylserine and that negative electrostatic potential is of lesser importance.

  10. Dictyostelium cells bind a secreted autocrine factor that represses cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Jonathan M; Bakthavatsalam, Deenadayalan; Phillips, Jonathan E; Gomer, Richard H

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Dictyostelium cells secrete the proteins AprA and CfaD. Cells lacking either AprA or CfaD proliferate faster than wild type, while AprA or CfaD overexpressor cells proliferate slowly, indicating that AprA and CfaD are autocrine factors that repress proliferation. CfaD interacts with AprA and requires the presence of AprA to slow proliferation. To determine if CfaD is necessary for the ability of AprA to slow proliferation, whether AprA binds to cells, and if so whether the...

  11. Identification and further characterization of the specific cell binding fragment from sponge aggregation factor

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) were raised against the aggregation factor (AF) from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Two clones were identified that secrete McAbs against the cell binding protein of the AF complex. Fab fragments of McAbs: 5D2-D11 completely abolished the activity of the AF to form secondary aggregates from single cells. The McAbs were determined to react with the AF in vitro; this interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor, isolated and purified from t...

  12. Changes in the Factor VIII C2 domain upon membrane binding determined by hydrogen-deuterium exchange MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazatos, Dionysios; Gessner, Christopher R; Woods, Virgil L; Gilbert, Gary E

    2014-08-01

    Factor VIII enhances the catalytic activity of Factor IXa in a membrane-bound enzyme complex and both proteins are necessary to prevent haemophilia. Tandem lectin-like C domains mediate the membrane binding of Factor VIII and membrane-interactive residues have been identified. However, the available data provide little insight into the dynamic changes that occur upon membrane binding. We used time-based hydrogen-deuterium exchange MS to evaluate the dynamics of FVIII-C2 (Factor VIII C2 domain) alone and when membrane bound. The results confirm the participation of previously identified membrane-interactive loops in the binding mechanism. In addition, they indicate that a long peptide segment, encompassing a membrane-interactive loop and strands of the β-barrel core, is remarkably dynamic prior to membrane binding. The flexibility is reduced following membrane binding. In addition, regions that interact with the A1 and C1 domains have reduced solvent exchange. Thus the isolated C2 domain has extensive flexibility that is subject to stabilization and could be related to interactions between domains as well as between Factor VIII and Factor IXa or Factor X. These results confirm that the proposed membrane-binding loops of the FVIII-C2 interact with the membrane in a manner that leads to protection from solvent exposure.

  13. Epidermal growth factor binding, stimulation of phosphorylation, and inhibition of gluconeogenesis in rat proximal tubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R C; Daniel, T O

    1989-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor and insulin share many biological activities, including stimulation of cell proliferation, ion flux, glycolysis, fatty acid and glycogen synthesis, and activation of receptor-linked tyrosine kinase activity. In the kidney, insulin has been shown to regulate transport processes and inhibit gluconeogenesis in the proximal tubule. Since the kidney represents a major source of EGF, the present studies investigated whether proximal tubule contained EGF receptors, whether EGF receptors were localized to apical or basolateral membranes, and whether EGF receptor activation participated in the regulation of an important proximal tubule function, gluconeogenesis. Specific EGF receptors were demonstrated in the basolateral membrane of proximal tubule. Following incubation with 125I EGF, basolateral membranes demonstrated equilibrium binding at 4 degrees C and 23 degrees C. There was 78 +/- 2% specific binding (n = 13). The dissociation constant (Kd) was 1.5 x 10(-9) M and maximal binding was 44 fmol/mg protein. There was ninefold more specific binding to proximal tubule basolateral membrane than to brush border membrane. In basolateral, but not brush border membranes, EGF induced phosphorylation of the tyrosine residues of intrinsic membrane proteins, including a 170 kDa protein, corresponding to the EGF receptor. In the presence of the gluconeogenic substrates, alanine, lactate, and succinate, proximal tubule suspensions synthesized glucose. EGF inhibited glucose production in a concentration-dependent manner over a concentration range of 3 x 10(-11) to 3 x 10(-9) M. In addition, EGF inhibited angiotensin II-stimulated glucose production in the proximal tubule suspensions. EGF did not significantly increase net glucose metabolism nor decrease cellular ATP concentrations. Therefore, these studies demonstrated that rat proximal tubule contained specific receptors for EGF that were localized to the basolateral membrane and linked to tyrosine kinase

  14. Multiple DNA-binding modes for the ETS family transcription factor PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Shingo; Evich, Marina G; Erlitzki, Noa; Germann, Markus W; Poon, Gregory M K

    2017-09-29

    The eponymous DNA-binding domain of ETS ( E 26 t ransformation- s pecific) transcription factors binds a single sequence-specific site as a monomer over a single helical turn. Following our previous observation by titration calorimetry that the ETS member PU.1 dimerizes sequentially at a single sequence-specific DNA-binding site to form a 2:1 complex, we have carried out an extensive spectroscopic and biochemical characterization of site-specific PU.1 ETS complexes. Whereas 10 bp of DNA was sufficient to support PU.1 binding as a monomer, additional flanking bases were required to invoke sequential dimerization of the bound protein. NMR spectroscopy revealed a marked loss of signal intensity in the 2:1 complex, and mutational analysis implicated the distal surface away from the bound DNA as the dimerization interface. Hydroxyl radical DNA footprinting indicated that the site-specifically bound PU.1 dimers occupied an extended DNA interface downstream from the 5'-GGAA-3' core consensus relative to its 1:1 counterpart, thus explaining the apparent site size requirement for sequential dimerization. The site-specifically bound PU.1 dimer resisted competition from nonspecific DNA and showed affinities similar to other functionally significant PU.1 interactions. As sequential dimerization did not occur with the ETS domain of Ets-1, a close structural homolog of PU.1, 2:1 complex formation may represent an alternative autoinhibitory mechanism in the ETS family at the protein-DNA level. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Identification and further characterization of the specific cell binding fragment from sponge aggregation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramzow, M; Bachmann, M; Uhlenbruck, G; Dorn, A; Müller, W E

    1986-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) were raised against the aggregation factor (AF) from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Two clones were identified that secrete McAbs against the cell binding protein of the AF complex. Fab fragments of McAbs: 5D2-D11 completely abolished the activity of the AF to form secondary aggregates from single cells. The McAbs were determined to react with the AF in vitro; this interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor, isolated and purified from the same species. After dissociation of the AF by sodium dodecyl sulfate and 2-mercaptoethanol, followed by electrophoretical fractionation, a 47-kD protein was identified by immunoblotting which interacted with the McAbs: 5D2-D11. During this dissociation procedure, the sunburst structure of the AF was destroyed. In a second approach, the 47-kD protein was isolated by immunoprecipitation; 12 molecules of this protein species were calculated to be associated with the intact AF particle. The 47-kD AF fragment bound to dissociated Geodia cells with a high affinity (Ka of 7 X 10(8) M-1) even in the absence of Ca++ ions; the number of binding sites was approximately 4 X 10(6)/cell. This interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor to the 47-kD protein in the homologous cell system. Moreover, it was established that this binding occurs species-specifically. The 47-kD fragment of the AF was localized only extracellularly by indirect immunofluorescence staining in cryostat slices. These data suggest that the 47-kD protein is the cell binding molecule of the AF from Geodia.

  16. Predicting combinatorial binding of transcription factors to regulatory elements in the human genome by association rule mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Vishwanath R

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cis-acting transcriptional regulatory elements in mammalian genomes typically contain specific combinations of binding sites for various transcription factors. Although some cis-regulatory elements have been well studied, the combinations of transcription factors that regulate normal expression levels for the vast majority of the 20,000 genes in the human genome are unknown. We hypothesized that it should be possible to discover transcription factor combinations that regulate gene expression in concert by identifying over-represented combinations of sequence motifs that occur together in the genome. In order to detect combinations of transcription factor binding motifs, we developed a data mining approach based on the use of association rules, which are typically used in market basket analysis. We scored each segment of the genome for the presence or absence of each of 83 transcription factor binding motifs, then used association rule mining algorithms to mine this dataset, thus identifying frequently occurring pairs of distinct motifs within a segment. Results Support for most pairs of transcription factor binding motifs was highly correlated across different chromosomes although pair significance varied. Known true positive motif pairs showed higher association rule support, confidence, and significance than background. Our subsets of high-confidence, high-significance mined pairs of transcription factors showed enrichment for co-citation in PubMed abstracts relative to all pairs, and the predicted associations were often readily verifiable in the literature. Conclusion Functional elements in the genome where transcription factors bind to regulate expression in a combinatorial manner are more likely to be predicted by identifying statistically and biologically significant combinations of transcription factor binding motifs than by simply scanning the genome for the occurrence of binding sites for a single transcription

  17. IQGAP1 Protein Binds Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) and Modulates Trastuzumab Resistance*

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Colin D.; Li, Zhigang; Dillon, Deborah A.; Sacks, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is overexpressed in 20–25% of breast cancers. Increased HER2 expression is an adverse prognostic factor and correlates with decreased patient survival. HER2-positive (HER2(+)) breast cancer is treated with trastuzumab. Unfortunately, some patients are intrinsically refractory to therapy, and many who do respond initially become resistant within 1 year. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying HER2 signaling and trastuzumab resistance is essential to reduce breast cancer mortality. IQGAP1 is a ubiquitously expressed scaffold protein that contains multiple protein interaction domains. By regulating its binding partners IQGAP1 integrates signaling pathways, several of which contribute to breast tumorigenesis. We show here that IQGAP1 is overexpressed in HER2(+) breast cancer tissue and binds directly to HER2. Knockdown of IQGAP1 decreases HER2 expression, phosphorylation, signaling, and HER2-stimulated cell proliferation, effects that are all reversed by reconstituting cells with IQGAP1. Reducing IQGAP1 up-regulates p27, and blocking this increase attenuates the growth inhibitory effects of IQGAP1 knockdown. Importantly, IQGAP1 is overexpressed in trastuzumab-resistant breast epithelial cells, and reducing IQGAP1 both augments the inhibitory effects of trastuzumab and restores trastuzumab sensitivity to trastuzumab-resistant SkBR3 cells. These data suggest that inhibiting IQGAP1 function may represent a rational strategy for treating HER2(+) breast carcinoma. PMID:21724847

  18. High-resolution mapping of transcription factor binding sites on native chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinathan, Sivakanthan; Orsi, Guillermo A.; Zentner, Gabriel E.; Ahmad, Kami; Henikoff, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins including transcription factors (TFs) are key determinants of gene regulation and chromatin architecture. Formaldehyde cross-linking and sonication followed by Chromatin ImmunoPrecipitation (X-ChIP) is widely used for profiling of TF binding, but is limited by low resolution and poor specificity and sensitivity. We present a simple protocol that starts with micrococcal nuclease-digested uncross-linked chromatin and is followed by affinity purification of TFs and paired-end sequencing. The resulting ORGANIC (Occupied Regions of Genomes from Affinity-purified Naturally Isolated Chromatin) profiles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Abf1 and Reb1 provide highly accurate base-pair resolution maps that are not biased toward accessible chromatin, and do not require input normalization. We also demonstrate the high specificity of our method when applied to larger genomes by profiling Drosophila melanogaster GAGA Factor and Pipsqueak. Our results suggest that ORGANIC profiling is a widely applicable high-resolution method for sensitive and specific profiling of direct protein-DNA interactions. PMID:24336359

  19. Dynamic nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of an Arabidopsis SR splicing factor: role of the RNA-binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausin, Glwadys; Tillemans, Vinciane; Stankovic, Nancy; Hanikenne, Marc; Motte, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are essential nuclear-localized splicing factors. We have investigated the dynamic subcellular distribution of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZp22 protein, a homolog of the human 9G8 SR factor. Little is known about the determinants underlying the control of plant SR protein dynamics, and so far most studies relied on ectopic transient overexpression. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the RSZp22 expression profile and describe its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling properties in specific cell types. Comparison of transient ectopic- and stable tissue-specific expression highlights the advantages of both approaches for nuclear protein dynamic studies. By site-directed mutagenesis of RSZp22 RNA-binding sequences, we show that functional RNA recognition motif RNP1 and zinc-knuckle are dispensable for the exclusive protein nuclear localization and speckle-like distribution. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging also revealed that these motifs are implicated in RSZp22 molecular interactions. Furthermore, the RNA-binding motif mutants are defective for their export through the CRM1/XPO1/Exportin-1 receptor pathway but retain nucleocytoplasmic mobility. Moreover, our data suggest that CRM1 is a putative export receptor for mRNPs in plants.

  20. HOCOMOCO: expansion and enhancement of the collection of transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2015-11-19

    Models of transcription factor (TF) binding sites provide a basis for a wide spectrum of studies in regulatory genomics, from reconstruction of regulatory networks to functional annotation of transcripts and sequence variants. While TFs may recognize different sequence patterns in different conditions, it is pragmatic to have a single generic model for each particular TF as a baseline for practical applications. Here we present the expanded and enhanced version of HOCOMOCO (http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco10), the collection of models of DNA patterns, recognized by transcription factors. HOCOMOCO now provides position weight matrix (PWM) models for binding sites of 601 human TFs and, in addition, PWMs for 396 mouse TFs. Furthermore, we introduce the largest up to date collection of dinucleotide PWM models for 86 (52) human (mouse) TFs. The update is based on the analysis of massive ChIP-Seq and HT-SELEX datasets, with the validation of the resulting models on in vivo data. To facilitate a practical application, all HOCOMOCO models are linked to gene and protein databases (Entrez Gene, HGNC, UniProt) and accompanied by precomputed score thresholds. Finally, we provide command-line tools for PWM and diPWM threshold estimation and motif finding in nucleotide sequences.

  1. Binding of transcription factors and creation of a large nucleoprotein complex on the human cytomegalovirus enhancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazal, P.; Lubon, H.; Fleckenstein, B.; Hennighausen, L.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of the human cytomegalovirus immediate early region 1 enhancer on transcription was studied in vitro with HeLa cell nuclear extract. Stimulation of in vitro transcription mediated by the enhancer element involves its recognition by specific trans-acting factors present in the nuclear extract. DNase I protection analysis was used to determine at the nucleotide level those enhancer sequences that interact with nuclear factors. At least nine sites of protein-DNA interaction were detected over ≅ 400 base pairs of enhancer sequence. The regions of nuclease protection are associated with 21-, 19-, 18-, and 17-base-pair repeat elements as well as with a unique sequence, creating a large nucleoprotein complex. The relationship between the protein binding and the activity of the immediate early region 1 enhancer is discussed

  2. A DNA-binding-site landscape and regulatory network analysis for NAC transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Jensen, Michael Krogh; de Velde, Jan Van

    2014-01-01

    Target gene identification for transcription factors is a prerequisite for the systems wide understanding of organismal behaviour. NAM-ATAF1/2-CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors are amongst the largest transcription factor families in plants, yet limited data exist from unbiased approaches to resolve...... the DNA-binding preferences of individual members. Here, we present a TF-target gene identification workflow based on the integration of novel protein binding microarray data with gene expression and multi-species promoter sequence conservation to identify the DNA-binding specificities and the gene...... of complementary functional genomics filters, makes it possible to translate, for each TF, protein binding microarray data into a set of high-quality target genes. With this approach, we confirm NAC target genes reported from independent in vivo analyses. We emphasize that candidate target gene sets together...

  3. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF binding proteins, and other endocrine factors in milk: role in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Jürg W; Baumrucker, Craig R

    2008-01-01

    The role of colostrum and milk in the neonate has been chiefly recognized as a comprehensive nutrient foodstuff. In addition, the provision of colostrum-the first milk-for early immune capacity has been well documented for several species. Colostrum is additionally a rich and concentrated source of various factors that demonstrate biological activity in vitro. Three hypotheses have been proposed for the phenotypic function of these secreted bioactive components: (1) only mammary disposal, (2) mammary cell regulation, and (3) neonatal function [gastrointestinal tract (GIT) or systemic]. Traditionally, it was assumed that the development of the GIT is preprogrammed and not influenced by events occurring in the intestinal lumen. However, a large volume of research has demonstrated that colostrum (or milk-borne) bioactive components can basically contribute to the regulation of GIT growth and differentiation, while their role in postnatal development at physiological concentrations has remained elusive. Much of our current understanding is derived from cell culture and laboratory animals, but experimentation with agriculturally important species is taking place. This chapter provides an overview of work conducted primarily in neonatal calves and secondarily in other species on the effects on neonates of selected peptide endocrine factors (hormones, growth factors, in part cytokines) in colostrum. The primary focus will be on insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) and other bioactive peptides, but new interest and concern about steroids (especially estrogens) in milk are considered as well.

  4. The Populus ARBORKNOX1 homeodomain transcription factor regulates woody growth through binding to evolutionarily conserved target genes of diverse function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijun; Zinkgraf, Matthew; Petzold, H Earl; Beers, Eric P; Filkov, Vladimir; Groover, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The class I KNOX homeodomain transcription factor ARBORKNOX1 (ARK1) is a key regulator of vascular cambium maintenance and cell differentiation in Populus. Currently, basic information is lacking concerning the distribution, functional characteristics, and evolution of ARK1 binding in the Populus genome. Here, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) technology to identify ARK1 binding loci genome-wide in Populus. Computational analyses evaluated the distribution of ARK1 binding loci, the function of genes associated with bound loci, the effect of ARK1 binding on transcript levels, and evolutionary conservation of ARK1 binding loci. ARK1 binds to thousands of loci which are highly enriched proximal to the transcriptional start sites of genes of diverse functions. ARK1 target genes are significantly enriched in paralogs derived from the whole-genome salicoid duplication event. Both ARK1 and a maize (Zea mays) homolog, KNOTTED1, preferentially target evolutionarily conserved genes. However, only a small portion of ARK1 target genes are significantly differentially expressed in an ARK1 over-expression mutant. This study describes the functional characteristics and evolution of DNA binding by a transcription factor in an undomesticated tree, revealing complexities similar to those shown for transcription factors in model animal species. No claim to original US Government works. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Platelet activating factor receptor binding plays a critical role in jet fuel-induced immune suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Gerardo; Kazimi, Nasser; Nghiem, Dat X.; Walterscheid, Jeffrey P.; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    Applying military jet fuel (JP-8) or commercial jet fuel (Jet-A) to the skin of mice suppresses the immune response in a dose-dependant manner. The release of biological response modifiers, particularly prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ), is a critical step in activating immune suppression. Previous studies have shown that injecting selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors into jet fuel-treated mice blocks immune suppression. Because the inflammatory phospholipid mediator, platelet-activating factor (PAF), up-regulates cyclooxygenase-2 production and PGE 2 synthesis by keratinocytes, we tested the hypothesis that PAF-receptor binding plays a role in jet fuel-induced immune suppression. Treating keratinocyte cultures with PAF and/or jet fuel (JP-8 and Jet-A) stimulates PGE 2 secretion. Jet fuel-induced PGE 2 production was suppressed by treating the keratinocytes with specific PAF-receptor antagonists. Injecting mice with PAF, or treating the skin of the mice with JP-8, or Jet-A, induced immune suppression. Jet fuel-induced immune suppression was blocked when the jet fuel-treated mice were injected with PAF-receptor antagonists before treatment. Jet fuel treatment has been reported to activate oxidative stress and treating the mice with anti-oxidants (Vitamins C, or E or beta-hydroxy toluene), before jet fuel application, interfered with immune suppression. These findings confirm previous studies showing that PAF-receptor binding can modulate immune function. Furthermore, they suggest that PAF-receptor binding may be an early event in the induction of immune suppression by immunotoxic environmental agents that target the skin

  6. WordSpy: identifying transcription factor binding motifs by building a dictionary and learning a grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guandong; Yu, Taotao; Zhang, Weixiong

    2005-07-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding sites or motifs (TFBMs) are functional cis-regulatory DNA sequences that play an essential role in gene transcriptional regulation. Although many experimental and computational methods have been developed, finding TFBMs remains a challenging problem. We propose and develop a novel dictionary based motif finding algorithm, which we call WordSpy. One significant feature of WordSpy is the combination of a word counting method and a statistical model which consists of a dictionary of motifs and a grammar specifying their usage. The algorithm is suitable for genome-wide motif finding; it is capable of discovering hundreds of motifs from a large set of promoters in a single run. We further enhance WordSpy by applying gene expression information to separate true TFBMs from spurious ones, and by incorporating negative sequences to identify discriminative motifs. In addition, we also use randomly selected promoters from the genome to evaluate the significance of the discovered motifs. The output from WordSpy consists of an ordered list of putative motifs and a set of regulatory sequences with motif binding sites highlighted. The web server of WordSpy is available at http://cic.cs.wustl.edu/wordspy.

  7. Demonstration of epidermal growth factor binding sites in the adult rat pancreas by light microscopic autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabot, J.G.; Walker, P.; Pelletier, G.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors was studied in the pancreas using light microscopic autoradiography, which was performed at different time intervals (2-60 min) after injecting 125 I-labeled EGF intravenously into the adult rat. In the exocrine pancreas, a labeling was found to occur over the pyramidal cells of the acini and cells lining the intercalated ducts. Moreover, substantial binding of EGF to cells of the islets of Langerhans was also revealed. At the 2-min time interval, most silver grains were found at the periphery of the target cells. The localization, as well as the diminution of silver grains over the cytoplasm of these cells, between 7 and 60 min, suggested the internalization and degradation of 125 I-labeled EGF. Control experiments indicated that the autoradiography reaction was due to specific interaction of 125 I-labeled EGF with its receptor. These results clearly indicate that EGF receptors are present in the acinar cells and the cells of intercalated ducts of the exocrine pancreas, as well as the cells of the endocrine pancreas. Finding that there are EGF binding sites in pancreatic acinar cells supports the physiological role of EGF in the regulation of pancreatic exocrine function. The presence of EGF receptors in cells of the islets of Langerhans suggests that EGF may play a role in the regulation of the endocrine pancreas

  8. Profiling of transcription factor binding events by chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liang; Koga, Yusuke; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-01-01

    In multi-cellular organisms, gene expression is orchestrated by thousands of transcription factors (TF). Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a robust tool to investigate gene expression because this technique profiles in vivo protein-DNA interaction at a genome-wide scale. Eight years after the first ChIP-seq paper, there are limited reports of ChIP-seq experiments in plants, especially for sequence-specific DNA binding TFs This lag greatly prevents our understanding of transcriptional regulation in an entire kingdom. In order to bridge the technical gap, we describe a ChIP-seq procedure that we have successfully applied to dozens of sequence-specific DNA binding TFs. The basic protocol includes procedures to isolate nuclei, sonicate chromatin, immunoprecipitate TF-DNA complex, and recover ChIP-enriched DNA fragments. The support protocol also describes practices to optimize library preparation by a gel-free DNA size selection. Lastly, examples are given to optimize library amplification using real-time PCR.

  9. Cyclic Limulus anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) factor-derived peptide CLP-19 antagonizes LPS function by blocking binding to LPS binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Ni, Bing; Ren, Jian-dong; Chen, Jian-hong; Tian, Zhi-qiang; Tang, Min; Li, Di; Xia, Peiyuan

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation and septic shock due to endotoxins from Gram-negative bacteria infection continue to pose significant challenges to human healthcare. It is, therefore, necessary to develop therapeutic strategies targeting endotoxins, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), to prevent their potentially systemic effects. Pathogenesis due to Gram-negative bacteria involves LPS binding to the host LPS-binding protein (LBP), causing detrimental downstream signaling cascades. Our previous study showed that CLP-19, a synthetic peptide derived from the Limulus anti-LPS factor (LALF), could effectively neutralize LPS toxicity; however, the detailed mechanisms underlying this anti-LPS effect remained unexplained. Thus, we carried out investigations to determine how the CLP-19 neutralizes LPS toxicity. CLP-19 was found to block LPS binding to LBP in a dose-dependent manner, as evidenced by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, CLP-19 blocked LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling proteins p38, extracellular signal-regulating kinase (ERK)1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)1/2. Furthermore, CLP-19 potency in LPS antagonism in vitro and in vivo was directly associated with its ability to block the LPS-LBP interaction. Taken together, the results suggested that CLP-19's inhibitory effect on LPS-LBP binding and on the subsequent MAPK pathway signaling may be responsible for its anti-LPS mechanism. This peptide appears to represent a potential therapeutic agent for clinical treatment of sepsis.

  10. Novel Strategy for Discrimination of Transcription Factor Binding Motifs Employing Mathematical Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Asuka; Sumi, Takuya; Kang, Jiyoung; Tateno, Masaru

    2017-07-01

    Recognition in biological macromolecular systems, such as DNA-protein recognition, is one of the most crucial problems to solve toward understanding the fundamental mechanisms of various biological processes. Since specific base sequences of genome DNA are discriminated by proteins, such as transcription factors (TFs), finding TF binding motifs (TFBMs) in whole genome DNA sequences is currently a central issue in interdisciplinary biophysical and information sciences. In the present study, a novel strategy to create a discriminant function for discrimination of TFBMs by constituting mathematical neural networks (NNs) is proposed, together with a method to determine the boundary of signals (TFBMs) and noise in the NN-score (output) space. This analysis also leads to the mathematical limitation of discrimination in the recognition of features representing TFBMs, in an information geometrical manifold. Thus, the present strategy enables the identification of the whole space of TFBMs, right up to the noise boundary.

  11. [A preliminary functional study of AT motif binding factor 1 in colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shu-Feng; Zhong, Lin

    2016-06-20

    To investigate the function of AT motif binding factor 1 (ATBF1) in colorectal cancer. ATBF1 protein expression was detected in 146 pairs of colorectal cancer tissues and the adjacent tissues using immunohistochemistry. ATBF1 protein expression was also examined in colorectal cell lines with laser confocal microscopy. ATBF1-A protein expression in colorectal cancer tissues of different differentiation grades and in the colorectal cancer cell lines were detected with Western blotting. The expressions of ATBF1 mRNA in 38 moderately differentiated colorectal cancer tissues and the paired adjacent tissues and in the colorectal cancer cell lines were tested using RT-PCR. ATBF1 protein expression levels in colorectal cancer tissues and adjacent tissues differed significantly (Pcolorectal cancer cell lines. ATBF1 executes the role of a tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer, and its protein expression is associated with tumor differentiation and lymph node metastases.

  12. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator-like proteases in teleosts lack genuine receptor-binding epidermal growth factor-like domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, René; Kristensen, Thomas K.; Jensen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    PA by lacking the exon encoding the uPAR-binding epidermal growth factor-like domain; zfuPA-b differs from mammalian uPA by lacking two cysteines of the epidermal growth factor-like domain and a uPAR-binding sequence comparable with that found in mammalian uPA. Accordingly, no zfuPA-b binding activity could...

  13. A family of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding proteins represses translation in late development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J; Christiansen, J; Lykke-Andersen, J

    1999-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a major fetal growth factor. The IGF-II gene generates multiple mRNAs with different 5' untranslated regions (5' UTRs) that are translated in a differential manner during development. We have identified a human family of three IGF-II mRNA-binding proteins...

  14. Regulation of myotube formation by the actin-binding factor drebrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancini Annalisa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myogenic differentiation involves cell-cycle arrest, activation of the muscle-specific transcriptome, and elongation, alignment and fusion of myoblasts into multinucleated myotubes. This process is controlled by promyogenic transcription factors and regulated by signaling pathways in response to extracellular cues. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK pathway promotes the activity of several such transcription factors, including MyoD and MEF2, thereby controlling the muscle-specific transcription program. However, few p38-regulated genes that play a role in the regulation of myogenesis have been identified. Methods RNA interference (RNAi, chemical inhibition and immunofluorescence approaches were used to assess the role of drebrin in differentiation of primary mouse myoblasts and C2C12 cells. Results In a search for p38-regulated genes that promote myogenic differentiation, we identified Dbn1, which encodes the actin-binding protein drebrin. Drebrin is an F-actin side-binding protein that remodels actin to facilitate the change of filopodia into dendritic spines during synaptogenesis in developing neurons. Dbn1 mRNA and protein are induced during differentiation of primary mouse and C2C12 myoblasts, and induction is substantially reduced by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. Primary myoblasts and C2C12 cells depleted of drebrin by RNAi display reduced levels of myogenin and myosin heavy chain and form multinucleated myotubes very inefficiently. Treatment of myoblasts with BTP2, a small-molecule inhibitor of drebrin, produces a phenotype similar to that produced by knockdown of drebrin, and the inhibitory effects of BTP2 are rescued by expression of a mutant form of drebrin that is unable to bind BTP2. Drebrin in myoblasts is enriched in cellular projections and cell cortices and at regions of cell-cell contact, all sites where F-actin, too, was concentrated. Conclusions Our findings reveal that Dbn1 expression is

  15. Meningococcal factor H binding proteins in epidemic strains from Africa: implications for vaccine development.

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    Rolando Pajon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Factor H binding protein (fHbp is an important antigen for vaccines against meningococcal serogroup B disease. The protein binds human factor H (fH, which enables the bacteria to resist serum bactericidal activity. Little is known about the vaccine-potential of fHbp for control of meningococcal epidemics in Africa, which typically are caused by non-group B strains.We investigated genes encoding fHbp in 106 serogroup A, W-135 and X case isolates from 17 African countries. We determined complement-mediated bactericidal activity of antisera from mice immunized with recombinant fHbp vaccines, or a prototype native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV vaccine from a serogroup B mutant strain with over-expressed fHbp. Eighty-six of the isolates (81% had one of four prevalent fHbp sequence variants, ID 4/5 (serogroup A isolates, 9 (W-135, or 74 (X in variant group 1, or ID 22/23 (W-135 in variant group 2. More than one-third of serogroup A isolates and two-thirds of W-135 isolates tested had low fHbp expression while all X isolates tested had intermediate or high expression. Antisera to the recombinant fHbp vaccines were generally bactericidal only against isolates with fHbp sequence variants that closely matched the respective vaccine ID. Low fHbp expression also contributed to resistance to anti-fHbp bactericidal activity. In contrast to the recombinant vaccines, the NOMV fHbp ID 1 vaccine elicited broad anti-fHbp bactericidal activity, and the antibodies had greater ability to inhibit binding of fH to fHbp than antibodies elicited by the control recombinant fHbp ID 1 vaccine.NOMV vaccines from mutants with increased fHbp expression elicit an antibody repertoire with greater bactericidal activity than recombinant fHbp vaccines. NOMV vaccines are promising for prevention of meningococcal disease in Africa and could be used to supplement coverage conferred by a serogroup A polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine recently introduced in some sub

  16. Beyond Thermodynamics: Drug Binding Kinetics Could Influence Epidermal Growth Factor Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Mayank; Rizzo, Michael; Schumacher, Frank; Wong, Chung F.

    2009-01-01

    We modeled the kinetics of drug binding to protein kinases in the EGF signaling pathway relevant to non-small cell lung cancer and found that binding kinetics could influence therapeutic potential, that fast binding kinetics was advantageous for most targets with a couple of exceptions, that targeting some protein kinases could enhance rather than attenuate the pathway, and that IC50 could be sensitive to the kinetic parameters of drug binding. PMID:19702309

  17. Expression and Critical Role of Interleukin Enhancer Binding Factor 2 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobing Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin enhancer binding factor 2 (ILF2, a transcription factor, regulates cell growth by inhibiting the stabilization of mRNA. Currently, its role has gained recognition as a factor in the tumorigenic process. However, until now, little has been known about the detailed role ILF2 plays in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In this study, we investigated the expression levels of ILF2 in HCC tissue with Western blot and immunohistochemical assays. To examine the effect of ILF2 on liver cancer cell growth and apoptosis, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs targeting ILF2 were recombined to create lentiviral overexpression vectors. Our results showed higher expression levels of ILF2 mRNA and ILF2 protein in HCC tissue compared with matched peritumoral tissue. Expression of ILF2 may regulate cell growth and apoptosis in liver cancer cells via regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2, Bcl-2 related ovarian killer (Bok, Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX, and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1 (cIAP1. Moreover, we inoculated nude mice with liver cancer cells to investigate the effect of ILF2 on tumorigenesis in vivo. As expected, a rapid growth was observed in cancer cells inoculated with a lentiviral vector coding Flag-ILF2 (Lenti-ILF2 compared with the control cells. Hence, these results promote a better understanding of ILF2’s potential role as a therapeutic target in HCC.

  18. Overexpression of Heparin-Binding Epidermal Growth Factor-Like Growth Factor Mediates Liver Fibrosis in Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yongze; Ding, Qian; Chen, Lei; Ji, Chenguang; Hao, Huiyao; Wang, Jia; Qi, Wei; Xie, Xiaoli; Ma, Junji; Li, Aidi; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiaotian; Jiang, Huiqing

    2017-08-01

    The role of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) in liver fibrosis is not clear and is sometimes even contradictory. To clarify this role, a HB-EGF transgenic (Tg) mouse model was, for the first time, used to evaluate the functions of HB-EGF in liver fibrosis. For the in vivo study, carbon tetrachloride injection and bile duct ligation treatment were used to induce liver fibrosis in HB-EGF Tg mice and wild-type (WT) mice, respectively. Primary hepatic satellite cells (HSCs) were isolated from HB-EGF Tg and WT mice for the in vitro study. Compared with the WT mice, HB-EGF Tg mice were shown to develop more severe liver fibrosis when treated with carbon tetrachloride or bile duct ligation, with increased matrix metalloproteinases 13 activity and enhanced expression of fibrogenic genes including α-smooth muscle actin and collagen I. HB-EGF gene transfer led to an increase in proliferation and a decrease in apoptosis in primary HSCs. The ERK signaling pathway was more highly activated in primary HSCs from HB-EGF Tg mice than in those from WT mice. Our investigation confirmed the profibrotic effect of HB-EGF on the liver using a Tg mouse model. This result may contribute to the elucidation of HB-EGF as a therapeutic target in liver fibrosis. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxidative stress effect on progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) binding to PIBF-receptor in lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haba, Carlos; Palacio, José R; Palkovics, Tamas; Szekeres-Barthó, Júlia; Morros, Antoni; Martínez, Paz

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-ligand binding is an essential interaction for biological function. Oxidative stress can modify receptors and/or membrane lipid dynamics, thus altering cell physiological functions. The aim of this study is to analyze how oxidative stress may alter receptor-ligand binding and lipid domain distribution in the case of progesterone-induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor. For membrane fluidity regionalization analysis of MEC-1 lymphocytes, two-photon microscopy was used in individual living cells. Lymphocytes were also double stained with AlexaFluor647/progesterone-induced blocking factor and Laurdan to evaluate -induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor distribution in the different membrane domains, under oxidative stress. A new procedure has been developed which quantitatively analyzes the regionalization of a membrane receptor among the lipid domains of different fluidity in the plasma membrane. We have been able to establish a new tool which detects and evaluates lipid raft clustering from two-photon microscopy images of individual living cells. We show that binding of progesterone-induced blocking factor to progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor causes a rigidification of plasma membrane which is related to an increase of lipid raft clustering. However, this clustering is inhibited under oxidative stress conditions. In conclusion, oxidative stress decreases membrane fluidity, impairs receptor-ligand binding and reduces lipid raft clustering. © 2013.

  20. Comparative binding of bovine, human and rat insulin-like growth factors to membrane receptors and to antibodies against human insulin-like growth factor-1.

    OpenAIRE

    Read, L C; Ballard, F J; Francis, G L; Baxter, R C; Bagley, C J; Wallace, J C

    1986-01-01

    The immunological properties of human, bovine and rat insulin-like growth factors (IGF) and insulin were compared in competitive binding studies with Tr10 and NPA polyclonal antisera raised in rabbits against human IGF-1. Bovine IGF-1 was 11-19% as effective as human IGF-1 in competing for binding with 125I-labelled human IGF-1, whereas IGF-2 reacted poorly and insulin did not compete. Similar competitive binding curves were obtained with the mouse monoclonal anti-(human IGF-1) antibody 3D1, ...

  1. Variable Extent of Lineage-Specificity and Developmental Stage-Specificity of Cohesin and CCCTC-Binding Factor Binding Within the Immunoglobulin and T Cell Receptor Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Loguercio

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF is largely responsible for the 3D architecture of the genome, in concert with the action of cohesin, through the creation of long-range chromatin loops. Cohesin is hypothesized to be the main driver of these long-range chromatin interactions by the process of loop extrusion. Here, we performed ChIP-seq for CTCF and cohesin in two stages each of T and B cell differentiation and examined the binding pattern in all six antigen receptor (AgR loci in these lymphocyte progenitors and in mature T and B cells, ES cells, and fibroblasts. The four large AgR loci have many bound CTCF sites, most of which are only occupied in lymphocytes, while only the CTCF sites at the end of each locus near the enhancers or J genes tend to be bound in non-lymphoid cells also. However, despite the generalized lymphocyte restriction of CTCF binding in AgR loci, the Igκ locus is the only locus that also shows significant lineage-specificity (T vs. B cells and developmental stage-specificity (pre-B vs. pro-B in CTCF binding. We show that cohesin binding shows greater lineage- and stage-specificity than CTCF at most AgR loci, providing more specificity to the loops. We also show that the culture of pro-B cells in IL7, a common practice to expand the number of cells before ChIP-seq, results in a CTCF-binding pattern resembling pre-B cells, as well as other epigenetic and transcriptional characteristics of pre-B cells. Analysis of the orientation of the CTCF sites show that all sites within the large V portions of the Igh and TCRβ loci have the same orientation. This suggests either a lack of requirement for convergent CTCF sites creating loops, or indicates an absence of any loops between CTCF sites within the V region portion of those loci but only loops to the convergent sites at the D-J-enhancer end of each locus. The V region portions of the Igκ and TCRα/δ loci, by contrast, have CTCF sites in both orientations, providing many options for

  2. C4b-binding protein inhibits the factor V-dependent but not the factor V-independent cofactor activity of protein S in the activated protein C-mediated inactivation of factor VIIIa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poel, R. H.; Meijers, J. C.; Bouma, B. N.

    2001-01-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is an important inactivator of coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. In the inactivation of factors Va and VIIIa, protein S serves as a cofactor to APC. Protein S can bind to C4b-binding protein (C4BP), and thereby loses its cofactor activity to APC. By modulating free protein

  3. [Rbf1 (RPG-box binding factor), a transcription factor involved in yeast-hyphal transition of Candida albicans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Y; Ishii, N; Watanabe, M; Yoshihara, F; Arisawa, M

    1998-01-01

    The major fungal pathogen for fungal diseases which have become a major medical problem in the last few years is Candida albicans, which can grow both in yeast and hyphae forms. This ability of C. albicans is thought to contribute to its colonization and dissemination within host tissues. In a recent few years, accompanying the introduction of molecular biological tools into C. albicans organism, several factors involved in the signal transduction pathway for yeast-hyphal transition have been identified. One MAP kinase pathway in C. albicans, similar to that leading to STE12 activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been reported. C. albicans strains mutant in these genes show retarded filamentous growth on a solid media but no impairment of filamentous growth in mice. These results suggest two scenarios that a kinase signaling cascade plays a part in stimulating the morphological transition in C. albicans, and that there would be another signaling pathway effective in animals. In this latter true hyphal pathway, although some candidate proteins, such as Efg1 (transcription factor), Int1 (integrin-like membrane protein), or Phr1 (pH-regulated membrane protein), have been identified, it is still too early to say that we understand the whole picture of that cascade. We have cloned a C. albicans gene encoding a novel DNA binding protein, Rbf1, that predominantly localizes in the nucleus, and shows transcriptional activation capability. Disruption of the functional RBF1 genes of C. albicans induced the filamentous growth on all solid and liquid media tested, suggesting that Rbf1 might be another candidate for the true hyphal pathway. Relationships with other factors described above, and the target (regulated) genes of Rbf1 is under investigation.

  4. Pipeline for Efficient Mapping of Transcription Factor Binding Sites and Comparison of Their Models

    KAUST Repository

    Ba alawi, Wail

    2011-06-01

    The control of genes in every living organism is based on activities of transcription factor (TF) proteins. These TFs interact with DNA by binding to the TF binding sites (TFBSs) and in that way create conditions for the genes to activate. Of the approximately 1500 TFs in human, TFBSs are experimentally derived only for less than 300 TFs and only in generally limited portions of the genome. To be able to associate TF to genes they control we need to know if TFs will have a potential to interact with the control region of the gene. For this we need to have models of TFBS families. The existing models are not sufficiently accurate or they are too complex for use by ordinary biologists. To remove some of the deficiencies of these models, in this study we developed a pipeline through which we achieved the following: 1. Through a comparison analysis of the performance we identified the best models with optimized thresholds among the four different types of models of TFBS families. 2. Using the best models we mapped TFBSs to the human genome in an efficient way. The study shows that a new scoring function used with TFBS models based on the position weight matrix of dinucleotides with remote dependency results in better accuracy than the other three types of the TFBS models. The speed of mapping has been improved by developing a parallelized code and shows a significant speed up of 4x when going from 1 CPU to 8 CPUs. To verify if the predicted TFBSs are more accurate than what can be expected with the conventional models, we identified the most frequent pairs of TFBSs (for TFs E4F1 and ATF6) that appeared close to each other (within the distance of 200 nucleotides) over the human genome. We show unexpectedly that the genes that are most close to the multiple pairs of E4F1/ATF6 binding sites have a co-expression of over 90%. This indirectly supports our hypothesis that the TFBS models we use are more accurate and also suggests that the E4F1/ATF6 pair is exerting the

  5. Identification of transcription factor AML-1 binding site upstream of human cytomegalovirus UL111A gene.

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    Xiaoqun Zheng

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV interleukin-10 (hcmvIL-10, encoded by HCMV UL111A gene, is a homolog of human IL-10. It exerts immunomodulatory effects that allow HCMV to evade host defense mechanisms. However, the exact mechanism underlying the regulation of hcmvIL-10 expression is not well understood. The transcription factor acute myeloid leukemia 1 (AML-1 plays an important role in the regulation of various genes involved in the differentiation of hematopoietic lineages. A putative AML-1 binding site is present within the upstream regulatory region (URR of UL111A gene. To provide evidence that AML-1 is involved in regulating UL111A gene expression, we examined the interaction of AML-1 with the URR of UL111A in HCMV-infected human monocytic THP-1 cells using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. HcmvIL-10 transcription was detected in differentiated THP-1 cells, but not in undifferentiated ones. Furthermore, the URR of UL111A showed a higher intensity of AML-1 binding, a higher level of histone H3 acetyl-K9, but a lower level of histone H3 dimethyl-K9 in differentiated THP-1 cells than undifferentiated cells. Down-regulation of AML1 by RNA interference decreased the expression of the UL111A gene. Our results suggest that AML-1 may contribute to the epigenetic regulation of UL111A gene via histone modification in HCMV-infected differentiated THP-1 cells. This finding could be useful for the development of new anti-viral therapies.

  6. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor binding activity of the roots of Enicosanthellum pulchrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Noraziah; Jalil, Juriyati; Jantan, Ibrahim; Murad, Shahnaz

    2012-03-01

    Enicosanthellum pulchrum (King) Heusden (Annonaceae) is a coniferous tree that is confined to mountain forests. The chemical constituents of this species have been studied previously; however, its biological activity has never been investigated before and is reported here for the first time. The extracts, fractions and compounds from the roots of E. pulchrum were investigated for their inhibitory effects on platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor binding to rabbit platelets using (3)H-PAF as a ligand. The PAF receptor binding inhibitory effect using rabbit platelets was determined in vitro by measuring the difference between total amount of bound (3)H-PAF in the presence and the absence of excess unlabelled PAF. The compounds were isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic techniques. Among the extracts tested, the ethyl acetate extract was the most active with 85.6% inhibition, while hexane and methanol extracts showed 40.2 and 42.5% inhibition, respectively. Fractionation of the ethyl acetate extract using vacuum liquid chromatography (VLC) yielded six fractions AEA(I--VI). Chromatography fraction AEA(VI) yielded a new compound, 1-(2',3',4'-trimethoxyphenyl)hexan-1-ol, while fraction AEA(III) afforded three compounds, namely liriodenine, cleistopholine and dehydroanonaine. 1-(2',3',4'-Trimethoxyphenyl)hexan-1-ol, cleistopholine and dehydroanonaine showed relatively strong inhibition with IC(50) values of 26.6, 50.2 and 45.4 µM, respectively. The results suggest that these compounds could be responsible for the PAF antagonistic activity of the ethyl acetate extract of this plant.

  7. Role of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in glucose and lipid metabolism

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    Ho-Seong Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP-3 has roles in modulating the effect of IGFs by binding to IGFs and inhibiting cell proliferation in an IGF-independent manner. Although recent studies have been reported that IGFBP-3 has also roles in metabolic regulation, their exact roles in adipose tissue are poorly understood. In this review, we summarized the studies about the biological roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. IGFBP-3 overexpression in transgenic mice suggested that IGFBP-3 results in glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. IGFBP-3 knockout (KO mice exhibited normal insulin level and glucose response after glucose challenge. More recent study in IGFBP-3 KO mice with a high-fat diet demonstrated that IGFBP-3 KO mice exhibited elevated fasting glucose and insulin, but normal response to glucose challenge, suggesting that IGFBP-3 KO mice may induce insulin resistance even though preserved insulin sensitivity. In vitro and in vivo studies using 3T3-L1 adipocytes and rat, IGFBP-3 induced insulin resistance by inhibiting glucose uptake. In contrast, the reduced levels of IGFBP-3 in obesity might induce insulin resistance by suppression of IGFBP-3's anti-inflammatory function, suggesting IGFBP-3 has a protective effect on insulin resistance. Also, proteolysis of IGFBP-3 might contribute to the insulin resistance in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, IGFBP-3 inhibited adipocyte differentiation, suggesting IGFBP-3 may contribute to the insulin insensitivity. Taken together, it is not yet certain that IGFBP-3 has a protective effect or enhancing effect on insulin resistance, and more studies will be needed to clarify the roles of IGFBP-3 in metabolic regulation.

  8. Predicting combinatorial binding of transcription factors to regulatory elements in the human genome by association rule mining

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Xochitl C; Ni, Shulin; Miranker, Daniel P; Iyer, Vishwanath R

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Cis-acting transcriptional regulatory elements in mammalian genomes typically contain specific combinations of binding sites for various transcription factors. Although some cis-regulatory elements have been well studied, the combinations of transcription factors that regulate normal expression levels for the vast majority of the 20,000 genes in the human genome are unknown. We hypothesized that it should be possible to discover transcription factor combinations that regul...

  9. Disruption and formation of surface salt bridges are coupled to DNA binding by integration host factor: a computational analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, L.; Sundlass, N. K.; Raines, R. T.; Cui, Q.

    2010-01-01

    Revealing the thermodynamic driving force of protein/DNA interactions is crucial to the understanding of factors that dictate the properties and function of protein-DNA complexes. For the binding of DNA to DNA-wrapping proteins, such as the integration host factor (IHF), Record and co-workers have proposed that the disruption of a large number of pre-existing salt-bridges is coupled with the binding process (J. Mol. Biol., 310, 2001, 379). To test this proposal, we have carried out explicit s...

  10. Anti-tumor activity of a novel HS-mimetic-vascular endothelial growth factor binding small molecule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyuki Sugahara

    Full Text Available The angiogenic process is controlled by variety of factors of which the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF pathway plays a major role. A series of heparan sulfate mimetic small molecules targeting VEGF/VEGFR pathway has been synthesized. Among them, compound 8 (2-butyl-5-chloro-3-(4-nitro-benzyl-3H-imidazole-4-carbaldehyde was identified as a significant binding molecule for the heparin-binding domain of VEGF, determined by high-throughput-surface plasmon resonance assay. The data predicted strong binding of compound 8 with VEGF which may prevent the binding of VEGF to its receptor. We compared the structure of compound 8 with heparan sulfate (HS, which have in common the functional ionic groups such as sulfate, nitro and carbaldehyde that can be located in similar positions of the disaccharide structure of HS. Molecular docking studies predicted that compound 8 binds at the heparin binding domain of VEGF through strong hydrogen bonding with Lys-30 and Gln-20 amino acid residues, and consistent with the prediction, compound 8 inhibited binding of VEGF to immobilized heparin. In vitro studies showed that compound 8 inhibits the VEGF-induced proliferation migration and tube formation of mouse vascular endothelial cells, and finally the invasion of a murine osteosarcoma cell line (LM8G7 which secrets high levels of VEGF. In vivo, these effects produce significant decrease of tumor burden in an experimental model of liver metastasis. Collectively, these data indicate that compound 8 may prevent tumor growth through a direct effect on tumor cell proliferation and by inhibition of endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis mediated by VEGF. In conclusion, compound 8 may normalize the tumor vasculature and microenvironment in tumors probably by inhibiting the binding of VEGF to its receptor.

  11. Cultured fibroblast monolayers secrete a protein that alters the cellular binding of somatomedin-C/insulinlike growth factor I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemmons, D.R.; Elgin, R.G.; Han, V.K.; Casella, S.J.; D'Ercole, A.J.; Van Wyk, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    We studied somatomedin-C/insulinlike growth factor (Sm-C/IGF-I) binding to human fibroblasts in both adherent monolayers and in suspension cultures. The addition of Sm-C/IGF-I in concentrations between 0.5 and 10 ng/ml to monolayers cultures resulted in a paradoxical increase in 125 I-Sm-C/IGF-I binding and concentrations between 25 and 300 ng/ml were required to displace the labeled peptide. The addition of unlabeled insulin resulted in no displacement of labeled Sm-C/IGF-I from the adherent cells. When fibroblast suspensions were used Sm-C/IGF-I concentrations between 1 and 10 ng/ml caused displacement, the paradoxical increase in 125 I-Sm-C/IGF-I binding was not detected, and insulin displaced 60% of the labeled peptide. Affinity cross-linking to fibroblast monolayers revealed a 43,000-mol wt 125 I-Sm-C-binding-protein complex that was not detected after cross-linking to suspended cells. The 43,000-mol wt complex was not detected after cross-linking to smooth muscle cell monolayers, and binding studies showed that 125 I-Sm-C/IGF-I was displaced greater than 90% by Sm-C/IGF-I using concentrations between 0.5 and 10 ng/ml. Because fibroblast-conditioned medium contains the 43,000-mol wt complex, smooth muscle cells were incubated with conditioned medium for 24 h prior to initiation of the binding studies. 125 I-Sm-C/IGF-I-binding increased 1.6-fold compared to control cultures and after cross-linking the 43,000-mol wt complex could be detected on the smooth muscle cell surface. Human fibroblast monolayers secrete a protein that binds 125 I-Sm-C/IGF-I which can be transferred to the smooth muscle cell surface and alters 125I-Sm-C/IGF-I binding

  12. Decomposition of the factors that govern binding site preference in a multiple rotaxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Joseph P; Sohlberg, Karl

    2009-06-18

    A particularly interesting class of multiple rotaxanes consists of complexes where one long shaft threads two rings. If the shaft contains three or more potential binding sites for the rings, multiple co-conformations are possible. Such a complex is a molecular topological analogue to an abacus. Here we address the question, how does strength of ring binding to the shaft vary with respect to position on the shaft? Previous studies have found that a shaft with three binding sites exhibits strongest ring binding at the center site. Here a five-binding-site shaft is studied. We employ a novel method to partition the total energy of the system into contributions from intercomponent binding and intracomponent distortion. The method uses the output of quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations to determine fitting parameters in a set of coupled equations. The solution of the equations yields the energy partitioning and reveals the influence of long-range intercomponent interactions.

  13. Genome-wide identification of transcription factors and transcription-factor binding sites in oleaginous microalgae Nannochloropsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianqiang; Wang, Dongmei; Li, Jing; Jing, Gongchao; Ning, Kang; Xu, Jian

    2014-06-26

    Nannochloropsis spp. are a group of oleaginous microalgae that harbor an expanded array of lipid-synthesis related genes, yet how they are transcriptionally regulated remains unknown. Here a phylogenomic approach was employed to identify and functionally annotate the transcriptional factors (TFs) and TF binding-sites (TFBSs) in N. oceanica IMET1. Among 36 microalgae and higher plants genomes, a two-fold reduction in the number of TF families plus a seven-fold decrease of average family-size in Nannochloropsis, Rhodophyta and Chlorophyta were observed. The degree of similarity in TF-family profiles is indicative of the phylogenetic relationship among the species, suggesting co-evolution of TF-family profiles and species. Furthermore, comparative analysis of six Nannochloropsis genomes revealed 68 "most-conserved" TFBS motifs, with 11 of which predicted to be related to lipid accumulation or photosynthesis. Mapping the IMET1 TFs and TFBS motifs to the reference plant TF-"TFBS motif" relationships in TRANSFAC enabled the prediction of 78 TF-"TFBS motif" interaction pairs, which consisted of 34 TFs (with 11 TFs potentially involved in the TAG biosynthesis pathway), 30 TFBS motifs and 2,368 regulatory connections between TFs and target genes. Our results form the basis of further experiments to validate and engineer the regulatory network of Nannochloropsis spp. for enhanced biofuel production.

  14. The host factor polyhedrin promoter binding protein (PPBP) is involved in transcription from the baculovirus polyhedrin gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S; Jain, A; Mukherjee, B; Habib, S; Hasnain, S E

    1998-09-01

    Hypertranscription and temporal expression from the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis (AcNPV) baculovirus polyhedrin promoter involves an alpha-amanitin-resistant RNA polymerase and requires a trans-acting viral factor(s). We previously reported that a 30-kDa host factor, polyhedrin promoter binding protein (PPBP), binds with unusual affinity, specificity, and stability to the transcriptionally important motif AATAAATAAGTATT within the polyhedrin (polh) initiator promoter and also displays coding strand-specific single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding activity (S. Burma, B. Mukherjee, A. Jain, S. Habib, and S. E. Hasnain, J. Biol. Chem. 269:2750-2757, 1994; B. Mukherjee, S. Burma, and S. E. Hasnain, J. Biol. Chem. 270:4405-4411, 1995). We now present evidence which indicates that an additional factor(s) is involved in stabilizing PPBP-duplex promoter and PPBP-ssDNA interactions. TBP (TATA box binding protein) present in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells is characteristically distinct from PPBP and does not interact directly with the polh promoter. Replacement of PPBP cognate sequences within the polh promoter with random nucleotides abolished PPBP binding in vitro and also failed to express the luciferase reporter gene in vivo. Phosphocellulose fractions of total nuclear extract from virus-infected cells which support in vitro transcription from the polh promoter contain PPBP activity. When PPBP was sequestered by the presence of oligonucleotides containing PPBP cognate sequence motifs, in vitro transcription of a C-free reporter cassette was affected but was restored by the exogenous addition of nuclear extract containing PPBP. When PPBP was mopped out in vivo by a plasmid carrying PPBP cognate sequence present in trans, polh promoter-driven expression of the luciferase reporter was abolished, demonstrating that binding of PPBP to the polh promoter is essential for transcription.

  15. Differential regulation of wild-type and mutant alpha-synuclein binding to synaptic membranes by cytosolic factors

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    Figeys Daniel

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-Synuclein (α-syn, a 140 amino acid protein associated with presynaptic membranes in brain, is a major constituent of Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease (PD. Three missense mutations (A30P, A53T and E46K in the α-syn gene are associated with rare autosomal dominant forms of familial PD. However, the regulation of α-syn's cellular localization in neurons and the effects of the PD-linked mutations are poorly understood. Results In the present study, we analysed the ability of cytosolic factors to regulate α-syn binding to synaptic membranes. We show that co-incubation with brain cytosol significantly increases the membrane binding of normal and PD-linked mutant α-syn. To characterize cytosolic factor(s that modulate α-syn binding properties, we investigated the ability of proteins, lipids, ATP and calcium to modulate α-syn membrane interactions. We report that lipids and ATP are two of the principal cytosolic components that modulate Wt and A53T α-syn binding to the synaptic membrane. We further show that 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C16:0 PAF is one of the principal lipids found in complex with cytosolic proteins and is required to enhance α-syn interaction with synaptic membrane. In addition, the impaired membrane binding observed for A30P α-syn was significantly mitigated by the presence of protease-sensitive factors in brain cytosol. Conclusion These findings suggest that endogenous brain cytosolic factors regulate Wt and mutant α-syn membrane binding, and could represent potential targets to influence α-syn solubility in brain.

  16. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in preterm infants with retinopathy of prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manizheh Mostafa Gharehbaghi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP is the main cause of visual impairment in preterm newborn infants. Objective: This study was conducted to determine whether insulin-like growth factor binding protein -3 (IGFBP-3 is associated with proliferative ROP and has a role in pathogenesis of the disease in premature infants. Materials and Methods: A total of 71 preterm infants born at or before 32 weeks of gestation participated in this study. Studied patients consisted of 41 neonates without vaso-proliferative findings of ROP as the control group and 30 preterm infants with evidence of severe ROP in follow up eye examination as the case group. Blood samples obtained from these infants 6-8 weeks after birth and blood levels of IGFBP-3 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results: The mean gestation age and birth weight of the studied patients were 28.2±1.6 weeks and 1120.7±197 gram in the case group and 28.4±1.6 weeks and 1189.4±454 gram in the control group (P=0.25 and P=0.44 respectively. The infants in the case group had significantly lower Apgar score at first and 5 min after birth. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein -3 (IGFBP-3 was significantly lower in the patients with proliferative ROP than the patients without ROP [592.5±472.9 vs. 995.5±422.2 ng/ml (P=0.009]. Using a cut-off point 770.45 ng/ml for the plasma IGFBP-3, we obtained a sensitivity of 65.9% and a specificity of 66.7% in the preterm infants with vasoproliferative ROP. Conclusion: Our data demonstrated that the blood levels IGFBP-3 was significantly lower in the patients with ROP and it is suspected that IGFBP-3 deficiency in the premature infants may have a pathogenetic role in proliferative ROP.

  17. A ChIP-Seq benchmark shows that sequence conservation mainly improves detection of strong transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Håndstad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors are important controllers of gene expression and mapping transcription factor binding sites (TFBS is key to inferring transcription factor regulatory networks. Several methods for predicting TFBS exist, but there are no standard genome-wide datasets on which to assess the performance of these prediction methods. Also, it is believed that information about sequence conservation across different genomes can generally improve accuracy of motif-based predictors, but it is not clear under what circumstances use of conservation is most beneficial. RESULTS: Here we use published ChIP-seq data and an improved peak detection method to create comprehensive benchmark datasets for prediction methods which use known descriptors or binding motifs to detect TFBS in genomic sequences. We use this benchmark to assess the performance of five different prediction methods and find that the methods that use information about sequence conservation generally perform better than simpler motif-scanning methods. The difference is greater on high-affinity peaks and when using short and information-poor motifs. However, if the motifs are specific and information-rich, we find that simple motif-scanning methods can perform better than conservation-based methods. CONCLUSIONS: Our benchmark provides a comprehensive test that can be used to rank the relative performance of transcription factor binding site prediction methods. Moreover, our results show that, contrary to previous reports, sequence conservation is better suited for predicting strong than weak transcription factor binding sites.

  18. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF binding proteins, serum acid-labile subunit and growth hormone binding protein in nephrotic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, D; Tönshoff, B; Blum, W F; Vickers, M; Siebler, T; Cronin, M J; Baxter, R C; Mehls, O

    1997-09-01

    We hypothesized that the increased glomerular permeability to serum proteins in the nephrotic syndrome might lead to alterations of the somatotropic hormone axis, thereby contributing to growth failure and catabolism in the nephrotic state. The insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II and the IGF binding proteins (IGFBP)-1, -2 and -3 were analyzed in serum and urine of 21 children with the nephrotic syndrome and normal glomerular filtration rate. Mean age-related serum IGF-I levels by RIA (-0.53 +/- 0.34 SD) were slightly, but significantly (P excretion rate of both peptides was enhanced fivefold. By RIA, mean age-related serum IGFBP-1 (2.05 +/- 0.19 SD) and, even more pronounced, IGFBP-2 (5.97 +/- 0.65 SD) were clearly elevated despite a 12-fold and 2-fold increase of the respective urinary excretion rate. There was a tight and specific correlation between age-related serum IGFBP-2 levels and the degree of the nephrotic syndrome, as estimated by serum albumin levels (r = -0.78, P 150 kDa IGFBP ternary complex in nephrotic serum, which in the presence of normal concentrations of the acid-labile subunit by RIA appears to be due to a reduction of intact IGFBP-3. Serum levels of the high-affinity GH binding protein that presumably reflects GH receptor status in tissues were normal. In summary, total serum IGFs in children with the nephrotic syndrome are normal, but the binding of IGFs to IGFBPs in the circulation is altered with a shift from the 150 kDa IGFBP complex to an excess of low molecular weight IGFBPs. Because increased unsaturated high-affinity IGFBPs in nephrotic serum have the ability to inhibit IGF action on target tissues by competing with the type 1 IGF receptor for IGF binding, this alteration is likely to contribute to growth failure and tissue catabolism in the nephrotic state.

  19. Low prevalence of antibodies and other plasma factors binding to CC chemokines and IL-2 in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Svenson, M; Schade Larsen, C

    2000-01-01

    Neutralizing cytokine antibodies are found in healthy and diseased individuals, including patients treated with recombinant cytokines. Identification of CCR-5 as co-receptor for HIV has focused interest on CC chemokines and their potential therapeutic use. Chemokine-binding components in plasma...... of HIV-infected patients were therefore assessed by radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay. IgG from 4/505 HIV patients and 9/2000 healthy controls (p>0.05) bound rMIP-1alpha and rMIP-1beta, but not rRANTES. No other plasma factors bound the chemokines. The antibodies inhibited receptor binding of both...... chemokines. There was no association between presence of antibodies and disease stage or HIV progression rate. Three of 11 patients treated with rIL-2 developed IgG antibodies suppressing cellular binding and growth promotion of rIL-2. Hence, circulating factors, including antibodies MIP-1alpha/MIP-1beta...

  20. Association of sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor gene polymorphisms with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X; Zeng, F; Zhang, N; Huang, T; Meng, Q; Liu, Y

    2012-01-01

    To explore the association between polymorphisms of the sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor (SREBF) gene and ischaemic stroke. The SREBF1c 54G>C and SREBPF2 1784G>C genotypes were assessed using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in 446 Han Chinese ischaemic stroke patients and 355 Han Chinese control subjects without cerebrovascular disease. The frequencies of the SREBF2 1784G>C CC genotype and the C allele were significantly higher in the ischaemic stroke group than in controls. Patients with ischaemic stroke who had the SREBF2 1784G>C CC genotype had significantly lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, compared with ischaemic stroke patients and control subjects with the GC or GG genotypes. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed a significant positive association between SREBF2 1784G>C and ischaemic stroke; an inverse association was observed between HDL level and risk of ischaemic stroke. The CC genotype of the SREBF2 1784G>C polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of ischaemic stroke, possibly through decreasing the HDL level, which was inversely associated with the risk of ischaemic stroke.

  1. IgA-binding factor suppresses synthesis of IgA in MOPC-315 plasmacytoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darby, C.; Moore, J.S.; Muller, S.; Aaronsen, D.; Madianos, E.; Hoover, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    T cells with Fc receptors for IgA (T/sup α/ cells) and their products, IgA-binding factors (IgABF), have been implicated in the regulation of IgA expression by B cells. They have previously shown that an IgABF produced by IgA induced normal T cells or constitutively by the Fc/sup α/ R+ T cell lymphoma, BALENTL 8, is capable of suppressing the proliferation and the amount of secreted IgA by MOPC-315 cells. In the present studies, they demonstrate that: (a) suppression of proliferation and secretion requires surface membrane IgA on the target cell, (b) suppression exhibits rapid kinetics with maximal effect occurring by 3-4 hours, (c) suppression is reversible, and (d) suppression of secretion involves selective suppression of IgA synthesis as measured by 3 H-leucine incorporation into immunoprecipitable IgA(non-IgA protein is unaffected). These findings indicate that IgA-isotype-specific effector molecules interact directly with their B cell targets through surface membrane immunoglobulin and cause a down regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis by the target. Current studies are underway to address whether this selective suppression of IgA is mediated at the transcriptional, translational or post-translational level. The use of MOPC-315 tumor cells as targets of T cell produced, isotype-specific, effector molecules should provide a unique model for the further analysis of isotype regulation at the molecular level

  2. Mannose-binding lectin as a risk factor for acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesonen, Erkki; Hallman, Mikko; Sarna, Seppo; Andsberg, Eva; Haataja, Ritva; Meri, Seppo; Persson, Kenneth; Puolakkainen, Mirja; Ohlin, Hans; Truedsson, Lennart

    2009-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a multifunctional protein involved in innate immunity. We tested whether MBL and elevated viral and bacterial antibodies were risk factors for acute coronary events. Controlled cohort study. A total of 354 patients with unstable angina pectoris (UA) or acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were compared with 334 paired controls. Enterovirus titres were associated with increased risk of UA (odds ratio 10.04, P<0.001) and AMI (odds ratio 3.18, P=0.003), but titres did not correlate with either MBL concentration or genotype. Chlamydia pneumoniae heat shock protein 60 IgG concentrations were also associated with increased risk of UA (odds ratio 1.63, P=0.049). Compared to asymptomatic controls, patients had lower complement C3 serum concentrations (P<0.001), higher MBL serum concentration, and more frequently had MBL genotypes that determined high MBL levels (P<0.001). High MBL genotypes had odds ratios of 1.16 (P=0.010) for UA and 1.12 (P=0.007) for AMI. The elevation of MBL concentrations in the acute phase correlated with MBL concentrations after recovery (r=0.85, P<0.001). Elevated microbial titres, indicating an on-going inflammation, were associated with cardiovascular events. MBL might have a dual role both decreasing susceptibility to infections and increasing the risk of acute coronary syndromes.

  3. In silico cloning and characterization of the TGA (TGACG MOTIF-BINDING FACTOR) transcription factors subfamily in Carica papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrovo Espín, Fabio Marcelo; Peraza-Echeverria, Santy; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2012-05-01

    The TGA transcription factors belong to the subfamily of bZIP group D that play a major role in disease resistance and development. Most of the TGA identified in Arabidopsis interact with the master regulator of SAR, NPR1 that controls the expression of PR genes. As a first approach to determine the possible involvement of these transcription factors in papaya defense, we characterized Arabidopsis TGA orthologs from the genome of Carica papaya cv. SunUp. Six orthologs CpTGA1 to CpTGA6, were identified. The predicted CpTGA proteins were highly similar to AtTGA sequences and probably share the same DNA binding properties and transcriptional regulation features. The protein sequences alignment evidenced the presence of conserved domains, characteristic of this group of transcription factors. The phylogeny showed that CpTGA evolved into three different subclades associated with defense and floral development. This is the first report of basal expression patterns assessed by RT-PCR, from the whole subfamily of CpTGA members in different tissues from papaya cv. Maradol mature plants. Overall, CpTGA1, CpTGA3 CpTGA6 and CpTGA4 showed a basal expression in all tissues tested; CpTGA2 expressed strongly in all tissues except in petioles while CpTGA5 expressed only in petals and to a lower extent in petioles. Although more detailed studies in anthers and other floral structures are required, we suggest that CpTGA5 might be tissue-specific, and it might be involved in papaya floral development. On the other hand, we report here for the first time, the expression of the whole family of CpTGA in response to salicylic acid (SA). The expression of CpTGA3, CpTGA4 and CpTGA6 increased in response to SA, what would suggest its involvement in the SAR response in papaya. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Chromatin status and transcription factor binding to gonadotropin promoters in gonadotrope cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huimin; Hoffmann, Hanne M; Iyer, Anita K; Brayman, Melissa J; Ngo, Cindy; Sunshine, Mary Jean; Mellon, Pamela L

    2017-10-24

    Proper expression of key reproductive hormones from gonadotrope cells of the pituitary is required for pubertal onset and reproduction. To further our understanding of the molecular events taking place during embryonic development, leading to expression of the glycoproteins luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), we characterized chromatin structure changes, imparted mainly by histone modifications, in model gonadotrope cell lines. We evaluated chromatin status and gene expression profiles by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, DNase sensitivity assay, and RNA sequencing in three developmentally staged gonadotrope cell lines, αT1-1 (progenitor, expressing Cga), αT3-1 (immature, expressing Cga and Gnrhr), and LβT2 (mature, expressing Cga, Gnrhr, Lhb, and Fshb), to assess changes in chromatin status and transcription factor access of gonadotrope-specific genes. We found the common mRNA α-subunit of LH and FSH, called Cga, to have an open chromatin conformation in all three cell lines. In contrast, chromatin status of Gnrhr is open only in αT3-1 and LβT2 cells. Lhb begins to open in LβT2 cells and was further opened by activin treatment. Histone H3 modifications associated with active chromatin were high on Gnrhr in αT3-1 and LβT2, and Lhb in LβT2 cells, while H3 modifications associated with repressed chromatin were low on Gnrhr, Lhb, and Fshb in LβT2 cells. Finally, chromatin status correlates with the progressive access of LHX3 to Cga and Gnrhr, followed by PITX1 binding to the Lhb promoter. Our data show the gonadotrope-specific genes Cga, Gnrhr, Lhb, and Fshb are not only controlled by developmental transcription factors, but also by epigenetic mechanisms that include the modulation of chromatin structure, and histone modifications.

  5. Identification and characterization of a pituitary corticotropin-releasing factor binding protein by chemical cross-linking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nishimura, E; Billestrup, Nils; Perrin, M

    1987-01-01

    A corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) binding protein has been identified based on the chemical cross-linking of ovine [Nle21,m-125I-Tyr32]CRF (125I-oCRF) to bovine anterior pituitary membranes using disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS). The apparent molecular weight of the cross-linked complex...

  6. The Populus ARBORKNOX1 homeodomain transcription factor regulates woody growth through binding to evolutionarily conserved target genes of diverse function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijun Liu; Matthew S. Zinkgraf; H. Earl Petzold; Eric P. Beers; Vladimir Filkov; Andrew Groover

    2014-01-01

    The class I KNOX homeodomain transcription factor ARBORKNOX1 (ARK1) is a key regulator of vascular cambium maintenance and cell differentiation in Populus. Currently, basic information is lacking concerning the distribution, functional characteristics, and evolution of ARK1 binding in the Populus genome.

  7. Frontolimbic serotonin 2A receptor binding in healthy subjects is associated with personality risk factors for affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Mortensen, Erik L.; Nielsen, Finn Årup

    2008-01-01

    Background: Serotonergic dysfunction has been associated with affective disorders. High trait neuroticism, as measured on personality inventories, is a risk factor for major depression. In this study we investigated whether neuroticism is associated with serotonin 2A receptor binding in brain reg...

  8. A cDNA encoding a pRB-binding protein with properties of the transcription factor E2F

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Lees, J A; Vidal, M

    1992-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) plays an important role in the control of cell proliferation, apparently by binding to and regulating cellular transcription factors such as E2F. Here we describe the characterization of a cDNA clone that encodes a protein with properties of E2F. This clone, RBP3...

  9. Assessing the role of insulin-like growth factors and binding proteins in prostate cancer using Mendelian randomization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonilla, Carolina; Lewis, Sarah J; Rowlands, Mari-Anne

    2016-01-01

    Circulating insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (IGFBPs) are associated with prostate cancer. Using genetic variants as instruments for IGF peptides, we investigated whether these associations are likely to be causal. We identified from the literature 56 single nucleotid...

  10. The intracellular immune receptor Rx1 regulates the DNA-binding activity of a Golden2-like transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Philip D; Dixon, Christopher H; Slootweg, Erik J; Sukarta, Octavina C A; Yang, Ally W H; Hughes, Timothy R; Sharples, Gary J; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Goverse, Aska; Cann, Martin J

    2018-03-02

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable the immune system to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. An early consequence of immune activation is transcriptional reprogramming, and some NLRs have been shown to act in the nucleus and interact with transcription factors. The Rx1 NLR protein of potato is further able to bind and distort double-stranded DNA. However, Rx1 host targets that support a role for Rx1 in transcriptional reprogramming at DNA are unknown. Here, we report a functional interaction between Rx1 and Nb Glk1, a Golden2-like transcription factor. Rx1 binds to Nb Glk1 in vitro and in planta. Nb Glk1 binds to known Golden2-like consensus DNA sequences. Rx1 reduces the binding affinity of Nb Glk1 for DNA in vitro. Nb Glk1 activates cellular responses to potato virus X, whereas Rx1 associates with Nb Glk1 and prevents its assembly on DNA in planta unless activated by PVX. This study provides new mechanistic insight into how an NLR can coordinate an immune signaling response at DNA following pathogen perceptions. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Structures of the Ets Protein DNA-binding Domains of Transcription Factors Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher D. O.; Newman, Joseph A.; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Allerston, Charles K.; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-01-01

    Ets transcription factors, which share the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain, number nearly 30 members in humans and are particularly involved in developmental processes. Their deregulation following changes in expression, transcriptional activity, or by chromosomal translocation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Ets DNA binding, selectivity, and regulation have been extensively studied; however, questions still arise regarding binding specificity outside the core GGA recognition sequence and the mode of action of Ets post-translational modifications. Here, we report the crystal structures of Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev, alone and in complex with DNA. We identify previously unrecognized features of the protein-DNA interface. Interactions with the DNA backbone account for most of the binding affinity. We describe a highly coordinated network of water molecules acting in base selection upstream of the GGAA core and the structural features that may account for discrimination against methylated cytidine residues. Unexpectedly, all proteins crystallized as disulfide-linked dimers, exhibiting a novel interface (distant to the DNA recognition helix). Homodimers of Etv1, Etv4, and Etv5 could be reduced to monomers, leading to a 40–200-fold increase in DNA binding affinity. Hence, we present the first indication of a redox-dependent regulatory mechanism that may control the activity of this subset of oncogenic Ets transcription factors. PMID:25866208

  12. A deeper look into transcription regulatory code by preferred pair distance templates for transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2011-08-18

    Motivation: Modern experimental methods provide substantial information on protein-DNA recognition. Studying arrangements of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) of interacting transcription factors (TFs) advances understanding of the transcription regulatory code. Results: We constructed binding motifs for TFs forming a complex with HIF-1α at the erythropoietin 3\\'-enhancer. Corresponding TFBSs were predicted in the segments around transcription start sites (TSSs) of all human genes. Using the genome-wide set of regulatory regions, we observed several strongly preferred distances between hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) and binding sites of a particular cofactor protein. The set of preferred distances was called as a preferred pair distance template (PPDT). PPDT dramatically depended on the TF and orientation of its binding sites relative to HRE. PPDT evaluated from the genome-wide set of regulatory sequences was used to detect significant PPDT-consistent binding site pairs in regulatory regions of hypoxia-responsive genes. We believe PPDT can help to reveal the layout of eukaryotic regulatory segments. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  13. The Association between Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 Levels and Clinical Prognosis in Patients with Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Yaşar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Recent studies report that the insulin-like growth factor system may be involved in stroke pathogenesis, and is reported to increase myelination, maturation, cell proliferation and neuronal sprouting of the central nervous system. The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the role of insulin-like growth factor system in ischemic stroke pathogenesis and its association with the prognosis by investigating insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 levels in patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: : Sixty-eight patients and 20 healthy individuals were included to this study. Clinical evaluation of the patients was performed according to National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and functional outcomes were graded according to Modified Rankin Scale. Bamford classification was used for the clinical classification of ischemic strokes, and the TOAST system for etiological classification. Each patient's levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 were measured on the first, fifth and thirtieth day of ischemic stroke. RESULTS: Only the levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 on the day of 5 were significantly decreased compared to the control group. The decrease in IGF-1 values was associated with an increased risk of death and was accompanied by clinical worsening and decreased functionality. CONCLUSION: It has been concluded that the levels of investigating insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 may affect mortality risk, clinical condition and functionality outcomes in patients presenting with ischemic stroke, and further studies are needed for the investigation of different effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 in future.

  14. Induced Genome-Wide Binding of Three Arabidopsis WRKY Transcription Factors during Early MAMP-Triggered Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkenbihl, Rainer P; Kracher, Barbara; Somssich, Imre E

    2017-01-01

    During microbial-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity (MTI), molecules derived from microbes are perceived by cell surface receptors and upon signaling to the nucleus initiate a massive transcriptional reprogramming critical to mount an appropriate host defense response. WRKY transcription factors play an important role in regulating these transcriptional processes. Here, we determined on a genome-wide scale the flg22-induced in vivo DNA binding dynamics of three of the most prominent WRKY factors, WRKY18, WRKY40, and WRKY33. The three WRKY factors each bound to more than 1000 gene loci predominantly at W-box elements, the known WRKY binding motif. Binding occurred mainly in the 500-bp promoter regions of these genes. Many of the targeted genes are involved in signal perception and transduction not only during MTI but also upon damage-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity, providing a mechanistic link between these functionally interconnected basal defense pathways. Among the additional targets were genes involved in the production of indolic secondary metabolites and in modulating distinct plant hormone pathways. Importantly, among the targeted genes were numerous transcription factors, encoding predominantly ethylene response factors, active during early MTI, and WRKY factors, supporting the previously hypothesized existence of a WRKY subregulatory network. Transcriptional analysis revealed that WRKY18 and WRKY40 function redundantly as negative regulators of flg22-induced genes often to prevent exaggerated defense responses. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  15. Amphipathic small molecules mimic the binding mode and function of endogenous transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrlage, Sara J; Bates, Caleb A; Rowe, Steven P; Minter, Aaron R; Brennan, Brian B; Majmudar, Chinmay Y; Wemmer, David E; Al-Hashimi, Hashim; Mapp, Anna K

    2009-05-15

    Small molecules that reconstitute the binding mode(s) of a protein and in doing so elicit a programmed functional response offer considerable advantages in the control of complex biological processes. The development challenges of such molecules are significant, however. Many protein-protein interactions require multiple points of contact over relatively large surface areas. More significantly, several binding modes can be superimposed upon a single sequence within a protein, and a true small molecule replacement must be preprogrammed for such multimodal binding. This is the case for the transcriptional activation domain or TAD of transcriptional activators as these motifs utilize a poorly characterized multipartner binding profile in order to stimulate gene expression. Here we describe a unique class of small molecules that exhibit both function and a binding profile analogous to natural transcriptional activation domains. Of particular note, the small molecules are the first reported to bind to the KIX domain within the CREB binding protein (CBP) at a site that is utilized by natural activators. Further, a comparison of functional and nonfunctional small molecules indicates that an interaction with CBP is a key contributor to transcriptional activity. Taken together, the evidence suggests that the small molecule TADs mimic both the function and mechanism of their natural counterparts and thus present a framework for the broader development of small molecule transcriptional switches.

  16. More recent swine vesicular disease virus isolates retain binding to coxsackie-adenovirus receptor, but have lost the ability to bind human decay-accelerating factor (CD55).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Clavero, Miguel A; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Ley, Victoria; Spiller, O Brad

    2005-05-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) evolved from coxsackie B virus serotype 5 (CVB5) in the recent past, crossing the species barrier from humans to pigs. Here, SVDV isolates from early and recent outbreaks have been compared for their capacity to utilize the progenitor virus receptors coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55). Virus titre of CVB5 and SVDV isolates It'66 and UK'72 on human HeLa cells was reduced by pre-incubation with either anti-DAF or anti-CAR antibodies; however, recent SVDV isolates R1072, R1120 and SPA'93 did not infect HeLa cells lytically. CVB5 and SVDV infection of the pig cell line IB-RS-2 was inhibited completely by anti-CAR antibodies for all isolates, and no reduction was observed following pre-incubation of cells with anti-pig DAF antibodies. Expression of human DAF in the pig cell line IB-RS-2 enhanced the virus titre of early SVDV isolates by 25-fold, but had no effect on recent SVDV isolate titre. Binding of radiolabelled CVB5 to IB-RS-2 cells was increased seven- to eightfold by expression of human DAF and binding of early SVDV isolates was increased 1.2-1.3-fold, whereas no increase in binding by recent SVDV isolates was mediated by human DAF expression. Addition of soluble hDAF-Fc inhibited CVB5, but not SVDV, infection of pig cells. Pre-incubation of all viruses with soluble hCAR-Fc blocked infection of IB-RS-2 pig cells completely; titration of the amount of soluble hCAR-Fc required to block infection revealed that early isolate UK'72 was the least susceptible to inhibition, and the most recent isolate, SPA'93, was the most susceptible.

  17. DNA binding-independent transcriptional activation of the vascular endothelial growth factor gene (VEGF) by the Myb oncoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutwyche, Jodi K.; Keough, Rebecca A.; Hunter, Julie; Coles, Leeanne S.; Gonda, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Myb is a key transcription factor that can regulate proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, predominantly in the haemopoietic system. Abnormal expression of Myb is associated with a number of cancers, both haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic. In order to better understand the role of Myb in normal and tumorigenic processes, we undertook a cDNA array screen to identify genes that are regulated by this factor. In this way, we identified the gene encoding vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as being potentially regulated by the Myb oncoprotein in myeloid cells. To determine whether this was a direct effect on VEGF gene transcription, we examined the activity of the murine VEGF promoter in the presence of either wild-type (WT) or mutant forms of Myb. It was found that WT Myb was able to activate the VEGF promoter and that a minimal promoter region of 120 bp was sufficient to confer Myb responsiveness. Surprisingly, activation of the VEGF promoter was independent of DNA binding by Myb. This was shown by the use of DNA binding-defective Myb mutants and by mutagenesis of a potential Myb-binding site in the minimal promoter. Mutation of Sp1 sites within this region abolished Myb-mediated regulation of a reporter construct, suggesting that Myb DNA binding-independent activation of VEGF expression occurs via these Sp1 binding elements. Regulation of VEGF production by Myb has implications for the potential role of Myb in myeloid leukaemias and in solid tumours where VEGF may be functioning as an autocrine growth factor

  18. DNA binding during expanded bed adsorption and factors affecting adsorbent aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Mathiasen, N.; Hobley, Timothy John

    2008-01-01

    DNA-induced aggregation and contraction of expanded bed adsorption chromatography beds have been examined using strong anion exchanger Q HyperZ and calf thymus DNA in buffers containing added NaCl. Two batches of adsorbent with different ionic capacities were used allowing the effects of different...... tolerance of anion exchangers when binding DNA. However, more importantly. with the adsorbents examined here. attempts to reduce bed aggregation by feedstock conditioning with added salt may increase DNA binding leading to a reduction in expanded bed adsorption performance compromising protein capture...... ligand densities to be examined. Very high dynamic binding capacities at 10% breakthrough were found in the absence of added salt. However, the highest binding capacities (similar to 10 and similar to 19mg DNA ml(-1) gel) were found in buffers containing added salt at concentrations of either 0.25 or 0...

  19. Networks of enzymatically oxidized membrane lipids support calcium-dependent coagulation factor binding to maintain hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauder, Sarah N; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Slatter, David A; Aldrovandi, Maceler; O'Connor, Anne; Farewell, Daniel; Percy, Charles L; Molhoek, Jessica E; Rannikko, Sirpa; Tyrrell, Victoria J; Ferla, Salvatore; Milne, Ginger L; Poole, Alastair W; Thomas, Christopher P; Obaji, Samya; Taylor, Philip R; Jones, Simon A; de Groot, Phillip G; Urbanus, Rolf T; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Uderhardt, Stefan; Ackermann, Jochen; Vince Jenkins, P; Brancale, Andrea; Krönke, Gerhard; Collins, Peter W; O'Donnell, Valerie B

    2017-11-28

    Blood coagulation functions as part of the innate immune system by preventing bacterial invasion, and it is critical to stopping blood loss (hemostasis). Coagulation involves the external membrane surface of activated platelets and leukocytes. Using lipidomic, genetic, biochemical, and mathematical modeling approaches, we found that enzymatically oxidized phospholipids (eoxPLs) generated by the activity of leukocyte or platelet lipoxygenases (LOXs) were required for normal hemostasis and promoted coagulation factor activities in a Ca 2+ - and phosphatidylserine (PS)-dependent manner. In wild-type mice, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-phospholipids (HETE-PLs) enhanced coagulation and restored normal hemostasis in clotting-deficient animals genetically lacking p12-LOX or 12/15-LOX activity. Murine platelets generated 22 eoxPL species, all of which were missing in the absence of p12-LOX. Humans with the thrombotic disorder antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) had statistically significantly increased HETE-PLs in platelets and leukocytes, as well as greater HETE-PL immunoreactivity, than healthy controls. HETE-PLs enhanced membrane binding of the serum protein β2GP1 (β2-glycoprotein 1), an event considered central to the autoimmune reactivity responsible for APS symptoms. Correlation network analysis of 47 platelet eoxPL species in platelets from APS and control subjects identified their enzymatic origin and revealed a complex network of regulation, with the abundance of 31 p12-LOX-derived eoxPL molecules substantially increased in APS. In summary, circulating blood cells generate networks of eoxPL molecules, including HETE-PLs, which change membrane properties to enhance blood coagulation and contribute to the excessive clotting and immunoreactivity of patients with APS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  20. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulate Myelination in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhei Nishimura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS, and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs. Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation

  1. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  2. Interaction between nucleotide binding sites on chloroplast coupling factor 1 during ATP hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leckband, D.; Hammes, G.G.

    1987-04-21

    The initial hydrolysis of radioactively-labelled CaATP by chloroplast coupling factor 1 was studied with the quenched-flow method. The time course of hydrolysis can be described as a first-order conversion of the enzyme to an active form followed by steady-state formation of product. The rate constant for the first-order process is independent of substrate concentration but increased hyperbolically to a limiting value of 0.43 s/sup -1/ with increasing concentrations of free Ca/sup 2 +/. A mechanism involving a Ca/sup 2 +/-triggered conversion to an active form of the enzyme is consistent with the data. The steady-state rate varied sigmoidally with the CaATP concentration. Initial exchange of tightly bound ADP is complex: approx. 50% of the bound nucleotide is lost within 30 s, with complete exchange requiring several minutes. The first-order rate constant characterizing the rapid phase of the reaction increases hyperbolically to a limiting value of 0.26 s/sup -1/ as the concentration of CaATP is increased, indicating that the binding of CaATP to the enzyme promotes the exchange process. Modification of the quenched-flow apparatus permitted measurement of the rate of nucleotide exchange during steady-state catalysis. The value of the first-order rate constant characterizing this process is similar to the catalytic rate constant determined under identical conditions. When MgATP is tightly bound to the enzyme, none of the kinetic properties of the enzyme described above were significantly changes. The results obtained suggest a mechanism in which two sites on the enzyme participate in catalysis. Several possible mechanisms consistent with the data are discussed.

  3. Identifying functional transcription factor binding sites in yeast by considering their positional preference in the promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Jou Lai

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site (TFBS identification plays an important role in deciphering gene regulatory codes. With comprehensive knowledge of TFBSs, one can understand molecular mechanisms of gene regulation. In the recent decades, various computational approaches have been proposed to predict TFBSs in the genome. The TFBS dataset of a TF generated by each algorithm is a ranked list of predicted TFBSs of that TF, where top ranked TFBSs are statistically significant ones. However, whether these statistically significant TFBSs are functional (i.e. biologically relevant is still unknown. Here we develop a post-processor, called the functional propensity calculator (FPC, to assign a functional propensity to each TFBS in the existing computationally predicted TFBS datasets. It is known that functional TFBSs reveal strong positional preference towards the transcriptional start site (TSS. This motivates us to take TFBS position relative to the TSS as the key idea in building our FPC. Based on our calculated functional propensities, the TFBSs of a TF in the original TFBS dataset could be reordered, where top ranked TFBSs are now the ones with high functional propensities. To validate the biological significance of our results, we perform three published statistical tests to assess the enrichment of Gene Ontology (GO terms, the enrichment of physical protein-protein interactions, and the tendency of being co-expressed. The top ranked TFBSs in our reordered TFBS dataset outperform the top ranked TFBSs in the original TFBS dataset, justifying the effectiveness of our post-processor in extracting functional TFBSs from the original TFBS dataset. More importantly, assigning functional propensities to putative TFBSs enables biologists to easily identify which TFBSs in the promoter of interest are likely to be biologically relevant and are good candidates to do further detailed experimental investigation. The FPC is implemented as a web tool at http://santiago.ee.ncku.edu.tw/FPC/.

  4. Mxi1 regulates cell proliferation through insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Je Yeong; Yoo, Kyung Hyun [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Han-Woong [Department of Biochemistry, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Hoon, E-mail: parkjh@sookmyung.ac.kr [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mxi1 regulates cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of IGFBP-3 is regulated by Mxi1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivation of Mxi1 reduces IGFBP-3 expression in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Mxi1, a member of the Myc-Max-Mad network, is an antagonist of the c-Myc oncogene and is associated with excessive cell proliferation. Abnormal cell proliferation and tumorigenesis are observed in organs of Mxi1-/- mice. However, the Mxi1-reltaed mechanism of proliferation is unclear. The present study utilized microarray analysis using Mxi1 mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to identify genes associated with cell proliferation. Among these genes, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) was selected as a candidate gene for real-time PCR to ascertain whether IGFBP-3 expression is regulated by Mxi1. Expression of IGFBP-3 was decreased in Mxi1-/- MEFs and Mxi1-/- mice, and the gene was regulated by Mxi1 in Mxi1 MEFs. Furthermore, proliferation pathways related to IGFBP-3 were regulated in Mxi1-/- mice compared to Mxi1+/+ mice. To determine the effect of Mxi1 inactivation on the induction of cell proliferation, a proliferation assay is performed in both Mxi1 MEFs and Mxi1 mice. Cell viability was regulated by Mxi1 in Mxi1 MEFs and number of PCNA-positive cells was increased in Mxi1-/- mice compared to Mxi1+/+ mice. Moreover, the IGFBP-3 level was decreased in proliferation defect regions in Mxi1-/- mice. The results support the suggestion that inactivation of Mxi1 has a positive effect on cell proliferation by down-regulating IGFBP-3.

  5. Differences in human skin between the epidermal growth factor receptor distribution detected by EGF binding and monoclonal antibody recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Couchman, J R

    1985-01-01

    Two methods have been used to examine epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor distribution in human scalp and foreskin. The first employed [125I]EGF viable explants and autoradiography to determine the EGF binding pattern while the second used a monoclonal antibody to the human EGF receptor to map...... the distribution on frozen skin sections of an extracellular epitope on the EGF receptor. The [125I]EGF binding experiments showed accessible, unoccupied EGF receptors to be present on the epidermal basal cells (with reduced binding to spinous cells), the basal cells of the hair shaft and sebaceous gland......, the eccrine sweat glands, capillary system, and the hair follicle outer root sheath, generally similar in pattern to that previously reported for full-thickness rat skin and human epidermis. The same areas also bound EGF-R1 but in addition the monoclonal antibody recognized a cone of melanin containing...

  6. Identification of Peptidic Antagonists of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 1 by Scanning the Binding Epitopes of Its Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhou, Lingyu; Reille-Seroussi, Marie; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Broussy, Sylvain; Zhang, Tianyu; Ji, Lili; Vidal, Michel; Liu, Wang-Qing

    2017-08-10

    Cancer angiogenesis is mainly initiated by vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs). On the basis of the reported crystal structures of three natural ligands (VEGF-A, -B, and PlGF) with the major receptors VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, we scanned receptor-binding epitopes of these ligands by designing linear and cyclic peptides with the aim to disrupt the VEGF-A/VEGFR-1 interaction, which is implicated in cancer development. The ability of peptides to inhibit this interaction was evaluated by an ELISA-based assay. Several peptides, especially those mimicking loop 1 (L1) of these ligands that binds primarily to domain D3 of VEGFRs, have demonstrated higher inhibition for VEGF-A/VEGFR-1 binding. They have also shown inhibitory effects on VEGF-induced tube formation in HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells). These results validate the domain D3 of VEGFRs as an efficient target for the design of VEGFR antagonists.

  7. Predicting sequence and structural specificities of RNA binding regions recognized by splicing factor SRSF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-binding proteins (RBPs play diverse roles in eukaryotic RNA processing. Despite their pervasive functions in coding and noncoding RNA biogenesis and regulation, elucidating the sequence specificities that define protein-RNA interactions remains a major challenge. Recently, CLIP-seq (Cross-linking immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing has been successfully implemented to study the transcriptome-wide binding patterns of SRSF1, PTBP1, NOVA and fox2 proteins. These studies either adopted traditional methods like Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation (MEME to discover the sequence consensus of RBP's binding sites or used Z-score statistics to search for the overrepresented nucleotides of a certain size. We argue that most of these methods are not well-suited for RNA motif identification, as they are unable to incorporate the RNA structural context of protein-RNA interactions, which may affect to binding specificity. Here, we describe a novel model-based approach--RNAMotifModeler to identify the consensus of protein-RNA binding regions by integrating sequence features and RNA secondary structures. Results As an example, we implemented RNAMotifModeler on SRSF1 (SF2/ASF CLIP-seq data. The sequence-structural consensus we identified is a purine-rich octamer 'AGAAGAAG' in a highly single-stranded RNA context. The unpaired probabilities, the probabilities of not forming pairs, are significantly higher than negative controls and the flanking sequence surrounding the binding site, indicating that SRSF1 proteins tend to bind on single-stranded RNA. Further statistical evaluations revealed that the second and fifth bases of SRSF1octamer motif have much stronger sequence specificities, but weaker single-strandedness, while the third, fourth, sixth and seventh bases are far more likely to be single-stranded, but have more degenerate sequence specificities. Therefore, we hypothesize that nucleotide specificity and

  8. The DNA binding properties of the parsley bZIP transcription factor CPRF4a are regulated by light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, F; Schäfer, E; Harter, K

    2001-03-02

    The common plant regulatory factors (CPRFs) from parsley are transcription factors with a basic leucine zipper motif that bind to cis-regulatory elements frequently found in promoters of light-regulated genes. Recent studies have revealed that certain CPRF proteins are regulated in response to light by changes in their expression level and in their intracellular localization. Here, we describe an additional mechanism contributing to the light-dependent regulation of CPRF proteins. We show that the DNA binding activity of the factor CPRF4a is modulated in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and that cytosolic components are involved in the regulation of this process. Moreover, we have identified a cytosolic kinase responsible for CPRF4a phosphorylation. Modification of recombinant CPRF4a by this kinase, however, is insufficient to cause a full activation of the factor, suggesting that additional modifications are required. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the DNA binding activity of the factor is modified upon light treatment. The results of additional irradiation experiments suggest that this photoresponse is controlled by different photoreceptor systems. We discuss the possible role of CPRF4a in light signal transduction as well as the emerging regulatory network controlling CPRF activities in parsley.

  9. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 serum concentrations in patients with adenomatous colon polyps

    OpenAIRE

    Janiak, Adam; Oset, Piotr; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Kumor, Anna; Małecka-Panas, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Insulin stimulates colonic mucosal cells proliferation directly and by influencing the concentration of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3). Aim To estimate serum concentrations of insulin, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3 and to determine the relationships between them and colorectal adenoma location, dysplasia grading, histological type, and size. Material and methods The study included 60 patients with colorectal adenomatous polyps...

  10. Statistical tests for natural selection on regulatory regions based on the strength of transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Alan M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although cis-regulatory changes play an important role in evolution, it remains difficult to establish the contribution of natural selection to regulatory differences between species. For protein coding regions, powerful tests of natural selection have been developed based on comparisons of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions, and analogous tests for regulatory regions would be of great utility. Results Here, tests for natural selection on regulatory regions are proposed based on nucleotide substitutions that occur in characterized transcription factor binding sites (an important type functional element within regulatory regions. In the absence of selection, these substitutions will tend to reduce the strength of existing binding sites. On the other hand, purifying selection will act to preserve the binding sites in regulatory regions, while positive selection can act to create or destroy binding sites, as well as change their strength. Using standard models of binding site strength and molecular evolution in the absence of selection, this intuition can be used to develop statistical tests for natural selection. Application of these tests to two well-characterized regulatory regions in Drosophila provides evidence for purifying selection. Conclusion This demonstrates that it is possible to develop tests for selection on regulatory regions based on the specific functional constrains on these sequences.

  11. Characterization in vitro of a human tumor necrosis factor-binding protein. A soluble form of a tumor necrosis factor receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Lantz, M; Gullberg, U; Nilsson, E; Olsson, I

    1990-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a pleiotropic mediator of inflammatory responses. A cysteine-rich, highly glycosylated 30-kD TNF-binding protein (TNF-BP) purified from urine may have a role in regulation because it protects in vitro against the biological effects of TNF. The cytotoxic effect of TNF on the fibrosarcoma cell line WEHI 164 was inhibited by 50% at a 10-fold excess of TNF-BP. The binding of TNF to the receptor was partially reversed after the addition of TNF-BP. Results from biosyn...

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis of Arg58 and Asp86 of elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli: effects on the GTPase reaction and aminoacyl-tRNA binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1996-01-01

    Elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli was mutated separately at positions Asp86 and Arg58, in order to shed light both on the GTPase mechanism of elongation factor Tu and on the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA. In addition, the binding of guanine nucleotides was investigated by determination...

  13. Effect of antemortem and postmortem factors on [3H]MK-801 binding in the human brain: Transient elevation during early childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornhuber, J.; Mack-Burkhardt, F.; Konradi, C.; Fritze, J.; Riederer, P.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of a number of antemortem and postmortem factors on [ 3 H]MK-801 binding was investigated under equilibrium conditions in the frontal cortex of human brains of 38 controls. Binding values transiently increased during the early postnatal period reaching a maximum at the age of about 2 years. After age 10 years [ 3 H]MK-801 binding sites disappeared at 5.7% per decade. The storage time of brain tissue had a reducing effect on these binding sites. There was no effect of gender, brain weight or postmortem time interval and the binding sites were bilaterally symmetrically distributed in the frontal cortex

  14. Remote memory and cortical synaptic plasticity require neuronal CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Somi; Yu, Nam-Kyung; Shim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Kim, Hyopil; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Ja Eun; Lee, Seung-Woo; Choi, Dong Il; Kim, Myung Won; Lee, Dong-Sung; Lee, Kyungmin; Galjart, Niels; Lee, Yong-Seok; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2018-04-30

    The molecular mechanism of long-term memory has been extensively studied in the context of the hippocampus-dependent recent memory examined within several days. However, months-old remote memory maintained in the cortex for long-term has not been investigated much at the molecular level yet. Various epigenetic mechanisms are known to be important for long-term memory, but how the three-dimensional (3D) chromatin architecture and its regulator molecules contribute to neuronal plasticity and systems consolidation are still largely unknown. CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is an eleven-zinc finger protein well known for its role as a genome architecture molecule. Male conditional knockout (cKO) mice in which CTCF is lost in excitatory neurons during adulthood showed normal recent memory in the contextual fear conditioning and spatial water maze tasks. However, they showed remarkable impairments in remote memory in both tasks. Underlying the remote memory-specific phenotypes, we observed that female CTCF cKO mice exhibit disrupted cortical long-term potentiation (LTP), but not hippocampal LTP. Similarly, we observed that CTCF deletion in inhibitory neurons caused partial impairment of remote memory. Through RNA-sequencing, we observed that CTCF knockdown in cortical neuron culture caused altered expression of genes that are highly involved in cell adhesion, synaptic plasticity, and memory. These results suggest that remote memory storage in the cortex requires CTCF-mediated gene regulation in neurons while recent memory formation in the hippocampus does not. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT CTCF is a well-known 3D genome architectural protein that regulates gene expression. Here, we use two different CTCF conditional knockout mouse lines and reveal for the first time that CTCF is critically involved in the regulation of remote memory. We also show that CTCF is necessary for appropriate expression of genes, many of which we found to be involved in the learning and memory related

  15. The rice transcription factor IDEF1 directly binds to iron and other divalent metals for sensing cellular iron status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Aung, May Sann; Senoura, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential for most living organisms and its availability often determines survival and proliferation. The Oryza sativa (rice) transcription factor IDEF1 plays a crucial role in regulating iron deficiency-induced genes involved in iron homeostasis. In the present report, we found characteristic histidine-asparagine repeat and proline-rich regions in IDEF1 and its homolog in Hordeum vulgare (barley), HvIDEF1. An immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography assay revealed that IDEF1 and HvIDEF1 bind to various divalent metals, including Fe(2+) and Ni(2+) . Recombinant IDEF1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli contained mainly Fe and Zn. This metal-binding activity of IDEF1 was almost abolished by deletion of the histidine-asparagine and proline-rich regions, but DNA-binding and trans-activation functions were not impaired by the deletion. Transgenic rice plants constitutively overexpressing IDEF1 without these metal-binding domains failed to cause pleiotropic effects conferred by overexpression of full-length IDEF1, including a low germination rate, impaired seedling growth, tolerance to iron deficiency in hydroponic culture, and enhanced expression of various iron deficiency-inducible genes. Impairment of the transcriptional regulation of IDEF1 by deletion of the metal-binding domains occurred primarily at an early stage of iron deficiency. These results suggest that the histidine-asparagine and proline-rich regions in rice IDEF1 directly bind to divalent metals and sense the cellular metal ion balance caused by changes in iron availability. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Identification of a functional hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 binding site in the neutral ceramidase promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maltesen, Henrik R; Troelsen, Jesper T; Olsen, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    in ceramide digestion. It was the purpose of the present work to experimentally verify the functional importance of a HNF-4a binding site predicted by bioinformatic analysis to be present in the Asah2 promoter. Using supershift analysis, HNF-4a overexpression, and HNF-4a knockdown experiments it was confirmed...... that the predicted HNF-4a binding site identified in the Asah2 promoter is functional. The results support the hypothesis that HNF-4a might be important for intestinal glycolipid metabolism....

  17. Systemic mastocytosis uncommon in KIT D816V mutation positive core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas; Preiss, Birgitte; Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The KIT D816V mutation is detected in the vast majority of adult cases of systemic mastocytosis (SM). The mutation is also frequently detected in core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) defined by the presence of t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1 or inv(16)(p13.1;q22)/t(16;16)...

  18. Fibrinogen binding sites P336 and Y338 of clumping factor A are crucial for Staphylococcus aureus virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Josefsson

    Full Text Available We have earlier shown that clumping factor A (ClfA, a fibrinogen binding surface protein of Staphylococcus aureus, is an important virulence factor in septic arthritis. When two amino acids in the ClfA molecule, P(336 and Y(338, were changed to serine and alanine, respectively, the fibrinogen binding property was lost. ClfAP(336Y(338 mutants have been constructed in two virulent S. aureus strains Newman and LS-1. The aim of this study was to analyze if these two amino acids which are vital for the fibrinogen binding of ClfA are of importance for the ability of S. aureus to generate disease. Septic arthritis or sepsis were induced in mice by intravenous inoculation of bacteria. The clfAP(336Y(338 mutant induced significantly less arthritis than the wild type strain, both with respect to severity and frequency. The mutant infected mice developed also a much milder systemic inflammation, measured as lower mortality, weight loss, bacterial growth in kidneys and lower IL-6 levels. The data were verified with a second mutant where clfAP(336 and Y(338 were changed to alanine and serine respectively. When sepsis was induced by a larger bacterial inoculum, the clfAP(336Y(338 mutants induced significantly less septic death. Importantly, immunization with the recombinant A domain of ClfAP(336SY(338A mutant but not with recombinant ClfA, protected against septic death. Our data strongly suggest that the fibrinogen binding activity of ClfA is crucial for the ability of S. aureus to provoke disease manifestations, and that the vaccine potential of recombinant ClfA is improved by removing its ability to bind fibrinogen.

  19. Sterol regulation of human fatty acid synthase promoter I requires nuclear factor-Y- and Sp-1-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, S; Chirala, S S; Wakil, S J

    2000-04-11

    To understand cholesterol-mediated regulation of human fatty acid synthase promoter I, we tested various 5'-deletion constructs of promoter I-luciferase reporter gene constructs in HepG2 cells. The reporter gene constructs that contained only the Sp-1-binding site (nucleotides -82 to -74) and the two tandem sterol regulatory elements (SREs; nucleotides -63 to -46) did not respond to cholesterol. Only the reporter gene constructs containing a nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) sequence, the CCAAT sequence (nucleotides -90 to -86), an Sp-1 sequence, and the two tandem SREs responded to cholesterol. The NF-Y-binding site, therefore, is essential for cholesterol response. Mutating the SREs or the NF-Y site and inserting 4 bp between the Sp-1- and NF-Y-binding sites both resulted in a minimal cholesterol response of the reporter genes. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays using anti-SRE-binding protein (SREBP) and anti-NF-Ya antibodies confirmed that these SREs and the NF-Y site bind the respective factors. We also identified a second Sp-1 site located between nucleotides -40 and -30 that can substitute for the mutated Sp-1 site located between nucleotides -82 and -74. The reporter gene expression of the wild-type promoter and the Sp-1 site (nucleotides -82 to -74) mutant promoter was similar when SREBP1a [the N-terminal domain of SREBP (amino acids 1-520)] was constitutively overexpressed, suggesting that Sp-1 recruits SREBP to the SREs. Under the same conditions, an NF-Y site mutation resulted in significant loss of reporter gene expression, suggesting that NF-Y is required to activate the cholesterol response.

  20. Acquisition of complement inhibitor serine protease factor I and its cofactors C4b-binding protein and factor H by Prevotella intermedia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Malm

    Full Text Available Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Prevotella intermedia gives rise to periodontitis and a growing number of studies implies an association of P. intermedia with rheumatoid arthritis. The serine protease Factor I (FI is the central inhibitor of complement degrading complement components C3b and C4b in the presence of cofactors such as C4b-binding protein (C4BP and Factor H (FH. Yet, the significance of complement inhibitor acquisition in P. intermedia infection and FI binding by Gram-negative pathogens has not been addressed. Here we show that P. intermedia isolates bound purified FI as well as FI directly from heat-inactivated human serum. FI bound to bacteria retained its serine protease activity as shown in degradation experiments with (125I-labeled C4b. Since FI requires cofactors for its activity we also investigated the binding of purified cofactors C4BP and FH and found acquisition of both proteins, which retained their activity in FI mediated degradation of C3b and C4b. We propose that FI binding by P. intermedia represents a new mechanism contributing to complement evasion by a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen associated with chronic diseases.

  1. Acquisition of complement inhibitor serine protease factor I and its cofactors C4b-binding protein and factor H by Prevotella intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Sven; Jusko, Monika; Eick, Sigrun; Potempa, Jan; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Prevotella intermedia gives rise to periodontitis and a growing number of studies implies an association of P. intermedia with rheumatoid arthritis. The serine protease Factor I (FI) is the central inhibitor of complement degrading complement components C3b and C4b in the presence of cofactors such as C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and Factor H (FH). Yet, the significance of complement inhibitor acquisition in P. intermedia infection and FI binding by Gram-negative pathogens has not been addressed. Here we show that P. intermedia isolates bound purified FI as well as FI directly from heat-inactivated human serum. FI bound to bacteria retained its serine protease activity as shown in degradation experiments with (125)I-labeled C4b. Since FI requires cofactors for its activity we also investigated the binding of purified cofactors C4BP and FH and found acquisition of both proteins, which retained their activity in FI mediated degradation of C3b and C4b. We propose that FI binding by P. intermedia represents a new mechanism contributing to complement evasion by a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen associated with chronic diseases.

  2. Uropathogenic virulence factor FimH facilitates binding of uteropathogenic Escherichia coli to canine endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krekeler, N; Marenda, M S; Browning, G F; Holden, K M; Charles, J A; Wright, P J

    2012-09-01

    Pyometra is a potentially life-threatening condition in bitches and is often caused by Escherichia coli infection. Both pathogenic and non-pathogenic E. coli strains commonly carry the genes for type 1 fimbriae that mediate bacterial adhesion onto host epithelium. To investigate whether the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, FimH, facilitates the binding of uropathogenic E. coli to canine endometrium, the fimH gene was insertionally inactivated in a pathogenic E. coli strain. The ability of E. coli to bind to canine endometrial epithelial cells was determined in vitro using canine uterine biopsies. Binding of the fimH mutant was only 0.3% of that of the wild type. Complementation of the mutation restored the phenotype to that of the parent. This study has developed an in vitro model that allows quantitative and qualitative assessment of bacterial binding to canine endometrium and has demonstrated that the fimH gene plays a role in adherence of pathogenic E. coli to canine endometrium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Complement factor H binds malondialdehyde epitopes and protects from oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weismann, David; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Lauer, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    polymorphism H402, which is strongly associated with AMD, markedly reduces the ability of CFH to bind MDA, indicating a causal link to disease aetiology. Our findings provide important mechanistic insights into innate immune responses to oxidative stress, which may be exploited in the prevention of and therapy...

  4. Metabolism of ATP-binding cassette drug transporter inhibitors: complicating factor for multidrug resistance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnubben, N.H.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Zanden, J.J. van; Rietjens, I.M.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    2005-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transport proteins play a central role in the defence of organisms against toxic compounds, including anticancer drugs. However, for compounds that are designed to display a toxic effect, this defence system diminishes

  5. Characterization of feline serum ferritin-binding proteins: the presence of a novel ferritin-binding protein as an inhibitory factor in feline ferritin immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hirofumi; Kuboi, Tomomi; Nagakura, Takahiko; Hayashi, Sayako; Hoshi, Fumio; Mutoh, Kenichiro; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Orino, Koichi

    2009-10-01

    Ferritin-binding proteins (FBPs) such as anti-ferritin antibody, alpha-2-macroglobulin, apolipoprotein B are expected to interact with circulating ferritin to eliminate it from circulation. However, we found that feline serum more strongly inhibits the detection of canine liver ferritin by immunoassay than its apoferritin; putative FBPs probably conceal ferritin epitopes detected by anti-ferritin antibodies. After complex formation between affinity-purified FBPs and canine liver ferritin, co-immunoprecipitates of the complex by anti-bovine spleen ferritin antibody were found to contain autoantibodies (IgG, IgM, and IgA) to ferritin by immunoblot analysis with antibodies specific for feline IgG, IgM, and IgA. On the other hand, affinity-purified samples did not show any inhibitory effect in the ferritin immunoassay. This result shows that feline serum has another FBP, which inhibits ferritin immunoassays, but not anti-ferritin autoantibody. A feline FBP was partially purified from feline serum by (NH(4))(2)SO(4) fractionation (33-50%), gel filtration chromatography, and anion exchange chromatography. After binding of the partially purified sample with canine liver ferritin coupled-Sepharose gel, the FBP was separated and purified from complexes formed in a native-PAGE gel. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the purified FBP is a homomultimer composed of 31 kDa monomeric subunits connected by intermolecular disulfide bonds. Detection of feline liver ferritin by immunoassay was inhibited by FBP in a dose-dependent manner. The purified protein molecules appeared to be conglomerate of pentraxin-like molecules by its electron micrographic appearance. These results demonstrate that feline serum contains a novel FBP as inhibitory factor of ferritin immunoassay with different molecular properties from those of other mammalian FBPs, in addition to auto-antibodies (IgG, IgM, and IgA) to ferritin.

  6. Structural modeling and DNA binding autoinhibition analysis of Ergp55, a critical transcription factor in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanti P Gangwar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ergp55 protein belongs to Ets family of transcription factor. The Ets proteins are highly conserved in their DNA binding domain and involved in various development processes and regulation of cancer metabolism. To study the structure and DNA binding autoinhibition mechanism of Ergp55 protein, we have produced full length and smaller polypeptides of Ergp55 protein in E. coli and characterized using various biophysical techniques. RESULTS: The Ergp55 polypeptides contain large amount of α-helix and random coil structures as measured by circular dichorism spectroscopy. The full length Ergp55 forms a flexible and elongated molecule as revealed by molecular modeling, dynamics simulation and structural prediction algorithms. The binding analyses of Ergp55 polypeptides with target DNA sequences of E74 and cfos promoters indicate that longer fragments of Ergp55 (beyond the Ets domain showed the evidence of auto-inhibition. This study also revealed the parts of Ergp55 protein that mediate auto-inhibition. SIGNIFICANCE: The current study will aid in designing the compounds that stabilize the inhibited form of Ergp55 and inhibit its binding to promoter DNA. It will contribute in the development of drugs targeting Ergp55 for the prostate cancer treatment.

  7. Andrographolide interferes with binding of nuclear factor-κB to DNA in HL-60-derived neutrophilic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, María A; Romero, Alex; Figueroa, Jaime; Cortés, Patricia; Concha, Ilona I; Hancke, Juan L; Burgos, Rafael A

    2005-01-01

    Andrographolide, the major active component from Andrographis paniculata, has shown to possess anti-inflammatory activity. Andrographolide inhibits the expression of several proinflammatory proteins that exhibit a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) binding site in their gene. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of andrographolide on the activation of NF-κB induced by platelet-activating factor (PAF) and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) in HL-60 cells differentiated to neutrophils. PAF (100 nM) and fMLP (100 nM) induced activation of NF-κB as determined by degradation of inhibitory factor B α (IκBα) using Western blotting in cytosolic extracts and by binding to DNA using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) in nuclear extracts. Andrographolide (5 and 50 μM) inhibited the NF-κB-luciferase activity induced by PAF. However, andrographolide did not reduce phosphorylation of p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 and did not change IκBα degradation induced by PAF and fMLP. Andrographolide reduced the DNA binding of NF-κB in whole cells and in nuclear extracts induced by PAF and fMLP. Andrographolide reduced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression induced by PAF and fMLP in HL-60/neutrophils. It is concluded that andrographolide exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting NF-κB binding to DNA, and thus reducing the expression of proinflammatory proteins, such as COX-2. PMID:15678086

  8. Epidermal growth factor treatment of A431 cells alters the binding capacity and electrophoretic mobility of the cytoskeletally associated epidermal growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, L.M.; Gittinger, C.K.; Landreth, G.E.

    1991-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor interacts with structural elements of A431 cells and remains associated with the cytoskeleton following extraction with nonionic detergents. Extraction of cells with 0.15% Triton X-100 resulted in detection of only approximately 40% of the EGF binding sites on the cytoskeleton. If the cells were exposed to EGF prior to extraction, approximately twofold higher levels of low-affinity EGF binding sites were detected. The difference in number of EGF binding sites was not a consequence of differences in numbers of EGF receptors associated with the cytoskeleton; equal amounts of 35S-labeled receptor were immunoprecipitated from the cytoskeletons of both control and EGF-treated cells. The effect of EGF pretreatment on binding activity was coincident with a change in the mobility of the receptor from a doublet of Mr approximately 160-180 kDa to a single sharp band at 180 kDa. The alteration in receptor mobility was not a simple consequence of receptor phosphorylation in that the alteration was not reversed by alkaline phosphatase treatment, nor was the shift produced by treatment of the cells with phorbol ester. The two EGF receptor species demonstrated differential susceptibility to V8 proteinase digestion. The EGF-induced 180 kDa species was preferentially digested by the proteinase relative to the 160 kDa species, indicating that EGF binding results in a conformational change in the receptor. The EGF-mediated preservation of binding activity and altered conformation may be related to receptor oligomerization

  9. Functional roles and clinical values of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 in different types of cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güllü, Gökçe; Karabulut, Sevgi; Akkiprik, Mustafa

    2012-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins(IGFBPs) are critical regulators of the mitogenic activity of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). IGFBP5, one of these IGFBPs, has special structural features, including a nuclear transport domain, heparin-binding motif, and IGF/extracellular matrix/acid-labile subunit-binding sites. Furthermore, IGFBP5 has several functional effects on carcinogenesis and even normal cell processes, such as cell growth, death, motility, and tissue remodeling. These biological effects are sometimes related with IGF (IGF-dependent effects) and sometimes not (IGF-independent effects). The functional role of IGFBP5 is most likely determined in a cell-type and tissue-type specific manner but also depends on cell context, especially in terms of the diversity of interacting proteins and the potential for nuclear localization. Clinical findings show that IGFBP5 has the potential to be a useful clinical biomarker for predicting response to therapy and clinical outcome of cancer patients. In this review, we summarize the functional diversity and clinical importance of IGFBP5 in different types of cancers.

  10. Cloning of Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor cDNA and Expression of Recombinant Soluble TNF-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Patrick W.; Barrett, Kathy; Chantry, David; Turner, Martin; Feldmann, Marc

    1990-10-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extra-cellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10-9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ).

  11. Construction of multifunctional proteins for tissue engineering: epidermal growth factor with collagen binding and cell adhesive activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannachi Imen, Elloumi; Nakamura, Makiko; Mie, Masayasu; Kobatake, Eiry

    2009-01-01

    The development of different techniques based on natural and polymeric scaffolds are useful for the design of different biomimetic materials. These approaches, however, require supplementary steps for the chemical or physical modification of the biomaterial. To avoid such steps, in the present study, we constructed a new multifunctional protein that can be easily immobilized onto hydrophobic surfaces, and at the same time helps enhance specific cell adhesion and proliferation onto collagen substrates. A collagen binding domain was fused to a previously constructed protein, which had an epidermal growth factor fused to a hydrophobic peptide that allows for cell adhesion. The new fusion protein, designated fnCBD-ERE-EGF is produced in Escherichia coli, and its abilities to bind to collagen and promote cell proliferation were investigated. fnCBD-ERE-EGF was shown to keep both collagen binding and cell growth-promoting activities comparable to those of the corresponding unfused proteins. The results obtained in this study also suggest the use of a fnCBD-ERE-EGF as an alternative for the design of multifunctional ECM-bound growth factor based materials.

  12. Identification of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) target cells and effects of dexamethasone on binding in anterior pituitary using a fluorescent analog of CRF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, J; Billestrup, Nils; Perrin, M

    1986-01-01

    A fluorescein-conjugated bioactive analog of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) was synthesized and used to label cells that have high affinity CRF-binding sites. Of cultured bovine anterior pituitary cells, 6.1 +/- 0.6% were visible by fluorescence microscopy after incubation with the analog. ......-binding sites and suggest that binding of CRF to anterior pituitary cells is altered by glucocorticoids....

  13. Membrane-associated insulin-like growth factor (IGF binding structures in placental cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROMANA MASNIKOSA

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The biological activities of IGF-I and –II are mediated mainly by the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF 1R and controlled by their interaction with soluble proteins, the IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs. Although there is a growing body of evidence that some IGFBPs may be cell surface-bound, published data concerning cell association of IGFBP-1 are scarce and none of them concern placental cells. The cell membranes used in this study were isolated from term human placentae. Detergent-solubilized membranes were shown to contain two types of IGF binding structures that were separated by gel filtration on a Sephadex G-100 column. Proteins in the first peak were eluted at V0 (Mr > 100 kD and they bound IGF-I with greater specificity and affinity than IGF-II and insulin. Most likely, they represented the IGF 1R. Small proteins (Mr ~ 45 kD were eluted with the membrane proteins in the second maximum. They were able to bind IGF-I and IGF-II, but not insulin. The identity of these proteins was shown to be IGFBP-1 on the basis of their reaction with specific anti-IGFBP-1 antibodies. To the best of our knowledge, the existence of IGFBP-1 associated with human placental cell membranes has not been reported in the literature before. Colocalisation of IGFBP-1 with IGF 1R in cell membranes could provide efficient modulation of IGF 1R receptor-ligand interactions.

  14. Distribution of epidermal growth factor binding sites in the adult rat anterior pituitary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabot, J.G.; Walker, P.; Pelletier, G.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of epidermal growth (EGF) binding sites was studied in the pituitary gland using light and electron microscope autoradiography which was performed at different time intervals (2 to 60 min) after intravenous (IV) injection of (/sup 125/I)EGF into adult rats. At the light microscopic level, the labeling was found over cells of the anterior pituitary gland. The time-course study performed by light microscope autoradiography showed that the maximal values were reached at the 2 min time interval. At this time interval, most silver grains were found at the periphery of the target cells. After, the number of silver grains decreased progressively and the localization of silver grains in the cytoplasm indicated the internalization of (/sup 125/I)EGF. Electron microscope autoradiography showed that labeling was mostly restricted to mammotrophs and somatotrophs. Control experiments indicated that the autoradiographic labeling was due specific interaction of (/sup 125/I)EGF with its binding site. These results indicate that EGF binding sites are present in at least two anterior pituitary cell types and suggest that EGF can exert a physiological role in the pituitary gland.

  15. Activation of factor IX zymogen results in exposure of a binding site for low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neels, J G; van Den Berg, B M; Mertens, K; ter Maat, H; Pannekoek, H; van Zonneveld, A J; Lenting, P J

    2000-11-15

    The interaction between the endocytic receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) and either coagulation factor IX or its active derivative factor IXa was studied. Purified factor IX was unable to associate with LRP when analyzed by surface plasmon resonance. By contrast, factor XIa-mediated conversion of factor IX into factor IXa resulted in reversible dose- and calcium-dependent binding to LRP. Active-site blocking of factor IXa did not affect binding to LRP, whereas LRP binding was efficiently inhibited in the presence of heparin or antibodies against factor IX or LRP. The factor IXa-LRP interaction could be described by a 2-site binding model with equilibrium dissociation constants of 27 nmol/L and 69 nmol/L. Consistent with this model, it was observed that factor IXa binds to 2 different recombinant receptor fragments of LRP (denoted cluster II and cluster IV) with equilibrium dissociation constants of 227 nmol/L and 53 nmol/L, respectively. The amount of factor IXa degraded by LRP-deficient cells was 35% lower than by LRP-expressing cells, demonstrating that LRP contributes to the transport of factor IXa to the intracellular degradation pathway. Because ligand binding to LRP is often preceded by binding to proteoglycans, the contribution of proteoglycans to the catabolism of factor IXa was addressed by employing proteoglycan-deficient cells. Degradation of factor IXa by proteoglycan-deficient cells proceeded at a 83% lower rate than wild-type cells. In conclusion, the data presented here indicate that both LRP and proteoglycans have the potential to contribute to the catabolism of factor IXa.

  16. Dwarfism and impaired gut development in insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Hammer, Niels A; Nielsen, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1 (IMP1) belongs to a family of RNA-binding proteins implicated in mRNA localization, turnover, and translational control. Mouse IMP1 is expressed during early development, and an increase in expression occurs around embryonic day 12.5 (E12.......5). To characterize the physiological role of IMP1, we generated IMP1-deficient mice carrying a gene trap insertion in the Imp1 gene. Imp1(-/-) mice were on average 40% smaller than wild-type and heterozygous sex-matched littermates. Growth retardation was apparent from E17.5 and remained permanent into adult life...

  17. Cloning, purification and structure determination of the HIV integrase-binding domain of lens epithelium-derived growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Clare; Cruz-Migoni, Abimael; Platonova, Olga; Owen, Robin L; Nettleship, Joanne E; Miller, Ami; Carr, Stephen B; Harris, Gemma; Rabbitts, Terence H; Phillips, Simon E V

    2018-03-01

    Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 is the dominant binding partner of HIV-1 integrase in human cells. The crystal structure of the HIV integrase-binding domain (IBD) of LEDGF has been determined in the absence of ligand. IBD was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized by sitting-drop vapour diffusion. X-ray diffraction data were collected at Diamond Light Source to a resolution of 2.05 Å. The crystals belonged to space group P2 1 , with eight polypeptide chains in the asymmetric unit arranged as an unusual octamer composed of four domain-swapped IBD dimers. IBD exists as a mixture of monomers and dimers in concentrated solutions, but the dimers are unlikely to be biologically relevant.

  18. Isolation of complexes formed between insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 and transferrin from the human serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljuš Goran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs play an important role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. The amount of free, biologically active IGFs is regulated by the IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs. IGFBP-3 is the most abundant binding protein and it is known to interact with other circulating proteins, including transferrin (Tf. In order to elucidate the possible role of IGF/IGFBP-3 in the iron metabolism, it is necessary to isolate IGFBP-3/Tf complexes. Several affinity-based techniques were employed. Results have shown that only double immunoprecipitation method with anti-Tf and anti-IGFBP-3 antibodies selectively separated complexes from other molecular forms, such as monomers, oligomers or fragments of IGFBP-3 and Tf. Isolated complexes can now be used to investigate the relationship between IGF/IGFBP-3 and iron, both in structural and metabolic tеrms.

  19. Osteopontin binding to lipopolysaccharide lowers tumor necrosis factor-α and prevents early alcohol-induced liver injury in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ge, Xiadong; Leung, Tung-Ming; Arriazu, Elena

    2014-01-01

    , tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) production, and liver injury. Since OPN is protective for the intestinal mucosa, we postulated that enhancing OPN expression in the liver and consequently in the blood and/or in the gut could protect from early alcohol-induced liver injury. Wild-type (WT), OPN knockout...... score, and the number of macrophages and TNFα+ cells. To establish if OPN could limit LPS availability and its noxious effects in the liver, binding studies were performed. OPN showed binding affinity for LPS which prevented macrophage activation, reactive oxygen, and nitrogen species generation...... by decreased liver-to-body weight ratio, hepatic triglycerides, the steatosis score, oil red-O staining, and lipid peroxidation. There was also less inflammation and liver injury as demonstrated by lower alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity, hepatocyte ballooning degeneration, LPS levels, the inflammation...

  20. dPeak: High Resolution Identification of Transcription Factor Binding Sites from PET and SET ChIP-Seq Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dongjun; Park, Dan; Myers, Kevin; Grass, Jeffrey; Kiley, Patricia; Landick, Robert; Keleş, Sündüz

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq) has been successfully used for genome-wide profiling of transcription factor binding sites, histone modifications, and nucleosome occupancy in many model organisms and humans. Because the compact genomes of prokaryotes harbor many binding sites separated by only few base pairs, applications of ChIP-Seq in this domain have not reached their full potential. Applications in prokaryotic genomes are further hampered by the fact that well studied data analysis methods for ChIP-Seq do not result in a resolution required for deciphering the locations of nearby binding events. We generated single-end tag (SET) and paired-end tag (PET) ChIP-Seq data for factor in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Direct comparison of these datasets revealed that although PET assay enables higher resolution identification of binding events, standard ChIP-Seq analysis methods are not equipped to utilize PET-specific features of the data. To address this problem, we developed dPeak as a high resolution binding site identification (deconvolution) algorithm. dPeak implements a probabilistic model that accurately describes ChIP-Seq data generation process for both the SET and PET assays. For SET data, dPeak outperforms or performs comparably to the state-of-the-art high-resolution ChIP-Seq peak deconvolution algorithms such as PICS, GPS, and GEM. When coupled with PET data, dPeak significantly outperforms SET-based analysis with any of the current state-of-the-art methods. Experimental validations of a subset of dPeak predictions from PET ChIP-Seq data indicate that dPeak can estimate locations of binding events with as high as to resolution. Applications of dPeak to ChIP-Seq data in E. coli under aerobic and anaerobic conditions reveal closely located promoters that are differentially occupied and further illustrate the importance of high resolution analysis of ChIP-Seq data. PMID:24146601

  1. Binding characteristics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to its receptors on neurons from the chick embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Tebar, A.; Barde, Y.A.

    1988-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein known to support the survival of embryonic sensory neurons and retinal ganglion cells, was derivatized with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and obtained in a biologically active, radioactive form (125I-BDNF). Using dorsal root ganglion neurons from chick embryos at 9 d of development, the basic physicochemical parameters of the binding of 125I-BDNF with its receptors were established. Two different classes of receptors were found, with dissociation constants of 1.7 x 10(-11) M (high-affinity receptors) and 1.3 x 10(-9) M (low-affinity receptors). Unlabeled BDNF competed with 125I-BDNF for binding to the high-affinity receptors with an inhibition constant essentially identical to the dissociation constant of the labeled protein: 1.2 x 10(-11) M. The association and dissociation rates from both types of receptors were also determined, and the dissociation constants calculated from these kinetic experiments were found to correspond to the results obtained from steady-state binding. The number of high-affinity receptors (a few hundred per cell soma) was 15 times lower than that of low-affinity receptors. No high-affinity receptors were found on sympathetic neurons, known not to respond to BDNF, although specific binding of 125I-BDNF to these cells was detected at a high concentration of the radioligand. These results are discussed and compared with those obtained with nerve growth factor on the same neuronal populations

  2. Trp[superscript 2313]-His[superscript 2315] of Factor VIII C2 Domain Is Involved in Membrane Binding Structure of a Complex Between the C[subscript 2] Domain and an Inhibitor of Membrane Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhuo; Lin, Lin; Yuan, Cai; Nicolaes, Gerry A.F.; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara; Huang, Mingdong (Harvard-Med); (UAH); (Maastricht); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2010-11-03

    Factor VIII (FVIII) plays a critical role in blood coagulation by forming the tenase complex with factor IXa and calcium ions on a membrane surface containing negatively charged phospholipids. The tenase complex activates factor X during blood coagulation. The carboxyl-terminal C2 domain of FVIII is the main membrane-binding and von Willebrand factor-binding region of the protein. Mutations of FVIII cause hemophilia A, whereas elevation of FVIII activity is a risk factor for thromboembolic diseases. The C2 domain-membrane interaction has been proposed as a target of intervention for regulation of blood coagulation. A number of molecules that interrupt FVIII or factor V (FV) binding to cell membranes have been identified through high throughput screening or structure-based design. We report crystal structures of the FVIII C2 domain under three new crystallization conditions, and a high resolution (1.15 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the FVIII C2 domain bound to a small molecular inhibitor. The latter structure shows that the inhibitor binds to the surface of an exposed {beta}-strand of the C2 domain, Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315}. This result indicates that the Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315} segment is an important constituent of the membrane-binding motif and provides a model to understand the molecular mechanism of the C2 domain membrane interaction.

  3. Genome-Wide Mapping of Binding Sites Reveals Multiple Biological Functions of the Transcription Factor Cst6p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Guodong; Bergenholm, David; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    In the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Cst6p has been reported to play important roles in several biological processes. However, the genome-wide targets of Cst6p and its physiological functions remain unknown. Here, we mapped the genome-wide binding sites of Cst6p...... of transcription factors. In the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Cst6p has been reported to regulate several biological processes, while its genome-wide targets remain unknown. Here, we mapped the genome-wide binding sites of Cst6p at high resolution. We show that the binding...... at high resolution. Cst6p binds to the promoter regions of 59 genes with various biological functions when cells are grown on ethanol but hardly binds to the promoter at any gene when cells are grown on glucose. The retarded growth of the CST6 deletion mutant on ethanol is attributed to the markedly...

  4. Evolutionary dynamics of DNA-binding sites and direct target genes of a floral master regulatory transcription factor [ChIP-Seq

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muiño, J.M.; Bruijn, de S.A.; Vingron, Martin; Angenent, G.C.; Kaufmann, K.

    2015-01-01

    Plant development is controlled by transcription factors (TFs) which form complex gene-regulatory networks. Genome-wide TF DNA-binding studies revealed that these TFs have several thousands of binding sites in the Arabidopsis genome, and may regulate the expression of many genes directly. Given the

  5. HOCOMOCO: towards a complete collection of transcription factor binding models for human and mouse via large-scale ChIP-Seq analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2017-10-31

    We present a major update of the HOCOMOCO collection that consists of patterns describing DNA binding specificities for human and mouse transcription factors. In this release, we profited from a nearly doubled volume of published in vivo experiments on transcription factor (TF) binding to expand the repertoire of binding models, replace low-quality models previously based on in vitro data only and cover more than a hundred TFs with previously unknown binding specificities. This was achieved by systematic motif discovery from more than five thousand ChIP-Seq experiments uniformly processed within the BioUML framework with several ChIP-Seq peak calling tools and aggregated in the GTRD database. HOCOMOCO v11 contains binding models for 453 mouse and 680 human transcription factors and includes 1302 mononucleotide and 576 dinucleotide position weight matrices, which describe primary binding preferences of each transcription factor and reliable alternative binding specificities. An interactive interface and bulk downloads are available on the web: http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco11. In this release, we complement HOCOMOCO by MoLoTool (Motif Location Toolbox, http://molotool.autosome.ru) that applies HOCOMOCO models for visualization of binding sites in short DNA sequences.

  6. HOCOMOCO: towards a complete collection of transcription factor binding models for human and mouse via large-scale ChIP-Seq analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Yevshin, Ivan S; Sharipov, Ruslan N; Fedorova, Alla D; Rumynskiy, Eugene I; Medvedeva, Yulia A; Magana-Mora, Arturo; Bajic, Vladimir B; Papatsenko, Dmitry A; Kolpakov, Fedor A; Makeev, Vsevolod J

    2018-01-04

    We present a major update of the HOCOMOCO collection that consists of patterns describing DNA binding specificities for human and mouse transcription factors. In this release, we profited from a nearly doubled volume of published in vivo experiments on transcription factor (TF) binding to expand the repertoire of binding models, replace low-quality models previously based on in vitro data only and cover more than a hundred TFs with previously unknown binding specificities. This was achieved by systematic motif discovery from more than five thousand ChIP-Seq experiments uniformly processed within the BioUML framework with several ChIP-Seq peak calling tools and aggregated in the GTRD database. HOCOMOCO v11 contains binding models for 453 mouse and 680 human transcription factors and includes 1302 mononucleotide and 576 dinucleotide position weight matrices, which describe primary binding preferences of each transcription factor and reliable alternative binding specificities. An interactive interface and bulk downloads are available on the web: http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco11. In this release, we complement HOCOMOCO by MoLoTool (Motif Location Toolbox, http://molotool.autosome.ru) that applies HOCOMOCO models for visualization of binding sites in short DNA sequences. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Probabilistic Inference on Multiple Normalized Signal Profiles from Next Generation Sequencing: Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-04-20

    With the prevalence of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing (ChIP-Seq) technology, massive ChIP-Seq data has been accumulated. The ChIP-Seq technology measures the genome-wide occupancy of DNA-binding proteins in vivo. It is well-known that different DNA-binding protein occupancies may result in a gene being regulated in different conditions (e.g. different cell types). To fully understand a gene\\'s function, it is essential to develop probabilistic models on multiple ChIP-Seq profiles for deciphering the gene transcription causalities. In this work, we propose and describe two probabilistic models. Assuming the conditional independence of different DNA-binding proteins\\' occupancies, the first method (SignalRanker) is developed as an intuitive method for ChIP-Seq genome-wide signal profile inference. Unfortunately, such an assumption may not always hold in some gene regulation cases. Thus, we propose and describe another method (FullSignalRanker) which does not make the conditional independence assumption. The proposed methods are compared with other existing methods on ENCODE ChIP-Seq datasets, demonstrating its regression and classification ability. The results suggest that FullSignalRanker is the best-performing method for recovering the signal ranks on the promoter and enhancer regions. In addition, FullSignalRanker is also the best-performing method for peak sequence classification. We envision that SignalRanker and FullSignalRanker will become important in the era of next generation sequencing. FullSignalRanker program is available on the following website: http://www.cs.toronto.edu/∼wkc/FullSignalRanker/ © 2015 IEEE.

  8. Transcription factor binding site enrichment analysis predicts drivers of altered gene expression in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lake, A.D.; Chaput, A.L.; Novák, Petr; Cherrington, N.J.; Smith, C.L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 122, December 15 (2016), s. 62-71 ISSN 0006-2952 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Transcription factor * Liver * Gene expression * Bioinformatics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.581, year: 2016

  9. Differential compartmentalization of Streptococcus pyogenes virulence factors and host protein binding properties as a mechanism for host adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilsgård, Ola; Karlsson, Christofer; Malmström, Erik; Malmström, Johan

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although S. pyogenes is a strictly human pathogen with no other known animal reservoir, several murine infection models exist to explore different aspects of the bacterial pathogenesis. Inoculating mice with wild-type S. pyogenes strains can result in the generation of new bacterial phenotypes that are hypervirulent compared to the original inoculum. In this study, we used a serial mass spectrometry based proteomics strategy to investigate if these hypervirulent strains have an altered distribution of virulence proteins across the intracellular, surface associated and secreted bacterial compartments and if any change in compartmentalization can alter the protein-protein interaction network between bacteria and host proteins. Quantitative analysis of the S. pyogenes surface and secreted proteomes revealed that animal passaged strains are associated with significantly higher amount of virulence factors on the bacterial surface and in the media. This altered virulence factor compartmentalization results in increased binding of several mouse plasma proteins to the bacterial surface, a trend that was consistent for mouse plasma from several different mouse strains. In general, both the wild-type strain and animal passaged strain were capable of binding high amounts of human plasma proteins. However, compared to the non-passaged strains, the animal passaged strains displayed an increased ability to bind mouse plasma proteins, in particular for M protein binders, indicating that the increased affinity for mouse blood plasma proteins is a consequence of host adaptation of this pathogen to a new host. In conclusion, plotting the total amount of virulence factors against the total amount of plasma proteins associated to the bacterial surface could clearly separate out animal passaged strains from wild type strains indicating a virulence model that could

  10. Identification of Splicing Factors Involved in DMD Exon Skipping Events Using an In Vitro RNA Binding Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miro, Julie; Bourgeois, Cyril F; Claustres, Mireille; Koenig, Michel; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie

    2018-01-01

    Mutation-induced exon skipping in the DMD gene can modulate the severity of the phenotype in patients with Duchenne or Becker Muscular Dystrophy. These alternative splicing events are most likely the result of changes in recruitment of splicing factors at cis-acting elements in the mutated DMD pre-mRNA. The identification of proteins involved can be achieved by an affinity purification procedure. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the in vitro RNA binding assay that we routinely apply to explore molecular mechanisms underlying splicing defects in the DMD gene. In vitro transcribed RNA probes containing either the wild type or mutated sequence are oxidized and bound to adipic acid dihydrazide-agarose beads. Incubation with a nuclear extract allows the binding of nuclear proteins to the RNA probes. The unbound proteins are washed off and then the specifically RNA-bound proteins are released from the beads by an RNase treatment. After separation by SDS-PAGE, proteins that display differential binding affinities for the wild type and mutant RNA probes are identified by mass spectrometry.

  11. TATA binding protein associated factor 3 (TAF3 interacts with p53 and inhibits its function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tora Laszlo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumour suppressor protein p53 is a sequence specific DNA-binding transcription regulator, which exerts its versatile roles in genome protection and apoptosis by affecting the expression of a large number of genes. In an attempt to obtain a better understanding of the mechanisms by which p53 transcription function is regulated, we studied p53 interactions. Results We identified BIP2 (Bric-à-brac interacting protein 2, the fly homolog of TAF3, a histone fold and a plant homeodomain containing subunit of TFIID, as an interacting partner of Drosophila melanogaster p53 (Dmp53. We detected physical interaction between the C terminus of Dmp53 and the central region of TAF3 both in yeast two hybrid assays and in vitro. Interestingly, DmTAF3 can also interact with human p53, and mammalian TAF3 can bind to both Dmp53 and human p53. This evolutionarily conserved interaction is functionally significant, since elevated TAF3 expression severely and selectively inhibits transcription activation by p53 in human cell lines, and it decreases the level of the p53 protein as well. Conclusion We identified TAF3 as an evolutionarily conserved negative regulator of p53 transcription activation function.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus surface protein SdrE binds complement regulator factor H as an immune evasion tactic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A Sharp

    Full Text Available Similar to other highly successful invasive bacterial pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus recruits the complement regulatory protein factor H (fH to its surface to inhibit the alternative pathway of complement. Here, we report the identification of the surface-associated protein SdrE as a fH-binding protein using purified fH overlay of S. aureus fractionated cell wall proteins and fH cross-linking to S. aureus followed by mass spectrometry. Studies using recombinant SdrE revealed that rSdrE bound significant fH whether from serum or as a purified form, in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, rSdrE-bound fH exhibited cofactor functionality for factor I (fI-mediated cleavage of C3b to iC3b which correlated positively with increasing amounts of fH. Expression of SdrE on the surface of the surrogate bacterium Lactococcus lactis enhanced recruitment of fH which resulted in increased iC3b generation. Moreover, surface expression of SdrE led to a reduction in C3-fragment deposition, less C5a generation, and reduced killing by polymorphonuclear cells. Thus, we report the first identification of a S. aureus protein associated with the staphylococcal surface that binds factor H as an immune evasion mechanism.

  13. Identification of RNA Binding Proteins Associated with Dengue Virus RNA in Infected Cells Reveals Temporally Distinct Host Factor Requirements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Viktorovskaya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There are currently no vaccines or antivirals available for dengue virus infection, which can cause dengue hemorrhagic fever and death. A better understanding of the host pathogen interaction is required to develop effective therapies to treat DENV. In particular, very little is known about how cellular RNA binding proteins interact with viral RNAs. RNAs within cells are not naked; rather they are coated with proteins that affect localization, stability, translation and (for viruses replication.Seventy-nine novel RNA binding proteins for dengue virus (DENV were identified by cross-linking proteins to dengue viral RNA during a live infection in human cells. These cellular proteins were specific and distinct from those previously identified for poliovirus, suggesting a specialized role for these factors in DENV amplification. Knockdown of these proteins demonstrated their function as viral host factors, with evidence for some factors acting early, while others late in infection. Their requirement by DENV for efficient amplification is likely specific, since protein knockdown did not impair the cell fitness for viral amplification of an unrelated virus. The protein abundances of these host factors were not significantly altered during DENV infection, suggesting their interaction with DENV RNA was due to specific recruitment mechanisms. However, at the global proteome level, DENV altered the abundances of proteins in particular classes, including transporter proteins, which were down regulated, and proteins in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which were up regulated.The method for identification of host factors described here is robust and broadly applicable to all RNA viruses, providing an avenue to determine the conserved or distinct mechanisms through which diverse viruses manage the viral RNA within cells. This study significantly increases the number of cellular factors known to interact with DENV and reveals how DENV modulates and usurps

  14. Modelling of the disulphide-swapped isomer of human insulin-like growth factor-1: implications for receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, R; Verma, C; Wallach, B; Ursø, B; Pitts, J; Wollmer, A; De Meyts, P; Wood, S

    1999-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is a serum protein which unexpectedly folds to yield two stable tertiary structures with different disulphide connectivities; native IGF-1 [18-61,6-48,47-52] and IGF-1 swap [18-61,6-47, 48-52]. Here we demonstrate in detail the biological properties of recombinant human native IGF-1 and IGF-1 swap secreted from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. IGF-1 swap had a approximately 30 fold loss in affinity for the IGF-1 receptor overexpressed on BHK cells compared with native IGF-1. The parallel increase in dose required to induce negative cooperativity together with the parallel loss in mitogenicity in NIH 3T3 cells implies that disruption of the IGF-1 receptor binding interaction rather than restriction of a post-binding conformational change is responsible for the reduction in biological activity of IGF-1 swap. Interestingly, the affinity of IGF-1 swap for the insulin receptor was approximately 200 fold lower than that of native IGF-1 indicating that the binding surface complementary to the insulin receptor (or the ability to attain it) is disturbed to a greater extent than that to the IGF-1 receptor. A 1.0 ns high-temperature molecular dynamics study of the local energy landscape of IGF-1 swap resulted in uncoiling of the first A-region alpha-helix and a rearrangement in the relative orientation of the A- and B-regions. The model of IGF-1 swap is structurally homologous to the NMR structure of insulin swap and CD spectra consistent with the model are presented. However, in the model of IGF-1 swap the C-region has filled the space where the first A-region alpha-helix has uncoiled and this may be hindering interaction of Val44 with the second insulin receptor binding pocket.

  15. In vivo studies on the binding of heparin and its fractions with platelet factor 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walz, D.A.; Hung, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    PF4 has a half-life in plasma of less than 3 minutes, and its rapid clearance appears to be a function of binding to the vascular endothelium. Once bound to the endothelium, PF4 can be released by heparin in a time-dependent manner; recovery is greater the sooner heparin is administered following PF4 infusion. This heparin-induced release of PF4 can be abolished if the heparin is first complexed with hexadimethrine bromide. Likewise, this heparin-induced release of PF4 is dependent upon the type of heparin used; low molecular weight heparin fractions and fragments do not cause the PF4 rebound seen with intact heparin. Thus, it would appear that low molecular weight forms of heparin are advantageous in that their in vivo administration would not be mediated by such platelet modulators as PF4

  16. Composite organization of the cobalamin binding and cubilin recognition sites of intrinsic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Fedosova, Natalya U; Berglund, Lars

    2005-01-01

    of the ligand. Each isolated fragment of IF was tested for the binding to the specific receptor cubilin in the presence or absence of Cbl. Neither apo nor holo forms of IF(20) and IF(30) were recognized by the receptor. When two fragments were mixed and incubated with Cbl, they associated into a stable complex......; however, efficient retention of the ligand required the presence of both fragments. Detailed schemes of the interaction of Cbl with IF(50) and with IF(30) and IF(20) are presented, where the sequential attachment of Cbl to the IF(20) and IF(30) domains plays the key role in recognition and retention......, IF(30+20).Cbl, which bound to cubilin as well as the noncleaved IF(50).Cbl complex. We suggest that formation of the cubilin recognition site on IF is caused by assembly of two distant domains, which allows the saturated protein to be recognized by the receptor. The obtained parameters for ligand...

  17. Characterization of binding mode of action of a blocking anti-platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-B monoclonal antibody, MOR8457, reveals conformational flexibility and avidity needed for PDGF-BB to bind PDGF receptor-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, Jun; Mosyak, Lidia; Brooks, Jon; Cain, Michael; Carven, Gregory J; Ogawa, Shinji; Ishino, Tetsuya; Tam, May; Lavallie, Edward R; Yang, Zhiyong; Ponsel, Dirk; Rauchenberger, Robert; Arch, Robert; Pullen, Nick

    2015-03-17

    Platelet derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) is an important mitogen and cell survival factor during development. PDGF-BB binds PDGF receptor-β (PDGFRβ) to trigger receptor dimerization and tyrosine kinase activation. We present the pharmacological and biophysical characterization of a blocking PDGF-BB monoclonal antibody, MOR8457, and contrast this to PDGFRβ. MOR8457 binds to PDGF-BB with high affinity and selectivity, and prevents PDGF-BB induced cell proliferation competitively and with high potency. The structural characterization of the MOR8457-PDGF-BB complex indicates that MOR8457 binds with a 2:1 stoichiometry, but that binding of a single MOR8457 moiety is sufficient to prevent binding to PDGFRβ. Comparison of the MOR8457-PDGF-BB structure with that of the PDGFRβ-PDGF-BB complex suggested the potential reason for this was a substantial bending and twisting of PDGF-BB in the MOR8457 structure, relative to the structures of PDGF-BB alone, bound to a PDGF-BB aptamer or PDGFRβ, which makes it nonpermissive for PDGFRβ binding. These biochemical and structural data offer insights into the permissive structure of PDGF-BB needed for agonism as well as strategies for developing specific PDGF ligand antagonists.

  18. Collagen and Stretch Modulate Autocrine Secretion of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins from Differentiated Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Carmen E.; Fenwick-Smith, Daniela; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1995-01-01

    Stretch-induced skeletal muscle growth may involve increased autocrine secretion of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) since IGF-1 is a potent growth factor for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and stretch elevates IGF-1 mRNA levels in vivo. In tissue cultures of differentiated avian pectoralis skeletal muscle cells, nanomolar concentrations of exogenous IGF-1 stimulated growth in mechanically stretched but not static cultures. These cultures released up to 100 pg of endogenously produced IGF-1/micro-g of protein/day, as well as three major IGF binding proteins of 31, 36, and 43 kilodaltons (kDa). IGF-1 was secreted from both myofibers and fibroblasts coexisting in the muscle cultures. Repetitive stretch/relaxation of the differentiated skeletal muscle cells stimulated the acute release of IGF-1 during the first 4 h after initiating mechanical activity, but caused no increase in the long-term secretion over 24-72 h of IGF-1, or its binding proteins. Varying the intensity and frequency of stretch had no effect on the long-term efflux of IGF-1. In contrast to stretch, embedding the differentiated muscle cells in a three-dimensional collagen (Type I) matrix resulted in a 2-5-fold increase in long-term IGF-1 efflux over 24-72 h. Collagen also caused a 2-5-fold increase in the release of the IGF binding proteins. Thus, both the extracellular matrix protein type I collagen and stretch stimulate the autocrine secretion of IGF-1, but with different time kinetics. This endogenously produced growth factor may be important for the growth response of skeletal myofibers to both types of external stimuli.

  19. Cross-talk between cognate and noncognate RpoE sigma factors and Zn(2+)-binding anti-sigma factors regulates photooxidative stress response in Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Namrata; Gupta, Ankush; Kumar, Santosh; Mishra, Rajeev; Singh, Chhaya; Tripathi, Anil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense harbors two redox-sensitive Zinc-binding anti-sigma (ZAS) factors (ChrR1 and ChrR2), which negatively regulate the activity of their cognate extra-cytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors (RpoE1 and RpoE2) by occluding their binding to the core enzyme. Both pairs of RpoE-ChrR control responses to photooxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the two RpoE-ChrR pairs cross-talk while responding to the stress. In silico analysis showed a high sequence similarity between ChrR1 and ChrR2 proteins, but differences in redox sensitivity. Using in silico and in vitro methods of protein-protein interaction, we have shown that both ChrR1 and ChrR2 proteins physically bind to their noncognate RpoE proteins. Restoration of the phenotypes of chrR1::Tn5 and chrR2::Km mutants related to carotenoid biosynthesis and photooxidative stress tolerance by expressing chrR1 or chrR2 provided in vivo evidence for the cross-talk. In addition, up- or down-regulation of several identical proteins by expressing chrR1 or chrR2 in the chrR1::Tn5 mutant provided another in vivo evidence for the cross-talk. Although multiple redox-sensitive ZAS anti-σ factors occur in some Gram-positive bacteria, no cross-talk is reported among them. We report here, for the first time, that the two ZAS anti-σ factors of A. brasilense also interact with their noncognate σ factors and affect gene expression. The two redox-sensitive ZAS anti-σ factors in A. brasilense may interact with their cognate as well as noncognate ECF σ factors to play an important role in redox homeostasis by facilitating recovery from the oxidative stress.

  20. The protein network surrounding the human telomere repeat binding factors TRF1, TRF2, and POT1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannone, Richard J [ORNL; McDonald, W Hayes [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Shen, Rong-Fong [National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health; Wang, Yisong [ORNL; Liu, Yie [National Institute on Aging, Baltimore

    2010-01-01

    Telomere integrity (including telomere length and capping) is critical in overall genomic stability. Telomere repeat binding factors and their associated proteins play vital roles in telomere length regulation and end protection. In this study, we explore the protein network surrounding telomere repeat binding factors, TRF1, TRF2, and POT1 using dual-tag affinity purification in combination with multidimensional protein identification technology liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (MudPIT LC-MS/MS). After control subtraction and data filtering, we found that TRF2 and POT1 co-purified all six members of the telomere protein complex, while TRF1 identified five of six components at frequencies that lend evidence towards the currently accepted telomere architecture. Many of the known TRF1 or TRF2 interacting proteins were also identified. Moreover, putative associating partners identified for each of the three core components fell into functional categories such as DNA damage repair, ubiquitination, chromosome cohesion, chromatin modification/remodeling, DNA replication, cell cycle and transcription regulation, nucleotide metabolism, RNA processing, and nuclear transport. These putative protein-protein associations may participate in different biological processes at telomeres or, intriguingly, outside telomeres.

  1. The protein network surrounding the human telomere repeat binding factors TRF1, TRF2, and POT1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Giannone

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Telomere integrity (including telomere length and capping is critical in overall genomic stability. Telomere repeat binding factors and their associated proteins play vital roles in telomere length regulation and end protection. In this study, we explore the protein network surrounding telomere repeat binding factors, TRF1, TRF2, and POT1 using dual-tag affinity purification in combination with multidimensional protein identification technology liquid chromatography--tandem mass spectrometry (MudPIT LC-MS/MS. After control subtraction and data filtering, we found that TRF2 and POT1 co-purified all six members of the telomere protein complex, while TRF1 identified five of six components at frequencies that lend evidence towards the currently accepted telomere architecture. Many of the known TRF1 or TRF2 interacting proteins were also identified. Moreover, putative associating partners identified for each of the three core components fell into functional categories such as DNA damage repair, ubiquitination, chromosome cohesion, chromatin modification/remodeling, DNA replication, cell cycle and transcription regulation, nucleotide metabolism, RNA processing, and nuclear transport. These putative protein-protein associations may participate in different biological processes at telomeres or, intriguingly, outside telomeres.

  2. Different papillomaviruses have different repertoires of transcription factor binding sites: convergence and divergence in the upstream regulatory region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Ángel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papillomaviruses (PVs infect stratified squamous epithelia in warm-blooded vertebrates and have undergone a complex evolutionary process. The control of the expression of the early ORFs in PVs depends on the binding of cellular and viral transcription factors to the upstream regulatory region (URR of the virus. It is believed that there is a core of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS common to all PVs, with additional individual differences, although most of the available information focuses only on a handful of viruses. Results We have studied the URR of sixty-one PVs, covering twenty different hosts. We have predicted the TFBS present in the URR and analysed these results by principal component analysis and genetic algorithms. The number and nature of TFBS in the URR might be much broader than thus far described, and different PVs have different repertoires of TFBS. Conclusion There are common fingerprints in the URR in PVs that infect primates, although the ancestors of these viruses diverged a long time ago. Additionally, there are obvious differences between the URR of alpha and beta PVs, despite these PVs infect similar histological cell types in the same host, i.e. human. A thorough analysis of the TFBS in the URR might provide crucial information about the differential biology of cancer-associated PVs.

  3. Inhibition of tumor metastasis by a growth factor receptor bound protein 2 Src homology 2 domain-binding antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubellino, Alessio; Gao, Yang; Lee, Sunmin; Lee, Min-Jung; Vasselli, James R; Medepalli, Sampath; Trepel, Jane B; Burke, Terrence R; Bottaro, Donald P

    2007-07-01

    Metastasis, the primary cause of death in most forms of cancer, is a multistep process whereby cells from the primary tumor spread systemically and colonize distant new sites. Blocking critical steps in this process could potentially inhibit tumor metastasis and dramatically improve cancer survival rates; however, our understanding of metastasis at the molecular level is still rudimentary. Growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2) is a widely expressed adapter protein with roles in epithelial cell growth and morphogenesis, as well as angiogenesis, making it a logical target for anticancer drug development. We have previously shown that a potent antagonist of Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-binding, C90, blocks growth factor-driven cell motility in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. We now report that C90 inhibits metastasis in vivo in two aggressive tumor models, without affecting primary tumor growth rate. These results support the potential efficacy of this compound in reducing the metastatic spread of primary solid tumors and establish a critical role for Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-mediated interactions in this process.

  4. Insulin-like growth factor II: complexity of biosynthesis and receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, S; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, F C

    1991-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) belongs to the insulin family of peptides and acts as a growth factor in many fetal tissues and tumors. The gene expression of IGF-II is initiated at three different promoters which gives rise to multiple transcripts. In a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line......, Man-6-P induces cellular responses. We have studied rat brain neuronal precursor cells where Man-6-P acted as a mitogen suggesting that phosphomannosylated proteins may act as growth factors via the Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor. In conclusion, the gene expression and mechanism of action of IGF-II is very...

  5. Serum insulin-like growth factors, insulin-like growth factor binding proteins, and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbaek, Henning; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Mellemkjaer, Lene

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown a positive association between serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and breast cancer risk in premenopausal but not postmenopausal women. IGF-II and estrogen receptor (ER) status has never been investigated. We examined the association between IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF...... cases with breast cancer and a matched control group including 397 cohort members. We estimated breast cancer risk using Cox regression analysis with adjustment for known breast cancer risk factors. RESULTS: We observed no association for IGF-I but a positive association between levels of IGFBP-3...

  6. Production of functional human insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) using recombinant expression in HEK293 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanscher, Anne Sofie Molsted; Williamson, Michael; Ebersole, Tasja Wainani

    2015-01-01

    on human proteins with therapeutic relevance is needed to design and process the next generation of protein therapeutics. In order to conduct structural and functional investigations large quantities of recombinant proteins are needed. However, finding a suitable recombinant production system for proteins......Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) display many functions in humans including regulation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway. The various roles of human IGFBPs make them attractive protein candidates in drug discovery. Structural and functional knowledge...... such as full-length human IGFBPs, still remains a challenge. Here we present a mammalian HEK293 expression method suitable for over-expression of secretory full-length human IGFBP-1 to -7. Protein purification of full-length human IGFBP-1, -2, -3 and -5 was conducted using a two-step chromatography procedure...

  7. Global analysis of ion dependence unveils hidden steps in DNA binding and bending by integration host factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, Paula; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Kuznetsov, Serguei V.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Ansari, Anjum

    2013-09-01

    Proteins that recognize and bind to specific sites on DNA often distort the DNA at these sites. The rates at which these DNA distortions occur are considered to be important in the ability of these proteins to discriminate between specific and nonspecific sites. These rates have proven difficult to measure for most protein-DNA complexes in part because of the difficulty in separating the kinetics of unimolecular conformational rearrangements (DNA bending and kinking) from the kinetics of bimolecular complex association and dissociation. A notable exception is the Integration Host Factor (IHF), a eubacterial architectural protein involved in chromosomal compaction and DNA recombination, which binds with subnanomolar affinity to specific DNA sites and bends them into sharp U-turns. The unimolecular DNA bending kinetics has been resolved using both stopped-flow and laser temperature-jump perturbation. Here we expand our investigation by presenting a global analysis of the ionic strength dependence of specific binding affinity and relaxation kinetics of an IHF-DNA complex. This analysis enables us to obtain each of the underlying elementary rates (DNA bending/unbending and protein-DNA association/dissociation), and their ionic strength dependence, even under conditions where the two processes are coupled. Our analysis indicates interesting differences in the ionic strength dependence of the bi- versus unimolecular steps. At moderate [KCl] (100-500 mM), nearly all the ionic strength dependence to the overall equilibrium binding affinity appears in the bimolecular association/dissociation of an initial, presumably weakly bent, encounter complex, with a slope SKbi ≈ 8 describing the loglog-dependence of the equilibrium constant to form this complex on [KCl]. In contrast, the unimolecular equilibrium constant to form the fully wrapped specific complex from the initial complex is nearly independent of [KCl], with SKuni protein-DNA contacts in the fully wrapped complex

  8. Factor H Binds to the Hypervariable Region of Many Streptococcus pyogenes M Proteins but Does Not Promote Phagocytosis Resistance or Acute Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Bodil M.; Olsen, John E.; Harris, Claire L.; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael L.; Stålhammar-Carlemalm, Margaretha; Lindahl, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Many pathogens express a surface protein that binds the human complement regulator factor H (FH), as first described for Streptococcus pyogenes and the antiphagocytic M6 protein. It is commonly assumed that FH recruited to an M protein enhances virulence by protecting the bacteria against complement deposition and phagocytosis, but the role of FH-binding in S. pyogenes pathogenesis has remained unclear and controversial. Here, we studied seven purified M proteins for ability to bind FH and found that FH binds to the M5, M6 and M18 proteins but not the M1, M3, M4 and M22 proteins. Extensive immunochemical analysis indicated that FH binds solely to the hypervariable region (HVR) of an M protein, suggesting that selection has favored the ability of certain HVRs to bind FH. These FH-binding HVRs could be studied as isolated polypeptides that retain ability to bind FH, implying that an FH-binding HVR represents a distinct ligand-binding domain. The isolated HVRs specifically interacted with FH among all human serum proteins, interacted with the same region in FH and showed species specificity, but exhibited little or no antigenic cross-reactivity. Although these findings suggested that FH recruited to an M protein promotes virulence, studies in transgenic mice did not demonstrate a role for bound FH during acute infection. Moreover, phagocytosis tests indicated that ability to bind FH is neither sufficient nor necessary for S. pyogenes to resist killing in whole human blood. While these data shed new light on the HVR of M proteins, they suggest that FH-binding may affect S. pyogenes virulence by mechanisms not assessed in currently used model systems. PMID:23637608

  9. Factor H binds to the hypervariable region of many Streptococcus pyogenes M proteins but does not promote phagocytosis resistance or acute virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias C U Gustafsson

    Full Text Available Many pathogens express a surface protein that binds the human complement regulator factor H (FH, as first described for Streptococcus pyogenes and the antiphagocytic M6 protein. It is commonly assumed that FH recruited to an M protein enhances virulence by protecting the bacteria against complement deposition and phagocytosis, but the role of FH-binding in S. pyogenes pathogenesis has remained unclear and controversial. Here, we studied seven purified M proteins for ability to bind FH and found that FH binds to the M5, M6 and M18 proteins but not the M1, M3, M4 and M22 proteins. Extensive immunochemical analysis indicated that FH binds solely to the hypervariable region (HVR of an M protein, suggesting that selection has favored the ability of certain HVRs to bind FH. These FH-binding HVRs could be studied as isolated polypeptides that retain ability to bind FH, implying that an FH-binding HVR represents a distinct ligand-binding domain. The isolated HVRs specifically interacted with FH among all human serum proteins, interacted with the same region in FH and showed species specificity, but exhibited little or no antigenic cross-reactivity. Although these findings suggested that FH recruited to an M protein promotes virulence, studies in transgenic mice did not demonstrate a role for bound FH during acute infection. Moreover, phagocytosis tests indicated that ability to bind FH is neither sufficient nor necessary for S. pyogenes to resist killing in whole human blood. While these data shed new light on the HVR of M proteins, they suggest that FH-binding may affect S. pyogenes virulence by mechanisms not assessed in currently used model systems.

  10. Elevated TATA-binding protein expression drives vascular endothelial growth factor expression in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sandra A S; Lin, Justin J; Walkey, Christopher J; Leathers, Michael P; Coarfa, Cristian; Johnson, Deborah L

    2017-07-25

    The TATA-binding protein (TBP) plays a central role in eukaryotic gene transcription. Given its key function in transcription initiation, TBP was initially thought to be an invariant protein. However, studies showed that TBP expression is upregulated by oncogenic signaling pathways. Furthermore, depending on the cell type, small increases in cellular TBP amounts can induce changes in cellular growth properties towards a transformed phenotype. Here we sought to identify the specific TBP-regulated gene targets that drive its ability to induce tumorigenesis. Using microarray analysis, our results reveal that increases in cellular TBP concentrations produce selective alterations in gene expression that include an enrichment for genes involved in angiogenesis. Accordingly, we find that TBP levels modulate VEGFA expression, the master regulator of angiogenesis. Increases in cellular TBP amounts induce VEGFA expression and secretion to enhance cell migration and tumor vascularization. TBP mediates changes in VEGFA transcription requiring its recruitment at a hypoxia-insensitive proximal TSS, revealing a mechanism for VEGF regulation under non-stress conditions. The results are clinically relevant as TBP expression is significantly increased in both colon adenocarcinomas as well as adenomas relative to normal tissue. Furthermore, TBP expression is positively correlated with VEGFA expression. Collectively, these studies support the idea that increases in TBP expression contribute to enhanced VEGFA transcription early in colorectal cancer development to drive tumorigenesis.

  11. Human pathogenic Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov. resists complement-mediated killing by direct binding of immune regulators factor H and factor H-like protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberger, Pia; Siegel, Corinna; Skerka, Christine; Fingerle, Volker; Schulte-Spechtel, Ulrike; van Dam, Alje; Wilske, Bettina; Brade, Volker; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard; Kraiczy, Peter

    2007-10-01

    Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov. has recently been shown to be a novel human pathogenic genospecies that causes Lyme disease in Europe. In order to elucidate the immune evasion mechanisms of B. spielmanii, we compared the abilities of isolates obtained from Lyme disease patients and tick isolate PC-Eq17 to escape from complement-mediated bacteriolysis. Using a growth inhibition assay, we show that four B. spielmanii isolates, including PC-Eq17, are serum resistant, whereas a single isolate, PMew, was more sensitive to complement-mediated lysis. All isolates activated complement in vitro, as demonstrated by covalent attachment of C3 fragments; however, deposition of the later activation products C6 and C5b-9 was restricted to the moderately serum-resistant isolate PMew and the serum-sensitive B. garinii isolate G1. Furthermore, serum adsorption experiments revealed that all B. spielmanii isolates acquired the host alternative pathway regulators factor H and factor H-like protein (FHL-1) from human serum. Both complement regulators retained their factor I-mediated C3b inactivation activities when bound to spirochetes. In addition, two distinct factor H and FHL-1 binding proteins, BsCRASP-1 and BsCRASP-2, were identified, which we estimated to be approximately 23 to 25 kDa in mass. A further factor H binding protein, BsCRASP-3, was found exclusively in the tick isolate, PC-Eq17. This is the first report describing an immune evasion mechanism utilized by B. spielmanii sp. nov., and it demonstrates the capture of human immune regulators to resist complement-mediated killing.

  12. Developmental roles of 21 Drosophila transcription factors are determined by quantitative differences in binding to an overlapping set of thousands of genomic regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacArthur, Stewart; Li, Xiao-Yong; Li, Jingyi; Brown, James B.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Zeng, Lucy; Grondona, Brandi P.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Knowles, David W.; Stapleton, Mark; Bickel, Peter; Biggin, Mark D.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2009-05-15

    BACKGROUND: We previously established that six sequence-specific transcription factors that initiate anterior/posterior patterning in Drosophila bind to overlapping sets of thousands of genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. While regions bound at high levels include known and probable functional targets, more poorly bound regions are preferentially associated with housekeeping genes and/or genes not transcribed in the blastoderm, and are frequently found in protein coding sequences or in less conserved non-coding DNA, suggesting that many are likely non-functional. RESULTS: Here we show that an additional 15 transcription factors that regulate other aspects of embryo patterning show a similar quantitative continuum of function and binding to thousands of genomic regions in vivo. Collectively, the 21 regulators show a surprisingly high overlap in the regions they bind given that they belong to 11 DNA binding domain families, specify distinct developmental fates, and can act via different cis-regulatory modules. We demonstrate, however, that quantitative differences in relative levels of binding to shared targets correlate with the known biological and transcriptional regulatory specificities of these factors. CONCLUSIONS: It is likely that the overlap in binding of biochemically and functionally unrelated transcription factors arises from the high concentrations of these proteins in nuclei, which, coupled with their broad DNA binding specificities, directs them to regions of open chromatin. We suggest that most animal transcription factors will be found to show a similar broad overlapping pattern of binding in vivo, with specificity achieved by modulating the amount, rather than the identity, of bound factor.

  13. Defining the plasticity of transcription factor binding sites by Deconstructing DNA consensus sequences: the PhoP-binding sites among gamma/enterobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Harari

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulators recognize specific DNA sequences. Because these sequences are embedded in the background of genomic DNA, it is hard to identify the key cis-regulatory elements that determine disparate patterns of gene expression. The detection of the intra- and inter-species differences among these sequences is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of both differential gene expression and evolution. Here, we address this problem by investigating the target promoters controlled by the DNA-binding PhoP protein, which governs virulence and Mg(2+ homeostasis in several bacterial species. PhoP is particularly interesting; it is highly conserved in different gamma/enterobacteria, regulating not only ancestral genes but also governing the expression of dozens of horizontally acquired genes that differ from species to species. Our approach consists of decomposing the DNA binding site sequences for a given regulator into families of motifs (i.e., termed submotifs using a machine learning method inspired by the "Divide & Conquer" strategy. By partitioning a motif into sub-patterns, computational advantages for classification were produced, resulting in the discovery of new members of a regulon, and alleviating the problem of distinguishing functional sites in chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray genome-wide analysis. Moreover, we found that certain partitions were useful in revealing biological properties of binding site sequences, including modular gains and losses of PhoP binding sites through evolutionary turnover events, as well as conservation in distant species. The high conservation of PhoP submotifs within gamma/enterobacteria, as well as the regulatory protein that recognizes them, suggests that the major cause of divergence between related species is not due to the binding sites, as was previously suggested for other regulators. Instead, the divergence may be attributed to the fast evolution of orthologous target

  14. Interactions between the R2R3-MYB transcription factor, AtMYB61, and target DNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Prouse

    Full Text Available Despite the prominent roles played by R2R3-MYB transcription factors in the regulation of plant gene expression, little is known about the details of how these proteins interact with their DNA targets. For example, while Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB protein AtMYB61 is known to alter transcript abundance of a specific set of target genes, little is known about the specific DNA sequences to which AtMYB61 binds. To address this gap in knowledge, DNA sequences bound by AtMYB61 were identified using cyclic amplification and selection of targets (CASTing. The DNA targets identified using this approach corresponded to AC elements, sequences enriched in adenosine and cytosine nucleotides. The preferred target sequence that bound with the greatest affinity to AtMYB61 recombinant protein was ACCTAC, the AC-I element. Mutational analyses based on the AC-I element showed that ACC nucleotides in the AC-I element served as the core recognition motif, critical for AtMYB61 binding. Molecular modelling predicted interactions between AtMYB61 amino acid residues and corresponding nucleotides in the DNA targets. The affinity between AtMYB61 and specific target DNA sequences did not correlate with AtMYB61-driven transcriptional activation with each of the target sequences. CASTing-selected motifs were found in the regulatory regions of genes previously shown to be regulated by AtMYB61. Taken together, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that AtMYB61 regulates transcription from specific cis-acting AC elements in vivo. The results shed light on the specifics of DNA binding by an important family of plant-specific transcriptional regulators.

  15. Studies on binding and mitogenic effect of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I in glomerular mesangial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, F.G.; Striker, L.J.; Lesniak, M.A.; MacKay, K.; Roth, J.; Striker, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    The mesangial cells are actively involved in regulating glomerular hemodynamics. Their overlying endothelium is fenestrated; therefore, these cells are directly exposed to plasma substances, including hormones such as insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). These peptides may contribute to the mesangial sclerosis and cellular hyperplasia that characterize diabetic glomerulopathy. We report herein the characterization of the receptors and the mitogenic effects of IGF-I and insulin on mouse glomerular mesangial cells in culture. The IGF-I receptor was characterized on intact cells. The Kd of the IGF-I receptor was 1.47 X 10(-9) M, and the estimated number of sites was 64,000 receptors/cell. The binding was time, temperature, and pH dependent, and the receptor showed down-regulation after exposure to serum. The expression of the receptor did not change on cells at different densities. The specific binding for insulin was too low to allow characterization of the insulin receptor on intact cells. However, it was possible to identify the insulin receptor in a wheat germ agglutinin-purified preparation of solubilized mesangial cells. This receptor showed the characteristic features of the insulin receptor, including pH dependence of binding and a curvilinear Scatchard plot. The mitogenic effects of insulin and IGF-I on mesangial cells were measured by the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA. IGF-I was more potent than insulin. The half-maximal response to IGF-I stimulation occurred at 1.3 X 10(-10) M, and a similar increase with insulin was observed at concentrations in the range of 10(-7) M, suggesting that this insulin action was mediated through the IGF-I receptor. These data show that the mouse microvascular smooth muscle cells of the glomerulus express a cell surface receptor for IGF-I in vitro and that this peptide is a potent mitogen for these mesangial cells

  16. Purification and characterization of a long-acting ciliary neurotrophic factor via genetically fused with an albumin-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Longfu; Zhang, Chun; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Qi; Wang, Jian; Liu, Yongdong; Su, Zhiguo

    2017-11-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a promising candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative or metabolic diseases, but suffers rapid clearance in body. Herein we constructed a new long-acting recombinant human CNTF (rhCNTF) by genetic fusion with an albumin-binding domain (ABD) through a flexible peptide linker, hoping to endow the new molecule prolonged serum circulation time by binding with endogenous human serum albumin (HSA) and then utilizing the naturally long-half-life property of HSA. This fused protein rhCNTF-ABD was expressed in Escherichia coli mainly in the soluble form and purified through a two-step chromatography, with purity of 95% and a high yield of 90-100 mg/L culture. The in vitro binding ability of rhCNTF-ABD with HSA was firstly verified by incubation of the two components together followed by HP-SEC analysis. ABD-fused rhCNTF showed similar secondary and tertiary structure as the parent protein. It retained approximately 94.1% of the native bioactivity as demonstrated via CCK-8 cell viability assay analysis. In vivo studies in SD rats were performed and the terminal half-life of 483.89 min for rhCNTF-ABD was determined, which is about 14 folds longer than that of rhCNTF (34.28 min) and comparable with 20 k-40 kDa PEGylated rhCNTFs. The new constructed rhCNTF-ABD represents a potential therapeutic modality, and the proposed strategy may also have useful applications for other long-lasting biopharmaceutics' design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bioinformatics comparisons of RNA-binding proteins of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Escherichia coli strains reveal novel virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pritha; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2017-08-24

    Pathogenic bacteria have evolved various strategies to counteract host defences. They are also exposed to environments that are undergoing constant changes. Hence, in order to survive, bacteria must adapt themselves to the changing environmental conditions by performing regulations at the transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional levels. Roles of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) as virulence factors have been very well studied. Here, we have used a sequence search-based method to compare and contrast the proteomes of 16 pathogenic and three non-pathogenic E. coli strains as well as to obtain a global picture of the RBP landscape (RBPome) in E. coli. Our results show that there are no significant differences in the percentage of RBPs encoded by the pathogenic and the non-pathogenic E. coli strains. The differences in the types of Pfam domains as well as Pfam RNA-binding domains, encoded by these two classes of E. coli strains, are also insignificant. The complete and distinct RBPome of E. coli has been established by studying all known E. coli strains till date. We have also identified RBPs that are exclusive to pathogenic strains, and most of them can be exploited as drug targets since they appear to be non-homologous to their human host proteins. Many of these pathogen-specific proteins were uncharacterised and their identities could be resolved on the basis of sequence homology searches with known proteins. Detailed structural modelling, molecular dynamics simulations and sequence comparisons have been pursued for selected examples to understand differences in stability and RNA-binding. The approach used in this paper to cross-compare proteomes of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains may also be extended to other bacterial or even eukaryotic proteomes to understand interesting differences in their RBPomes. The pathogen-specific RBPs reported in this study, may also be taken up further for clinical trials and/or experimental validations.

  18. Importin α-importin β complex mediated nuclear translocation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Long, Juan; Yi, Yuxin; Xia, Wei

    2017-10-28

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-5 is a secreted protein that binds to IGFs and modulates IGF actions, as well as regulates cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis independent of IGF. Proper cellular localization is critical for the effective function of most signaling molecules. In previous studies, we have shown that the nuclear IGFBP-5 comes from ER-cytosol retro-translocation. In this study, we further investigated the pathway mediating IGFBP-5 nuclear import after it retro-translocation. Importin-α5 was identified as an IGFBP-5-interacting protein with a yeast two-hybrid system, and its interaction with IGFBP-5 was further confirmed by GST pull down and co-immunoprecipitation. Binding affinity of IGFBP-5 and importins were determined by surface plasmon resonance (IGFBP-5/importin-β: K D =2.44e-7, IGFBP-5/importin-α5: K D =3.4e-7). Blocking the importin-α5/importin-β nuclear import pathway using SiRNA or dominant negative impotin-β dramatically inhibited IGFBP-5-EGFP nuclear import, though importin-α5 overexpress does not affect IGFBP-5 nuclear import. Furthermore, nuclear IGFBP-5 was quantified using luciferase report assay. When deleted the IGFBP-5 nuclear localization sequence (NLS), IGFBP-5 ΔNLS loss the ability to translocate into the nucleus and accumulation of IGFBP-5 ΔNLS was visualized in the cytosol. Altogether, our findings provide a substantially evidence showed that the IGFBP-5 nuclear import is mediated by importin-α/importin-β complex, and NLS is critical domain in IGFBP-5 nuclear translocation.

  19. Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Downregulates Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Binding to the Cell Surface and Intracellular Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassone, Evelyne; Valacca, Cristina; Mignatti, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP, MMP-14), a transmembrane proteinase with an extracellular catalytic domain and a short cytoplasmic tail, degrades extracellular matrix components and controls diverse cell functions through proteolytic and non-proteolytic interactions with extracellular, intracellular, and transmembrane proteins. Here we show that in tumor cells MT1-MMP downregulates fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) signaling by reducing the amount of FGF-2 bound to the cell surface with high and low affinity. FGF-2 induces weaker activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase in MT1-MMP expressing cells than in cells devoid of MT1-MMP. This effect is abolished in cells that express proteolytically inactive MT1-MMP but persists in cells expressing MT1-MMP mutants devoid of hemopexin-like or cytoplasmic domain, showing that FGF-2 signaling is downregulated by MT1-MMP proteolytic activity. MT1-MMP expression results in downregulation of FGFR-1 and -4, and in decreased amount of cell surface-associated FGF-2. In addition, MT1-MMP strongly reduces the amount of FGF-2 bound to the cell surface with low affinity. Because FGF-2 association with low-affinity binding sites is a prerequisite for binding to its high-affinity receptors, downregulation of low-affinity binding to the cell surface results in decreased FGF-2 signaling. Consistent with this conclusion, FGF-2 induction of tumor cell migration and invasion in vitro is stronger in cells devoid of MT1- MMP than in MT1-MMP expressing cells. Thus, MT1-MMP controls FGF-2 signaling by a proteolytic mechanism that decreases the cell's biological response to FGF-2. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) induces gene and protein expression of the Dictyostelium nuclear calmodulin-binding protein nucleomorphin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Poloz, Yekaterina; Myre, Michael A

    2009-02-01

    The nucleomorphin gene numA1 from Dictyostelium codes for a multi-domain, calmodulin binding protein that regulates nuclear number. To gain insight into the regulation of numA, we assessed the effects of the stalk cell differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), an extracellular signalling molecule, on the expression of numA1 RNA and protein. For comparison, the extracellular signalling molecules cAMP (mediates chemotaxis, prestalk and prespore differentiation) and ammonia (NH(3)/NH(4)(+); antagonizes DIF) were also studied. Starvation, which is a signal for multicellular development, results in a greater than 80% decrease in numA1 mRNA expression within 4 h. Treatment with ammonium chloride led to a greater than 90% inhibition of numA1 RNA expression within 2 h. In contrast, the addition of DIF-1 completely blocked the decrease in numA1 gene expression caused by starvation. Treatment of vegetative cells with cAMP led to decreases in numA1 RNA expression that were equivalent to those seen with starvation. Western blotting after various morphogen treatments showed that the maintenance of vegetative levels of numA1 RNA by DIF-1 in starved cells was reflected in significantly increased numA1 protein levels. Treatment with cAMP and/or ammonia led to decreased protein expression and each of these morphogens suppressed the stimulatory effects of DIF-1. Protein expression levels of CBP4a, a calcium-dependent binding partner of numA1, were regulated in the same manner as numA1 suggesting this potential co-regulation may be related to their functional relationship. NumA1 is the first calmodulin binding protein shown to be regulated by developmental morphogens in Dictyostelium being upregulated by DIF-1 and down-regulated by cAMP and ammonia.

  1. Characterization and localization of metal-responsive-element-binding transcription factors from tilapia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Andrew Pok-Lap; Au, Candy Yee-Man; Chan, William Wai-Lun; Chan, King Ming

    2010-01-01

    Two isoforms of MTF-1, MTF-1L (long form) and MTF-1S (short form), were cloned in tilapia (Ti) and characterized in a tilapia liver cell line, Hepa-T1. The cloned tiMTF-1L has the characteristics of all of the tiMTF-1S identified so far with the zinc finger domain having six fingers, the acidic-rich, proline-rich, and serine/threonine-rich domains; however, the short form encodes for the zinc finger domain with five zinc fingers only and no other domains. The transient transfection of tiMTF-1L into human HepG2 cells showed both constitutive and zinc-induced metal-responsive-element (MRE)-driven reporter gene expression. However, the transfection of tiMTF-1S (which lacks all three transactivation domains) into a human cell line showed reduced transcriptional activities compared with an endogenous control in both basal- and Zn 2+ -induced conditions. The tiMTF-1 isoforms were tagged with GFP and transfected into Hepa-T1 cells (tilapia hepatocytes). The nuclear translocation of tiMTF-1L was observed when the cells were exposed to a sufficient concentration of metals for 6 h. However, tiMTF-1S, was localized in the nucleus with or without metal treatment. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) confirmed that both of the isoforms were able to bind to the MRE specifically in vitro. Tissue distribution studies showed that tiMTF-1L was more abundant than tiMTF-1S in all of the tissues tested.

  2. Characterization and localization of metal-responsive-element-binding transcription factors from tilapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Andrew Pok-Lap; Au, Candy Yee-Man; Chan, William Wai-Lun [Department of Biochemistry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Sha Tin, N.T., Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Chan, King Ming, E-mail: kingchan@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Biochemistry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Sha Tin, N.T., Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2010-08-01

    Two isoforms of MTF-1, MTF-1L (long form) and MTF-1S (short form), were cloned in tilapia (Ti) and characterized in a tilapia liver cell line, Hepa-T1. The cloned tiMTF-1L has the characteristics of all of the tiMTF-1S identified so far with the zinc finger domain having six fingers, the acidic-rich, proline-rich, and serine/threonine-rich domains; however, the short form encodes for the zinc finger domain with five zinc fingers only and no other domains. The transient transfection of tiMTF-1L into human HepG2 cells showed both constitutive and zinc-induced metal-responsive-element (MRE)-driven reporter gene expression. However, the transfection of tiMTF-1S (which lacks all three transactivation domains) into a human cell line showed reduced transcriptional activities compared with an endogenous control in both basal- and Zn{sup 2+}-induced conditions. The tiMTF-1 isoforms were tagged with GFP and transfected into Hepa-T1 cells (tilapia hepatocytes). The nuclear translocation of tiMTF-1L was observed when the cells were exposed to a sufficient concentration of metals for 6 h. However, tiMTF-1S, was localized in the nucleus with or without metal treatment. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) confirmed that both of the isoforms were able to bind to the MRE specifically in vitro. Tissue distribution studies showed that tiMTF-1L was more abundant than tiMTF-1S in all of the tissues tested.

  3. Prospective study of insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3, genetic variants in the IGF1 and IGFBP3 genes and risk of coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricketts, Sally L.; Rensing, Katrijn L.; Holly, Jeff M.; Chen, Li; Young, Elizabeth H.; Luben, Robert; Ashford, Sofie; Song, Kijoung; Yuan, Xin; Dehghan, Abbas; Wright, Benjamin J.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Mooser, Vincent; Waeber, Gérard; Vollenweider, Peter; Epstein, Stephen E.; Burnett, Mary S.; Devaney, Joseph M.; Hakonarson, Hakon H.; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Danesh, John; Thompson, Simon G.; Dunning, Alison M.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Samani, Nilesh J.; McPherson, Ruth; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Sandhu, Manjinder S.

    2011-01-01

    Although experimental studies have suggested that insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and its binding protein IGFBP-3 might have a role in the aetiology of coronary artery disease (CAD), the relevance of circulating IGFs and their binding proteins in the development of CAD in human populations is

  4. The β3-Integrin Binding Protein β3-Endonexin Is a Novel Negative Regulator of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kračun, Damir; Rieß, Florian; Kanchev, Ivan; Gawaz, Meinrad

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Integrins are multifunctional heterodimeric adhesion receptors that mediate the attachment between a cell and the extracellular matrix or other surrounding cells. In endothelial cells, integrins can modulate cell migration and motility. In particular, β3-integrin is expressed in angiogenic vessels. Signal transduction by β3-integrins requires the recruitment of intracellular signaling molecules. β3-endonexin is a highly spliced molecule that has been identified as a β3-integrin binding protein. β3-endonexin isoforms are expressed in endothelial cells and have been suggested to act as shuttle proteins between the membrane and the nucleus. However, their functional role in angiogenesis is unclear. In this study, we investigated whether β3-endonexin isoforms are involved in endothelial angiogenic processes under hypoxia. Results: The overexpression of β3-endonexin isoforms decreased endothelial proliferation and tube formation under hypoxia, while the depletion of β3-endonexin by RNAi promoted angiogenic responses in vitro and in vivo. In hypoxia, β3-endonexin accumulated in the nucleus, and prevention of this response by depletion of β3-endonexin increased hypoxic activation and induction of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 and its target genes VEGF and PAI-1. β3-endonexin diminished nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) activation and decreased NFκB binding to the HIF-1α promoter under hypoxia, subsequently diminishing NFκB-dependent transcription of HIF-1α under hypoxia. Innovation: Our results indicate for the first time that the overexpression of β3-endonexin can decrease hypoxic induction and activation of HIF-1α and can prevent hypoxic endothelial proliferation and angiogenic responses. Conclusion: β3-endonexin can act as a novel anti-angiogenic factor specifically in the response to hypoxia due to its negative impact on the activation of HIF-1. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1964–1976. PMID:24386901

  5. MADS evolution : insights into evolutionary changes in transcription factors and their binding sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de Suze-Annigje

    2017-01-01

    Although most flowers follow a conserved 'bauplan' consisting of sepals, petals, stamens and carpels, there is a remarkable amount of morphological diversity. Interestingly, all flowers are specified by the conserved (A)BCE-model. Most of the transcription factors in this model belong to the

  6. The vaccinia virus DNA polymerase structure provides insights into the mode of processivity factor binding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tarbouriech, N.; Ducournau, C.; Hutin, S.; Mas, P.J.; Man, Petr; Forest, E.; Hart, D.J.; Peyrefitte, Ch.N.; Burmeister, W.P.; Iseni, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, NOV 13 (2017), s. 1-12, č. článku 1455. ISSN 2041-1723 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : PROTEIN SECONDARY STRUCTURE * CRYSTAL- STRUCTURE * GENETIC-CHARACTERIZATION Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 12.124, year: 2016

  7. Nectin-1 binds and signals through the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Kirsten Borup; Clausen, Ole; Rohde, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    protein and induced neurite outgrowth in primary cultures of hippocampal and cerebellar granule neurons, an effect abolished by treatment with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitor SU5402, or by transfection with a dominant-negative FGFR1 construct. We showed by surface plasmon resonance...

  8. Diagnostic utility of leptin and insulin-like growth factor binding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    modulate glucose and insulin homeostasis through activation in peripheral tissues [6]. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system has a highly conserved function in mammals and plays a critical role in energy metabolism and cell renewal in response to nutrients. IGF pathway is not only involved in cell growth in tissue ...

  9. DNA binding by the plant-specific NAC transcription factors in crystal and solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Ditte Hededam; Lindemose, Søren; Grossmann, J. Günter

    2012-01-01

    NAC (NAM/ATAF/CUC) plant transcription factors regulate essential processes in development, stress responses and nutrient distribution in important crop and model plants (rice, Populus, Arabidopsis), which makes them highly relevant in the context of crop optimization and bioenergy production...

  10. Factor H binds to the hypervariable region of many Streptococcus pyogenes M proteins but does not promote phagocytosis resistance or acute virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Caj Ulrik Mattias; Lannergård, Jonas; Nilsson, Olof Rickard

    2013-01-01

    Many pathogens express a surface protein that binds the human complement regulator factor H (FH), as first described for Streptococcus pyogenes and the antiphagocytic M6 protein. It is commonly assumed that FH recruited to an M protein enhances virulence by protecting the bacteria against...... complement deposition and phagocytosis, but the role of FH-binding in S. pyogenes pathogenesis has remained unclear and controversial. Here, we studied seven purified M proteins for ability to bind FH and found that FH binds to the M5, M6 and M18 proteins but not the M1, M3, M4 and M22 proteins. Extensive...... to an M protein promotes virulence, studies in transgenic mice did not demonstrate a role for bound FH during acute infection. Moreover, phagocytosis tests indicated that ability to bind FH is neither sufficient nor necessary for S. pyogenes to resist killing in whole human blood. While these data shed...

  11. The effect of human factor H on immunogenicity of meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccines with over-expressed factor H binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T Beernink

    Full Text Available The binding of human complement inhibitors to vaccine antigens in vivo could diminish their immunogenicity. A meningococcal ligand for the complement down-regulator, factor H (fH, is fH-binding protein (fHbp, which is specific for human fH. Vaccines containing recombinant fHbp or native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV from mutant strains with over-expressed fHbp are in clinical development. In a previous study in transgenic mice, the presence of human fH impaired the immunogenicity of a recombinant fHbp vaccine. In the present study, we prepared two NOMV vaccines from mutant group B strains with over-expressed wild-type fHbp or an R41S mutant fHbp with no detectable fH binding. In wild-type mice in which mouse fH did not bind to fHbp in either vaccine, the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp elicited 2-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.001 and 4-fold higher complement-mediated bactericidal titers against a PorA-heterologous strain than the NOMV with the mutant fHbp (P = 0.003. By adsorption, the bactericidal antibodies were shown to be directed at fHbp. In transgenic mice in which human fH bound to the wild-type fHbp but not to the R41S fHbp, the NOMV vaccine with the mutant fHbp elicited 5-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.002, and 19-fold higher bactericidal titers than the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp (P = 0.001. Thus, in mice that differed only by the presence of human fH, the respective results with the two vaccines were opposite. The enhanced bactericidal activity elicited by the mutant fHbp vaccine in the presence of human fH far outweighed the loss of immunogenicity of the mutant protein in wild-type animals. Engineering fHbp not to bind to its cognate complement inhibitor, therefore, may increase vaccine immunogenicity in humans.

  12. Response and binding elements for ligand-dependent positive transcription factors integrate positive and negative regulation of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, M.G.; Glass, C.K.; Adler, S.; Crenshaw, E.B. III; He, X.; Lira, S.A.; Elsholtz, H.P.; Mangalam, H.J.; Holloway, J.M.; Nelson, C.; Albert, V.R.; Ingraham, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    Accurate, regulated initiation of mRNA transcription by RNA polymerase II is dependent on the actions of a variety of positive and negative trans-acting factors that bind cis-acting promoter and enhancer elements. These transcription factors may exert their actions in a tissue-specific manner or function under control of plasma membrane or intracellular ligand-dependent receptors. A major goal in the authors' laboratory has been to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for the serial activation of hormone-encoding genes in the pituitary during development and the positive and negative regulation of their transcription. The anterior pituitary gland contains phenotypically distinct cell types, each of which expresses unique trophic hormones: adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, prolactin, growth hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone/luteinizing hormone. The structurally related prolactin and growth hormone genes are expressed in lactotrophs and somatotrophs, respectively, with their expression virtually limited to the pituitary gland. The reported transient coexpression of these two structurally related neuroendocrine genes raises the possibility that the prolactin and growth hormone genes are developmentally controlled by a common factor(s)

  13. Intracellular protein delivery activity of peptides derived from insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 3 and 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Inomata, Kosuke; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have various IGF-independent cellular activities, including receptor-independent cellular uptake followed by transcriptional regulation, although mechanisms of cellular entry remain unclear. Herein, we focused on their receptor-independent cellular entry mechanism in terms of protein transduction domain (PTD) activity, which is an emerging technique useful for clinical applications. The peptides of 18 amino acid residues derived from IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, which involve heparin-binding regions, mediated cellular delivery of an exogenous protein into NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Relative protein delivery activities of IGFBP-3/5-derived peptides were approximately 20-150% compared to that of the HIV-Tat peptide, a potent PTD. Heparin inhibited the uptake of the fusion proteins with IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, indicating that the delivery pathway is heparin-dependent endocytosis, similar to that of HIV-Tat. The delivery of GST fused to HIV-Tat was competed by either IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5-derived synthetic peptides. Therefore, the entry pathways of the three PTDs are shared. Our data has shown a new approach for designing protein delivery systems using IGFBP-3/5 derived peptides based on the molecular mechanisms of IGF-independent activities of IGFBPs

  14. Multi-species, multi-transcription factor binding highlights conserved control of tissue-specific biological pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Benoit; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Schmidt, Dominic; Gonzàlez-Porta, Mar; Carlucci, Matthew; Chen, Xiaoting; Chessman, Kyle; Faure, Andre J; Funnell, Alister PW; Goncalves, Angela; Kutter, Claudia; Lukk, Margus; Menon, Suraj; McLaren, William M; Stefflova, Klara; Watt, Stephen; Weirauch, Matthew T; Crossley, Merlin; Marioni, John C; Odom, Duncan T; Flicek, Paul; Wilson, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    As exome sequencing gives way to genome sequencing, the need to interpret the function of regulatory DNA becomes increasingly important. To test whether evolutionary conservation of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) gives insight into human gene regulation, we determined transcription factor (TF) binding locations of four liver-essential TFs in liver tissue from human, macaque, mouse, rat, and dog. Approximately, two thirds of the TF-bound regions fell into CRMs. Less than half of the human CRMs were found as a CRM in the orthologous region of a second species. Shared CRMs were associated with liver pathways and disease loci identified by genome-wide association studies. Recurrent rare human disease causing mutations at the promoters of several blood coagulation and lipid metabolism genes were also identified within CRMs shared in multiple species. This suggests that multi-species analyses of experimentally determined combinatorial TF binding will help identify genomic regions critical for tissue-specific gene control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02626.001 PMID:25279814

  15. ATAF2, a NAC Transcription Factor, Binds to the Promoter and Regulates NIT2 Gene Expression Involved in Auxin Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Sung Un; Lee, Suk-Bae; Kim, Hwang Hyun; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor ATAF2, one of the plant specific NAC family genes, is known as repressor of pathogenesis-related genes and responsive to the diverse defense-related hormones, pathogen infection, and wounding stress. Furthermore, it is important to consider that tryptophan-dependant IAA biosynthesis pathway can be activated by wounding and pathogen. We found that ATAF2pro::GUS reporter was induced upon indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN) treatments. And ataf2 mutant showed reduced sensitivity to IAN whereas 35S::ATAF2 plants showed hyper-sensitivity to IAN. IAN biosynthesis required nitrilase involved in the conversion of IAN to an auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). We found that the NIT2 gene was repressed in ataf2 knockout plants. Expression of both ATAF2 and NIT2 genes was induced by IAN treatment. Transgenic plants overexpressing ATAF2 showed up-regulated NIT2 expression. ATAF2 activated promoter of the NIT2 gene in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that NIT2 promoter region from position −117 to −82 contains an ATAF2 binding site where an imperfect palindrome sequence was critical to the protein-DNA interaction. These findings indicate that ATAF2 regulates NIT2 gene expression via NIT2 promoter binding. PMID:22965747

  16. Genome-wide analysis of p63 binding sites identifies AP-2 factors as co-regulators of epidermal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDade, Simon S; Henry, Alexandra E; Pivato, Geraldine P; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Mitsopoulos, Constantinos; Fenwick, Kerry; Assiotis, Ioannis; Hakas, Jarle; Zvelebil, Marketa; Orr, Nicholas; Lord, Christopher J; Patel, Daksha; Ashworth, Alan; McCance, Dennis J

    2012-08-01

    The p63 transcription factor (TP63) is critical in development, growth and differentiation of stratifying epithelia. This is highlighted by the severity of congenital abnormalities caused by TP63 mutations in humans, the dramatic phenotypes in knockout mice and de-regulation of TP63 expression in neoplasia altering the tumour suppressive roles of the TP53 family. In order to define the normal role played by TP63 and provide the basis for better understanding how this network is perturbed in disease, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) to identify >7500 high-confidence TP63-binding regions across the entire genome, in primary human neonatal foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs). Using integrative strategies, we demonstrate that only a subset of these sites are bound by TP53 in response to DNA damage. We identify a role for TP63 in transcriptional regulation of multiple genes genetically linked to cleft palate and identify AP-2alpha (TFAP2A) as a co-regulator of a subset of these genes. We further demonstrate that AP-2gamma (TFAP2C) can bind a subset of these regions and that acute depletion of either TFAP2A or TFAP2C alone is sufficient to reduce terminal differentiation of organotypic epidermal skin equivalents, indicating overlapping physiological functions with TP63.

  17. Residues remote from the binding pocket control the antagonist selectivity towards the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xianqiang; Cheng, Jianxin; Wang, Xu; Tang, Yun; Ågren, Hans; Tu, Yaoquan

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin releasing factors receptor-1 and receptor-2 (CRF1R and CRF2R) are therapeutic targets for treating neurological diseases. Antagonists targeting CRF1R have been developed for the potential treatment of anxiety disorders and alcohol addiction. It has been found that antagonists targeting CRF1R always show high selectivity, although CRF1R and CRF2R share a very high rate of sequence identity. This has inspired us to study the origin of the selectivity of the antagonists. We have therefore built a homology model for CRF2R and carried out unbiased molecular dynamics and well-tempered metadynamics simulations for systems with the antagonist CP-376395 in CRF1R or CRF2R to address this issue. We found that the side chain of Tyr6.63 forms a hydrogen bond with the residue remote from the binding pocket, which allows Tyr6.63 to adopt different conformations in the two receptors and results in the presence or absence of a bottleneck controlling the antagonist binding to or dissociation from the receptors. The rotameric switch of the side chain of Tyr3566.63 allows the breaking down of the bottleneck and is a perquisite for the dissociation of CP-376395 from CRF1R.

  18. Structures of the Ets Protein DNA-binding Domains of Transcription Factors Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev: DETERMINANTS OF DNA BINDING AND REDOX REGULATION BY DISULFIDE BOND FORMATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher D O; Newman, Joseph A; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Allerston, Charles K; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-05-29

    Ets transcription factors, which share the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain, number nearly 30 members in humans and are particularly involved in developmental processes. Their deregulation following changes in expression, transcriptional activity, or by chromosomal translocation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Ets DNA binding, selectivity, and regulation have been extensively studied; however, questions still arise regarding binding specificity outside the core GGA recognition sequence and the mode of action of Ets post-translational modifications. Here, we report the crystal structures of Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev, alone and in complex with DNA. We identify previously unrecognized features of the protein-DNA interface. Interactions with the DNA backbone account for most of the binding affinity. We describe a highly coordinated network of water molecules acting in base selection upstream of the GGAA core and the structural features that may account for discrimination against methylated cytidine residues. Unexpectedly, all proteins crystallized as disulfide-linked dimers, exhibiting a novel interface (distant to the DNA recognition helix). Homodimers of Etv1, Etv4, and Etv5 could be reduced to monomers, leading to a 40-200-fold increase in DNA binding affinity. Hence, we present the first indication of a redox-dependent regulatory mechanism that may control the activity of this subset of oncogenic Ets transcription factors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Vitamin B12 Phosphate Conjugation and Its Effect on Binding to the Human B12 -Binding Proteins Intrinsic Factor and Haptocorrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ó Proinsias, Keith; Ociepa, Michał; Pluta, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    and its limitations examined. The resulting derivatives, particularly those bearing terminal alkyne and azide groups, were isolated and used in copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reactions (CuAAC). Their sensitivity towards light revealed their potential as photocleavable molecules. The binding...

  20. Identification and characterization of the factor H and FHL-1 binding complement regulator-acquiring surface protein 1 of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberger, Pia; Siegel, Corinna; Skerka, Christine; Fingerle, Volker; Schulte-Spechtel, Ulrike; Wilske, Bettina; Brade, Volker; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard; Kraiczy, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Borrelia spielmanii, one of the etiological agents of Lyme disease found in Europe, evades host complement-mediated killing by recruitment of the immune regulators factor H and FHL-1 from human serum. Serum-resistant and intermediate serum-resistant isolates express up to 3 distinct complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs) that bind factor H and/or FHL-1. The present study describes identification and functional characterization of BsCRASP-1 as the dominant factor H and FHL-1 binding protein of B. spielmanii. BsCRASP-1 is a 27.7kDa outer surface lipoprotein, which after processing has a predicted mass of 24.9kDa. BsCRASP-1 is encoded by a single copy gene, cspA, that maps to a linear plasmid of approximately 55kb. Ligand affinity blot techniques revealed that both native and recombinant BsCRASP-1 from different isolates can strongly bind FHL-1, but only weakly factor H. Deletion mutants of recombinant BsCRASP-1 were generated and a high-affinity binding site for factor H and FHL-1 was mapped to its carboxy-terminal 10-amino-acid residue domain. Similarly, the dominant binding site of factor H and FHL-1 was localized to short consensus repeats (SCRs) 5-7. Factor H and FHL-1 maintained cofactor activity for factor I-mediated C3b inactivation when bound to full-length BsCRASP-1 but not to a deletion mutant lacking the carboxy-terminal 10-amino-acid residue domain. In conclusion, BsCRASP-1 binds the host immune regulators factor H and FHL-1, and is suggested to represent a key molecule of B. spielmanii for complement resistance. Thus, BsCRASP-1 most likely contributes to persistence of B. spielmanii and to pathogenesis of Lyme disease.

  1. Direct astatination of a tumour-binding protein, human epidermal growth factor, using nido-carborane as a prosthetic group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestroem, A.; Carlsson, J.; Lundqvist, H.; Koziorowski, J.

    2003-01-01

    A method for direct astatine labeling of proteins has been investigated. Binding sites for astatine were created by coupling of a nido-carborane derivative to a protein, the human epidermal growth factor (hEGF), using two different conjugation methods - by glutaraldehyde cross-linking or by introduction of sulfohydryl groups by Traut's reagent with subsequent linking of ANC-1 with m-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide ester. The conjugates were astatinated using the Chloramine-T method in high yield. The best labeling was obtained by the glutaraldehyde conjugate with an average yield of 68 ± 9%. In vitro stability tests indicated that the glutaraldehyde conjugated label was as stable as hEGF labeled with astatobenzoate. (author)

  2. Antibodies against amino acids 1-15 of tumor necrosis factor block its binding to cell-surface receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Socher, S H; Riemen, M W; Martinez, D; Friedman, A; Tai, J; Quintero, J C; Garsky, V; Oliff, A

    1987-01-01

    Human tumor necrosis factor (hTNF) mediates a variety of biologic activities, which are dependent on the attachment of hTNF to cell-surface receptors. To identify regions of the hTNF protein involved in binding hTNF to its receptor, we prepared five synthetic peptides [hTNF-(1-15), hTNF-(1-31), hTNF-(65-79), hTNF-(98-111), and hTNF-(124-141)] and two hydroxylamine cleavage fragments [hTNF-(1-39) and hTNF-(40-157)] of hTNF. The hTNF-synthetic peptides and hTNF fragments were tested in hTNF rec...

  3. Physical capacity influences the response of insulin-like growth factor and its binding proteins to training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Lars; Langberg, Henning; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2002-01-01

    The influence of initial training status on the response of circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and its binding proteins (IGFBP) to prolonged physical training was studied in young men. It was hypothesized that highly standardized training would result in more extensive changes...... in the circulating IGF system in untrained subjects because of lower fitness level. Seven untrained (UT) and 12 well-trained (WT) individuals performed 11 wk of intense physical training (2-4 h daily). Fasting serum samples were analyzed for total and free IGF-I and -II, for IGFBP-1 to -4, as well as for IGFBP-3...... proteolysis. Eleven weeks of physical training resulted in decreased levels of total IGF-I, free IGF-I, and IGFBP-4 in both the UT and WT groups. In the UT group, IGFBP-2 increased, IGFBP-3 decreased [from 4,255 +/- 410 (baseline) to 3,896 +/- 465 (SD) microg/l (week 4); P

  4. An Essential Role for the Glut1 PDZ-Binding Motif in Growth Factor Regulation of Glut1 Degradation and Trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Wieman, Heather L.; Horn, Sarah R.; Jacobs, Sarah R.; Altman, Brian J.; Kornbluth, Sally; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    Cell surface localization of the glucose transporter, Glut1, is a cytokine-controlled process essential to support the metabolism and survival of hematopoietic cells. Molecular mechanisms that regulate Glut1 trafficking, however, are not certain. Here we show a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif in Glut1 is critical to promote maximal cytokine-stimulated Glut1 cell surface localization and prevent Glut1 lysosomal degradation in the absence of growth factor. Disruption of this PDZ-binding sequence t...

  5. The ModERN Resource: Genome-Wide Binding Profiles for Hundreds ofDrosophilaandCaenorhabditis elegansTranscription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudron, Michelle M; Victorsen, Alec; Gevirtzman, Louis; Hillier, LaDeana W; Fisher, William W; Vafeados, Dionne; Kirkey, Matt; Hammonds, Ann S; Gersch, Jeffery; Ammouri, Haneen; Wall, Martha L; Moran, Jennifer; Steffen, David; Szynkarek, Matt; Seabrook-Sturgis, Samantha; Jameel, Nader; Kadaba, Madhura; Patton, Jaeda; Terrell, Robert; Corson, Mitch; Durham, Timothy J; Park, Soo; Samanta, Swapna; Han, Mei; Xu, Jinrui; Yan, Koon-Kiu; Celniker, Susan E; White, Kevin P; Ma, Lijia; Gerstein, Mark; Reinke, Valerie; Waterston, Robert H

    2018-03-01

    To develop a catalog of regulatory sites in two major model organisms, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans , the modERN (model organism Encyclopedia of Regulatory Networks) consortium has systematically assayed the binding sites of transcription factors (TFs). Combined with data produced by our predecessor, modENCODE (Model Organism ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements), we now have data for 262 TFs identifying 1.23 M sites in the fly genome and 217 TFs identifying 0.67 M sites in the worm genome. Because sites from different TFs are often overlapping and tightly clustered, they fall into 91,011 and 59,150 regions in the fly and worm, respectively, and these binding sites span as little as 8.7 and 5.8 Mb in the two organisms. Clusters with large numbers of sites (so-called high occupancy target, or HOT regions) predominantly associate with broadly expressed genes, whereas clusters containing sites from just a few factors are associated with genes expressed in tissue-specific patterns. All of the strains expressing GFP-tagged TFs are available at the stock centers, and the chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data are available through the ENCODE Data Coordinating Center and also through a simple interface (http://epic.gs.washington.edu/modERN/) that facilitates rapid accessibility of processed data sets. These data will facilitate a vast number of scientific inquiries into the function of individual TFs in key developmental, metabolic, and defense and homeostatic regulatory pathways, as well as provide a broader perspective on how individual TFs work together in local networks and globally across the life spans of these two key model organisms. Copyright © 2018 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. The carboxy-terminal domain of Dictyostelium C-module-binding factor is an independent gene regulatory entity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Lucas

    Full Text Available The C-module-binding factor (CbfA is a multidomain protein that belongs to the family of jumonji-type (JmjC transcription regulators. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, CbfA regulates gene expression during the unicellular growth phase and multicellular development. CbfA and a related D. discoideum CbfA-like protein, CbfB, share a paralogous domain arrangement that includes the JmjC domain, presumably a chromatin-remodeling activity, and two zinc finger-like (ZF motifs. On the other hand, the CbfA and CbfB proteins have completely different carboxy-terminal domains, suggesting that the plasticity of such domains may have contributed to the adaptation of the CbfA-like transcription factors to the rapid genome evolution in the dictyostelid clade. To support this hypothesis we performed DNA microarray and real-time RT-PCR measurements and found that CbfA regulates at least 160 genes during the vegetative growth of D. discoideum cells. Functional annotation of these genes revealed that CbfA predominantly controls the expression of gene products involved in housekeeping functions, such as carbohydrate, purine nucleoside/nucleotide, and amino acid metabolism. The CbfA protein displays two different mechanisms of gene regulation. The expression of one set of CbfA-dependent genes requires at least the JmjC/ZF domain of the CbfA protein and thus may depend on chromatin modulation. Regulation of the larger group of genes, however, does not depend on the entire CbfA protein and requires only the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA (CbfA-CTD. An AT-hook motif located in CbfA-CTD, which is known to mediate DNA binding to A+T-rich sequences in vitro, contributed to CbfA-CTD-dependent gene regulatory functions in vivo.

  7. Alboserpin, a Factor Xa Inhibitor from the Mosquito Vector of Yellow Fever, Binds Heparin and Membrane Phospholipids and Exhibits Antithrombotic Activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Calvo, E.; Mizurini, D.M.; Sa-Nunes, A.; Ribeiro, J.M.C.; Andersen, J. F.; Mans, B.J.; Monteiro, R.Q.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Francischetti, I.M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 286, č. 32 (2011), 27998-28010 ISSN 0021-9258 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : serpin * mosquito * Aedes albopictus * phospholipids * Factor Xa * heparin * binding affinity * coagulation * thrombus * bleeding Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 4.773, year: 2011

  8. Depletion of elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing enhances antiviral response in porcine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type I interferons (IFN) are key mediators of the innate antiviral response in mammalian cells. Elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins (4E-BPs) are translational controllers of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), the master regulator of IFN transcription. The role of 4EBPs in the negat...

  9. A resource for characterizing genome-wide binding and putative target genes of transcription factors expressed during secondary growth and wood formation in Populus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijun Liu; Trevor Ramsay; Matthew S. Zinkgraf; David Sundell; Nathaniel Robert Street; Vladimir Filkov; Andrew Groover

    2015-01-01

    Identifying transcription factor target genes is essential for modeling the transcriptional networks underlying developmental processes. Here we report a chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) resource consisting of genome-wide binding regions and associated putative target genes for four Populus homeodomain transcription factors...

  10. Heparin-Binding EGF-like Growth Factor (HB-EGF) Therapy for Intestinal Injury: Application and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jixin; Su, Yanwei; Zhou, Yu; Besner, Gail E.

    2014-01-01

    Throughout the past 20 years, we have been investigating the potential therapeutic roles of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), a member of the epidermal growth factor family, in various models of intestinal injury including necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, and hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation (HS/R). Our studies have demonstrated that HB-EGF acts as an effective mitogen, a restitution-inducing reagent, a cellular trophic factor, an anti-apoptotic protein and a vasodilator, via its effects on various cell types in the intestine. In the current paper, we have reviewed the application and therapeutic effects of HB-EGF in three classic animal models of intestinal injury, with particular emphasis on its protection of the intestines from NEC. Additionally, we have summarized the protective functions of HB-EGF on various target cells in the intestine. Lastly, we have provided a brief discussion focusing on the future development of HB-EGF clinical applications for the treatment of various forms of intestinal injury including NEC. PMID:24345808

  11. Further structural insights into the binding of complement factor H by complement regulator-acquiring surface protein 1 (CspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caesar, Joseph J. E.; Wallich, Reinhard; Kraiczy, Peter; Zipfel, Peter F.; Lea, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    B. burgdorferi binds complement factor H using a dimeric surface protein, CspA (BbCRASP-1). Presented here is a new structure of CspA that suggests that there is a degree of flexibility between subunits which may have implications for complement regulator binding. Borrelia burgdorferi has evolved many mechanisms of evading the different immune systems across its range of reservoir hosts, including the capture and presentation of host complement regulators factor H and factor H-like protein-1 (FHL-1). Acquisition is mediated by a family of complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs), of which the atomic structure of CspA (BbCRASP-1) is known and shows the formation of a homodimeric species which is required for binding. Mutagenesis studies have mapped a putative factor H binding site to a cleft between the two subunits. Presented here is a new atomic structure of CspA which shows a degree of flexibility between the subunits which may be critical for factor H scavenging by increasing access to the binding interface and allows the possibility that the assembly can clamp around the bound complement regulators

  12. ChIP-nexus: a novel ChIP-exo protocol for improved detection of in vivo transcription factor binding footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiye; Johnston, Jeff; Zeitlinger, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how eukaryotic enhancers are bound and regulated by specific combinations of transcription factors is still a major challenge. To better map transcription factor binding genome-wide at nucleotide resolution in vivo, we have developed a robust ChIP-exo protocol called ChIP experiments with nucleotide resolution through exonuclease, unique barcode and single ligation (ChIP-nexus), which utilizes an efficient DNA self-circularization step during library preparation. Application of ChIP-nexus to four proteins—human TBP and Drosophila NFkB, Twist and Max— demonstrates that it outperforms existing ChIP protocols in resolution and specificity, pinpoints relevant binding sites within enhancers containing multiple binding motifs and allows the analysis of in vivo binding specificities. Notably, we show that Max frequently interacts with DNA sequences next to its motif, and that this binding pattern correlates with local DNA sequence features such as DNA shape. ChIP-nexus will be broadly applicable to studying in vivo transcription factor binding specificity and its relationship to cis-regulatory changes in humans and model organisms. PMID:25751057

  13. Characterization of in vivo DNA-binding events of plant transcription factors by ChIP-seq

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourik, Van Hilda; Muiño, J.M.; Pajoro, Alice; Angenent, G.C.; Kaufmann, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a powerful technique for genome-wide identification of in vivo binding sites of DNA-binding proteins. The technique had been used to study many DNA-binding proteins in a broad variety of species. The basis of the

  14. Synergistic inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activation by protein S and C4b-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S. J.; van't Veer, C.; Sixma, J. J.; Bouma, B. N.

    1995-01-01

    The complement protein C4b-binding protein plays an important role in the regulation of the protein C anticoagulant pathway. C4b-binding protein can bind to protein S, thereby inhibiting the cofactor activity of protein S for activated protein C. In this report, we describe a new role for

  15. Expression and purification of Nod factor receptors - Initial characterization of ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broghammer, Angelique

    . Lipochitooligosaccharides also serve as signals in the mutually beneficial interactions between arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) and most land plants. In the model legume Lotus japonicus the Nod factor receptors, LjNFR1 and LjNFR5, two LysM receptor like kinases (LysM-RLK), are responsible for perceiving the rhizobial...... and LjNFR5 ectodomains were glycosylated; 3) LjNFR1 retained its in vitro kinase activity and 4) LjNFR1 and LjNFR5 were localized to the plasma membrane. In depth mass spectroscopy analysis of the N-glycan structure of LjNFR5 resulted in identification of two different glycan structures with identical...

  16. Humanin Peptide Binds to Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 3 (IGFBP3) and Regulates Its Interaction with Importin-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njomen, Evert; Evans, Hedeel G; Gedara, Samanthi H; Heyl, Deborah L

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear translocation of IGFBP3 by importin-β1 is a prerequisite for IGFBP3-induced apoptosis. The neuroprotective peptide humanin (HN) counteracts IGFBP3-induced cell death. However, the mechanism by which humanin protects cells is currently unknown. The natural synthesis of this peptide decreases with age, coincident with the likelihood for the development of Alzheimer's Disease, making it a promising target for therapeutics. We have examined the effect of full-length humanin and a synthetic analogue (HN 3-19), known to be sufficient for its neuroprotective function, on the interaction between IGFBP3 and importin-β1. Using competitive ligand dot blotting, co-immunoprecipitation, and an ELISA-based binding assay, we determined that 1) humanin binds to IGFBP3 with a Kd of 5.05 µM and 2) both humanin (IC50 of 18.1 µM) and HN 3-19 (IC50 of 10.3 μM) interfere with the binding of importin-β1 to IGFBP3 in vitro. We also demonstrated that HN 3-19 is able to reduce the rate of apoptosis in a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, suggesting a possible mechanism of action for humanin as an inhibitor of IGFBP3 nuclear translocation. Understanding the exact mechanism by which humanin and its analogue, HN 3-19, bind to IGFPB3 and regulate its interaction with importin-β1 will open the door to modulating the protein-protein interactions involved in neuronal cell death.

  17. Genome-wide identification of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and -2 binding sites in hypoxic human macrophages alternatively activated by IL-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausendschön, Michaela; Rehli, Michael; Dehne, Nathalie; Schmidl, Christian; Döring, Claudia; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Brüne, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦ) often accumulate in hypoxic areas, where they significantly influence disease progression. Anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10, generate alternatively activated macrophages that support tumor growth. To understand how alternative activation affects the transcriptional profile of hypoxic macrophages, we globally mapped binding sites of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages prestimulated with IL-10. 713 HIF-1 and 795 HIF-2 binding sites were identified under hypoxia. Pretreatment with IL-10 altered the binding pattern, with 120 new HIF-1 and 188 new HIF-2 binding sites emerging. HIF-1 binding was most prominent in promoters, while HIF-2 binding was more abundant in enhancer regions. Comparison of ChIP-seq data obtained in other cells revealed a highly cell type specific binding of HIF. In MΦ HIF binding occurred preferentially in already active enhancers or promoters. To assess the roles of HIF on gene expression, primary human macrophages were treated with siRNA against HIF-1α or HIF-2α, followed by genome-wide gene expression analysis. Comparing mRNA expression to the HIF binding profile revealed a significant enrichment of hypoxia-inducible genes previously identified by ChIP-seq. Analysis of gene expression under hypoxia alone and hypoxia/IL-10 showed the enhanced induction of a set of genes including PLOD2 and SLC2A3, while another group including KDM3A and ADM remained unaffected or was reduced by IL-10. Taken together IL-10 influences the DNA binding pattern of HIF and the level of gene induction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Transforming growth factor-beta1 stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 in human bone marrow stromal osteoblast progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveiborg, Marie; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Eriksen, E F

    2001-01-01

    While transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) regulates proliferation and differentiation of human osteoblast precursor cells, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not known. Several hormones and locally acting growth factors regulate osteoblast functions through changes in the insulin......-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). Thus, we studied the effects of TGF-beta1 on IGFs and IGFBPs in human marrow stromal (hMS) osteoblast precursor cells. TGF-beta1 increased the steady-state mRNA level of IGF-I up to 8.5+/-0.6-fold (P...

  19. The microRNA-302b-inhibited insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 signaling pathway induces glioma cell apoptosis by targeting nuclear factor IA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Cheng Lee

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally control the expression of genes involved in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM development. Although miR-302b functions as a tumor suppressor, its role in GBM is still unclear. Therefore, this study comprehensively explored the roles of miR-302b-mediated gene networks in GBM cell death. We found that miR-302b levels were significantly higher in primary astrocytes than in GBM cell lines. miR-302b overexpression dose dependently reduced U87-MG cell viability and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and poly(ADP ribose polymerase degradation. A transcriptome microarray revealed 150 downregulated genes and 380 upregulated genes in miR-302b-overexpressing cells. Nuclear factor IA (NFIA, higher levels of which were significantly related to poor survival, was identified as a direct target gene of miR-302b and was involved in miR-302b-induced glioma cell death. Higher NFIA levels were observed in GBM cell lines and human tumor sections compared with astrocytes and non-tumor tissues, respectively. NFIA knockdown significantly enhanced apoptosis. We found high levels of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2, another miR-302b-downregulated gene, in patients with poor survival. We verified that NFIA binds to the IGFBP2 promoter and transcriptionally enhances IGFBP2 expression levels. We identified that NFIA-mediated IGFBP2 signaling pathways are involved in miR-302b-induced glioma cell death. The identification of a regulatory loop whereby miR-302b inhibits NFIA, leading to a decrease in expression of IGFBP-2, may provide novel directions for developing therapies to target glioblastoma tumorigenesis.

  20. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase: Structural Implication to Liporprotein Binding and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samanta, Uttamkumar; Bahnson, Brian J. (Delaware)

    2009-02-23

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5 angstroms. It has a classic lipase alpha/beta-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser273, His351, and Asp296. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser273. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  1. The chromatin remodelling factor BRG1 is a novel binding partner of the tumor suppressor p16INK4a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Graham J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CDKN2A/p16INK4a is frequently altered in human cancers and it is the most important melanoma susceptibility gene identified to date. p16INK4a inhibits pRb phosphorylation and induces cell cycle arrest, which is considered its main tumour suppressor function. Nevertheless, additional activities may contribute to the tumour suppressor role of p16INK4a and could help explain its specific association with melanoma predisposition. To identify such functions we conducted a yeast-two-hybrid screen for novel p16INK4a binding partners. Results We now report that p16INK4a interacts with the chromatin remodelling factor BRG1. We investigated the cooperative roles of p16INK4a and BRG1 using a panel of cell lines and a melanoma cell model with inducible p16INK4a expression and BRG1 silencing. We found evidence that BRG1 is not required for p16INK4a-induced cell cycle inhibition and propose that the p16INK4a-BRG1 complex regulates BRG1 chromatin remodelling activity. Importantly, we found frequent loss of BRG1 expression in primary and metastatic melanomas, implicating this novel p16INK4a binding partner as an important tumour suppressor in melanoma. Conclusion This data adds to the increasing evidence implicating the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex in tumour development and the association of p16INK4a with chromatin remodelling highlights potentially new functions that may be important in melanoma predisposition and chemoresistance.

  2. Novel Nucleotide Variations, Haplotypes Structure and Associations with Growth Related Traits of Goat AT Motif-Binding Factor ( Gene

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    Xiaoyan Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The AT motif-binding factor (ATBF1 not only interacts with protein inhibitor of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 (PIAS3 to suppress STAT3 signaling regulating embryo early development and cell differentiation, but is required for early activation of the pituitary specific transcription factor 1 (Pit1 gene (also known as POU1F1 critically affecting mammalian growth and development. The goal of this study was to detect novel nucleotide variations and haplotypes structure of the ATBF1 gene, as well as to test their associations with growth-related traits in goats. Herein, a total of seven novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (SNP 1-7 within this gene were found in two well-known Chinese native goat breeds. Haplotypes structure analysis demonstrated that there were four haplotypes in Hainan black goat while seventeen haplotypes in Xinong Saanen dairy goat, and both breeds only shared one haplotype (hap1. Association testing revealed that the SNP2, SNP5, SNP6, and SNP7 loci were also found to significantly associate with growth-related traits in goats, respectively. Moreover, one diplotype in Xinong Saanen dairy goats significantly linked to growth related traits. These preliminary findings not only would extend the spectrum of genetic variations of the goat ATBF1 gene, but also would contribute to implementing marker-assisted selection in genetics and breeding in goats.

  3. Production of functional human insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) using recombinant expression in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanscher, Anne Sofie Molsted; Williamson, Michael; Ebersole, Tasja Wainani; Streicher, Werner; Wikström, Mats; Cazzamali, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) display many functions in humans including regulation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway. The various roles of human IGFBPs make them attractive protein candidates in drug discovery. Structural and functional knowledge on human proteins with therapeutic relevance is needed to design and process the next generation of protein therapeutics. In order to conduct structural and functional investigations large quantities of recombinant proteins are needed. However, finding a suitable recombinant production system for proteins such as full-length human IGFBPs, still remains a challenge. Here we present a mammalian HEK293 expression method suitable for over-expression of secretory full-length human IGFBP-1 to -7. Protein purification of full-length human IGFBP-1, -2, -3 and -5 was conducted using a two-step chromatography procedure and the final protein yields were between 1 and 12mg protein per liter culture media. The recombinant IGFBPs contained PTMs and exhibited high-affinity interactions with their natural ligands IGF-1 and IGF-2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-6 Alters Skeletal Muscle Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Doaa Aboalola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 (IGFBP-6, the main regulator of insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-2, is a component of the stem cell niche in developing muscle cells. However, its role in muscle development has not been clearly defined. In this study, we investigated the role of IGFBP-6 in muscle commitment and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from the placenta. We showed that placental mesenchymal stem cells (PMSCs have the ability to differentiate into muscle cells when exposed to a specific culture medium by expressing muscle markers Pax3/7, MyoD, myogenin, and myosin heavy chain in a stage-dependent manner with the ultimate formation of multinucleated fibers and losing pluripotency-associated markers, OCT4 and SOX2. The addition of IGFBP-6 significantly increased pluripotency-associated markers as well as muscle differentiation markers at earlier time points, but the latter decreased with time. On the other hand, silencing IGFBP-6 decreased both pluripotent and differentiation markers at early time points. The levels of these markers increased as IGFBP-6 levels were restored. These findings indicate that IGFBP-6 influences MSC pluripotency and myogenic differentiation, with more prominent effects observed at the beginning of the differentiation process before muscle commitment.

  5. Genome-wide mapping of boundary element-associated factor (BEAF) binding sites in Drosophila melanogaster links BEAF to transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Emberly, Eldon; Cuvier, Olivier; Hart, Craig M

    2009-07-01

    Insulator elements play a role in gene regulation that is potentially linked to nuclear organization. Boundary element-associated factors (BEAFs) 32A and 32B associate with hundreds of sites on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. We hybridized DNA isolated by chromatin immunoprecipitation to genome tiling microarrays to construct a genome-wide map of BEAF binding locations. A distinct difference in the association of 32A and 32B with chromatin was noted. We identified 1,820 BEAF peaks and found that more than 85% were less than 300 bp from transcription start sites. Half are between head-to-head gene pairs. BEAF-associated genes are transcriptionally active as judged by the presence of RNA polymerase II, dimethylated histone H3 K4, and the alternative histone H3.3. Forty percent of these genes are also associated with the polymerase negative elongation factor NELF. Like NELF-associated genes, most BEAF-associated genes are highly expressed. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, we found that the expression levels of most BEAF-associated genes decrease in embryos and cultured cells lacking BEAF. These results provide an unexpected link between BEAF and transcription, suggesting that BEAF plays a role in maintaining most associated promoter regions in an environment that facilitates high transcription levels.

  6. Tissue factor-expressing tumor cells can bind to immobilized recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor under static and shear conditions in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara P Y Che

    Full Text Available Mammary tumors and malignant breast cancer cell lines over-express the coagulation factor, tissue factor (TF. High expression of TF is associated with a poor prognosis in breast cancer. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI, the endogenous inhibitor of TF, is constitutively expressed on the endothelium. We hypothesized that TF-expressing tumor cells can bind to immobilized recombinant TFPI, leading to arrest of the tumor cells under shear in vitro. We evaluated the adhesion of breast cancer cells to immobilized TFPI under static and shear conditions (0.35 - 1.3 dyn/cm2. We found that high-TF-expressing breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231 (with a TF density of 460,000/cell, but not low TF-expressing MCF-7 (with a TF density of 1,400/cell, adhered to recombinant TFPI, under static and shear conditions. Adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells to TFPI required activated factor VII (FVIIa, but not FX, and was inhibited by a factor VIIa-blocking anti-TF antibody. Under shear, adhesion to TFPI was dependent on the TFPI-coating concentration, FVIIa concentration and shear stress, with no observed adhesion at shear stresses greater than 1.0 dyn/cm2. This is the first study showing that TF-expressing tumor cells can be captured by immobilized TFPI, a ligand constitutively expressed on the endothelium, under low shear in vitro. Based on our results, we hypothesize that TFPI could be a novel ligand mediating the arrest of TF-expressing tumor cells in high TFPI-expressing vessels under conditions of low shear during metastasis.

  7. Phosphorylation of the PCNA binding domain of the large subunit of replication factor C by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibits DNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maga, G; Mossi, R; Fischer, R

    1997-01-01

    Replication factor C (RF-C) is a heteropentameric protein essential for DNA replication and DNA repair. It is a molecular matchmaker required for loading of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) sliding clamp onto double-strand DNA and for PCNA-dependent DNA synthesis by DNA polymerases...... delta and epsilon. The DNA and PCNA binding domains of the large 140 kDa subunit of human RF-C have been recently cloned [Fotedar, R., Mossi, R., Fitzgerald, P., Rousselle, T., Maga, G., Brickner, H., Messier, H., Khastilba. S., Hübscher, U., & Fotedar, A. (1996) EMBO J. 15, 4423-4433]. Here we show...... that the PCNA binding domain is phosphorylated by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an enzyme required for cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells. The DNA binding domain, on the other hand, is not phosphorylated. Phosphorylation by CaMKII reduces the binding of PCNA to RF-C...

  8. Kinetic analysis of PCNA clamp binding and release in the clamp loading reaction catalyzed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication factor C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzahn, Melissa R; Hayner, Jaclyn N; Meyer, Jennifer A; Bloom, Linda B

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerases require a sliding clamp to achieve processive DNA synthesis. The toroidal clamps are loaded onto DNA by clamp loaders, members of the AAA+family of ATPases. These enzymes utilize the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to perform a variety of cellular functions. In this study, a clamp loader-clamp binding assay was developed to measure the rates of ATP-dependent clamp binding and ATP-hydrolysis-dependent clamp release for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae clamp loader (RFC) and clamp (PCNA). Pre-steady-state kinetics of PCNA binding showed that although ATP binding to RFC increases affinity for PCNA, ATP binding rates and ATP-dependent conformational changes in RFC are fast relative to PCNA binding rates. Interestingly, RFC binds PCNA faster than the Escherichia coli γ complex clamp loader binds the β-clamp. In the process of loading clamps on DNA, RFC maintains contact with PCNA while PCNA closes, as the observed rate of PCNA closing is faster than the rate of PCNA release, precluding the possibility of an open clamp dissociating from DNA. Rates of clamp closing and release are not dependent on the rate of the DNA binding step and are also slower than reported rates of ATP hydrolysis, showing that these rates reflect unique intramolecular reaction steps in the clamp loading pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The meningococcal vaccine candidate neisserial surface protein A (NspA binds to factor H and enhances meningococcal resistance to complement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Lewis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Complement forms an important arm of innate immunity against invasive meningococcal infections. Binding of the alternative complement pathway inhibitor factor H (fH to fH-binding protein (fHbp is one mechanism meningococci employ to limit complement activation on the bacterial surface. fHbp is a leading vaccine candidate against group B Neisseria meningitidis. Novel mechanisms that meningococci employ to bind fH could undermine the efficacy of fHbp-based vaccines. We observed that fHbp deletion mutants of some meningococcal strains showed residual fH binding suggesting the presence of a second receptor for fH. Ligand overlay immunoblotting using membrane fractions from one such strain showed that fH bound to a approximately 17 kD protein, identified by MALDI-TOF analysis as Neisserial surface protein A (NspA, a meningococcal vaccine candidate whose function has not been defined. Deleting nspA, in the background of fHbp deletion mutants, abrogated fH binding and mAbs against NspA blocked fH binding, confirming NspA as a fH binding molecule on intact bacteria. NspA expression levels vary among strains and expression correlated with the level of fH binding; over-expressing NspA enhanced fH binding to bacteria. Progressive truncation of the heptose (Hep I chain of lipooligosaccharide (LOS, or sialylation of lacto-N-neotetraose LOS both increased fH binding to NspA-expressing meningococci, while expression of capsule reduced fH binding to the strains tested. Similar to fHbp, binding of NspA to fH was human-specific and occurred through fH domains 6-7. Consistent with its ability to bind fH, deleting NspA increased C3 deposition and resulted in increased complement-dependent killing. Collectively, these data identify a key complement evasion mechanism with important implications for ongoing efforts to develop meningococcal vaccines that employ fHbp as one of its components.

  10. Global MYCN transcription factor binding analysis in neuroblastoma reveals association with distinct E-box motifs and regions of DNA hypermethylation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Derek M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma, a cancer derived from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is a major cause of childhood cancer related deaths. The single most important prognostic indicator of poor clinical outcome in this disease is genomic amplification of MYCN, a member of a family of oncogenic transcription factors. METHODOLOGY: We applied MYCN chromatin immunoprecipitation to microarrays (ChIP-chip) using MYCN amplified\\/non-amplified cell lines as well as a conditional knockdown cell line to determine the distribution of MYCN binding sites within all annotated promoter regions. CONCLUSION: Assessment of E-box usage within consistently positive MYCN binding sites revealed a predominance for the CATGTG motif (p<0.0016), with significant enrichment of additional motifs CATTTG, CATCTG, CAACTG in the MYCN amplified state. For cell lines over-expressing MYCN, gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment for the binding of MYCN at promoter regions of numerous molecular functional groups including DNA helicases and mRNA transcriptional regulation. In order to evaluate MYCN binding with respect to other genomic features, we determined the methylation status of all annotated CpG islands and promoter sequences using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP). The integration of MYCN ChIP-chip and MeDIP data revealed a highly significant positive correlation between MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation. This association was also detected in regions of hemizygous loss, indicating that the observed association occurs on the same homologue. In summary, these findings suggest that MYCN binding occurs more commonly at CATGTG as opposed to the classic CACGTG E-box motif, and that disease associated over expression of MYCN leads to aberrant binding to additional weaker affinity E-box motifs in neuroblastoma. The co-localization of MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation further supports the dual role of MYCN, namely that of a classical transcription factor affecting the

  11. A new mode of DNA binding distinguishes Capicua from other HMG-box factors and explains its mutation patterns in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forés, Marta; Simón-Carrasco, Lucía; Ajuria, Leiore; Samper, Núria; González-Crespo, Sergio; Drosten, Matthias; Barbacid, Mariano; Jiménez, Gerardo

    2017-03-01

    HMG-box proteins, including Sox/SRY (Sox) and TCF/LEF1 (TCF) family members, bind DNA via their HMG-box. This binding, however, is relatively weak and both Sox and TCF factors employ distinct mechanisms for enhancing their affinity and specificity for DNA. Here we report that Capicua (CIC), an HMG-box transcriptional repressor involved in Ras/MAPK signaling and cancer progression, employs an additional distinct mode of DNA binding that enables selective recognition of its targets. We find that, contrary to previous assumptions, the HMG-box of CIC does not bind DNA alone but instead requires a distant motif (referred to as C1) present at the C-terminus of all CIC proteins. The HMG-box and C1 domains are both necessary for binding specific TGAATGAA-like sites, do not function via dimerization, and are active in the absence of cofactors, suggesting that they form a bipartite structure for sequence-specific binding to DNA. We demonstrate that this binding mechanism operates throughout Drosophila development and in human cells, ensuring specific regulation of multiple CIC targets. It thus appears that HMG-box proteins generally depend on auxiliary DNA binding mechanisms for regulating their appropriate genomic targets, but that each sub-family has evolved unique strategies for this purpose. Finally, the key role of C1 in DNA binding also explains the fact that this domain is a hotspot for inactivating mutations in oligodendroglioma and other tumors, while being preserved in oncogenic CIC-DUX4 fusion chimeras associated to Ewing-like sarcomas.

  12. Functional mapping of YadA- and Ail-mediated binding of human factor H to Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedzka-Sarek, Marta; Salmenlinna, Saara; Gruber, Markus; Lupas, Andrei N; Meri, Seppo; Skurnik, Mikael

    2008-11-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is an enteric pathogen that exploits diverse means to survive in the human host. Upon Y. enterocolitica entry into the human host, bacteria sense and respond to variety of signals, one of which is the temperature. Temperature in particular has a profound impact on Y. enterocolitica gene expression, as most of its virulence factors are expressed exclusively at 37 degrees C. These include two outer membrane proteins, YadA and Ail, that function as adhesins and complement resistance (CR) factors. Both YadA and Ail bind the functionally active complement alternative pathway regulator factor H (FH). In this study, we characterized regions on both proteins involved in CR and the interaction with FH. Twenty-eight mutants having short (7 to 41 amino acids) internal deletions within the neck and stalk of YadA and two complement-sensitive site-directed Ail mutants were constructed to map the CR and FH binding regions of YadA and Ail. Functional analysis of the YadA mutants revealed that the stalk of YadA is required for both CR and FH binding and that FH appears to target several conformational and discontinuous sites of the YadA stalk. On the other hand, the complement-sensitive Ail mutants were not affected in FH binding. Our results also suggested that Ail- and YadA-mediated CR does not depend solely on FH binding.

  13. Functional Mapping of YadA- and Ail-Mediated Binding of Human Factor H to Yersinia enterocolitica Serotype O:3▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedzka-Sarek, Marta; Salmenlinna, Saara; Gruber, Markus; Lupas, Andrei N.; Meri, Seppo; Skurnik, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is an enteric pathogen that exploits diverse means to survive in the human host. Upon Y. enterocolitica entry into the human host, bacteria sense and respond to variety of signals, one of which is the temperature. Temperature in particular has a profound impact on Y. enterocolitica gene expression, as most of its virulence factors are expressed exclusively at 37°C. These include two outer membrane proteins, YadA and Ail, that function as adhesins and complement resistance (CR) factors. Both YadA and Ail bind the functionally active complement alternative pathway regulator factor H (FH). In this study, we characterized regions on both proteins involved in CR and the interaction with FH. Twenty-eight mutants having short (7 to 41 amino acids) internal deletions within the neck and stalk of YadA and two complement-sensitive site-directed Ail mutants were constructed to map the CR and FH binding regions of YadA and Ail. Functional analysis of the YadA mutants revealed that the stalk of YadA is required for both CR and FH binding and that FH appears to target several conformational and discontinuous sites of the YadA stalk. On the other hand, the complement-sensitive Ail mutants were not affected in FH binding. Our results also suggested that Ail- and YadA-mediated CR does not depend solely on FH binding. PMID:18765735

  14. Structural basis for the selective vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) binding to neuropilin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Matthew W.; Xu, Ping; Li, Xiaobo; Vander Kooi, Craig W. (Kentucky)

    2012-07-25

    Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) is an essential receptor for angiogenesis that binds to VEGF-A. Nrp1 binds directly to VEGF-A with high affinity, but the nature of their selective binding has remained unclear. Nrp1 was initially reported to bind to the exon 7-encoded region of VEGF-A and function as an isoform-specific receptor for VEGF-A164/165. Recent data have implicated exon 8-encoded residues, which are found in all proangiogenic VEGF-A isoforms, in Nrp binding. We have determined the crystal structure of the exon 7/8-encoded VEGF-A heparin binding domain in complex with the Nrp1-b1 domain. This structure clearly demonstrates that residues from both exons 7 and 8 physically contribute to Nrp1 binding. Using an in vitro binding assay, we have determined the relative contributions of exon 7- and 8-encoded residues. We demonstrate that the exon 8-encoded C-terminal arginine is essential for the interaction of VEGF-A with Nrp1 and mediates high affinity Nrp binding. Exon 7-encoded electronegative residues make additional interactions with the L1 loop of Nrp1. Although otherwise conserved, the primary sequences of Nrp1 and Nrp2 differ significantly in this region. We further show that VEGF-A{sub 164} binds 50-fold more strongly to Nrp1 than Nrp2. Direct repulsion between the electronegative exon 7-encoded residues of the heparin binding domain and the electronegative L1 loop found only in Nrp2 is found to significantly contribute to the observed selectivity. The results reveal the basis for the potent and selective binding of VEGF-A{sub 164} to Nrp1.

  15. Specific binding of 125I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin to gonadal tissue: comparison of limited-point saturation analyses to Scatchard analyses for determining binding capacities and factors affecting estimates of binding capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spicer, L.J.; Ireland, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare gonadotropin binding capacity calculated from limited-point saturation analyses to those obtained from Scatchard analyses, and to test the effects of membrane purity and source of gonadotropin receptors on determining the maximum percentage of radioiodinated hormone bound to receptors (maximum bindability). One- to four-point saturation analyses gave results comparable to results by Scatchard analyses when examining relative binding capacities of receptors. Crude testicular homogenates had lower estimates of maximum bindability of 125 I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin than more purified gonadotropin receptor preparations. Under similar preparation techniques, some gonadotropin receptor sources exhibited low maximum bindability

  16. Bioinformatics Identification of Modules of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Genes by In Silico Promoter Analysis and Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Augustin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms and genetic risk factors underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis are only partly understood. To identify new factors, which may contribute to AD, different approaches are taken including proteomics, genetics, and functional genomics. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach and found that distinct AD-related genes share modules of transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a transcriptional coregulation. To detect additional coregulated genes, which may potentially contribute to AD, we established a new bioinformatics workflow with known multivariate methods like support vector machines, biclustering, and predicted transcription factor binding site modules by using in silico analysis and over 400 expression arrays from human and mouse. Two significant modules are composed of three transcription factor families: CTCF, SP1F, and EGRF/ZBPF, which are conserved between human and mouse APP promoter sequences. The specific combination of in silico promoter and multivariate analysis can identify regulation mechanisms of genes involved in multifactorial diseases.

  17. Fasting Induces Nuclear Factor E2-Related Factor 2 and ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters via Protein Kinase A and Sirtuin-1 in Mouse and Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Donepudi, Ajay C.; Xu, Jialin; Wei, Wei; Cheng, Qiuqiong C.; Driscoll, Maureen V.; Johnson, Delinda A.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Li, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine whether 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) and Sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) dependent mechanisms modulate ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) transport protein expression. ABC transport proteins (ABCC2–4) are essential for chemical elimination from hepatocytes and biliary excretion. Nuclear factor-E2 related-factor 2 (NRF2) is a transcription factor that mediates ABCC induction in response to chemical inducers and liver injury. However, a role for NRF2 in the regulation of transporter expression in nonchemical models of liver perturbation is largely undescribed. Results: Here we show that fasting increased NRF2 target gene expression through NRF2- and SIRT1–dependent mechanisms. In intact mouse liver, fasting induces NRF2 target gene expression by at least 1.5 to 5-fold. In mouse and human hepatocytes, treatment with 8-Bromoadenosine-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased NRF2 target gene expression and antioxidant response element activity, which was decreased by the PKA inhibitor, H-89. Moreover, fasting induced NRF2 target gene expression was decreased in liver and hepatocytes of SIRT1 liver-specific null mice and NRF2-null mice. Lastly, NRF2 and SIRT1 were recruited to MAREs and Antioxidant Response Elements (AREs) in the human ABCC2 promoter. Innovation: Oxidative stress mediated NRF2 activation is well described, yet the influence of basic metabolic processes on NRF2 activation is just emerging. Conclusion: The current data point toward a novel role of nutrient status in regulation of NRF2 activity and the antioxidant response, and indicates that cAMP/PKA and SIRT1 are upstream regulators for fasting-induced activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 15–30. PMID:23725046

  18. Neuronal kappa B-binding factors consist of Sp1-related proteins. Functional implications for autoregulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xianrong; Moerman, Andrea M; Barger, Steven W

    2002-11-22

    Neurons contain a protein factor capable of binding DNA elements normally bound by the transcription factor NF-kappaB. However, several lines of evidence suggest that this neuronal kappaB-binding factor (NKBF) is not bona fide NF-kappaB. We have identified NKBF from cultures of neocortical neurons as a complex containing proteins related to Sp1. This complex was bound by antibodies to Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 and was competed from binding to an NF-kappaB element by an oligonucleotide containing an Sp1-binding site. This Sp1 oligonucleotide detected an abundant factor in neuronal nuclei that migrated in electrophoretic mobility shift assays at a position consistent with NKBF. Expression of transfected Sp1 stimulated transcription in a manner dependent upon a kappaB cis-element. Similar to our previous reports for NKBF (Mao, X., Moerman, A. M., Lucas, M. M., and Barger, S. W. (1999) J. Neurochem. 73, 1851-1858 and Moerman, A. M., Mao, X., Lucas, M. M., and Barger, S. W. (1999) Mol. Brain Res. 67, 303-315), the activity of the Sp1-related factor was reduced by activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors, consistent with proteolytic degradation of all three Sp1-related factors. Expression of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-1 (NR1) subunit of glutamate receptors correlated with the activity of the Sp1-related factor, specifically through an Sp1 element in the NR1 promoter. These data provide the first evidence that Sp1 or related family members are responsible for kappaB-binding activity and are involved in a negative feedback for NR1 in central nervous system neurons.

  19. Serum Heparin-binding Epidermal Growth Factor-like Growth Factor (HB-EGF) as a Biomarker for Primary Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Kohei; Yotsumoto, Fusanori; Fukagawa, Satoshi; Kiyoshima, Chihiro; Ouk, Nam Sung; Urushiyama, Daichi; Ito, Tomohiro; Katsuda, Takahiro; Kurakazu, Masamitsu; Araki, Ryota; Sanui, Ayako; Miyahara, Daisuke; Murata, Masaharu; Shirota, Kyoko; Yagi, Hiroshi; Takono, Tadao; Kato, Kiyoko; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Akazawa, Kohei; Kuroki, Masahide; Yasunaga, Shin'ichiro; Miyamoto, Shingo

    2017-07-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal malignancy among gynaecological cancers. Although many anticancer agents have been developed for the treatment of ovarian cancer, it continues to have an extremely poor prognosis. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like grown factor (HB-EGF) has been reported to be a rational therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. Here, we evaluated the clinical significance of serum HB-EGF by examining the association between prognosis and serum HB-EGF levels in patients with primary ovarian cancer. We found that high serum HB-EGF concentrations were significantly associated with poor prognosis in a combined cohort of patients with all stages of ovarian cancer, as well as in a subset of patients with advanced disease. In addition, serum HB-EGF levels increased as the cancer advanced. These data suggest that serum HB-EGF may be a target for the design of novel therapies for ovarian cancer. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  20. Multiple POU-binding motifs, recognized by tissue-specific nuclear factors, are important for Dll1 gene expression in neural stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Kohzo; Nagase, Kazuko; Tokutake, Yuriko; Koh, Chang-Sung; Hiratochi, Masahiro; Ohkawara, Takeshi; Nakayama, Noriko

    2004-01-01

    We cloned the 5'-flanking region of the mouse homolog of the Delta gene (Dll1) and demonstrated that the sequence between nucleotide position -514 and -484 in the 5'-flanking region of Dll1 played a critical role in the regulation of its tissue-specific expression in neural stem cells (NSCs). Further, we showed that multiple POU-binding motifs, located within this short sequence of 30 bp, were essential for transcriptional activation of Dll1 and also that multiple tissue-specific nuclear factors recognized these POU-binding motifs in various combinations through differentiation of NSCs. Thus, POU-binding factors may play an important role in Dll1 expression in developing NSCs

  1. N-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-Phe-Leu-Phe-Leu-Phe (BOC2) inhibits the angiogenic activity of heparin-binding growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Imtiaz M; Chiodelli, Paola; Rezzola, Sara; Paganini, Giuseppe; Corsini, Michela; Lodola, Alessio; Di Ianni, Alessio; Mor, Marco; Presta, Marco

    2018-02-01

    The peptides N-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-Phe-Leu-Phe-Leu-Phe (BOC2) and BOC-Met-Leu-Phe (BOC1) are widely used antagonists of formyl peptide receptors (FPRs), BOC2 acting as an FPR1/FPR2 antagonist whereas BOC1 inhibits FPR1 only. Extensive investigations have been performed by using these FPR antagonists as a tool to assess the role of FPRs in physiological and pathological conditions. Based on previous observations from our laboratory, we assessed the possibility that BOC2 may exert also a direct inhibitory effect on the angiogenic activity of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A). Our data demonstrate that BOC2, but not BOC1, inhibits the angiogenic activity of heparin-binding VEGF-A 165 with no effect on the activity of the non-heparin-binding VEGF-A 121 isoform. Endothelial cell-based bioassays, surface plasmon resonance analysis, and computer modeling indicate that BOC2 may interact with the heparin-binding domain of VEGF-A 165 , thus competing for heparin interaction and preventing the binding of VEGF-A 165 to tyrosine kinase receptor VEGFR2, its phosphorylation and downstream signaling. In addition, BOC2 inhibits the interaction of a variety of heparin-binding angiogenic growth factors with heparin, including fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) whose angiogenic activity is blocked by the compound. Accordingly, BOC2 suppresses the angiogenic potential of human tumor cell lines that co-express VEGF-A and FGF2. Thus, BOC2 appears to act as a novel multi-heparin-binding growth factor antagonist. These findings caution about the interpretation of FPR-focusing experimental data obtained with this compound and set the basis for the design of novel BOC2-derived, FPR independent multi-target angiogenesis inhibitors.

  2. Collagen scaffolds combined with collagen-binding ciliary neurotrophic factor facilitate facial nerve repair in mini-pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao; Meng, Danqing; Cao, Jiani; Xiao, Zhifeng; Cui, Yi; Fan, Jingya; Cui, Xiaolong; Chen, Bing; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Jinling; Pan, Juli; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-05-01

    The preclinical studies using animal models play a very important role in the evaluation of facial nerve regeneration. Good models need to recapitulate the distance and time for axons to regenerate in humans. Compared with the most used rodent animals, the structure of facial nerve in mini-pigs shares more similarities with humans in microanatomy. To evaluate the feasibility of repairing facial nerve defects by collagen scaffolds combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), 10-mm-long gaps were made in the buccal branch of mini-pigs' facial nerve. Three months after surgery, electrophysiological assessment and histological examination were performed to evaluate facial nerve regeneration. Immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscope observation showed that collagen scaffolds with collagen binding (CBD)-CNTF could promote better axon regeneration, Schwann cell migration, and remyelination at the site of implant device than using scaffolds alone. Electrophysiological assessment also showed higher recovery rate in the CNTF group. In summary, combination of collagen scaffolds and CBD-CNTF showed promising effects on facial nerve regeneration in mini-pig models. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The emerin-binding transcription factor Lmo7 is regulated by association with p130Cas at focal adhesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele A. Wozniak

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Loss of function mutations in the nuclear inner membrane protein, emerin, cause X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (X-EDMD. X-EDMD is characterized by contractures of major tendons, skeletal muscle weakening and wasting, and cardiac conduction system defects. The transcription factor Lmo7 regulates muscle- and heart-relevant genes and is inhibited by binding to emerin, suggesting Lmo7 misregulation contributes to EDMD disease. Lmo7 associates with cell adhesions and shuttles between the plasma membrane and nucleus, but the regulation and biological consequences of this dual localization were unknown. We report endogenous Lmo7 also associates with focal adhesions in cells, and both co-localizes and co-immunoprecipitates with p130Cas, a key signaling component of focal adhesions. Lmo7 nuclear localization and transcriptional activity increased significantly in p130Cas-null MEFs, suggesting Lmo7 is negatively regulated by p130Cas-dependent association with focal adhesions. These results support EDMD models in which Lmo7 is a downstream mediator of integrin-dependent signaling that allows tendon cells and muscles to adapt to and withstand mechanical stress.

  4. Profiling of Concanavalin A-Binding Glycoproteins in Human Hepatic Stellate Cells Activated with Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannan Qin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Glycoproteins play important roles in maintaining normal cell functions depending on their glycosylations. Our previous study indicated that the abundance of glycoproteins recognized by concanavalin A (ConA was increased in human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs following activation by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1; however, little is known about the ConA-binding glycoproteins (CBGs of HSCs. In this study, we employed a targeted glycoproteomics approach using lectin-magnetic particle conjugate-based liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to compare CBG profiles between LX-2 HSCs with and without activation by TGF-β1, with the aim of discovering novel CBGs and determining their possible roles in activated HSCs. A total of 54 and 77 proteins were identified in the quiescent and activated LX-2 cells, respectively. Of the proteins identified, 14.3% were glycoproteins and 73.3% were novel potential glycoproteins. Molecules involved in protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum (e.g., calreticulin and calcium signaling (e.g., 1-phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate phosphodiesterase β-2 [PLCB2] were specifically identified in activated LX-2 cells. Additionally, PLCB2 expression was upregulated in the cytoplasm of the activated LX-2 cells, as well as in the hepatocytes and sinusoidal cells of liver cirrhosis tissues. In conclusion, the results of this study may aid future investigations to find new molecular mechanisms involved in HSC activation and antifibrotic therapeutic targets.

  5. MicroRNA genes preferentially expressed in dendritic cells contain sites for conserved transcription factor binding motifs in their promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huynen Martijn A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs play a fundamental role in the regulation of gene expression by translational repression or target mRNA degradation. Regulatory elements in miRNA promoters are less well studied, but may reveal a link between their expression and a specific cell type. Results To explore this link in myeloid cells, miRNA expression profiles were generated from monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs. Differences in miRNA expression among monocytes, DCs and their stimulated progeny were observed. Furthermore, putative promoter regions of miRNAs that are significantly up-regulated in DCs were screened for Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBSs based on TFBS motif matching score, the degree to which those TFBSs are over-represented in the promoters of the up-regulated miRNAs, and the extent of conservation of the TFBSs in mammals. Conclusions Analysis of evolutionarily conserved TFBSs in DC promoters revealed preferential clustering of sites within 500 bp upstream of the precursor miRNAs and that many mRNAs of cognate TFs of the conserved TFBSs were indeed expressed in the DCs. Taken together, our data provide evidence that selected miRNAs expressed in DCs have evolutionarily conserved TFBSs relevant to DC biology in their promoters.

  6. Nerve growth factor affects 11C-nicotine binding, blood flow, EEG, and verbal episodic memory in an Alzheimer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, L.; Nordberg, A.; Holst, H. von

    1992-01-01

    Based on animal research suggesting that nerve growth factor (NGF) can stimulate central cholinergic neurons, the known losses of cholinergic innervation of the cortices in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and our experience of infusing NGF to support adrenal grafts in parkinsonian patients, we have initiated clinical trials of NGF infusions into the brain of patients with AD. Here we report a follow-up of our first case, a 69-year-old woman, with symptoms of dementia since 8 years. Intraventricular infusion of 6.6 mg NGF during three months resulted in a marked transient increase in uptake and binding of 11 C-nicotine in frontal and temporal cortex and a persistent increase in cortical blood flow as measured by PET as well as progressive decreases of slow wave EEG activity. After one month of NGF, tests of verbal episodic memory were improved whereas other cognitive tests were not. No adverse effects could be ascribed to the NGF infusion. Taken together, the results of this case study indicate that NGF may counteract cholinergic deficits in AD, and suggest that further clinical trials of NGF infusion in AD are warranted. (authors)

  7. Genetic diversity and levels of expression of factor H binding protein among carriage isolates of Neisseria meningitidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Lemée

    Full Text Available The prevention of meningococcal disease may be improved by recombinant vaccines such as 4CMenB and rLP2086 that target the factor H binding protein (fHbp, an immunogenic surface component of Neisseria meningitidis present as one of three variants. Whether such vaccines decrease carriage of invasive isolates and thus induce herd immunity is unknown. We analyzed the genetic diversity and levels of expression of fHbp among 268 carriage strains and compare them to those of 467 invasive strains. fhbp gene sequencing showed higher proportions of variants 2 and 3 among carriage isolates (p<0.0001. Carriage isolates expressed lower levels of fHbp (p<0.01 but that remain high enough to predict targeting by antibodies against fHbp particularly in group B isolates belonging to the frequent hypervirulent clonal complexes in Europe and North America (cc32, cc41/44, cc269. This suggests that fHbp targeting meningococcal vaccines might reduce, at least in part, the acquisition of some hyperinvasive isolates.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of the DNA-binding with one zinc finger (Dof) transcription factor family in bananas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chen; Hu, Huigang; Xie, Jianghui

    2016-12-01

    DNA-binding with one finger (Dof) domain proteins are a multigene family of plant-specific transcription factors involved in numerous aspects of plant growth and development. In this study, we report a genome-wide search for Musa acuminata Dof (MaDof) genes and their expression profiles at different developmental stages and in response to various abiotic stresses. In addition, a complete overview of the Dof gene family in bananas is presented, including the gene structures, chromosomal locations, cis-regulatory elements, conserved protein domains, and phylogenetic inferences. Based on the genome-wide analysis, we identified 74 full-length protein-coding MaDof genes unevenly distributed on 11 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis with Dof members from diverse plant species showed that MaDof genes can be classified into four subgroups (StDof I, II, III, and IV). The detailed genomic information of the MaDof gene homologs in the present study provides opportunities for functional analyses to unravel the exact role of the genes in plant growth and development.

  9. Mannose-binding lectin inhibits monocyte proliferation through transforming growth factor-β1 and p38 signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Mannose-binding lectin (MBL, a plasma C-type lectin, plays an important role in innate immunity. However, the interaction, and the consequences of it, between MBL and the immune system remain ill defined. We have investigated the contributing mechanisms and effects of MBL on the proliferation of human monocytes. At lower concentrations (≤4 μg/ml MBL was shown to partially enhance monocyte proliferation. By contrast, at higher concentrations (8-20 μg/ml of MBL, cell proliferation was markedly attenuated. MBL-induced growth inhibition was associated with G0/G1 arrest, down-regulation of cyclin D1/D3, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk 2/Cdk4 and up-regulation of the Cdk inhibitory protein Cip1/p21. Additionally, MBL induced apoptosis, and did so through caspase-3 activation and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage. Moreover, transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 levels increased in the supernatants of MBL-stimulated monocyte cultures. We also found that MBL-dependent inhibition of monocyte proliferation could be reversed by the TGF-β receptor antagonist SB-431542, or by anti-TGF-β1 antibody, or by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK inhibitors specific for p38 (SB203580, but not ERK (U0126 or JNK (SP600125. Thus, at high concentrations, MBL can affect the immune system by inhibiting monocyte proliferation, which suggests that MBL may exhibit anti-inflammatory effects.

  10. Gene variability and degree of expression of vaccine candidate factor H binding protein in clinical isolates of Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Anne; Jacobsson, Susanne; Hussain, Shahida; Olcén, Per; Mölling, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The factor H binding protein (fHbp) is currently being evaluated in clinical trials as a vaccine candidate for a meningococcal group B vaccine. We have previously described the prevalence and sequence variation of fHbp (Jacobsson et al., 2009) and here we investigate the expression of the antigen. The present study includes isolates from carriers (n = 62) and patients with invasive Neisseria meningitidis infections (n = 146), of which 62 had a fatal outcome. Among the invasive isolates from patients with fatal and non-fatal infections fHbp allele 1 was most common (42% and 29% respectively), but it was only identified in 3% of the carrier isolates, where allele 16 was most frequent (13%). The Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis identified fHbp expression in all except seven isolates and further analysis by Western blot showed that five of these seven samples were indeed negative using a polyclonal anti-fHbp serum. The negative isolates belonged to serogroup B fHbp allele 24, Y allele 104, and W-135 allele 16 (all invasive). Two were non-serogroupable carrier isolates (allele 21 and 101). An interesting finding is that isolates from invasive infections with fatal outcome had lower expression of fHbp or lower affinity for the fHbp antibody compared to isolates from non-fatal invasive infections and carriers. © 2012 The Authors APMIS © 2012 APMIS.

  11. Prediction of the outcome of growth hormone provocative testing in short children by measurement of serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Skakkebaek, N E

    1997-01-01

    Serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) reflect the secretion of endogenous growth hormone (GH) in healthy children and exhibit little diurnal variation, which makes them potential candidates for screening of GH deficiency (G...

  12. Central Role of Core Binding Factor β2 in Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Organogenesis in Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatake, Takahiro; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Sato, Shintaro; Okura, Hideaki; Tachibana, Masashi; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Ito, Kosei; Shimojou, Michiko; Matsumoto, Naomi; Suzuki, Hidehiko; Kunisawa, Jun; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) is a group of secondary and organized lymphoid tissue that develops at different mucosal surfaces. Peyer's patches (PPs), nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT), and tear duct-associated lymphoid tissue (TALT) are representative MALT in the small intestine, nasal cavity, and lacrimal sac, respectively. A recent study has shown that transcriptional regulators of core binding factor (Cbf) β2 and promotor-1-transcribed Runt-related transcription factor 1 (P1-Runx1) are required for the differentiation of CD3-CD4+CD45+ lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells, which initiate and trigger the developmental program of PPs, but the involvement of this pathway in NALT and TALT development remains to be elucidated. Here we report that Cbfβ2 plays an essential role in NALT and TALT development by regulating LTi cell trafficking to the NALT and TALT anlagens. Cbfβ2 was expressed in LTi cells in all three types of MALT examined. Indeed, similar to the previous finding for PPs, we found that Cbfβ2-/- mice lacked NALT and TALT lymphoid structures. However, in contrast to PPs, NALT and TALT developed normally in the absence of P1-Runx1 or other Runx family members such as Runx2 and Runx3. LTi cells for NALT and TALT differentiated normally but did not accumulate in the respective lymphoid tissue anlagens in Cbfβ2-/- mice. These findings demonstrate that Cbfβ2 is a central regulator of the MALT developmental program, but the dependency of Runx proteins on the lymphoid tissue development would differ among PPs, NALT, and TALT.

  13. Hepatic insulin-like growth-factor binding protein (igfbp) responses tofood restriction in Atlantic salmon smolts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breves, Jason P.; Phipps-Costin, Silas K.; Fujimoto, Chelsea K.; Einarsdottir, Ingibjörg E.; Regish, Amy M.; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur; McCormick, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The growth hormone (Gh)/insulin-like growth-factor (Igf) system plays a central role in the regulation of growth in fishes. However, the roles of Igf binding proteins (Igfbps) in coordinating responses to food availability are unresolved, especially in anadromous fishes preparing for seaward migration. We assayed plasma Gh, Igf1, thyroid hormones and cortisol along with igfbp mRNA levels in fasted and fed Atlantic salmon ( Salmo salar ). Fish were fasted for 3 or 10 days near the peak of smoltification (late April to early May). Fasting reduced plasma glucose by 3 days and condition factor by 10 days. Plasma Gh, cortisol, and thyroxine (T 4 ) were not altered in response to fasting, whereas Igf1 and 3,5,3′-triiodo- l -thyronine (T 3 ) were slightly higher and lower than controls, respectively. Hepatic igfbp1b1 , - 1b2 , - 2a , - 2b1 and - 2b2 mRNA levels were not responsive to fasting, but there were marked increases in igfbp1a1 following 3 and 10 days of fasting. Fasting did not alter hepatic igf1or igf2 ; however, muscle igf1 was diminished by 10 days of fasting. There were no signs that fasting compromised branchial ionoregulatory functions, as indicated by unchanged Na + /K + -ATPase activity and ion pump/transporter mRNA levels. We conclude that dynamic hepatic igfbp1a1 and muscle igf1 expression participate in the modulation of Gh/Igf signaling in smolts undergoing catabolism.

  14. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 affects osteogenic efficacy on dental implants in rat mandible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattarai, Govinda; Lee, Young-Hee [Department of Oral Biochemistry, Institute of Oral Bioscience, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Min-Ho [Department of Dental Materials, Institute of Oral Bioscience, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Il-Song [Division of Advanced Materials Engineering, Research Center for Advanced Materials, Development and Institute of Biodegradable Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ho-Keun, E-mail: yihokn@chonbuk.ac.kr [Department of Oral Biochemistry, Institute of Oral Bioscience, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    Insulin like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in bone cells and its utilization in dental implants have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to determine the osteogenic efficacy of chitosan gold nanoparticles (Ch-GNPs) conjugated with IGFBP-3 coated titanium (Ti) implants. Ch-GNPs were conjugated with IGFBP-3 plasmid DNA through a coacervation process. Conjugation was cast over Ti surfaces, and cells were seeded on coated surfaces. For in vitro analysis the expression of different proteins was analyzed by immunoblotting. For in vivo analysis, Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated implants were installed in rat mandibles. Four weeks post-implantation, mandibles were examined by microcomputed tomography (μCT), immunohistochemistry, hematoxylin & eosin and tartrate resistance acid phosphatase staining. In vitro overexpressed Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated Ti surfaces was associated with activation of extracellular signal related kinase (ERK), inhibition of the stress activated protein c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and enhanced bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and 7 compared to control. Further, in vivo, Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated implants were associated with inhibition of implant induced osteoclastogenesis molecules, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and enhanced expression of osteogenic molecules including BMP2/7 and osteopontin (OPN). The μCT analysis demonstrated that IGFBP-3 increased the volume of newly formed bone surrounding the implants compared to control (n = 5; p < 0.05). These results support the view that IGFBP-3 overexpression diminishes osteoclastogenesis and enhances osteogenesis of Ti implants, and can serve as a potent molecule for the development of good implantation. - Highlights: • Chitosan gold nanoparticles were conjugated with IGFBP-3 and coated onto surface of the titanium implants for gene delivery to bone. • Implants were inserted in rat mandible for 4 weeks. • Parameters studied: histopathology and radiology.

  15. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 affects osteogenic efficacy on dental implants in rat mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattarai, Govinda; Lee, Young-Hee; Lee, Min-Ho; Park, Il-Song; Yi, Ho-Keun

    2015-01-01

    Insulin like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in bone cells and its utilization in dental implants have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to determine the osteogenic efficacy of chitosan gold nanoparticles (Ch-GNPs) conjugated with IGFBP-3 coated titanium (Ti) implants. Ch-GNPs were conjugated with IGFBP-3 plasmid DNA through a coacervation process. Conjugation was cast over Ti surfaces, and cells were seeded on coated surfaces. For in vitro analysis the expression of different proteins was analyzed by immunoblotting. For in vivo analysis, Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated implants were installed in rat mandibles. Four weeks post-implantation, mandibles were examined by microcomputed tomography (μCT), immunohistochemistry, hematoxylin & eosin and tartrate resistance acid phosphatase staining. In vitro overexpressed Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated Ti surfaces was associated with activation of extracellular signal related kinase (ERK), inhibition of the stress activated protein c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and enhanced bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and 7 compared to control. Further, in vivo, Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated implants were associated with inhibition of implant induced osteoclastogenesis molecules, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and enhanced expression of osteogenic molecules including BMP2/7 and osteopontin (OPN). The μCT analysis demonstrated that IGFBP-3 increased the volume of newly formed bone surrounding the implants compared to control (n = 5; p < 0.05). These results support the view that IGFBP-3 overexpression diminishes osteoclastogenesis and enhances osteogenesis of Ti implants, and can serve as a potent molecule for the development of good implantation. - Highlights: • Chitosan gold nanoparticles were conjugated with IGFBP-3 and coated onto surface of the titanium implants for gene delivery to bone. • Implants were inserted in rat mandible for 4 weeks. • Parameters studied: histopathology and radiology.

  16. Binding of a 100-kDa ubiquitous factor to the human prolactin promoter is required for its basal and hormone-regulated activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peers, B; Nalda, A M; Monget, P; Voz, M L; Belayew, A; Martial, J A

    1992-11-15

    cAMP strongly stimulates the activity of the human prolactin (hPRL) promoter. We have previously shown that two types of cis-element are required for this cAMP regulation; binding sites for the pituitary-specific factor Pit-1, and the sequence spanning nucleotides -115 to -85 (named sequence A). Sequence A contains the TGACG motif found in the consensus sequence of the cAMP-responsive element (CRE). In this study, we show that a mutation in the TGACG motif of sequence A strongly reduces not only the cAMP regulation but also the Ca2+ regulation and basal activity of the hPRL promoter. Furthermore, gel-shift assays indicate that the mutation prevents binding of a ubiquitous factor which is not the CRE-binding protein. Southwestern experiments suggest that this ubiquitous factor's molecular mass is approximately 100 kDa. We conclude that binding of a 100-kDa ubiquitous factor to sequence A is required for full basal and hormonal regulation of hPRL-promoter activity.

  17. Effect of genetic variations in syntaxin-binding protein-5 and syntaxin-2 on von willebrand factor concentration and cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. van Loon (Janine ); F.W.G. Leebeek (Frank); J.W. Deckers (Jaap); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); D. Poldermans (Don); D.P. Strachan (David); W. Tang (Weihong); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); N.L. Smith (Nicholas); M.P.M. de Maat (Moniek)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground - Elevated von Willebrand factor (VWF) plasma levels are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A meta-analysis of genomewide association studies on VWF identified novel candidate genes, that is, syntaxin-binding protein 5 (STXBP5) and syntaxin 2 (STX2),

  18. Impact of nutrients on insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and their ratio in African American and white males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Katharine M; Hoel, Brian D; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Hoel, David G

    2007-01-01

    Higher levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and lower levels of IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) have been associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. Nutrition is known to partially regulate IGF levels and it is possible that nutritional factors mediate the impact of IGF levels on prostate cancer risk. A cross-sectional analysis of the impact of nutritional factors measured by a dietary questionnaire on plasma levels of IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and their molar ratio. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to test for effects of nutrients on IGF levels. Prostate cancer screening at the Hollings Cancer Center in Charleston, South Carolina. Ninety-five African American and 138 white males aged 33-83 years attending the screening. In whites, intakes of total, saturated and monounsaturated fats were positively associated with an increase in the molar ratio, while there was no association in African Americans. In African Americans, we found that increasing intake of calcium and dairy servings was positively associated with IGF-I levels. Increased vegetable intake was positively associated with IGFBP-3 in African Americans, while there was no effect in whites. A higher percentage of alcohol in the total diet was significantly associated with a decrease in the molar ratio and an increase in IGFBP-3 in both groups. Our results confirm previous findings of nutritional determinants of IGF levels. Additionally, we found the impact of several nutrients on IGF levels to be different in whites and African Americans, which warrants further investigation.

  19. The role of the glucose-sensing transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein pathway in termite queen fertility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sillam-Dusses, D.; Hanus, Robert; Poulsen, M.; Roy, V.; Favier, M.; Vasseur-Cognet, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 5 (2016), č. článku 160080. ISSN 2046-2441 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12774S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : reproduction * phenotypic plasticity * carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein * transcription factor * social insects * lipogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.481, year: 2016 http://rsob.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/6/5/160080

  20. Nonparallel changes of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, and GH-binding protein, after craniospinal irradiation and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nivot, S.; Adan, L.; Souberbielle, J.; Rappaport, R.; Brauner, R.; Benelli, C.; Clot, J.P.; Saucet, C.; Zucker, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The authors studied the GH-insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis serially over 24-36 months in six patients with medulloblastoma who underwent surgical removal of the tumor followed by craniospinal irradiation therapy for 6 weeks and then chemotherapy for 42 weeks. Eighteen and 24 months after beginning irradiation there was a decline in the peak GH secretory response to acute stimulation with arginine/insulin hypoglycemia. Six months after irradiation and during chemotherapy there was a transient decline in IGF-I, IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), and GH-BP values (respective mean values of 56.1 ± 9.0 ng/mL, 1.1 ± 0.2 μg/mL, and 7.6 ± 3.3% of radioactivity as compared to time 0 values: 139 ± 15 ng/mL, 2.2 ± 0.2 μg/mL, and 20.0 ± 4.0%, P < 0.001), although provoked GH secretion was normal at this time. The IGF-I, IGFBP-3, and GH-BP returned to pretreatment ranges by 12-36 months after initiation of the study. There was also a decline in body mass index and serum protein values at 6 months after irradiation in ligand and immunoblot analysis there was a decline in IGFBP-3 and an abnormal electrophoretic mobility of IGFBP-2 that were both normalized at 36 months. In one patient they observed a high level of IGFBP-3 proteolysis at this time. This study demonstrates that before the decrease of GH secretion in patients receiving cranial irradiation there is a transient phase of GH insensitivity that may be characteristic of the acute therapeutic phase including the chemotherapy. This partial insensitivity may explain the early growth retardation observed in these patients. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. Identification of a phosphorylation-dependent nuclear localization motif in interferon regulatory factor 2 binding protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen C T Teng

    Full Text Available Interferon regulatory factor 2 binding protein 2 (IRF2BP2 is a muscle-enriched transcription factor required to activate vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGFA expression in muscle. IRF2BP2 is found in the nucleus of cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. During the process of skeletal muscle differentiation, some IRF2BP2 becomes relocated to the cytoplasm, although the functional significance of this relocation and the mechanisms that control nucleocytoplasmic localization of IRF2BP2 are not yet known.Here, by fusing IRF2BP2 to green fluorescent protein and testing a series of deletion and site-directed mutagenesis constructs, we mapped the nuclear localization signal (NLS to an evolutionarily conserved sequence (354ARKRKPSP(361 in IRF2BP2. This sequence corresponds to a classical nuclear localization motif bearing positively charged arginine and lysine residues. Substitution of arginine and lysine with negatively charged aspartic acid residues blocked nuclear localization. However, these residues were not sufficient because nuclear targeting of IRF2BP2 also required phosphorylation of serine 360 (S360. Many large-scale phosphopeptide proteomic studies had reported previously that serine 360 of IRF2BP2 is phosphorylated in numerous human cell types. Alanine substitution at this site abolished IRF2BP2 nuclear localization in C(2C(12 myoblasts and CV1 cells. In contrast, substituting serine 360 with aspartic acid forced nuclear retention and prevented cytoplasmic redistribution in differentiated C(2C(12 muscle cells. As for the effects of these mutations on VEGFA promoter activity, the S360A mutation interfered with VEGFA activation, as expected. Surprisingly, the S360D mutation also interfered with VEGFA activation, suggesting that this mutation, while enforcing nuclear entry, may disrupt an essential activation function of IRF2BP2.Nuclear localization of IRF2BP2 depends on phosphorylation near a conserved NLS. Changes in phosphorylation status

  2. Epithelial separation theory for post-tonsillectomy secondary hemorrhage: evidence in a mouse model and potential heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswick, Daniel M; Santa Maria, Chloe; Ayoub, Noel F; Capasso, Robson; Santa Maria, Peter Luke

    2018-02-01

    To provide histological evidence to investigate a theory for post-tonsillectomy secondary hemorrhage (PTH) in a mouse model and to evaluate the potential for heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) treatment on wound healing in this model. A prospective randomized single-blinded cohort study. A uniform tongue wound was created in 84 mice (day 0). Mice were randomized to HB-EGF (treatment, n = 42) or saline (control, n = 42). In treatment mice, HB-EGF 5 µg/ml was administered intramuscularly into the wound daily (days 0-14). In control mice, normal saline was administered daily. Three mice from each group were sacrificed daily through day 14 and the wounds evaluated histologically by blinded reviewers. Key stages of wound healing, including keratinocyte proliferation and migration, wound contraction, epithelial separation, and neoangiogenesis, are defined with implications for post-tonsillectomy wound healing. Epithelial separation (59 vs. 100%, p = 0.003) and wound reopening (8 vs. 48%, p < 0.001) were reduced with HB-EGF. Epithelial thickness (220 vs. 30 µm, p = 0.04) was greater with HB-EGF. Wound closure (days 4-5 vs. day 6, p = 0.01) occurred earlier with HB-EGF. In healing of oral keratinocytes on muscle epithelial separation secondary to muscle, contraction occurs concurrently with neoangiogenesis in the base of the wound, increasing the risk of hemorrhage. This potentially explains why post-tonsillectomy secondary hemorrhage occurs and its timing. HB-EGF-treated wounds showed greater epithelial thickness, less frequent epithelial separation and wound reopening, and earlier wound closure prior to neovascularization, suggesting that HB-EGF may be a potential preventative therapy for PTH. NA-animal studies or basic research.

  3. Overexpression of lymphoid enhancer-binding factor-1 (LEF1) is a novel favorable prognostic factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, M; Zhao, H-Z; Shen, H-P; Cheng, Y-P; Luo, Z-B; Li, S-S; Zhang, J-Y; Tang, Y-M

    2015-10-01

    Lymphoid enhancer-binding factor-1 (LEF1) is a target gene and central mediator of the Wnt signaling pathway. High LEF1 expression has been reported as a prognostic marker in several types of hematologic malignancies of adult patients. In this study, LEF1 expression was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 122 children with newly diagnosed ALL treated on the China NPCAC97 protocols. Patients' samples were dichotomized at the median value of control group and divided into LEF1(low) and LEF1(high) groups. The LEF1 mRNA levels in patients with ALL were significantly higher than those of normal controls, and the LEF1 levels were dramatically decreased following induction therapy. In addition, LEF1(high) patients had lower white blood cell (WBC) count at diagnosis and lower minimal residual disease (MRD) levels at the time of complete remission as compared to LEF1(low) patients. Finally, our studies showed that high LEF1 expression is associated with favorable CR rate and overall survival (OS) in childhood ALL (5-year OS: LEF1(high) 92% vs. LEF1(low) 73%, P = 0.009). High LEF1 level was associated with a favorable relapse-free survival in standard-risk patients and also related to a better OS within the subgroup of patients with BCR-ABL-negative ALL. Overexpression of LEF1 is a favorable prognostic factor in childhood ALL. The prognostic impact of LEF1 may assist treatment stratification and suggest the need of alternative regimens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Induction of Regulatory T Cells and Its Regulation with Insulin-like Growth Factor/Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-4 by Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Ippei; Nakayamada, Shingo; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Yamagata, Kaoru; Sakata, Kei; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2017-09-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent and exert anti-inflammatory effects, but the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. In the current study, we investigated the regulatory mechanism of regulatory T cell (Treg) induction through the growth factors released by human MSCs. Human naive CD4 + T cells were stimulated with anti-CD3/28 Abs and cocultured with human MSC culture supernatant for 48 h. The proliferation and cytokine production of CD4 + T cells and surface molecule expression on CD4 + T cells were evaluated. The proliferation of anti-CD3/28 Abs-stimulated CD4 + T cells was suppressed by the addition of human MSC culture supernatant; in addition, the production of IL-10 and IL-4 increased. The human MSC culture supernatant induced CD4 + FOXP3 + Tregs that expressed CD25, CTLA-4, glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1R, and IGF-2R, showing antiproliferative activity against CD4 + T cells. In addition, the induction of Tregs by human MSC culture supernatant was enhanced by the addition of IGF and suppressed by the inhibition of IGF-1R. In contrast, a significant amount of IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-4, an inhibitor of IGF action, was detected in the human MSC culture supernatant. After neutralization of IGFBP-4 in the human MSC culture supernatant by anti-IGFBP-4 Ab, Treg numbers increased significantly. Thus, our results raise the possibility that human MSC actions also involve a negative-regulatory mechanism that suppresses Treg proliferation by releasing IGFBP-4. The results of this study suggest that regulation of IGF may be important for treatments using human MSCs. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Neuronal expression of TATA box-binding protein containing expanded polyglutamine in knock-in mice reduces chaperone protein response by impairing the function of nuclear factor-Y transcription factor.

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    Huang, Shanshan; Ling, Joseph J; Yang, Su; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Shihua

    2011-07-01

    The polyglutamine diseases consist of nine neurodegenerative disorders including spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 that is caused by a polyglutamine tract expansion in the TATA box-binding protein. In all polyglutamine diseases, polyglutamine-expanded proteins are ubiquitously expressed throughout the body but cause selective neurodegeneration. Understanding the specific effects of polyglutamine-expanded proteins, when expressed at the endogenous levels, in neurons is important for unravelling the pathogenesis of polyglutamine diseases. However, addressing this important issue using mouse models that either overly or ubiquitously express mutant polyglutamine proteins in the brain and body has proved difficult. To investigate the pathogenesis of spinocerebellar ataxia 17, we generated a conditional knock-in mouse model that expresses one copy of the mutant TATA box-binding protein gene, which encodes a 105-glutamine repeat, selectively in neuronal cells at the endogenous level. Neuronal expression of mutant TATA box-binding protein causes age-dependent neurological symptoms in mice and the degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Mutant TATA box-binding protein binds more tightly to the transcription factor nuclear factor-Y, inhibits its association with the chaperone protein promoter, as well as the promoter activity and reduces the expression of the chaperones Hsp70, Hsp25 and HspA5, and their response to stress. These findings demonstrate how mutant TATA box-binding protein at the endogenous level affects neuronal function, with important implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of polyglutamine diseases.

  6. A resource for characterizing genome-wide binding and putative target genes of transcription factors expressed during secondary growth and wood formation in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijun; Ramsay, Trevor; Zinkgraf, Matthew; Sundell, David; Street, Nathaniel Robert; Filkov, Vladimir; Groover, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Identifying transcription factor target genes is essential for modeling the transcriptional networks underlying developmental processes. Here we report a chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) resource consisting of genome-wide binding regions and associated putative target genes for four Populus homeodomain transcription factors expressed during secondary growth and wood formation. Software code (programs and scripts) for processing the Populus ChIP-seq data are provided within a publically available iPlant image, including tools for ChIP-seq data quality control and evaluation adapted from the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project. Basic information for each transcription factor (including members of Class I KNOX, Class III HD ZIP, BEL1-like families) binding are summarized, including the number and location of binding regions, distribution of binding regions relative to gene features, associated putative target genes, and enriched functional categories of putative target genes. These ChIP-seq data have been integrated within the Populus Genome Integrative Explorer (PopGenIE) where they can be analyzed using a variety of web-based tools. We present an example analysis that shows preferential binding of transcription factor ARBORKNOX1 to the nearest neighbor genes in a pre-calculated co-expression network module, and enrichment for meristem-related genes within this module including multiple orthologs of Arabidopsis KNOTTED-like Arabidopsis 2/6. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Pharmacological inhibition of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor promotes peritoneal angiogenesis in a peritoneal dialysis rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenyuan; Yan, Hao; Yuan, Jiangzi; Cao, Liou; Lin, Aiwu; Dai, Huili; Ni, Zhaohui; Qian, Jiaqi; Fang, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Molecular mechanisms of peritoneal dialysis (PD) ultrafiltration failure, peritoneal neo-angiogenesis, and fibrosis remain to be determined. We aimed to determine the role of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) inhibition on angiogenesis of peritoneal membrane in a PD rat model. 32 male Wistar rats were assigned into (1) control group; (2) uremic non-PD group: subtotal nephrectomy-induced uremic rats without PD; (3) uremic rats subjected to PD: uremic rats that were dialyzed with Dianeal ® for 4 weeks; (4) CRM 197 group: dialyzed uremic rats were supplemented with CRM197, a specific HB-EGF inhibitor. Peritoneal transport function was examined by peritoneal equilibration test. Expression of HB-EGF and EGFR in peritoneal samples were examined by real-time PCR, immunohistochemical staining, and western blot. Progressive angiogenesis and fibrosis were observed in uremic PD rats, and there were associated with decreased net ultrafiltration (nUF), increased permeability of peritoneal membrane, and reduced expression of HB-EGF and EGFR protein and mRNA in uremic PD rats compared to uremic non-PD or control groups (both p CRM197 significantly induced peritoneal membrane permeability, decreased nUF, increased higher vessel density, and reduced pericyte count compared to that of uremic PD rats. The levels of HB-EGF and EGFR expression negatively correlated with vessel density in peritoneal membrane (both p < 0.001). PD therapy was associated with peritoneal angiogenesis, functional deterioration, and downregulation of HB-EGF/EGFR. Pharmacological inhibition of HB-EGF promoted PD-induced peritoneal angiogenesis and fibrosis and ultrafiltration decline, suggesting that HB-EGF downregulation contributes to peritoneal functional deterioration in the uremic PD rat model.

  8. Micro-RNA Binding Site Polymorphisms in the WFS1 Gene Are Risk Factors of Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elek, Zsuzsanna; Németh, Nóra; Nagy, Géza; Németh, Helga; Somogyi, Anikó; Hosszufalusi, Nóra; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Rónai, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    The absolute or relative lack of insulin is the key factor in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Although the connection between loss of function mutations of the WFS1 gene and DIDMOAD-syndrome including diabetes mellitus underpins the significance of wolframin in the pathogenesis, exact role of WFS1 polymorphic variants in the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has not been discovered yet. In this analysis, 787 patients with diabetes and 900 healthy people participated. Genotyping of the 7 WFS1 SNPs was carried out by TaqMan assays. Association study was performed by χ 2-test in combination with correction for multiple testing. For functional analysis, the entire 3’ UTR of the WFS1 gene was subcloned in a pMIR-Report plasmid and relative luciferase activities were determined. Linkage disequilibrium analysis showed a generally high LD within the investigated region, however the rs1046322 locus was not in LD with the other SNPs. The two miR-SNPs, rs1046322 and rs9457 showed significant association with T1DM and T2DM, respectively. Haplotype analysis also confirmed the association between the 3’ UTR loci and both disease types. In vitro experiments showed that miR-185 reduces the amount of the resulting protein, and rs9457 miRSNP significantly influences the rate of reduction in a luciferase reporter assay. Genetic variants of the WFS1 gene might contribute to the genetic risk of T1DM and T2DM. Furthermore demonstrating the effect of rs9457 in binding of miR-185, we suggest that the optimal level of wolframin protein, potentially influenced by miR-regulation, is crucial in normal beta cell function. PMID:26426397

  9. Islet cell proliferation and apoptosis in insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheen, S T; Rajkumar, K; Murphy, L J

    1997-12-01

    Transgenic mice which overexpress insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFPB-1) demonstrate fasting hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and glucose intolerance in adult life. Here we have examined the ontogeny of pancreatic endocrine dysfunction and investigated islet cell proliferation and apoptosis in this mouse model. In addition we have examined pancreatic insulin content in transgenic mice derived from blastocyst transfer into non-transgenic mice. Transgenic mice were normoglycemic at birth but had markedly elevated plasma insulin levels, 56.2 +/- 4.5 versus 25.4 +/- 1.5 pmol/l, p < 0.001, and pancreatic insulin concentration, 60.5 +/- 2.5 versus 49.0 +/- 2.6 ng/mg of tissue, P < 0.01, compared with wild-type mice. Transgenic mice derived from blastocyst transfer to wild-type foster mothers had an elevated pancreatic insulin content similar to that seen in pups from transgenic mice. There was an age-related decline in pancreatic insulin content and plasma insulin levels and an increase in fasting blood glucose concentrations, such that adult transgenic mice had significantly less pancreatic insulin than wild-type mice. Pancreatic islet number and the size of mature islets were increased in transgenic animals at birth compared with wild-type mice. Both islet cell proliferation, measured by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling, and apoptosis, assessed by the in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase and nick translation assay, were increased in islets of newborn transgenic mice compared with wild-type mice. In adult mice both islet cell proliferation and apoptosis were low and similar in transgenic and wild-type mice. Islets remained significantly larger and more numerous in adult transgenic mice despite a reduction in pancreatic insulin content. These data suggest that overexpression of IGFBP-1, either directly or indirectly via local or systemic mechanisms, has a positive trophic effect on islet development.

  10. Effects of Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn. on insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3 to prevent overtraining syndrome

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    Ermita I.I. Ilyas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive physical exercises (overtraining can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. One of the indicators of overtraining syndrome is a decrease in insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3. Administration of Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn., a powerful antioxidant, is expected to boost endogenous antioxidants, and thus prevents overtraining. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of H. sabdariffa on IGFBP-3 levels in rats under ”overtraining physical excersice”.Methods: This experimental study was conducted on 30 male rats (Rattus norvegicus 200-250 grams, randomly allocated into 5 groups: 1 control group (C; 2 control with H. sabdariffa (C-Hib; 3 mild aerobic exercise (A-Ex; 4 overtraining exercise (OT; 5 overtraining exercise with H. Sabdariffa (OT-Hib. H. sabdariffa (400 mg/kg/d, 11 weeks were administered orally via syringe cannula. IGFBP-3 was measured by using ELISA (Cusa bio kit and data were analyzed with ANOVA test.Results: Plasma level of IGFBP-3 in the C and OT groups were 17.4 ± 10 mIU/L, the lowest in OT groups (10.7 ± 9.9 mIU/L and the OT-Hib group had the highest level (31.5 ± 6.2 mIU/L. There was significant difference of the level IGFBP-3 in OT groups with A-Ex groups (10.7 ± 9.9 vs 23.5 ± 9.7 mIU/L; p < 0,05. The significant difference was also observed in the level of IGFBP 3 between C groups and the OT-Hib groups (17.4 ± 10 vs 31.5 ± 6.2; p < 0.05.Conclusion: Administration of H. sabdariffa can prevent the decrease of IGFBP-3 levels in overtraining rats, indicating its role in preventing overtraining syndrome.

  11. TATA-binding protein-associated factor 7 regulates polyamine transport activity and polyamine analog-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Junichi; Hiipakka, Richard A; Kokontis, John M; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Igarashi, Kazuei; Liao, Shutsung

    2004-07-16

    Identification of the polyamine transporter gene will be useful for modulating polyamine accumulation in cells and should be a good target for controlling cell proliferation. Polyamine transport activity in mammalian cells is critical for accumulation of the polyamine analog methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) that induces apoptosis, although a gene responsible for transport activity has not been identified. Using a retroviral gene trap screen, we generated MGBG-resistant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to identify genes involved in polyamine transport activity. One gene identified by the method encodes TATA-binding protein-associated factor 7 (TAF7), which functions not only as one of the TAFs, but also a coactivator for c-Jun. TAF7-deficient cells had decreased capacity for polyamine uptake (20% of CHO cells), decreased AP-1 activation, as well as resistance to MGBG-induced apoptosis. Stable expression of TAF7 in TAF7-deficient cells restored transport activity (55% of CHO cells), AP-1 gene transactivation (100% of CHO cells), and sensitivity to MGBG-induced apoptosis. Overexpression of TAF7 in CHO cells did not increase transport activity, suggesting that TAF7 may be involved in the maintenance of basal activity. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibitors blocked MGBG-induced apoptosis without alteration of polyamine transport. Decreased TAF7 expression, by RNA interference, in androgen-independent human prostate cancer LN-CaP104-R1 cells resulted in lower polyamine transport activity (25% of control) and resistance to MGBG-induced growth arrest. Taken together, these results reveal a physiological function of TAF7 as a basal regulator for mammalian polyamine transport activity and MGBG-induced apoptosis.

  12. Lack of diurnal rhythm of low molecular weight insulin-like growth factor binding protein in patients with Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degerblad, M.; Povoa, G.; Thoren, M.; Wivall, I.-L.; Hall, K.

    1989-01-01

    A specific radioimmunoassay with antibodies raised against the 25 kD insulin-like growth factor binding protein (25 kD IGFBP) in amniotic fluid was used to measure levels of cross-reacting protein in human serum and plasma. Plasma samples collected continually at 20-min intervals during 24-h in 6 healthy adults revealed a distinct diurnal rhythm in the concentration of 25 kD IGFBP. The lowest levels (9-13 μg/l) were found between 13.00 and 24.00 h with a rise after midnight to maximum levels (23-71 μg/l) between 03.00 and 09.00 h. There was no relation between the patterns of GH and 25 kD IGFBP. In 3 patients with active Cushing's disease, the levels of 25 kD IGFBP in plasma samples collected during 12 h. 19.00-07.00 h, were generally low and without nocturnal variations. One of the patients studied after extirpation of a pituitary adenoma displayed a nocturnal rhythm with maximum levels of 25 kD IGFBP between 03.00 and 07.00 h. Eight patients treated with stereotactic pituitary irradiation owing to Cushing's disease also showed a distinct nocturnal increase of 25 kD IGFBP. The results indicate the existence of a diurnal rhythm of 25 kD IGFBP in adults. Further, low levels and lack of diurnal rhythm of 25 kD IGFBP are demonstrated in Cushing's disease. (author)

  13. Assessing the clinical utility of measuring Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins in tissues and sera of melanoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buckley Michael T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins (IGFBPs have been investigated as potential biomarkers in several types of tumors. In this study, we examined both IGFBP-3 and -4 levels in tissues and sera of melanoma patients representing different stages of melanoma progression. Methods The study cohort consisted of 132 melanoma patients (primary, n = 72; metastatic, n = 60; 64 Male, 68 Female; Median Age = 56 prospectively enrolled in the New York University School of Medicine Interdisciplinary Melanoma Cooperative Group (NYU IMCG between August 2002 and December 2006. We assessed tumor-expression and circulating sera levels of IGFBP-3 and -4 using immunohistochemistry and ELISA assays. Correlations with clinicopathologic parameters were examined using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests and Spearman-rank correlation coefficients. Results Median IGFBP-4 tumor expression was significantly greater in primary versus metastatic patients (70% versus 10%, p = 0.01 A trend for greater median IGFBP-3 sera concentration was observed in metastatic versus primary patients (4.9 μg/ml vs. 3.4 μg/ml, respectively, p = 0.09. However, sera levels fell within a normal range for IGFBP-3. Neither IGFBP-3 nor -4 correlated with survival in this subset of patients. Conclusion Decreased IGFBP-4 tumor expression might be a step in the progression from primary to metastatic melanoma. Our data lend support to a recently-described novel tumor suppressor role of secreting IGFBPs in melanoma. However, data do not support the clinical utility of measuring levels of IGFBP-3 and -4 in sera of melanoma patients.

  14. Micro-RNA Binding Site Polymorphisms in the WFS1 Gene Are Risk Factors of Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Elek

    Full Text Available The absolute or relative lack of insulin is the key factor in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Although the connection between loss of function mutations of the WFS1 gene and DIDMOAD-syndrome including diabetes mellitus underpins the significance of wolframin in the pathogenesis, exact role of WFS1 polymorphic variants in the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has not been discovered yet. In this analysis, 787 patients with diabetes and 900 healthy people participated. Genotyping of the 7 WFS1 SNPs was carried out by TaqMan assays. Association study was performed by χ2-test in combination with correction for multiple testing. For functional analysis, the entire 3' UTR of the WFS1 gene was subcloned in a pMIR-Report plasmid and relative luciferase activities were determined. Linkage disequilibrium analysis showed a generally high LD within the investigated region, however the rs1046322 locus was not in LD with the other SNPs. The two miR-SNPs, rs1046322 and rs9457 showed significant association with T1DM and T2DM, respectively. Haplotype analysis also confirmed the association between the 3' UTR loci and both disease types. In vitro experiments showed that miR-185 reduces the amount of the resulting protein, and rs9457 miRSNP significantly influences the rate of reduction in a luciferase reporter assay. Genetic variants of the WFS1 gene might contribute to the genetic risk of T1DM and T2DM. Furthermore demonstrating the effect of rs9457 in binding of miR-185, we suggest that the optimal level of wolframin protein, potentially influenced by miR-regulation, is crucial in normal beta cell function.

  15. Micro-RNA Binding Site Polymorphisms in the WFS1 Gene Are Risk Factors of Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elek, Zsuzsanna; Németh, Nóra; Nagy, Géza; Németh, Helga; Somogyi, Anikó; Hosszufalusi, Nóra; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Rónai, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    The absolute or relative lack of insulin is the key factor in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Although the connection between loss of function mutations of the WFS1 gene and DIDMOAD-syndrome including diabetes mellitus underpins the significance of wolframin in the pathogenesis, exact role of WFS1 polymorphic variants in the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has not been discovered yet. In this analysis, 787 patients with diabetes and 900 healthy people participated. Genotyping of the 7 WFS1 SNPs was carried out by TaqMan assays. Association study was performed by χ2-test in combination with correction for multiple testing. For functional analysis, the entire 3' UTR of the WFS1 gene was subcloned in a pMIR-Report plasmid and relative luciferase activities were determined. Linkage disequilibrium analysis showed a generally high LD within the investigated region, however the rs1046322 locus was not in LD with the other SNPs. The two miR-SNPs, rs1046322 and rs9457 showed significant association with T1DM and T2DM, respectively. Haplotype analysis also confirmed the association between the 3' UTR loci and both disease types. In vitro experiments showed that miR-185 reduces the amount of the resulting protein, and rs9457 miRSNP significantly influences the rate of reduction in a luciferase reporter assay. Genetic variants of the WFS1 gene might contribute to the genetic risk of T1DM and T2DM. Furthermore demonstrating the effect of rs9457 in binding of miR-185, we suggest that the optimal level of wolframin protein, potentially influenced by miR-regulation, is crucial in normal beta cell function.

  16. PTEN-induction in U251 glioma cells decreases the expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitt, Randy J.; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Pollak, Michael

    2005-01-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene whose loss of function is observed in ∼40-50% of human cancers. Although insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) was classically described as a growth inhibitor, multiple recent reports have shown an association of overexpression and/or high serum levels of IGFBP-2 with poor prognosis of several malignancies, including gliomas. Using an inducible PTEN expression system in the PTEN-null glioma cell line U251, we demonstrate that PTEN-induction is associated with reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis, and a substantial reduction of the high levels of IGFBP-2 expression. The PTEN-induced decrease in IGFBP-2 expression could be mimicked with the PI3-kinase inhibitor LY294002, indicating that the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN is responsible for the observed effect. However, the rapamycin analog CCI-779 did not affect IGFBP-2 expression, suggesting that the PTEN-induced decrease in IGFBP-2 expression is not attributable to decreased mTOR signalling. Recombinant human IGFBP-2 was unable to rescue U251-PTEN cells from the antiproliferative effects of PTEN, and IGFBP-2 siRNA did not affect the IGF-dependent or -independent growth of this cell line. These results suggest that the clinical data linking IGFBP-2 expression to poor prognosis may arise, at least in part, because high levels of IGFBP-2 expression correlate with loss of function of PTEN, which is well known to lead to aggressive behavior of gliomas. Our results motivate translational research regarding the relationship between IGFBP-2 expression and loss of function of PTEN

  17. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 in the ruminant uterus: potential endometrial marker and regulator of conceptus elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Rebecca M; Erikson, David W; Kim, Jinyoung; Burghardt, Robert C; Bazer, Fuller W; Johnson, Greg A; Spencer, Thomas E

    2009-09-01

    Establishment of pregnancy in ruminants requires conceptus elongation and production of interferon-tau (IFNT), the pregnancy recognition signal that maintains ovarian progesterone (P4) production. These studies determined temporal and spatial alterations in IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-1 and IGFBP3 in the ovine and bovine uterus; effects of P4 and IFNT on their expression in the ovine uterus; and effects of IGFBP1 on ovine trophectoderm cell proliferation, migration, and attachment. IGFBP1 and IGFBP3 were studied because they are the only IGFBPs specifically expressed by the endometrial luminal epithelia in sheep. In sheep, IGFBP1 and IGFBP3 expression was coordinate with the period of conceptus elongation, whereas only IGFBP1 expression was coordinate with conceptus elongation in cattle. IGFBP1 mRNA in the ovine endometria was between 5- and 29-fold more abundant between d 12 and 16 of pregnancy compared with the estrous cycle and greater on d 16 of pregnancy than nonpregnancy in the bovine uterus. In sheep, P4 induced and IFNT stimulated expression of IGFBP1 but not IGFBP3; however, the effect of IFNT did not mimic the abundant increase observed in pregnant ewes. Therefore, IGFBP1 expression in the endometrium is regulated by another factor from the conceptus. IGFBP1 did not affect the proliferation of ovine trophectoderm cells in vitro but did stimulate their migration and mediate their attachment. These studies reveal that IGFBP1 is a common endometrial marker of conceptus elongation in sheep and cattle and most likely regulates conceptus elongation by stimulating migration and attachment of the trophectoderm.

  18. Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4 as the causative factor and marker of vascular injury related to insulin resistance

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    Marcin Majerczyk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of adipokines involved in the development of insulin resistance is retinol-binding protein 4(RBP4. The physiological role of RBP4 is transport of retinol from the liver to peripheral tissues. One of the first events related to the excessive visceral fat accumulation is the development of inflammation followed by hormonal adipose tissue dysfunction, including excessive RBP4 production. Reduced density of the membrane-type glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 is considered as a direct cause for the stimulation of RBP4 release to the circulation by adipocytes. Circulating RBP4 inhibits the signal pathways stimulated by insulin in skeletal muscle cells, resulting in the development of insulin resistance. Drugs stimulating receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated gamma (PPARγ – thiazolidinediones – inhibit the production of RBP4 by adipose tissue and increase the insulin sensitivity of the tissues. Increased secretion of RBP4 stimulates the expression of adhesion molecules in the endothelial cells, promoting development of atherosclerosis and arterial hypertension. Population studies demonstrated an association between serum RBP4 in the circulation, and the severity of atherosclerosis and risk of the cardiovascular events and type 2 diabetes. It also appears that the rbp4 gene functional polymorphisms may influence the risk of metabolic complications of obesity, including vascular injury. Therefore, the concentration of RBP4 in the circulation may be considered both as the causative factor and marker of chronic vascular injury. This article summarizes the current state of knowledge on the potential role of RBP4 in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, particularly related to insulin resistance.

  19. RNA-binding proteins of the NXF (nuclear export factor) family and their connection with the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamon, L A; Ginanova, V R; Kliver, S F; Yakimova, A O; Atsapkina, A A; Golubkova, E V

    2017-04-01

    The mutual relationship between mRNA and the cytoskeleton can be seen from two points of view. On the one hand, the cytoskeleton is necessary for mRNA trafficking and anchoring to subcellular domains. On the other hand, cytoskeletal growth and rearrangement require the translation of mRNAs that are connected to the cytoskeleton. β-actin mRNA localization may influence dynamic changes in the actin cytoskeleton. In the cytoplasm, long-lived mRNAs exist in the form of RNP (ribonucleoprotein) complexes, where they interact with RNA-binding proteins, including NXF (Nuclear eXport Factor). Dm NXF1 is an evolutionarily conserved protein in Drosophila melanogaster that has orthologs in different animals. The universal function of nxf1 genes is the nuclear export of different mRNAs in various organisms. In this mini-review, we briefly discuss the evidence demonstrating that Dm NXF1 fulfils not only universal but also specialized cytoplasmic functions. This protein is detected not only in the nucleus but also in the cytoplasm. It is a component of neuronal granules. Dm NXF1 marks nuclear division spindles during early embryogenesis and the dense body on one side of the elongated spermatid nuclei. The characteristic features of sbr mutants (sbr 10 and sbr 5 ) are impairment of chromosome segregation and spindle formation anomalies during female meiosis. sbr 12 mutant sterile males with immobile spermatozoa exhibit disturbances in the axoneme, mitochondrial derivatives and cytokinesis. These data allow us to propose that the Dm NXF1 proteins transport certain mRNAs in neurites and interact with localized mRNAs that are necessary for dynamic changes of the cytoskeleton. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Assessment of clusters of transcription factor binding sites in relationship to human promoter, CpG islands and gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakaki Yoshiyuki

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression is regulated mainly by transcription factors (TFs that interact with regulatory cis-elements on DNA sequences. To identify functional regulatory elements, computer searching can predict TF binding sites (TFBS using position weight matrices (PWMs that represent positional base frequencies of collected experimentally determined TFBS. A disadvantage of this approach is the large output of results for genomic DNA. One strategy to identify genuine TFBS is to utilize local concentrations of predicted TFBS. It is unclear whether there is a general tendency for TFBS to cluster at promoter regions, although this is the case for certain TFBS. Also unclear is the identification of TFs that have TFBS concentrated in promoters and to what level this occurs. This study hopes to answer some of these questions. Results We developed the cluster score measure to evaluate the correlation between predicted TFBS clusters and promoter sequences for each PWM. Non-promoter sequences were used as a control. Using the cluster score, we identified a PWM group called PWM-PCP, in which TFBS clusters positively correlate with promoters, and another PWM group called PWM-NCP, in which TFBS clusters negatively correlate with promoters. The PWM-PCP group comprises 47% of the 199 vertebrate PWMs, while the PWM-NCP group occupied 11 percent. After reducing the effect of CpG islands (CGI against the clusters using partial correlation coefficients among three properties (promoter, CGI and predicted TFBS cluster, we identified two PWM groups including those strongly correlated with CGI and those not correlated with CGI. Conclusion Not all PWMs predict TFBS correlated with human promoter sequences. Two main PWM groups were identified: (1 those that show TFBS clustered in promoters associated with CGI, and (2 those that show TFBS clustered in promoters independent of CGI. Assessment of PWM matches will allow more positive interpretation of TFBS in

  1. Heterodimerization of the transcription factors E2F-1 and DP-1 is required for binding to the adenovirus E4 (ORF6/7) protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Harlow, E

    1994-01-01

    Adenovirus infection leads to E1A-dependent activation of the transcription factor E2F. E2F has recently been identified in complexes with cellular proteins such as the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and the two pRB family members p107 and p130. E1A dissociates E2F from these cellular proteins......, and another viral protein, E4 (ORF6/7), can bind to E2F. The binding of E4 to E2F induces the formation of a stable DNA-binding complex containing the two proteins, and stimulation of the adenovirus E2 early promoter can occur. Recent studies have shown that E2F is the combined activity of several proteins...

  2. Cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells (BBCEC) - a blood-brain barrier model for studying the binding and internalization of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, B.T.; Borchardt, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    Cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells (BBCEC) have previously been reported by their laboratory as a working model for studying nutrient and drug transport and metabolism at the blood-brain barrier. In the present study, they have utilized this culture system to investigate the binding and internalization of [ 125 I]-labelled insulin (INS) and insulin-like growth factor 1(IGF-1) by BBCEC. After 2 hrs at 23 0 C, the specific binding of INS and IGF-1 was 1.6% and 13.6%, respectively. At 37 0 C, the maximum specific binding was 0.9% for INS and 5.8% for IGF-1. Using an acid-wash technique to assess peptide internalization, it was observed that, at 37 0 C, approximately 60% of the bound INS rapidly became resistant to acid treatment, a value which was constant over 2 hr. With IGF-1, a similar proportion of the bound material, 62%, became resistant by 30 min, but subsequently decreased to 45% by 2 hr. Scatchard analysis of competitive binding studies indicated the presence of two binding sites for each protein, having K/sub d/'s of 0.82 nM and 19.2 nM for INS and 0.39 nM and 3.66 nM for IGF-1. Little change in the amount of INS binding was observed over a four-day interval as the cultures became a confluent monolayer. The present report of binding and internalization of these proteins suggests that the BBCEC may utilize a receptor-mediated process to internalize and/or transport (transcytosis) INS and IGF-1 from the circulation

  3. Linchpin DNA-binding residues serve as go/no-go controls in the replication factor C-catalyzed clamp-loading mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Zhou, Yayan; Hingorani, Manju M

    2017-09-22

    DNA polymerases depend on circular sliding clamps for processive replication. Clamps must be loaded onto primer-template DNA (ptDNA) by clamp loaders that open and close clamps around ptDNA in an ATP-fueled reaction. All clamp loaders share a core structure in which five subunits form a spiral chamber that binds the clamp at its base in a twisted open form and encloses ptDNA within, while binding and hydrolyzing ATP to topologically link the clamp and ptDNA. To understand how clamp loaders perform this complex task, here we focused on conserved arginines that might play a central coordinating role in the mechanism because they can alternately contact ptDNA or Walker B glutamate in the ATPase site and lie close to the clamp loader-clamp-binding interface. We mutated Arg-84, Arg-88, and Arg-101 in the ATPase-active B, C, and D subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication factor C (RFC) clamp loader, respectively, and assessed the impact on multiple transient events in the reaction: proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) clamp binding/opening/closure/release, ptDNA binding/release, and ATP hydrolysis/product release. The results show that these arginines relay critical information between the PCNA-binding, DNA-binding, and ATPase sites at all steps of the reaction, particularly at a checkpoint before RFC commits to ATP hydrolysis. Moreover, their actions are subunit-specific with RFC-C Arg-88 serving as an accelerator that enables rapid ATP hydrolysis upon contact with ptDNA and RFC-D Arg-101 serving as a brake that confers specificity for ptDNA as the correct substrate for loading PCNA. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Computational identification of developmental enhancers:conservation and function of transcription factor binding-site clustersin drosophila melanogaster and drosophila psedoobscura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Benjamin P.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Laverty, Todd R.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Eisen, Michael B.; Celniker, SusanE.

    2004-08-06

    The identification of sequences that control transcription in metazoans is a major goal of genome analysis. In a previous study, we demonstrated that searching for clusters of predicted transcription factor binding sites could discover active regulatory sequences, and identified 37 regions of the Drosophila melanogaster genome with high densities of predicted binding sites for five transcription factors involved in anterior-posterior embryonic patterning. Nine of these clusters overlapped known enhancers. Here, we report the results of in vivo functional analysis of 27 remaining clusters. We generated transgenic flies carrying each cluster attached to a basal promoter and reporter gene, and assayed embryos for reporter gene expression. Six clusters are enhancers of adjacent genes: giant, fushi tarazu, odd-skipped, nubbin, squeeze and pdm2; three drive expression in patterns unrelated to those of neighboring genes; the remaining 18 do not appear to have enhancer activity. We used the Drosophila pseudoobscura genome to compare patterns of evolution in and around the 15 positive and 18 false-positive predictions. Although conservation of primary sequence cannot distinguish true from false positives, conservation of binding-site clustering accurately discriminates functional binding-site clusters from those with no function. We incorporated conservation of binding-site clustering into a new genome-wide enhancer screen, and predict several hundred new regulatory sequences, including 85 adjacent to genes with embryonic patterns. Measuring conservation of sequence features closely linked to function--such as binding-site clustering--makes better use of comparative sequence data than commonly used methods that examine only sequence identity.

  5. Alboserpin, a factor Xa inhibitor from the mosquito vector of yellow fever, binds heparin and membrane phospholipids and exhibits antithrombotic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Eric; Mizurini, Daniella M; Sá-Nunes, Anderson; Ribeiro, José M C; Andersen, John F; Mans, Ben J; Monteiro, Robson Q; Kotsyfakis, Michail; Francischetti, Ivo M B

    2011-08-12

    The molecular mechanism of factor Xa (FXa) inhibition by Alboserpin, the major salivary gland anticoagulant from the mosquito and yellow fever vector Aedes albopictus, has been characterized. cDNA of Alboserpin predicts a 45-kDa protein that belongs to the serpin family of protease inhibitors. Recombinant Alboserpin displays stoichiometric, competitive, reversible and tight binding to FXa (picomolar range). Binding is highly specific and is not detectable for FX, catalytic site-blocked FXa, thrombin, and 12 other enzymes. Alboserpin displays high affinity binding to heparin (K(D) ~ 20 nM), but no change in FXa inhibition was observed in the presence of the cofactor, implying that bridging mechanisms did not take place. Notably, Alboserpin was also found to interact with phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine but not with phosphatidylserine. Further, annexin V (in the absence of Ca(2+)) or heparin outcompetes Alboserpin for binding to phospholipid vesicles, suggesting a common binding site. Consistent with its activity, Alboserpin blocks prothrombinase activity and increases both prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time in vitro or ex vivo. Furthermore, Alboserpin prevents thrombus formation provoked by ferric chloride injury of the carotid artery and increases bleeding in a dose-dependent manner. Alboserpin emerges as an atypical serpin that targets FXa and displays unique phospholipid specificity. It conceivably uses heparin and phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine as anchors to increase protein localization and effective concentration at sites of injury, cell activation, or inflammation.

  6. Interaction of the RNP1 motif in PRT1 with HCR1 promotes 40S binding of eukaryotic initiation factor 3 in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Klaus H; Valásek, Leos; Sykes, Caroah

    2006-01-01

    We found that mutating the RNP1 motif in the predicted RRM domain in yeast eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) subunit b/PRT1 (prt1-rnp1) impairs its direct interactions in vitro with both eIF3a/TIF32 and eIF3j/HCR1. The rnp1 mutation in PRT1 confers temperature-sensitive translation initiation...... impairs the 40S binding of eIF3 more so than the 40S binding of HCR1; (iii) overexpressing HCR1-R215I decreases the Ts(-) phenotype and increases 40S-bound eIF3 in rnp1 cells; (iv) the rnp1 Ts(-) phenotype is exacerbated by tif32-Delta6, which eliminates a binding determinant for HCR1 in TIF32; and (v......) hcr1Delta impairs 40S binding of eIF3 in otherwise wild-type cells. Interestingly, rnp1 also reduces the levels of 40S-bound eIF5 and eIF1 and increases leaky scanning at the GCN4 uORF1. Thus, the PRT1 RNP1 motif coordinates the functions of HCR1 and TIF32 in 40S binding of eIF3 and is needed...

  7. A Trematode Parasite Derived Growth Factor Binds and Exerts Influences on Host Immune Functions via Host Cytokine Receptor Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad A Sulaiman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The trematode Fasciola hepatica is responsible for chronic zoonotic infection globally. Despite causing a potent T-helper 2 response, it is believed that potent immunomodulation is responsible for rendering this host reactive non-protective host response thereby allowing the parasite to remain long-lived. We have previously identified a growth factor, FhTLM, belonging to the TGF superfamily can have developmental effects on the parasite. Herein we demonstrate that FhTLM can exert influence over host immune functions in a host receptor specific fashion. FhTLM can bind to receptor members of the Transforming Growth Factor (TGF superfamily, with a greater affinity for TGF-β RII. Upon ligation FhTLM initiates the Smad2/3 pathway resulting in phenotypic changes in both fibroblasts and macrophages. The formation of fibroblast CFUs is reduced when cells are cultured with FhTLM, as a result of TGF-β RI kinase activity. In parallel the wound closure response of fibroblasts is also delayed in the presence of FhTLM. When stimulated with FhTLM blood monocyte derived macrophages adopt an alternative or regulatory phenotype. They express high levels interleukin (IL-10 and arginase-1 while displaying low levels of IL-12 and nitric oxide. Moreover they also undergo significant upregulation of the inhibitory receptor PD-L1 and the mannose receptor. Use of RNAi demonstrates that this effect is dependent on TGF-β RII and mRNA knock-down leads to a loss of IL-10 and PD-L1. Finally, we demonstrate that FhTLM aids newly excysted juveniles (NEJs in their evasion of antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC by reducing the NO response of macrophages-again dependent on TGF-β RI kinase. FhTLM displays restricted expression to the F. hepatica gut resident NEJ stages. The altered fibroblast responses would suggest a role for dampened tissue repair responses in facilitating parasite migration. Furthermore, the adoption of a regulatory macrophage phenotype would allow

  8. FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER Negatively Regulates Ethylene Response DNA-Binding Factors by Activating an Ethylene-Responsive Factor to Control Arabidopsis Floral Organ Senescence and Abscission1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei-Fang; Lee, Yung-I; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    In this study of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we investigated the relationship between FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER (FYF) and Ethylene Response DNA-binding Factors (EDFs) and functionally analyzed a key FYF target, an Ethylene-Responsive Factor (ERF), that controls flower senescence/abscission. Ectopic expression of EDF1/2/3/4 caused promotion of flower senescence/abscission and the activation of the senescence-associated genes. The presence of a repressor domain in EDFs and the enhancement of the promotion of senescence/abscission in EDF1/2/3/4+SRDX (converting EDFs to strong repressors by fusion with the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression motif repression domain SRDX) transgenic plants suggested that EDFs act as repressors. The significant reduction of β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression by 35S:FYF in EDF1/2/3/4:GUS plants indicates that EDF1/2/3/4 functions downstream of FYF in regulating flower senescence/abscission. In this study, we also characterized an ERF gene, FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER UP-REGULATING FACTOR1 (FUF1), which is up-regulated by FYF during flower development. Ectopic expression of FUF1 caused similar delayed flower senescence/abscission as seen in 35S:FYF plants. This phenotype was correlated with deficient abscission zone formation, ethylene insensitivity, and down-regulation of EDF1/2/3/4 and abscission-associated genes in 35S:FUF1 flowers. In contrast, significant promotion of flower senescence/abscission and up-regulation of EDF1/2/3/4 were observed in 35S:FUF1+SRDX transgenic dominant-negative plants, in which FUF1 is converted to a potent repressor by fusion to an SRDX-suppressing motif. Thus, FUF1 acts as an activator in suppressing EDF1/2/3/4 function and senescence/abscission of the flowers. Our results reveal that FYF regulates flower senescence/abscission by negatively regulating EDF1/2/3/4, which is the downstream gene in the ethylene response, by activating FUF1 in Arabidopsis. PMID:26063506

  9. Novel RNA-binding protein P311 binds eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit b (eIF3b) to promote translation of transforming growth factor β1-3 (TGF-β1-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Michael M; Lv, Kaosheng; Meredith, Stephen C; Martindale, Jennifer L; Gorospe, Myriam; Schuger, Lucia

    2014-12-05

    P311, a conserved 8-kDa intracellular protein expressed in brain, smooth muscle, regenerating tissues, and malignant glioblastomas, represents the first documented stimulator of TGF-β1-3 translation in vitro and in vivo. Here we initiated efforts to define the mechanism underlying P311 function. PONDR® (Predictor Of Naturally Disordered Regions) analysis suggested and CD confirmed that P311 is an intrinsically disordered protein, therefore requiring an interacting partner to acquire tertiary structure and function. Immunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectroscopy identified eIF3 subunit b (eIF3b) as a novel P311 binding partner. Immunohistochemical colocalization, GST pulldown, and surface plasmon resonance studies revealed that P311-eIF3b interaction is direct and has a Kd of 1.26 μm. Binding sites were mapped to the non-canonical RNA recognition motif of eIF3b and a central 11-amino acid-long region of P311, here referred to as eIF3b binding motif. Disruption of P311-eIF3b binding inhibited translation of TGF-β1, 2, and 3, as indicated by luciferase reporter assays, polysome fractionation studies, and Western blot analysis. RNA precipitation assays after UV cross-linking and RNA-protein EMSA demonstrated that P311 binds directly to TGF-β 5'UTRs mRNAs through a previously unidentified RNA recognition motif-like motif. Our results demonstrate that P311 is a novel RNA-binding protein that, by interacting with TGF-βs 5'UTRs and eIF3b, stimulates the translation of TGF-β1, 2, and 3. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. A Point Mutation in the Exon Junction Complex Factor Y14 Disrupts Its Function in mRNA Cap Binding and Translation Enhancement*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tzu-Wei; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Lou, Yuan-Chao; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNA biogenesis involves a series of interconnected steps mediated by RNA-binding proteins. The exon junction complex core protein Y14 is required for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and promotes translation. Moreover, Y14 binds the cap structure of mRNAs and inhibits the activity of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. In this report, we show that an evolutionarily conserved tryptophan residue (Trp-73) of Y14 is critical for its binding to the mRNA cap structure. A Trp-73 mutant (W73V) bound weakly to mRNAs and failed to protect them from degradation. However, this mutant could still interact with the NMD and mRNA degradation factors and retained partial NMD activity. In addition, we found that the W73V mutant could not interact with translation initiation factors. Overexpression of W73V suppressed reporter mRNA translation in vitro and in vivo and reduced the level of a set of nascent proteins. These results reveal a residue of Y14 that confers cap-binding activity and is essential for Y14-mediated enhancement of translation. Finally, we demonstrated that Y14 may selectively and differentially modulate protein biosynthesis. PMID:26887951

  11. A Point Mutation in the Exon Junction Complex Factor Y14 Disrupts Its Function in mRNA Cap Binding and Translation Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tzu-Wei; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Lou, Yuan-Chao; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2016-04-15

    Eukaryotic mRNA biogenesis involves a series of interconnected steps mediated by RNA-binding proteins. The exon junction complex core protein Y14 is required for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and promotes translation. Moreover, Y14 binds the cap structure of mRNAs and inhibits the activity of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. In this report, we show that an evolutionarily conserved tryptophan residue (Trp-73) of Y14 is critical for its binding to the mRNA cap structure. A Trp-73 mutant (W73V) bound weakly to mRNAs and failed to protect them from degradation. However, this mutant could still interact with the NMD and mRNA degradation factors and retained partial NMD activity. In addition, we found that the W73V mutant could not interact with translation initiation factors. Overexpression of W73V suppressed reporter mRNA translation in vitro and in vivo and reduced the level of a set of nascent proteins. These results reveal a residue of Y14 that confers cap-binding activity and is essential for Y14-mediated enhancement of translation. Finally, we demonstrated that Y14 may selectively and differentially modulate protein biosynthesis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. EBNA2 Drives Formation of New Chromosome Binding Sites and Target Genes for B-Cell Master Regulatory Transcription Factors RBP-jκ and EBF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fang; Chen, Horng-Shen; Kossenkov, Andrew V; DeWispeleare, Karen; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Lieberman, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) transforms resting B-lymphocytes into proliferating lymphoblasts to establish latent infections that can give rise to malignancies. We show here that EBV-encoded transcriptional regulator EBNA2 drives the cooperative and combinatorial genome-wide binding of two master regulators of B-cell fate, namely EBF1 and RBP-jκ. Previous studies suggest that these B-cell factors are statically bound to target gene promoters. In contrast, we found that EBNA2 induces the formation of new binding for both RBP-jκ and EBF1, many of which are in close physical proximity in the cellular and viral genome. These newly induced binding sites co-occupied by EBNA2-EBF1-RBP-jκ correlate strongly with transcriptional activation of linked genes that are important for B-lymphoblast function. Conditional expression or repression of EBNA2 leads to a rapid alteration in RBP-jκ and EBF1 binding. Biochemical and shRNA depletion studies provide evidence for cooperative assembly at co-occupied sites. These findings reveal that EBNA2 facilitate combinatorial interactions to induce new patterns of transcription factor occupancy and gene programming necessary to drive B-lymphoblast growth and survival.

  13. EBNA2 Drives Formation of New Chromosome Binding Sites and Target Genes for B-Cell Master Regulatory Transcription Factors RBP-jκ and EBF1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV transforms resting B-lymphocytes into proliferating lymphoblasts to establish latent infections that can give rise to malignancies. We show here that EBV-encoded transcriptional regulator EBNA2 drives the cooperative and combinatorial genome-wide binding of two master regulators of B-cell fate, namely EBF1 and RBP-jκ. Previous studies suggest that these B-cell factors are statically bound to target gene promoters. In contrast, we found that EBNA2 induces the formation of new binding for both RBP-jκ and EBF1, many of which are in close physical proximity in the cellular and viral genome. These newly induced binding sites co-occupied by EBNA2-EBF1-RBP-jκ correlate strongly with transcriptional activation of linked genes that are important for B-lymphoblast function. Conditional expression or repression of EBNA2 leads to a rapid alteration in RBP-jκ and EBF1 binding. Biochemical and shRNA depletion studies provide evidence for cooperative assembly at co-occupied sites. These findings reveal that EBNA2 facilitate combinatorial interactions to induce new patterns of transcription factor occupancy and gene programming necessary to drive B-lymphoblast growth and survival.

  14. Inositol phospholipids regulate the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor Tiam1 by facilitating its binding to the plasma membrane and regulating GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Ian N; Batty, Ian H; Prescott, Alan R; Gray, Alex; Kular, Gursant S; Stewart, Hazel; Downes, C Peter

    2004-09-15

    Binding of the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor, Tiam1, to the plasma membrane requires the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. In the present study, we show that membrane-association is mediated by binding of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) to the pleckstrin homology domain. Moreover, in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, translocation of Tiam1 to the cytosol, following receptor-mediated stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) breakdown, correlates with decreased Rac1-GTP levels, indicating that membrane-association is required for GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1. In addition, we show that platelet-derived growth factor activates Rac1 in vivo by increasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) concentrations, rather than the closely related lipid, PtdIns(3,4)P(2). Finally, the data demonstrate that PtdIns(4,5)P(2) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) bind to the same pleckstrin homology domain in Tiam1 and that soluble inositol phosphates appear to compete with lipids for this binding. Together, these novel observations provide strong evidence that distinct phosphoinositides regulate different functions of this enzyme, indicating that local concentrations of signalling lipids and the levels of cytosolic inositol phosphates will play crucial roles in determining its activity in vivo.

  15. Crystal structure of the DNA binding domain of the transcription factor T-bet suggests simultaneous recognition of distant genome sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ce Feng; Brandt, Gabriel S; Hoang, Quyen Q; Naumova, Natalia; Lazarevic, Vanja; Hwang, Eun Sook; Dekker, Job; Glimcher, Laurie H; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A

    2016-10-25

    The transcription factor T-bet (Tbox protein expressed in T cells) is one of the master regulators of both the innate and adaptive immune responses. It plays a central role in T-cell lineage commitment, where it controls the T H 1 response, and in gene regulation in plasma B-cells and dendritic cells. T-bet is a member of the Tbox family of transcription factors; however, T-bet coordinately regulates the expression of many more genes than other Tbox proteins. A central unresolved question is how T-bet is able to simultaneously recognize distant Tbox binding sites, which may be located thousands of base pairs away. We have determined the crystal structure of the Tbox DNA binding domain (DBD) of T-bet in complex with a palindromic DNA. The structure shows a quaternary structure in which the T-bet dimer has its DNA binding regions splayed far apart, making it impossible for a single dimer to bind both sites of the DNA palindrome. In contrast to most other Tbox proteins, a single T-bet DBD dimer binds simultaneously to identical half-sites on two independent DNA. A fluorescence-based assay confirms that T-bet dimers are able to bring two independent DNA molecules into close juxtaposition. Furthermore, chromosome conformation capture assays confirm that T-bet functions in the direct formation of chromatin loops in vitro and in vivo. The data are consistent with a looping/synapsing model for transcriptional regulation by T-bet in which a single dimer of the transcription factor can recognize and coalesce distinct genetic elements, either a promoter plus a distant regulatory element, or promoters on two different genes.

  16. Electrostatic Forces as Dominant Interactions Between Proteins and Polyanions: an ESI MS Study of Fibroblast Growth Factor Binding to Heparin Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Dubin, Paul L.; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2017-04-01

    The interactions between fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) are facilitated by heparan sulfate (HS) and heparin (Hp), highly sulfated biological polyelectrolytes. The molecular basis of FGF interactions with these polyelectrolytes is highly complex due to the structural heterogeneity of HS/Hp, and many details still remain elusive, especially the significance of charge density and minimal chain length of HS/Hp in growth factor recognition and multimerization. In this work, we use electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) to investigate the association of relatively homogeneous oligoheparins (octamer, dp8, and decamer, dp10) with acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1). This growth factor forms 1:1, 2:1, and 3:1 protein/heparinoid complexes with both dp8 and dp10, and the fraction of bound protein is highly dependent on protein/heparinoid molar ratio. Multimeric complexes are preferentially formed on the highly sulfated Hp oligomers. Although a variety of oligomers appear to be binding-competent, there is a strong correlation between the affinity and the overall level of sulfation (the highest charge density polyanions binding FGF most strongly via multivalent interactions). These results show that the interactions between FGF-1 and Hp oligomers are primarily directed by electrostatics, and also demonstrate the power of ESI MS as a tool to study multiple binding equilibria between proteins and structurally heterogeneous polyanions.

  17. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 and Selected Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein Concentrations during an Ultramarathon Sled Dog Race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Brunke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of running a 1000-mile (1600 km endurance sled dog race on serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 1 and 3 (IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3. Serum was examined from 12 sled dogs prior to the race, at midrace (approximately 690 km, and again at the finish. IGF-1, IGFBP-1, and IGFBP-3 were assessed using radioimmunoassay or enzyme linked immune-absorbance assays. Mean prerace concentrations were significantly higher than midrace and end-race concentrations at 215.93 ± 80.51 ng/mL, 54.29 ± 25.45 ng/mL, and 55.53 ± 28.25 ng/mL, respectively (P<0.001. Mean IGFBP-1 concentrations were not different across these time periods at 24.1 ± 15.8 ng/mL, 25.7 ± 14.0 ng/mL, and 26.6 ± 17.6 ng/mL, respectively. IGFBP-3 concentrations showed a modest significant decrease across time periods at 3,067 ± 2,792 ng/mL, 2,626 ± 2,310 ng/mL, and 2,331 ± 2,301 ng/mL, respectively (P<0.01. Endurance sled dogs show a precipitous drop in serum IGF-1 concentrations. These differences may be related to fuel utilization and excessive negative energy balance associated with the loss of body condition during racing. The relative stability of IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3 suggests that IGF-1 anabolic signaling is diminished during ultramarathon racing. Further studies comparing the influence of time and duration of exercise versus negative energy balance on serum IGF-1 status are warranted to better understand exercise versus negative energy balance differences.

  18. Evidence for a conserved inhibitory binding mode between the membrane fusion assembly factors Munc18 and syntaxin in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Czuee; Kienle, C Nickias; Klöpper, Tobias H; Burkhardt, Pawel; Fasshauer, Dirk

    2017-12-15

    The membrane fusion necessary for vesicle trafficking is driven by the assembly of heterologous SNARE proteins orchestrated by the binding of Sec1/Munc18 (SM) proteins to specific syntaxin SNARE proteins. However, the precise mode of interaction between SM proteins and SNAREs is debated, as contrasting binding modes have been found for different members of the SM protein family, including the three vertebrate Munc18 isoforms. While different binding modes could be necessary, given their roles in different secretory processes in different tissues, the structural similarity of the three isoforms makes this divergence perplexing. Although the neuronal isoform Munc18a is well-established to bind tightly to both the closed conformation and the N-peptide of syntaxin 1a, thereby inhibiting SNARE complex formation, Munc18b and -c, which have a more widespread distribution, are reported to mainly interact with the N-peptide of their partnering syntaxins and are thought to instead promote SNARE complex formation. We have reinvestigated the interaction between Munc18c and syntaxin 4 (Syx4). Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we found that Munc18c, like Munc18a, binds to both the closed conformation and the N-peptide of Syx4. Furthermore, using a novel kinetic approach, we found that Munc18c, like Munc18a, slows down SNARE complex formation through high-affinity binding to syntaxin. This strongly suggests that secretory Munc18s in general control the accessibility of the bound syntaxin, probably preparing it for SNARE complex assembly. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Familial risk for mood disorder and the personality risk factor, neuroticism, interact in their association with frontolimbic serotonin 2A receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjær, Vibe Gedsø; Vinberg, Maj; Erritzoe, David

    2010-01-01

    Life stress is a robust risk factor for later development of mood disorders, particularly for individuals at familial risk. Likewise, scoring high on the personality trait neuroticism is associated with an increased risk for mood disorders. Neuroticism partly reflects stress vulnerability...... binding. These findings point at a plausible neurobiological link between genetic and personality risk factors and vulnerability to developing mood disorders. It contributes to our understanding of why some people at high risk develop mood disorders while others do not. We speculate that an increased......-twin history of mood disorder were included. They answered self-report personality questionnaires and underwent [(18)F]altanserin positron emission tomography. We found a significant interaction between neuroticism and familial risk in predicting the frontolimbic 5-HT(2A) receptor binding (p=0...

  20. Protection of blood retinal barrier and systemic vasculature by insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagna P R Jarajapu

    Full Text Available Previously, we showed that insulin growth factor (IGF-1 binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3, independent of IGF-1, reduces pathological angiogenesis in a mouse model of the oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR. The current study evaluates novel endothelium-dependent functions of IGFBP-3 including blood retinal barrier (BRB integrity and vasorelaxation. To evaluate vascular barrier function, either plasmid expressing IGFBP-3 under the regulation of an endothelial-specific promoter or a control plasmid was injected into the vitreous humor of mouse pups (P1 and compared to the non-injected eyes of the same pups undergoing standard OIR protocol. Prior to sacrifice, the mice were given an injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP. IGFBP-3 plasmid-injected eyes displayed near-normal vessel morphology and enhanced vascular barrier function. Further, in vitro IGFBP-3 protects retinal endothelial cells from VEGF-induced loss of junctional integrity by antagonizing the dissociation of the junctional complexes. To assess the vasodilatory effects of IGFBP-3, rat posterior cerebral arteries were examined in vitro. Intraluminal IGFBP-3 decreased both pressure- and serotonin-induced constrictions by stimulating nitric oxide (NO release that were blocked by L-NAME or scavenger receptor-B1 neutralizing antibody (SRB1-Ab. Both wild-type and IGF-1-nonbinding mutant IGFBP-3 (IGFBP-3NB stimulated eNOS activity/NO release to a similar extent in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs. NO release was neither associated with an increase in intracellular calcium nor decreased by Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamKII blockade; however, dephosphorylation of eNOS-Thr(495 was observed. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K activity and Akt-Ser(473 phosphorylation were both increased by IGFBP-3 and selectively blocked by the SRB1-Ab or PI3K blocker LY294002. In conclusion, IGFBP-3 mediates protective effects on BRB integrity and mediates robust NO release to stimulate

  1. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 levels are increased in patients with IgA nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Koki [Department of Digestive and Life-Style Related Disease, Health Research Course, Human and Environmental Sciences, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Uto, Hirofumi, E-mail: hirouto@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Digestive and Life-Style Related Disease, Health Research Course, Human and Environmental Sciences, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Takami, Yoichiro; Mera, Kumiko; Nishida, Chika; Yoshimine, Yozo; Fukumoto, Mayumi; Oku, Manei; Sogabe, Atsushi; Nosaki, Tsuyoshi; Moriuchi, Akihiro; Oketani, Makoto; Ido, Akio; Tsubouchi, Hirohito [Department of Digestive and Life-Style Related Disease, Health Research Course, Human and Environmental Sciences, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} IGFBP-1 mRNA over express in kidneys obtained from mice model of IgA nephropathy. {yields} Serum IGFBP-1 levels are high in patients with IgA nephropathy. {yields} Serum IGFBP-1 levels correlate with renal function and the severity of renal injury. -- Abstract: The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy (IgAN) are not well understood. In this study, we examined gene expression profiles in kidneys obtained from mice with high serum IgA levels (HIGA mice), which exhibit features of human IgAN. Female inbred HIGA, established from the ddY line, were used in these experiments. Serum IgA levels, renal IgA deposition, mesangial proliferation, and glomerulosclerosis were increased in 32-week-old HIGA mice in comparison to ddY animals. By microarray analysis, five genes were observed to be increased by more than 2.5-fold in 32-week-old HIGA in comparison to 16-week-old HIGA; these same five genes were decreased more than 2.5-fold in 32-week-old ddY in comparison to 16-week-old ddY mice. Of these five genes, insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein (IGFBP)-1 exhibited differential expression between these mouse lines, as confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. In addition, serum IGFBP-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with IgAN than in healthy controls. In patients with IgAN, these levels correlated with measures of renal function, such as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), but not with sex, age, serum IgA, C3 levels, or IGF-1 levels. Pathologically, serum IGFBP-1 levels were significantly associated with the severity of renal injury, as assessed by mesangial cell proliferation and interstitial fibrosis. These results suggest that increased IGFBP-1 levels are associated with the severity of renal pathology in patients with IgAN.

  2. Preparation and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of crystals of bacterial flagellar sigma factor σ28 in complex with the σ28-binding region of its antisigma factor, FlgM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Kengo; Ichihara, Hisako; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Ishihama, Akira; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2007-01-01

    A complex of E. coli flagellar and chemotaxis-specific sigma factor σ 28 bound to the σ 28 -binding region of its antisigma factor FlgM was crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.7 Å. The sigma 28 kDa (σ 28 ) factor is a transcription factor specific for the expression of bacterial flagellar and chemotaxis genes. Its antisigma factor, FlgM, binds σ 28 factor and inhibits its activity as a transcription factor. In this study, crystals of the complex between Escherichia coli σ 28 and the C-terminal σ 28 -binding region of FlgM were obtained. The crystals belong to space group P3 1 21 or P3 2 21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.7 (2), c = 51.74 (3) Å, containing one complex in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. An X-ray intensity data set was collected to a resolution of 2.7 Å

  3. Combined Roles of Human IgG Subclass, Alternative Complement Pathway Activation, and Epitope Density in the Bactericidal Activity of Antibodies to Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Reason, Donald C.

    2012-01-01

    Meningococcal vaccines containing factor H binding protein (fHbp) are in clinical development. fHbp binds human fH, which enables the meningococcus to resist complement-mediated bacteriolysis. Previously, we found that chimeric human IgG1 mouse anti-fHbp monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) had human complement-mediated bactericidal activity only if the MAb inhibited fH binding. Since IgG subclasses differ in their ability to activate complement, we investigated the role of human IgG subclasses on antibody functional activity. We constructed chimeric MAbs in which three different murine fHbp-specific binding domains were each paired with human IgG1, IgG2, or IgG3. Against a wild-type group B isolate, all three IgG3 MAbs, irrespective of their ability to inhibit fH binding, had bactericidal activity that was >5-fold higher than the respective IgG1 MAbs, while the IgG2 MAbs had the least activity. Against a mutant with increased fHbp expression, the anti-fHbp MAbs elicited greater C4b deposition (classical pathway) and greater bactericidal activity than against the wild-type strain, and the IgG1 MAbs had similar or greater activity than the respective IgG3 MAbs. The bactericidal activity against both wild-type and mutant strains also was dependent, in part, on activation of the alternative complement pathway. Thus, at lower epitope density in the wild-type strain, the IgG3 anti-fHbp MAbs had the greatest bactericidal activity. At a higher epitope density in the mutant, the IgG1 MAbs had similar or greater bactericidal activity than the IgG3 MAbs, and the activity was less dependent on the inhibition of fH binding than at a lower epitope density. PMID:22064712

  4. Differences in human skin between the epidermal growth factor receptor distribution detected by EGF binding and monoclonal antibody recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Couchman, J R

    1985-01-01

    the distribution on frozen skin sections of an extracellular epitope on the EGF receptor. The [125I]EGF binding experiments showed accessible, unoccupied EGF receptors to be present on the epidermal basal cells (with reduced binding to spinous cells), the basal cells of the hair shaft and sebaceous gland...... presumptive cortex cells, excluding the medulla, lying around and above the upper dermal papilla of anagen hair follicles, epithelial cells around the lower dermal papilla region, and in some tissue samples the cell margins of the viable differentiating layers of the epidermis. In a control study, to clarify...

  5. Host factor I, Hfq, binds to Escherichia coli ompA mRNA in a growth rate-dependent fashion and regulates its stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vytvytska, O; Jakobsen, J S; Balcunaite, G

    1998-01-01

    ompA was purified and identified as Hfq, a host factor initially recognized for its function in phage Qbeta replication. The ompA RNA-binding activity parallels the amount of Hfq, which is elevated in bacteria cultured at slow growth rate, a condition leading to facilitated degradation of the ompA m...... suggest a regulatory role for Hfq that specifically facilitates the ompA mRNA degradation in a growth rate-dependent manner....

  6. DNA Polymorphism of Insulin-like Growth Factor-binding Protein-3 Gene and Its Association with Cashmere Traits in Cashmere Goats

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Haiying; Liu, Chao; Yang, Guiqin; Li, Hui; Dai, Jin; Cong, Yuyan; Li, Xuejian

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) gene is important for regulation of growth and development in mammals. The present investigation was carried out to study DNA polymorphism by PCR-RFLP of IGFBP-3 gene and its effect on fibre traits of Chinese Inner Mongolian cashmere goats. The fibre traits data investigated were cashmere fibre diameter, combed cashmere weight, cashmere fibre length and guard hair length. Four hundred and forty-four animals were used to detect polymorphis...

  7. Identification of outer membrane Porin D as a vitronectin-binding factor in cystic fibrosis clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsson, Magnus; Singh, Birendra; Al-Jubair, Tamim

    2015-01-01

    to host epithelial cells. METHODS: We screened clinical isolates from the airways of CF patients and from the bloodstream of patients with bacteremia for binding of vitronectin. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE and a proteomic approach were used to identify vitronectin-receptors in P. aeruginosa. RESULTS: P...

  8. Binding of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) to eIF4G represses translation of uncapped mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, S Z; Sachs, A B

    1997-12-01

    mRNA translation in crude extracts from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is stimulated by the cap structure and the poly(A) tail through the binding of the cap-binding protein eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and the poly(A) tail-binding protein Pab1p. These proteins also bind to the translation initiation factor eIF4G and thereby link the mRNA to the general translational apparatus. In contrast, uncapped, poly(A)-deficient mRNA is translated poorly in yeast extracts, in part because of the absence of eIF4E and Pab1p binding sites on the mRNA. Here, we report that uncapped-mRNA translation is also repressed in yeast extracts due to the binding of eIF4E to eIF4G. Specifically, we find that mutations which weaken the eIF4E binding site on the yeast eIF4G proteins Tif4631p and Tif4632p lead to temperature-sensitive growth in vivo and the stimulation of uncapped-mRNA translation in vitro. A mutation in eIF4E which disturbs its ability to interact with eIF4G also leads to a stimulation of uncapped-mRNA translation in vitro. Finally, overexpression of eIF4E in vivo or the addition of excess eIF4E in vitro reverses these effects of the mutations. These data support the hypothesis that the eIF4G protein can efficiently stimulate translation of exogenous uncapped mRNA in extracts but is prevented from doing so as a result of its association with eIF4E. They also suggest that some mRNAs may be translationally regulated in vivo in response to the amount of free eIF4G in the cell.

  9. The ligand specificities of the insulin receptor and the insulin-like growth factor I receptor reside in different regions of a common binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjeldsen, T.; Andersen, A.S.; Wiberg, F.C.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Schaeffer, L.; Balschmidt, P.; Moller, K.B.; Moller, N.P.H. (Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd (Denmark))

    1991-05-15

    To identify the region(s) of the insulin receptor and the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor responsible for ligand specificity (high-affinity binding), expression vectors encoding soluble chimeric insulin/IGF-I receptors were prepared. The chimeric receptors were expressed in mammalian cells and partially purified. Binding studies revealed that a construct comprising an IGF-I receptor in which the 68 N-terminal amino acids of the insulin receptor {alpha}-subunit had replaced the equivalent IGF-I receptor segment displayed a markedly increased affinity for insulin. In contrast, the corresponding IGF-I receptor sequence is not critical for high-affinity IGF-I binding. It is shown that part of the cysteine-rich domain determines IGF-I specificity. The authors have previously shown that exchanging exons 1, 2, and 3 of the insulin receptor with the corresponding IGF-I receptor sequence results in loss of high affinity for insulin and gain of high affinity for IGF-I. Consequently, it is suggested that the ligand specificities of the two receptors (i.e., the sequences that discriminate between insulin and IGF-I) reside in different regions of a binding site with common features present in both receptors.

  10. Neural cell adhesion molecule-180-mediated homophilic binding induces epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) down-regulation and uncouples the inhibitory function of EGFR in neurite outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays important roles in neuronal development, regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. NCAM homophilic binding mediates cell adhesion and induces intracellular signals, in which the fibroblast growth factor receptor plays a prominent role. Recent studies...... on axon guidance in Drosophila suggest that NCAM also regulates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, 28, 2005, 141). A possible interaction between NCAM and EGFR in mammalian cells has not been investigated. The present study demonstrates for the first time...

  11. Site of ADP-ribosylation and the RNA-binding site are situated in different domains of the elongation factor EF-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydova, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    One of the proteins participating in the process of elongation of polypeptide chains - elongation factor 2 (EF-2) - can be ADP-ribosylated at a unique amino acid residue - diphthamide. Since the ADP-ribosylation of EF-2 at dipthamide leads to a loss of affinity of the factor for RNA while the presence of RNA inhibits the ADP-ribosylation reaction, it seemed probable to the authors that diphthamide participated directly in the binding of EF-2 to DNA. The experiments presented in this article showed that this was not the case: diphthamide and the RNA-binding site are situated on different domains of EF-2. Thus, ADP-ribosylation of factor EF-2 in one domain leads to a loss of the ability to bind to RNA in the other. The authors investigated the mutual arrangement of diphthamide and the RNA-binding site on the EF-2 molecule by preparing a factor from rabbit reticulocytes and subjecting it to proteolytic digestion with elastase. The factor was incubated with elastase for 15 min at 37 0 C at an enzyme:substrate ratio of 1:100 in buffer solution containing 20 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.6, 10 mM KCl, 1 mM MgCl 2 , and 2 mM dithiothreitol. The reaction was stopped by adding para-methylsulfonyl fluoride to 50 micro-M. The authors obtained a preparation as a result of proteolysis and applied it on a column with RNA-Sepharose and separated into two fractions: RNA-binding and without affinity for RNA. The initial preparation and its fractions were subjected to exhaustive ADP-ribosylation in the presence of diphtheria toxin and [U- 14 C] nicotinaide adenine dinucleotide ([ 14 C]NAD) (296 mCi/mmole). The samples were analyzed electrophoretically in a polyacrylamide gel gradient in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. For the detection of [ 14 C] ADP-ribosylated components, the gels were dried and exposed with RM-V x-ray film

  12. Runx transcription factors repress human and murine c-Myc expression in a DNA-binding and C-terminally dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paejonette T Jacobs

    Full Text Available The transcription factors Runx1 and c-Myc have individually been shown to regulate important gene targets as well as to collaborate in oncogenesis. However, it is unknown whether there is a regulatory relationship between the two genes. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of endogenous c-Myc by Runx1 in the human T cell line Jurkat and murine primary hematopoietic cells. Endogenous Runx1 binds to multiple sites in the c-Myc locus upstream of the c-Myc transcriptional start site. Cells transduced with a C-terminally truncated Runx1 (Runx1.d190, which lacks important cofactor interaction sites and can block C-terminal-dependent functions of all Runx transcription factors, showed increased transcription of c-Myc. In order to monitor c-Myc expression in response to early and transiently-acting Runx1.d190, we generated a cell membrane-permeable TAT-Runx1.d190 fusion protein. Murine splenocytes treated with TAT-Runx1.d190 showed an increase in the transcription of c-Myc within 2 hours, peaking at 4 hours post-treatment and declining thereafter. This effect is dependent on the ability of Runx1.d190 to bind to DNA. The increase in c-Myc transcripts is correlated with increased c-Myc protein levels. Collectively, these data show that Runx1 directly regulates c-Myc transcription in a C-terminal- and DNA-binding-dependent manner.

  13. PPARγ induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through upregulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 in gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.Y. [Department of Pediatrics, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M.S.; Lee, M.K. [Department of Pediatrics, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.S.; Yi, H.K. [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Nam, S.Y. [Department of Alternative Therapy, Jeonju University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D.Y.; Hwang, P.H. [Department of Pediatrics, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-13

    Peroxisome proliferator activator receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated transcriptional factor involved in the carcinogenesis of various cancers. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is a tumor suppressor gene that has anti-apoptotic activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anticancer mechanism of PPARγ with respect to IGFBP-3. PPARγ was overexpressed in SNU-668 gastric cancer cells using an adenovirus gene transfer system. The cells in which PPARγ was overexpressed exhibited growth inhibition, induction of apoptosis, and a significant increase in IGFBP-3 expression. We investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms of PPARγ in SNU-668 cells using an IGFBP-3 promoter/luciferase reporter system. Luciferase activity was increased up to 15-fold in PPARγ transfected cells, suggesting that PPARγ may directly interact with IGFBP-3 promoter to induce its expression. Deletion analysis of the IGFBP-3 promoter showed that luciferase activity was markedly reduced in cells without putative p53-binding sites (-Δ1755, -Δ1795). This suggests that the critical PPARγ-response region is located within the p53-binding region of the IGFBP-3 promoter. We further demonstrated an increase in PPARγ-induced luciferase activity even in cells treated with siRNA to silence p53 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that PPARγ exhibits its anticancer effect by increasing IGFBP-3 expression, and that IGFBP-3 is a significant tumor suppressor.

  14. Evaluation of insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin like growth factor binding protein-3 in diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency in short-stature children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.; Hashim, R.; Khan, F.A.; Sattar, A.; Ijaz, A.; Manzoor, S.M.; Younas, M.

    2009-01-01

    Growth Hormone Deficiency (GHD) is conventionally diagnosed and confirmed by diminished peak Growth Hormone (GH) levels to provocative testing. Serum Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) are under the influence of GH and reflect the spontaneous endogenous GH secretion. Owing to the absence of a circadian rhythm, it is possible to take individual measurements of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 at any time of the day for evaluation of GH status instead of subjecting the individual to cumbersome provocative tests. Objectives of this study were to compare IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 assays with Exercise and L-Dopa stimulation tests in the diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency in short stature children using ITT as gold standard. Methods: This validation study was conducted at Department of Chemical Pathology and Endocrinology, AFIP, Rawalpindi, from November 2005 to October 2006. Fifty-two short stature children were included in the study. Basal samples for GH levels and simultaneous IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 measurements were obtained and afterwards all children were subjected to sequential exercise and LDopa stimulation tests. Insulin Tolerance Test (ITT) was performed one week later with all the necessary precautionary measures. On the basis of ITT results, children were divided into two groups, i.e., 31 growth hormone deficient and 21 Normal Variant Short Stature (NVSS). Results: The diagnostic value of exercise stimulation test remained highest with sensitivity 90.3%, specificity 76.0%, Positive Predictive Value (PPV) 84.84%, Negative Predictive Value (NPV) 84.2% and accuracy 84.6%. The conventional L-Dopa stimulation had sensitivity 96.7%, specificity 38.0%, PPV 69.7%, NPV 88.8 % and accuracy 73.0%. The serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels were positively correlated with post ITT peak GH levels (r= 0.527, r=0.464 respectively, both p<0.001). The diagnostic value of IGF-1 had sensitivity 83.87%, specificity 76.2%, PPV 83.87%, NPV 76.2% and

  15. Analysis of the DNA-Binding Activities of the Arabidopsis R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Family by One-Hybrid Experiments in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Kelemen

    Full Text Available The control of growth and development of all living organisms is a complex and dynamic process that requires the harmonious expression of numerous genes. Gene expression is mainly controlled by the activity of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins called transcription factors (TFs. Amongst the various classes of eukaryotic TFs, the MYB superfamily is one of the largest and most diverse, and it has considerably expanded in the plant kingdom. R2R3-MYBs have been extensively studied over the last 15 years. However, DNA-binding specificity has been characterized for only a small subset of these proteins. Therefore, one of the remaining challenges is the exhaustive characterization of the DNA-binding specificity of all R2R3-MYB proteins. In this study, we have developed a library of Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB open reading frames, whose DNA-binding activities were assayed in vivo (yeast one-hybrid experiments with a pool of selected cis-regulatory elements. Altogether 1904 interactions were assayed leading to the discovery of specific patterns of interactions between the various R2R3-MYB subgroups and their DNA target sequences and to the identification of key features that govern these interactions. The present work provides a comprehensive in vivo analysis of R2R3-MYB binding activities that should help in predicting new DNA motifs and identifying new putative target genes for each member of this very large family of TFs. In a broader perspective, the generated data will help to better understand how TF interact with their target DNA sequences.

  16. Yersinia pestis Ail recruitment of C4b-binding protein leads to factor I-mediated inactivation of covalently and noncovalently bound C4b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Derek K; Skurnik, Mikael; Blom, Anna M; Meri, Seppo

    2014-03-01

    The outer membrane protein Ail of Yersinia pestis mediates several virulence functions, including serum resistance. Here, we demonstrate that Ail binds C4b-binding protein (C4BP), the primary fluid-phase regulator of the classical and lectin pathways. Non-covalent binding of C4 and C4b to Ail was also observed. C4BP bound to Ail can act as a cofactor to the serine protease factor I (fI) in the cleavage of fluid-phase C4b. Employing a panel of C4BP alpha-chain mutants, we observed that the absence of complement control protein domain 6 and 8 reduced binding to Ail. Immunoblot analysis of normal human serum (NHS)-treated bacteria revealed minimal C4b alpha'-chain complexes with bacterial outer membrane targets. Addition of the anti-C4BP monoclonal antibody MK104 to NHS restored C4b-alpha' chain target complexes, suggesting that C4b binds covalently to targets on the Y. pestis surface. C4b bound to Ail noncovalently was also cleaved in a C4BP and fI-dependent manner, leaving the C4c fragment bound to Ail. MK104 also prevented the cleavage of noncovalently bound C4b. Collectively, these data suggest that when C4BP is bound to Ail, fI can cleave and inactivate C4b that has bound covalently to bacterial surface structures as well as C4b bound noncovalently to Ail. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Crystal structure of Yersinia pestis virulence factor YfeA reveals two polyspecific metal-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radka, Christopher D; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Wilson, Landon S; Lawrenz, Matthew B; Perry, Robert D; Aller, Stephen G

    2017-07-01

    Gram-negative bacteria use siderophores, outer membrane receptors, inner membrane transporters and substrate-binding proteins (SBPs) to transport transition metals through the periplasm. The SBPs share a similar protein fold that has undergone significant structural evolution to communicate with a variety of differentially regulated transporters in the cell. In Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, YfeA (YPO2439, y1897), an SBP, is important for full virulence during mammalian infection. To better understand the role of YfeA in infection, crystal structures were determined under several environmental conditions with respect to transition-metal levels. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and anomalous X-ray scattering data show that YfeA is polyspecific and can alter its substrate specificity. In minimal-media experiments, YfeA crystals grown after iron supplementation showed a threefold increase in iron fluorescence emission over the iron fluorescence emission from YfeA crystals grown from nutrient-rich conditions, and YfeA crystals grown after manganese supplementation during overexpression showed a fivefold increase in manganese fluorescence emission over the manganese fluorescence emission from YfeA crystals grown from nutrient-rich conditions. In all experiments, the YfeA crystals produced the strongest fluorescence emission from zinc and could not be manipulated otherwise. Additionally, this report documents the discovery of a novel surface metal-binding site that prefers to chelate zinc but can also bind manganese. Flexibility across YfeA crystal forms in three loops and a helix near the buried metal-binding site suggest that a structural rearrangement is required for metal loading and unloading.

  18. Nuclear Factor 90, a cellular dsRNA binding protein inhibits the HIV Rev-export function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Laurent Georges

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV Rev protein is known to facilitate export of incompletely spliced and unspliced viral transcripts to the cytoplasm, a necessary step in virus life cycle. The Rev-mediated nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of nascent viral transcripts, dependents on interaction of Rev with the RRE RNA structural element present in the target RNAs. The C-terminal variant of dsRNA-binding nuclear protein 90 (NF90ctv has been shown to markedly attenuate viral replication in stably transduced HIV-1 target cell line. Here we examined a mechanism of interference of viral life cycle involving Rev-NF90ctv interaction. Results Since Rev:RRE complex formations depend on protein:RNA and protein:protein interactions, we investigated whether the expression of NF90ctv might interfere with Rev-mediated export of RRE-containing transcripts. When HeLa cells expressed both NF90ctv and Rev protein, we observed that NF90ctv inhibited the Rev-mediated RNA transport. In particular, three regions of NF90ctv protein are involved in blocking Rev function. Moreover, interaction of NF90ctv with the RRE RNA resulted in the expression of a reporter protein coding sequences linked to the RRE structure. Moreover, Rev influenced the subcellular localization of NF90ctv, and this process is leptomycin B sensitive. Conclusion The dsRNA binding protein, NF90ctv competes with HIV Rev function at two levels, by competitive protein:protein interaction involving Rev binding to specific domains of NF90ctv, as well as by its binding to the RRE-RNA structure. Our results are consistent with a model of Rev-mediated HIV-1 RNA export that envisions Rev-multimerization, a process interrupted by NF90ctv.

  19. Endogenous biotin-binding proteins: an overlooked factor causing false positives in streptavidin-based protein detection

    OpenAIRE

    Tytgat, Hanne L P; Schoofs, Geert; Driesen, Mich?le; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Els J M; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Biotinylation is widely used in DNA, RNA and protein probing assays as this molecule has generally no impact on the biological activity of its substrate. During the streptavidin-based detection of glycoproteins in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG with biotinylated lectin probes, a strong positive band of approximately 125 kDa was observed, present in different cellular fractions. This potential glycoprotein reacted heavily with concanavalin A (ConA), a lectin that specifically binds...

  20. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  1. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, S.; Fairchild, R.G.; Watts, K.P.; Greenberg, D.; Hannon, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed

  2. The Regulatory T Cell Lineage Factor Foxp3 Regulates Gene Expression through Several Distinct Mechanisms Mostly Independent of Direct DNA Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Xie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The lineage factor Foxp3 is essential for the development and maintenance of regulatory T cells, but little is known about the mechanisms involved. Here, we demonstrate that an N-terminal proline-rich interaction region is crucial for Foxp3's function. Subdomains within this key region link Foxp3 to several independent mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. Our study suggests that Foxp3, even in the absence of its DNA-binding forkhead domain, acts as a bridge between DNA-binding interaction partners and proteins with effector function permitting it to regulate a large number of genes. We show that, in one such mechanism, Foxp3 recruits class I histone deacetylases to the promoters of target genes, counteracting activation-induced histone acetylation and thereby suppressing their expression.

  3. Effects of single-base substitutions within the acanthamoeba castellanii rRNA promoter on transcription and on binding of transcription initiation factor and RNA polymerase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kownin, P.; Bateman, E.; Paule, M.R.

    1988-02-01

    Single-point mutations were introduced into the promoter region of the Acanthamoeba castellanii rRNA gene by chemical mutagen treatment of a single-stranded clone in vitro, followed by reverse transcription and cloning of the altered fragment. The promoter mutants were tested for transcription initiation factor (TIF) binding by a template commitment assay plus DNase I footprinting and for transcription by an in vitro runoff assay. Point mutations within the previously identified TIF interaction region (between -20 and -47, motifs A and B) indicated that TIF interacts most strongly with a sequence centered at -29 and less tightly with sequences upstream and downstream. Some alterations of the base sequence closer to the transcription start site (and outside the TIF-protected site) also significantly decrease specific RNA synthesis in vitro. These were within the region which is protected from DNAse I digestion by polymerase I, but these mutations did not detectably affect the binding of polymerase to the promoter.

  4. Mecasermin rinfabate: insulin-like growth factor-I/insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, mecaserimin rinfibate, rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Insmed is developing mecasermin rinfabate, a recombinant complex of insulin-like growth factor-I (rhIGF-I) and binding protein-3 (rhIGFBP-3) [insulin-like growth factor-I/insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3, SomatoKine], for a number of metabolic and endocrine indications. In the human body, IGF-I circulates in the blood bound to a binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), which regulates the delivery of IGF-I to target tissues, and particular proteases clip them apart in response to stresses and release IGF-I as needed. IGF-I, a naturally occurring hormone, is necessary for normal growth and metabolism. For the treatment of IGF-I deficiency, it is desirable to administer IGF-I bound to IGFBP-3 to maintain the normal equilibrium of these proteins in the blood. Mecasermin rinfabate (rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3) mimics the effects of the natural protein complex in the bloodstream and would augment the natural supply of these linked compounds. The most advanced indication in development of mecasermin rinfabate is the treatment of severe growth disorders due to growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHIS), also called Laron syndrome. GHIS is a genetic condition in which patients do not produce adequate quantities of IGF because of a failure to respond to the growth hormone signal. This results in a slower growth rate and short stature. Mecasermin rinfabate also has potential as replacement therapy for IGF-I, which may become depleted in indications such as major surgery, organ damage/failure, traumatic injury, cachexia and severe burn trauma. It also has potential for the treatment of osteoporosis. Mecasermin rinfabate was developed by Celtrix using its proprietary recombinant protein production technology. Subsequently, Celtrix was acquired by Insmed Pharmaceuticals on 1 June 2000. Insmed and Avecia of the UK have signed an agreement for manufacturing mecasermin rinfabate and its components, rhIGF-1 and rhIGFBP-3. CGMP clinical production of mecasermin rinfabate

  5. Down-regulation of MicroRNAs 222/221 in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia with Deranged Core-Binding Factor Subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Brioschi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Core-binding factor leukemia (CBFL is a subgroup of acutemyeloid leukemia (AML characterized by genetic mutations involving the subunits of the core-binding factor (CBF. The leukemogenesis model for CBFL posits that one, or more, gene mutations inducing increased cell proliferation and/or inhibition of apoptosis cooperate with CBF mutations for leukemia development. One of the most commonmutations associated with CBF mutations involves the KIT receptor. A high expression of KIT is a hallmark of a high proportion of CBFL. Previous studies indicate that microRNA (MIR 222/221 targets the 3′ untranslated region of the KIT messenger RNA and our observation that AML1 can bind the MIR-222/221 promoter, we hypothesized that MIR-222/221 represents the link between CBF and KIT. Here, we show that MIR-222/221 expression is upregulated after myeloid differentiation of normal bone marrow AC133+ stem progenitor cells. CBFL blasts with either t(8;21 or inv(16 CBF rearrangements with high expression levels of KIT (CD117 display a significantly lower level of MIR-222/221 expression than non-CBFL blasts. Consistently, we found that the t(8;21 AML1-MTG8 fusion protein binds the MIR-222/221 promoter and induces transcriptional repression of a MIR-222/221-LUC reporter. Because of the highly conserved sequence homology, we demonstrated concomitant MIR-222/221 down-regulation and KIT up-regulation in the 32D/WT1 mouse cell model carrying the AML1-MTG16 fusion protein. This study provides the first hint that CBFL-associated fusion proteins may lead to up-regulation of the KIT receptor by down-regulating MIR-222/221, thus explaining the concomitant occurrence of CBF genetic rearrangements and overexpression of wild type or mutant KIT in AML.

  6. Interaction between TATA-Binding Protein (TBP and Multiprotein Bridging Factor-1 (MBF1 from the Filamentous Insect Pathogenic Fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Song

    Full Text Available TATA-binding protein (TBP is a ubiquitous component of eukaryotic transcription factors that acts to nucleate assembly and position pre-initiation complexes. Multiprotein bridging factor 1 (MBF1 is thought to interconnect TBP with gene specific transcriptional activators, modulating transcriptional networks in response to specific signal and developmental programs. The insect pathogen, Beauveria bassiana, is a cosmopolitan fungus found in most ecosystems where it acts as an important regulator of insect populations and can form intimate associations with certain plants. In order to gain a better understanding of the function of MBF1 in filamentous fungi, its interaction with TBP was demonstrated. The MBF1 and TBP homologs in B. bassiana were cloned and purified from a heterologous E. coli expression system. Whereas purified BbTBP was shown to be able to bind oligonucleotide sequences containing the TATA-motif (Kd ≈ 1.3 nM including sequences derived from the promoters of the B. bassiana chitinase and protease genes. In contrast, BbMBF1 was unable to bind to these same target sequences. However, the formation of a ternary complex between BbMBF1, BbTBP, and a TATA-containing target DNA sequence was seen in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA. These data indicate that BbMBF1 forms direct interactions with BbTBP, and that the complex is capable of binding to DNA sequences containing TATA-motifs, confirming that BbTBP can link BbMBF1 to target sequences as part of the RNA transcriptional machinery in fungi.

  7. Interaction between TATA-Binding Protein (TBP) and Multiprotein Bridging Factor-1 (MBF1) from the Filamentous Insect Pathogenic Fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chi; Ortiz-Urquiza, Almudena; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Jin-Xia; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2015-01-01

    TATA-binding protein (TBP) is a ubiquitous component of eukaryotic transcription factors that acts to nucleate assembly and position pre-initiation complexes. Multiprotein bridging factor 1 (MBF1) is thought to interconnect TBP with gene specific transcriptional activators, modulating transcriptional networks in response to specific signal and developmental programs. The insect pathogen, Beauveria bassiana, is a cosmopolitan fungus found in most ecosystems where it acts as an important regulator of insect populations and can form intimate associations with certain plants. In order to gain a better understanding of the function of MBF1 in filamentous fungi, its interaction with TBP was demonstrated. The MBF1 and TBP homologs in B. bassiana were cloned and purified from a heterologous E. coli expression system. Whereas purified BbTBP was shown to be able to bind oligonucleotide sequences containing the TATA-motif (Kd ≈ 1.3 nM) including sequences derived from the promoters of the B. bassiana chitinase and protease genes. In contrast, BbMBF1 was unable to bind to these same target sequences. However, the formation of a ternary complex between BbMBF1, BbTBP, and a TATA-containing target DNA sequence was seen in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). These data indicate that BbMBF1 forms direct interactions with BbTBP, and that the complex is capable of binding to DNA sequences containing TATA-motifs, confirming that BbTBP can link BbMBF1 to target sequences as part of the RNA transcriptional machinery in fungi.

  8. The SLC6A4 VNTR genotype determines transcription factor binding and epigenetic variation of this gene in response to cocaine in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliou, Sylvia A; Ali, Fahad R; Haddley, Kate; Cardoso, M Cristina; Bubb, Vivien J; Quinn, John P

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrated that the genotype of the variable number tandem repeats (VNTRs) in the linked polymorphic region (LPR) of the 5' promoter and in the intron 2 (Stin2) transcriptional regulatory domains of the serotonin transporter SLC6A4 gene determined its promoter interactions with transcription factors and co-activators in response to cocaine in the JAr cell line. The LPR variants contain 14 (short, s) or 16 (long, l) copies of a 22-23 bp repeat element, whereas the Stin2 VNTR exists as three variants containing 9, 10 or 12 copies of a 16-17 bp repeat. We observed a differential effect of cocaine on the association of the promoter with the transcription factor CTCF, which bound to both LPR alleles prior to cocaine exposure but only to the l-allele following exposure. Significantly, this differential effect of cocaine was correlated with the binding of the transcriptional regulator MeCP2 specifically to the s-allele and recruiting the histone deacetylase complex (HDAC). Concurrently, cocaine increased the association of positive histone marks over the SLC6A4 gene locus. At the Stin2 domain, we lost binding of the transcription factor YB-1, while CTCF remained bound. Our biochemical data are consistent with differential reporter gene activity directed by the individual or dual domains in response to cocaine in an Epstein-Barr virus-based episome model of stable transfections. These observations suggest that exposure of JAr cells to cocaine may result in differential binding of transcription factors and activators based on a specific genotype that might alter epigenetic parameters affecting gene expression after the initial challenge. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Defining the DNA Binding Site Recognized by the Fission Yeast Zn2Cys6Transcription Factor Pho7 and Its Role in Phosphate Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwer, Beate; Sanchez, Ana M; Garg, Angad; Chatterjee, Debashree; Shuman, Stewart

    2017-08-15

    Fission yeast phosphate homeostasis entails transcriptional induction of genes encoding phosphate-mobilizing proteins under conditions of phosphate starvation. Transcription factor Pho7, a member of the Zn 2 Cys 6 family of fungal transcription regulators, is the central player in the starvation response. The DNA binding sites in the promoters of phosphate-responsive genes have not been defined, nor have any structure-function relationships been established for the Pho7 protein. Here we narrow this knowledge gap by (i) delineating an autonomous DNA-binding domain (DBD) within Pho7 that includes the Zn 2 Cys 6 module, (ii) deploying recombinant Pho7 DBD in DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) to map the Pho7 recognition sites in the promoters of the phosphate-regulated pho1 and tgp1 genes to a 12-nucleotide sequence motif [5'-TCG(G/C)(A/T)xxTTxAA], (iii) independently identifying the same motif as a Pho7 recognition element via in silico analysis of available genome-wide ChIP-seq data, (iv) affirming that mutations in the two Pho7 recognition sites in the pho1 promoter efface pho1 expression in vivo , and (v) establishing that the zinc-binding cysteines and a pair of conserved arginines in the DBD are essential for Pho7 activity in vivo IMPORTANCE Fungi respond to phosphate starvation by inducing the transcription of a set of phosphate acquisition genes that comprise a phosphate regulon. Pho7, a member of the Zn 2 Cys 6 family of fungal transcription regulators, is the central player in the phosphate starvation response in fission yeast. The present study identifies a 12-nucleotide Pho7 DNA binding motif [5'-TCG(G/C)(A/T)xxTTxAA] in the promoters of phosphate-regulated genes, pinpoints DNA and protein features important for Pho7 binding to DNA, and correlates them with Pho7-dependent gene expression in vivo The results highlight distinctive properties of Pho7 vis-a-vis other fungal zinc binuclear cluster transcription factors as

  10. Preparation of cultured skin for transplantation using insulin-like growth factor I in conjunction with insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5, epidermal growth factor, and vitronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Rebecca A; Upton, Zee; Malda, Jos; Harkin, Damien G

    2006-06-27

    Cultured skin for transplantation is routinely prepared by growing patient keratinocytes in the presence of semidefined sources of growth factors including serum and feeder cells, but these materials require substantial risk remediation and can contribute to transplant rejection. We have therefore investigated the potential of a novel combination of recombinant and purified growth factors to replace serum and feeder cells in cultures of human keratinocytes suitable for clinical application. Our technique was investigated with respect to culture establishment, serial propagation, colony-forming efficiency, immunocytochemistry, epidermal reconstruction, and suitability to support transplantation by aerosolization. We demonstrate that insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I--used in conjunction with epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-5 and vitronectin--supports growth in the absence of serum. Moreover, a threefold greater number of cells are generated within 7 days compared to those grown under current best practice conditions using serum (P<0.05). The resulting test cultures are suitable for epidermal reconstruction and support the option for delivery in the form of an aerosolized cell suspension. Serial propagation, with the view to producing confluent sheets for extensive injuries, was achieved but with less consistency and this result correlated with a significant decline in colony-forming efficiency compared to controls. IGF-I used in conjunction with IGFBP-5, EGF, and vitronectin provides a superior alternative to serum for the rapid expansion and transplantation of cultured keratinocytes within the first week of treatment. Nevertheless, further optimization is required with respect to elimination of feeder cells and serial expansion of cultures for treatment of extensive injuries.

  11. The Arabidopsis GAGA-Binding Factor BASIC PENTACYSTEINE6 Recruits the POLYCOMB-REPRESSIVE COMPLEX1 Component LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 to GAGA DNA Motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Andreas; Brand, Luise H; Peter, Sébastien; Simoncello, Nathalie; Kilian, Joachim; Harter, Klaus; Gaudin, Valérie; Wanke, Dierk

    2015-07-01

    Polycomb-repressive complexes (PRCs) play key roles in development by repressing a large number of genes involved in various functions. Much, however, remains to be discovered about PRC-silencing mechanisms as well as their targeting to specific genomic regions. Besides other mechanisms, GAGA-binding factors in animals can guide PRC members in a sequence-specific manner to Polycomb-responsive DNA elements. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GAGA-motif binding factor protein basic pentacysteine6 (BPC6) interacts with like heterochromatin protein1 (LHP1), a PRC1 component, and associates with vernalization2 (VRN2), a PRC2 component, in vivo. By using a modified DNA-protein interaction enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, we could show that BPC6 was required and sufficient to recruit LHP1 to GAGA motif-containing DNA probes in vitro. We also found that LHP1 interacts with VRN2 and, therefore, can function as a possible scaffold between BPC6 and VRN2. The lhp1-4 bpc4 bpc6 triple mutant displayed a pleiotropic phenotype, extreme dwarfism and early flowering, which disclosed synergistic functions of LHP1 and group II plant BPC members. Transcriptome analyses supported this synergy and suggested a possible function in the concerted repression of homeotic genes, probably through histone H3 lysine-27 trimethylation. Hence, our findings suggest striking similarities between animal and plant GAGA-binding factors in the recruitment of PRC1 and PRC2 components to Polycomb-responsive DNA element-like GAGA motifs, which must have evolved through convergent evolution. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  12. SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1, CALMODULIN BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2, and other transcription factors are involved in ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Saito, Tatsunori; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the root apex is protected from aluminum (Al) rhizotoxicity by excretion of malate, an Al chelator, by ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 (AtALMT1). AtALMT1 expression is fundamentally regulated by the SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1 (STOP1) zinc finger protein, but other transcription factors have roles that enable Al-inducible expression with a broad dynamic range. In this study, we characterized multiple cis-elements in the AtALMT1 promoter that interact with transcription factors. In planta complementation assays of AtALMT1 driven by 5' truncated promoters of different lengths showed that the promoter region between -540 and 0 (the first ATG) restored the Al-sensitive phenotype of atalm1 and thus contains cis-elements essential for AtALMT1 expression for Al tolerance. Computation of overrepresented octamers showed that eight regions in this promoter region contained potential cis-elements involved in Al induction and STOP1 regulation. Mutation in a position around -297 from the first ATG completely inactivated AtALMT1 expression and Al response. In vitro binding assays showed that this region contained the STOP1 binding site, which accounted for the recognition by four zinc finger domains of the protein. Other positions were characterized as cis-elements that regulated expression by repressors and activators and a transcription factor that determines root tip expression of AtALMT1. From the consensus of known cis-elements, we identified CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2 to be an activator of AtALMT1 expression. Al-inducible expression of AtALMT1 changed transcription starting sites, which increased the abundance of transcripts with a shortened 5' untranslated region. The present analyses identified multiple mechanisms that regulate AtALMT1 expression. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Effects of tibolone and its metabolites on prolactin and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 expression in human endometrial stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzel, Elif; Buchwalder, Lynn; Basar, Murat; Kayisli, Umit; Ocak, Nehir; Bozkurt, Idil; Lockwood, Charles J; Schatz, Frederick

    2015-05-01

    The effects of the postmenopausal replacement steroid tibolone and its 3α-, 3β-OH and Δ-4 tibolone metabolites were evaluated on progesterone receptor-mediated classic decidualization markers insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) and prolactin expression in human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs). Supernatants of conditioned medium or erxtracted RNA from experimental cell incubations of confluent HESCs were subjected to ELISAs, Western blot analysis and RT/PCR, and results were statisically assesed. Over 21 days, specific ELISAs observed linear increases in secreted IGFBP-1 and prolactin levels elicited by tibolone and its metabolites. Cultured HESCs were refractory to E2 and dexamethasone, whereas tibolone and each metabolite exceeded medroxyprogesterone acetate in significantly elevating IGFBP-1 and prolactin output. Anti-progestins eliminated IGFBP-1 and prolactin induction by tibolone and its metabolites. Immunoblotting and RT/PCR confirmed ELISA results. These observations of IGFBP-1 and prolactin expression: (a) indicate the relevance of cultured HESCs in evaluating the chronic effects of tibolone administration to women; (b) are consistent with PR-mediated endometrial atrophy and protection against endometrial bleeding despite the persistence of circulating ER-binding, but not PR-binding metabolites following tibolone administration to women.

  14. Structure-function mapping of BbCRASP-1, the key complement factor H and FHL-1 binding protein of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Frank S; Kraiczy, Peter; Roversi, Pietro; Simon, Markus M; Brade, Volker; Jahraus, Oliver; Wallis, Russell; Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard; Lea, Susan M

    2006-05-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, a spirochaete transmitted to human hosts during feeding of infected Ixodes ticks, is the causative agent of Lyme disease, the most frequent vector-borne disease in Eurasia and North America. Sporadically Lyme disease develops into a chronic, multisystemic disorder. Serum-resistant B. burgdorferi strains bind complement factor H (FH) and FH-like protein 1 (FHL-1) on the spirochaete surface. This binding is dependent on the expression of proteins termed complement-regulator acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs). The atomic structure of BbCRASP-1, the key FHL-1/FH-binding protein of B. burgdorferi, has recently been determined. Our analysis indicates that its protein topology apparently evolved to provide a high affinity interaction site for FH/FHL-1 and leads to an atomic-level hypothesis for the functioning of BbCRASP-1. This work demonstrates that pathogens interact with complement regulators in ways that are distinct from the mechanisms used by the host and are thus obvious targets for drug design.

  15. PscanChIP: finding over-represented transcription factor-binding site motifs and their correlations in sequences from ChIP-Seq experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelli, Federico; Pesole, Graziano; Pavesi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing with next-generation technologies (ChIP-Seq) has become the de facto standard for building genome-wide maps of regions bound by a given transcription factor (TF). The regions identified, however, have to be further analyzed to determine the actual DNA-binding sites for the TF, as well as sites for other TFs belonging to the same TF complex or in general co-operating or interacting with it in transcription regulation. PscanChIP is a web server that, starting from a collection of genomic regions derived from a ChIP-Seq experiment, scans them using motif descriptors like JASPAR or TRANSFAC position-specific frequency matrices, or descriptors uploaded by users, and it evaluates both motif enrichment and positional bias within the regions according to different measures and criteria. PscanChIP can successfully identify not only the actual binding sites for the TF investigated by a ChIP-Seq experiment but also secondary motifs corresponding to other TFs that tend to bind the same regions, and, if present, precise positional correlations among their respective sites. The web interface is free for use, and there is no login requirement. It is available at http://www.beaconlab.it/pscan_chip_dev. PMID:23748563

  16. Isolation of an inhibitory insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein from bone cell-conditioned medium: A potential local regulator of IGF action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, S.; Bautista, C.M.; Wergedal, J.; Baylink, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Inhibitory insulin-like growth factor binding protein (In-IGF-BP) has been purified to homogeneity from medium conditioned by TE89 human osteosarcoma cells by two different methods using Sephadex G-100 gel filtration, FPLC Mono Q ion-exchange, HPLC C 4 reverse-phase, HPLC CN reverse-phase and affinity chromatographies. In-IGF-BP thus purified appeared to be homogeneous and unique by the following criteria. (i) N-terminal sequence analysis yielded a unique sequence (Asp-Glu-Ala-Ile-His-Cys-Pro-Pro-Glu-Ser-Glu-Ala-Lys-Leu-Ala). (ii) Amino acid composition of In-IGF-BP revealed marked differences with the amino acid compositions of other known PBs. (iii) In-IGF-BP exhibited a single band with molecular mass of 25 kDa under reducing conditions on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels. IGF-I and IGF-II but not insulin displaced the binding of 125 I-labeled IGF-I or 125 I-labeled IGF-II binding to In-IGF-BP. In-IGF-BP inhibited basal, IGF-stimulated bone cell proliferation and serum-stimulated bone cell proliferation. Forskolin increases synthesis of In-IGF-BP in TE85 human osteosarcoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Based on these findings, the authors conclude that In-IGF-BP is a protein that has a unique sequence and significant biological actions on bone cells

  17. The VP3 factor from viruses of Birnaviridae family suppresses RNA silencing by binding both long and small RNA duplexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Valli

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery.

  18. The VP3 factor from viruses of Birnaviridae family suppresses RNA silencing by binding both long and small RNA duplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, Adrian; Busnadiego, Idoia; Maliogka, Varvara; Ferrero, Diego; Castón, José R; Rodríguez, José Francisco; García, Juan Antonio

    2012-01-01

    RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery.

  19. Association of the yeast poly(A) tail binding protein with translation initiation factor eIF-4G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, S Z; Sachs, A B

    1996-12-16

    Although the cap structure and the poly(A) tail are on opposite ends of the mRNA molecule, previous work has suggested that they interact to enhance translation and inhibit mRNA degradation. Here we present biochemical data that show that the proteins bound to the mRNA cap (eIF-4F) and poly(A) tail (Pab1p) are physically associated in extracts from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Specifically, we find that Pab1p co-purifies and co-immunoprecipitates with the eIF-4G subunit of eIF-4F. The Pab1p binding site on the recombinant yeast eIF-4G protein Tif4632p was mapped to a 114-amino-acid region just proximal to its eIF-4E binding site. Pab1p only bound to this region when complexed to poly(A). These data support the model that the Pablp-poly(A) tail complex on mRNA can interact with the cap structure via eIF-4G.

  20. Endogenous biotin-binding proteins: an overlooked factor causing false positives in streptavidin-based protein detection

    Science.gov (United States)