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Sample records for intramedullary nail distal

  1. Intramedullary nailing in distal tibial fracture

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    Damian Arroquy

    2015-11-01

    Methods The inclusion criteria of this study were skeletally mature patients with displaced fractures of the distal tibia treated with intramedullary nail with a minimum follow up of one year. Gustilo III open fractures and type C fractures of the AO classification (complete articular Stroke were excluded. The sample comprised 35 patients remained. The follow-up was 29.2 months. We evaluated the time of consolidation, malunion and complications. The functional results were described according to the AOFAS score. Results Of the 35 patients with fracture of the distal third of the tibia all of them presented fracture healing. The average time to union was 17.2 weeks (range: 11-26. Of the total sample, 5 patients had delayed union, requiring dynamic nail on average at 12 weeks. The malunion was present in 4 (11.4% patients. We found no  difference (p = 0.201 in the time to union between fractures associated with fractures of the fibula treated (13sem or not (17sem. The AOFAS score was 86 points. Conclusion Intramedullary nailing with multiple distal locks like a good alternative treatment for distal tibia fractures AO type A or B, with low complication rate and a high rate of consolidation.

  2. Distal femoral complications following antegrade intramedullary nail placement

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    Amanda J. Fantry

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available While antegrade nailing for proximal and diaphyseal femur fractures is a commonly utilized fixation method with benefits including early mobilization and high rates of fracture union, both intraoperative and postoperative complications may occur. Intraoperative errors include leg length discrepancy, anterior cortical perforation, malreduction of the fracture, and neurovascular injury, and postoperative complications include nonunion, malunion, infection, and hardware failure. This case series reviews complications affecting the distal femur after intramedullary nailing including fracture surrounding a distal femoral interlocking screw (Case #1, nonunion after dynamization with nail penetration into the knee joint (Case #2, and anterior cortical perforation (Case #3. Prevention of intraoperative and postoperative complications surrounding intramedullary nailing requires careful study of the femoral anatomy and nail design specifications (radius of curvature, consideration of the necessity of distal interlocking screws, the need for close radiographic follow-up after nail placement with X-rays of the entire length of the nail, and awareness of possible nail penetration into the knee joint after dynamization.

  3. Setscrew distal locking for intramedullary nails: a biomechanical study.

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    Köse, N; Günal, I; Wang, X; Athanasiou, K A; Agrawal, C M; Mabrey, J D

    2000-08-01

    This biomechanical study was undertaken to examine the effectiveness of setscrew distal locking in a static intramedullary (IM) femoral nail on the stability of fixation of femoral shaft fractures. Fifteen fresh-frozen cadeveric femora were randomly separated into three groups of five bones and transversely sectioned immediately distal to the isthmus. After the insertion of the large-diameter nails, distal locking was obtained by conventional method in the first group. In the second group, set-screw design was used in which two transverse screws penetrated only the lateral cortex of the femur and compressed the nail in the intramedullary canal. No distal locking was used in the third group. All instrumented femurs were mounted on a servohydraulic testing machine and tested in both rotations (20 degrees) and axial compression (amplitude: 1,000 Newton). Loading-versus-displacement data, acquired at a ten-Hertz sampling rate, were calibrated and used to calculate maximum torque, stiffness, and energy capacity to failure. Maximum displacement and axial stiffness also were determined. Mean maximum torque at 10 degrees for each group were 15.3+/-4.8 newton-meters for the interlocking group, 8.5 +/-1.2 newton-meters for the setscrew group, and 3.6+/-2.7 newton-meters for the nonlocked femora. At 20 degrees of rotational displacement, the torque measured 37.4+/-2.6 newton-meters; 15.0+/-4.0 newton-meters; and 5.3+/-3.1 newton-meters, respectively (p 0.05). The setscrew design provided 87 percent of the torsional rigidity of the interlocking group. In the axial compression test, mean maximum shortening was 1.1+/-0.3 millimeters in the interlocking group and 1.4+/-0.6 millimeters in the setscrew group (p > 0.05). The mean stiffness on longitudinal compression provided by the interlocking screws and the setscrews was 918 and 860 newton-meters per millimeter, respectively. The distal setscrew design provides adequate distal fixation of intramedullary nail for patients in the

  4. [Retrograde intramedullary nailing for periprosthetic fractures of the distal femur].

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    Biber, R; Bail, H J

    2014-10-01

    Intramedullary stabilization of periprosthetic distal femoral fractures by interlocking nailing. Closed reduction by retrograde nail can be combined with the use of transmedullary support screws (TMS principle of Stedtfeld). Supracondylar fractures above stable knee arthroplasty (Rorabeck types I and II), femoral shaft fractures ipsilateral of stable hip and/or knee arthroplasty, contraindications for antegrade nailing Closed box design of femoral implant, intercondylar distance of the femoral component smaller than nail diameter, more than 40° flexion deficit of the knee, inability to place two bicortical distal interlocking screws. Relative contraindication: insufficient overlap with proximal implants Supine position and knee flexion of approximately 45°. Fluoroscopy should be possible between the knee and hip. Longitudinal skin incision into the pre-existing scar over the patellar tendon which is then split. The nail entry point is located in the intercondylar groove at the deepest point of Blumensaat's line, often predetermined by the femoral arthroplasty component. Reaming is rarely necessary. Transmedullary support screws may correct axial malalignment during nail insertion. Static interlocking in a direction from lateral to medial by the aiming device. Insertion of locking cap. Retrograde nailing normally allows full weight bearing. Range of motion does not need to be restricted. Out of 101 fractures treated between 2000 and 2013 with a Targon RF nail (Aesculap, Tuttlingen, Germany) 10 were periprosthetic, all were classified as Rorabeck type II and of these 6 fractures were metaphyseal and 4 were diaphyseal. In four cases proximal implants were present. The mean operative time for periprosthetic fracture fixation did not significantly differ from that for normal retrograde femoral nailing. There were no postoperative infections, fixation failures or delayed unions. There was one revision for secondary correction of maltorsion.

  5. Delayed pseudoaneurysm caused by distal locking screw of a femoral intramedullary nail: a case report.

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    Bose, Deepa; Hauptfleisch, Jennifer; McNally, Martin

    2006-09-01

    Interlocked intramedullary nailing is an accepted technique in the management of closed femoral shaft fractures. If this technique is used in patients who are skeletally immature, the position of locking screws relative to soft tissues can alter with time. We present a case of an 11-year-old male who developed a delayed pseudoaneurysm 4 years after intramedullary nailing that was most likely produced by movement of the distal locking screws of his femoral nail in relation to the surrounding vascular structures.

  6. Distal femoral fixation: a biomechanical comparison of retrograde nail, retrograde intramedullary nail, and prototype locking retrograde nail.

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    Heiney, Jake P; Battula, Suneel; O'Connor, Jill A; Ebraheim, Nabil; Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Vrabec, Gregory

    2012-08-01

    Distal femur fractures continue to be a complex surgical problem for which the incidence is increasing. Presently, there is a need for different constructs to address these complex fractures. This study attempts to define the biomechanical properties of several implants. A novel, prototype locking retrograde intramedullary nail and the Russell-Taylor femoral retrograde nail were tested at non-destructive, physiological, axial mode load strength using a young, synthetic bone model for a medial segmental shaft defect in the supracondylar region of the distal femur (medial gap of 10mm, 65mm proximal to the distal joint and parallel to the knee axis). Each specimen was compressively loaded and unloaded to the peak load for 80,000cycles at a 0.5Hz frequency. These were compared to the results from the same lab of the retrograde Trigen intramedullary nail. Motion and peak displacement were measured across the fracture site as a reflection of construct stability. Previous testing demonstrated that Trigen intramedullary nail had significantly less motion across the gap and increased overall stiffness of the construct (Pnails. Locking technology used in a nail biomechanically appears to lead to more micro-motion across the fracture gap and to less stiffness in this construct. Further research needs to be invested into intramedullary, locking technology before introducing it into clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Intramedullary nailing and plate osteosynthesis for fractures of the distal metaphyseal tibia and fibula.

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    Krishan, Ajay; Peshin, Chetan; Singh, Dara

    2009-12-01

    To assess the results of concurrent intramedullary nailing plus plate osteosynthesis for fractures of the distal tibia and fibula. 15 men and 10 women (mean age, 35 years) with concurrent fractures of the distal tibia and fibula underwent intramedullary nailing (for the tibia) and plate osteosynthesis (for the fibula). 17 fractures were type A1, 6 type A2, and 2 type A3. Compound type IIIB or more extensive fractures were excluded. The mean follow-up duration was 2 years. The mean time to bone union was 20 weeks. Six patients underwent dynamisation and 4 bone grafting. Two patients had malalignment (angulation of >5 degrees in any plane), but none was rotational. No patient had shortening, hardware breakdown, or deep-seated infection. Two patients had superficial cellulitis at the site of the distal locking screws. Concurrent intramedullary nailing and plate osteosynthesis for fractures of the distal tibia and fibula is effective in preventing malalignment. Plate osteosynthesis for the fibula provides additional stability even when a single distal locking bolt is used to fix the intramedullary nail to the tibia.

  8. Robotic distal locking of intramedullary nailing: Technical description and cadaveric testing.

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    Panzica, Martin; Suero, Eduardo M; Westphal, Ralf; Citak, Musa; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Hawi, Nael; Petri, Max; Krettek, Christian; Stuebig, Timo

    2017-12-01

    Interlocked intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for femoral shaft fractures. However, distal locking is a technically challenging part of the procedure that can result in distal femoral malrotation and high radiation exposure. We have tested a robotic procedure for robotic distal locking based on the computation of a drilling trajectory on two calibrated fluoroscopic images. Twenty distal holes were attempted in ten cadaveric femur specimens. Successful screw hole drilling was achieved at the first attempt in each of the ten specimens (20 drill holes in total). No failures were recorded. The average total number of images needed was 6.5 +/- 3.6. The average computation time was 16.5+/- 16.0 seconds. Robotic distal locking was feasible in this test and can be integrated into a fully robotic intramedullary nailing procedure. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Treatment of distal tibia metaphyseal fractures; plating versus intramedullary nailing: a systematic review of recent evidence.

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    Iqbal, H J; Pidikiti, P

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of distal tibia metaphyseal fractures is challenging. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the recent literature regarding management of extra-articular distal tibia fractures with a view to compare the outcome of intramedullary nailing with plate fixation. Advanced literature search was performed using Medline (Ovid), Embase (Ovid) and Cochrane databases. Data were extracted regarding number of participants, fracture fixation devices, percentage of open fractures, malunions, nonunions, wound infections and metal removal etc. After inclusion, exclusion criteria, two RCTs and four retrospective comparative studies were deemed suitable for this review. The overall results showed relatively higher rate of infection in plating group as compared to intramedullary nailing. However malalignment was more common with intramedullary nailing. Both techniques can provide adequate treatments in appropriately selected patients. None of the studies had sufficient power to show clinically significant difference. Further studies are required to compare new locking plates with intramedullary nails. Copyright © 2013 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pre-bent elastic stable intramedullary nail fixation for distal radial shaft fractures in children.

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    Ge, Yi-hua; Wang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Hai-qing; Yang, Jie; Xu, Yun-lan; Li, Yu-chan; Zhang, Yu-chen; Chen, Bo-chang

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the functional and radiographic outcomes of pre-bent elastic stable intramedullary nail in treatment of distal radial shaft fractures in children. From January 2006 to December 2008, 18 children with distal radial shaft fracture were treated by close reduction and internal fixation with a pre-bent elastic stable intramedullary nail. The age range was from 5 years to 15 years, with an average of 9 years and 8 months. The minimum follow-up was 12 months. All fractures maintained good alignment postoperatively, and 94.4% (17/18) of the patients regained a full range of rotation of the forearm. One patient has limitation of rotation to less than 10°, this had improved by final follow-up. Complications included soft tissue irritation at the site of nail insertion in one patient and transient scar hypersensitivity in another. Fixation with a pre-bent elastic stable intramedullary nail is an effective, safe and convenient method for treating distal radial shaft fractures in children. © 2010 Tianjin Hospital and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Fluoroscopic freehand and electromagnetic-guided targeting system for distal locking screws of humeral intramedullary nail.

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    Persiani, P; Gurzi, M; Moreschini, O; Di Giacomo, G; Villani, C

    2017-04-01

    The current techniques used to lock distal screws for the nailing of long bone fractures expose the surgeons, radiologists and patients to a hearty dose of ionizing radiation. The Sureshot™ Distal Targeting System is a new technique that, with the same results, allows for shorter surgery times and, consequently, less exposure to radiation. The study was performed on 59 patients (34 males and 25 females) with a simple humerus fracture diagnosis, type 1.2.A according to the AO classification, who were divided into two groups. Group 1 was treated with ante-grade intramedullary nailing with distal locking screws inserted with a freehand technique. Group 2 was treated with the intramedullary nail using the Sureshot™ Distal Targeting System. Two intra-operative time parameters were evaluated in both groups: the time needed for the positioning of the distal locking screws and the time of exposure to ionizing radiations during this procedure. Group 2 showed a lower average distal locking time compared to group 1 (645.48″ vs. 1023.57″) and also a lower average time of exposure to ionizing radiation than in group 1 (4.35″ vs. 28.96″). The Sureshot™ Distal Targeting System has proven to be equally effective when compared to the traditional techniques, with the added benefits of a significant reduction in both surgical time and risk factors related to the exposure to ionizing radiation for all the operating room staff and the patient.

  12. [Value of intramedullary locked nailing in distal fractures of the tibia].

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    Bonnevialle, P; Savorit, L; Combes, J M; Rongières, M; Bellumore, Y; Mansat, M

    1996-01-01

    This study is a retrospective analysis of 38 extra-articular distal tibial fractures treated by intramedullary locked nailing. 38 patients with a distal metaphyseal extra-articular fracture (43 A AO type) or with minimal ankle joint extension were managed. There was 26 men and 12 women with a mean age of 32.3 years, 10 fractures were open. The fractures were transverse or oblique in 13 cases, with torsional or flexion wedge in 12 cases and spiroïd in 13 cases. In only 2 cases was the fibula intact. AO classification was not useful because many fractures began more proximally than the limit described by Müller. All the fractures were fixed by closed locked intramedullary nailing : the nail was cut just after the distal hole and impacted close to the subchondral plate. In 7 cases the fibula was fixed too. There was no postoperative complication in 27 cases. Three patients had a transient nerve palsy (one tibial nerve and two common fibular nerve). In ten cases the nail was dynamized. One patient had a non union but healed with a new dynamic nail. Two patients had a delayed union and healed after dynamization and osteotomy of the fibula. The mean time to union was 5 months (2 to 8). 8 patients had a varus or a valgus deformity of 3 to 6 degrees. 11 patients suffered from anterior knee pain and in 5 patients the fracture site was painful. In 18 patients a CT scan was performed : 6 had a rotational deformity from 4 to 26 degrees, and 2 a tibial lengthening (discrepancy of 7 and 9 mm). Closed intramedullary nailing is a safe and effective method for the treatment of distal metaphyseal tibial fractures. The authors propose a new classification.

  13. Comparison of intramedullary nail and plate fixation in distal tibia diaphyseal fractures close to the mortise.

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    Yavuz, Umut; Sökücü, Sami; Demir, Bilal; Yıldırım, Timur; Ozcan, Cağrı; Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz Selim

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the functional and radiological results of intramedullary nailing and plate fixation techniques in the surgical treatment of distal tibia diaphyseal fractures close to the ankle joint. Between 2005 and 2011, 55 patients (32 males, 23 females; mean age 42 years; range 15 to 72 years) who were treated with intramedullary nailing (21 patients) or plate fixation (34 patients) due to distal tibia diaphyseal fracture were included in the study. The average follow-up period was 27.6 months (range, 12-82 months). The patients were evaluated with regard to nonunion, malunion, infection, and implant irritation. The AOFAS (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society) scale was used for the clinical evaluation. No statistically significant difference was found between the two surgical methods with respect to unification time, AOFAS score, accompanying fibula fracture, material irritation, and malunion. Nine patients had open fractures, and these patients were treated with plate fixation (p=0.100). Nonunion developed in three patients who were treated with plates. Infection occurred in one patient. Anterior knee pain was significantly higher in patients who were treated with intramedullary nails. There was no malunion in any patient. As the distal fragment is not long enough, plate fixation technique is usually preferred in the treatment of distal tibia diaphyseal fractures. In this study, we observed that if the surgical guidelines are followed carefully, intramedullary nailing is an appropriate technique in this kind of fracture. The malunion rates are not significantly increased, and it also has the advantages of being a minimally invasive surgery with fewer wound problems.

  14. Alignment After Intramedullary Nailing of Distal Tibia Fractures Without Fibula Fixation.

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    De Giacomo, Anthony F; Tornetta, Paul

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of intramedullary nailing of distal tibia fractures using modern techniques, without fibula fixation, in obtaining and maintaining alignment. Retrospective case review. Level-I academic trauma center. One hundred thirty-two consecutive patients with distal tibia fractures. Intramedullary nail of distal tibia fracture, without fibula fixation, was performed in consecutive patients using modern reduction techniques. Malalignment and malunion were defined as >5 degrees of varus/valgus angulation or anterior/posterior angulation on the initial postoperative or final anteroposterior and lateral x-rays. There were 122 consecutive patients (86 men and 36 women) 16-93 years of age (average, 43 years) with 36 (30%) open and 85 (70%) closed fractures with complete follow-up. Mechanism of injury did not predict the presence or level of fibula fracture. Upon presentation, varus/valgus and procurvatum/recurvatum angulation was greatest when the fibula was fractured at the level of the tibia fracture (P = 0.001 and 0.028). The most common intraoperative reduction aids were nailing in relative extension, transfixion external fixation, and clamps at the fracture site. The OTA fracture type or level/presence of fibula fracture did not influence malalignment (P = 0.86 and 0.66), malunion (P = 0.81 and 0.79), or the change in alignment during union, which averaged 0.9 degrees. We found an overall low rate of both malalignment (2%) and malunion (3%) after intramedullary nailing of distal tibial shaft fracture without fibula fixation. We conclude that when modern nailing techniques are used, which allow for confirmation of reduction by visualization in fluoroscopy, from nail placement to distal interlocking, fibula fixation is not necessary to obtain or maintain alignment. Furthermore, standard 2 medial to lateral screws distally afford adequate stability to hold the reduction during union with a 0.9-degree difference in the initial postoperative and final

  15. X-ray-based machine vision system for distal locking of intramedullary nails.

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    Juneho, F; Bouazza-Marouf, K; Kerr, D; Taylor, A J; Taylor, G J S

    2007-05-01

    In surgical procedures for femoral shaft fracture treatment, current techniques for locking the distal end of intramedullary nails, using two screws, rely heavily on the use of two-dimensional X-ray images to guide three-dimensional bone drilling processes. Therefore, a large number of X-ray images are required, as the surgeon uses his/her skills and experience to locate the distal hole axes on the intramedullary nail. The long-term effects of X-ray radiation and their relation to different types of cancer still remain uncertain. Therefore, there is a need to develop a surgical technique that can limit the use of X-rays during the distal locking procedure. A robotic-assisted orthopaedic surgery system has been developed at Loughborough University to assist orthopaedic surgeons by reducing the irradiation involved in such operations. The system simplifies the current approach as it uses only two near-orthogonal X-ray images to determine the drilling trajectory of the distal locking holes, thereby considerably reducing irradiation to both the surgeon and patient. Furthermore, the system uses robust machine vision features to reduce the surgeon's interaction with the system, thus reducing the overall operating time. Laboratory test results have shown that the proposed system is very robust in the presence of variable noise and contrast in the X-ray images.

  16. Hands-on robotic distal interlocking in intramedullary nail fixation of femoral shaft fractures.

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    Oszwald, Markus; Westphal, Ralf; Stier, Rebecca; Gaulke, Ralph; Calafi, Afshin; Müller, Christian W; Wahl, Friedrich; Krettek, Christian; Gösling, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Intramedullary nailing has become the gold standard in the treatment of femoral shaft fractures. This procedure involves the placement of distal interlocking bolts using the freehand technique. Accurate placement of distal interlocks can be a challenging task, especially in inexperienced hands. Misplacement of distal interlocking bolts can lead to iatrogenic fracture, instability of the bone-implant construct, or even malalignment of the extremity. Repeated drilling attempts increase radiation exposure and can cause additional bony and soft tissue trauma. We hypothesize that robot-guided placement of distal interlocks is more accurate, precise, and efficient than the freehand technique. A custom-designed drill guide was mounted onto the arm of an industrial robot. We developed a special device to secure a generic block (Synbone, Malans, Switzerland) into which an intramedullary nail could be inserted in a standardized way. A metric scale allowed later measurements of the drillings. Digital images were taken from each side of the block for analysis of the drilling trajectories. The fluoroscope was adjusted to obtain perfect circles of the distal interlocking holes. The number of images necessary to achieve this was recorded. The axis was recognized automatically by using the differences in contrast between the matrix of the generic bone and the implant (intramedullary nail). The drill trajectories were then computed. The robot with the mounted drill-guide automatically moved onto the calculated trajectory. The surgeon then executed the drilling. We performed 40 robot assisted drillings in generic blocks. Freehand drilling served as our control group. Analysis of the digital images revealed a mean deviation of 0.94 mm and 2.7° off the ideal trajectory using robotic assistance. In 100% of the cases (n = 40), the distal locking hole was hit. A mean of 8.8 images was acquired. After manual drilling, 92.5% of the distal interlocks were hit. A mean deviation of 3.66 mm

  17. Angle stable interlocking screws improve construct stability of intramedullary nailing of distal tibia fractures: a biomechanical study.

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    Horn, J; J, Horn; Linke, B; B, Linke; Höntzsch, D; D, Höntzsch; Gueorguiev, B; B, Gueorguiev; Schwieger, K; K, Schwieger

    2009-07-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for most displaced tibial shaft fractures. The ability to maintain a mechanically stable fixation becomes more difficult the further the fracture extends distally or proximally or when unreamed tibial nails are used. We assumed that a new angular stable locking option would provide improved stability and reduced interfragmentary movements in a distal tibia in vitro fracture model. Left and right bones of 8 pairs of human cadaveric tibiae were randomly assigned to either a group with conventional locked or a group with angular stable locked intramedullary nails. Nails of 10-mm-diameter were used after reaming up to 11 mm. A transverse distal osteotomy was performed and the specimens were tested mechanically under eccentric axial load. A video optical measurement system was used to determine the angular displacement of the osteotomy gap during loading. Construct stiffness, maximum load of the bone-nail construct and gap angle at 0.5 kN load were measured. The group with the angular stable locking option showed significantly higher stiffness values and reduced fracture gap motion compared to the group with conventional locked nails. A new angular stable locking option of intramedullary nails provides higher stability in terms of construct stiffness and reduced interfragmentary movements in a distal tibia in vitro fracture model.

  18. Optimal location of a single distal interlocking screw in intramedullary nailing of distal third femoral shaft fractures.

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    George, C J; Lindsey, R W; Noble, P C; Alexander, J W; Kamaric, E

    1998-05-01

    This biomechanical study was done to determine the effect of the level of a single distal screw in a static intramedullary (IM) femoral nail on the stability of fixation of a fracture in the distal third of the femur. Fifteen composite fiberglass femora were osteotomized transversely in the distal third of the femur. A Grosse-Kempf nail was implanted into the femurs, which were divided into three groups of five specimens. Single screw distal nail locking was varied distal to the osteotomy site for each group at 2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 centimeters, respectively. All instrumented femurs were mounted on a servohydraulic testing machine and fitted with transducers to measure axial, rotational, and bending displacements. Specimens were cyclically loaded (one hertz) in simultaneous torsion (moment: +/- 10 newton-meters) and axial compression (amplitude: 2,000 newtons) for 500 cycles with a 250-pound abductor force. Data from linear and rotational transducers were sampled at 100 hertz for five cycles before cycling, every 100 cycles of loading, and immediately after cycling. Custom computer software was developed to convert transducer signals into static and dynamic measurements of axial motion (in millimeters), rotation (in degrees), and angulation (in degrees). Osteotomy site dynamic rotation increased significantly in specimens locked at 7.5 centimeters when compared with the 2.5-centimeter group. There was minimal difference between the stability of the 5.0-centimeter and 7.5-centimeter groups. There was no significant change in position at the fracture site before or after cyclic loading with respect to axial shortening, rotation, or bending. Both dynamic axial and angular displacements were also unaffected by screw position. The location of a single distal interlocking screw in static IM nail fixation of distal third femur fractures can significantly affect rotational stability but not axial or angular fixation.

  19. A patient specific finite element simulation of intramedullary nailing to predict the displacement of the distal locking hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Javad; Farahmand, Farzam; Behzadipour, Saeed; Yeganeh, Ali; Aghighi, Mohammad

    2018-05-01

    Distal locking is a challenging subtask of intramedullary nailing fracture fixation due to the nail deformation that makes the proximally mounted targeting systems ineffective. A patient specific finite element model was developed, based on the QCT data of a cadaveric femur, to predict the position of the distal hole of the nail postoperatively. The mechanical interactions of femur and nail (of two sizes) during nail insertion was simulated using ABAQUS in two steps of dynamic pushing and static equilibrium, for the intact and distally fractured bone. Experiments were also performed on the same specimen to validate the simulation results. A good agreement was found between the model predictions and the experimental observations. There was a three-point contact pattern between the nail and medullary canal, only on the proximal fragment of the fractured bone. The nail deflection was much larger in the sagittal plane and increased for the larger diameter nail, as well as for more distally fractured or intact femur. The altered position of the distal hole was predicted by the model with an acceptable error (mean: 0.95; max: 1.5 mm, in different tests) to be used as the compensatory information for fine tuning of proximally mounted targeting systems. Copyright © 2018 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Flexible intramedullary nailing for distal femoral fractures in patients with myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Hanspeter; André, Guillaume; Rumeau, Francine; Journeau, Pierre; Haumont, Thierry; Lascombes, Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Distal femoral fractures are quite common in nonambulating patients with myopathies, as they present marked osteoporosis. The deterioration of preexisting knee flexion contracture is a known problem, as these fractures are usually angulated posteriorly. The goals of treatment are to reduce immobilization and bed rest to a minimum, prevent function loss, and prevent refracture. The aim of our work was to investigate if these goals can be achieved by an operative treatment with closed reduction and flexible intramedullary nailing (FIN). Six distal femoral fractures in four nonambulating patients with myopathies (three Duchenne muscular dystrophy and one nemaline myopathy) were treated with FIN between 2005 and 2011. Patient charts and radiographs were reviewed to determine if intra- or postoperative complications occurred and to detect the interval to wheelchair mobilization and hospital discharge. Pre- and postoperative knee flexion contracture was noted from the patient charts of our reeducation unit, where patients were already known preoperatively. Wheelchair mobilization without further immobilization after an interval of 2-3 days was possible. No aggravation of knee flexion contracture was detected in our patient series. No complications associated to the operative treatment itself and no refractures in the follow up occurred. Our experience showed that FIN is a low invasive and sufficiently stable osteosynthesis in such fractures. Left in place, nails will reinforce mechanical stability.

  1. Intramedullary nailing of proximal and distal one-third tibial shaft fractures with intraoperative two-pin external fixation.

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    Wysocki, Robert W; Kapotas, James S; Virkus, Walter W

    2009-04-01

    Fractures of the proximal and distal one thirds of the tibial shaft have historically higher malunion rates than those of the midshaft. This retrospective case series evaluates the postoperative radiographic outcome of intramedullary nailing of proximal and distal one-third tibial shaft fractures using intraoperative two-pin external fixation, often referred to as traveling traction. Between 2000 and 2005, 15 consecutive patients with proximal third and 27 consecutive patients with distal third displaced extra-articular fractures of the tibia were treated with statically locked intramedullary nailing and supplementary intraoperative two-pin rectangular frame external fixation. The external fixation was removed once the proximal and distal locking screws were in place. The alignment of the fractures was determined using standard postoperative anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. Postoperatively, 14 of 15 patients with proximal fractures and 25 of 27 patients with distal fractures had less than 5 degrees of angular deformity in both the coronal and sagittal planes and less than 1 cm shortening. Statically locked intramedullary nailing with simultaneous intraoperative traveling traction external fixation as treatment for proximal and distal one-third extra-articular tibial shaft fractures is successful in achieving a high rate of acceptable postoperative alignment.

  2. A comparative study of intramedullary interlocking nailing and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis in extra articular distal tibial fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Arup K Daolagupu; Ashwani Mudgal; Vikash Agarwala; Kaushik K Dutta

    2017-01-01

    Background: Extraarticular distal tibial fractures are among the most challenging fractures encountered by an orthopedician for treatment because of its subcutaneous location, poor blood supply and decreased muscular cover anteriorly, complications such as delayed union, nonunion, wound infection, and wound dehiscence are often seen as a great challenge to the surgeon. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) and intramedullary interlocking nail (IMLN) are two well-accepted and effectiv...

  3. Elastic stable intramedullary nailing for severely displaced distal tibial fractures in children

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    Shen, Kaiying; Cai, Haiqing; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Yunlan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) has became a well-accepted method of osteosynthesis of diaphyseal fractures in the skeletally immature patient for many advantages, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the preliminary results of this minimally invasive treatment for severely displaced distal tibial diaphyseal metaphyseal junction (DTDMJ) fractures. This study was carried out over a 6-year period. Twenty-one severely displaced DTDMJ fractures treated using ESIN were evaluated clinically and radiographically. Complications were assessed: the patients were evaluated with regard to nonunion, malunion, infection, growth arrest, leg length discrepancy, implant irritation, and joint function. Mean age at the time of surgery was 7.8 years (range between 5.3 and 14.8 years), mean body weight 34.1 kg, all fractures were transverse or mild oblique type, including 3 open fractures, 5 multifragmented fractures, and 4 fractures associated with polytrauma; 6 cases were treated with antegrade ESIN of tibia while 15 cases need combined retrograde fibula and antegrade tibia fixation treatments. Follow-ups were ranging from 11 to 36 months, 19 fractures showed both clinical and radiographic evidence of healing within 5 months; all cases had full range motion of knee and ankle with symmetrical foot progress angle. Nail removal was at a mean 7.1 months, at final follow-up, no growth arrest or disturbances occurred. Five patients had complications; leg length discrepancy had decreased yet affected 2 patients, 2 cases showed delayed union, and 1 case developed restricted dorsal extension at the metatarsophalangeal joint of the hallux. ESIN is the treatment of choice for pediatric severely displaced DTDMJ fractures that cannot be reduced by closed reduction or ones that cannot be casted. The advantages include faster fracture healing, excellent functional and cosmetic results, safe and reliable surgical technique, and lower severe complication rate. PMID

  4. Biomechanical performance of flexible intramedullary nails with end caps tested in distal segmental defects of pediatric femur models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpon, José Batista; Perina, Maurício Martins; Okubo, Rodrigo; Maranho, Daniel Augusto Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Unstable distal femoral fractures in children are challenging lesions with restricted surgical options for adequate stabilization. Elastic nails have become popular for treating femoral shaft fractures, yet they are still challenging for using in distal fractures. The aim of this study was to test whether end caps (CAP) inserted into the nail extremity improved the mechanical stabilization of a segmental defect at the distal femoral metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction created in an artificial pediatric bone model. Two 3.5-mm titanium elastic nails (TEN) were introduced intramedullary into pediatric femur models, and a 7.0-mm-thick segmental defect was created at the distal diaphyseal-metaphyseal junction. Nondestructive 4-point bending, axial-bending, and torsion tests were conducted. After this, the end caps were inserted into the external tips of the nails and then screwed into the bone cortex. The mechanical tests were repeated. Stiffness, displacement, and torque were analyzed using the Wilcoxon nonparametric test for paired samples. In the combined axial-bending tests, the TEN+CAP combination was 8.75% stiffer than nails alone (Ptorsion tests, the TEN+CAP was 14% stiffer than nails alone (Pbending test did not show differences between the methods (P=0.91, stiffness; P=0.51, displacement). Thus, the end caps contributed to an increase in the construct stability for torsion and axial-bending forces but not for 4-point bending forces. These findings indicate that end caps fitted to elastic nails may contribute to the stabilization of fractures that our model mimics (small distal fragment, bone comminution, and distal bone fragment loss). Type II [therapeutic study: lesser-quality randomized controlled trial (eg, <80% follow-up, no blinding, or improper randomization)].

  5. [Distal tibial fracture--an indication for osteosynthesis with the unreamed intramedullary nail?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D; Ostermann, P A; Ekkernkamp, A; Hahn, M P; Muhr, G

    1997-01-01

    In a prospective study, 50 fractures of the distal fifth of the tibia with additional involvement of the ankle joint in 18 patients were stabilized by unreamed nailing. In all, 90% of all fractures healed uneventfully without further surgical intervention after unreamed nailing, the highest ratio of complications (22%) being seen in all patients with distal fractures of the fibula without additional plating (of the fibula). Tibial fractures close to the ankle joint can be managed by unreamed nailing; distal fractures of the fibula should be additionally stabilized by fibular plating.

  6. Management of aseptic non-unions of the distal third of the tibial diaphysis using static interlocking intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begkas, Dimitrios; Katsenis, Dimitrios; Pastroudis, Alexandros

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the management of aseptic non-unions of the distal third of the tibial diaphysis, using static interlocking intramedullary nailing. Between January 2005 and November 2012, a total number of 42 patients who underwent surgery at our hospital for aseptic non-unions of the distal third of the tibial diaphysis, were included in our study. Preoperatively, all the patients were tested for the presence of infection of non-union. The post-operative follow up was based on clinical and radiological findings. Union was achieved in 41 (98%) patients, at a mean time of 5.8 months (four-eight months). One (2%) patient developed infection of the wound four weeks after the operation. A small decrease of the tibial length, of about one cm was seen in three (7%) patients. Pain of the patellar tendon, at the entry point of the nail, was observed in six (14%) patients, without impacting the range of motion of the knee. In two (5%) patients, a decrease in dorsiflexion of the ankle joint occurred, of about ten degrees angle. Static interlocking intramedullary nailing is the preferable technique in the management of aseptic non-unions of the distal third of the tibial diaphysis, because it provides high union rate and few postoperative complications. A good preoperative evaluation for infections, use of proper surgical technique with respect to soft tissues, use of autogenous bone grafts and early mobilization of patients, are the keys to success of this method.

  7. Intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrö, A; Lamppu, M; Böstman, O

    1995-01-01

    Sixty-four displaced tibial shaft fractures were treated using intramedullary nailing, either primarily or after an attempt at conservative treatment, which consisted of closed reduction under anaesthesia and immobilisation in a long-leg plaster cast. There were 37 closed and 27 open fractures. Three patients had a fracture of both tibiae. The median time period from the intramedullary nailing of the closed solitary fractures to union was about the same after primary nailing as after delayed nailing. Although the fractures were different in these groups, it is possible that the time spent in conservative treatment before intramedullary nailing brings no additional benefits. The incidence of deep infection in open fractures after primary nailing was 1/16. The fractures, in which an acceptable position could not be maintained using conservative methods, were mainly spiral in configuration and located in the distal third or at the junction of the middle and distal thirds of the tibia.

  8. The percutaneous use of a pointed reduction clamp during intramedullary nailing of distal third tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Jordanna M; Urruela, Adriana M; Egol, Kenneth A

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this retrospective chart and radiographic review is to describe an effective reduction technique during intramedullary nailing of distal metaphyseal tibia fractures with the use of a pointed percutaneous clamp. Between 2007 and 2010, 100 patients who sustained 102 tibia fractures were definitively treated with an intramedullary nail at one of two medical centers. Diaphyseal fractures and injuries with an associated disruption of the distal tibiofibular joint were excluded from our study. A total of 27 patients with 27 distal metaphyseal tibia fractures (OTA types 42-A, 43-A, and 43-B) were included. All 27 patients underwent IM nailing of their fractures with anatomic reduction achieved using a percutaneously placed pointed reduction clamp prior to insertion of the IM implant. Fracture alignment and angular deformity was assessed using goniometric measurement functions on the PACS system (GE, Waukeshau, WI) obtained from preoperative and postoperative anteroposterior and lateral images for all subjects. Malalignment was defined as more than 5 degrees of angulation in any plane. Fourteen of the fractures were classified as OTA 42-A, 9 were OTA 43-A, and 4 were OTA 43-B. Analysis of post-closed reduction, preoperative anteroposterior radiographs revealed a mean of 7.9 degrees of coronal plane (range: 0.9 degrees-26 degrees) angulation. Post closed reduction preoperative lateral radiographs revealed a mean of 6.8 degrees sagittal plane (range: 0 degrees-24.6 degrees) angulation. Postoperative anteroposterior and lateral radiographs showed the distal segment returned to its anatomical alignment with a mean angulation of 0.5 degrees (range, 0 degrees-3.5 degrees) and 0.7 degrees (range, 0 degrees-4.2 degrees) of varus/ valgus and apex anterior/posterior angulation, respectively. These results showed an acceptable postopertative alignment in all 27 distal third fractures. No intra-operative or postoperative complications were noted in the study group. This

  9. A comparative study of intramedullary interlocking nailing and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis in extra articular distal tibial fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daolagupu, Arup K; Mudgal, Ashwani; Agarwala, Vikash; Dutta, Kaushik K

    2017-01-01

    Extraarticular distal tibial fractures are among the most challenging fractures encountered by an orthopedician for treatment because of its subcutaneous location, poor blood supply and decreased muscular cover anteriorly, complications such as delayed union, nonunion, wound infection, and wound dehiscence are often seen as a great challenge to the surgeon. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) and intramedullary interlocking nail (IMLN) are two well-accepted and effective methods, but each has been historically related to complications. This study compares clinical and radiological outcome in extraarticular distal tibia fractures treated by intramedullary interlocking nail (IMLN) and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO). 42 patients included in this study, 21 underwent IMLN and 21 were treated with MIPO who met the inclusion criteria and operated between June 2014 and May 2015. Patients were followed up for clinical and radiological evaluation. In IMLN group, average union time was 18.26 weeks compared to 21.70 weeks in plating group which was significant ( P plating group. Lesser complications in terms of implant irritation, ankle stiffness, and infection, were seen in interlocking group as compared to plating group. Average functional outcome according to American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society score was measured which came out to be 96.67. IMLN group was associated with lesser duration of surgery, earlier weight bearing and union rate, lesser incidence of infection and implant irritation which makes it a preferable choice for fixation of extra-articular distal tibial fractures. However, larger randomized controlled trials are required for confirming the results.

  10. A prospective, randomised trial comparing closed intramedullary nailing with percutaneous plating in the treatment of distal metaphyseal fractures of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J J; Tang, N; Yang, H L; Tang, T S

    2010-07-01

    We compared the outcome of closed intramedullary nailing with minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis using a percutaneous locked compression plate in patients with a distal metaphyseal fracture in a prospective study. A total of 85 patients were randomised to operative stabilisation either by a closed intramedullary nail (44) or by minimally invasive osteosynthesis with a compression plate (41). Pre-operative variables included the patients' age and the side and pattern of the fracture. Peri-operative variables were the operating time and the radiation time. Postoperative variables were wound problems, the time to union of the fracture, the functional American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle surgery score and removal of hardware. We found no significant difference in the pre-operative variables or in the time to union in the two groups. However, the mean radiation time and operating time were significantly longer in the locked compression plate group (3.0 vs 2.12 minutes, p Foot and Ankle surgery scores, although the differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.234, p = 0.157, p = 0.897, p = 0.177 respectively). Three (6.8%) patients in the intramedullary nailing group and six (14.6%) in the locked compression plate group showed delayed wound healing, and 37 (84.1%) in the former group and 38 (92.7%) in the latter group expressed a wish to have the implant removed. We conclude that both closed intramedullary nailing and a percutaneous locked compression plate can be used safely to treat Orthopaedic Trauma Association type-43A distal metaphyseal fractures of the tibia. However, closed intramedullary nailing has the advantage of a shorter operating and radiation time and easier removal of the implant. We therefore prefer closed intramedullary nailing for patients with these fractures.

  11. Humeral Shaft Fracture: Intramedullary Nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Sanjit R; Saleh, Hesham; Fisher, Nina; Egol, Kenneth A

    2017-08-01

    This video demonstrates the technique of intramedullary nailing for a humeral shaft fracture. The patient is a 30-year-old man who sustained a gunshot wound to his right arm. The patient was indicated for humeral nailing given the comminuted nature of the diaphysis and to allow for minimal skin incisions. Other relative indications include soft-tissue compromise about the arm precluding a large surgical exposure. This video presents a case of a comminuted humeral shaft fracture treated with an intramedullary nail. Anatomic reduction and stable fixation was obtained with this technique. This case demonstrates a soft-tissue sparing technique of humeral shaft fixation using a humeral intramedullary nail. The technique is easy to perform and has significant benefits in minimizing surgical exposure, decreasing operative time, and decreasing blood loss. In the correct clinical setting, humeral nailing provides an expeditious form of fixation that restores length, alignment, and rotation of the fracture humeral diaphysis.

  12. A robust and accurate two-stage approach for automatic recovery of distal locking holes in computer-assisted intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guoyan; Zhang, Xuan; Haschtmann, Daniel; Gedet, Philippe; Dong, Xiao; Nolte, Lutz-Peter

    2008-02-01

    It has been recognized that one of the most difficult steps in intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures is the distal locking - the insertion of distal transverse interlocking screws, for which it is necessary to know the positions and orientations of the distal locking holes (DLHs) of the intramedullary nail (IMN). This paper presents a robust and accurate approach for solving this problem based on two calibrated and registered fluoroscopic images. The problem is formulated as a two-stage model-based optimal fitting process. The first stage, nail detection, automatically estimates the axis of the distal part of the IMN (DP-IMN) by iteratively fitting a cylindrical model to the images. The second stage, pose recovery, resolves the translations and the rotations of the DLHs around the estimated axis by iteratively fitting the geometrical models of the DLHs to the images. An iterative best matched projection point (IBMPP) algorithm is combined with random sample strategies to effectively and robustly solve the fitting problems in both stages. We designed and conducted comprehensive experiments to validate the robustness and the accuracy of the present approach. Our in vitro experiments show on average less than 14 s execution time on a Linux machine, a mean angular error of 0.48 degrees (std = 0.21 degrees ), and a mean translational error of 0.09 mm (std = 0.041 mm). We conclude that the present approach is fast, robust, and accurate for distal locking applications.

  13. [Locked plating with minimally invasive percutaneous plate osteosynthesis versus intramedullary nailing of distal extra-articular tibial fracture: a retrospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qi; Ni, Jie; Peng, Li-bin; Yu, Da-xin; Yuan, Xiao-ming

    2013-12-17

    To compare the efficacies of minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPPO) and interlocking intramedullary nailing (IMN) in the treatment of extra-articular fractures of distal tibia. Retrospective reviews were conducted for 126 patients with extra-articular distal tibia fractures. Treatment was either MIPPO (n = 61) or IMN (n = 65). The outcomes were assessed by comparing operating duration, time to union, the last follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score and complication rate. The average follow-up period was 23.7 (12-53) months. In the minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis group, there were deep infections (n = 2), superficial infections (n = 5), delayed union (n = 2), malunion (n = 2) and knee joint pain (n = 10) were observed. In addition, the average operating duration (85.9 ± 18.9 min), average time to union (17.3 ± 3.8 weeks) and average AOFAS (83.2 ± 11.9) were analyzed. In the interlocking intramedullary nailing group, there were delayed union (n = 3), malunion (n = 12) and knee joint pain (n = 22). And the average operating duration (83.3 ± 15.7 min), average time to union (16.5 ± 3.1 weeks) and average AOFAS (84.9 ± 12.0) were analyzed. No statistical significance existed in operating duration, time to union and the last follow-up AOFAS between two groups (P > 0.05). However, the rates of malformation and knee joint pain were higher in the intramedullary nail group than those in the plate group. And the difference was statistically significant (P = 0.015, P = 0.025). Both MIPPO and IMN are effective for extra-articular fractures of distal tibia. However, the former has the advantage of lowers rate of malformation and knee joint pain. Therefore a surgeon should consider the degree of injury while managing extra-articular fracture of distal tibia.

  14. Intramedullary nailing in segmental tibial fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, G C; Sotgiu, F; Lepori, M; Guido, P

    1981-10-01

    Thirty-eight consecutive segmental fractures of the tibia were treated by intramedullary nailing with the Küntscher-Herzog nail. Twenty-two fractures were closed and sixteen were open. Reaming of the medullary cavity was performed and adequate fixation was ensured by use of a plaster cast. Weight-bearing was allowed after thirty-days for closed fractures and sixty days for open fractures. All of the closed fractures healed without malunion or infection. Of the patients with open fractures, one had an infection; one, non-union; and one, malunion. In all cases but one, union was slower at the distal fracture.

  15. Reducing intraoperative duration and ionising radiation exposure during the insertion of distal locking screws of intramedullary nails: a small-scale study comparing the current fluoroscopic method against radiation-free, electromagnetic navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimwood, Darren; Harvey-Lloyd, Jane

    2016-12-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the standard surgical treatment for mid-diaphyseal fractures of long bones; however, it is also a high radiation dose procedure. Distal locking is regularly cited as a demanding element of the procedure, and there remains a reliance on X-ray fluoroscopy to locate the distal holes. A recently developed electromagnetic navigation (EMN) system allows radiation-free distal locking, with a virtual on-screen image. To compare operative duration, fluoroscopy time and radiation dose when using EMN over fluoroscopy, for the distal locking of intramedullary nails. Consecutive patients with mid-diaphyseal fractures of the tibia and femur, treatable with intramedullary nails, were prospectively enrolled during a 9-month period. The sample consisted of 29 individuals, 19 under fluoroscopic guidance and 10 utilising EMN. Participants were allocated depending on the type of intramedullary nail used and surgeon's preference. These were further divided into tibial and femoral subcategories, relative to the fracture site. EMN reduced fluoroscopy time by 49 (p = 0.038) and 28 s during tibial and femoral nailings, respectively. Radiation dose was reduced by 18 cGy/cm 2 (p = 0.046) during tibial and 181 cGy/cm 2 during femoral nailings when utilising EMN. Operative duration was 11 min slower during tibial nailings using EMN, but 38 min faster in respect of femoral nailings. This study has evidenced statistically significant reductions in both fluoroscopy time and radiation dose when using EMN for the distal locking of intramedullary nails. It is expected that overall operative duration would also decrease in line with similar studies, with increased usage and a larger sample.

  16. Outcome of displaced distal tibial metaphyseal fractures in children between 6 and 15 years of age treated by elastic stable intramedullary nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravino, Mattia; Canavese, Federico; De Rosa, Vincenzo; Marengo, Lorenza; Samba, Antoine; Rousset, Marie; Mansour Khamallah, Mounira; Andreacchio, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    From June 1995 to August 2012, 18 children were treated surgically using elastic stable intramedullary nails for displaced closed fractures of the distal metaphysis of the tibia. The patients were followed radiographically and clinically on a regular basis until union was clinically and radiographically achieved. Thirteen boys and five girls with a mean age at trauma of 11 ± 2.9 years (range 6-15) were included in the study. Radiographically, all fractures healed without evidence of delayed union, re-fracture, hardware migration. All patients were pain free at last follow-up and all regained full, normal activities including sports. IV.

  17. Effect on dynamic mechanical stability and interfragmentary movement of angle-stable locking of intramedullary nails in unstable distal tibia fractures: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueorguiev, Boyko; Wähnert, Dirk; Albrecht, Daniel; Ockert, Ben; Windolf, Markus; Schwieger, Karsten

    2011-02-01

    Unstable distal tibia fractures are challenging injuries that require surgery. Increasingly, intramedullary nails are being used. However, fracture site anatomy may cause distal-fragment stabilization and fixation problems and lead to malunion/nonunion. We studied the influence of angle-stable nail locking on fracture gap movement and other biomechanical parameters. Eight pairs of fresh human cadaver tibiae were used. The bone mineral density (BMD) was determined. All tibiae were nailed with a Synthes Expert tibial nail. Within each pair, one tibia was randomized to receive conventional locking screws; the other, angle-stable screws with sleeves. A 7-mm osteotomy was created 10 mm above the upper distal locking screw, to simulate an AO 42-A3 fracture. Biomechanical testing involved nondestructive mediolateral and anteroposterior pure bending, followed by cyclic combined axial and torsional loading to catastrophic failure. The neutral zone was determined. Fracture gap movement was monitored with 3-D motion tracking. The angle-stable locked constructs had a significantly smaller mediolateral neutral zone (mean: 0.04 degree; p=0.039) and significantly smaller fracture gap angulation (p=0.043). The number of cycles to failure did not differ significantly between the locking configurations. BMD was a significant covariate affecting the number of cycles to failure (p=0.008). However, over the first 20,000 cycles, there was no significant correlation in the angle-stable construct. Angle-stable locking of the Expert tibial nail was associated with a significant reduction in the mediolateral neutral zone and in fracture gap movement. Angle-stable fixation also reduced the influence of BMD over the first 20,000 cycles.

  18. Treatment of femoral shaft fractures with a titanium intramedullary nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gun-Il; Shin, Seong-Ryong

    2002-08-01

    Ninety-nine femoral shaft fractures were treated with locked intramedullary nails made from titanium alloy. One of the distal interlocking screws failed in six fractures (6%) and both screws failed in two fractures (2%). Delayed union was associated with all of the eight fractures that had locking screw failure. Young, heavier patients who had nails of small diameter had an increased risk of screw failure. Additional surgery was needed when both screws failed. The authors still use this nail, but currently prefer to ream the medullary canal more so that larger nails can be inserted. Decisions concerning weightbearing are made on an individual basis for each patient, and currently full weightbearing is delayed for young, active, and heavy patients. Two distal interlocking screws should be inserted for treatment of femoral shaft fracture when a Ti locked intramedullary nail is used.

  19. [Treatment of femoral shaft fractures with expandable intramedullary nail].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilli, Feridun; Mahiroğullari, Mahir; Pehlivan, Ozcan; Keklikçi, Kenan; Kuşkucu, Mesih; Kiral, Ahmet; Avşar, Serdar

    2009-07-01

    Femoral shaft fractures are usually seen in the young population as a result of high energy traumas and are often accompanied by major organ injuries. In this paper, we aimed to assess the clinical results of expandable femoral intramedullary nails in the treatment of 20 femoral shaft fractures. The average age was 34.7. One fracture was the result of a gunshot wound, type 3A open fracture, and the other 19 fractures were closed. Under fluoroscopic control, all patients underwent elective closed reduction and internal fixation with intramedullary expandable femoral nails (Fixion, Disc-O-Tech; Israel). In case of failed or unacceptable closed reduction, open reduction was achieved with a second incision over the fracture site. Average operation time was 26.3 minutes. Full union was achieved in all patients. The shortest union time was 12 weeks and the longest 24 weeks, with an average of 15.2 weeks. Results in 15 patients (75%) were excellent, in 4 patients (20%) good and in 1 patient (5%) moderate according to Thorensen criteria. Use of expandable nails provides union without major complications and offers advantages such as less exposure to radiation as seen in distal locking of classical intramedullary nails. In conclusion, the good results of this study show that the expandable femoral intramedullary nail provides a successful option to classical intramedullary nails.

  20. Metaphyseal Distal Tibia Fractures: A Cohort, Single-Surgeon Study Comparing Outcomes of Patients Treated With Minimally Invasive Plating Versus Intramedullary Nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcak, Eric; Collinge, Cory A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and functional outcomes of patients with distal tibia fractures treated with minimally invasive plating (MIPO) or intramedullary nailing (IMN). Cohort study. Level II regional trauma center. Overall, 86 patients with metaphyseal distal fractures (within 5 cm of joint) with simple or no articular involvement treated by a single, fellowship trained, orthopedic trauma surgeon from 2002 to 2013. Intramedullary nailing or minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis. Clinical and radiographic results were evaluated at a minimum of 1-year follow-up. Limb-specific outcomes (American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Surgeons' ankle-hindfoot instrument) and whole-person measures [Short Form 36 (SF-36) instrument] were assessed at the final follow-up. We studied 86 patients with distal tibia fractures treated with MIPO (43 patients) and IMN (43 patients). Thirty-seven patients in the MIPO group and 27 in the IMN group met inclusion criteria. All patients ultimately healed, with the average time to union of 23 weeks in both the groups. Complications were similar between the 2 groups (MIPO vs. IMN, respectively), including nonunion (8% vs. 7%), malalignment (3.6% vs. 3%), wound complications (3.6% vs. 3%), and infection (0% vs. 3.6%). The need for secondary procedures for the removal of implants was 25.9% in the IMN group (distal locking screws only in 6/7) versus 8.3% in the MIPO group (P = 0.05). Additionally, the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Surgeons and all SF-36 version 2 domain scores were quantitatively higher for the IMN group, although only Role Emotional reached a level of statistical superiority between the groups. Similar clinical results and marginally enhanced functional outcomes were seen when treating nonarticular or minimally articular metaphyseal distal tibia fractures with IMN compared with MIPO. However, patients treated with IMN required more frequent secondary surgeries for the removal of painful distal locking

  1. Outcome of Displaced Fractures of the Distal Metaphyseal-Diaphyseal Junction of the Humerus in Children Treated With Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marengo, Lorenza; Canavese, Federico; Cravino, Mattia; De Rosa, Vincenzo; Rousset, Marie; Samba, Antoine; Mansour, Mounira; Andreacchio, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of displaced distal humeral metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction fractures in children treated by elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN). During the study period, 14 consecutive children with fractures of the distal humeral metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction were surgically treated by ESIN. All patients underwent full-length preoperative and postoperative anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of the injured humerus. One year after the index surgery, patients were asked to answer the short version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand outcome questionnaire (Quick DASH). During the study period, fractures of the distal metaphyseal-diaphyseal humeral junction represented 1.5% (16/1100) of all humeral fractures. Fourteen patients underwent surgery and met the inclusion criteria. The male to female ratio was 1:1. The average patient age at the time of injury was 9.7 years (range, 3.6 to 13.7 y). The left and right sides were equally affected. The mean follow-up was 28.1 months (range, 20 to 38 mo).Radiologically, no secondary displacement, nail migration, loss of fixation, consolidation delay, nonunion, or refracture was noted. None of the patients showed signs of growth arrest on either radiologic or clinical assessment.All patients returned to their previous daily and sport activities without discomfort or difficulty, and they were free of pain at their last follow-up visits. The injured elbow range of motion was comparable with that of the contralateral side at the last follow-up visit in all patients. The mean Quick DASH score was 0.81 (range, 0 to 6.8). We recommend surgery for displaced fractures of the distal humeral metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction. ESIN results in stable reduction, good rotational control, and faster mobilization. Level IV.

  2. New Technique: A Novel Femoral Derotation Osteotomy for Malrotation following Intramedullary Nailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jagernauth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 19-year-old female patient sustained a closed spiral midshaft femoral fracture and subsequently underwent femoral intramedullary nail insertion. At followup she complained of difficulty in walking and was found to have a unilateral in-toeing gait. CT imaging revealed 30 degrees of internal rotation at the fracture site, which had healed. A circumferential osteotomy was performed distal to the united fracture site using a Gigli saw with the intramedullary femoral nail in situ. The static distal interlocking screws were removed and the malrotation was corrected. Two further static distal interlocking screws were inserted to secure the intramedullary nail in position. The osteotomy went on to union and her symptoms of pain, walking difficulty, and in-toeing resolved. Our paper is the first to describe a technique for derotation osteotomy following intramedullary malreduction that leaves the intramedullary nail in situ.

  3. Comprehensive global evolution of intramedullary nailing of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by infections, instability, metal electrolysis and fatigue failure all leading to disastrous results. He abandoned the procedure but predicted that intramedullary nailing .... micro-movements and intermittent compression during walking and muscular contractions because the nail only neutralizes twisting and flexion movements.

  4. Reoperation rates following intramedullary nailing versus external ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Open tibia fractures are among the most difficult to manage due to the lack of soft tissue coverage and poor blood supply. This is especially true in developing settings primarily due to a lack of resources. Both locked Intramedullary Nailing (IM) and External Fixation (EF) are two possible modalities for surgical ...

  5. reoperation rates following intramedullary nailing versus external

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3-5). In. Tanzania, controversy over the best treatment method for these fractures remain, as complication rates have been reported as high as 30% at referral trauma centers following surgical fixation (5,6). Intramedullary (IM) nailing or External ...

  6. Reamed intramedullary nailing of the femur: 551 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinsky, P R; McCarty, E; Shyr, Y; Johnson, K

    1999-03-01

    The care of the patient with the fractured femur entails a multiple surgical team approach. Healing of the fracture and expediency in the operating room are both important. We sought to determine the results of the treatment of fractures of the femoral shaft with interlocking femoral nails inserted with closed techniques, and to compare the outcomes of fractures nailed by using a fracture table with those stabilized with the leg draped free on a radiolucent table. Eight hundred eighty-two consecutive patients with fractures of the femoral shaft treated with a first-generation intramedullary nail at the authors' institution during the years 1986 to 1996 were identified. Five hundred fifty-one fractures in 515 patients met the inclusion criteria. Treatment with an intramedullary nail led to a union rate of 98.9%. There were six infections, all occurring in closed fractures. Thirty-eight percent of the fractures had hardware removed, most commonly because of pain. One nail and 13 locking bolts broke. Four hundred eighteen fractures had adequate radiographs available to assess fracture alignment. No fracture healed with more than 10 degrees of angulation in either plane. Forty-four fractures healed with more than 5 degrees of angulation. A distal third fracture was found to be associated with an increased incidence of malalignment. There were no differences in outcomes between fractures stabilized with or without a fracture table. Reamed intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures results in a low rate of nonunion, malunion, infection, and hardware failure. There is no difference in the outcomes of fractures treated with and without the use of a fracture table. This is particularly useful in the patient with multiple injuries for whom transfer to a fracture table may not be time effective.

  7. A comparative study of intramedullary interlocking nailing and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis in extra articular distal tibial fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arup K Daolagupu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: IMLN group was associated with lesser duration of surgery, earlier weight bearing and union rate, lesser incidence of infection and implant irritation which makes it a preferable choice for fixation of extra-articular distal tibial fractures. However, larger randomized controlled trials are required for confirming the results.

  8. Intramedullary nailing of the femur with an inflatable self-locking nail: comparison with locked nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Luciano; Lepore, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola

    2003-01-01

    We report a comparative study between an inflatable expandable nail and a traditional locked intramedullary implant in closed fractures of the femoral shaft. We matched each of 43 patients who had undergone intramedullary fixation with an inflatable expandable nail with a patient of the same sex, age (within 2 years), and fracture who had undergone statically locked intramedullary fixation with traditional nails. The mean duration of surgery was significantly shorter in the patients who were treated with the inflatable expandable nail. There were no differences in average blood loss, transfusion requirements, or hospitalization. Five of the patients who underwent traditional nailing required dynamization to achieve union. The inflatable expandable nail allows effective management of diaphyseal fractures of the femur. Interlocking is not necessary, operative times are reduced, and exposure to ionizing radiation is minimized. At present, however, the inflatable expandable nail used in the this investigation is markedly more expensive than traditional devices.

  9. Loss of bone strength after intramedullary nailing. Torsion tests of tibial osteotomies in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaartinen, E; Paavolainen, P; Holmström, T; Slätis, P

    1985-12-01

    Rigid intramedullary nailing was used in 75 rabbits to stabilize a transverse osteotomy of the midshaft of the tibia. In 36 additional rabbits intramedullary nailing was performed without osteotomy. No additional external immobilization was used postoperatively. After removal of the nail the mechanical strength of the tibiofibular bones was tested torsiometrically in 30 osteotomized and 18 non-osteotomized animals from 3 to 24 weeks after the operation. At 3 weeks the torsional load fractured all osteotomized bones through the osteotomy line. At later stages a spiral fracture occurred either crossing or close to the osteotomy area, usually distal to the tibiofibular junction. The increase in mechanical strength of the osteotomized bones reached a maximum at 6 weeks and then decreased. The strength of the non-osteotomized nailed bones also decreased slightly. The results suggest that rigid intramedullary nailing, although providing good conditions for early consolidation of experimental osteotomy, leads secondarily to deterioration of the mechanical properties of tubular bone.

  10. Expanding nail or expanding femur? An adverse event with the expandable intramedullary nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Soham; Riley, Nicholas D; Sivaji, Chellappan K

    2010-01-01

    The expandable intramedullary nail is self-locking and has the advantage of reducing operating time and exposure to ionizing radiation. The nail is recommended for simple diaphyseal fractures involving the middle third of long bones, where the nail can bypass the fracture site by at least 5 cm. We encountered a unique complication with the expandable nail in a simple transverse shaft fracture at the junction of the middle and distal third of the left femur in an otherwise healthy 57-year-old man. The fracture was reduced and a 12-mm expandable nail was inserted. Following full expansion, intraoperative radiographs were obtained prior to closure. After six postoperative weeks, it was noted that the nail expanded the femoral canal, converting a simple fracture to a distally progressing comminuted fracture with a butterfly fragment. A review of the intraoperative radiographs showed slight widening of the medullary canal at the level of the fracture. As the alignment was satisfactory and callus was present, no further surgical intervention was considered. The patient was advised not to bear weight and was provided with a locked knee brace in extension to wear for six weeks. Radiographs at 12 weeks demonstrated good progress of healing with adequate callus and the patient was permitted to bear weight as tolerated and commence knee flexion. The fracture united satisfactorily at four months. This adverse experience emphasizes that caution should be exercised when expanding the nail, with close observation of the medullary canal diameter during the later stages of expansion.

  11. Ankle fusion with a retrograde locked intramedullary nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Xu

    2012-06-01

    intramedullary nail, all the intramedullary nails were not retrieved at the end of follow-up. Nail breakage happened in one patient and no other breakage or backing out of the nail was found. Conclusions: Lower extremity compartment syndrome and residual ankle deformity often extremely impact ambulation and are hard to deal with because several patho-logic phenomena might exist in these patients, for instance, poor skin conditions due to repeated preexisting surgery; poor perfusion in distal limbs following blood vascular injury; reflux limitation and long-term limb swelling due to muscle strength disturbance; osteoporosis as a result of long-term immobilization or limb disuse. Ankle fusion with a retro-grade locked intramedullary nail is an optimal protocol to solve these clinical symptoms and rather ensures a definite fusion and firm fixation to these patients with simple ma-nipulation and few complications. Key words: Ankle; Compartment syndromes; Lower extremity; Bone nails

  12. Outcome of Interlocking Intramedullary Nailing in the Treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Fracture of the tibia is one of the commonest musculoskeletal injuries. The current practice is a locked intramedullary nailing of these fractures. This retrospective study aims to review the use of, and assess the clinical outcome of reamed locked antegrade intramedullary nailing of the tibia. Material and Methods: ...

  13. Open intramedullary nailing for segmental long bone fractures: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Closed, locked intramedullary nailing has been accepted as the gold standard in the care of femoral fractures, with reported union rates as high as 98–100%. Closed, locked intramedullary nailing often requires expensive equipment which is a challenge in developing countries. Segmental long bone fractures ...

  14. A novel intramedullary nail for micromotion stimulation of tibial fractures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dailey, Hannah L

    2011-09-20

    BACKGROUND: Animal studies and clinical trials have suggested that early application of controlled axial micromotion can accelerate healing of long bone fractures compared to rigid fixation. However, experimental investigations of micromotion constructs have been limited to external fixators, which have a higher incidence of complications than intramedullary nails. The purpose of this study was to assess whether a novel intramedullary nail design can generate stimulatory micromotion under minimal weight-bearing loads typical of the early healing period. METHODS: Eight cadaver tibiae were reamed, osteotomised, and implanted with commercially-available IM nails fitted with a custom insert that allowed 1mm of axial micromotion after proximal\\/distal interlocking. Specimens were mounted in a materials testing machine and subjected to cyclic axial loading while interfragmentary motion was measured using an extensometer. Implants were also tested in standard statically-locked mode. FINDINGS: The average force required to cause distraction of the fracture gap in micromotion mode was 37.0 (SD 21.7) N. The mean construct stiffness was 1046.8 (SD 193.6) N\\/mm in static locking mode and 512.4 (SD 99.6) N\\/mm in micromotion mode (significantly different, P<0.001). INTERPRETATION: These results support the development of a micromotion-enabled IM nail because the forces required to cause interfragmentary movements are very low, less than the weight of the hanging shank and foot. In contrast to rigid-fixation nails, which require significant weight-bearing to induce interfragmentary motion, the micromotion-enabled nail may allow movement in non-weight-bearing patients during the early healing period when the benefits of mechanical stimulation are most critical.

  15. Radiation-free Insertion of Distal Interlocking Screw in Tibial and Femur Nailing: A Simple Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Soni, Ritesh Kumar; Mehta, Surender Mohan; Awasthi, Bhanu; Singh, Janith Lal; Kumar, Amit; Thakur, Lokesh; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Distal interlocking screw insertion in intramedullary nailing of long-bone fracture is a challenging task for orthopedic surgeons. It is difficult particularly when the surgeon is in his learning stage or when image intensifier is not available. We describe a radiation-free technique of distal interlocking screw insertion which is easy and practicable. Materials and Methods: In this technique, a same length nail is placed over the skin (outer nail) and through its distal-most scre...

  16. Treatment of humeral shaft fractures with antegrade intramedullary locking nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsourvakas, Stefanos; Alexandropoulos, Christos; Papachristos, Ioannis; Tsakoumis, Grigorios; Ameridis, Nikolaos

    2011-12-01

    Antegrade interlocked humeral nailing for stabilization of humeral fractures was introduced many years ago, and studies on this method in the orthopedic literature have shown mixed results. The purpose of this investigation was to document the clinical outcome and complications associated with the use of an antegrade intramedullary nail (T2, Stryker) for the humeral fractures. Between 2005 and 2008, 52 fractures of the humeral shaft were treated operatively with this intramedullary nail in our department. Eight patients were polytraumatized, and four patients had an open fracture. The mean age of patients was 51.7 years. Forty-eight patients had an adequate duration of clinical follow-up (a mean of 18 months) for analysis. Complications were recorded, and the time to union was measured. Shoulder and elbow functions were assessed using the Constant Score and the Morrey Score, respectively. Forty-six fractures healed, with a mean time to clinical union of 10.3 weeks. Two patients developed pseudarthroses. There were four adverse events: two proximal screws backed out, one superficial infection at the insertion point, and one fracture at the distal end of the nail. Ninety-one percentage of patients had an excellent or good shoulder function. Five further operations were necessary: two for treatment of pseudarthroses, two for removal the backed out proximal screws, and one wound debridement for superficial infection. Antegrade humeral nailing is a valid therapeutic option for stabilization of humeral shaft fractures. By strictly adhering to the operation technique, the number and the severity of complications can be reduced. When good fracture alignment and stability are obtained, uneventful bone healing with good functional results is the rule.

  17. [Tibial intramedullary nailing without open drilling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuner, E H; Serif el-Nasr, M S; Münst, P; Staiger, M

    1993-10-01

    By means on the basis of a prospective study of 33 osteosynthesis with the unreamed tibia nail (UTN) the following conclusions were found: 1. A technical simple, intramedullary solid strength bearing device in only two diameters is available, therefore costs for stock keeping are low. Systematic interlocking of the nail is necessary. Regarding the multiplicity of indication as well as the mechanical character the UTN is close to the principle of the internal fixator. 2. As a result of its solid constitution remarkable hollow cavities do not exist, so that retention of hematoma or secretions is limited (prophylaxis of infection). 3. In case of a closed nailing procedure the less rigid fracture fixation is favourable for the biology of the bone healing (fracture hematoma, less traumatic procedure without reaming of the medullary cavity, etc.). 4. The frequently observed breakage of interlocking bolts leads spontaneously to a dynamisation favourable as to time and therefore to a better bone healing process (callus formation). 5. Time intervals of bony fractures consolidation are significantly shorter compared to the exclusive osteosynthesis with the external fixator [3]. 6. The unreamed tibia nail is an implant for both primary stabilisation of closed diaphyseal fractures of the tibia with soft tissue injury and for secondary procedure/treatment for example after external fixator osteosynthesis or initial non-operative treatment. Early change of procedure seems to be of importance.

  18. Interlocked intramedullary nailing for treatment of open femoral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, F; Baixauli, E J; Sánchez-Alepuz, E; Baixauli, F

    1998-05-01

    Twenty-eight patients with open femoral shaft fractures treated by reamed intramedullary nailing were reviewed retrospectively. Nine patients had Gustilo Grade I injuries; 14, Grade II; and five, Grade IIIA. Twenty cases had static locking, two cases had dynamic locking, and six cases were not locked. Average time to union was 20 weeks. The infection and nonunion rates were 0%. The data suggest that interlocked reamed intramedullary nailing is a safe treatment option for treating open femoral shaft fractures.

  19. "Push-past" reaming as a reduction aid with intramedullary nailing of metadiaphyseal and diaphyseal femoral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Joshua L; Munz, John W; Burgess, Andrew R

    2014-06-01

    Eccentric reaming of cortical bone near a fracture site can introduce malalignment when an intramedullary nail is placed. The authors describe a technique of reaming metadiaphyseal and diaphyseal femur fractures in which maintaining reduction at the fracture site is not necessary to obtain an excellent alignment of long bone fractures after intramedullary nailing. They have found that central reaming proximal and distal to, but not at, the fracture site allows for excellent reduction of long bone fractures when the intramedullary nail is passed. The reamer is stopped just before the fracture site and then "pushed" across the fracture prior to resumption of reaming. The authors present "push-past" reaming as a technical trick to facilitate reduction of femoral fractures treated with intramedullary nails and a consecutive series of 18 cases in which excellent postoperative alignment was achieved. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Safe surgical technique: intramedullary nail fixation of tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelle, Boris A; Boni, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Statically locked, reamed intramedullary nailing remains the standard treatment for displaced tibial shaft fractures. Establishing an appropriate starting point is a crucial part of the surgical procedure. Recently, suprapatellar nailing in the semi-extended position has been suggested as a safe and effective surgical technique. Numerous reduction techiques are available to achieve an anatomic fracture alignment and the treating surgeon should be familiar with these maneuvers. Open reduction techniques should be considered if anatomic fracture alignment cannot be achieved by closed means. Favorable union rates above 90 % can be achieved by both reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing. Despite favorable union rates, patients continue to have functional long-term impairments. In particular, anterior knee pain remains a common complaint following intramedullary tibial nailing. Malrotation remains a commonly reported complication after tibial nailing. The effect of postoperative tibial malalignment on the clinical and radiographic outcome requires further investigation.

  1. [Antegrade femoral intramedullary nailing in a lateral position].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederichs, J; von Rüden, C; Hierholzer, C; Bühren, V

    2015-04-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the gold standard for the treatment of femoral shaft fractures; however, rotational malalignment remains a common complication. The patient can be positioned on the fracture table in a supine position or alternatively in the lateral decubitus position without any traction. The aim of this article is to describe an effective method to control intraoperative torsion of the femur. The surgical technique described in this article is the standard procedure for femoral shaft fractures and subtrochanteric fractures in this level 1 trauma center. The patient is positioned in a lateral position on a radiolucent table with free draping of the injured leg. Using the C-arm, reduction can be performed with this technique with precise placing of the nails and torsion can be exactly adjusted and controlled with the aid of the femoral neck axis, the distal locking holes and both parallel femoral condyles. The described technique represents an effective method for the intraoperative control of femoral torsion. With an acceptable and most probably clinically irrelevant bias, this technique is able to avoid significant rotational malalignment. It does not prolong the operative procedure and does not require additional navigation settings. It has also been shown to be helpful in the treatment of subtrochanteric fractures. The surgical technique of anterograde intramedullary nailing using the lateral decubitus position without any traction device and free draping of the injured leg represents a safe and reliable treatment concept and offers logistical advantages compared to the supine position of the patient on a fracture table. Together with other described methods of intraoperative torsional control of femoral fractures, the radiological technique described in this study is an easily applicable and safe method, which needs to be confirmed in clinical studies.

  2. Complications during removal of stainless steel versus titanium nails used for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of the tibia

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Seyhan; Olcay Guler; Mahir Mahirogullari; Ferdi Donmez; Arel Gereli; Serhat Mutlu

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for fractures of the tibial shaft, which might necessitate the nail removal due to complications in the long-term. Although considered as a low-risk procedure, intramedullary nail removal is also associated with certain complications. Here, we compared the most commonly used stainless steel and titanium nails with respect to the complications during removal and clinical outcome for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of ...

  3. Complications during removal of stainless steel versus titanium nails used for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of the tibia

    OpenAIRE

    Seyhan, Mustafa; Guler, Olcay; Mahirogullari, Mahir; Donmez, Ferdi; Gereli, Arel; Mutlu, Serhat

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for fractures of the tibial shaft, which might necessitate the nail removal due to complications in the long-term. Although considered as a low-risk procedure, intramedullary nail removal is also associated with certain complications. Here, we compared the most commonly used stainless steel and titanium nails with respect to the complications during removal and clinical outcome for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of t...

  4. Flexible intramedullary nailing for femoral diaphyseal fractures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojan Tamrakar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Although various treatment options are available for the treatment of femoral diaphyesal fractures in children, the titanium flexible nailing has gained popularity because it is safe, easy procedure with rapid recovery and high success rate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of titanium elastic nails in treating paediatric femoral diaphyesal fractures at Patan Hospital.Materials & Methods: There were 35 cases which were all fixed with titanium flexible intramedullary nail under image intensifier at the Patan hospital from January 2013 and December 2015. Patients were evaluated in follow-ups to observe the alignment of fracture, infection, delayed union, nonunion, limb length discrepancy, implant failure, range of movement of hip and knee joints, and time to unite the fracture. The final results were evaluated using criteria of titanium elastic nail (TEN outcome score described by Flynn et al.Results: The mean age of the patients was 8.51 years. Among 35 patients (22 boys and 13 girls, there were 19 mid-shaft fractures, nine proximal third fractures and seven distal third fractures. Fracture patterns were transverse (22, oblique (10, spiral (2, and comminuted (2. The mean time for fracture union was 8.17 weeks radiologically whereas 9.83 weeks clinically. According to TEN outcome score, excellent and good results were in 28 cases (80% and seven cases (20% respectively.Conclusion: Flexible titanium nailing is a safe and satisfactory treatment for diaphyseal femoral fractures in children, because it provides rapid recovery, short rehabilitation and immobilization as well as very high union rate with few complications.

  5. [Retrograde locking nail osteosynthesis of distal femoral fractures with the distal femoral nail (DFN)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grass, R; Biewener, A; Rammelt, S; Zwipp, H

    2002-04-01

    Non-operative treatment with immobilization or isometric traction has been abandoned as treatment for fractures of the distal femur at the end of the 1960ies. The technique of open reduction and internal fixation with a condylar plate as suggested by the AO has been the golden standard since the 1970ies. However, anatomic reconstruction of the condylar region with interfragmentary screw fixation and axial realignment of the femur shaft with a plate are challenging procedures especially in the presence of severely compromised soft tissues and put periosteal blood supply at risk. Soft tissue complications, axial malalignment and delayed fracture healing times led to the consideration of alternative techniques, such as intramedullary nailing which has been practiced with success since the 1940ies by Gerhard Küntscher and colleagues for femoral shaft fractures with minimal complication rates and improved results after closed reduction. The era of retrograde femoral nailing began with the systematic approach through the intercondylar notch by Green. This paper reviews the biomechanical properties, indication, technique as well as potential hazards and pitfalls of fracture management with the AO "distal femoral nail" (DFN). With appropriate application this technique is suitable for all fractures of the distal third of the femoral shaft including highly instable bicondylar fractures without damage to the soft tissues and the knee joint.

  6. OUTCOME OF DISTAL TIBIA FRACTURE BY NAIL OR PLATE (MIPPO)- A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Madhuchandra R; Chandrashekhar Mudgal; Sandeep; Amol Shivaji Chavan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Distal tibial fracture often present a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. The best option for surgical management of distal tibial fracture is still unclear, whether nail or plate. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study consists of 24 patients of distal tibial fracture treated either with reamed intramedullary nails or locked plating/MIPPO with open reduction method or minimally-invasive techniques. RESULTS 24 patients included in the present study were divided i...

  7. Randomized trial of reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Tornetta, Paul; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Sanders, David; Walter, Stephen D.; Gregory Tennent Sanders, David W.; Macleod, Mark D.; Carey, Timothy; Leitch, Kellie; Bailey, Stuart; Gurr, Kevin; Konito, Ken; Bartha, Charlene; Low, Isolina; MacBean, Leila V.; Ramu, Mala; Reiber, Susan; Strapp, Ruth; Tieszer, Christina; Kreder, Hans J.; Stephen, David J. G.; Axelrod, Terry S.; Yee, Albert J. M.; Richards, Robin R.; Finkelstein, Joel; Ford, Michael; Gofton, Wade; Murnaghan, John; Schatztker, Joseph; Bulmer, Beverly; Conlan, Lisa; Laflamme, G. Yves; Berry, Gregory; Beaumont, Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Laflamme, Georges-Henri; Gagnon, Sylvain; Malo, Michel; Fernandes, Julio; Poirier, Marie-France; McKee, Michael D.; Waddell, James P.; Bogoch, Earl R.; Daniels, Timothy R.; McBroom, Robert R.; Vicente, Milena R.; Storey, Wendy; Wild, Lisa M.; McCormack, Robert; Perey, Bertrand; Goetz, Thomas J.; Pate, Graham; Penner, Murray J.; Panagiotopoulos, Kostas; Pirani, Shafique; Dommisse, Ian G.; Loomer, Richard L.; Stone, Trevor; Moon, Karyn; Zomar, Mauri; Webb, Lawrence X.; Teasdall, Robert D.; Birkedal, John Peter; Martin, David Franklin; Ruch, David S.; Kilgus, Douglas J.; Pollock, David C.; Harris, Mitchel Brion; Wiesler, Ethan Ron; Ward, William G.; Shilt, Jeffrey Scott; Koman, Andrew L.; Poehling, Gary G.; Kulp, Brenda; Creevy, William R.; Stein, Andrew B.; Bono, Christopher T.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Brown, T. Desmond; Pacicca, Donna; Sledge, John B.; Foster, Timothy E.; Voloshin, Ilva; Bolton, Jill; Carlisle, Hope; Shaughnessy, Lisa; Obremskey, William T.; LeCroy, C. Michael; Meinberg, Eric G.; Messer, Terry M.; Craig, William L.; Dirschl, Douglas R.; Caudle, Robert; Harris, Tim; Elhert, Kurt; Hage, William; Jones, Robert; Piedrahita, Luis; Schricker, Paul O.; Driver, Robin; Godwin, Jean; Kregor, Philip James; Tennent, Gregory; Truchan, Lisa M.; Sciadini, Marcus; Shuler, Franklin D.; Driver, Robin E.; Nading, Mary Alice; Neiderstadt, Jacky; Vap, Alexander R.; Vallier, Heather A.; Patterson, Brendan M.; Wilber, John H.; Wilber, Roger G.; Sontich, John K.; Moore, Timothy Alan; Brady, Drew; Cooperman, Daniel R.; Davis, John A.; Cureton, Beth Ann; Mandel, Scott; Orr, R. Douglas; Sadler, John T. S.; Hussain, Tousief; Rajaratnam, Krishan; Petrisor, Bradley; Drew, Brian; Bednar, Drew A.; Kwok, Desmond C. H.; Pettit, Shirley; Hancock, Jill; Sidorkewicz, Natalie; Cole, Peter A.; Smith, Joel J.; Brown, Gregory A.; Lange, Thomas A.; Stark, John G.; Levy, Bruce A.; Swiontkowski, Marc F.; Garaghty, Mary J.; Salzman, Joshua G.; Schutte, Carol A.; Tastad, Linda; Vang, Sandy; Seligson, David; Roberts, Craig S.; Malkani, Arthur L.; Sanders, Laura; Dyer, Carmen; Heinsen, Jessica; Smith, Langan; Madanagopal, Sudhakar; Frantz-Bush, Linda; Coupe, Kevin J.; Tucker, Jeffrey J.; Criswell, Allen R.; Buckle, Rosemary; Rechter, Alan Jeffrey; Sheth, Dhiren Shaskikant; Urquart, Brad; Trotscher, Thea; Anders, Mark J.; Kowalski, Joseph M.; Fineberg, Marc S.; Bone, Lawrence B.; Phillips, Matthew J.; Rohrbacher, Bernard; Stegemann, Philip; Mihalko, William M.; Buyea, Cathy; Augustine, Stephen J.; Jackson, William Thomas; Solis, Gregory; Ero, Sunday U.; Segina, Daniel N.; Berrey, Hudson B.; Agnew, Samuel G.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Campbell, Lakina C.; Derting, Lynn; McAdams, June; Goslings, J. Carel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Luitse, Jan; Kloen, Peter; Joosse, Pieter; Winkelhagen, Jasper; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Teague, David C.; Davey, Joseph; Sullivan, J. Andy; Ertl, William J. J.; Puckett, Timothy A.; Pasque, Charles B.; Tompkins, John F.; Gruel, Curtis R.; Kammerlocher, Paul; Lehman, Thomas P.; Puffinbarger, William R.; Carl, Kathy L.; Weber, Donald W.; Jomha, Nadr M.; Goplen, Gordon R.; Masson, Edward C. O.; Beaupre, Lauren A.; Greaves, Karen E.; Schaump, Lori N.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Goetz, David R.; Westberry, David E.; Broderick, J. Scott; Moon, Bryan S.; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Powell, James N.; Buckley, Richard E.; Elves, Leslie; Connolly, Stephen; Abraham, Edward P.; Steele, Trudy; Ellis, Thomas; Herzberg, Alex; Brown, George A.; Crawford, Dennis E.; Hart, Robert; Hayden, James; Orfaly, Robert M.; Vigland, Theodore; Vivekaraj, Maharani; Bundy, Gina L.; Miclau, Theodore; Matityahu, Amir; Coughlin, R. Richard; Kandemir, Utku; McClellan, R. Trigg; Lin, Cindy Hsin-Hua; Karges, David; Cramer, Kathryn; Watson, J. Tracy; Moed, Berton; Scott, Barbara; Beck, Dennis J.; Orth, Carolyn; Puskas, David; Clark, Russell; Jones, Jennifer; Egol, Kenneth A.; Paksima, Nader; France, Monet; Wai, Eugene K.; Johnson, Garth; Wilkinson, Ross; Gruszczynski, Adam T.; Vexler, Liisa

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There remains a compelling biological rationale for both reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing for the treatment of tibial shaft fractures. Previous small trials have left the evidence for either approach inconclusive. We compared reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing with

  8. Complex Tibial Fractures: Tips and Tricks for Intramedullary Nail Fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Githens

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramedullary nailing of metaphyseal and segmental tibia fractures can be technically challenging for a variety of reasons. Restoring length, alignment and rotation of the injured limb requires careful preoperative planning and meticulous attention to surgical technique, while avoiding common pitfalls. Understanding the deforming forces on the fracture segments and normal tibial osteology provides a background for recognizing the most common pitfalls when nailing these fractures. Many adjuncts for obtaining and maintaining fracture reduction while nailing have been described, including extended positioning, use of the femoral distractor, blocking screws, and provisional plating. We discuss these techniques as well as the role of intramedullary fixation for treating metaphyseal fractures with articular extension. The purpose of this paper is to describe the background and technique for a variety of operative tips and tricks to facilitate intramedullary nailing of metaphyseal and segmental tibia fractures.

  9. Static or dynamic intramedullary nailing of femur and tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omerovic, Djemil; Lazovic, Faruk; Hadzimehmedagic, Amel

    2015-04-01

    The basic principle of non-surgical fracture treatment is to restore the original anatomical position of fractured fragments by different techniques, without direct access to the bone and without further traumatizing of tissues. Intramedullary nailing is synthesis and consolidation of fracture fragments with the main goal to gain strength and permanent placement of the implants. Two techniques of intramedullary osteosynthesis are used: with dynamic or with static intramedullary nail. Dynamization include conversion of static nail by removing screws from the longest fragment. The aim of this study is to determine whether there is a difference in the speed and quality of healing of the type A and B fractures of the femur and tibia treated by static or dynamic intramedullary nails and to compare the results. The study was conducted at the Clinic for Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Clinical Center University Sarajevo from January 2004 to June 2009. The study was retrospective-prospective, manipulative, controlled and it was conducted on a total of 129 patients with closed fractures of the diaphysis of the femur and tibia type A and type B, with different segments of bone, regardless of sex and age structure, with the exception of children under 14 years of age. Precisely there were 47 patients with femoral fractures and 82 patients with tibial fractures. The average number of weeks of healing femoral and tibial fractures was slightly in advantage of static intramedullary osteosynthesis, it was 17.08 weeks (SD=3.382). The average number of weeks of healing in 23 patients with fractures of the femur, treated by dynamic intramedullary osteosynthesis was 17.83 (SD=2.978). We can conclude that static intramedullary nailing osteosynthesis unable movements between fragments which directly stimulates bone formation and formation of minimal callus. Static intramedullary osteosynthesis resolve the problem of stabilizing the fracture, limb shortening and rotation of fragments.

  10. [Electromagnetic navigation interlocking intramedullary nail technology for treatment of femoral shaft fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Kangkang; Qin, Wei; Guo, Qing; Palati-Ababaikeli; Qiao, Peiliu; Shen, Mingquan; Yin, Lele; Pan, Qilin; Xu, Xiaoxiong

    2014-10-01

    To explore the value of electromagnetic navigation interlocking intramedullary nail in the treatment of femoral shaft fracture. Between July 2012 and October 2013, 53 cases of femoral shaft fracture were treated. There were 40 males and 13 females, aged 16-52 years (mean, 38.3 years). The causes of injury were traffic accident in 28 cases, falling from height in 11 cases, falling in 7 cases, crush injury in 4 cases, and other in 3 cases. Of 53 cases, there were 3 cases of open fracture (Gustilo I degree) and 50 cases of closed fracture. Fracture was located in the proximal femur in 17 cases, middle femur in 29 cases, and distal femur in 7 cases. According to Winquist classification, 7 cases were rated as type I, 8 cases as type II, 22 cases as type III, and 16 cases as type IV; according to AO classification, 18 cases were rated as type 32-A, 28 cases as type 32-B, and 7 cases as type 32-C. The time from injury to operation was 3-11 days (mean, 5 days). Distal interlocking intramedullary nail was implanted using electromagnetic navigation. The distal locking nail operation with interlocking intramedullary nail was successfully completed under electromagnetic navigation; the one-time success rate of distal locking nail operation reached 100%; and the locking nail time was 5.0-9.5 minutes (mean, 7.0 minutes). Healing of incision by first intention was obtained after operation, and no complication of skin necrosis, infection, and sinus tract occurred. Fifty-three cases were all followed up 5-12 months (mean, 9 months). One case had hip pain and weaken middle gluteal muscle strength, and the symptoms disappeared after removing the nail. During the follow-up period, no broken nails, nail exit, infection, or re-fracture occurred. All fractures achieved clinical healing, and the healing time was 8-22 weeks (mean, 14.5 weeks). In 49 patients followed up 8 months, the Lysholm score was excellent in 44 cases, good in 4 cases, and acceptable in 1 case, with an excellent and

  11. [Angle-stable fixation of intramedullary nails using the Angular Stable Locking System® (ASLS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höntzsch, D; Blauth, M; Attal, R

    2011-12-01

    Greater stability in intramedullary osteosynthesis using angle-stable fixation with intramedullary nails and proximal locking screws. A novel screw-and-sleeve system (ASLS®, Synthes GmbH, Oberdorf, Switzerland) is applied using normal cannulated nails. Decisions can be made intraoperatively. This technology widens the range of indications for intramedullary nailing: The smaller and less stable the fragment requiring fixation, the greater the indication for angular stable fixation of the proximal and/or distal fragment. Femoral, tibial and humeral fractures, intramedullary osteosynthesis in osteoporotic bone and ante- and retrograde nailing. Particularly in the case of retrograde nailing, sustained prevention of nail toggling is achieved. None. Drill with the first drill bit, which has the same core diameter as the screw shaft. Drill the cortex to the external diameter of the sleeve. Place the sleeve on the tip of the screw. The screw-sleeve combination is then advanced through the larger near hole until the sleeve-covered screw tip sits in the locking hole of the intramedullary fixation nail. Advance the screw. As the screw diameter becomes larger, the sleeve expands resulting in an angular stable locking effect. The screw is then advanced until the head of the screw sits on the exposed surface of the cortex. The hole is filled with the expanded part of the screw shaft beneath the screw head. The necessary 1-3 turns are cut by the self-tapping flute on the screw. According to experience to date, this form of angle-stable fixation enables earlier and/or greater partial mobilization or earlier full mobilization. In all other respects, the guidelines for aftercare in intramedullary nailing apply. A multi-center pilot study has shown the technique to be reproducible and simple. There have been no complications using this technique to date. Biomechanical laboratory studies have demonstrated that stability with respect to axial and torsional loading is statically and

  12. [Elastic intramedullary nailing of the tibia with the Marchetti-Vicenzi nail. 43 treated cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmansour, M B; Gottin, M; Rouvillain, J L; Larosa, G; Dib, C; Dintimille, H; Catonné, Y

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the results of tibial intramedullary nailing using an unreamed "Universal Elastic Bundle Nail". Forty-three intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft were done in 43 patients with recents fractures, from May 1993 and May 1996. There were 36 males and 7 females. The average age was 31.5 years (range 17-68 years). Thirty-three were injured in a traffic accident (20 motorcycles, 5 pedestrians and 8 car passengers), seven were injured in a home accident (fall) and three had a sport injury. There were 13 open fractures according to Gustilo: 5 grade I, 7 grade II and one grade III B. Eight fractures involved the proximal metaphyseal part of the tibia, 16 the distal metaphyseal part and 14 the tibial shaft; in five cases there were segmental fractures. According to AO classification there were: 10 fractures type A, 24 fractures type B and 9 fractures type C (5 segmental fractures). In 5 cases there were associated femoral fractures: three ipsilaterals and two controlaterals. All were treated in the same time: four by UEBN device and one by AO's nail. All the patients with type B and C fractures were positioned on a Maquet table with a boot traction or transcalcaneal pin traction (in the distal fractures). The nail was introduced after closed reduction through a vertical transpatellar tendon incision, without reaming procedure. Forty one fractures healed after an average time of 96 days (60-120). In 11 open fractures bone union occurred after 98 days (85-120). The distal fractures healed after a mean time of 86 days (60-120), proximal fractures in 123 days and mid shaft fractures in 98 days. In type A fractures bone union occurred after an average time of 68 days, while bone union occurred after a mean time of 100 days in type B and C fractures. Two patients with an open proximal type B fracture, had a delayed union: both healed after proximal screws removal. Two fractures healed with a valgus angulaton 5 degrees and 10 degrees. No

  13. Nonreamed locking intramedullary nailing for open fractures of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatus, T; Olson, S A; Lee, S; Chapman, M W

    1997-06-01

    The use of nonreamed interlocking tibial nails in the management of open fractures of the tibial shaft has gained wide acceptance. This technique has been reported to have reproducible good results with a low incidence of complications in Type I, Type II, and Type IIIA open tibial shaft fractures. The use of nonreamed nails in Type IIIB fractures continues to be a source of controversy. The treatment of 72 open fractures of the tibial shaft with nonreamed interlocking intramedullary nailing is detailed. There were 27 Type I, 22 Type II, 11 Type IIIA, and 12 Type IIIB open tibial shaft fractures. There were three (4.2%) deep infections; one Type II, one Type IIIA, and one Type IIIB. Forty-nine fractures (68%) united by 6 months, all fractures had united by 12 months. The use of nonreamed locking intramedullary nailing in Types I, II, IIIA, and IIIB open fractures of the tibial shaft is supported.

  14. Diaphyseal humeral fractures and intramedullary nailing: Can we improve outcomes?

    OpenAIRE

    Christos Garnavos

    2011-01-01

    While intramedullary nailing has been established as the treatment of choice for diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia, its role in the management of diaphyseal humeral fractures remains controversial. The reasons include not only the complicated anatomy and unique biomechanical characteristics of the arm but also the fact that surgical technique and nail designs devised for the treatment of femoral and tibial fractures are being transposed to the humerus. As a result there is no consen...

  15. Safe surgical technique: intramedullary nail fixation of tibial shaft fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Zelle, Boris A.; Boni, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Statically locked, reamed intramedullary nailing remains the standard treatment for displaced tibial shaft fractures. Establishing an appropriate starting point is a crucial part of the surgical procedure. Recently, suprapatellar nailing in the semi-extended position has been suggested as a safe and effective surgical technique. Numerous reduction techiques are available to achieve an anatomic fracture alignment and the treating surgeon should be familiar with these maneuvers. Open reduction ...

  16. Diaphyseal humeral fractures and intramedullary nailing: Can we improve outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnavos, Christos

    2011-01-01

    While intramedullary nailing has been established as the treatment of choice for diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia, its role in the management of diaphyseal humeral fractures remains controversial. The reasons include not only the complicated anatomy and unique biomechanical characteristics of the arm but also the fact that surgical technique and nail designs devised for the treatment of femoral and tibial fractures are being transposed to the humerus. As a result there is no consensus on many aspects of the humeral nailing procedure, e.g., the basic nail design, nail selection criteria, timing of the procedure, and the fundamental principles of the surgical technique (e.g., antegrade/retrograde, reamed/unreamed, and static/dynamic). These issues will be analyzed and discussed in the present article. Proposals aiming to improve outcomes include the categorization of humeral nails in two distinct groups: “fixed” and “bio”, avoidance of reaming for the antegrade technique and utilization of “semi-reaming” for the retrograde technique, guidelines for reducing complications, setting the best “timing” for nailing and criteria for selecting the most appropriate surgical technique (antegrade or retrograde). Finally, suggestions are made on proper planning and conducting clinical and biomechanical studies regarding the use of intramedullary nailing in the management of humeral shaft fractures. PMID:21559099

  17. Diaphyseal humeral fractures and intramedullary nailing: Can we improve outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnavos, Christos

    2011-05-01

    While intramedullary nailing has been established as the treatment of choice for diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia, its role in the management of diaphyseal humeral fractures remains controversial. The reasons include not only the complicated anatomy and unique biomechanical characteristics of the arm but also the fact that surgical technique and nail designs devised for the treatment of femoral and tibial fractures are being transposed to the humerus. As a result there is no consensus on many aspects of the humeral nailing procedure, e.g., the basic nail design, nail selection criteria, timing of the procedure, and the fundamental principles of the surgical technique (e.g., antegrade/retrograde, reamed/unreamed, and static/dynamic). These issues will be analyzed and discussed in the present article. Proposals aiming to improve outcomes include the categorization of humeral nails in two distinct groups: "fixed" and "bio", avoidance of reaming for the antegrade technique and utilization of "semi-reaming" for the retrograde technique, guidelines for reducing complications, setting the best "timing" for nailing and criteria for selecting the most appropriate surgical technique (antegrade or retrograde). Finally, suggestions are made on proper planning and conducting clinical and biomechanical studies regarding the use of intramedullary nailing in the management of humeral shaft fractures.

  18. Diaphyseal humeral fractures and intramedullary nailing: Can we improve outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Garnavos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While intramedullary nailing has been established as the treatment of choice for diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia, its role in the management of diaphyseal humeral fractures remains controversial. The reasons include not only the complicated anatomy and unique biomechanical characteristics of the arm but also the fact that surgical technique and nail designs devised for the treatment of femoral and tibial fractures are being transposed to the humerus. As a result there is no consensus on many aspects of the humeral nailing procedure, e.g., the basic nail design, nail selection criteria, timing of the procedure, and the fundamental principles of the surgical technique (e.g., antegrade/retrograde, reamed/unreamed, and static/dynamic. These issues will be analyzed and discussed in the present article. Proposals aiming to improve outcomes include the categorization of humeral nails in two distinct groups: "fixed" and "bio", avoidance of reaming for the antegrade technique and utilization of "semi-reaming" for the retrograde technique, guidelines for reducing complications, setting the best "timing" for nailing and criteria for selecting the most appropriate surgical technique (antegrade or retrograde. Finally, suggestions are made on proper planning and conducting clinical and biomechanical studies regarding the use of intramedullary nailing in the management of humeral shaft fractures.

  19. ediatric femoral shaft fractures treated by flexible intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapil Mani, K C; Dirgha Raj, R C; Parimal, Acharya

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays pediatric femoral fractures are more commonly managed with operative treatment rather than conservative treatment because of more rapid recovery and avoidance of prolonged immobilization. Children between the ages of 5-13 years are treated either by traction plus hip spica and flexible/elastic stable retrograde intramedullary nail, or external fixators in the case of open fractures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcome of pediatric femoral shaft fractures treated by stainless steel flexible intramedullary nail in children between 5 and 13 years of age. There were 32 cases of femoral shaft fractures which were all fixed with stainless steel flexible intramedullary nail under fluoroscopy. Long leg cast was applied at the time of fixation. Partial weight bearing was started 2 weeks after surgery. Patients were evaluated in follow-up study to observe the alignment of fracture, infection, delayed union, nonunion, limb length discrepancy, motion of knee joint, and time to unite the fracture. We were able to follow up 28 out of 32 patients. The patients were 8.14 years of age on average. The mean hospital stay after operation was 4 days and fracture union time was 9.57 weeks. There were 3 cases of varus angulation, 2 cases of anterior angulation, and 4 cases of limb lengthening. Patients aged between 5 and 13 years treated with flexible intramedullary nail for closed femoral shaft fracture have rapid union and recovery, short rehabilitation period, less immobilization and psychological impact, and cost-effective.

  20. skeletal traction and intramedullary nailing cost-effectiveness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To our knowledge no similar study has been done in Africa. Objective:To determine the cost-effectiveness of skeletal traction compared to intramedullary nailing. Design: Prospective conventional sampling analytical study. Setting: Hospital based study in a referral and teaching institution - Kenyatta National Hospital,.

  1. Clinical Outcomes after Open Locked Intramedullary Nailing of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... joint stiffness due to prolonged immobilization.[8,9] Open reduction and internal fixation have reduced some of these complications by enabling early mobilization of the patient after surgery. The gold standard for treating closed femoral shaft fractures currently is closed locked intramedullary nailing.[10-13] ...

  2. Skeletal traction and intramedullary nailing cost-effectiveness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the operative group 24 patients had union with one delayed union while in the traction group 12 patients had union, 9 with mal union and 4 delayed union. Conclusion: Intramedullary nailing is more cost-effective than skeletal traction. It met the dominant strategy, because it was significantly less costly than skeletal ...

  3. Clinical Outcomes after Open Locked Intramedullary Nailing of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Femoral shaft fractures are common injuries in adults. Closed locked intramedullary nailing is the recommended treatment for femoral shaft fractures due to its high union rate. Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the outcome of management of closed femoral shaft fractures in adult patients, ...

  4. Intramedullary nailing of the femoral shaft: a prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, C D; Meek, R N; Blachut, P A; O'Brien, P J; Pate, G C

    2014-08-01

    We conducted a prospective, randomized study on 84 consecutive patients with 88 acute, traumatic femoral shaft fractures using 32 Grosse-Kempf nails, 29 Russell-Taylor nails, and 27 Synthes nails. Although total operative times and proximal and distal locking times were similar for the three groups, the procedure was faster with the Grosse-Kempf nail. Three proximal fractures could not be locked with the Synthes nail. At first follow-up, we found no significant difference in terms of pain, limp, range of motion, or time to union; however, we removed fewer Synthes nails to resolve patient complaints of pain. Three delayed unions were attributed to fracture distraction. We conclude that all three nails are suitable for the treatment of almost all femoral shaft fractures. A careful analysis of intraoperative technique and instrumentation indicates that all three nails can be used safely and easily once experience is gained. Clinical outcome is similar regardless of the nail chosen.

  5. Comparison of functional bracing and locked intramedullary nailing in the treatment of displaced tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, A; Benterud, J G; Høgevold, H E; Ekeland, A; Strømsøe, K

    1992-04-01

    Thirty-five displaced tibial shaft fractures, treated with functional bracing were compared with 43 similar fractures, treated with locked intramedullary nailing. There were 22 excellent/good results in the brace group and 38 in the nail group. There was one infection in the brace group and three in the nailed group. There were five delayed unions and two nonunions in the brace group and one delayed union in the nail group. The functional results in the nailed group were better than the braced group but locked intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures require special resources and training. Locked intramedullary nailing fullfils all the functional criteria for acceptable fracture care.

  6. [Fresh femoral shaft fractures treated with un-reamed intramedullary nail: 203 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Wang, M; Sun, L; An, G; Rong, G

    2000-06-01

    To discuss the experience treating fresh femoral shaft fractures with un-reamed intramedullary nail. 203 cases of fresh femoral shaft fractures who had been treated with un-reamed intramedullary nail from November. 1995 to January. 1999 were analyzed retrospectively. 18 cases were open, classified as Gustilo I, and. 185 cases were closed. Traction table and image intensifier were used during operation. Closed reduction, un-reamed and free hand distal locking technique were used. Active movements of nearby joints were encouraged and partial weight bearing of 10 - 15 kg were allowed right after operation. All 203 cases of fresh femoral shaft fractures got bone union within 4 - 6 months. No case of delayed union and infection happened. 1 distal locking screw was broken. All patients gained normal extremity functions. Un-reamed intramedullary nailing of fresh femoral shaft fracture has less damage to the local soft tissue and blood supply. It has a relative stable fracture fixation, and less interruption to the healing procedure. It is one of the best methods for treating femoral fracture.

  7. Outcome of intramedullary interlocking SIGN nail in tibial diaphyseal fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.; Javed, S.; Khan, G.N.; Aziz, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the outcome of intramedullary interlocking surgical implant generation network (SIGN) nail in diaphyseal tibial fractures in terms of union and failure of implant (breakage of nail or interlocking screws). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Orthopaedics and Spinal Surgery, Ghurki Trust Teaching Hospital, Lahore Medical and Dental College, Lahore, from September 2008 to August 2009. Methodology: Fifty patients aged 14 - 60 years, of either gender were included, who had closed and Gustilo type I and II open fractures reported in 2 weeks, whose closed reduction was not possible or was unsatisfactory and fracture was located 7 cm below knee joint to 7 cm above ankle joint. Fractures previously treated with external fixator, infected fractures and unfit patients were excluded. All fractures were fixed with intramedullary interlocking SIGN nail and were followed clinically and radiographically for union and for any implant failure. Results: Forty one (88%) patients had united fracture within 6 months, 5 (10%) patients had delayed union while 4 (8%) patients had non-union. Mean duration for achieving union was 163 + 30.6 days. Interlocking screws were broken in 2 patients while no nail was broken in any patient. Conclusion: Intramedullary interlocking nailing is an effective measure in treating closed and grade I and II open tibial fractures. It provides a high rate of union less complications and early return to function. (author)

  8. Primary unreamed intramedullary locked nailing in open fractures of tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Vineet

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fractures of tibia are among the commonest fractures sustained in road traffic accidents. They are frequently open and contaminated. Unreamed nails are considered superior to external fixator in the management of open fractures of tibia. Method: Forty patients with open fractures of tibia, grade I, II, IIIa, IIIb were included in the study. They were managed by primary unreamed intramedullary nailing with adequate soft tissue management. Results: Functional results were excellent in 26 cases, good in 10 cases and fair in 4 cases. Four cases had delayed union. Average time of union was 16.9 weeks. Conclusion: Primary unreamed intramedullary nailing offers advantage of rigid fixation, low incidence of infection, non-union, good functional results and early return to work. An adequate soft tissue management is mandatory in treatment of these fractures.

  9. Results of Closed Intramedullary Nailing using Talwarkar Square Nail in Adult Forearm Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem A Lil

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate results of closed intramedullary nailing using Talwarkar square nails in adult forearm fractures. We prospectively evaluated 34 patients with both bone forearm fractures. The average time to union was 12.8 (SD +3.2 weeks with cast support for a mean of 8.2 weeks. Union was achieved in 31 out of 34 patients. Using the Grace and Eversmann rating system, 17 patients were excellent, 10 were good, and 4 had an acceptable result. Three patients had non-unions, 2 for the radius and one for the ulna. There were two cases of superficial infection, one subject had olecranon bursitis, and one case of radio-ulnar synostosis. Complication rates associated with the use of square nails were lower compared to plate osteosynthesis and locked intramedullary nails. To control rotation post- operatively, there is a need for application of an above-elbow cast after nailing.

  10. Architecture of the femoral medullary canal and working length for intramedullary nailing. Biomechanic indications for dynamic nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steriopoulos, K; Psarakis, S A; Savakis, C; Papakitsou, E; Christakis, D; Velivasakis, E

    1997-10-01

    We classified human femoral intramedullary architecture into 3 types. The cortex in the first type is thick and the medullary canal narrow with an even and smooth translation towards the metaphysis. In the second type, the cortex is thin and the canal wider, also evenly distributed along the entire length, while in the third type the canal narrows just distal to the subtrochanteric region and similarly a few centimeters distally. Some medullary canals of the second type do not allow dynamic nailing, while canals of the third type presents some difficulties for unreamed nails. Most medullary canals belong to the first and second type and only few belong to type three. We performed comparative experimental loading in 11 pairs of cadaveric fractured femora fixed with static and dynamic nailing. Dynamic nailing was found to behave as safely as static ones in the presence of a sound femoral shaft central and peripheral to the fracture with a length twice the diameter of the femur at the fracture level. This could be checked intraoperatively with gentle rotation under image intensifier. In a clinical series, dynamic nailing was performed in about one quarter of the patients with femoral shaft fractures (18 of 72 patients) with excellent results.

  11. Influence of nail prominence and insertion point on anterior knee pain after tibial intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Lin, Kai-Cheng; Yang, Shan-Wei; Tarng, Yih-Wen; Hsu, Chien-Jen; Renn, Jenn-Huei

    2014-03-01

    Chronic anterior knee pain is the most common complication after tibial nail insertion. Its etiology remains unknown, and multifactorial sources have been suggested. The authors believe that nail prominence and the insertion point of the nail are important in the development of anterior knee pain. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the roles of the insertion point and nail prominence in anterior knee pain after tibial intramedullary nailing using a transtendinous approach and a common nail type. A total of 108 patients with tibial shaft fractures underwent reamed intramedullary nailing using a transtendinous approach between 2006 and 2009. Mean follow-up was 26.8±5.0 months. A visual analog scale (0-100) was used to estimate anterior knee pain severity while patients performed 7 activities retrospectively. Radiographic assessments, including nail prominence and insertion point, were performed. Sixty (55.6%) patients experienced knee pain (group P) and 48 (44.4%) did not (group N). Significant differences were not found between the groups with respect to demographics, nail diameters, or fracture classifications. Less superior and more anterior nail prominences in radiographic assessments were significantly associated with anterior knee pain. When the insertion point was over the bottom half of the anterior cortex, the influence of anterior nail prominence was more obvious. Nail removal resulted in diminished pain during the 7 assessed activities. Nail insertion should be over the bottom half of the anterior cortex, with minimal anterior nail prominence. If anterior knee pain occurs, removal of the nail should be considered. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Carbon fiber intramedullary nails reduce artifact in postoperative advanced imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimel, Melissa N.; Hwang, Sinchun; Riedel, Elyn R.; Healey, John H.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether radiolucent carbon fiber reinforced-polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) intramedullary nails decreased hardware artifact on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in vitro and in an oncologic patient population. In vitro and clinical evaluations were done. A qualitative assessment of metal artifact was performed using CFR-PEEK and titanium nail MRI phantoms. Eight patients with a femoral or tibial prophylactic CFR-PEEK nail were retrospectively identified. All patients had postoperative surveillance imaging by MRI, CT, and were followed for a median 20 months (range, 12-28 months). CFR-PEEK images were compared to images from a comparative group of patients with titanium femoral intramedullary nails who had a postoperative MRI or CT. A musculoskeletal-trained radiologist graded visualization of the cortex, corticomedullary junction, and bone-muscle interface, on T1-weighted (T1W), STIR, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted fat-saturated (T1W FS) sequences of both groups with a five-point scale, performing independent reviews 4 months apart. Statistical analysis used the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and a weighted kappa. Substantially less MRI signal loss occurred in the CFR-PEEK phantom than in the titanium phantom simulation, particularly as the angle increased with respect to direction of the static magnetic field. CFR-PEEK nails had less MRI artifact than titanium nails on scored T1W, STIR, and contrast-enhanced T1W FS MRI sequences (p ≤ 0.03). The mean weighted kappa was 0.64, showing excellent intraobserver reliability between readings. CFR-PEEK intramedullary nail fixation is a superior alternative to minimize implant artifact on MRI or CT imaging for patients requiring long bone fixation. (orig.)

  13. Multiple intramedullary nailing of proximal phalangeal fractures of hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patankar Hemant

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proximal phalangeal fractures are commonly encountered fractures in the hand. Majority of them are stable and can be treated by non-operative means. However, unstable fractures i.e. those with shortening, displacement, angulation, rotational deformity or segmental fractures need surgical intervention. This prospective study was undertaken to evaluate the functional outcome after surgical stabilization of these fractures with joint-sparing multiple intramedullary nailing technique. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with 35 isolated unstable proximal phalangeal shaft fractures of hand were managed by surgical stabilization with multiple intramedullary nailing technique. Fractures of the thumb were excluded. All the patients were followed up for a minimum of six months. They were assessed radiologically and clinically. The clinical evaluation was based on two criteria. 1. total active range of motion for digital functional assessment as suggested by the American Society for Surgery of Hand and 2. grip strength. Results: All the patients showed radiological union at six weeks. The overall results were excellent in all the patients. Adventitious bursitis was observed at the point of insertion of nails in one patient. Conclusion: Joint-sparing multiple intramedullary nailing of unstable proximal phalangeal fractures of hand provides satisfactory results with good functional outcome and fewer complications.

  14. Anterior knee pain after unreamed intramedullary nailing of the tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Fanian

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: Tibial shaft fracture is the most common type of long bone fractures, and intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice. Anterior knee pain (AKP is the most common complication of tibial nailing. The exact etiology of AKP is unknown, and the reported incidence is between 10-86%. Since many activities of daily living of Iranians need kneeling, squatting, and tailor position, knee pain can effectively limit these activities. We decided to evaluate knee pain in patients with tibial shaft fractures treated with unreamed intramedullary nailing in our hospital.
    • METHODS: We evaluated 232 patients between 16-77 year-old with tibial shaft fractures treated with intramedullary nailing from 2005 to 2007 with six months follow up period.
    • RESULTS: According to visual analogue scale (0-10, 165 (71.1% patients had no pain. Anterior knee pain was mild in 54 (28.9% cases; 12 (5.2% cases had moderate pain, and one patient (0.4% experienced severe pain. The most severe pain was felt in kneeling position and the mildest pain was felt in resting position.
    • CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of moderate to severe AKP in patients who had intramedullary nailing for tibial shaft fractures was relatively low. In view of medicolegal litigation, patients should be aware of this complication.
    • KEYWORDS: Tibia, fracture, knee pain, trauma, internal fixation.

  15. Occurrence of secondary fracture around intramedullary nails used for trochanteric hip fractures: a systematic review of 13,568 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Rory; Bhattacharjee, Dhritiman; Parker, Martyn J

    2012-06-01

    A sliding hip screw (SHS) is currently the treatment of choice for trochanteric hip fractures, largely due to the low incidence of complications. An alternative treatment is the use of intramedullary proximal femoral nails. Unfortunately these implants have been associated with a risk of later fracture around the implant. The aim of this study was to see if any improvements have been made to the current intramedullary nails, to reduce the incidence of secondary fracture around the distal tip of the nail. We analysed data related to 13,568 patients from 89 studies, focusing on the incidence of post operative secondary femoral shaft fracture following the use of intramedullary nails in the fixation of trochanteric hip fractures. The overall reported incidence of secondary fracture around the nail was 1.7%. The incidence of fracture has reduced in the 3rd generation Gamma nails when compared to the older Gamma nail (1.7% versus 2.6%, p value 0.03). However, the incidence of secondary fracture in the 3rd generation Gamma nails is still significantly higher than the other brands of short nail (1.7% versus 0.7%, p value 0.0005). Long nails had a slight tendency towards a lower risk of fracture although the difference was not statistically significant (1.1% versus 1.7%, p value 0.28). There was a significantly lower risk of fracture for those nails with a biaxial fixation as opposed to uniaxial fixation (0.6% versus 1.9%, p value fracture around a proximal femoral nail is one of the most significant of fracture healing complications, and this study suggests that continuing design changes to this method of fixation has reduced the risk of this complication occurring. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Assisting plate with reamed intramedullary nailing for segmental fractures of proximal-middle tibia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Wang, Qiu-Gen; Huang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Jian-Dong; Li, Fan; Gao, Wei; Li, Hao-Qing; Tao, Jie

    2013-10-18

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of combining reduction plating with reamed intramedullary nailing for segmental fractures of proximal-middle tibia. From June 2007 to October 2011, 31 patients with segmental fractures of proximal-middle tibia were admitted. There were 18 males and 13 females, with an average age of 45.2 years (range: 23-77 years), of whom, 9 were Gustilo I type open fractures and 22 were close fractures. All the patients were treated with assisting plate combined with reamed intramedullary nailing. The operation was performed averagely 35 h (range: 16-72 h) after injury. During the post-operation follow-up radiographic evaluation, the range of knee joint, and Johner-Wruhs scores were measured. All the patients were followed-up for 18.5 months (range: 17-24 months). No wound infection or osteofascial compartment syndrome happened. All the fractures healed after 5.1 months (range: 4-6 months). The proximal and distal fracture sites healed simultaneously. No malunion was found. In the last follow-up, the mean range of knee joint was 9°-0°-127°, and according to Johner-Wruhs scores, 19 were excellent, 10 good, and 2 fair. Assisting plate with reamed intramedullary nailing is a safe and effective alternative choice for segmental fractures of proximal-middle tibia, which can ease the difficulty of the procedure, improve the quantity of reduction and enhance the stability of the hardware.

  17. [Use of the orthofix intramedullary nail in tibial shaft fractures. A review of 22 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Juárez, José Dolores; Aguilera Zepeda, José Manuel; Bienvenu, Alfonso Tohen; Encalada Díaz, Melchor Iván; Sheldon, Oscar Dáivila

    2007-01-01

    Tibial shaft fractures are common since they account for 9% of all fractures. Intramedullary nailing is described in the literature as the gold standard for their treatment and the most recent research emphasizes minimum exposure. To present the clinical and radiological course of closed, unreamed intramedullary fixation for tibial shaft fractures in a group of patients seen at Medica Sur Hospital. Twenty-two male patients with a diagnosis of tibial shaft fracture were analyzed retrospectively; mean age was 28 years. In all of them the Orthofix nail was inserted through the patellar tendon, with a closed approach and without reaming the medullary cavity. Twenty patients had closed fractures (90.90%) and 2 patients had open fractures (9.09%). The mean time to starting ambulation with protected weight bearing was two weeks in 18 patients (81.81%); with full weight bearing, six weeks in 13 patients (91%). The mean time to full weight bearing without crutches was 10 weeks in 21 patients (95.45%). Mean radiographic grade III-IV healing time was 16 weeks. Complications were: delayed union in two patients (9.09%), compartmental syndrome, in one patient (4.45%). The Orthofix interlocking intramedullary nail placed with a closed approach provides immediate stability due to the proximal and distal locking. Patient rehabilitation is quicker, with total mobility, providing an early stimulation for callus formation and the added benefit of sparing the endosteal blood supply.

  18. Intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures. Part III: Long-term effects of static interlocking fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumback, R J; Ellison, T S; Poka, A; Bathon, G H; Burgess, A R

    1992-01-01

    The results of treatment of fractures of the femoral shaft with static interlocking nailing were reviewed retrospectively to determine the clinical importance of any stress-riser or stress-shielding properties of the nail. These properties, if relevant, would have been manifested by refracture of the femur, either through a hole used for a locking screw or through the original site of fracture after extraction of the device. Two hundred and fourteen fractures that had been treated with static interlocking nailing and that had healed without conversion to dynamic intramedullary fixation were divided into two groups. In Group I, which comprised 111 fractures, the static interlocking-fixation device was retained and in Group II, which comprised 103 fractures, the static interlocking-fixation device was removed during one operative procedure at an average of fourteen months after the injury. The average duration of follow-up was thirty months from the time of the original fixation in both groups. All patients in Group II were followed for a minimum of six months after removal of the nail. No femur in Group I, in which the static interlocked nail remained in situ, refractured. No femur in either group fractured through the proximal or the distal holes used for the locking screws. No locking screws or nails broke. One patient (1 per cent) in Group II had a refracture of the femoral shaft through the site of the original fracture six weeks after removal of the nail.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Semiextended position of intramedullary nailing of the proximal tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornetta, P; Collins, E

    1996-07-01

    Over a 24 month period, 30 patients with proximal tibia fractures who were reviewed consecutively were treated by nonreamed, statically locked, intramedullary nailing. There were 16 open, 13 segmental, and 7 comminuted fractures (Winquist III, IV). The average distance from the fracture to the proximal locking screws was 24 mm (range, 0-65 mm). All procedures were performed while the patient's affected leg was on a radiolucent table without traction. The last 25 fractures were nailed using a partial (2/3) medial parapatellar incision while the leg was semiextended. This approach allowed the patella to be subluxed laterally availing the trochlear groove for use as a conduit for nail placement. Using only 15 degrees knee flexion eliminated the extension force of the quadriceps on the proximal fragment, which otherwise would have tended to cause anterior angulation at the fracture site. In the first 5 patients, the average anterior angulation was 8 degrees (range, 5 degrees-15 degrees). Of the 25 patients who were treated while in the semiextended position, none had more than 5 degrees anterior angulation and 19 had no anterior angulation. Fractures of 3 of the 25 patients had greater than 5 degrees angulation in the coronal plane, 2 of which were nailed in the semiextended position. This technique greatly facilitates intramedullary nailing of proximal tibia fractures.

  20. Locked intramedullary nailing in the treatment of femoral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, K

    2000-03-30

    In treatment of femoral shaft fractures the most effective method should be chosen, one which makes rapid bone union possible and facilitates early and efficient rehabilitation. In our opinion locking intramedullary nailing fulfils these requirements. This is a technically demanding procedure that requires considerable experience on the part of the operating team. A knowledge of the physiology of fracture healing would appear to be the key to obtaining a good treatment outcome. Closed intramedullary nailing is a less invasive method of osteosynthesis because it does not require the fracture site to be opened. Familiarity with the various operative stages and good teamwork reduce operating time and X-ray exposure, and insure the best treatment outcome.

  1. Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing for Treatment of Pediatric Tibial Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Gurung; Dipendra KC; Roshni Khatri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tibia fractures in the skeletally immature patient can usually be treated with above knee cast or patellar tendon bearing cast. The purpose of our study was to evaluate epidemiology and outcome of Elastic stable intramedullary nailing fixation of pediatric tibial shaft fractures treated at our institution. Methods: Over a period of one year, fifty pediatric patients of tibial shaft fractures, with average age of 9.68 yr (SD=2.37), were treated with elastic stable intramedul...

  2. Intramedullary Venous Drainage System for Distal Fingertip Replantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purisa, Husrev; Ozturk, Muhammed Besir; Kabakas, Fatih; Mersa, Berkan; Ozcelik, Ismail Bulent; Sezer, Ilker

    2017-08-01

    The number of venous anastomoses performed during fingertip replantation is one of the most important factors affecting the success of replantation. However, because vessel diameters decrease in the zone 1 level, vessel anastomoses, especially vein anastomoses, are technically difficult and, thus, cannot be performed in most cases. Alternative venous drainage methods are crucial when any reliable vein repair is not possible. In the literature, so many artery-only replantation techniques have been defined, such as arteriovenous anastomoses, forming an arteriovenous or venocutaneous fistula, manual milking and massage, puncturing, and external bleeding via a fishmouth incision and using a medical leech. It has been shown that, in distal fingertip replantations, the medullary cavity may also be a good way for venous return. In this study, we introduce an alternative intramedullary venous drainage system we developed to facilitate venous drainage in artery-only fingertip replantations. The results of 24 fingertip replantations distal to the nail fold by using this system are presented with a literature review.

  3. Compartment syndrome after intramedullary nailing of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischenko, G J; Goodman, S B

    1990-01-01

    Three patients had compartment syndrome of the leg after tibial intramedullary nailing with reaming. They were all treated successfully with emergency fasciotomy. A prospective study was done of seven additional patients who had continual monitoring of the pressure in the deep posterior compartment during tibial intramedullary nailing with reaming. In five of them, the procedure was performed three weeks or less after injury and in the remaining two, the nailing was performed later for the treatment of non-union. Two pressure peaks in the deep posterior compartment were noted: one after strong longitudinal traction was applied and the fracture was reduced and the other during intramedullary reaming. Intraoperative pressure of thirty millimeters of mercury or more were recorded in three of the seven patients. In the treatment of tibial fractures, operative procedures that involve forceful traction for a long time may predispose the patient to compartment syndrome in the leg. Close clinical observation of such patients is needed. When there is a high risk of compartment syndrome, monitoring of the pressure in the compartment may be prudent.

  4. Flexible Intramedullary Nailing for Paediatric Shaft of Femur Fractures – Does the Number of Nails Alter the Outcome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kanthimathi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of flexible intramedullary nailing, allowing micro movement at the fracture site, results in excellent outcomes regardless of the number of nails used. We undertook analysis of the outcomes of flexible nailing with reference to the number of nails used. METHODS: Twenty patients with diaphyseal femur fracture aged 5-15 years were treated with retrograde flexible intramedullary nailing. The number of nails varied from single to multiple. The results were analysed with regard to the number of nails used. RESULTS: The mean patient age was 7.9 years; patients were followed up for a mean duration of 13.2 months. Those with two and three nails had similar results. CONCLUSION: A minimum of two flexible nails is needed for optimal fixation in paediatric femur shaft fractures. Also, limiting the number of implants to two is cost effective, decreases operative time, reduces radiation exposure and offers equal results to that of three nails.

  5. [Removal of a broken massive tibial intramedullary nail].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frima, A J; Karthaus, A J

    1998-12-01

    A problem has arisen when replacing the reamed tibia nail by the massive unreamed tibia nail. In case of nail fracture it is difficult to remove the distal fragment from the medullary cavity. It may also occur that the connecting screw between the insertion handle and the nail breaks off at the edge of the implant, which much complicates removal of the nail. The authors have developed a technique to remove the implant without having to saw a fissure in the marrow. A concave instrument is slid over the part of the nail left behind after which the two are connected by means of a K wire. This method has been successfully applied in 2 patients.

  6. [Removal of a massive broken tibial intramedullary nail].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frima, A J; Karthaus, A J

    1998-03-01

    A problem arose when the reamed tibia nail was replaced by a massive unreamed tibia nail. Of the nail fractures, it is difficult to remove the distal fragment from the medullary cavity. It may also happen that the connecting screw between the insertion handle and the nail breaks off at the edge of the implant, which complicates removal of the nail. The authors have developed a technique for removing the implant without having to saw a fissure in the marrow. A concave instrument is slid over the part of the nail left behind after which the two are connected by means of a K wire. This method has been successfully applied in two patients.

  7. [Closed intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verret, G

    1995-08-01

    To assess patient outcome after nailing of the tibial shaft with the unreamed AO/ASIF nail. A retrospective study of 54 nailed fractures of the tibial shaft treated between 1990 and 1994. Follow-up was done at the outpatient clinic and included measurements of the lower limbs and x-rays. The study was conducted at the Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jésus, Québec, a centre specializing in trauma care. Fifty-four acute displaced fractures of the tibial shaft occurring in 52 patients were studied. Nailing with the Synthes AO/ASIF unreamed locked nails. Time to bone fusion, rate of infection, incidence of deformity and failure rate of the implants, especially the lock screws. The majority of fractures were associated with a high-speed trauma (40/54 or 74% of cases) and 18 (33%) were open fractures. Osteitis developed in one (1.8%) open type IIIA fracture. Bone fusion was observed clinically and radiologically after 29 weeks on average; none of the fractures presented residual deformity on rotation of more than 5 degrees or a difference in length of more than 1 cm or a frontal or sagittal displacement of more than 10 degrees. A single case of pseudoarthrosis was noted. One or more lock screws became deformed or broke in 16 (34%) tibias; however, this did not lead to any reduction loss. Four compartment syndromes were diagnosed. Excellent results were obtained with respect to limb alignment and length. Loss of joint mobility was minimal. The number of lock screw failures indicates that a delayed weight bearing could prevent this complication, especially when an interfragment space remains after the nail placement.

  8. Advances in Intramedullary Nailing: Suprapatellar Nailing of Tibial Shaft Fractures in the Semiextended Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelle, Boris A; Boni, Guilherme; Hak, David J; Stahel, Philip F

    2015-12-01

    Reamed locked intramedullary nailing remains the standard treatment for displaced tibial shaft fractures. Supra-patellar tibial nailing in the semiextended position has been suggested as a safe and effective surgical technique that allows mitigating certain challenges of the standard subpatellar approach. Suprapatellar nailing seems to facilitate achieving and maintaining fracture reduction, particularly in proximal third tibia fractures. Preliminary investigations have suggested that this technique is associated with a low rate of complications, including a reduced incidence of postoperative anterior knee pain. Further clinical investigations are necessary to establish overall complication rates and long-term subjective outcomes. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. The risk of iatrogenic injury to anterior tibial artery variations during tibial nail distal interlocking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanter, Nathan J; Inouye, Sandra E; Beiser, Christopher W

    2017-01-01

    Tibial intramedullary nailing remains a common tibial fracture fixation method. Tibial nailing indications continue to expand. Neurovascular complications from tibial nailing have been described; however, the proximity of distal tibial locking bolts to the anterior tibial artery (ATA) variants has not. 52 cadaveric legs were dissected identifying three common ATA variants. Each ATA variant received an intraluminal wire to facilitate fluoroscopic identification. Three different intramedullary tibial nails were inserted in each of the three ATA variant specimens. With fluoroscopy, the proximity of the distal locking holes of each tibial nail to the intraluminal wire representing the ATA variant course was measured. Of the 40 measurements, the intraluminal wire was directly in the bolt insertional path in 8 of 40 (20%) and within 5 mm in 16 of 40 (40%). All specimens had the wire cross the locking bolt insertional path at least once in each of the nails. The ATA variant taking a more lateral course deep to the extensor digitorum longus and peroneus tertius to overlay the lateral malleolus had the highest occurrence of measurements less than 5 mm. The close proximity of tibial nail distal locking bolt holes to ATA variants presents a risk for iatrogenic vascular injury during insertion. The coronal locking bolts pose the greatest iatrogenic risk to the most laterally positioned ATA variant.

  10. OUTCOME OF DISTAL TIBIA FRACTURE BY NAIL OR PLATE (MIPPO- A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuchandra R

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Distal tibial fracture often present a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. The best option for surgical management of distal tibial fracture is still unclear, whether nail or plate. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study consists of 24 patients of distal tibial fracture treated either with reamed intramedullary nails or locked plating/MIPPO with open reduction method or minimally-invasive techniques. RESULTS 24 patients included in the present study were divided into two groups as nailing group A and plating group B. Nailing group included 12 patients and plating group included 12. Age range of patients was 21-62 years. Most common mode of trauma in both groups as RTA followed by accidental fall in 2 cases. The average time for union and weightbearing was 19 weeks in group A and 20.08 weeks in group B. Complications like malalignment, more surgical time were seen in group A and surgical site infection, skin necrosis, prolonged immobilisation were seen in group B. CONCLUSION Both IM nailing and plating are optional methods of treatment. Intramedullary nailing in distal tibial fractures result in early mobilisation is an easier technique, more economical and has fewer complications rate. Plating is preferred in cases where fracture is very close to ankle mortise and associate with higher rate of wound complications.

  11. Training effect of using Touch Surgery for intramedullary femoral nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugand, Kapil; Mawkin, Mala; Gupte, Chinmay

    2016-02-01

    Simulation in orthopaedic training is becoming increasingly popular and has been widely used in formal curricula. However, these resources are expensive and not easily accessible to every trainee. Other means of disseminating surgical education through virtual reality (VR) multimedia can act as useful adjunct to traditional methods of teaching. One validated VR platform is Touch Surgery, a cognitive task simulation and rehearsal app. The primary objective of this study was to identify the training effect of Touch Surgery intramedullary femoral nailing (IFN) modules using objective performance metrics over six consecutive attempts. Secondary objectives consisted of validated multiple choice questions (MCQ) testing before the first (pre) and after the sixth (post) attempts. 27 medical undergraduates were recruited to complete the decision-making process six consecutive times for four modules on the procedural steps of IFN. The modules consisted of (i) preparing the patient and equipment, (ii) femoral canal preparation, (iii) nail insertion and proximal locking, and (iv) distal locking and closure. Real-time objective performance metrics were obtained, stored electronically and analysed using the median and Bonett-Price 95% confidence intervals from the participants' attempts to assess training effect. Significance was calculated using the Mann-Whitney U test for independent data whilst the Wilcoxon signed ranked test was used for paired data. Significance was set as 2-tailed p-value <0.05. Median performance scores per attempt for all four modules demonstrated a significant improvement ranging from 58 to 115%. Scoring variability and distribution was reduced and more predictable per attempt. Logarithmic learning curves elicited strong positive correlations between the number of attempts and scoring. Mean scores for pre and post-study MCQs tests significantly improved from 83 to 94% in all modules. IFN modules on Touch Surgery app demonstrated a significant training

  12. Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing for Treatment of Pediatric Tibial Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Gurung

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tibia fractures in the skeletally immature patient can usually be treated with above knee cast or patellar tendon bearing cast. The purpose of our study was to evaluate epidemiology and outcome of Elastic stable intramedullary nailing fixation of pediatric tibial shaft fractures treated at our institution. Methods: Over a period of one year, fifty pediatric patients of tibial shaft fractures, with average age of 9.68 yr (SD=2.37, were treated with elastic stable intramedullary nail. Demographic data, union and complication rate were evaluated. Results: There were 36 closed and 14 open fractures. The average time to union was 11.6 weeks  (SD=2.65 for close and  14.3 weeks (SD=2.62 for open fracture. There were no instances of growth arrest, remanipulations, or refracture. Conclusion: We conclude that flexible intramedullary fixation is an easy and effective method of management of both open and closed unstable fractures of the tibia in children.

  13. Anterior gonalgic syndrome after intramedullary nailing: ultrasound and radiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, F; Binda, M; Lovisetti, G

    1998-01-01

    A total of 33 patients submitted to tibial intramedullary osteosynthesis for fracture (27 cases) and non-union were assessed by ultrasound and x-rays an average of 10.9 months after surgery. The route of access was patellar transtendineal in each case; the means of synthesis used was the Marchetti Vicenzi nail. In 19 patients (57.6%) there was anterior gonalgia. Radiologic assessment evaluated prominence of the nail, while nail-tendon impingement was examined by ultrasound. Nail-tendon impingement was frequently observed (24 cases, 72.7%); in cases such as these anterior pain in the knee was present in 17 patients: however, this fact did not achieve statistical significance. The patellar tendon was thickened as compared to the contralateral one, with disorganization of the fibrillar echotexture, but it was not shortened. The tendinous morphostructure did not reveal any relationship with anterior gonalgia. In none of the cases did we observe the formation of scarring nuromas. In the area of the Hoffa body reactive synovitis phenomena with structural hyperechogenicity, an unclear aspect of the posterior tendinous profile and calcifications were observed. Radiographic prominence of the nail was correlated with echographic impingement, but not with clinical findings. Removal of the instrumentation carried out in 8 patients characterized by anterior gonalgia did not lead to resolution of symptoms in 2 cases in which MRI study showed patellar tendinitis and in 1 case patellar chondropathy with irregularity of the Hoffa body in the second.

  14. Nonreamed interlocked intramedullary tibial nailing. One community's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwelius, P J; Schmidt, A H; Rubinstein, R A; Green, J M

    1995-06-01

    Forty-nine acute displaced tibial fractures (31 closed, 18 open: 5 Grade I, 7 Grade II, 4 Grade IIIA, and 2 Grade IIIB) were treated in 1 community with a standard operative protocol using a distractor without a fracture table, and an unreamed interlocked tibial nail. Forty-six fractures healed (94%). Complications included 3 nonunions (6%), 2 deep infections (4%), 9 delayed unions (18%), 4 angular malunions (8%), 2 rotatory malunions (4%), and 12 interlocking screws bent or broke (24%). Twenty-eight patients (57%) required at least 1 additional operation to obtain union, most commonly dynamization of a statically locked nail. The authors conclude that unreamed tibial nails provide adequate stabilization of displaced tibial fractures and can be used in the management of most open or closed tibial fractures. However, static locking is required in axially unstable fractures. Early dynamization or exchange nailing and bone grafting should be considered to hasten union and avoid screw failure. The distractor is an excellent adjunctive technique for reduction and alignment of tibial shaft fractures during intramedullary nailing.

  15. Comparative study between biologic plating and intramedullary nailing for the treatment of subtrochanteric fractures: Is biologic plating using LCP-DF superior to intramedullary nailing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Won Chul; Moon, Nam Hoon; Jang, Jae Hoon; Lee, Hee Jin; Suh, Kuen Tak

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the outcome measures of subtrochanteric fractures between biologic plating and intramedullary nailing and determine if biologic plating is superior to intramedullary nailing. Between March 2009 and December 2015, 81 patients with subtrochanteric fractures were enrolled (52 males and 29 females; 31 treated with biologic plating and 50 with intramedullary nailing). Biologic plating was conducted consecutively between May 2011 and March 2013 and intramedullary nailing was performed for the rest of period. Perioperative outcomes including operation time and blood loss during the operation; postoperative radiologic outcomes including union, time to union, coronal alignment, and shortening of the femur; and clinical outcomes including walking ability and pain were evaluated. The biologic plating group was compared with the intramedullary nailing group as a historical control. No significant differences were identified for bony union and time to union between the two different fixation methods Coronal alignment was significantly better in the biologic plating group than in the intramedullary nailing group (pbiologic plating for the treatment of subtrochanteric fractures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiation-free Insertion of Distal Interlocking Screw in Tibial and Femur Nailing: A Simple Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Ritesh Kumar; Mehta, Surender Mohan; Awasthi, Bhanu; Singh, Janith Lal; Kumar, Amit; Thakur, Lokesh; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Distal interlocking screw insertion in intramedullary nailing of long-bone fracture is a challenging task for orthopedic surgeons. It is difficult particularly when the surgeon is in his learning stage or when image intensifier is not available. We describe a radiation-free technique of distal interlocking screw insertion which is easy and practicable. In this technique, a same length nail is placed over the skin (outer nail) and through its distal-most screw hole, a 3.2 mm drill bit is inserted to drill the distal locking screw hole of the intramedullary nail (inner nail). With a small skin incision over the distal screw holes, the distal-most screw hole is identified; the bone window overlying the screw hole is widened with an awl and a locking bolt is inserted with a washer under direct visualization. The other distal interlocking screw is simply drilled by matching the other three holes of the outer and inner nails. We have operated 86 patients (39 femoral shaft fracture and 47 tibial shaft fracture) in 1 year where this technique was used. There were 41 open fracture and 45 closed fracture. Within 6 months of follow-up, bony union was achieved in 36 of 39 femur fractures and 45 of 47 tibial fractures. No unwanted complications were observed during the postoperative period and in follow-up. This method of radiation-free distal interlocking screw insertion is simple and can be used in third world country where image intensifier facility is not available. However, surgeons are encouraged to use image intensifier facility where the facility is available.

  17. Complications during removal of stainless steel versus titanium nails used for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan, Mustafa; Guler, Olcay; Mahirogullari, Mahir; Donmez, Ferdi; Gereli, Arel; Mutlu, Serhat

    2018-02-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for fractures of the tibial shaft, which might necessitate the nail removal due to complications in the long-term. Although considered as a low-risk procedure, intramedullary nail removal is also associated with certain complications. Here, we compared the most commonly used stainless steel and titanium nails with respect to the complications during removal and clinical outcome for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of the tibia. Sixty-two patients (26 females, 36 males) were included in this retrospective study. Of the removed nails, 24 were of stainless steel and 38 of titanium. Preoperative and intraoperative parameters, such as implant discomfort, anterior knee pain, operating time and amount of bleeding, and postoperative outcomes were evaluated for each patient. Titanium nail group had more, but not statistically significant, intraoperative complications than stainless steel group during the removal of nails (p = .4498). Operating time and amount of intraoperative bleeding were significantly higher in titanium group than stainless steel group (p = .0306 and p titanium nails than those of stainless steel nails, whereas there was no difference in terms of postoperative SF-36 and KSS scores. In conclusion, although greater bone contact with titanium increases implant stability, nail removal is more difficult, resulting in more longer surgical operation and more intraoperative bleeding. Therefore, we do not recommend titanium nail removal in asymptomatic patients.

  18. Intramedullary nail fixation of non-traditional fractures: Clavicle, forearm, fibula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Niloofar; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2017-06-01

    Locked intramedullary fixation is a well-established technique for managing long-bone fractures. While intramedullary nail fixation of diaphyseal fractures in the femur, tibia, and humerus is well established, the same is not true for other fractures. Surgical fixations of clavicle, forearm and ankle are traditionally treated with plate and screw fixation. In some cases, fixation with an intramedullary device is possible, and may be advantageous. However, there is however a concern regarding a lack of rotational stability and fracture shortening. While new generation of locked intramedullary devices for fractures of clavicle, forearm and fibula are recently available, the outcomes are not as reliable as fixation with plates and screws. Further research in this area is warranted with high quality comparative studies, to investigate the outcomes and indication of these fractures treated with intramedullary nail devices compared to intramedullary nail fixation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Complications during removal of stainless steel versus titanium nails used for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of the tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Seyhan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for fractures of the tibial shaft, which might necessitate the nail removal due to complications in the long-term. Although considered as a low-risk procedure, intramedullary nail removal is also associated with certain complications. Here, we compared the most commonly used stainless steel and titanium nails with respect to the complications during removal and clinical outcome for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of the tibia. Patients and methods: Sixty-two patients (26 females, 36 males were included in this retrospective study. Of the removed nails, 24 were of stainless steel and 38 of titanium. Preoperative and intraoperative parameters, such as implant discomfort, anterior knee pain, operating time and amount of bleeding, and postoperative outcomes were evaluated for each patient. Results: Titanium nail group had more, but not statistically significant, intraoperative complications than stainless steel group during the removal of nails (p = .4498. Operating time and amount of intraoperative bleeding were significantly higher in titanium group than stainless steel group (p = .0306 and p < .001, respectively. Preoperative SF-36 physical component and KSS scores were significantly lower in patients who had removal of titanium nails than those of stainless steel nails, whereas there was no difference in terms of postoperative SF-36 and KSS scores. Conclusion: In conclusion, although greater bone contact with titanium increases implant stability, nail removal is more difficult, resulting in more longer surgical operation and more intraoperative bleeding. Therefore, we do not recommend titanium nail removal in asymptomatic patients. Keywords: Fractures of tibial shaft, Removal of intramedullary nailing, Stainless steel nail, Titanium nail

  20. The effect of retained intramedullary nails on tibial bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J C; Lindsey, R W; Hipp, J A; Gugala, Z; Rianon, N; LeBlanc, A

    2008-07-01

    Intramedullary nailing has become a standard treatment for adult tibial shaft fractures. Retained intramedullary nails have been associated with stress shielding, although their long-term effect on decreasing tibial bone mineral density is currently unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine if retained tibial intramedullary nails decrease tibial mineral density in patients with successfully treated fractures. Patients treated with statically locked intramedullary nails for isolated, unilateral tibia shaft fractures were studied. Inclusion required that fracture had healed radiographically and that the patient returned to the pre-injury activity level. Data on patient demographic, fracture type, surgical technique, implant, and post-operative functional status were tabulated. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure bone mineral density in selected regions of the affected tibia and the contralateral intact tibia. Image reconstruction software was employed to ensure symmetry of the studied regions. Twenty patients (mean age 43; range 22-77 years) were studied at a mean of 29 months (range 5-60 months) following intramedullary nailing. There was statistically significant reduction of mean bone mineral density in tibiae with retained intramedullary nails (1.02 g/cm(2) versus 1.06 g/cm(2); P=0.04). A significantly greater decrease in bone mineral density was detected in the reamed versus non-reamed tibiae (-7% versus +6%, respectively; Pnails. Intramedullary reaming appears to be a factor potentiating the reduction of tibia bone mineral density in long-term nail retention.

  1. Surgical management of diaphyseal humeral nonunion after intramedullary nailing: Wave-plate fixation and autologous bone grafting without nail removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerber, Ariane; Marti, René; Jupiter, Jesse

    2003-01-01

    Six patients with a nonunion of the humeral diaphysis after intramedullary nailing were treated with a wave plate and autologous bone graft but without removal of the intramedullary implant. The mean duration of the nonunion was 19 months (range, 6-36 months). At a mean follow-up of 12 months

  2. [The relationship between anterior knee pain occurring after tibial intramedullary nailing and the localization of the nail in the proximal tibia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzümcügil, Onat; Doğan, Ahmet; Yalçinkaya, Merter; Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz S

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the development of postoperative anterior knee pain and the location of the nail in the proximal tibia in patients treated with locked intramedullary nailing for tibial diaphyseal fractures. Thirty patients were selected among those who underwent locked intramedullary nailing for tibial diaphyseal fractures, with exclusion of all other factors that might be associated with postoperative anterior knee pain. In all the patients, intramedullary nailing was performed using the transtendinous approach and both proximal and distal locking. The patients were evaluated in two groups: 10 patients (3 women, 7 men; mean age 38 + or - 14 years) had anterior knee pain, whereas 20 patients (5 women, 15 men; mean age 35 + or - 12 years) did not. The distances from the nail to the tibial plateau and anterior tibial cortex were measured on the lateral x-rays after a mean follow-up of 56.6 months and 45.2 months in patients with and without anterior knee pain, respectively. The two groups were similar with respect to gender and follow-up period (p>0.05). The mean distances from the nail to the tibial plateau and anterior tibial cortex were -11.5 + or - 7.9 mm and 3.7 + or - 5.4 mm, respectively, in patients with anterior knee pain. The corresponding distances were -8.8 + or - 7.3 mm and 6.5 + or - 4.7 mm in patients without knee pain. Neither of the distances showed a significant difference between the two groups (p>0.05). Our findings suggest that the distances from the nail to the tibial plateau and anterior tibial cortex do not have any role in the development of postoperative anterior knee pain.

  3. Intramedullary nailing in femoral shaft fractures. Evaluation of a group of 101 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobellis, Claudio; Strukul, Leonardo

    2008-05-01

    The Authors analyse the results of intramedullary nailing in a group of 101 femoral shaft fractures. Used nails: Universal Synthes (62 cases), Russel-Taylor (14), Gamma long (10), uncannulated femoral nail (9), cannulated femoral nail (4) and proximal femoral nail (2). Stabilisation of the femoral shaft fracture was possible using a reamed technique in 91 cases, unreamed in 10. All nails were locked. Dynamisation was performed in 35 cases and was not in 66. The fracture heal was faster with the reaming and dynamisation technique. Ten fractures were open (5 Gustilo I, 5 Gustilo II) and stabilisation with Universal Synthes nail (8 cases), Russel-Taylor nail (1) and Gamma long nail (1) was performed. No infection was detected. Lung embolism (6) and deep vein thrombosis (3) occurred only in the case of reamed nails. All results confirm the locking nail system as the best treatment in the shaft fractures, especially with new-generation nails.

  4. Undetected iatrogenic lesions of the anterior femoral shaft during intramedullary nailing: a cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Lane

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of undetected radiographically iatrogenic longitudinal splitting in the anterior cortex during intramedullary nailing of the femur has not been well documented. Methods Cadaveric study using nine pairs of fresh-frozen femora from adult cadavers. The nine pairs of femora underwent a standardized antegrade intramedullary nailing and the detection of iatrogenic lesions, if any, was performed macroscopically and by radiographic control. Results Longitudinal splitting in the anterior cortex was revealed in 5 of 18 cadaver femora macroscopically. Anterior splitting was not detectable in radiographic control. Conclusion Longitudinal splitting in the anterior cortex during intramedullary nailing of the femur cannot be detected radiographically.

  5. Provisional plating of Type III open tibia fractures prior to intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Robert P; Nork, Sean E; Barei, David P; Mills, William J

    2005-07-01

    Intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures is the preferred treatment of most displaced, unstable tibial shaft fractures. In open tibia fractures, direct exposure of the fracture segments for irrigation and debridement is required prior to fracture stabilization. We propose a method of provisional stabilization using commonly available implants placed through the associated traumatic open wound prior to intramedullary nailing. This technique, particularly helpful to surgeons operating with limited assistance, employs a temporarily applied 3.5-mm dynamic compression plate or limited contact dynamic compression plate implant secured with unicortical screws, allowing reaming and intramedullary nailing of a reduced, stabilized tibia fracture.

  6. Does electromagnetic-manual guided distal locking influence rotational alignment in antegrade femoral nailing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftdemir, Mert; Tuncel, Sedat A; Ozcan, Mert; Copuroglu, Cem; Erem, Murat

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether distal locking using an electromagnetic-manual guided distal locking decreases the malrotation rate in femur fractures treated with intramedullary nailing. A total of 113 adult patients having unilateral femoral shaft fractures treated using IM nails were evaluated regarding demographic features, injury mechanism, fracture type, interval between trauma and nailing, operation time and number of image intensifier shots during the operation at least one year after nailing. Patients were divided into two groups according to distal locking technique. All patients had also undergone clinical examination for lower extremity alignment and range of motion and filled out the SF-36 questionnaire and undergone ultrasound measurement of femoral anteversion angles to reveal any rotational femoral malalignment. Group 1 consisted of 47 patients (41.6 %) with electromagnetic-manual targeting guided distal locking and group 2 consisted of 66 patients (58.4 %) with free-hand distal locking. Both groups were statistically similar regarding demographic features, injury mechanism, fracture type, interval between trauma and nailing, clinical examination and SF-36 results. Operation time and number of image intensifier shots were significantly less in group 1. No statistically significant difference was found between the femoral anteversion angles of injured and uninjured sides of the patients in both groups. Although there is no significant effect on malrotation, previously known advantages lead us to state that electromagnetic-manual guided distal interlocking is an advantageous treatment option in femoral shaft fractures.

  7. Treatment of distal tibial fractures: plate versus nail: a retrospective outcome analysis of matched pairs of patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, K.W.; Biert, J.; Kampen, A. van

    2007-01-01

    A study of 24 patients who sustained an extra-articular fracture of the distal third of the tibial shaft was performed to determine the effect of the type of treatment, open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) or closed reduction and intramedullary (IM) nailing, on the occurrence of malalignment.

  8. [True/Flex intramedullary nailing for forearm shaft fractures. Long-term results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trlica, J; Počepcov, I; Kočí, J; Frank, M; Holeček, T; Dědek, T

    2012-01-01

    Presentation of technical experience and the clinical and functional results of intramedullary fixation of forearm shaft fractures. Between January 1994 and December 2009, a total of 96 patients with 144 radial and/or ulnar fractures (ulna, 33; radius,15; both, 48) were treated by nailing (True/Flex®). According to the AO classification there were 22-A, 22-B and 22-C type fractures in 39 (41%), 44 (46%) and 13 (13%).cases, respectively. Of these, 82 (85%) were closed (types: 0, 48; I, 33; II, 1) and 14 (15%) were open (types: I, 13; II, 1; III, 0) fractures. Seventy-eight patients (81%) were followed up and their functional outcomes were evaluated according to the criteria of Anderson et al. The average interval between the operation and final follow-up was 28 months (15 to 96 months) The average time to surgery was 2.2 days (0 to 25 days). Early complications were recorded in 4% of the patients (1x bursitis olecrani; 1x end cup replacement; 1x bending of nails) and late complications in 15% (5x non-union; 2x delay union; 4x bursitis olecrani; 1x ruptured tendon). Bone healing was achieved in 95% of the cases and took on average 16 weeks (7 to 34 weeks). No infection, refracture or synostosis occurred. Primary loss of reduction was recorded in four cases due to distraction in one, bent nails in two and a wrong size of the implant in one; secondary loss of reduction was found in three cases, with two cases of radius shortening and one 10°malrotation. No primary malrotation was recorded, but secondary loss of alignment was seen in the distal part of the radius and the proximal part of the ulna. Functional results according to the Anderson criteria were excellent and good in 87% of the cases. Intramedullary mailing provides good stability to mid- and distal-third shaft fractures of the ulna and mid- and proximalthird shaft fractures of the radius, particularly in AO type A and type B fractures. The technical aspects of the method are analysed in detail in this paper

  9. UNSTABLE FEMORAL FRACTURES TREATED WITH TITANIUM ELASTIC INTRAMEDULLARY NAILS, IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Soni, Jamil Faissal; Schelle, Gisele; Valenza, Weverley; Pavelec, Anna Carolina; Souza, Camila Deneka Arantes

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the indications, epidemiology, associated lesions, complications and prognosis among children with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who were treated with titanium elastic intramedullary nails. Method: This was a retrospective analysis on 24 patients aged 5-12 years with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who underwent surgical treatment with elastic titanium intramedullary nails at the Cajuru University Hospital, Curitiba-PR, between April 2002 and March 2008, wit...

  10. Multiple fracture of medullary tube during intramedullary nailing of long bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakharia, M R; Lehto, S A; Mohler, D G

    2000-01-01

    Intramedullary nailing is an accepted treatment for the fixation of femoral and tibial shaft fractures. There is a low but significant incidence of intraoperative complications during intramedullary nailing. During this procedure, a medullary tube may be used to exchange the bent olive-tipped reaming guidewire for the straight guidewire. A review of the literature found only one report of a fracture of the medullary tube. Two cases in which the medullary tube fractured into multiple pieces are presented.

  11. [Non-union of the clavicle after intramedullary nailing with a steel Kirschner wire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faymonville, C; Jubel, A; Schiffer, G

    2010-04-01

    Elastically stable intramedullary nailing is a safe surgical procedure used to treat mid-shaft clavicular fractures of types A and B according to the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) classification. In the case reported intramedullary fixation with a Kirschner wire and an incorrectly performed surgical technique led to pseudoarthrosis (non-union). After revision surgery with an elastically stable titanium nail and a correct surgical technique, fracture healing was achieved.

  12. Clinical Outcome of Ream Versus Unream Intramedullary Nailing for Femoral Shaft Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Bagheri, Farshid; Sharifi, Seyed Reza; Mirzadeh, Navid Reza; Hootkani, Alireza; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohamad Hosein; Ashraf, Hami

    2013-01-01

    Background Stabilization of fractures with an intramedullary nail is a widespread technique in the treatment of femoral shaft fractures in adults; however, to ream or not to ream is still being debated. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to determine clinical results following unreamed versus ream intramedullary nailing of femoral fractures. Patients and Methods Between January 2008 and August 2009, 50 patients with femoral shaft fractures were treated with unreamed or reamed ...

  13. Reamed versus unreamed intramedullary nailing for the treatment of femoral fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A-Bing; Zhang, Wei-Jiang; Guo, Wei-Jun; Wang, Xin-Hua; Jin, Hai-Ming; Zhao, You-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and objective: Intramedullary nailing is commonly used for treating femoral shaft fractures, one of the most common long bone fractures in adults. The reamed intramedullary nail is considered the standard implant for femoral fractures. This meta-analysis was performed to verify the superiority of reamed intramedullary nailing over unreamed intramedullary nailing in fractures of the femoral shaft in adults. Subgroup analysis of implant failure and secondary procedure was also performed. Methods: Electronic literature databases were used to identify relevant publications and included MEDLINE (Ovid interface), EMBASE (Ovid interface), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Wiley Online Library). The versions available on January 30, 2016, were utilized. Only human studies, which were designed as randomized controlled clinical trials, were included. Two authors independently evaluated the quality of original research publications and extracted data from the studies that met the criteria. Results: Around 8 randomized controlled trials involving 1078 patients were included. Reamed intramedullary nailing was associated with shorter time to consolidation of the fracture (SMD = –0.62, 95% CI = –0.89 to –0.35, P fractures using reamed intramedullary nailing is recommended. PMID:27442651

  14. Effect of autocontrol micromotion intramedullary interlocking nail on fracture healing: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-zhou; Guo, Xiao-dong; Zhao, Ju-cai; Wang, Yi-jin

    2006-06-01

    To investigate the effect of autocontrol micromotion locking nail (AMLN) on experimental fracture healing and its mechanism. 16 goats undergoing both sides of transverse osteotomy of the femoral shafts were fixed intramedullary with AMLN and Gross-Kempf (GK) nail, respectively. The follow-up time was 7, 14, 28 and 56 days. Roentgenographic, biomechanical, histological, scanning electromicroscopic and biochemical analyses were done. (1) The strength of anticompression, antiflexion and antitorsion in the fractural end in the AMLN-fixed group was higher than that of GK nail-fixed group; whereas, the rate of stress shelter in the fractured end decreased significantly (P<0.01). (2) The content of the total collagen, insoluble collagen, calcium and phosphate in the AMLN-fixed group was higher than that in the GK nail-fixed group (P<0.05). (3) Histological observation and quantitative analysis of calluses revealed that AMLN could promote the growth of bridge calluses and periosteum calluses. Hence the fracture healing and remolding process achieved early, which was much better than traditional GK nail fixation. (P<0.05). (4) 7-14 days postoperation, the calluses of AMLN-fixed group was flourish and camellarly arranged and the collagen fibril formed constantly in the absorption lacuna of bone trabecula. 28-56 days postoperation, the collagen fibril was flourish around the absorption lacuna and was parallel to the bone's longitudinal axis. Active bony absorption and formation were seen, so was remolding and rebuilding. Haversian system was intact and the bony structural net was very tenacious because of the deposition of calcium salt. None of the above findings was observed in the GK nail-fixed group. The design of AMLN accords well with the plastic fixation theory. As the geometry ametabolic system constituted by the intramedullary fixation instruments and the proximal and distal end of the fracture is very firm and stable, the disturbance to the physical stress

  15. The Effect of Blocking Screws on Union of Infraisthmal Femur Fractures Stabilized with a Retrograde Intramedullary Nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Bryan; Colley, Ryan; Ottomeyer, Christina; Palmer, Ryan; Pugh, Kevin

    2018-01-05

    To investigate the effect of blocking screws on the union rate and stability of infra-isthmal femur fractures treated with retrograde intramedullary nail (RIMN) insertion. Retrospective cohort study SETTING:: A single level 1 trauma centerPatients/Participants: All patients with an infra-isthmal femur fracture treated with a RIMN from 2005 to 2012. All fractures were treated with a RIMN. Blocking screws (BS) were used at the discretion of the treating surgeon. 1) Radiographic time to union, 2) Initial post-operative sagittal and coronal angulation, and 3) Final sagittal and coronal angulation RESULTS:: Neither the average time to union (BS 21.1 weeks vs. 21.8 weeks), nor union rates (BS 61% vs. 77%) were statistically different between blocking screw and non-blocking screw constructs. No significant alignment differences existed whether BS were used or not. In this study, we were not able to verify our hypothesis. In fact, we did not find any significant advantages when blocking screws were added to a retrograde intramedullary nail construct for distal femur fractures with respect to union time, union rate, or improvements in alignment. Additional studies are needed to determine the actual benefit of blocking screws in the treatment of infra-isthmal femoral shaft fractures treated with retrograde intramedullary nailing.

  16. Immediate weight-bearing after treatment of a comminuted fracture of the femoral shaft with a statically locked intramedullary nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumback, R J; Toal, T R; Murphy-Zane, M S; Novak, V P; Belkoff, S M

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this two-part investigation was to test the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of immediate weight-bearing after treatment of fractures of the shaft of the femur with a statically locked intramedullary nail. In the first part of the investigation, a biomechanical study was performed to determine the fatigue strength of eleven different statically locked intramedullary nail constructs. Segmentally comminuted midisthmal fractures were simulated with use of sections of polyvinyl chloride pipe; each construct was cyclically loaded in compression with use of physiologically relevant loads in a materials testing machine at eight hertz. The fatigue tests were conducted according to the so-called staircase method, and the construct was considered to have run out (exceeded its anticipated service life) if it had not failed after 500,000 cycles. In the second part of the study, a clinical investigation of immediate weight-bearing after treatment of comminuted fractures of the femoral shaft with a Russell-Taylor (RT-2) construct was performed. Complete follow-up data were available for twenty-eight of the thirty-five patients (thirty-six fractures) entered into the study. In Part I of the study, two constructs, a statically locked twelve-millimeter-diameter Russell-Taylor femoral nail with two distal locking screws (RT-2) and a statically locked twelve-millimeter-diameter Zimmer femoral nail with two distal locking screws (Z-2), had significantly higher mean fatigue strengths (2171 and 2113 newtons, respectively) than all other constructs tested (plocking screw demonstrated significantly lower (pnail may be possible, even for patients who have a comminuted fracture of the femoral shaft. In Part II of the study, twenty-six of the twenty-eight patients were bearing full weight on the fractured limb or limbs at the six-week follow-up visit. All fractures united; only one of these needed an additional procedure (the removal of the screws five months after the

  17. Treatment of tibial fractures by reaming and intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, L B; Johnson, K D

    1986-07-01

    We treated 112 fractures of the tibia by manipulative reduction, reaming of the medullary canal, and fixation of the fracture fragments with an intramedullary nail. Seventy-six of the fractures were acute, and eight of these were second or third-degree open fractures. The other thirty-six fractures had a non-union, osteotomy for malunion, or failure of other types of treatment. Follow-up of 100 fractures showed union in all but one, which was in a drug abuser who had an amputation due to infection. The main complication was infection, which was successfully treated in six of seven fractures. The method of treatment, employing either closed or open technique and recently making use of interlocking bolts to stabilize one or both principal fracture fragments on the nail, is an excellent one for unstable acute fractures and for secondary procedures in fractures that are not associated with infection. The infection rate was increased with the open surgical technique. The few contraindications to its use are described.

  18. [Augmentative locking compression plate (LCP) combined with bone graft for the treatment of aseptic femoral shaft nonunion after intramedullary nailing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei-da; Gao, Yao-zu; Yuan, Wei; Du, Jin-qiang; Wei, Xiao-chun

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the effect of augmentative locking compression plate combined with bone graft in treating aseptic femoral shaft nonunion after intramedullary nailing. Twenty-one cases with aseptic femoral shaft nonunion after intramedullary nailing from January 2007 to January 2013 were treated,including 18 males and 3 females with a mean age of 37.7 years (ranged from 23 to 64 years). The mean period of nonunion after surgery was 23.9 months (ranged from 9 to 62 months). According to Weber-Cech classification,10 of those 21 cases were hypertrophic nonunion,7 were atrophic, and 4 had oligotrophic fracture nonunion. All patients retained the original intramedullary nail, and applied with augmentation plating of 6 to 8 holes locking compression plate, unicortical fixation with 2 to 3 locking screws in the proximal or distal end, with simultaneous autologous iliac bone grafting. After treatment,all patients were allowed to partial weight-bearing until full weight-bearing according to the radiological results. All patients were followed up and were evaluated with clinical and imaging results. All patients were followed up from 8 to 24 months, averaged (13.5±3.5) months,which showed clinical union at 4 to 8 months, averaged (6.0±1.0) months and radiological solid union at 7 to 12 months, averaged (9.1±1.5) months. No such complications as infection,hardware loosening or breaking were found. Augmentative locking compression plate(LCP) combined with bone graft for aseptic femoral shaft nonunion after intramedullary nail has a satisfied clinical efficacy. It's an useful and simple method.

  19. Intramedullary nailing with reaming to treat non-union of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledge, S L; Johnson, K D; Henley, M B; Watson, J T

    1989-08-01

    The records of fifty-one patients who were treated by intramedullary nailing with reaming for non-union of the tibia were retrospectively reviewed. The fractures had been treated initially by closed reduction and immobilization in a cast, external fixation followed by immobilization in a cast, fixation by pins incorporated in a plaster cast, minimum internal fixation and immobilization in a cast, dynamic compression plating, or intramedullary nailing with or without reaming. After the initial treatment had failed, intramedullary nailing with reaming was done to gain union. Although closed nailing of the tibia was preferred, in thirty-three patients, the site of the non-union was opened to improve alignment by performing an osteotomy or to remove failed hardware. Bone grafts from the iliac crest were used in ten patients, and a fibular ostectomy or osteotomy was done in thirty-three. Of thirty-four open fractures (fourteen grade I, seven grade II, and thirteen grade III), eight were infected at the time of intramedullary nailing. The average time of the diagnosis of a non-union was 9.6 months; the average length of follow-up after nailing was twenty months. In forty-nine (96 per cent) of the fifty-one patients, tibial union occurred at an average of seven months postoperatively. Complications included persistent infection (three patients), acquired infection after intramedullary nailing with reaming (three patients), fracture of the nail that necessitated an additional operation (two patients), shortening of more than one centimeter (two patients), malrotation of more than 15 degrees (one patient), peroneal palsy (one patient), and amputation (one patient). When used to treat non-union of the tibia, intramedullary nailing with reaming can produce union as effectively as other alternatives, while enabling the patient to function more normally without external immobilization or walking aids.

  20. [Locked intramedullary nailing in treatment of femur and tibia delayed union and pseudoarthrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Krzysztof; Gaździk, Tadeusz Szymon; Jaworski, Jerzy Mirosław; Gajda, Tomasz

    2004-01-01

    Five patients treated operatively on account of tibia and femur shaft delayed union and pseudoarthrosis were re-operated by locked intramedullary nailing. The method permits stable bone fixation. Intramedullary canal reaming stimulates bone union, as it refreshes fracture site and is a source of bone graft. Intramedullary nail covers anatomical axis of bone and, in the case of femur, is close to its mechanical axis. It diminishes the risk of implant breakage. The method permits active and efficient rehabilitation. Some fractures stabilised with external fixator or operated by Zespol or Polfix method can be re-operated by close technic. It shortens time of operation and diminishes its aggressiveness. In our opinion locked intramedullary nailing is an efficient method in treatment of tibia and femur shaft delayed union and pseudoarthrosis.

  1. Effect of unreamed, limited reamed, and standard reamed intramedullary nailing on cortical bone porosity and new bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupel, T M; Weinberg, J A; Aksenov, S A; Schemitsch, E H

    2001-01-01

    To compare the effects of unreamed nail insertion and reamed nail insertion with limited and standard canal reaming on cortical bone porosity and new bone formation. A canine segmental tibial fracture was created in fifteen adult dogs. The tibiae were stabilized with a statically locked 6.5-millimeter intramedullary nail without prior canal reaming (n = 5), after limited reaming to 7.0 millimeters (n = 5), or after standard canal reaming to 9.0 millimeters (n = 5). Porosity, new bone formation, and the mineral apposition rate of cortical bone were directly compared between the three nailing techniques. A significant increase in cortical bone porosity and new bone formation was seen in all three groups of experimental animals compared with the control tibiae. The overall lowest porosity levels were measured in the limited reamed group, with similar porosity levels measured in the unreamed and standard reamed groups. Porosity was lower in the limited reamed group in the entire cortex of the segmental and distal cross sections, as well as the endosteal, anterior, and posterior cortices along the length of the tibia. Overall, there was no difference in the amount of new bone formation or the mineral apposition rate between the three groups of animals at eleven weeks after surgery. The results of this study suggest that limited intramedullary reaming is a biologically sound alternative for the treatment of tibial diaphyseal fractures in which the circulation is already compromised.

  2. Anterior Knee Pain after Tibial Intra-medullary Nailing: Is it Predictable?

    OpenAIRE

    Soraganvi, PC; Anand-Kumar, BS; Rajagopalakrishnan, R; Praveen-Kumar, BA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Intramedullary nailing has been used frequently for the treatment of tibial diaphyseal fractures. Chronic anterior knee pain has been considered the most frequent post-operative complication of this technique. We investigated the relationship between anterior knee pain and position of nail tip in proximal tibia. Methods: 103 patients were selected among patients who underwent interlocking nailing in our institution. Patients with other factors that might ...

  3. Intramedullary nailing in the treatment of open fractures of the tibia and fibula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, F J; Hodgkinson, A H; Harvey, P M

    1975-10-01

    Intramedullary nailing of thirty acute displaced open fractures of the tibia and fibula resulted in union with only one superficial infection. The low incidence of sepsis is attributed to the use of the curved malleable Hodgkinson tibial nail which requires no reaming, renders the operation less difficult and traumatic, and interferes minimally with bone vascularity. Fibular nailing was an effective means of stabilizing nine of the twelve fractures close to the ankle joint.

  4. Retrograde Tibial Nailing: a minimally invasive and biomechanically superior alternative to angle-stable plate osteosynthesis in distal tibia fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, antegrade intramedullary nailing and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) represent the main surgical alternatives in distal tibial fractures. However, neither choice is optimal for all bony and soft tissue injuries. The Retrograde Tibial Nail (RTN) is a small-caliber prototype implant, which is introduced through a 2-cm-long incision at the tip of the medial malleolus with stab incisions sufficient for interlocking. During this project, we investigated the feasibility of retrograde tibial nailing in a cadaver model and conducted biomechanical testing. Methods Anatomical implantations of the RTN were carried out in AO/OTA 43 A1-3 fracture types in three cadaveric lower limbs. Biomechanical testing was conducted in an AO/OTA 43 A3 fracture model for extra-axial compression, torsion, and destructive extra-axial compression. Sixteen composite tibiae were used to compare the RTN against an angle-stable plate osteosynthesis (Medial Distal Tibial Plate, Synthes®). Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t test. Results Retrograde intramedullary nailing is feasible in simple fracture types by closed manual reduction and percutaneous reduction forceps, while in highly comminuted fractures, the use of a large distractor can aid the reduction. Biomechanical testing shows a statistically superior stability (p nail meets the requirements of maximum soft tissue protection by a minimally invasive surgical approach with the ability of secure fracture fixation by multiple locking options. Retrograde tibial nailing with the RTN is a promising concept in the treatment of distal tibia fractures. PMID:24886667

  5. UNSTABLE FEMORAL FRACTURES TREATED WITH TITANIUM ELASTIC INTRAMEDULLARY NAILS, IN CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Jamil Faissal; Schelle, Gisele; Valenza, Weverley; Pavelec, Anna Carolina; Souza, Camila Deneka Arantes

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the indications, epidemiology, associated lesions, complications and prognosis among children with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who were treated with titanium elastic intramedullary nails. This was a retrospective analysis on 24 patients aged 5-12 years with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who underwent surgical treatment with elastic titanium intramedullary nails at the Cajuru University Hospital, Curitiba-PR, between April 2002 and March 2008, with a minimum follow-up of 36 months. The epidemiological data, angular deviations, leg shortening and bone consolidation were evaluated. The medical files of 113 cases operated between April 2002 and March 2008 were reassessed. From these, 24 cases of unstable femoral diaphysis fractures treated with elastic titanium intramedullary nails with retrograde insertion were included in the study. There were two bilateral fractures and two exposed fractures. Seven patients were female and 17 were male, and the mean age was 8.3 years. The following were presented at the end of the study: shortening, varus or valgus displacement, final retrocurvatum or antecurvatum of zero, and absence of delayed consolidation or pseudarthrosis. The elastic titanium intramedullary nails were easily placed and removed. We believe that using elastic titanium intramedullary nails is a good option for fixation of unstable femoral fractures in children.

  6. Multiple flexible intramedullary nailing for the treatment of humeral bone cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guity M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Simple bone cyst is a common benign lesion in the proximal humerus, especially in prepubertal children. Up to 75 percent of patients with the bone cyst have a pathologic fracture and the most significant complication is recurrent pathologic fracture. Since the process of spontaneous healing of these fractures is rare, treatment is required. Ideal treatment for simple bone cyst should stabilize pathologic fractures, assist healing and provide a quick return to normal activity with reduced complication and recurrence. Methods: In this descriptive case series study, 24 patients with simple bone cysts of the humerus were selected for retrograde flexible intramedullary nailing from the lateral cortex of the distal humerus, since 2000 to 2005 at Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran. The mean age of the patients was 14.4 years, ranging from 6-39 years. Results were evaluated by plain radiography using the classification system of Capanna et al. Results: The mean duration of follow up for 23 of the patients was 31 (9-51 months. One patient with short-term of follow-up was excluded. Of these patients, 91.3% were healed either completely (65.2% or with residual minor defect (26.1%. Only one cyst (4.3% persisted with no response to treatment and one patient (4.3% had a recurrence of the cyst. However, there was no instance of recurrent pathologic fracture among these patients. Conclusion: This study shows that flexible intramedullary nailing is an effective treatment for humeral simple bone cysts that reduces the chance of complication, recurrence of cyst or pathologic fracture. This technique provides sufficient stability for quick return to normal activity.

  7. A biomechanical study on flexible intramedullary nails used to treat pediatric femoral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jason K; Werner, Frederick W; Dhawan, Raman; Evans, Peter J; Kelley, Sean; Webster, Dwight A

    2005-11-01

    Flexible intramedullary nails have been indicated to treat femoral fractures in pediatric patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the stability of simulated transverse fractures after retrograde intramedullary flexible nail fixation. Various nail diameter combinations were tested using composite femurs in bending, torsion, and a combined axial/bending test where a vertical compressive force was applied to the femoral head. The cross-sectional percent area fill of the nails within the femurs was also determined. In 4 point bending, the greatest repair stiffness was 12% of the intact stiffness. In torsion, the greatest stiffness was 1% of the intact stiffness for either internal or external rotation. The greatest repair stiffness was 80% of the intact stiffness for a compressive load applied to the femoral head. Nail combinations with single nail diameters greater than 40% of the mid-shaft canal width, as measured from an AP radiograph, prevented the fracture from being reduced and left a posterior gap. Flexible intramedullary nails may be of value in the treatment of pediatric femoral fractures, but care must be taken to insert nails that are correctly sized for the canal and to protect the healing fracture from high torsional and bending loads.

  8. A locked hip screw-intramedullary nail (cephalomedullary nail) for the treatment of fractures of the proximal part of the femur combined with fractures of the femoral shaft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, A; Ekeland, A; Grøgaard, B; Dokke, J R

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with complex femoral fractures (combined shaft and proximal femoral fractures) were treated with a modified Grosse-Kempf slotted locking nail (cephalomedullary nail), wherein two screws were inserted in the hip. Four types of complex, multifocal femoral fractures were represented in the series. Eleven of the femoral shaft fractures were secondary to a previous, internally fixed, not yet united hip fracture (type I). Ten comminuted peritrochanteric fractures occurred in normal bone (type II). Three similar fractures were pathologic because of metastasis. Two patients had an ipsilateral fracture of the femoral shaft and the trochanteric area (type III), and one of the shaft and the femoral neck (type IV). Locking was made static in 24 cases. Additional cerclage wiring was used in three type II fractures. Five complications were as follows: one cutting out of a screw in the femoral head, two fractures of the nail, one deep venous thrombosis, and one wound hematoma. Reoperations were two salvage operations using a new nail and one evacuation of hematoma. One patient with multiple injuries and four elderly patients died within 2 months. Eighteen patients with fractures in normal bone were followed for a median of 20 (6 to 37) months. All fractures united. Two nails were removed. The end result was excellent in ten patients, good in seven, and fair in one (2-cm shortening and 20-degree external rotation). We conclude that a locked intramedullary construct with locking screws in femoral neck and distal femur controls a complex fracture situation well.

  9. Medial migration of the intramedullary Gamma 3 nail - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Costa Pinheiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Intertrochanteric femur fractures are very common in patients over 65 years old, and are often associated with osteoporosis. Proximal femoral nails are preferred because of their biomechanical advantages in the treatment of these fractures, especially if the fracture is unstable. However, many complications associated with intramedullary fracture fixation have been described. The medial migration of the intramedullary gamma nail is a rare complication. The authors report an uncommon but potentially fatal complication, medial and intrapelvic migration of the intramedullary Gamma 3 nails, recorded after one month of osteosynthesis. This article aims to alert the orthopedic community to this rare complication, which may present a high risk of morbidity and mortality.

  10. Surgical tips of intramedullary nailing in severely bowed femurs in atypical femur fractures: Simulation with 3D printed model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jai Hyung; Lee, Yongkoo; Shon, Oog-Jin; Shon, Hyun Chul; Kim, Ji Wan

    2016-06-01

    The surgical management of atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) is complex in cases with severe bowing of the femur, being associated with a high rate of failure. Our first aim was to use preoperative templating and 3D printed model characterise the technical difficulties associated with use of current commercially available intramedullary nail (IMN) systems for the management of AFFs with severe bowing. Our second aim was to use outcomes of our 3D printing analysis to define technical criteria to overcome these problems. The modelled femur with 3D printing had an anterior bowing curvature radius of 772mm and an angle of lateral bowing of 15.4°. Nine commercially available IMN systems were evaluated in terms of position of the nail within the medullary canal, occurrence of perforation of femoral cortex by the distal tip of the nail, and location of the site of perforation relative to the knee joint. The following IMN systems were evaluated: unreamed femoral nail (UFN), cannulated femoral nail (CFN), Sirus nail, right and left expert Asian femoral nail (A2FN), right and left Zimmer Natural Nail (ZNN), proximal femoral nail anti-rotation (PFNA), and Zimmer Cephalomedullary Nail (CMN). Along the sagittal plane, the UFN, CFN and Sirus systems were acceptably contained within the medullary canal, as well as the "opposite side" A2FN and ZNN. Only the Sirus IMN system was contained along the coronal plane. The distal part of the all other IMN systems perforated the anterior cortex of the femur, at distances ranging between 2.8 and 11.7cm above the distal end of the femoral condyles. Using simulated fracture reduction in the 3D printed model, none of the 9 IMN systems provided acceptable anatomical reduction of the fracture. A residual gap in fragment position and translation was provided by the "opposite side" ZNN, followed by the UFN and Sirus systems. Commercially available IMN systems showed mismatch with severely bowed femurs. Our simulation supports that fit of these

  11. Evaluation of the Stryker S2 IM Nail Distal Targeting Device for reduction of radiation exposure: a case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastopoulos, George; Ntagiopoulos, Panagiotis G; Chissas, Dionisios; Loupasis, George; Asimakopoulos, Antonios; Athanaselis, Eustratios; Megas, Panagiotis

    2008-10-01

    Distal locking is one challenging step during intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures that can lead to an increase of radiation exposure. In the present study, the authors describe a technique for the distal locking of femoral nails, implementing a new targeting device in an attempt to reduce radiation exposure and operational time. Over a 2-year period, 127 consecutive cases of femoral shaft fractures were included in the study. All cases were treated with nailing of femoral shaft fractures with an unslotted reamed antegrade femoral nail and distal locking was performed with the use of a proximally mounted aiming device. Mean duration of the procedure was 63.5 18.1 min while the duration for distal locking was 6.6 +/- 2.6 min. In all successful cases, exposure from intraoperative fluoroscopy was 17.2 +/- 7.4 s for the whole operative procedure, and for distal locking was 2 shots, 1.35 s (range, 0.9-2.2 s) and 1.9 mGy (range, 1.1-2.9 mGy). Five cases (3.9%) were unsuccessful, but overall no intraoperative complications were encountered from the application of this technique. The ability of the device to correspond to the level of nail deformation and to properly identify the distal holes, reduced exposure to radiation compared to other published reports, and should be considered as a valuable tool for distal locking of femoral fractures.

  12. Permanent antibiotic impregnated intramedullary nail in diabetic limb salvage: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason B. Woods

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Managing complications after attempted hind foot and ankle arthrodesis with intramedullary nail fixation is a challenge. This situation becomes more problematic in the patient with diabetes mellitus and multiple comorbidities. Infection and subsequent osteomyelitis can be a devastating, limb threatening complication associated with these procedures. The surgeon must manage both the infectious process and the skeletal instability concurrently. This article provides a literature review and detailed management strategies for a modified technique of employing antibiotic impregnated polymethylmethacrylate-coated intramedullary nailing.

  13. Attritional rupture of extensor pollicis longus: a rare complication following elastic stable intramedullary nailing of a paediatric radial fracture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sproule, James A

    2011-01-01

    Elastic stable intramedullary nail fixation has become established as an acceptable method of treatment for diaphyseal fractures of both forearm bones in the paediatric population. It is considered safe, minimally invasive and does not compromise physeal growth. We report a case of delayed rupture of extensor pollicis longus due to attrition over the sharp edges of a protruding nail end after elastic stable intramedullary nailing of a paediatric radial diaphyseal fracture.

  14. Meta-analysis of reamed versus unreamed intramedullary nailing for open tibial fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Open fractures of the tibial diaphysis are usually caused by high-energy trauma and associated with severe bone and soft tissue injury. Reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing are often used for treatment of tibial injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of reamed versus unreamed intramedullary nailing for open tibial fractures (OTF). Methods A meta-analysis was conducted according to the guidelines of the Cochrane Collaboration using databases containing the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMbase, Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese VIP information, and WanFang Database. Randomized and semi-randomized controlled clinical trials of both reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing for OTF treatment were analyzed using Reviewer Manager (RevMan5.0) software. Results A total of 695 references were initially identified from the selected databases. However, only four studies were assessed, matching all the eligibility criteria conducted by two independent reviewers. The result showed that there was no statistical difference in healing rate, secondary surgery rate, implant failure rate, osteofascial compartment syndrome, and infection during the postoperative period between reamed and unreamed nails in OTF. Conclusions Findings of this study suggest that there was no statistical difference between reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing in clinical treatment of OTF. However, the result of this meta-analysis should be cautiously accepted due to some limitations, and further studies are still needed. PMID:25149501

  15. Comparison of non-compression and compression interlocking intramedullary nailing in rabbit femoral shaft osteotomy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baki, Mehmet Emre; Aldemir, Cengiz; Duygun, Fatih; Doğan, Ali; Kerimoğlu, Gökçen

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to compare non-compression and compression intramedullary nailing in an experimental femoral shaft osteotomy model in terms of radiological, histological, and biomechanical aspects. Twenty-four white New Zealand rabbits (average weight 4.3 kg; range 4 to 4.8 kg) were divided into three groups. A right femoral osteotomy was performed in all rabbits and all femurs were fixed with titanium compression interlocking intramedullary nail. After locking of nails, no compression was performed in group 1 while 0.5 mm and 1 mm compressions were performed in group 2 and 3, respectively. All rabbits were sacrificed four weeks after operation. Fracture sites were examined histologically and radiologically. Finite element analyses were performed. Radiological scores of groups 2 and 3 were significantly higher than group 1. There was no significant difference between groups 2 and 3 radiologically. Best histological scores were achieved in group 2. According to finite element analyses, osteotomy site in group 2 was exposed to 1240 N of load and 34.5 MPa of mean stress. Compression interlocking intramedullary nailing provides faster fracture healing than non-compression interlocking intramedullary nailing. Best histological fracture healing scores were obtained with 0.5 mm compression performed at the fracture site.

  16. Intramedullary fixation of fibular fractures with flexible titanium elastic nails: surgical technique and a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simovitch, Ryan W; Radkowski, Christopher A; Zura, Robert D

    2006-01-01

    Intramedullary fixation of fibular fractures has been reported in the literature. Its advantages include ease of fixation as well as minimal soft tissue disruption. Various implants have been described, including the Inyo nail and Rush rods. Several studies have examined their use in older people with osteoporotic bone as well as in instances where soft tissue preservation is of concern. To our knowledge, no technique has been described using flexible titanium elastic nails (TENS) (Synthes; Paoli, PA). We illustrate such a technique as well as a case report that demonstrates our experience. Insertion of flexible titanium elastic nails requires attention to detail with preservation of the peroneal tendons and their sheath. While such a construct cannot control rotation, it can preserve length as well as prevent varus and valgus displacement. Future endeavors could focus on the biomechanical principles of intramedullary fibular fixation with TENS nails.

  17. A comparison of effi cacy of femoral and tibial fractures healing treated by static and dynamic intramedullary nails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đemil Omerović

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intramedullary nailing is synthesis and  consolidation of fracture fragments with the main goalto gain strength and permanent placement of the implants. Two techniques of intramedullary osteosynthesis are used: with dynamic or with static intramedullary nail. Dynamization include conversion of static nail by removing screws from the longest fragment. The aim of this study is to determine whether there is a difference in the speed and quality of healing of the type A and B fractures of the femur and tibia treated by static or dynamic intramedullary nails and to compare the results.Methods: The study was conducted on a total of 129 patients with closed fractures of the diaphysis of the femur and tibia type A and type B. Patients were divided into two groups, based on the applied operating method, static or dynamic intramedullary osteosynthesis.Results: The average number of weeks of healing femoral and tibial fractures was slightly in advantage of static intramedullary osteosynthesis, it was 17.08 weeks (SD=3.382. The average number of weeks of healing in 23 patients with fractures of the femur, treated by dynamic intramedullary osteosynthesis was 17.83 (SD=2.978.Conclusion: We can conclude that static intramedullary nailing osteosynthesis unable movements between fragments which directly stimulates bone formation and formation of minimal callus. Static intramedullary ostesinthesys resolve the problem of stabilizing the fracture, limb shortening and rotation of fragments.

  18. Use and abuse of flexible intramedullary nailing in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascombes, Pierre; Haumont, Thierry; Journeau, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) has became a well-accepted method of osteosynthesis of diaphyseal fractures in children and adolescents for many reasons including the following: no need for postoperative cast, primary bone union with avoidance of growth plate injury, and minimum invasive surgery. The principle is to introduce 2 elastic nails, titanium or stainless steel, into the medullary canal through a metaphyseal approach. The bended nails must have their maximum of curve at the level of the fracture, and their orientation, most often face to face, is in charge of the reduction and, so far, the stabilization, of the fracture. The usual size of the nails is equal to 0.4 times the diameter of the medullary canal. As far as possible, a bigger diameter is better than a thinner one. Most fractures of the femur are treated with a bipolar retrograde ESIN when some distal fractures need an antegrade subtrochanteric approach. Forearm fractures need a combined retrograde radial and antegrade ulnar through the posterolateral part of the olecranon. Humerus and tibial diaphyseal fractures may also be treated with ESIN. Complications are mainly caused by technical errors including too-thin nails, asymmetry of the frame, and malorientation of the implants. Nonunion was never observed in fractures of the femur and the forearm; osteomyelitis rate is 2%, and mean overgrowth of the femur is less than 10 mm before the age of 10 years. Indications of ESIN are fractures of the diaphysis: all the fractures of the femur between the age of 6 years and the end of growth except for the severe open grade III fractures, all the unstable fractures of the forearm, and some unstable fractures of the humerus and the tibia during adolescence or before the end of growth. In addition, ESIN is indicated in polytraumatism and multiple injuries. The good results of this reliable technique are obtained when surgeons have a good knowledge of it, especially in the understanding of the

  19. Comparison of Tibial Intramedullary Nailing Guided by Digital Technology Versus Conventional Method: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Xu, Xian; Li, Xu; Wu, Wei; Cai, Junfeng; Lu, Qingyou

    2017-06-12

    BACKGROUND This prospective study aimed to compare clinical effects of intramedullary nailing guided by digital and conventional technologies in treatment of tibial fractures. MATERIAL AND METHODS Thirty-two patients (mean age 43 years, 18 males and 14 females) who were treated for tibial fractures from October 2010 to October 2012 were enrolled. They were sequentially randomized to receive intramedullary nailing guided by either digital technology (digital group, n=16) or conventional technology (conventional group, n=16). The operation time, fluoroscopy times, fracture healing time, distance between the actual and planned insertion point, postoperative lower limb alignment, and functional recovery were recorded for all patients. RESULTS The mean operation time in the digital group was 43.1±6.2 min compared with 48.7±8.3 min for the conventional technology (P=0.039). The fluoroscopy times and distance between the actual and planned insertion point were significantly lower in the digital group than in the conventional group (both Pdigital technology. No difference was found in fracture healing time and good postoperative lower limb alignment between the digital and conventional groups (P=0.083 and P=0.310), as well as the effective rate (100% vs. 87.50%, P=0.144). CONCLUSIONS Intramedullary nailing guided by digital technology has many advantages in treatment of tibial fractures compared to conventional technology, including shorter operation time, reduced fluoroscopy times, and decreased distance between the actual and planned insertion point of the intramedullary nail.

  20. Local and Widespread Hyperalgesia After Isolated Tibial Shaft Fractures Treated with Intramedullary Nailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter; Elsøe, Rasmus; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    postoperatively after intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fracture. METHODS: A total of 39 patients were included in this 12-month follow-up study. After 6 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively the pain intensity was measured on a visual analog scale (VAS) and the pressure pain sensitivity was assessed...

  1. Prognostic factors for predicting outcomes after intramedullary nailing of the tibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schemitsch, Emil H.; Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Sanders, David W.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Tornetta, Paul; Walter, Stephen D.; Zdero, Rad; Goslings, J. C.; Teague, David; Jeray, Kyle; McKee, Michael D.; Sprague, Sheila; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Buckingham, Lisa; Leece, Pamela; Viveiros, Helena; Mignott, Tashay; Ansell, Natalie; Sidorkewicz, Natalie; Agel, Julie; Bombardier, Claire; Berlin, Jesse A.; Bosse, Michael; Browner, Bruce; Gillespie, Brenda; Jones, Alan; O'Brien, Peter; Poolman, Rudolf; Kreder, Hans J.; Stephen, David J. G.; Axelrod, Terry S.; Yee, Albert J. M.; Richards, Robin R.; Finkelstein, Joel; Gofton, Wade; Murnaghan, John; Schatztker, Joseph; Ford, Michael; Bulmer, Beverly; Conlan, Lisa; Laflamme, G. Yves; Berry, Gregory; Beaumont, Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Laflamme, Georges-Henri; Gagnon, Sylvain; Malo, Michel; Fernandes, Julio; Poirier, Marie-France; Waddell, James P.; Bogoch, Earl R.; Daniels, Timothy R.; McBroom, Robert R.; Vicente, Milena R.; Storey, Wendy; Wild, Lisa M.; McCormack, Robert; Perey, Bertrand; Goetz, Thomas J.; Pate, Graham; Penner, Murray J.; Panagiotopoulos, Kostas; Pirani, Shafique; Dommisse, Ian G.; Loomer, Richard L.; Stone, Trevor; Moon, Karyn; Zomar, Mauri; Webb, Lawrence X.; Teasdall, Robert D.; Birkedal, John Peter; Martin, David Franklin; Ruch, David S.; Kilgus, Douglas J.; Pollock, David C.; Harris, Mitchel Brion; Wiesler, Ethan Ron; Ward, William G.; Shilt, Jeffrey Scott; Koman, Andrew L.; Poehling, Gary G.; Kulp, Brenda; Creevy, William R.; Stein, Andrew B.; Bono, Christopher T.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Brown, Desmond; Pacicca, Donna; Sledge, John B.; Foster, Timothy E.; Voloshin, Ilva; Bolton, Jill; Carlisle, Hope; Shaughnessy, Lisa; Obremskey, William T.; LeCroy, C. Michael; Meinberg, Eric G.; Messer, Terry M.; Craig, William L.; Dirschl, Douglas R.; Caudle, Robert; Harris, Tim; Elhert, Kurt; Hage, William; Jones, Robert; Piedrahita, Luis; Schricker, Paul O.; Driver, Robin; Godwin, Jean; Kregor, Philip James; Tennent, Gregory; Truchan, Lisa M.; Sciadini, Marcus; Shuler, Franklin D.; Driver, Robin E.; Nading, Mary Alice; Neiderstadt, Jacky; Vap, Alexander R.; Vallier, Heather A.; Patterson, Brendan M.; Wilber, John H.; Wilber, Roger G.; Sontich, John K.; Moore, Timothy Alan; Brady, Drew; Cooperman, Daniel R.; Davis, John A.; Cureton, Beth Ann; Mandel, Scott; Orr, R. Douglas; Sadler, John T. S.; Hussain, Tousief; Rajaratnam, Krishan; Petrisor, Bradley; Drew, Brian; Bednar, Drew A.; Kwok, Desmond C. H.; Pettit, Shirley; Hancock, Jill; Cole, Peter A.; Smith, Joel J.; Brown, Gregory A.; Lange, Thomas A.; Stark, John G.; Levy, Bruce A.; Swiontkowski, Marc F.; Garaghty, Mary J.; Salzman, Joshua G.; Schutte, Carol A.; Tastad, Linda; Vang, Sandy; Seligson, David; Roberts, Craig S.; Malkani, Arthur L.; Sanders, Laura; Dyer, Carmen; Heinsen, Jessica; Smith, Langan; Madanagopal, Sudhakar; Frantz-Bush, Linda; Coupe, Kevin J.; Tucker, Jeffrey J.; Criswell, Allen R.; Buckle, Rosemary; Rechter, Alan Jeffrey; Sheth, Dhiren Shaskikant; Urquart, Brad; Trotscher, Thea; Anders, Mark J.; Kowalski, Joseph M.; Fineberg, Marc S.; Bone, Lawrence B.; Phillips, Matthew J.; Rohrbacher, Bernard; Stegemann, Philip; Mihalko, William M.; Buyea, Cathy; Augustine, Stephen J.; Jackson, William Thomas; Solis, Gregory; Ero, U.; Segina, Daniel N.; Berrey, Hudson B.; Agnew, Samuel G.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Campbell, Lakina C.; Derting, Lynn; McAdams, June; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Kloen, Peter; Joosse, Pieter; Winkelhagen, Jasper; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Teague, David C.; Davey, Joseph; Sullivan, J. Andy; Ertl, William J. J.; Puckett, Timothy A.; Pasque, Charles B.; Tompkins, John F.; Gruel, Curtis R.; Kammerlocher, Paul; Lehman, Thomas P.; Puffinbarger, William R.; Carl, Kathy L.; Weber, Donald W.; Jomha, Nadr M.; Goplen, Gordon R.; Masson, Edward; A, Lauren; Schaump, Lori N.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Goetz, David R.; Westberry, David E.; Broderick, J. Scott; Moon, Bryan S.; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Powell, James N.; Buckley, Richard E.; Elves, Leslie; John, Saint; Connolly, Stephen; Abraham, Edward P.; Steele, Trudy; Ellis, Thomas; Herzberg, Alex; Brown, George A.; Crawford, Dennis E.; Hart, Robert; Hayden, James; Orfaly, Robert M.; Vigland, Theodore; Vivekaraj, Maharani; Bundy, Gina L.; Miclau, Theodore; Matityahu, Amir; Coughlin, R. Richard; Kandemir, Utku; McClellan, R. Trigg; Lin, Cindy Hsin-Hua; Karges, David; Cramer, Kathryn; Watson, J. Tracy; Moed, Berton; Scott, Barbara; Beck, Dennis J.; Orth, Carolyn; Puskas, David; Clark, Russell; Jones, Jennifer; Egol, Kenneth A.; Paksima, Nader; Wai, Eugene K.; Johnson, Garth; Wilkinson, Ross; Gruszczynski, Adam T.; Vexler, Liisa

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of negative postoperative outcomes after long-bone fracture treatment may help to optimize patient care. We recently completed the Study to Prospectively Evaluate Reamed Intramedullary Nails in Patients with Tibial Fractures (SPRINT), a large, multicenter trial of reamed and unreamed

  2. The incidence of non-union following unreamed intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Moumni, M.; Leenhouts, P. A.; ten Duis, H. J.; Wendt, K. W.

    Introduction: Stabilisation. of fractures with an intramedullary nail is a widespread technique in the treatment of femoral shaft fractures in adults. To ream or not to ream is still debated. The primary objective of this Study was to determine the incidence of non-union following unreamed

  3. Intramedullary nailing of clavicular midshaft fractures in adults using titanium elastic nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Qing-yv

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: Studies showed elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN of displaced midclavicular fractures has excellent outcomes, as well as high complication rates and specific problems. The aim was to discuss ESIN of midshaft clavicular fractures. Methods: Totally 60 eligible patients (aged 18-63 years were randomized to either ESIN group or non-operative group between January 2007 and May 2008. Clavicular shortening was measured after trauma and osseous consolidation. Radiographic union and complications were assessed. Function analysis including Constant shoulder scores and disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH scores were performed after a 15-month follow-up. Results: ESIN led to a signifcantly shorter time to union, especially for simple fractures. In ESIN group, all patients got fracture union, of which 5 cases had medial skin irritation and 1 patient needed revision surgery because of implant failure. In the nonoperative group, there were 3 nonunion cases and 2 symptomatic malunions developed requiring corrective osteotomy. At 15 months after intramedullary stabilization, patients in the ESIN group were more satisfied with the appearance of the shoulder and overall outcome, and they benefited a lot from the great improvement of post-traumatic clavicular shortening. Furthermore, DASH scores were lower and Constant scores were significantly higher in contrast to the non-operative group. Conclusion: ESIN is a safe minimally invasive surgical technique with lower complication rate, faster return to daily activities, excellent cosmetic and better functional results, restoration of clavicular length for treating mid-shaft clavicular fractures, resulting in high overall satisfaction, which can be regard as an alternative to plate fixation or nonoperative treatment of mid-shaft clavicular fractures. Key words: Clavicle; Fracture fixation intramedu- llary; Outcome assessment

  4. Anterior Knee Pain after Tibial Intra-medullary Nailing: Is it Predictable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraganvi PC

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intramedullary nailing has been used frequently for the treatment of tibial diaphyseal fractures. Chronic anterior knee pain has been considered the most frequent post-operative complication of this technique. We investigated the relationship between anterior knee pain and position of nail tip in proximal tibia. Methods: 103 patients were selected among patients who underwent interlocking nailing in our institution. Patients with other factors that might cause anterior knee pain were excluded. In all patients intramedullary nailing was done using transpatellar approach. The patients were evaluated in two groups, 42 patients had anterior knee pain (Group A, whereas 61 patients did not have pain (Group B. The distance from nail tip from tibial plateau was measured on lateral radiographs. Nail prominence from anterior tibial cortex was also measured. Results: The two groups were similar with respect to gender and follow up period. Out of 42 patients who had knee pain 21 (50% had nail tip within proximal third distance from plateau to tibial tuberosity. Twenty-four patients (42% among knee pain group had nail prominence of more than 5mm from anterior tibial cortex followed by 12 patients (29% within 5mm and 12 patients (29% nail tip buried within the anterior cortex. Conclusion: A greater incidence of knee pain was found when nail was prominent more than 5mm and when it is in the proximal third distance from tibial plateau to tuberosity. Patients should be aware of high incidence of knee pain when the nail tip is placed in proximal third and prominence of more than 5mm.

  5. Elastic robust intramedullary nailing for forearm fracture in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasem, Jürgen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Forearm fractures are the most common fractures in children (23% of all fractures. Basically there are two treatment options available for diaphyseal forearm fractures in children: closed reduction with cast immobilisation (conservative therapy and the elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN. Treatment decision is influenced by the doctor's estimation of fracture instability. Stable fractures can be treated conservatively whereas instable forearm shaft fractures can be treated according the following three treatment strategies: 1. conservative therapy in an outpatient setting 2. conservative therapy in the operating room in attendance to change to ESIN in case that no stabilisation can be achieved with cast immobilisation 3. immediate treatment with ESIN in the operating room. Objectives: Aim of this Health Technology Assessment (HTA report is to assess and report the published evidence concerning effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ESIN as a treatment option for diaphyseal forearm fractures in children and to identify future research need. Important parameters for the assessment of effectiveness are objective parameters (axis deviation, losses of motion, and numbers of reductions in case of redislocations and subjective parameters (pain or impairment in quality of life. Furthermore, a health economic evaluation shall be done which refers to the costs of the different therapy strategies. Methods: An extensive, systematic literature search in medical, economic, and HTA literature databases was performed. Relevant data were extracted and synthesised. Results: Three cohort studies and seven case series have been identified. Controlled clinical studies, systematic reviews and/or HTA reports that gave evidence to answer the own study question have not been found. The identified studies partly differed in respect of defined indication for ESIN, study population and treatment strategies. For that reason comparability of results was

  6. Ulnar interlocking intramedullary nail stabilization of a proximal radio-ulnar fracture in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatineau, Matthieu; Planté, Jérôme

    2010-12-01

    To report use of an ulnar interlocking intramedullary nail for repair of an open highly comminuted fracture of the proximal third of the antebrachium in a dog, caused by gunshot. Case report. 1.5-year old, 60 kg, neutered male Mastiff. An ulnar interlocking intramedullary nail was used to stabilize an open comminuted proximal antebrachial fracture and a cast applied for 4 weeks. Union by secondary bone healing occurred in 8 weeks. At 16 weeks, there was advanced remodeling of the radial and ulnar bony callus and fracture lines were no longer evident. Limb use was normal with normal pain free range of motion of the right elbow. Ulnar interlocking nail is a viable alternative treatment for highly comminuted fracture of the proximal third of the antebrachium in dogs. © Copyright 2010 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  7. Construct Failure in an Atypical Femoral Fracture treated with Intramedullary Nailing: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Bonifacio

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to document a rare case of construct failure in a 68-year old Filipina who sustained an atypical femoral fracture (AFF in her left subtrochanteric area. The patient previously had a 40-month history of alendronate 70mg + vitamin D 5600u therapy for osteoporosis and underwent closed intramedullary nailing for the AFF. Six months postoperatively, she began to experience progressive pain in her operated thigh. Radiographs revealed a broken nail at the proximal screw hole and non-union of the AFF. The patient was treated with exposure of the fracture site, removal of the broken device, exchange intramedullary nailing, and iliac bone grafting. She had radiographic and clinical union and was full weight bearing after three months.

  8. The locked flexible intramedullary humerus nail in pediatric femur and tibia shaft fractures: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienkowski, P; Harvey, E J; Reindl, R; Berry, G K; Benaroch, T E; Ouellet, J A

    2004-01-01

    There are several options for the treatment of long bone fractures in skeletally immature patients. Surgeon experience, type of fracture, and the possibility of damage to the physeal area dictate individual fracture management patterns. Notably, nail devices have not gained popularity in this patient group. Intramedullary locking nails have become the standard of care in adult patients due to decreased morbidity and mortality. A novel nail has been developed for humeral shaft fractures that uses a lateral starting position to avoid damage to the rotator cuff in humeral fracture fixation. This is possible because of the nail's transient flexibility during insertion. This study illustrates that it is feasible to insert this type of nail through multiple entry portals for both tibial and femoral fracture fixation, without damaging the physeal blood supply or growth areas.

  9. Sarcoidosis: radiographic manifestations in the nails and distal phalanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albers, Brittany K.; Garner, Hillary W.; Sluzevich, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease which can affect multiple organ systems. Clinical and radiologic manifestations depend on the organ system involved and the chronicity of disease. Nail involvement in sarcoidosis is rare, but is clinically relevant as it indicates chronic systemic disease. Nail abnormalities can be identified radiographically, and when seen in patients with known or suspected sarcoidosis, should prompt careful evaluation of the underlying bone for osseous involvement. We describe a case of sarcoidosis with radiographic findings in the nails and distal phalangeal tufts, which were indicative of nail and osseous sarcoid involvement and strongly supported the presence of chronic systemic disease. Although the nail findings resolved clinically and on radiographs after treatment, the osseous findings showed only minimal improvement. To our knowledge, the radiographic findings of nail sarcoidosis have not been previously addressed in the literature. (orig.)

  10. Sarcoidosis: radiographic manifestations in the nails and distal phalanges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albers, Brittany K.; Garner, Hillary W. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Sluzevich, Jason C. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Dermatology, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease which can affect multiple organ systems. Clinical and radiologic manifestations depend on the organ system involved and the chronicity of disease. Nail involvement in sarcoidosis is rare, but is clinically relevant as it indicates chronic systemic disease. Nail abnormalities can be identified radiographically, and when seen in patients with known or suspected sarcoidosis, should prompt careful evaluation of the underlying bone for osseous involvement. We describe a case of sarcoidosis with radiographic findings in the nails and distal phalangeal tufts, which were indicative of nail and osseous sarcoid involvement and strongly supported the presence of chronic systemic disease. Although the nail findings resolved clinically and on radiographs after treatment, the osseous findings showed only minimal improvement. To our knowledge, the radiographic findings of nail sarcoidosis have not been previously addressed in the literature. (orig.)

  11. Influence of sagittal plane malpositioning of the patella on anterior knee pain after tibia intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Ismail; Saglam, Yavuz; Turkmensoy, Fatih; Kemah, Bahattin; Kara, Adnan; Unay, Koray

    2017-01-01

    Anterior knee pain (AKP) is one of the most common complications after tibia intramedullary surgery. We evaluated changes in patellar tendon length after tibia intramedullary nailing surgery using a transtendinous approach and assessed the importance of nail position in relation to the anterior tibial cortex and joint line. Two surgeons blinded to patients' pain status measured both the knee Insall-Salvati and Caton-Deschamps indexes on 30° flexion lateral knee X-rays of 33 patients. Superior nail prominence (the distance from the proximal tip of the nail to the tibial plateau) and anterior nail prominence (the distance from the anterior tip of the nail to the anterior tibial cortex) were measured on the CT. Clinical assessment showed that 10 patients (30 %) had AKP at the last follow-up. HSS and Lysholm scores and the incidence of AKP were similar between patients whose IM nails were removed and those who still had them. HSS score, Insall-Salvati, and Caton-Deschamps indexes were significantly lower in the operated extremity than in the healthy limb at last follow-up. No association was demonstrated between AKP and nail position in relation to the anterior tibial cortex or tibial plateau. According to our study, although the patellar tendon shortened significantly on the affected side compared with the contralateral side, these measurements did not correlate with the presence or absence of pain. AKP and functional knee scores after tibia IM nailing using a transtendinous approach were not associated with nail position in relation to the anterior tibial cortex or tibial plateau. Level 3 (Case control study).

  12. Comparative analysis of uniplanar external fixator and retrograde intramedullary nailing for ankle arthrodesis in diabetic Charcot′s neuroarthropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakul S Shah

    2011-01-01

    Results: All five (100% patients treated by intramedullary nailing achieved radiological union on an average follow-up of 16 weeks. The external fixation group had significantly higher rate of complications with one amputation, four non unions (66.7% and a delayed union which went on to full osseous union. Conclusion: The retrograde intramedullary nailing for tibio-talar arthrodesis in Charcot′s neuroarthropathy yielded significantly better outcomes as compared to the use of uniplanar external fixator.

  13. Removal of interlocking intramedullary nail for relieve of knee pain after tibial fracture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaodong; Wu, Xiaotao; Liu, Lei; Wang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of intramedullary nail removal after tibial fracture repair. Sixty patients at our hospital were enrolled in a prospective study and divided into moderate/severe knee pain (visual analog scale (VAS) ≥ 4) and mild/no knee pain (VAS knee and ankle pain, the range of motion of the knee and ankle, and Johner-Wruhs criteria before, 6 weeks after operation, and at the last follow-up. Fifty-seven patients were followed for a mean of 8.4 (2-17) months. In patients with moderate or severe knee pain intramedullary nail removal led to significant pain reductions ( p anterior border of tibia (knee pain. Knee pain VAS scores significantly lowered 6 weeks postoperatively and at the last follow-up, compared to before the operation ( p pain VAS scores, range of motion, and Johner-Wruhs criteria ( p > 0.05). For patients complaining knee pain after interlocking intramedullary nailing of tibial fractures, especially with a short distance from the tip of the nail tail to the tibial plateau (anterior border of the tibia (pain significantly.

  14. Paediatric diaphyseal femur fracture treated with intramedullary titanium elastic nail system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrawan Kumar Thapa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available noBackground & Objectives: Over the few years there has been a marked increase in the use of intramedullary fixation in the management of fracture of shaft of femur in children. The goals should be to stabilize the fracture, to control length and alignment, to promote bone healing and to minimize the morbidity and complications for the child. In this prospective study we intend to evaluate the functional and radiological outcome of diaphyseal fracture of shaft of femur treated with elastic intramedullary nail.Materials & Methods: All 56 patients with diaphyseal fracture shaft of femur were treated with titanium elastic nail and followed for period of 32 weeks.Results: The In this study, outcome was assessed by using Flynn’s criteria of titanium flexible nail outcome score and we found excellent result in 49 cases, satisfactory in six cases and poor in one case. We faced one major complication in form of implant failure and six minor complications inform of superficial wound infection.Conclusion: Elastic intramedullary nail used in treatment of diaphyseal fracture shaft of femur yield excellent functional and radiological outcome. It is easy and simple procedure has low rate of complication. It is physeal-protective, cost effective, does not involve heavy instrumentation and can be performed in small set up. It has minimal risk of infection and no risk of injury to the neurovascular structure.JCMS Nepal. 2015; 11(2:20-22

  15. Rotary self-locking intramedullary nail for long tubular bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhong-lian; Yang, Hai-long; Xu, Jian-kun; Xia, Xue; Wang, Xin-jia; Song, Jian-xin; Hu, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Intramedullary nails had been widely used in the treatment of long-bone fractures because of less interference of fractures and center bearing biomechanical advantage. However, it had been also found many shortcomings such as broken nails, delayed healing and was modified in order to achieve better efficacy and reduce complications. The aim of the present study is to compare the efficacy of rotary self-locking intramedullary nails (RSIN) with that of interlocking intramedullary nails (IIN) in the treatment of long-bone fractures. A retrospective study investigated 129 cases with long-bone fractures (36 with femoral fracture, 81 with tibial fracture, and 12 with humeral fracture). The fractures were fixed using either an RSIN or IIN. All patients underwent followup for 12-30 months. All patients in both groups achieved a clinical fracture healing standard and the postoperative affected limb muscle strength and joint function were well restored. The RSIN group required a shorter operative time and the fracture healed faster. There was no significant difference in the hospital stay, intraoperative blood loss or postoperative complications between the two groups. RSIN is used to treat long-bone fractures. Its healing efficacy is equivalent to the IIN. Moreover, the RSIN method is simpler and causes less tissue damage than the IIN, therefore having the advantage of accelerated healing.

  16. Clinical outcome of ream versus unream intramedullary nailing for femoral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Farshid; Sharifi, Seyed Reza; Mirzadeh, Navid Reza; Hootkani, Alireza; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohamad Hosein; Ashraf, Hami

    2013-05-01

    Stabilization of fractures with an intramedullary nail is a widespread technique in the treatment of femoral shaft fractures in adults; however, to ream or not to ream is still being debated. The primary objective of this study was to determine clinical results following unreamed versus ream intramedullary nailing of femoral fractures. Between January 2008 and August 2009, 50 patients with femoral shaft fractures were treated with unreamed or reamed femoral nails in our clinic. From this prospective single centre study, 16 patients were excluded due to insufficient follow-up data. According to the AO classification, fractures in this study were either type A or B. Dynamic proximal locking was performed in all cases. The remaining 34 patients were divided into two groups of 17 with ream or unream nailing. During and after the operation, we evaluated some variables in whole series. After statistical analyzes, we found that there were no differences in radiologic union time (P = 1) or full weight bearing time (P = 0.73) between ream and unream nailing. Nail breakage or iatrogenic fractures during nail insertion did not occur and we did not have any fat emboli in both groups but one secondary loss of reduction occurred in the unream group. Superficial infection after the operation was seen in one case which was treated successfully with antibiotics. In the ream group surgical time was about thirty minutes longer and differences were significant (P = 0.000). Patients had to pay more for ream nailing but the difference was not significant. We found no statistical difference between union time with or without reaming; on the other hand, there was significant increased operation length, blood loss and systemic changes in BP or So2 in the ream group versus the unream group. We advocate that unream nailing in traumatic femoral shaft fractures is a simple, safe and effective procedure with significant advantages, especially in multitrauma patients.

  17. Comparison of our self-designed rotary self-locking intramedullary nail and interlocking intramedullary nail in the treatment of long bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bailian; Xiong, Ying; Deng, Hong; Gu, Shao; Jia, Fu; Li, Qunhui; Wang, Daxing; Gan, Xuewen; Liu, Wei

    2014-07-21

    The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical effects of our self-designed rotary self-locking intramedullary nail (RSIN) and interlocking intramedullary nail (IIN) for long bone fractures. A retrospective study was performed in 1,704 patients who suffered bone fractures and underwent RSIN or IIN operation in our hospital between March 1999 and March 2013, including 494 with femoral fractures, 572 with humeral fractures, and 638 with tibial fractures. Among them, 634 patients were followed up for more than 1 year. The operative time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative complications, healing rate, and the excellent and good rate of functional recovery were compared between two groups. Compared with IIN group, RSIN group exhibited significantly shorter operative time and less intraoperative blood loss no matter for humeral, femoral, or tibial fractures (all p fractures (both p fracture. In IIN group, nail breakage or loosening occurred in 7 patients with femoral fractures and 16 patients with tibial fractures, radial nerve injury was observed in 8 patients with humeral fractures, and incision infection was present in 2 patients with humeral fractures and 1 patient with femoral fracture. The complication rate of IIN group was significantly higher than that of RSIN group (p fractures.

  18. Reamed versus unreamed intramedullary nailing for the treatment of femoral fractures: A meta-analysis of prospective randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A-Bing; Zhang, Wei-Jiang; Guo, Wei-Jun; Wang, Xin-Hua; Jin, Hai-Ming; Zhao, You-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Intramedullary nailing is commonly used for treating femoral shaft fractures, one of the most common long bone fractures in adults. The reamed intramedullary nail is considered the standard implant for femoral fractures. This meta-analysis was performed to verify the superiority of reamed intramedullary nailing over unreamed intramedullary nailing in fractures of the femoral shaft in adults. Subgroup analysis of implant failure and secondary procedure was also performed. Electronic literature databases were used to identify relevant publications and included MEDLINE (Ovid interface), EMBASE (Ovid interface), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Wiley Online Library). The versions available on January 30, 2016, were utilized. Only human studies, which were designed as randomized controlled clinical trials, were included. Two authors independently evaluated the quality of original research publications and extracted data from the studies that met the criteria. Around 8 randomized controlled trials involving 1078 patients were included. Reamed intramedullary nailing was associated with shorter time to consolidation of the fracture (SMD = -0.62, 95% CI = -0.89 to -0.35, P fractures using reamed intramedullary nailing is recommended.

  19. Retrograde nailing for distal femur fractures in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giddie Jasdeep

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We report the results of treating a series of 56 fractures in 54 elderly patients with a distal femur fracture with a retrograde femoral nail. Methods: Fifty-four of the nails were inserted percutaneously with a closed reduction. After surgery all patients were allowed to weight bear as tolerated. Four fractures were supported in a temporary external splint. Results: The mean age of patients was 80.6 years (range 51–103 years, 52/54 (96% were females. There were no cases of nail related complications and no re-operations were required. One patient was lost to follow up. The 30-day mortality was 5/54 (9.3% and the one year mortality was 17/54 (31.5%. Conclusions: Distal femoral nail fixation provides a good method of fixation allowing immediate mobilisation for this group of patients.

  20. [Application of auto-control micro-motion intramedullary locking nail in the treatment of femoral shaft fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongjun; Liu, Youwen; Gao, Shutu; Du, Zhiqian

    2008-06-01

    The auto-control micro-motion intramedullary locking nail (AMLN) is designed, to reduce the incidence of delayed union and non-union of femoral shaft fractures fixed by interlocking intramedullary nails, and to observe the clinical effect of self-design AMLN in the treatment of femoral shaft fractures. The distal and promixal nails were connected by the micro-motion locking structure, which could cause 1.0-1.5 mm axial micro-motion between fracture gaps. It could produce physical stimulus and conduction between fracture gaps in the course of fracture union. From December 2003 to May 2006, 32 cases of femoral shaft fractures were treated with AMLN, including 21 males and 11 females with the average age of 31.2 years (ranging from 20 years to 43 years). The trauma resulted from fall wounds in 3 cases, crash injuries in 1 case and car accidents in 28 cases. Twenty-nine cases were fresh fractures in different parts of the femoral shaft with transverse, oblique, spiral and comminuted fractures of type I, II, III and IV. Three cases were old non-union fractures. The fresh fractures were treated by closed AMLN fixation, while the old fractures were treated by open AMLN nails after routine implantation of self bone. All the 32 cases were followed up for the average time of 11.5 months (ranging from 8 months to 22 months). The X-ray films showed the fractures were healed 4.0 to 7.5 months after the operation, with the mean time of 5.1 months, and no break of the nail happened. One nail mildly bent in the comminuted fracture, and 2 patients felt slightly unwell at the needling point. According to the Klemm criterion for function, 26 cases were excellent, 5 good, 1 fair, and the choiceness rate was 96.88%. With a suitable design, AMLN is easy to perform and helpful to quicken fracture union, and it is effective to treat femoral shaft fractures.

  1. Intramedullary fixation of pertrochanteric hip fractures with the short AO-ASIF proximal femoral nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogagnolo, F; Kfuri, M; Paccola, C A J

    2004-01-01

    The advantages of intramedullary fixation of pertrochanteric hip fractures over dynamic screw-plate devices in the clinical setting are still a matter of debate. We performed a case series study in a teaching hospital to analyse the results of the recent AO-ASIF proximal femoral nail (PFN). Between July 1998 and May 2001, 46 consecutive patients (47 fractures) were included in the investigation. The average patient age was 76.4 years (range 50-93 years), and most fractures (74.5%) were unstable. Operative details, adequacy of fracture reduction, screw position in the femoral head, re-operations, and postoperative complications were documented. Functional results were evaluated by the Parker and Palmer mobility score and Barthel Index for patients with a minimum follow-up of 4 months. Intraoperative technical or mechanical complications occurred in 11 patients (23.4%), mostly problems with the distal nail locking and fracture of the lateral wall of the greater trochanter. Mean surgical time was 83.4 min. The lateral protrusion of screws causing thigh pain was the most common postoperative complication, with an incidence of 21.2%. There was only one femoral shaft fracture at the nail tip caused by a fall at 9 months of follow-up. Five patients (10.6%) had intra-articular migration of screws, which was associated with loss of reduction and varus collapse in one case. There were 2 persistent deep infections and 2 haematomas that required surgical drainage. The re-operation rate was 19.1%, mainly cephalic screw removal due to lateral protrusion at the proximal thigh. Ten patients (32.2%) fully recovered their Parker and Palmer mobility score, and 20 patients (66.6%) recovered more than 90% of their pre-injury Barthel Index values. The average limb shortening was 14 mm. Mortality rate during the observation period was 20.4%. In view of only one loss of reduction with varus collapse clearly caused by a technical error, we concluded that the PFN is a suitable implant for

  2. Comparative study between reamed versus unreamed interlocking intramedullary nailing in compound fractures of shaft tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Puri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tibia is the commonest bones to sustain open injury because of subcutaneous position. Treatment of open fractures requires simultaneous management of both skeletal and soft tissue injury. Intramedullary nailing with reaming is generally considered to be contraindicated for open fractures tibia, because it damages the endosteal blood supply which will lead to non-union, deep infection. However, recent studies with or without reaming in open fracture tibia shows no influence in healing of fracture. Purpose: To compare the clinical and radiological results of intramedullary interlocking nailing of open fractures of the tibial shaft after reaming versus unreamed medullary canal. Materials and Methods: Between 2008 and 2011, we have treated 40 patients with compound tibia fracture (type I, II, IIIA by simultaneous care of wound and skeletal injury. Primary fixation for fracture stabilization was done by closed intramedullary interlock nailing either reamed or unreamed; the allocation to the two groups made on alternating basis. Wound was managed by thorough debridement with primary/delayed primary closure by suturing, split thickness skin grafting or fasciocutaneous flap cover. Active, non-weight bearing exercises were started from next post-op day. Partial weight bearing after suture removal was started on 12 th day. Further follow-up was done at 6 weeks interval for union. Results: Open fractures of shaft of tibia treated with unreamed/reamed interlocking nailing gave excellent results. In present series, 19 fractures (95% treated by unreamed and 19 (95% fractures treated by reamed technique, united within 6 months of injury. Delay in union was noticed in one patient treated by unreamed technique who had segmental and extensive soft tissue injury and in reamed nailing there was one patient with deep infection, which was treated with antibiotic coated nail. Conclusion: Time to complete union was similar in both groups. Adequate

  3. Intramedullary nailing and functional bracing of tibial shaft fractures: 167 cases followed for minimum 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santos de la Fuente, F J; López Arévalo, R; Tena Carrillo, C; Ramos Salguero, J C; Fernández Medina, J M

    1998-10-01

    We treated 167 diaphyseal tibial fractures without reaming and with intramedullary fixation, using an unlocked Küntscher nail. The patients were followed for a minimum of 2 years. The mean time to union was 16 weeks. There were no serious complications, but 1 case of nonunion, 1 case of deep infection and 2 cases of clinically relevant malalignment. Migration of the nail was observed in 11 cases. We conclude that this treatment is simple and gives satisfactory results in diaphyseal fractures after low- or mid-energy trauma.

  4. Closed Locked Intramedullary Nailing of Femoral Shaft Fractures in the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoster, Thomas A; Miller, Richard A

    2003-01-01

    A review was performed of all patients over the age of 60 years who were treated with a locked intramedullary nail for a femoral shaft fracture. There were 15 patients with 16 femoral shaft fractures. Four patients died perioperatively. Of the surviving 11 patients with 12 fractures, union occurred in 100 percent. Knee range of motion was greater than 100 degrees in 11 of the 12 knees. Nine of the 11 patients returned to their preoperative level of ambulation. Intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures in patients over the age of 60 years is an effective method of treatment. The mortality rate in elderly patients who sustain this injury is comparable to that seen after a femoral neck fracture in this age group. PMID:14575248

  5. [Effect of interlocking intramedullary nail in treatment of open tibial and fibula fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jianfei; Zhao, Yinsong; He, Xueyu; Zhou, Yang

    2009-03-01

    To determine the effect of interlocking intramedullary nail in treatment of open tibial and fibula fractures and analyze the method to promote the bone union. From December 2003 to June 2006, thirty-five patients with open tibial and fibula fracture were treated with emergency debridement, interlocked intramedullary fixation for tibia and fixed fibula at the same time. During operation, the bone marrow was collected and grafted into the fracture gaps. Among them, there were 27 males and 8 females, involving in 22 left legs and 13 right legs. Their ages ranged from 19 to 65 years, with an average of 34.7 years. The location of fracture was the middle of the tibia and fibula in 16 cases, the distal 1/3 of the tibia and fibula in 12 cases and the proximal 1/3 in 7 cases. According to the Gustilo classification of open injuries, there were 7 cases of type I, 19 cases of type II, 8 cases of type III a and 1 case of type III b. The mean range of knee motion was 48.3 degrees (45-70 degrees). The mean time from injury to operation was 4.3 hours (50 minutes to 7 hours). The mean operation time was 94 minutes (60-132 minutes) and the mean blood loss was 122 mL (100-350 mL). The wound healed by first intention in 32 patients. Incision was sutured in 2 cases of type III a fractures after operation 4 days, gastrocnemius flap graft was performed in 1 case of type III b fracture 1 week after operation. They all achieve good healing. No fractures split off, no iatrogenic nerve and vascular injury occurred, no osteofascial compartment syndromes or deep vein thrombus happened. Tension blisters appeared in 1 case of type II fracture after operation and subsided after 5 days. Patients were followed up for 14-43 months (mean 22 months). The X-ray films showed that fracture union was observe in 30 cases after 14 weeks of operation, in 3 cases after 18 weeks and in 1 case after 22 weeks of operation. The fractures union time was 15.2 weeks on average. About 2 cm nonunion in lateral

  6. Treatment of low-energy tibial shaft fractures: plaster cast compared with intramedullary nailing

    OpenAIRE

    Toivanen, J.A.K.; Honkonen, S.E.; Koivisto, A.-M.; Järvinen, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed data from 87 patients who had displaced closed or open grade I simple or spiral wedge tibial shaft fractures caused by low-energy impact. Fifty-four patients were treated with plaster cast and 33 with intramedullary locking nail (IMLN). Delayed union only occurred in 8 patients after plaster cast treatment. Forty-two patients in the IMLN group and one in the plaster cast group suffered from anterior knee pain. Final treatment outcome, healing time, hospitalization time and duratio...

  7. Intramedullary nailing without interlocking screws for femoral and tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreb, Dieuwertje L; Blokhuis, Taco J; van Wessem, Karlijn J P; Bemelman, Mike; Lansink, Koen W W; Leenen, Luke P H

    2013-08-01

    Intramedullary fixation is the treatment of choice for diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia. Locking the implant can sometimes be cumbersome and time consuming. In our institution, fractures with axial and rotational stability are treated with intramedullary nailing without interlocking. All consecutive patients presented in the University Medical Center Utrecht from October 2003 to August 2009 with acute traumatic diaphyseal fractures of the tibia or femur that were considered axial and rotational stable were included. They underwent internal fixation using intramedullary nails without interlocking. Patient records were evaluated for duration of surgery, perioperative complications, consolidation time and re-operations. Twenty-nine long bone fractures were treated in 27 patients: 20 men and 7 women, with an average age of 28.9 years (range 15.6-54.4). There were 12 femoral fractures and 17 tibial fractures. Sixteen fractures were closed and 13 were open (10 Gustilo 1, 3 Gustilo 2). The mean operating time was 43 min (range 18-68 min) for tibial fractures and 55 min (range 47-150 min) for femoral fractures. Postoperative complications occurred in six patients. Two patients (three fractures) were lost to follow-up. Healing occurred in 25 of the 26 remaining fractures (96 %) without additional interventions. One tibia was secondarily converted to a standard locked nail because of axial and rotational instability. All patients returned to their pre-injury level of activity. The use of intramedullary nailing without interlocking is associated with minimal complications in selected fractures. The advantages include a short operating time and the simplicity of its application.

  8. THE RESULT OF INTRAMEDULLARY NAILING WITH BONE GRAFTING OF TIBIA'S PATHOLOGIC FRACTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Shapovalov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors give the clinical case of successful surgical treatment of patient with tibia's pathologic fracture by intramedullary nailing with bone grafting. The disadvantages of such patients' treatment by plaster immobilization and by some invasive methods like vascular autografting by Ilizarov's method and bone plating were also discussed. The obvious benefits of proposed surgical treatment technique of observed patient category are shown.

  9. Comparative study between reamed versus unreamed interlocking intramedullary nailing in compound fractures of shaft tibia

    OpenAIRE

    Subhash Puri; Samar Kumar Biswas; Anil Salgia; Sahil Sanghi; Tushar Agarwal; Rohit Malhotra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tibia is the commonest bones to sustain open injury because of subcutaneous position. Treatment of open fractures requires simultaneous management of both skeletal and soft tissue injury. Intramedullary nailing with reaming is generally considered to be contraindicated for open fractures tibia, because it damages the endosteal blood supply which will lead to non-union, deep infection. However, recent studies with or without reaming in open fracture tibia shows no influence in heal...

  10. Treatment of tibial diaphysis fractures with reamed and locked intramedullary nailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Coşar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of reamed and locked intramedullary nailing for tibial diaphysis fractures.Materials and methods: The study included 38 patients (26 males, 12 females who were treated with reamed and locked intramedullary nailing for tibial diaphysis fractures. Fractures were classified according to Gustilo-Anderson classification and functional results were assessed using the Johner-Wrush criteria.Results: The mean age was 36 years (range 18-61. There were 21 AO/ASIF type A, 16 type B, and 1 type C fractures. Twenty-four fracture were closed (63.1% and 14 (36.9% were open fractures. According to the Gustilo-Anderson classification, 9 were grade I, 4 patients grade II, and one grade IIIA open fractures. Intramedullary nailing was performed following open reduction in 18 patients, and closed reduction in 20. The mean time to surgery was 9.4 days and the mean follow-up was 29 months. Union was achieved in all patients within a mean of 17.6 weeks. Anterior knee pain developed in 18 patients and infection developed in three patients. Angular deformity less than 10º was developed 12 patients (31.6%. There were screw breakacge and synostosis in four and two patients respectively. According to the Johner-Wrush criteria, functional results were very good in 23 patients (60.5%, good in 12 patients (31.6% and fair in 3 (7.9% patients.Conclusion: Treatment of tibial diaphysis fractures with reamed and locked intramedullary nailing gives satisfactory results. It should be considered as first choice in the treatment of these fractures. J Clin Exp Invest 2011;2(2:168-74

  11. [Evaluation of patients with humeral midshaft fractures treated with DCP plate vs. intramedullary nail UHN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Guevara, Jonathan; López-Cázares, Gerardo; Barragán-Hervella, Rodolfo Gregorio; Villegas-Rosas, José Saúl Alejandro; Alvarado-Ortega, Iván; Montiel-Jarquín, Álvaro José

    2016-01-01

    Humeral midshaft fractures should be surgically managed, so the knowledge of functionality, bone healing and pain of these treatments is required to obtain the expected results. The aim of this paper is to compare the results of patients with humeral midshaft fracture operated with intramedullary nails UHN vs. DCP plate. Comparative study, conducted during the period of June 2014 to June 2015, in patients with humeral midshaft fracture, incidents, operated with intramedullary nails UHN vs. DCP plate. Pain, functional and radiographic assessment were conducted by Andersen, UCLA and simple X ray test, respectively. There were 40 patients, 57.5% with DCP plate, 67.5% male, mean age was 42.38 years, mean operative time was 73.3 minutes, side affected 50% right, 87% had complete consolidation with DCP plate against 70.6% of the patients treated with intramedullary nails UHN. Radiographic consolidation was good for both treatments, functionality and pain patients had presented no statistically significant differences in both groups (p ≥ 0.05). Complications are in the range described worldwide for both treatments. Both treatments are effective for humeral diaphyseal lesions, however should be cautious and try to avoid the complications that can be serious is recommended.

  12. Is intact fibula a disadvantage in treatment of tibial diaphysis fracture with intramedullary nailing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz; Sökücü, Sami; Özcan, Çağrı; Beng, Kubilay; Lapçin, Osman; Demir, Bilal

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare solitary tibial diaphysis fractures and tibial diaphysis fractures associated with fibula fracture treated with the intramedullary nailing method. Records of 254 patients diagnosed with tibial diaphysis fracture and treated with intramedullary nailing between 2010 and 2013 were examined and 30 patients were included in the study. Group 1 comprised patients with solitary tibial diaphysis fracture, and Group 2 was made up of patients with tibial diaphysis fractures associated with fibula fracture. Patients in both groups were compared in terms of time to surgery, duration of surgical tourniquet, time to union, and varus, valgus, recurvatum, and antecurvatum deformities of the tibia at final follow-up. No statistically significant difference was found between the 2 groups in time to surgery, duration of surgical tourniquet, time to union, or varus, valgus, recurvatum, and antecurvatum deformities. Results indicated that intact fibula in tibial diaphysis fracture treated with intramedullary nailing was not a disadvantage; it did not affect rate of union or lead to loss of reduction, non-union, or malunion.

  13. Evaluation of Complications from Stainless-Steel Flexible Intramedullary Nailing in Children's Femoral Shaft Fractures and Recommendations for Continued Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Asif; Bhat, M Rafiq; Khursheed, Omar; Maqbool Wani, Mubashir; Ahmad Kawoosa, Altaf; Kotwal, Hilal Ahmad; Manzoor, Qazi Waris

    2017-05-10

    [b]Background.[/b] Flexible intramedullary nailing is currently considered the treatment of choice for femoral diaphyseal fractures in school-aged children. The purpose of our study was to critically evaluate and analyze the complications of stainless steel flexible intramedullary nailing in children's femoral shaft fractures. (mean age, 8.2 years) with a femoral shaft fracture treated with stainless steel flexible intramedullary nailing from January 1, 2009 to July 31, 2015 and evaluated for complications.[b]Results.[/b] All fractures united in a mean time of 9.2 weeks. Minor complications were noted in 19 patients, and major complications were noted in two patients. The Flynn score was excellent in 74 patients, satisfactory in 23 patients, and poor in three patients.[b]Conclusions.[/b] 1. Stainless steel flexible intramedullary nailing in children's femoral shaft fractures is associated with minimal complications. 2. These complications are not related to the alloy of the implant and are mostly due to the long nail end; these complications can be prevented easily. 3. Stainless steel flexible intramedullary nailing is also cost effective, and we recommend its use be enhanced for the treatment of femoral shaft fractures in children.

  14. A prospective study of closed and open reamed intramedullary nailing of 136 femoral shaft fractures in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Gharehdaghi; Hasan Rahimi; Mahmoud Bahari; Javad Afzali

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Femoral shaft fractures are major causes of mortality and morbidity and are managed with intramedullary nailing (IMN). In this study we compared the results of open and closed nailing in femoral shaft fractures. Between 1993 and 2001 we managed 136 femoral shaft fractures by IMN (81 closed and 55 open nailings)
    METHODS: in 120 patients with mean age of 36.2 years. The mean time of follow up was two years. Radiolo...

  15. Incidence of Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Intramedullary Nailing of Femoral Shaft Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Wan; Oh, Jong-Keon; Byun, Young-Soo; Shon, Oog-Jin; Park, Jai Hyung; Oh, Hyoung Keun; Shon, Hyun Chul; Park, Ki Chul; Kim, Jung Jae; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of this study was to determine the incidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVNFH) after intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures and to identify risk factors for developing AVNFH. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with femoral shaft fractures treated with antegrade intramedullary nailing at 10 institutions. Among the 703 patients enrolled, 161 patients were excluded leaving 542 patients in the study. Average age was 42.1 years with average follow-up of 26.3 months. Patient characteristics and fracture patterns as well as entry point of femoral nails were identified and the incidence of AVNFH was investigated. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to open versus closed physis, open versus closed fractures, and age (<20 versus ≥20 years). Overall incidence of AVNFH was 0.2% (1 of 542): the patient was 15-year-old boy. Of 25 patients with open physis, the incidence of AVNFH was 4%, whereas none of 517 patients with closed physis developed AVNFH (P < 0.001). The incidence of AVNFH in patients aged < 20 versus ≥20 years was 1.1% (1 of 93) and 0.0% (0 of 449), respectively (P = 0.172), which meant that the incidence of AVNFH was 0% in adult with femur shaft fracture. Of 61 patients with open fractures, the incidence of AVNFH was 0%. The number of cases with entry point at the trochanteric fossa or tip of the greater trochanter (GT) was 324 and 218, respectively, and the incidence of AVNFH was 0.3% and 0.0%, respectively (P = 0.412). In patients aged ≥20 years with isolated femoral shaft fracture, there was no case of AVNFH following antegrade intramedullary nailing regardless of the entry point. Therefore, our findings suggest that the risk of AVNFH following antegrade femoral nailing is extremely low in adult patients. PMID:26844518

  16. The incidence of non-union following unreamed intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Moumni, M; Leenhouts, P A; ten Duis, H J; Wendt, K W

    2009-02-01

    Stabilisation of fractures with an intramedullary nail is a widespread technique in the treatment of femoral shaft fractures in adults. To ream or not to ream is still debated. The primary objective of this study was to determine the incidence of non-union following unreamed intramedullary stabilisation of femoral fractures. Secondary objectives were intra- and postoperative complications and implant failure. Between March 1995 and June 2005, 125 patients with 129 traumatic femoral shaft fractures were treated with as unreamed femoral nail. From this retrospective single centre study, 18 patients were excluded due to insufficient follow up data, including 1 patient who died within 2 days after severe head injury. Sixty-six patients had suffered multiple injuries. 21 fractures were open. According to the AO classification, there were 54 type A, 42 type B, and 14 type C fractures. Dynamic proximal locking was performed in 44 cases (36 type A and 8 type B fractures). Non-union occurred in two patients (1.9%; one type B and one type C fractures). Intra-operative complications were seen in three patients (2.8%). Postoperative in-hospital complications occurred in 29 patients (27%). Local superficial infection occurred in two patients (1.9%), there were no cases of deep infection. Implant failure occurred in three patients (2.8%): nail breakage was seen in two patients. In this study, the incidence of non-union following unreamed intramedullary nailing is low (1.9%) and comparable with the best results of reamed nailing in the literature.

  17. A forward-striking technique for reducing fracture gaps during intramedullary nailing: A technical note with clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seung-Jae; So, Sang-Yeon; Yoon, Yong-Cheol; Cho, Won-Tae; Oh, Jong-Keon

    2015-12-01

    A residual postoperative fracture gap between major bone fragments following intramedullary nailing of long-bone fractures is recognised as one of the major risk factors for delayed union and non-union. The most common method for reducing a fracture gap after nail insertion is through application of the backstroke technique. We introduce forward-striking as a new and simple technique that can be used to reduce fracture gaps during cephalomedullary or intramedullary nailing. The forward-striking technique was used in 20 patients with subtrochanteric or femoral shaft fractures and three patients with tibial shaft fractures who underwent cephalomedullary or intramedullary nailing at two university teaching hospitals between February 2013 and March 2014. Bone union was achieved in all cases, with a mean time of 5.7 months (range, 3-9 months). No major complications, including, non-union, implant failure, or infection, were encountered during the follow-up period. A forward-striking technique is simple, convenient, and highly efficient in terms of reducing fracture gaps during cephalomedullary or intramedullary nailing. The advantage of this technique is that it carries no risk of deforming the proximal interlocking screw, prevents excessive protrusion of the nail, and enables the lag screw to be placed into the optimal lag screw position relative to the femoral head at the time of cephalomedullary nailing. The forward-striking technique is particularly useful if no compression screw system is available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Interlocking intramedullary nailing with and without reaming for the treatment of closed fractures of the tibial shaft. A prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blachut, P A; O'Brien, P J; Meek, R N; Broekhuyse, H M

    1997-05-01

    One hundred and fifty-two patients who had 154 closed fractures of the shaft of the tibia were prospectively randomized to management with interlocking intramedullary nailing either with or without reaming. Thirteen patients who had been randomized to treatment without reaming were switched to the group that had reaming because of technical reasons; these patients were excluded from the analysis of the results. An additional five patients were lost to follow-up. Thus, seventy-two patients (seventy-three fractures) who had been managed with nailing with reaming and sixty-three patients (sixty-three fractures) who had been managed with nailing without reaming were available for follow-up at an average of twelve months (range, three to thirty-three months) postoperatively. The two groups were similar with regard to demographics and the configurations of the fractures. The average total duration of the procedures performed without reaming was eleven minutes shorter than that of the procedures done with reaming (p = 0.0013). The duration of fluoroscopy was not significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.35, Mann-Whitney test). The average estimated blood loss was identical for the two groups. Seventy fractures (96 per cent) that were treated with nailing with reaming and fifty-six (89 per cent) that were treated with nailing without reaming united without the need for an additional operation (p = 0.19). Because of the small sample size, the study has insufficient power (34.7 per cent) to detect this difference if it is real. There was only one deep infection, which developed after nailing without reaming. The nail fractured after one procedure with reaming. A screw fractured after two procedures with reaming and after ten without reaming (p = 0.012); multiple screws fractured after three procedures in the latter group. Malunion occurred after three nailing procedures with reaming and after two without reaming. Four malunions were of very proximal fractures and

  19. [A minimally invasive technique of intramedullary femoral nailing using the RDS system. A new technique for insertion of retrograde femoral nail].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiletto, R J; Baacke, M

    2001-08-01

    A total of 72 patients with femoral fractures was treated between July 1997 and November 1999, 41 of them with retrograde intramedullary fixation. A minimally invasive technique was performed in 18 cases using a recently designed retrograde dilatator system (RDS) for the insertion of ACE-nail (DePuy), the reaming of the femoral canal and the locking of the distal screws. The mean age of the 18 patients (7 men and 11 women) was 49 (+/- 21) years. 8 type A, 6 type B and 4 type C fractures of the femoral shaft according to the AO classification were observed. 5 of the patients had sustained a severe polytrauma. The mean ISS of the total collective was 18 (+/- 19). No nail failed, no infection occurred, and no nerve palsies were recorded. The follow-up time was 10 (+/- 7) months. All fractures healed uneventfully. 16 patients were mobilized under full weight-bearing and regained a full range of motion without pain. In 2 cases of very old patients nursing was possible without pain. In 5 cases an implant removal was carried out in the same technique. The performed minimally invasive technique using the RDS minimizes damages to the patella ligament and the articular cartilage. It facilitates the control of rotational deformities and length discrepancies of the femur also under difficult conditions, e.g. polytrauma and obese patients.

  20. Open Intramedullary Nailing for Segmental Long Bone Fractures: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    as the gold standard in the care of femoral shaft fractures, with high union ... shaft fractures as compared with open nailing.[19] Other ..... alignment. To achieve these, all except one of our fractures were statically locked using 3 or 4 interlocking screws. Despite the open method of reduction, our overall union rate of 91.7% at ...

  1. Locked intramedullary nailing for displaced tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, A; Ekeland, A; Strømsøe, K; Follerås, G; Thoresen, B O

    1990-09-01

    We analysed the results of 93 tibial shaft fractures treated with the Grosse-Kempf locked nail. Twenty-six fractures were comminuted, 19 were open grade I to II, and 54 were located outside the middle third of the tibia. The deep infection rate was 3.2%. There were only two poor results. The use of this method is recommended and discussed.

  2. Intramedullary fixation of forearm fractures with new locked nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: This new interlocking nail may be considered as an alternative to plate osteosynthesis for fractures of the forearm in adults. The advantages are benefit of closed reduction, smaller residual scar, reduced cost and early union with allowance of immediate movements.

  3. commonly asked questions on the practice of intramedullary nailing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Q3) what are the advantages of IMN over conventional plating? A) Closed nailing has the advantage of preserving the fracture biology as opposed to plating. Even done open, IMN may be done with minimal to no periosteal stripping as opposed to plating in which the periosteum is stripped and bone cortex devascularised.

  4. [Ankle para-articular tibial fracture. Is osteosynthesis with the unreamed intramedullary nail adequate?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D; Hahn, M P; Laun, R A; Ekkernkamp, A; Muhr, G; Ostermann, P A

    1998-05-01

    In a prospective study, 53 fractures of the distal fifth of the tibia were stabilized by unreamed nailing. Additional involvement of the ankle joint occurred in 18 patients. 50 patients returned for follow-up. In 30 patients tibia and fibula were fractured at the same (distal) level; in 20 patients the fracture of the fibula was located more proximally. In 12 patients the fractures extended into the tibial pilon. Severe soft tissue damage was seen in 24 fractures (18 open, 6 closed). Ninety percent of all fractures healed uneventfully without further surgical intervention after unreamed nailing. In two patients the unreamed nail had to be exchanged for a reamed tibial nail. Bone grafting and secondary dynamization of the nail by removal of a proximal interlocking bolt were performed in one case each. Thirty-one fractures healed in anatomical position. Valgus or varsus angulation of less than 5 degrees occurred in 18 patients. One fracture healed with rotatory angulation of 15 degrees. The highest rate of complications (22%) was seen in patients with distal fractures of the fibula without additional plating (of the fibula). There was no deep infection. Tibial fractures close to the ankle joint can be managed by unreamed nailing. Distal fractures of the fibula should be stabilized by additional plating. Because of the unreamed technique of implantation this procedure can also be used in grade II or III open fractures.

  5. [Suitability of computer-assisted femoral intramedullary nailing for control of torsion and length : Systematic review of clinical studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liodakis, Emmanouil; Krettek, Christian; Hawi, Nael

    2018-03-01

    Despite promising results in experimental studies, computer-assisted femoral intramedullary nailing has not become established in the clinical practice for most orthopedic surgeons. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of computer-assisted reduction and nailing of femoral fractures as reported in clinical studies. A systematic analysis of the available literature on the clinical application of computer-assisted femoral intramedullary nailing (Pubmed, Cochrane library and Embase) was carried out. Studies published up to May 2017 were included. A total of three articles were included in this meta-analysis. All studies showed a relevant increase in total operating time and radiation exposure time with the use of computer-assisted femoral intramedullary nailing. The clinical results for computer-assisted nailing with respect to femoral torsion and length tended to be slightly better but the results were very heterogeneous. Our analysis could show that computer-assisted femoral intramedullary nailing is clinically feasible but the operative and fluoroscopy time needed are high and the reported postoperative results for femoral length and torsion were very heterogeneous. Further comparative studies are needed in the future.

  6. The impact of antegrade intramedullary nailing start site using the SIGN nail in proximal femoral fractures: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa Diab, Mohamed; Wu, Hao-Hua; Eliezer, Edmund; Haonga, Billy; Morshed, Saam; Shearer, David W

    2018-02-01

    In many low and middle-income countries (LMICs) SIGN nail is commonly used for antegrade femoral intramedullary (IM) nailing, using a start site either at the tip of the greater trochanter or piriformis fossa. While a correct start site is considered an essential technical step; few studies have evaluated the impact of using an erroneous start site. This is particularly relevant in settings with limited access to fluoroscopy to aid in creating a nail entry point. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of antegrade SIGN IM nailing start site on radiographic alignment and health-related quality of life. In this prospective cohort study, adult patients with proximal femur fractures (OTA 32, subtrochanteric zone) treated with antegrade IM SIGN nail at Muhimbili Orthopaedic Institute (MOI), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania were enrolled. Start site was determined on the immediate postoperative X-ray and was graded on a continuous scale based on distance of the IM nail center from the greater trochanteric tip. The primary outcome measurement was coronal alignment on the post-operative x-ray. The secondary outcomes were reoperation rates, RUST scores and EQ5D scores at one year follow-up. Seventy-nine patients were enrolled. 50 of them (63.3%) had complete data at 1year and were included in the final data analysis. Of the fifty patients, nine (18%) had IM nails placed laterally, 26 (52%) medially and 15 (30%) directly over the tip of the greater trochanter. Compared to a start site at the tip or medial to the greater trochanter, a lateral start site was 9 times more likely to result in a varus malalignment (95% CI: 1.42-57.70, p=0.021). Lateral start site was associated with varus malalignment. Although lateral start site was not significantly associated with reoperation, varus deformity was associated with higher reoperation rates. Surgeons should consider avoiding a start site lateral to the tip of the greater trochanter or allow the nail to rotate to avoid

  7. hlorhexidine-releasing implant coating on intramedullary nail reduces infection in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Shiels

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of internal intramedullary nails for long bone fracture fixation is a common practice among surgeons. Bacteria naturally attach to these devices, increasing the risk for wound infection, which can result in non- or malunion, additional surgical procedures and extended hospital stays. Intramedullary nail surface properties can be modified to reduce bacterial colonisation and potentially infectious complications. In the current study, a coating combining a non-fouling property with leaching chlorhexidine for orthopaedic implantation was tested. Coating stability and chlorhexidine release were evaluated in vitro. Using a rat model of intramedullary fixation and infection, the effect of the coating on microbial colonisation and fracture healing was evaluated in vivo by quantitative microbiology, micro-computed tomography, plain radiography, three-point bending and/or histology. Low dose systemic cefazolin was administered to increase the similarities to clinical practice, without overshadowing the effect of the anti-infective coating. When introduced into a contaminated wound, the non-fouling chlorhexidine-coated implant reduced the overall bacteria colonisation within the bone and on the implant, reduced the osteolysis and increased the radiographic union, confirming its potential for reducing complications in wounds at high risk of infection. However, when implanted into a sterile wound, non-union increased. Further studies are required to best optimise the anti-microbial effectiveness, while not sacrificing fracture union.

  8. [Treatment results of aseptic non-unions of long bones with medullary canal reaming followed by intramedullary nailing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasiuk, Michał; Kmieciak, Marek

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents results of treatment of 46 consecutive patients with pseudoarthroses of the long bones treated with closed intramedullary reaming followed by intramedullary nailing. There were 22 nonunions of the tibia, 15 of the femur, 3 of the humerus and 6 of the forearm. The union occurred in 40 cases, among them in 3 of 4 treated atrophic, that gives 87% success. None of treated pseudoarthrosis of the humerus united.

  9. Prognostic Factors for Predicting Outcomes After Intramedullary Nailing of the Tibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemitsch, Emil H.; Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Sanders, David W.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Tornetta, Paul; Walter, Stephen D.; Zdero, Rad; Goslings, J.C.; Teague, David; Jeray, Kyle; McKee, Michael D.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Sanders, David W.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Tornetta, Paul; Walter, Stephen D.; Zdero, Rad; Goslings, J.C.; Teague, David; Jeray, Kyle; McKee, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prediction of negative postoperative outcomes after long-bone fracture treatment may help to optimize patient care. We recently completed the Study to Prospectively Evaluate Reamed Intramedullary Nails in Patients with Tibial Fractures (SPRINT), a large, multicenter trial of reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures in 1226 patients. Using the SPRINT data, we conducted an investigation of baseline and surgical factors to determine any associations with an increased risk of adverse events within one year of intramedullary nailing. Methods: Using multivariable logistic regression analysis, we investigated fifteen baseline and surgical factors for any associations with an increased risk of negative outcomes. Results: There was an increased risk of negative events in patients with a high-energy mechanism of injury (odds ratio [OR] = 1.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05 to 2.35), a stainless steel compared with a titanium nail (OR = 1.52; 95% CI, 1.10 to 2.13), a fracture gap (OR = 2.40; 95% CI, 1.47 to 3.94), and full weight-bearing status after surgery (OR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.00 to 2.64). There was no increased risk with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, late or early time to surgery, or smoking status. Open fractures had a higher risk of events among patients treated with reamed nailing (OR = 3.26; 95% CI, 2.01 to 5.28) but not in patients treated with unreamed nailing (OR = 1.50; 95% CI, 0.92 to 2.47). Patients with open fractures who had wound management either without any additional procedures or with delayed primary closure had a decreased risk of events compared with patients who required subsequent, more complex reconstruction (OR = 0.18 [95% CI, 0.09 to 0.35] and 0.29 [95% CI, 0.14 to 0.62], respectively). Conclusions: We identified several baseline fracture and surgical characteristics that may increase the risk of adverse events in patients with tibial shaft fractures. Surgeons should consider the

  10. [Elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) in the treatment of both-bone forearm fractures in the child: about 87 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andaloussi, Saad; Amine Oukhouya, Mohamed; Alaoui, Othmane; Atarraf, Karima; Chater, Lamiae; Afifi, My Abderrahmane

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to describe the complications of elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) in the treatment of both-bone forearm diaphyseal fractures in the child. Between January 2009 and December 2013, 87 children with both-bone forearm diaphyseal fractures were treated by elastic stable intramedullary nailing with Métaizeau nails. 76 boys and 11 girls, with an average age of 12 years, were enrolled in the study. Nailing was promptly performed in 50 cases and after secondary displacement during plaster-cast treatment in the other cases. Both bones were nailed in all cases. All patients underwent systematic plaster immobilization for a period of about one month. On average, nails were removed after about 6 months. Functional outcomes were studied over a mean follow-up period of 10 months. Complications were marked by 14 superficial infections (14 cases), osteitis associated with material (2 cases), refracture (3 cases), pseudarthrosis (3 cases), delayed fracture consolidation (2 cases) and proximal radioulnar synostosis (1 case). Although intramedullary nailing ideally is an osteosynthesis technique suitable for the treatment of fractures in children, it is more invasive than orthopaedic treatment.Indications for treatment should remain within well-established limits.

  11. Treatment of lower extremity long bone nonunion with expandable intramedullary nailing and autologous bone grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yunfei; Bai, Yushu; Xu, Shuogui; Liu, Xinwei; Wang, Panfeng; Wu, Dajiang; Zhang, Chuncai; Li, Ming

    2011-07-01

    Nonunion of long bones in lower limbs is a common complication of orthopedic trauma that can be extremely debilitating. This retrospective study describes our experience using expandable intramedullary nails and autologous bone grafting in treating lower limb long bone nonunion with bone defects. Nineteen patients (mean age 38.9 years, range 18-61) with lower limb long bone nonunion and defects caused by femoral or tibial fracture types were as follows: A2 (3 femoral, 1 tibial), A3 (1 femoral, 2 tibial), B2 (3 femoral, 4 tibial), and B3 (1 femoral, 4 tibial). Expandable intramedullary nailing and autologous bone (iliac and/or fibular) grafting were used for the treatment. Postoperative bone healing as determined by analysis of standard anteroposterior and lateral X-ray films every 4 weeks. Complications were noted. The average number of previous surgeries was 1.9 (range 1-4). The mean duration from original injury to treatment was 17.6 months (range 9-40 months). Femoral shaft nonunion healed on average of 26.5 weeks (range 16-60 weeks) after surgery, while tibial shaft nonunion healed on average of 23.6 weeks (range 12-40 weeks) after surgery. Class I healing occurred in all but two patients who experienced chronic postoperative osteomyelitis and delayed wound healing, respectively. Two patients complained of postoperative donor site pain. The use of expandable intramedullary nails and autologous bone grafts was an effective method for repair of nonunion of lower limb fractures combining with bone defects with minimal complications.

  12. Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with combined retrograde intramedullary nail and lateral L-plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2012-01-01

    Achieving stable fixation when performing tibiotalocalcaneal or tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis can be challenging. Patients undergoing these procedures often have osteopenia, poor bone stock, fragmentation of the bones of the foot and ankle, joint subluxation, or even dislocation. The author describes a technique of tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with intramedullary nail fixation augmented by lateral plating through the transfibular approach. This can provide excellent exposure of the ankle and subtalar joints, morselized bone for grafting, and better construct stability. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical Outcomes after Open Locked Intramedullary Nailing of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... a prospective study which was carried out on all adult patients aged 16 years and above who presented within 2 weeks of ..... include poor knowledge of road safety measures such as road signs and speed limit by the .... The shortening was managed with a shoe raise. Loosening of distal screws was seen ...

  14. [Fractures of the tibial shaft treated by blind intramedullary nailing. A review of 521 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Y; Aubriot, J H; Lamotte, N

    1977-09-01

    The authors have studied a series of 521 fractures of the tibia treated by blind intramedullary nailing without reaming. Union by the 120th day was obtained in 93.3% of cases. Malunion was uncommon and was related to an inadequate initial reduction. A secondary procedure was only necessary in two cases of malunion. In closed fractures, no case suffered infection. In compound fractures, 4.3% became infected (5 osteitis, 4 septic non-union) but all cases were cured by secondary procedures. Aseptic non-union occurred in 2.3% of cases. The authors recommend the use of nails of at least 8 mm diameter driven down to the region of the lower articular surface. In patients with a narrow medullary canal, or in fractures of the lower third of the tibia, the authors consider that reaming would have given better results. In other types of fracture reaming is more hazardous than useful.

  15. Complications of Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing for treating paediatric long bone fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Aamer; Bhosale, Abhijit; Madan, Sanjeev S.; Flowers, Mark J.; Fernandes, James A.; Jones, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the complications observed in children with long bone fractures treated using Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing (ESIN). One hundred and sixty-four (n = 164) fractures in 160 patients under the age of 16 years formed the basis of our review. This included 108 boys and 52 girls with the median age of 11 years and median follow up of 7.5 months. The analysis included fractures of the radius/ulna, humerus, femur and tibia. All pathological fractures were excluded. In this series 54 patients (34%) had complications however majority of these were minor complications with irritation due to prominent nail ends being the commonest complication. No long-term sequelae were encountered in our patients. PMID:24403743

  16. Intramedullary bone fragment obstructing passage of reaming guide wire with iatrogenic fractured tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Suman; Lall, Hitesh; Jain, Vijay Kumar; Bansal, Pankaj; Khare, Rahul; Mittal, Deepak

    2010-02-01

    Reamed interlocking intramedullary fixation is the treatment of choice for displaced tibial shaft fractures in adults. In most cases it can be performed without difficulty; however, technical difficulties may be encountered during nailing in some cases. This article describes a case of closed nailing for a tibial shaft fracture in which intramedullary guide wire was obstructed by a small intramedullary bone fragment in the distal fracture segment. Forceful reaming and insertion of the nail led to a break in the cortex of the distal fragment and bending of guide wire. Finally, open reduction and intramedullary nailing was performed to retrieve the guide wire and intramedullary bone fragment and fix the tibia.A comminuted fracture with multiple close fragments in proximity to the fracture site should be preoperatively scrutinized to look for intramedullary bone fragment or a fragment that could be pushed in the intramedullary canal during the intramedullary nailing. The surgeon can then anticipate the potential operative difficulty that may be encountered during closed nailing of such a fracture; and the patient can be counseled, as open nailing is a safer and viable option. Finally it is pertinent that even if this fracture type is overlooked, catastrophe can be avoided by properly following all the steps of intramedullary nailing. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Technical note: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the presence of an intramedullary femoral nail using anteromedial drilling

    OpenAIRE

    Lacey, Matthew; Lamplot, Joseph; Walley, Kempland C; DeAngelis, Joseph P; Ramappa, Arun J

    2017-01-01

    AIM To describe an approach to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using autologous hamstring by drilling via the anteromedial portal in the presence of an intramedullary (IM) femoral nail. METHODS Once preoperative imagining has characterized the proposed location of the femoral tunnel preparations are made to remove all of the hardware (locking bolts and IM nail). A diagnostic arthroscopy is performed in the usual fashion addressing all intra-articular pathology. The ACL remnant...

  18. [The biomechanical study of rotating-arm self-locking intramedullary nails in comminuted femoral shaft fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yue; Fu, Xiuxin; Chi, Leiting; Wang, Guanglin; Yang, Tianfu

    2006-10-01

    This study was sought to compare and evaluate the biomechanical properities of rotating-arm self-locking intramedullary nails (RSIN) with domestic femoral intramedullary nail (DFIN) in communited femoral shaft fractures. A 2 cm midshaft defect was created on seven pairs of cadaver femur, and fixed with two kinds of intramedullary nails. Then the torsion, four-point bending and axial loading to failure were tested on these models. The load versus deformation curve was generated from the load recorded by the load cell and the deformation simultaneously recorded by the linear variable displacement transducer. The mean torsional stiffness of the femora fixed with RSIN was 0.98 Nm/degree, which was significantly less than that fixed with the similar nails reported in documents, and the mean value of bending stiffness of the femur fixed with DFIN was larger than that of the femur fixed with RBIN, but there was no significant statistic difference. For use in fracture models under compression load beyond 1200 N, the RBIN was more rigid than DFIN, which provided the biggest load. All the parameters of the test with nails were greater than that for femur fixed with nails. In conclusion, FBIN probably provides enough strength and rigidity for use in communited femoral shaft fractures.

  19. Reamed interlocking intramedullary nailing for the treatment of tibial diaphyseal fractures and aseptic nonunions. Can we expect an optimum result?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalidis, Byron E; Petsatodis, George E; Sachinis, Nick C; Dimitriou, Christos G; Christodoulou, Anastasios G

    2009-10-01

    The need for reaming and the number of locking screws to be used in intramedullary (IM) tibial nailing of acute fractures as well as routine bone grafting of tibial aseptic nonunions have not been clearly defined. We describe the results of reamed interlocked IM nails in 233 patients with 247 tibial fractures (190 closed, 27 open and 30 nonunions). Ninety-six percent of the fractures were united at review after an average of 4.9 years. No correlation was found between union and nail diameter (P = 0.501) or the number of locking screws used (P = 0.287). Nail dynamization was effective in 82% of fractures. Locking screw(s) breakage was associated with nonunion in 25% of cases. Bone grafting during IM nailing was found not to increase the healing rate in tibial nonunions (P = 0.623). None of the IM nails were removed or revised due to infection. A dropped hallux and postoperative compartment syndrome were found in 0.8 and 1.6% of cases, respectively. Anterior knee pain was reported in 42% of patients but nail removal did not alleviate the symptoms in almost half. This series confirms the place of reamed intramedullary nailing for the vast majority of tibial diaphyseal fractures. It provides an optimum outcome and minimizes the need for supplementary bone grafting in aseptic nonunions.

  20. Open grade III fractures of femoral shaft: Outcome after early reamed intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D; Garg, R; Bassi, J L; Tripathi, S K

    2011-09-01

    Open grade III fractures of femur are a challenging therapeutic problem as most of them are associated with multiple trauma. Method used for skeletal stabilization of these fractures should limit further soft tissue damage, bacterial spread and morbidity in addition to its ease of application, providing mechanical support and restoring normal alignment. Forty-six patients with open grade III fractures of femoral shaft were included in the study. There were 10 grade IIIA, 34 grade IIIB and two grade IIIC fractures that were treated with early reamed intramedullary nailing with adequate management of soft tissue. Patients were reviewed retrospectively. Mean time of union was 27 weeks. Infection rate was 4% and non-union rate was 9%. There were two cases (4%) with limb shortening. No case of angular or rotational deformity was noted. Early reamed intramedullary nailing for open grade III fractures of femoral shaft, after giving due respect to the soft tissue injury, gives satisfactory results with proper alignment, good range of motion, short rehabilitation period and low infection rate. Level IV. Retrospective therapeutic study. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Treatment of acute fractures of the femoral shaft with reamed intramedullary interlocking AO nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umer, M; Niazi, A K; Hussain, D; Ahmad, M

    2004-08-01

    To review and audit our experience with closed intramedullary interlocking nailing for acute femoral shaft fractures. All patients admitted to The Aga Khan University Hospital, over the last six years and with a minimum follow-up of twelve months, with acute fractures of the femoral shaft were included in the study. All patients treated for established non-unions and infections or with pathological fractures were excluded from the study. There were 89 fractures, 74% of whom were closed and 50% were associated with other orthopedic injuries. Most of these were younger patients involved in high velocity road traffic accidents. The union rate was 88% with 4.4% of fractures going into non-union. The remaining 8% of the fractures went into a phase of delayed union, but ultimately united, making the overall success rate to be 95.6%. The mean time for union was 11.5 weeks. At the final clinical follow-up, 4% of the patients had minor pain, 7% had limp, 4% had leg length discrepancy of more than 2 cm and 4% had decreased range of motion at the hip or knee joints. We had a 4% rate of superficial infection. There were 3 cases of pudendal nerve neuropraxia and 2 cases of deep vein thrombosis. Intramedullary Interlocking nailing is a safe and effective treatment modality for acute fractures of the femoral shaft. Proper surgical decision making regarding static versus dynamic mode of locking can avoid problems of delayed union.

  2. Reconstruct the proximal radius with iliac graft and elastic intramedullary nail fixation after tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bin; Yang, Jielai; Cheng, Dongdong; Yin, Xiaofan; Yang, Qingcheng

    2016-08-08

    This study aims to introduce a novel technique in treating benign bone tumors of the proximal radius by elastic intramedullary nail fixation and iliac graft after tumor resection. In this retrospective case series, the treatment outcomes of 17 patients with benign bone tumor involving the proximal radius were reported from January 2010 to August 2014. All the patients received reconstruction surgery with iliac graft and elastic intramedullary nail fixation after tumor resection. Pain scoring was assessed using the 0 to 10 numerical rating scale. The quality of life scoring was assessed using the SF-30 scoring system. In addition, functional outcome was assessed with the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score. The mean follow-up was 16 months (range, 10-22). The average bone consolidate time was 19.2 weeks (range, 16-24 weeks). The pre- and postoperative pain scores were 5.47 ± 1.58 and 1.18 ± 0.39, respectively. The pain symptom was significantly ameliorated after the operation (t = 13.50, p proximal radius.

  3. Anterior knee pain after tibial intramedullary nailing using a medial paratendinous approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Si Young; Chang, Ho Geun; Byun, Jae Chul; Kim, Tae Young

    2012-03-01

    To determine the incidence, severity, and etiology of anterior knee pain after tibial intramedullary (IM) nailing using a medial paratendinous approach and to investigate the association between anterior knee pain and functional impairment. Retrospective study with current clinical and radiographic assessments. Level I trauma center. Forty-five patients with unilateral, tibial diaphyseal fractures treated with tibial IM nailing between August 2005 and January 2009. The mean follow-up was 22.3 months (range, 12-52 months). All patients underwent tibial IM nailing using a medial paratendinous approach. Anterior knee pain based on a visual analog scale and functional outcomes based on the Tegner activity score and the modified Lysholm score. Of the 45 patients, 16 (36%) were painless (N group), 16 (36%) had mild pain (M group), and 13 (28%) had moderate to severe pain (MS group). No group differences were found with respect to age, sex, body mass index, mode of injury, or type of fracture. With regard to nail prominence, superior nail prominence was greater in the MS group than in the other two groups (P = 0.042). There were no significant differences among the three groups in terms of anterior nail prominence (P = 0.221). The nail-apex distance in the MS group was significantly greater than in the other two groups (P = 0.033), and no significant difference was found between the N and M groups. The descending order of the activities with respect to severity of knee pain was kneeling, squatting, running, and stair ascending. Visual analog scale analysis revealed that the MS group had significantly more severe pain for all eight activities examined than the M group. At latest follow-up, the Tegner activity score was significantly lower in the MS group than in the other two groups (P = 0.008), and there were statistically significant intergroup differences in the modified Lysholm score (P Anterior knee pain after tibial IM nailing using a medial paratendinous approach

  4. Character, Incidence, and Predictors of Knee Pain and Activity After Infrapatellar Intramedullary Nailing of an Isolated Tibia Fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obremskey, William; Agel, Julie; Archer, Kristin; To, Philip; Tornetta, Paul; Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Sanders, David W.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Walter, Stephen; Sprague, Sheila; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Buckingham, Lisa; Leece, Pamela; Viveiros, Helena; Mignott, Tashay; Ansell, Natalie; Sidorkewicz, Natalie; Bombardier, Claire; Berlin, Jesse A.; Bosse, Michael; Browner, Bruce; Gillespie, Brenda; Jones, Alan; O'Brien, Peter; Poolman, Rudolf; Macleod, Mark D.; Carey, Timothy; Leitch, Kellie; Bailey, Stuart; Gurr, Kevin; Konito, Ken; Bartha, Charlene; Low, Isolina; MacBean, Leila V.; Ramu, Mala; Reiber, Susan; Strapp, Ruth; Tieszer, Christina; Kreder, Hans J.; Stephen, David J. G.; Axelrod, Terry S.; Yee, Albert J. M.; Richards, Robin R.; Finkelstein, Joel; Gofton, Wade; Murnaghan, John; Schatztker, Joseph; Ford, Michael; Bulmer, Beverly; Conlan, Lisa; Laflamme, G. Yves; Berry, Gregory; Beaumont, Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Laflamme, Georges-Henri; Gagnon, Sylvain; Malo, Michel; Fernandes, Julio; Poirier, Marie-France; McKee, Michael D.; Waddell, James P.; Bogoch, Earl R.; Daniels, Timothy R.; McBroom, Robert R.; Vicente, Milena R.; Storey, Wendy; Wild, Lisa M.; McCormack, Robert; Perey, Bertrand; Goetz, Thomas J.; Pate, Graham; Penner, Murray J.; Panagiotopoulos, Kostas; Pirani, Shafique; Dommisse, Ian G.; Loomer, Richard L.; Stone, Trevor; Moon, Karyn; Zomar, Mauri; Webb, Lawrence X.; Teasdall, Robert D.; Birkedal, John Peter; Martin, David Franklin; Ruch, David S.; Kilgus, Douglas J.; Pollock, David C.; Harris, Mitchel Brion; Wiesler, Ethan Ron; Ward, William G.; Shilt, Jeffrey Scott; Koman, Andrew L.; Poehling, Gary G.; Kulp, Brenda; Creevy, William R.; Stein, Andrew B.; Bono, Christopher T.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Brown, T. Desmond; Pacicca, Donna; Sledge, John B.; Foster, Timothy E.; Voloshin, Ilva; Bolton, Jill; Carlisle, Hope; Shaughnessy, Lisa; Obremskey, William T.; LeCroy, C. Michael; Meinberg, Eric G.; Messer, Terry M.; Craig, William L.; Dirschl, Douglas R.; Caudle, Robert; Harris, Tim; Elhert, Kurt; Hage, William; Jones, Robert; Piedrahita, Luis; Schricker, Paul O.; Driver, Robin; Godwin, Jean; Kregor, Philip James; Tennent, Gregory; Truchan, Lisa M.; Sciadini, Marcus; Shuler, Franklin D.; Driver, Robin E.; Nading, Mary Alice; Neiderstadt, Jacky; Vap, Alexander R.; Vallier, Heather A.; Patterson, Brendan M.; Wilber, John H.; Wilber, Roger G.; Sontich, John K.; Moore, Timothy Alan; Brady, Drew; Cooperman, Daniel R.; Davis, John A.; Cureton, Beth Ann; Mandel, Scott; Orr, R. Douglas; Sadler, John T. S.; Hussain, Tousief; Rajaratnam, Krishan; Petrisor, Bradley; Drew, Brian; Bednar, Drew A.; Kwok, Desmond C. H.; Pettit, Shirley; Hancock, Jill; Cole, Peter A.; Smith, Joel J.; Brown, Gregory A.; Lange, Thomas A.; Stark, John G.; Levy, Bruce A.; Swiontkowski, Marc F.; Garaghty, Mary J.; Salzman, Joshua G.; Schutte, Carol A.; Tastad, Linda; Vang, Sandy; Seligson, David; Roberts, Craig S.; Malkani, Arthur L.; Sanders, Laura; Dyer, Carmen; Heinsen, Jessica; Smith, Langan; Madanagopal, Sudhakar; Frantz-Bush, Linda; Coupe, Kevin J.; Tucker, Jeffrey J.; Criswell, Allen R.; Buckle, Rosemary; Rechter, Alan Jeffrey; Sheth, Dhiren Shaskikant; Urquart, Brad; Trotscher, Thea; Anders, Mark J.; Kowalski, Joseph M.; Fineberg, Marc S.; Bone, Lawrence B.; Phillips, Matthew J.; Rohrbacher, Bernard; Stegemann, Philip; Mihalko, William M.; Buyea, Cathy; Augustine, Stephen J.; Jackson, William Thomas; Solis, Gregory; Ero, Sunday U.; Segina, Daniel N.; Berrey, Hudson B.; Agnew, Samuel G.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Campbell, Lakina C.; Derting, Lynn; McAdams, June; Goslings, J. Carel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Luitse, Jan; Kloen, Peter; Joosse, Pieter; Winkelhagen, Jasper; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Teague, David C.; Davey, Joseph; Sullivan, J. Andy; Ertl, William J. J.; Puckett, Timothy A.; Pasque, Charles B.; Tompkins, John F.; Gruel, Curtis R.; Kammerlocher, Paul; Lehman, Thomas P.; Puffinbarger, William R.; Carl, Kathy L.; Weber, Donald W.; Jomha, Nadr M.; Goplen, Gordon R.; Masson, Edward; Beaupre, Lauren A.; Greaves, Karen E.; Schaump, Lori N.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Goetz, David R.; Westberry, David E.; Broderick, J. Scott; Moon, Bryan S.; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Powell, James N.; Buckley, Richard E.; Elves, Leslie; Connolly, Stephen; Abraham, Edward P.; Steele, Trudy; Ellis, Thomas; Herzberg, Alex; Brown, George A.; Crawford, Dennis E.; Hart, Robert; Hayden, James; Orfaly, Robert M.; Vigland, Theodore; Vivekaraj, Maharani; Bundy, Gina L.; Miclau, Theodore; Matityahu, Amir; Coughlin, R. Richard; Kandemir, Utku; McClellan, R. Trigg; Lin, Cindy Hsin-Hua; Karges, David; Cramer, Kathryn; Watson, J. Tracy; Moed, Berton; Scott, Barbara; Beck, Dennis J.; Orth, Carolyn; Puskas, David; Clark, Russell; Jones, Jennifer; Egol, Kenneth A.; Paksima, Nader; France, Monet; Wai, Eugene K.; Johnson, Garth; Wilkinson, Ross; Gruszczynski, Adam T.; Vexler, Liisa

    2016-01-01

    To study the activity and incidence of knee pain after sustaining an isolated tibia fracture treated with an infrapatellar intramedullary nail at 1 year. Retrospective review of prospective cohort. Multicenter Academic and Community hospitals. Four hundred thirty-seven patients with an isolated

  5. Reamed interlocking intramedullary nailing for the treatment of tibial diaphyseal fractures and aseptic nonunions. Can we expect an optimum result?

    OpenAIRE

    Chalidis, Byron E.; Petsatodis, George E.; Sachinis, Nick C.; Dimitriou, Christos G.; Christodoulou, Anastasios G.

    2009-01-01

    The need for reaming and the number of locking screws to be used in intramedullary (IM) tibial nailing of acute fractures as well as routine bone grafting of tibial aseptic nonunions have not been clearly defined. We describe the results of reamed interlocked IM nails in 233 patients with 247 tibial fractures (190 closed, 27 open and 30 nonunions). Ninety-six percent of the fractures were united at review after an average of 4.9?years. No correlation was found between union and nail diameter ...

  6. Unreamed intramedullary nailing for pathological femoral fractures. Good results in 30 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoudis, P V; Bastawrous, S S; Bunola, J A; Macdonald, D A; Smith, R M

    1999-02-01

    We have used the AO unreamed femoral nail for stabilization of impending and complete pathological fractures since March 1994. 27 patients with 30 pathological fractures (23) or impending fractures (7) of the femur were retrospectively analyzed. These included 18 subtrochanteric fractures, 11 shaft fractures and 1 distal fracture. The mean age of the patients was 68 (51-84) years. All patients were treated with a solid femoral nail inserted by an unreamed technique. The nail was inserted through a minimally invasive approach and with a median surgical time of 55 (35-70) minutes. A reconstructive proximal locking option (spiral blade) was used in 25 cases. There were no intraoperative complications, no operative mortality. Reliable skeletal stability was obtained in all cases and most were able to mobilize early with minimum discomfort. 1 case was revised for a secondary fracture through a distal metastasis at 6 months. The median survival was 5 (2-9) months. Unreamed nailing with the AO solid femoral nail appears to be a good option for the stabilization of pathological femoral fractures.

  7. [The comparisive study of the clinical effect of rotary self-locking intramedullary nail and intramedullary interlocking nail for the treatment of femur fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Man-jiang; Sun, Shu-dong; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Dong-zhao

    2008-10-01

    To compare the clinical effect of rotary self-locking intramedullary nail (RSIN) and intramedullary interlocking nail (IIN) for the treatment of fresh femoral shaft fracture. The radiological records of 60 fresh femoral shaft fractures (41 stable fractures and 19 unstable fractures) were retrospectively analyzed. Among them, 49 were male and 11 were female. The average age was 33.5 years old (range from 12 to 68 years old). All cases were fresh fracture with no important blood vessel or nerve injury, which were taken operation with RSIN on IIN respectively in 2 h-7 d after injury. The patients in IIN group began functional movements at postoperative 4 to 5 days and could bear the weight of 10-15 kg. The patients in RSIN group could began functional exercises after the wound healed and bear partly weight after 6 weeks. Both groups were contrasted on the biomechanics, operation procedure, fracture healing time, functional recovery and operative indication. Both groups were followed-up for average 13 months. IIN group: the average healing time of closed femur fracture was 16 weeks while that of open fracture was 20 weeks. The healing rate was 100% and the malunion rate was 7.9%. The excellent and good rate of functional recovery was 93.3% including excellent in 27 cases, good in 1, fair in 1 and bad in 1. RSIN group: the average healing time of closed femur fracture was 16 weeks while open fracture was 23 weeks. The healing rate was 87% and the malunion rate was 18.2%. The excellent and good rate of functional recovery was 83.3% including excellent in 23 cases, good in 2, fair in 3 and bad in 2. No implant break and nonunion happened. The differences between two groups in healing time, deformity-union rate and the rate of the twice operation were statistically significant. IIN provides a reliable and practical alternative method for the treatment of all kinds of femoral shaft fracture and its important complication is fewer than RSIN group. RSIN also has a good

  8. Open Intramedullary Nailing for Segmental Long Bone Fractures: An Effective Alternative in a Resource-restricted Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babalola, Olasunkanmi M; Ibraheem, Gbadebo Hakeem; Ahmed, Bola A; Olawepo, Ayokunle; Agaja, Samuel B; Adeniyi, Adebowale

    2016-01-01

    Background: Closed, locked intramedullary nailing has been accepted as the gold standard in the care of femoral fractures, with reported union rates as high as 98–100%. Closed, locked intramedullary nailing often requires expensive equipment which is a challenge in developing countries. Segmental long bone fractures are often a result of high-energy trauma and hence often associated with a lot of injuries to the surrounding soft tissues. This consequently results in higher rates of delayed or nonunion. This study was proposed to review the outcome of management of segmental fractures with locked intramedullary nails, using an open method of reduction. Methods: A retrospective analysis was made of data obtained from all segmental long bone fractures treated with intramedullary nailing over a 1-year period. Records were retrieved from the folders of patients operated on from January 2011 to December 2011. Patients were followed up for a minimum of 1 year after the surgery. Results: We managed a total of 12 segmental long bone fractures in 11 patients. Eight of the 12 fractures were femoral fractures and 10 of the fractures were closed fractures. All but one fracture (91.7%) achieved union within 4 months with no major complications. Conclusions: Open method of locked intramedullary nailing achieves satisfactory results when used for the management of long bone fractures. The method can be used for segmental fractures of the humerus, femur, and tibia, with high union rates. This is particularly useful in low-income societies where the use of intraoperative imaging may be unavailable or unaffordable. It gives patients in such societies, a chance for comparable outcomes in terms of union rates as well as avoidance of major complications. Larger prospective studies will be necessary to conclusively validate the efficacy of this fixation method in this environment. PMID:27843272

  9. [Intramedullary osteosynthesis of distal metacarpal fractures with curved wires].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlageter, M; Winkel, R; Porcher, R; Haas, H G

    1997-07-01

    When intramedullary pinning is used to treat metacarpal fractures, as recently described by Förstner (1994) and Foucher (1995), the closed reduction technique developed by Jahss (1938) is applied in the same way as for conservative fracture treatment. It is not always possible to achieve complete anatomical reduction using this closed technique. The intramedullary pinning technique, that we have applied since 1989, involves a Kirschner wire which is bent at one end. Apart from reducing the fracture, the pre-set Kirschner wire serves as a butressing internal fixator. The elastic clamping of the wire acts as an internal wire spring splint, permitting early mobilisation. We have operated on 62 metacarpal fractures using the above-mentioned technique over a period of 6 years until 1995. Anatomic reduction was realized in 50 of 62 fractures. In the follow-up of 32 fractures, we noticed four complications: one infection, two paraesthesias, and one non-union.

  10. A newly designed intramedullary nail for the treatment of diaphyseal forearm fractures in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Azboy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The treatment of diaphyseal forearm fractures using open reduction and plate fixation is generally accepted as the best choice in many studies. However, periosteal stripping, haematoma evacuation may result in delayed union, nonunion and infection. Refracture after plate removal is another concern. To overcome these problems intramedullary nails (IM with different designs have been used with various outcomes. However previous IM nails have some shortcomings such is rotational instability and interlocking difficulties. We evaluated the results of newly designed IM nail in the treatment of diaphyseal forearm fractures in adults. Materials and Methods: 32 patients who had been treated with the interlocking IM nail for forearm fractures between 2011 and 2014 were included in this study. There were 23 males and 9 females with mean age of 36 years (range 18-68 years. 22 patients (68.8% had both bone fractures. Nine patients (28.1% had open fractures. The remaining ten patients (31.2% had radius or ulna fractures. Grace and Eversmann rating system was used to assess functional evaluation. Patient reported outcomes were assessed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH questionnaire scores. Results: Union was achieved in all patients. The mean followup was 17 months (range 13 – 28 months. According to the Grace-Eversmann criteria, 27 patients (87.5% had excellent or good results. The mean DASH score was 14 (range 5-36. Overall complication rate was 12.5%. Superficial infection was encountered in two patients. One patient had delayed union, however fracture healed without any additional surgical procedure. One patient who had open grade 3A, comminuted proximal third radius fracture developed radioulnar synostosis. Conclusions: The new design IM interlocking forearm nail provides satisfactory functional and radiological outcomes in the treatment of adult diaphyseal forearm fractures.

  11. Removal of a Broken Cannulated Intramedullary Nail: Review of the Literature and a Case Report of a New Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr A. Abdelgawad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonunion of long bones fixed with nails may result in implant failure. Removal of a broken intramedullary nail may be a real challenge. Many methods have been described to allow for removal of the broken piece of the nail. In this paper, we are reviewing the different techniques to extract a broken nail, classifying them into different subsets, and describing a new technique that we used to remove a broken tibial nail with narrow canal. Eight different categories of implant removal methods were described, with different methods within each category. This classification is very comprehensive and was never described before. We described a new technique (hook captured in the medulla by flexible nail introduced from the locking hole which is a valuable technique in cases of nail of a small diameter where other methods cannot be used because of the narrow canal of the nail. Our eight categories for broken nail removal methods simplify the concepts of nail removal and allow the surgeon to better plan for the removal procedure.

  12. [Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis using a distally introduced femur nail (DFN)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grass, René

    2005-10-01

    Simultaneous arthrodesis of ankle and subtalar joints and, at the same sitting, correction of axial malalignment of hindfoot, treatment of bony defects and of sequelae of circulatory disturbances after multiple previous interventions. Internal stabilization with a short distal femur nail. Restitution of a pain-free weight bearing. Failure of arthrodesis of ankle and subtalar joint causing pain in patients with severely altered bone structures particularly at the level of the talar dome. Malalignment of hind- and/or forefoot after previous arthrodesis of ankle and subtalar joint. Failure of conservative therapy in both above-enumerated conditions. Poor skin or soft-tissue conditions. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Acute osteitis/osteomyelitis. Posterolateral approach. Resection of the articular cartilage and the areas of sclerosis of the ankle and of the posterior facet of the subtalar joint. Interposition of bone grafts harvested from the iliac crest. Correction of malalignment of hind- and forefoot. Locked nailing with a short distal femur nail. Fitting of a flexible custom-made arthrodesis boot; weight bearing in boot not exceeding half of body weight until the 8th week. Gait training. After 12 weeks wearing of normal shoes. Radiographs after 6 and 12 weeks. Between February 1, 2002 and September 1, 2003 this technique was performed on 18 feet in 17 patients (three women, 14 men, average age 53 years [38.9-73.7 years]). Average duration of follow-up: 1.2 years (0.6-2.1 years). The goal of surgery was reached in all patients. Subjective assessment: 14 times good, three times satisfactory. Four complications: one loss of nail purchase, one dislocation of locking screw, one breakage of locking bolt, one prolonged bone healing.

  13. Reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing for the treatment of open and closed tibial fractures: a subgroup analysis of randomised trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Deting; Zheng, Qiang; Li, Hang; Qian, Shengjun; Zhang, Bo

    2009-01-01

    The choice between reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing for the treatment of open and closed tibial fractures is an ongoing controversy. We carried out a comprehensive search strategy. Six eligible randomised controlled trials were included. Three reviewers independently assessed methodological quality and extracted outcome data. Analyses were performed using Review Manager 5.0. The results showed lower risks of tibial fracture nonunion and implant failures with reamed nails compared to unreamed nails in closed tibial fractures [relative risk (RR): 0.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.21–0.89, P = 0.008 for nonunion and RR: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.22–0.56, P reamed and unreamed nails in open tibial fractures. In conclusion, our study recommended reamed nails for the treatment of closed tibial fractures. But the choice for open tibial fractures remains uncertain. PMID:19841919

  14. Titanium elastic stable intramedullary nailing of displaced midshaft clavicle fractures: A review of 38 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadakia, Anish P; Rambani, Rohit; Qamar, Faisal; McCoy, Steven; Koch, Lutz; Venkateswaran, Balachandran

    2012-07-01

    Clavicle fractures accounting for 3 to 5% of all adult fractures are usually treated non-operatively. There is an increasing trend toward their surgical fixation. The aim of our study was to investigate the outcome following titanium elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) for midshaft non-comminuted clavicle fractures with >20 mm shortening/displacement. A total of 38 patients, which met inclusion criteria, were reviewed retrospectively. There were 32 males and six females. The mean age was 27.6 years. The patients were assessed for clinical/radiological union and by Oxford Shoulder and QuickDASH scores. 71% patients required open reduction. 100% union was achieved at average of 11.3 weeks. The average follow-up was 12 months. The average Oxford Shoulder and QuickDASH scores were 45.6 and 6.7, respectively. 47% patients had nail removal. One patient had lateral nail protrusion while other required its medial trimming. In our hands, ESIN is safe and minimally invasive with good patient satisfaction, cosmetic appearance, and overall outcome.

  15. A Novel Closed Method to Retrieve Broken Teflon Tube During Intramedullary Nailing in Proximal Humeral Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuk Fai Lau

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Broken medullary tubes have been used for intramedullary (IM nailing of femoral and tibial fractures. In these reported cases, fragments of the medullary tube were retrieved by opening the fracture sites or left in situ, which might jeopardize periosteal blood supply. We herein present the case of a 58-year-old woman who underwent IM nailing for proximal humeral fracture, which was complicated by breakage of the medullary tube intraoperatively. Different instruments including guide rods, straight forceps, and cement extract hook were used to retrieve the retained fragments from the medullary canal, but these attempts were unsuccessful. Finally, the fragments were successfully removed using an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL ENDOBUTTON depth gauge. This case highlights that medullary tubes can break during humeral IM nailing, which could be minimized by ensuring integrity of the medullary tube prior to surgery and disposing medullary tubes with more than 100 exposures. A novel method of using ACL ENDOBUTTON depth gauge to retrieve retained tube fragments is recommended because of its long and slim design.

  16. Rotation of intramedullary alignment rods affects distal femoral cutting plane in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maderbacher, Günther; Matussek, Jan; Keshmiri, Armin; Greimel, Felix; Baier, Clemens; Grifka, Joachim; Maderbacher, Hermann

    2018-02-17

    Intramedullary rods are widely used to align the distal femoral cut in total knee arthroplasty. We hypothesised that both coronal (varus/valgus) and sagittal (extension/flexion) cutting plane are affected by rotational changes of intramedullary femoral alignment guides. Distal femoral cuts using intramedullary alignment rods were simulated by means of a computer-aided engineering software in 4°, 6°, 8°, 10°, and 12° of valgus in relation to the femoral anatomical axis and 4° extension, neutral, as well as 4°, 8°, and 12° of flexion in relation to the femoral mechanical axis. This reflects the different angles between anatomical and mechanical axis in coronal and sagittal planes. To assess the influence of rotation of the alignment guide on the effective distal femoral cutting plane, all combinations were simulated with the rod gradually aligned from 40° of external to 40° of internal rotation. Rotational changes of the distal femoral alignment guides affect both the coronal and sagittal cutting planes. When alignment rods are intruded neutrally with regards to sagittal alignment, external rotation causes flexion, while internal rotation causes extension of the sagittal cutting plane. Simultaneously the coronal effect (valgus) decreases resulting in an increased varus of the cutting plane. However, when alignment rods are intruded in extension or flexion partly contradictory effects are observed. Generally the effect increases with the degree of valgus preset, rotation and flexion. As incorrect rotation of intramedullary alignment guides for distal femoral cuts causes significant cutting errors, exact rotational alignment is crucial. Coronal cutting errors in the distal femoral plane might result in overall leg malalignment, asymmetric extension gaps and subsequent sagittal cutting errors.

  17. Ipsilateral proximal femur and shaft fractures treated with hip screws and a reamed retrograde intramedullary nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrum, Robert F; Tornetta, Paul; Watson, J Tracy; Christiano, Anthony; Vafek, Emily

    2014-09-01

    Although not common, proximal femoral fractures associated with ipsilateral shaft fractures present a difficult management problem. A variety of surgical options have been employed with varying results. We investigated the use of hip screws and a reamed retrograde intramedullary (IM) nail for the treatment of this combined fracture pattern in terms of postoperative alignment (malunion), nonunion, and complications. Between May 2002 and October 2011, a total of 95 proximal femoral fractures with associated shaft fractures were treated at three participating Level 1 trauma centers; all were treated with hip screw fixation (cannulated screws or sliding hip screws) and retrograde reamed IM nails. The medical records of these patients were reviewed retrospectively for alignment, malunion, nonunion, and complications. Followup was available on 92 of 95 (97%) of the patients treated with hip screws and a retrograde nail. Forty were treated with a sliding hip screw, and 52 were treated with cannulated screws. There were five proximal malunions in this series (5%). The union rate was 98% (90 of 92) for the femoral neck fractures and 91.3% (84 of 92) for the femoral shaft fractures after the initial surgery. There were two nonunions of comminuted femoral neck fractures after cannulated screw fixation. There was no difference in femoral neck union or alignment when comparing cannulated screws to a sliding hip screw. Four open comminuted femoral shaft fractures went on to nonunion and required secondary surgery to obtain union, and one patient developed symptomatic avascular necrosis. The treatment of ipsilateral proximal femoral neck and shaft fractures with hip screw fixation and a reamed retrograde nail demonstrated a high likelihood of union for the femoral neck fractures and a low risk of malunion. Comminution and initial displacement of the proximal femoral fracture may still lead to a small incidence of malunion or nonunion, and open comminuted femoral shaft fractures

  18. Can Tibial Shaft Fractures Bear Weight After Intramedullary Nailing? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Steven C; Galos, David K; Taormina, David P; Crespo, Alexander; Egol, Kenneth A; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2016-07-01

    To examine the potential benefits and risks associated with weight-bearing after intramedullary (IM) nailing of unstable tibial shaft fractures. Randomized controlled trial. Two New York State level 1 trauma centers, one level 2 trauma center, and 1 tertiary care orthopaedic hospital in a large urban center in New York City. Eighty-eight patients with 90 tibial shaft fractures were enrolled. The following were used as inclusion criteria: (1) skeletally mature adult patients 18 years of age or older, (2) displaced fractures of tibial diaphysis (OTA type 42) treated with operative intervention, and (3) radiographs, including injury, operative, and completion of follow-up. Sixty-eight patients with 70 tibial shaft fractures completed follow-up. All patients were treated with locked IM nailing. Patients were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: immediate weight-bearing-as-tolerated (WBAT) or non-weight-bearing for the first 6 postoperative weeks (NWB). Fracture union or treatment failure/revision surgery. There was no statistical difference in the observed time to union between groups (WBAT = 22.1 ± 11.7 weeks vs. NWB = 21.3 ± 9.9 weeks; P = 0.76). Rates of complications did not statistically differ between groups. No fracture loss of reduction leading to malunion was encountered. Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment scores for all domains did not statistically differ between groups. Immediate weight-bearing after IM nailing of tibial shaft fractures is safe and is not associated with an increase in adverse events or complications. Patients should be allowed to bear weight as tolerated after IM nailing of OTA subtype 42-A and 42-B tibial shaft fractures. Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  19. Use of oral anticoagulants after intramedullary nailing of femur and tibial fractures in trauma department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Dulaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors evaluated of the effectiveness of new oral anticoagulants in patients with diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia.We analyzed the effectiveness of thromboprophylaxis in 85 patients with diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia in the early postoperative period. Patients were divided into 3 groups: group 1 - patients, who was taking enoxaparin, group 2 - dabigatran etexilate, group 3 - rivaroxaban. We evaluated the frequency of thromboembolic complications and bleeding for 4 weeks after intramedullary nailing of femur and tibia.The lowest frequency of postoperative bleeding was observed in patients treated with dabigatran etexilate. In addition, the minimum frequency of complications was observed among patients of the second group of the study (9.7% in the group receiving dabigatran etexilati compared with 27.8% for the combined group I and III.Statistically significant differences between groups of patients taking oral or parenteral anticoagulants was not obtained.

  20. Rotational Mal-Alignment after Reamed Intramedullary Nailing for tibial shaft fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sher Baz; Mohib, Yasir; Rashid, Rizwan Haroon; Rashid, Haroonur

    2016-10-01

    Intra-medullary (IM) nailing is standard of care for unstable tibial shaft fractures. Malrotation is very common but it is under-recognised, inpart because of variation in normal anatomy and partly due to difficulty in accurately assessing rotation. This study was planned to evaluate the frequency of rotational mal-alignment after reamed tibia IMnailing. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Aga khan University Hospital, Karachi, and comprised patients with tibia shaft fractures managed with IMnailing from January to December 2014. All the patients were assessed intra-operatively for rotational alignment using the knee and ankle fluoroscopic images. There were 81 patients with a mean age of 38±16.9 years. There were 64(79%) male patients. Overall the incidence of malrotation was in 20(24.7%) cases. Rotational mal-alignment is one of the preventable complications after IMnailing which can be assesed intra-operatively under fluoroscope.

  1. Current practice in the intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon H; Tornetta, Paul; Swiontkowski, Marc F; Hanson, Beate; Sprague, Sheila; Syed, Amena; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2002-10-01

    Tibial fractures are the most common of all long bone fractures. Although many tibial fractures may be managed conservatively, a certain subset, including unstable fractures and open fractures, require operative stabilization. Intramedullary nails have become the popular choice of implant in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures. The variability in outcomes with tibial shaft fractures may reflect technical aspects of the surgical procedure and perioperative care regimens among surgeons. Identifying the distribution of surgeons' preferences in nailing technique, and the rationale for their choices, will aid in focusing educational activities for the orthopedic community and planning future clinical trials. Our objectives were to clarify surgeons' opinions regarding technical aspects of surgery and perioperative care after intramedullary nailing of closed and open tibial shaft fractures, and to identify predictors of surgeons' preferences in technique and perioperative care. This study was a cross-sectional survey using focus groups, key informants, and sampling to redundancy strategies to develop a survey to examine surgeons' preferences in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures. The survey was pilot tested for clarity and content validity. We mailed this survey in July 2000 to 577 orthopedic surgeons who have an interest in trauma care. These were members of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, or European AO International affiliated trauma centers. We used several strategies to improve response rates including personalized cover letters, stamped return envelopes, follow-up telephone calls, and repeat mailing of questionnaires. Main outcome measures included technical issues such as reduction, exposure, intramedullary reaming, and interlocking screws; and factors associated with surgeons' preferences such as age, fellowship, academic practice, and geographic location. Four hundred forty-four surgeons (77%) responded

  2. Flexible Intramedullary Nails for Femur Fractures in Pediatric Patients Heavier Than 100 Pounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaha, James; Cage, Jason M; Black, Sheena; Wimberly, Robert L; Shaha, Steven H; Riccio, Anthony I

    2018-02-01

    Flexible intramedullary nailing (FIMN) of femoral shaft fractures in children >100 pounds remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to assess the relationship between patient weight and alignment at radiographic union following Ender's FIMN of pediatric femoral shaft fractures. An IRB approved, retrospective review of all patients who sustained a femoral shaft fracture treated by retrograde, stainless-steel Ender's FIMN was performed at a level 1 pediatric trauma center from 2005 to 2012. Preoperative radiographs were analyzed to determine fracture pattern, location, and isthmic canal diameter. Patient weight was measured on presentation to the emergency room. Radiographs at bony union were reviewed to measure shortening, coronal angulation, and sagittal angulation. A total of 261 children underwent Ender's FIMN for femoral shaft fractures during the study period. There were 24 patients who weighed ≥100 lbs and 237 patients who weighed pounds with excellent radiographic outcomes and no increased risk for malunion. Therapeutic Level III.

  3. Biomechanical assessment and clinical analysis of different intramedullary nailing systems for oblique fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alierta, J A; Pérez, M A; Seral, B; García-Aznar, J M

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the fracture union or non-union for a specific patient that presented oblique fractures in tibia and fibula, using a mechanistic-based bone healing model. Normally, this kind of fractures can be treated through an intramedullary nail using two possible configurations that depends on the mechanical stabilisation: static and dynamic. Both cases are simulated under different fracture geometries in order to understand the effect of the mechanical stabilisation on the fracture healing outcome. The results of both simulations are in good agreement with previous clinical experience. From the results, it is demonstrated that the dynamization of the fracture improves healing in comparison with a static or rigid fixation of the fracture. This work shows the versatility and potential of a mechanistic-based bone healing model to predict the final outcome (union, non-union, delayed union) of realistic 3D fractures where even more than one bone is involved.

  4. Complex fractures of the humeral shaft treated with antegrade locked intramedullary nail: clinical experience and long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campochiaro, Gabriele; Baudi, Paolo; Loschi, Roberta; Serafin, F; Catani, Fabio

    2015-04-27

    indications for surgical treatment of complex humeral shaft fractures are still controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of treating humeral shaft fractures using antegrade locked  intramedullary nail, compared to the treatment with traditional more aggressive techniques such as plate and screws. between February 2008 and January 2011 38 patients were treated with antegrade locked intramedullary nail for humeral shaft fractures, divided according to the AO classification. 28 patients were clinically followed: disability, pain and functional recovery were evaluated using the Constant score and DASH score and the ROM of the shoulder was checked. Bony union was obtained in 27 patients at a mean time of 2.7 months. One fracture ended in nonunion, healed after replacing the nail with a longer one. Patients achieved satisfactory shoulder function with a mean Constant score of  90.57 points and with a mean DASH score of 4.69 points. There were no other complications. the antegrade locked intramedullary nail represents a recommended option for the treatment of humeral shaft fractures, obtaining a steady synthesis, a short time of consolidation and a rapid functional recovery. (www.actabiomedica.it).

  5. Reaming does not add significant time to intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of the tibia and femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Brett D; Wolinsky, Philip R

    2009-10-01

    Reamed intramedullary nailing is the current gold standard for the treatment of diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia. Current concepts of orthopedic damage control surgery for patients with multiple injuries have placed an emphasis on appropriate surgical timing, limiting blood loss, and the duration of the initial operative procedure(s). Proponents of unreamed nailing have stated that reaming places polytraumatized patients "at risk," in part because it adds to the length of the surgical procedure and may exacerbate the severity of a patient's pulmonary injury. The purpose of this study was to determine how many minutes reaming actually takes and what percentage of operative time reaming comprises during intramedullary nailing of femoral and tibial shaft fractures. Intraoperative timing data were collected prospectively on a total of 52 patients with 54 fractures (21 femoral and 33 tibial) who underwent reamed intramedullary nailing of acute closed or open femoral or tibial shaft fractures over a 10-month period. Total operating room, surgical, and reaming times were collected. The average reaming time for femur and tibia fractures was 6.9 minutes and 7 minutes, respectively. On average, reaming accounted for 4.9% of the surgical time and 3.2% of the total operating room time for femur fractures and 4.9% of the surgical time and 3.4% of the total operating room for tibia fractures. Our results show that reaming comprises a small percentage of the operative time and the total time a patient spends in the operating room.

  6. External jig-aided intramedullary interlocking nailing of diaphyseal fractures: experience from a tropical developing centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikpeme, Ikpeme; Ngim, Ngim; Udosen, Anthony; Onuba, Obiora; Enembe, Okokon; Bello, Segun

    2011-01-01

    Intramedullary interlocking nailing for diaphyseal fractures is a standard treatment option in affluent societies. These procedures are often performed under image intensifier guidance. The cost of these gadgets precludes their common use in resource poor regions. External jig-aided intramedullary interlocking nailing is relatively cheap and offers the chance for performing these procedures in resource poor regions. The aim of this study was to document the advantages, challenges and outcome of this form of treatment in a resource poor setting. The Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) implants and instrumentation were used for this study. Thirty-seven limbs in 35 patients were included. There were 30 males and five females giving a ratio of 6:1. The mean age was 35 ± 11.9 years with a range of 15-61 years. The femur and tibia were the bones studied with a total of 23 and 14 fractures, respectively (ratio 1.6:1). There were 14 comminuted fractures, two segmented fractures, six mal-unions, eight non-unions and seven simple fractures. Road traffic accidents were the most common cause of injuries with motorcycle accidents accounting for 19 (57.4%) cases. The mean follow-up period was 22 ± 5.32 months, mean time to union was 16.9 ± 5.4 weeks and the major complication was osteomyelitis (10.8%). We conclude that this is a viable treatment option for musculoskeletal injuries in resource poor regions. Education to encourage early acceptance of surgical intervention and reduced patronage of traditional bone setting for injudicious interventions can reduce the infective complication rates.

  7. Elastic stable intramedullary nailing in paediatric traumatology at Yopougon Teaching Hospital (Abidjan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T H Odéhouri-Koudou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Elastic stable intramedullary nailing has revolutionised the treatment of fractures in children. Aim : To report our experience with this current technique of management of fractures in children. Methods and Materials : A retrospective study of all children with fractures treated by this method from November 2003 to June 2006 at the Paediatric Surgery Department of Yopougon Teaching Hospital, Abidjan, Côte d′Ivoire. Data were recorded from their medical charts regarding demographics, fracture patterns, associated injuries, morbidity, and outcome. Results : A total of 38 children (14 boys; mean age, 11.7 years; range, 9-15 years with 41 fractures, sited at femur (n=15, humerus (n=8, tibia and fibula (n=6, forearm (n=7, and radial neck (n=5, associated with other injuries in 7 cases, were enrolled in the study. The mean interval for surgery was 6.8 days. Open reduction was required 5 times (12.1%. The hospital stay was in the range 5-12 days. Minor adverse events were 1 (2.4% early tibial loss of reduction, 3 (7.3% skin irritations and 2 (4.8% transient knee limitations. Complications (17.3% included 2 axial (4.8% and 1 rotational (2.4% femoral malunions below 15°; 3 elbow (7.3% and 1 knee stiffness (2.4% in openly reduced cases. Solid consolidation was achieved in all cases, with no disturbance in standard union times. At a mean follow-up period of 16 months (range, 9-28 months, all but 3 patients with opened joints recovered full range of motion, and none showed either limp and gait anomalies or re-fracture after removal of wires. Conclusion : Elastic stable intramedullary nailing in children fractures is easy to perform and has little complications if a proper technique is used.

  8. Risk factors for re-fracture in children with diaphyseal fracture of the forearm treated with elastic stable intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, Marie; Mansour, Mounira; Samba, Antoine; Pereira, Bruno; Canavese, Federico

    2016-02-01

    A retrospective study aims to investigate predisposing factors leading to re-fracture in patients with nails still in place and to identify potential correlations between nail size-to-medullary canal diameter ratio and re-fracture, working to the hypothesis that a higher ratio correlates with a higher risk of re-fracture. Rates of re-fracture with nail still in place after forearm elastic stable intramedullary nailing are higher in younger pediatric patients. Re-fractures occurred at a mean age of 6.7 years (range 5-8.7). While the role of body frame and bone medullary diameter remains unclear, there are grounds for adjusting treatment strategy for age, weight and bone medullary diameter to achieve effective outcome. History of previous forearm fracture and open treatment may also be further risk factors.

  9. Tibia-based referencing for standard proximal tibial radiographs during intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; Choxi, Ankeet A; Dhulipala, Sravan C; Evans, Jason M; Mir, Hassan R

    2013-11-01

    Limited information exists to define standard tibial radiographs. The purpose of this study was to define new landmarks on the proximal tibia for standard anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. In 10 cadaveric knees, fibular head bisection was considered the anteroposterior image, and femoral condyle overlap the lateral image. In another 10 knees, a "twin peaks" anteroposterior view, showing the sharpest profile of the tibial spines, was used. The "flat plateau" lateral image was obtained by aligning the femoral condyles then applying a varus adjustment with overlap of the tibial plateaus. Medial peritendinous approaches were performed, and an entry reamer used to open the medullary canal. A priori analysis showed good to excellent intra-/inter-observer reliability with the new technique (intra-class correlation coefficient ICC 0.61-0.90). The "twin peaks" anteroposterior radiograph was externally rotated 2.7±2.1° compared to the standard radiograph with fibular head bisection. Portal position and incidence of damage to intra-articular structures did not significantly differ between groups (P>.05). The "twin peaks" anteroposterior view and "flat plateau" lateral view can safely be used for nail entry portal creation in the anatomic safe zone. Tibia-based radiographic referencing is useful for intramedullary nailing cases in which knee or proximal tibiofibular joint anatomy is altered.

  10. Percutaneous cerclage wiring followed by intramedullary nailing for subtrochanteric femoral fractures: a technical note with clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon-Woo; Park, Ki-Chul; Oh, Jong-Keon; Oh, Chang-Wug; Yoon, Yong-Cheol; Chang, Hyo-Won

    2014-09-01

    Although intramedullary nailing is an ideal treatment for subtrochanteric femoral fractures, it is technically challenging in fractures extending into the nail entry area and/or involving the lesser trochanter. Although the application of circumferential wire may facilitate reduction in these situations, its use remains controversial due to possible blood supply disturbances to underlying bone. In the present study, we evaluated complex subtrochanteric fractures treated by percutaneous cerclage wiring followed by intramedullary (IM) nailing for anatomical fracture reduction and union. Twelve patients (mean age 48.3 years) with an unstable subtrochanteric fracture were prospectively treated. Indications of percutaneous cerclage wiring followed by IM nailing were a fracture extending proximally into the nail entry area deemed difficult to treat by anatomical reconstruction by IM nailing or a fracture with long oblique or spiral component. One or two cerclage wires were percutaneously applied for the temporary reduction of main fragments, and then, a cephalo-medullary or a reconstruction nail was fixed. We assessed radiologic results (union time, alignment), functional results, and complications. All 12 cases healed, without a bone graft, at an average of 19.1 weeks after surgery (range 16-24). In 11 cases, acceptable alignment was achieved (mean, valgus 0.3° extension 0.6°) with minimal leg-length discrepancy; the other exhibited 1 cm of shortening. All patients were able to return to pre-injury activity levels, and median Merle d'Aubigne score was 16.9 (15-18). No infection or implant-related complication was encountered to latest follow-up (minimum 12 months postoperatively). Temporary reduction by percutaneous wiring offers a means of satisfactory nailing in difficult subtrochanteric femoral fractures, and affords anatomical reconstruction and favorable bony union.

  11. Reamed intramedullary exchange nailing in the operative treatment of aseptic tibial shaft nonunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierholzer, Christian; Friederichs, Jan; Glowalla, Claudio; Woltmann, Alexander; Bühren, Volker; von Rüden, Christian

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a standardized treatment protocol regarding the rate of secondary bone union, complications, and functional outcome. This study was started as a prospective study in a single Level I Trauma Centre between 2003 and 2012. The study group consisted of 188 patients with the diagnosis of an aseptic tibial shaft nonunion. Exchange nailing was performed following a standardized surgical protocol. Long-term follow-up was analyzed for rate of bone healing and functional outcome. Osseous healing was achieved in 182 out of 188 patients (97 %). In 165 out of 188 patients (88 %), bone healing was observed timely and uneventfully after a single exchange nailing procedure. An open approach was necessary in 32 patients (17 %). Twenty-three patients (12 %) required additional therapy such as extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Post-operative complications were observed in seven patients (4 %). Almost all patients demonstrated osseous healing within 12 months, with the majority of osseous healing occurring within six months. A relevant shortening of the fractured tibia was observed in 20 out of 188 patients (11 %). After a median follow-up of 23 months (range 12-45 months), outcome was evaluated using the assessment system of Friedman/Wyman. In summary, 154 out of 188 patients (82 %) had a good functional long-term result. Reamed intramedullary exchange nailing including correction of axis alignment is a safe and effective treatment of aseptic tibial shaft nonunion with a high rate of bone healing and a good radiological and functional long-term outcome.

  12. Surgical stabilization for open tibial fractures in children: External fixation or elastic stable intramedullary nail - which method is optimal?

    OpenAIRE

    Rohan A Ramasubbu; Benjamin M Ramasubbu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Management of open tibial fractures is well documented in adults, with existing protocols outlining detailed treatment strategies. No clear guidelines exist for children. Surgical stabilization of tibial fractures in the pediatric population requires implants that do not disrupt the open epiphyses (growth plate). Both elastic stable intramedullary nails and external fixation can be used. The objective of this study was to identify the optimal method of surgical stabilization in th...

  13. Comparison and analysis of reoperations in two different treatment protocols for trochanteric hip fractures - postoperative technical complications with dynamic hip screw, intramedullary nail and Medoff sliding plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, Johnny; Stig, Josefine Corin; Olsson, Ola

    2017-08-24

    In treatment of unstable trochanteric fractures dynamic hip screw and Medoff sliding plate devices are designed to allow secondary fracture impaction, whereas intramedullary nails aim to maintain fracture alignment. Different treatment protocols are used by two similar Swedish regional emergency care hospitals. Dynamic hip screw is used for fractures considered as stable within the respective treatment protocol, whereas one treatment protocol (Medoff sliding plate/dynamic hip screw) uses biaxial Medoff sliding plate for unstable pertrochanteric fractures and uniaxial Medoff sliding plate for subtrochanteric fractures, the second (intramedullary nail/dynamic hip screw) uses intramedullary nail for subtrochanteric fractures and for pertrochanteric fractures with intertrochanteric comminution or subtrochanteric extension. All orthopedic surgeries are registered in a regional database. All consecutive trochanteric fracture operations during 2011-2012 (n = 856) and subsequent technical reoperations (n = 40) were derived from the database. Reoperations were analysed and classified into the categories adjustment (percutaneous removal of the locking screw of the Medoff sliding plate or the intramedullary nail, followed by fracture healing) or minor, intermediate (reosteosynthesis) or major (hip joint replacement, Girdlestone or persistent nonunion) technical complications. The relative risk of intermediate or major technical complications was 4.2 (1.2-14) times higher in unstable pertrochanteric fractures and 4.6 (1.1-19) times higher in subtrochanteric fractures with treatment protocol: intramedullary nail/dynamic hip screw, compared to treatment protocol: Medoff sliding plate/dynamic hip screw. Overall rates of intermediate and major technical complications in unstable pertrochanteric and subtrochanteric fractures were with biaxial Medoff sliding plate 0.68%, with uniaxial Medoff sliding plate 1.4%, with dynamic hip screw 3.4% and with intramedullary nail 7.2%. The

  14. Outcomes following combined intramedullary nail and plate fixation for complex tibia fractures: A multi-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Richard S; Bible, Jesse; Marcus, Matthew S; Donegan, Derek J; Bergmann, Karl A; Siebler, Justin C; Mir, Hassan R; Liporace, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant plate fixation as an adjunct to intramedullary nailing (IMN) of proximal third tibia fractures is a proven technique. Benefits include its role as a minimally invasive reduction aid, allowing for minimal soft tissue disruption. Expanding its indications as adjunct fixation to IMN throughout the tibia, we aimed to study outcomes in a multi-centre initiative. From May 1999 to March 2010, a total of 1302 operatively treated tibial fractures (including plateau and pilon fractures) with complete medical records were identified for review. Of these, 376 cases were treated via IMN, of which 30 cases were treated via combined IMN and plating, meeting inclusion criteria. Primary outcome was union rates, time to union, and complication rates. Secondary outcomes included mean alignment from the immediate postoperative period to the time of final follow-up. Twenty-seven out of 30 patients were available for follow-up. Twenty-five (93%) achieved bony union; the remaining two patients, sustained Type IIIA and B injuries respectively, went onto non-union secondary to deep infection and required multiple re-operations before achieving ultimate union. Mean time at final follow-up was 20 ± 10 months, 96% were ambulatory at full weight bearing status with no malunions. No significant changes in alignment in either the coronal or sagittal planes were noted at time of final follow-up. Combined IMN and plate fixation is a reliable tool not only in the treatment of fractures of the proximal tibia, but also for those fractures in the diaphysis and segmental fractures with proximal and/or distal metadiaphyseal extension with consistent ability to maintain high union rates and maintained alignment. However, longer-term follow-up and prospective trials will be necessary before coming to a definitive conclusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Retrospective analysis of AO 42A-B type tibia fractures treated with percutaneus locked plating and intramedullary nailing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgili, Fuat; Kılıç, Ayhan; Sökücü, Sami; Parmaksızoğlu, Atilla Sancar; Çepni, Kamil Serdar; Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz Selim

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the results of AO 42A and 42B type tibia fractures treated with intramedullary nail (IMN) and percutaneus locking plate (PLP) were evaluated. The complications were examined, and it was questioned whether the type of fixation had an effect on union time and functional results. Forty-two patients with extraarticular distal tibial fractures were enrolled in this retrospective study. Eighteen patients were treated with closed IMN (Group I) and 24 patients were treated with PLP fixation (Group II). Mean age was 41 (range: 16-70) years; thirty-two of the patients were men. Fractures were classified according to the AO classification system. Union time, functional results and complications (malunion, malalignment, infection) were compared. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Surgery (AOFAS) scoring was used to compare functional results. The average follow-up period was 20 (12-32) months for Group I and 23 (13-36) months for Group II. The average union time was 16 (12-24) weeks in Group I and 19 (range: 16-24) weeks in Group II (p=0.002). The AOFAS scoring was 85 (range: 69-100) points in Group I and 81 (range: 60-95) points in Group II. The difference in AOFAS scoring was not significant (p=0.06). Two patients had nonunion in Group II. Two patients in Group I and three patients in Group II had malalignment. We suggest that IMN can provide early healing time. Although it is not statistically significant, complication rate was lower and functional results were better in patients treated with IMN.

  16. Improving stability of elastic stable intramedullary nailing in a transverse midshaft femur fracture model: biomechanical analysis of using end caps or a third nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Marion; Gros, Nina; Zachert, Gregor; Schulze-Hessing, Maaike; Stratmann, Christina; Wendlandt, Robert; Kaiser, Martin Michael

    2015-06-25

    Elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) is accepted widely for treatment of diaphyseal femur fractures in children. However, complication rates of 10 to 50 % are described due to shortening or axial deviation, especially in older or heavier children. Biomechanical in vitro testing was performed to determine whether two modified osteosyntheses with end caps or a third nail could significantly improve the stability in comparison to classical elastic stable intramedullary nailing in a transverse femur fracture model. We performed biomechanical testing in 24 synthetic adolescent femoral bone models (Sawbones®) with a transverse midshaft (diaphyseal) fracture. First, in all models, two nails were inserted in a C-shaped manner (2 × 3.5 mm steel nails, prebent), then eight osteosyntheses were modified by using end caps and another eight by adding a third nail from the antero-lateral (2.5-mm steel, not prebent). Testing was performed in four-point bending, torsion, and shifting under physiological 9° compression. The third nail from the lateral showed a significant positive influence on the stiffness in all four-point bendings as well as in internal rotation comparing to the classical 2C configuration: mean values were significantly higher anterior-posterior (1.04 vs. 0.52 Nm/mm, p < 0.001), posterior-anterior (0.85 vs. 0.43 Nm/mm, p < 0.001), lateral-medial (1.26 vs. 0.70 Nm/mm, p < 0.001), and medial-lateral (1.16 vs. 0.76 Nm/mm, p < 0.001) and during internal rotation (0.16 vs. 0.11 Nm/°, p < 0.001). The modification with end caps did not improve the stiffness in any direction. The configuration with a third nail provided a significantly higher stiffness than the classical 2C configuration as well as the modification with end caps in this biomechanical model. This supports the ongoing transfer of the additional third nail into clinical practice to reduce the axial deviation occurring in clinical practice.

  17. Treatment for Trochanteric Fracture of the Femur with Short Femoral Nail: A Comparison between the Asian Intramedullary Hip Screw (IMHS) and the Conventional IMHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaji, Hidemi; Uematsu, Takuya; Oba, Ryosuke; Satake, Yoshihiko; Hoshikawa, Naoya; Takai, Shinro

    2016-01-01

    We usually use short femoral nails for the treatment of trochanteric fracture of the femur. In this retrospective study, we investigated and compared the clinical results of the conventional intramedullary hip screw (IMHS) and the Asian IMHS, which is a redesigned version of the former. The subjects were 42 patients; 21 treated with the Asian IMHS and 21 were treated with the conventional IMHS. From the clinical records, we retrospectively investigated the patients' age, sex, in-hospital waiting period for operation, operating time, intraoperative blood loss, walking ability before fracture and at discharge, and complication pertaining to the operation. The 21 patients (4 men and 17 women) receiving the Asian IMHS and the 21 patients (5 men and 16 women) receiving the conventional IMHS did not differ significantly in mean age, sex ratio, preoperative waiting period, mean postoperative hospital stay, mean operation time, or mean intraoperative blood loss. Among patients receiving the Asian IMHS, the complications of intraoperative fractures of the femur developed in 3 patients and breakage of the implant occurred in 1 patient. No complications occurred in patients receiving the conventional IMHS. Compared with the conventional IMHS, the Asian IMHS is smaller, has increased variations in the shaft/neck angle of the lag screw, and has a titanium-alloy construction, allowing magnetic resonance imaging. The intraoperative fracture may have occurred because of the configuration of the distal interlocking screw in the Asian IMHS. Breakage of the implant likely occurred because the nail was too small in diameter, and too short in length for the unstable AO 31-A3 fracture. If careful attention is paid to the configuration of its distal interlocking screw intraoperatively and a nail of appropriate size is selected, the Asian IMHS is better suited than the conventional IMHS for treating Japanese patients, who generally have a small physique, because of its many variations in

  18. Technical note: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the presence of an intramedullary femoral nail using anteromedial drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Matthew; Lamplot, Joseph; Walley, Kempland C; DeAngelis, Joseph P; Ramappa, Arun J

    2017-05-18

    To describe an approach to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using autologous hamstring by drilling via the anteromedial portal in the presence of an intramedullary (IM) femoral nail. Once preoperative imagining has characterized the proposed location of the femoral tunnel preparations are made to remove all of the hardware (locking bolts and IM nail). A diagnostic arthroscopy is performed in the usual fashion addressing all intra-articular pathology. The ACL remnant and lateral wall soft tissues are removed from the intercondylar, to provide adequate visualization of the ACL footprint. Femoral tunnel placement is performed using a transportal ACL guide with desired offset and the knee flexed to 2.09 rad. The Beath pin is placed through the guide starting at the ACL's anatomic footprint using arthroscopic visualization and/or fluoroscopic guidance. If resistance is met while placing the Beath pin, the arthroscopy should be discontinued and the obstructing hardware should be removed under fluoroscopic guidance. When the Beath pin is successfully placed through the lateral femur, it is overdrilled with a 4.5 mm Endobutton drill. If the Endobutton drill is obstructed, the obstructing hardware should be removed under fluoroscopic guidance. In this case, the obstruction is more likely during Endobutton drilling due to its larger diameter and increased rigidity compared to the Beath pin. The femoral tunnel is then drilled using a best approximation of the graft's outer diameter. We recommend at least 7 mm diameter to minimize the risk of graft failure. Autologous hamstring grafts are generally between 6.8 and 8.6 mm in diameter. After reaming, the knee is flexed to 1.57 rad, the arthroscope placed through the anteromedial portal to confirm the femoral tunnel position, referencing the posterior wall and lateral cortex. For a quadrupled hamstring graft, the gracilis and semitendinosus tendons are then harvested in the standard fashion. The tendons are whip

  19. External Fixation vs Intramedullary Nailing for Knee Arthrodesis After Failed Infected Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher J; Palmer, Antony J R; Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study is to compare intramedullary nailing with external fixation for knee arthrodesis after failed infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Primary outcome is radiographic union. Secondary outcomes include recurrent deep infection, revision arthrodesis, and amputation. Systematic review and meta-analysis of studies comparing outcomes from intramedullary nailing and external fixation in patients with infected TKA undergoing arthrodesis procedures was performed. Randomized controlled trials and cohort studies were included. Intramedullary nailing achieves a significantly higher rate of radiographic union compared with external fixation (odds ratio [OR] 5.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.74-9.75, P external fixation (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.08-0.93, P = .04). Intramedullary nailing is more effective than external fixation with respect to several clinically important outcomes. Therefore, we recommend intramedullary nailing for achieving knee arthrodesis as a salvage procedure for infected TKA in the absence of specific indications for external fixation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional outcome of displaced radial head fractures in children treated by elastic stable intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyonnet, Clément; Martins, Antoine; Marengo, Lorenza; Mansour, Mounira; Rousset, Marie; Samba, Antoine; Dimeglio, Alain; Canavese, Federico

    2017-10-03

    The objectives of this study were to retrospectively investigate the clinical and radiological outcomes of displaced radial head fractures in children treated by elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) and evaluate the functional outcome of these injuries using the short version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand outcome questionnaire (Quick DASH). A total of 24 patients (nine males and 15 females) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The mean age at the time of injury was 10.7±2.8 years (range: 9.5-16.33 years). Before surgery, the mean angulation was 53.8°±18.4° (range: 28°-82°) differentiating fractures on the basis of Judet's classification. The mean Quick DASH score was a good 4 (range: 0-15.9). Functional outcomes were similar irrespective of the severity of fracture displacement (P>0.05), presence or absence of associated fracture (P>0.05), and time immobilized (P>0.05). The Quick DASH score was better in children younger than 9 years of age (1.62) than children older than 9 years of age (4.95), but without a statistically significant difference (P=0.058). Children with displaced radial head fractures treated with ESIN showed good functional outcomes. Associated fracture injuries were not a predictive factor of functional outcome. Open reduction must be avoided as it carries an increased risk of complications.

  1. Bilateral femoral insuffiency fractures treated with inflatable intramedullary nails: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Ilgan, Seyfettin; Ozgur Karacalioglu, A; Cicek, Engin Ilker; Yildrim, Duzgun; Erler, Kaan

    2007-09-01

    Stress fractures could be classified as fatigue fractures and insufficiency fractures (IF). Fatigue fractures occur when abnormal mechanical stress is applied to a normal bone, on the other hand insufficiency fractures occur when normal to moderate pressure is applied to a bone that has decreased resistance (Daffner and Pavlov in Am J Radiol 159:242-245, 1992). IF have been observed mainly in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis, and are becoming more common with the increase of elderly population (Daffner and Pavlov in Am J Radiol 159:242-245, 1992). Other systemic and metabolic conditions that can result in osteopenia and IF include osteomalacia, hyperparathyroidism, hyperthyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, fluoride treatment, diabetes mellitus, fibrous dysplasia, Paget's disease, irradiation and mechanical factors (Daffner and Pavlov in Am J Radiol 159:242-245, 1992; Soubrier et al. in Joint Bone Spine 70:209-218, 2003; Epps et al. in Am J Orthop 33:457-460, 2004; Austin and Chrissos in Orthopedics 28:795-797, 2005). In this case report, the authors present an osteoporotic woman who developed bilateral insufficiency fracture of the femoral shaft after longstanding steroid, thyroxine replacement and alendronate therapy due to partial empty sella syndrome and osteoporosis, resulting in the treatment of the fracture by inflatable intramedullary nailing.

  2. [Tibio-talo-calcaneal arthrodesis with the retrograde intramedullary nail MEDIN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popelka, S; Vavřík, P; Landor, I; Bek, J; Popelka ml, S; Hromádka, R

    2013-01-01

    When the talus and the talocalcaneal joint are both affected, their fusion is the method of treatment. Ankle arthrodesis is carried out using various osteosynthetic materials such as external fixators, screws and plates. One of the options is retrograde nailing. Tibio-talo-calcaneal arthrodesis is frequently indicated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in whom both the talus and the subtalar joint are often affected. A retrograde nail for tibio-talo-calcaneal arthrodesis was developed at our department in cooperation with MEDIN Company. This is a titanium double-curved nail, with the distal part bent at 8 degrees ventrally and 10 degrees laterally. It is inserted from the transfibular approach. Sixty-two patients, 35 women and 27 men, were treated at our department from 2005. Since one patient had bilateral surgery, 63 ankles were included. The indications for arthrodesis involved rheumatoid arthritis in 42, post-traumatic arthritis in 10, failed ankle arthrodesis in two and failed total ankle arthroplasty in five ankles; tibial stress fractures close above the ankle in two RA patients, one patient with dermatomyositis and one with lupus erythematodes. The average age at the time of surgery was 64.2 years (range, 30 to 80). The average follow-up was 4.5 years (range, 1 to 9 years), Satisfaction with the treatment outcome and willingness to undergo surgery on the other side were reported by 82% of the patients. The AOFAS score improved from 35 to 74 points. Three (4.8%) patients complained of painful feet due to the fact that exact correction of the calcaneus was not achieved and the heel after arthrodesis remained in a slightly varus position. Of them, two had a failed total ankle arthroplasty. Post-operative complications included early infection managed by antibiotic treatment and early surgical revision with irrigation.in two (3.2%) RA patients, who were undergoing biological therapy. Late infection developed at 2 to 3 years after surgery in three (4

  3. Percutaneous clamping of spiral and oblique fractures of the tibial shaft: a safe and effective reduction aid during intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinge, Cory A; Beltran, Michael J; Dollahite, Henry A; Huber, Florian G

    2015-06-01

    The reduction of tibial shaft fractures during intramedullary nailing is important if limb alignment is to be restored and successful clinical outcomes are expected. We have used a percutaneously applied (or open) clamp or clamps to achieve and maintain reduction during nailing of all amendable tibial shaft fractures. In this article, we describe the technique and preliminary results comparing closed, simple spiral and oblique tibial shaft fractures (OTA 42-A1 and A2) managed with percutaneous clamp-assisted nailing (CAN) versus nailing using manual reduction (MRN) held by the surgical team. In the MRN group, there were an increased fracture gap (P = 0.04) and trends toward malalignment (P = 0.07) and healing time (P = 0.06) compared with the CAN group. There were also trends in clinical; no wound complications occurred in either group. We have found that percutaneous CAN of closed, simple spiral and oblique tibial shaft fractures seems safe and allows for early predictable union with reproducible alignment compared with nailing using MRN.

  4. Femoral shaft fractures treated by intramedullary nailing. A follow-up study focusing on problems related to the method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bråten, M; Terjesen, T; Rossvoll, I

    1995-07-01

    One hundred and sixteen patients with 120 femoral fractures treated by reamed intramedullary nailing were reviewed. All fractures but one healed without additional procedures. One comminuted fracture had a bone transplant after 8 months to enhance bone remodelling in the lateral part of the fracture area. Three patients developed adult respiratory distress syndrome; all patients survived. Deep infection complicated one osteosynthesis. Thromboembolism was recorded in five cases. Twenty-three patients had a true torsional deformity (anteversion difference of 15 degrees or more), but only nine had complaints. Four of these patients needed a corrective osteotomy. Shortening of 10 mm or more was revealed in 11 patients; only one was above 20 mm. Prior to nail removal, hip and knee pain was present in 26 and 20 per cent, respectively. Few patients had such pain after nail removal. We conclude that reamed IM nailing of femoral fractures gives excellent fracture healing, rapid patient recovery and few complications. Some problems are, however, related to the method: torsional deformity occurs frequently, but will not always cause complaints. Shortening is a potential problem, but dramatic shortenings can be avoided when static locking is used. Hip and knee pain occurs frequently, but will usually disappear after nail removal.

  5. Comparative Study Using Intramedullary K-wire Fixation Over Titanium Elastic Nail in Paediatric Shaft Femur Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Anand, Tushar; Singh, Sudhir

    2014-11-01

    Fracture shaft femur is common paediatric trauma leading to significant morbidity. Conservative treatments available are associated with prolonged periods of immobilization. Use of flexible intramedullary implant allows early rehabilitation in diaphyseal fractures of femur in children. The aim of the present study is to compare fixation of diaphyseal femur fracture by titanium elastic nail and intramedullary K-wires in children. Prospective randomized study in a tertiary care hospital. Fifty-two children between 6 years and 14 years of age with femoral shaft fracture were assigned either in Group I or Group II based on computer generated random numbers. In Group I closed percutaneous intramedullary K- wire fixation and in Group II closed percutaneous intramedullary titanium elastic nail was used to fix the fractures. Partial weight bearing was allowed after 6 weeks of surgery and full weight bearing at clinico-radiological union. Average time of radiological union was 6 to 10 weeks in both groups. In both the groups two cases had entry site irritation which resolved with early implant removal. One case in both the groups had unacceptable mal-alignment. Both the groups had few cases of limb-length discrepancy, which was in acceptable limit, except two cases of TENS. There was no statistically significant difference between the results of both the groups. But, using K-wires significantly reduced the cost of treatment. Most of such fractures in our society are neglected because of high cost of treatment. Providing a cheaper alternative in form of K-wires may be beneficial for the patients from low socio-economic status.

  6. [Retrograde interlocked intramedullary nailing with tibia bone graft fusion for the treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhong-Yu; Pei, Ping; Liu, Lin; Song, Yu-Xin

    2017-06-25

    To explore clinical outcomes of retrograde interlocked intramedullary nailing with tibia bone graft fusion in treating end-stage ankle arthritis. From November 2014 to April 2016, 22 patients with end-stage ankle arthritis were treated with retrograde interlocked intramedullary nailing with tibia bone graft fusion, including 9 males and 13 females aged from 30 to 65 years old with an average of 48.5 years old. Seven patients had obvious varus deformity, and other 15 patients' appearance were normal. Operative time, blood loss, fracture healing time and complications were observed and compared, AOFAS and VAS score were applied for evaluate ankle joint function and pain degree before operation and 9 months after operation. All patients were followed up from 12 to 24 months with an average of 18.6 months. The incision were healed at stage I , and no complications occurred. Operative time ranged from 80 to 120 min with an average of 90 min;blood loss ranged from 15 to 50 ml with an average of 30 ml;fracture healing time was from 10 to 18 weeks with an average of 14 weeks. AOFAS score at 9 months after operation was 88.00±3.45, while 54.82±2.98 before operation, and there was statistical significance; 8 cases obtained excellent results, 12 good and 2 moderate. There was significant difference in VAS score between preoperative(3.96±1.27) and 9 months after operation(9.37±0.55). Retrograde interlocked intramedullary nailing with tibia bone graft fusion for the treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis has advantages of stable fixation, less trauma, less blood loss, bone union and rapid recovery of function, and could relieve pain obviously.

  7. Surgical stabilization for open tibial fractures in children: External fixation or elastic stable intramedullary nail - which method is optimal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubbu, Rohan A; Ramasubbu, Benjamin M

    2016-09-01

    Management of open tibial fractures is well documented in adults, with existing protocols outlining detailed treatment strategies. No clear guidelines exist for children. Surgical stabilization of tibial fractures in the pediatric population requires implants that do not disrupt the open epiphyses (growth plate). Both elastic stable intramedullary nails and external fixation can be used. The objective of this study was to identify the optimal method of surgical stabilization in the treatment of open tibial fractures in children. MEDLINE and Embase were searched from their inception to March 2014 using the following advanced search terms (Key words): "open tibia fracture," "fracture fixation," "external fixation," "intramedullary," and "bone nail." Only studies in English and pertaining to children with open fractures treated with elastic stable intramedullary nails or external fixation between 1994 and 2014 were included. Twelve clinical studies were critically appraised. Due to a paucity in the literature coupled with a nonsystematic presentation of results, it proved to be very difficult in extracting relevant results from the studies. This was further added by a variation in outcome measures. Consequently, the results we obtained were difficult to draw conclusions from. There is no conclusive evidence or best practice guidelines for their management. Thus, as is highlighted in this study, more research is needed to determine the optimum treatment strategy for this common pediatric injury. The existing literature is of poor quality; consisting mainly of retrospective reviews of patients' medical records, charts, and radiographs. Carefully designed, high-quality prospective cohort studies utilizing a nationalized multi-hospital approach are needed to improve understanding before protocols and guidelines can be developed and implemented.

  8. Comparison of Posterior Approach With Intramedullary Nailing Versus Lateral Transfibular Approach With Fixed-Angle Plating for Tibiotalocalcaneal Arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Ryan P; Adams, Samuel B; Easley, Mark E; DeOrio, James K; Nunley, James A

    2017-12-01

    A variety of operative approaches and fixation techniques have been described for tibiotalocalcaneal (TTC) arthrodesis. The intramedullary (IM) nail and lateral, fixed-angle plating are commonly used because of ease of use and favorable biomechanical properties. A lateral, transfibular (LTF) approach allows for direct access to the tibiotalar and subtalar joints, but the posterior, Achilles tendon-splitting (PATS) approach offers a robust soft tissue envelope. The purpose of this study was to compare the results of TTC arthrodesis with either a PATS approach with IM nailing or LTF approach with fixed-angle plating. A retrospective review was performed on all patients who underwent simultaneous TTC arthrodesis with minimum 1 year clinical and radiographic follow up. Patients were excluded if they underwent TTC arthrodesis through an approach other than PATS or LTF, and received fixation without an IM nail or fixed-angle plate. Primary outcomes examined were union rate, revisions, and complications. Thirty-eight patients underwent TTC arthrodesis with a PATS approach and IM nailing, and 28 with a LTF approach and lateral plating. The overall union rate was 71%; 76% (29 of 38 patients) for the PATS/IM nail group, and 64% (18 of 28) for LTF/plating group ( P = .41). Symptomatic nonunion requiring revision arthrodesis occurred in 16% (6 of 38) of the PATS/IM nail group versus 7% (2 of 28) in the LTF/lateral plating group ( P = .45). There were no significant differences in individual tibiotalar or subtalar union rates, superficial wound problems, infection, symptomatic hardware, stress fractures, or nerve irritations. Union, revision, and complication rates were similar for TTC arthrodesis performed with a PATS approach and IM nail compared with an LTF approach and fixed-angle plate in a complex patient population. Both techniques were adequate, especially when prior incisions, preexisting hardware, or deformity preclude options. Level III, retrospective comparative

  9. Intramedullary fixation of tibial shaft fractures using an expandable nail: early results of 54 acute tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Ely L; Geller, David S; Yacoubian, Shahan V; Shasha, Nadav; Dekel, Shmuel; Lorich, Dean G

    2006-05-01

    To evaluate and present our experience using the expandable nail system for the treatment of acute tibial shaft fractures. Retrospective study. Two level-1 trauma centers-University teaching hospitals. Fifty-four consecutive patients were treated by this nail system for acute tibial shaft fracture. Two nail diameters were used, 8.5 mm and 10 mm. Operation, hospitalization and healing times, reaming versus nonreaming, isolated versus multiple injuries, and reoperations were recorded and analyzed statistically. Follow-up was obtained either until fracture healing or for a minimum of 1 year with an average of 14 months (12 to 24). All fractures healed in an average time of 72 days (21 to 204). The average healing times for patients treated with 8.5-mm and 10-mm nails were 77.2 days (27 to 204) and 63.4 days (21 to 121), respectively. Average operative time was 103 minutes (40 to 185) if reamed and 56 minutes (30 to 80) if unreamed. Average healing times were 65.4 days (21 to 190) if reamed and 79.5 days (42 to 204) if unreamed. There were 11 complications (20.4%) related to the nailing: 3 deep infections, 2 superficial infections, 2 bone shortenings of 1 cm secondary to nail protrusion in the knee, 1 compartment syndrome, 1 fracture propagation, 1 distal malalignment, and 1 delayed union. Hardware was removed in 6 patients (3 infections, 2 patients' request and 1 protrusion into the knee), and 1 additional patient underwent exchange nailing due to a delayed union. The expandable nail offers the theoretical advantages of improved load sharing and rotational control without the need for interlocking screws. This study demonstrates satisfactory healing and alignment for the treatment of tibial shaft fractures using this device. However, caution must be exercised when using this nail in cases of significant comminution and in cases where the fracture pattern involves the more proximal or distal aspect of the tibial shaft.

  10. Rotational malalignment after closed intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures and its influence on daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Ozgur; Ayhan, Egemen; Kesmezacar, Hayrettin; Seker, Ali; Unlu, Mehmet Can; Aydingoz, Onder

    2014-10-01

    Any intraoperative rotational malalignment during intramedullary nailing (IMN) of femoral shaft fractures will become permanent. We hypothesized that rotational malalignment of the femur and its compensatory biomechanics may induce problems in the hip, knee, patellofemoral and ankle joints. We purposed to clarify the influence of a femoral rotational malalignment of ≥10° on daily activities. Twenty-four femoral shaft fracture patients treated with closed antegrade IMN were included. At last follow-up, to reveal any rotational malalignment, computerized tomography (CT) scans of both femurs (injured and uninjured sides) were examined. The patient groups with or without CT-detected true rotational malalignment ≥10° were compared with respect to the activity scores. Ten of the 24 patients (41.7%) had a CT-detected true rotational malalignment of ≥10° compared with the unaffected side. The AOFAS scores were 100.00 for all of the patients. LKS, WOMAC knee, and WOMAC hip scores were significantly decreased in the patients with rotational malalignment compared to those without. Patients without rotational malalignment tolerated climbing stairs significantly better than those with rotational malalignment. Patients who could not tolerate climbing stairs were consistently complaining of anterior knee pain. A femoral rotational malalignment of ≥10° is symptomatic for the patients, and the hip, knee, and patellofemoral joints were affected. Because of the possibly altered joint loadings and biomechanics, these could render patients prone to degenerative joint disease. In addition, due to the high rates of rotational malalignment after femoral shaft fracture and consequent malpractice claims, it is important for surgeons to be more aware of rotational alignment during surgery.

  11. Role of the fibula in the stability of diaphyseal tibial fractures fixed by intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, John G; Daly, Charles J; Harty, James A; Dailey, Hannah L

    2016-10-01

    For tibial fractures, the decision to fix a concomitant fibular fracture is undertaken on a case-by-case basis. To aid in this clinical decision-making process, we investigated whether loss of integrity of the fibula significantly destabilises midshaft tibial fractures, whether fixation of the fibula restores stability to the tibia, and whether removal of the fibula and interosseous membrane for expediency in biomechanical testing significantly influences tibial interfragmentary mechanics. Tibia/fibula pairs were harvested from six cadaveric donors with the interosseous membrane intact. A tibial osteotomy fracture was fixed by reamed intramedullary (IM) nailing. Axial, torsion, bending, and shear tests were completed for four models of fibular involvement: intact fibula, osteotomy fracture, fibular plating, and resected fibula and interosseous membrane. Overall construct stiffness decreased slightly with fibular osteotomy compared to intact bone, but this change was not statistically significant. Under low loads, the influence of the fibula on construct stability was only statistically significant in torsion (large effect size). Fibular plating stiffened the construct slightly, but this change was not statistically significant compared to the fibular osteotomy case. Complete resection of the fibula and interosseous membrane significantly decreased construct torsional stiffness only (large effect size). These results suggest that fixation of the fibula may not contribute significantly to the stability of diaphyseal tibial fractures and should not be undertaken unless otherwise clinically indicated. For testing purposes, load-sharing through the interosseous membrane contributes significantly to overall construct mechanics, especially in torsion, and we recommend preservation of these structures when possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of intra-medullary stacked nailing in the reduction of proximal plastic deformity in a pediatric Monteggia fracture:a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jason; Huntley, James S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction In a Monteggia fracture dislocation, it is important to reduce the ulnar fracture completely. Extensive plastic deformation of the proximal ulna may make reduction by closed manipulation impossible. Case presentation We report the case of a four-year-old Caucasian boy in whom the plastic deformation of the proximal ulna was reduced, and this reduction was maintained, using intra-medullary stacked nailing. Conclusion The technique of stacked nailing is a useful addition t...

  13. A new mini-invasive technique in treating pediatric diaphyseal forearm fractures by bioabsorbable elastic stable intramedullary nailing: a preliminary technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinikumpu, J-J; Keränen, J; Haltia, A-M; Serlo, W; Merikanto, J

    2013-01-01

    Operative treatment is often indicated in unstable pediatric diaphyseal forearm fractures. Recently minimally invasive reduction and elastic stable intramedullary nailing have been of increasing interest, instead of open reduction and internal fixation with plates. There are several disadvantages of metallic intramedullary implants, such as soft-tissue irritation and a risk of disturbing later imaging. Thus, they are generally removed in later operations. We aimed to develop a new technique to stabilize pediatric forearm fractures by the bioabsorbable intramedullary nailing. We developed a new, two-stage mini-invasive surgical technique to stabilize the unstable diaphyseal fractures in children. The procedure is bioabsorbable elastic stable intramedullary nailing. Ultra-high-strength bioabsorbable intramedullary nails of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) were manufactured for our purpose. The material has been widely proven to be biocompatible and stable enough for fracture treatment as screws and pins. We have used the new technique in the unstable both-bone diaphyseal forearm fractures in children between the ages of 5 and 15 years. We report the technique and our clinical experience in the series of those three cases that have been followed up for at least 12 months. The present series has been randomized for the procedure instead for titanium elastic stable intramedullary nailing, and the series represents a part of ongoing randomized trial. The reported cases operated by the new technique referred good union in the fractured bones and acceptable alignment in the follow-up. Removal of the implants was not required. No troubles with the procedure or implant per se were noticed, indicating good feasibility. One high-energy refracture occurred half year after the primary trauma. Traditional titanium implants were used to control the refracture. We report our preliminary experience of a new surgical mini-invasive procedure to stabilize the unstable pediatric forearm shaft

  14. Effects of third fragment size and displacement on non-union of femoral shaft fractures after locking for intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J R; Kim, H-J; Lee, K-B

    2016-04-01

    femoral shaft fractures with fragments 8cm or longer or when the displacement in the proximal area is 20mm or greater and 10mm or greater in the distal area during the intramedullary nailing procedure. Regarding union rate, the degree of displacement has more influence than the third fragment size in femoral shaft fractures. IV, retrospective cohort study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. A prospective study of closed and open reamed intramedullary nailing of 136 femoral shaft fractures in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Gharehdaghi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Femoral shaft fractures are major causes of mortality and morbidity and are managed with intramedullary nailing (IMN. In this study we compared the results of open and closed nailing in femoral shaft fractures. Between 1993 and 2001 we managed 136 femoral shaft fractures by IMN (81 closed and 55 open nailings
    METHODS: in 120 patients with mean age of 36.2 years. The mean time of follow up was two years. Radiologic and clinical results were analyzed with SPSS software using student-t and Fisher test.
    RESULTS: 93.2% healed within six months. 2.9% required dynamization; total union rate was 96%. Full weight bearing was permitted between 5-16 weeks (mean of 10.62 weeks in the closed method, and 10-20 weeks (mean of 12.83 weeks in the open method (P<0.001. Complications included 4.41% nonunions, 2.9% shortening, 10.8% limited range of movement, 1.47% deep infection, and 6.6% malunion. Nonunion was observed in 2 cases in closed and in 4 patients in open method (P = 0.039. Closed series showed higher rate of malunion (P = 0.181, P = 0.221.
    CONCLUSIONS: In closed method attention should be paid to malalignment while locking the nail.

  16. Robotic technique improves entry point alignment for intramedullary nailing of femur fractures compared to the conventional technique: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suero, Eduardo M; Westphal, Ralf; Citak, Musa; Hawi, Nael; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Krettek, Christian; Stuebig, Timo

    2017-08-11

    We aimed to test whether a robotic technique would offer more accurate access to the proximal femoral medullary cavity for insertion of an intramedullary nail compared to the conventional manual technique. The medullary cavity of ten femur specimens was accessed in a conventional fashion using fluoroscopic control. In ten additional femur specimens, ISO-C 3D scans were obtained and a computer program calculated the ideal location of the cavity opening based on the trajectory of the medullary canal. In both techniques, the surgeon opened the cavity using a drill and inserted a radiopaque tube that matched the diameter of the cavity. The mean difference in angle between the proximal opening and the medullary canal in the shaft of the femur was calculated for both groups. Robotic cavity opening was more accurate than the manual technique, with a mean difference in trajectory between the proximal opening and the shaft canal of 2.0° (95% CI 0.6°-3.5°) compared to a mean difference of 4.3° (95% CI 2.11°-6.48°) using the manual technique (P = 0.0218). The robotic technique was more accurate than the manual procedure for identifying the optimal location for opening the medullary canal for insertion of an intramedullary nail. Additional advantages may include a reduction in total radiation exposure, as only one ISO-C 3D scan is needed, as opposed to multiple radiographs when using the manual technique.

  17. Flexible intramedullary nailing for unicameral cysts in children's long bones : Level of evidence: lV, case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanzmann, Michael C; Campos, Lautaro

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of flexible intramedullary nailing for unicameral bone cysts in terms of function and osseous consolidation. Twenty-two unicameral bone cysts in children's long bones were treated by flexible intramedullary nailing. In 13 cases the bone cyst was diagnosed in a traumatic event leading to a pathologic fracture. Fifteen patients were referred to our clinic after failed conservative treatment. In 16 patients the cyst was located in the humerus, and in 6 patients in the femur. Mean duration of follow-up after surgery was 24 months. According to Capanna's criteria healing was obtained in 20 cases with a mean time of 16 months. Sixteen cysts healed completely. Four lesions were classified as grade 2, meaning that residual radiolucencies were radiographically visible at the latest follow-up. Two recurrences of humeral cysts were seen at 16 and 18 months postoperatively. The complication rate was minimal. Due to the immediate stabilization of the lesion aftercare becomes facile. This method allows prompt mobilization and early weight bearing without the necessity of a plaster cast. Further it prevents effectively the most common complication, a re-fracture or a pathologic fracture. Therefore we propose this surgical procedure as the treatment of choice for unicameral bone cysts in children's long bones.

  18. Outcome analysis of retrograde nailing and less invasive stabilization system in distal femoral fractures: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hierholzer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Two major therapeutic principles can be employed for the treatment of distal femoral fractures: retrograde intramedullary (IM nailing (RN or less invasive stabilization on system (LISS. Both operative stabilizing systems follow the principle of biological osteosynthesis. IM nailing protects the soft-tissue envelope due to its minimally invasive approach and closed reduction techniques better than distal femoral locked plating. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare outcome of distal femur fracture stabilization using RN or LISS techniques. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study from 2003 to 2008, we analyzed 115 patients with distal femur fracture who had been treated by retrograde IM nailing (59 patients or LISS plating (56 patients. In the two cohort groups, mean age was 54 years (17-89 years. Mechanism of injury was high energy impact in 57% (53% RN, 67% LISS and low-energy injury in 43% (47% RN, 33% LISS, respectively. Fractures were classified according to AO classification: there were 52 type A fractures (RN 31, LISS 21 and 63 type C fractures (RN 28, LISS 35; 32% (RN and 56% (LISS were open and 68% (RN and 44% (LISS were closed fractures, respectively. Functional and radiological outcome was assessed. Results: Clinical and radiographic evaluation demonstrated osseous healing within 6 months following RN and following LISS plating in over 90% of patients. However, no statistically significant differences were found for the parameters time to osseous healing, rate of nonunion, and postoperative complications. The following complications were treated: hematoma formation (one patient RN and three patients LISS, superficial infection (one patient RN and three patients LISS, deep infection (2 patients LISS. Additional secondary bone grafting for successful healing 3 months after the primary operation was required in four patients in the RN (7% of patients and six in the LISS group (10% of patients

  19. (Sample) size matters! An examination of sample size from the SPRINT trial study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedullary nails in patients with tibial fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Tornetta, Paul; Rampersad, Shelly-Ann; Sprague, Sheila; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Sanders, David W.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Walter, Stephen; Guyatt, Gordon; Buckingham, Lisa; Leece, Pamela; Viveiros, Helena; Mignott, Tashay; Ansell, Natalie; Sidorkewicz, Natalie; Agel, Julie; Bombardier, Claire; Berlin, Jesse A.; Bosse, Michael; Browner, Bruce; Gillespie, Brenda; O'Brien, Peter; Poolman, Rudolf; Macleod, Mark D.; Carey, Timothy; Leitch, Kellie; Bailey, Stuart; Gurr, Kevin; Konito, Ken; Bartha, Charlene; Low, Isolina; MacBean, Leila V.; Ramu, Mala; Reiber, Susan; Strapp, Ruth; Tieszer, Christina; Kreder, Hans; Stephen, David J. G.; Axelrod, Terry S.; Yee, Albert J. M.; Richards, Robin R.; Finkelstein, Joel; Holtby, Richard M.; Cameron, Hugh; Cameron, John; Gofton, Wade; Murnaghan, John; Schatztker, Joseph; Bulmer, Beverly; Conlan, Lisa; Laflamme, Yves; Berry, Gregory; Beaumont, Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Laflamme, Georges-Henri; Jodoin, Alain; Renaud, Eric; Gagnon, Sylvain; Maurais, Gilles; Malo, Michel; Fernandes, Julio; Latendresse, Kim; Poirier, Marie-France; Daigneault, Gina; McKee, Michael M.; Waddell, James P.; Bogoch, Earl R.; Daniels, Timothy R.; McBroom, Robert R.; Vicente, Milena R.; Storey, Wendy; Wild, Lisa M.; McCormack, Robert; Perey, Bertrand; Goetz, Thomas J.; Pate, Graham; Penner, Murray J.; Panagiotopoulos, Kostas; Pirani, Shafique; Dommisse, Ian G.; Loomer, Richard L.; Stone, Trevor; Moon, Karyn; Zomar, Mauri; Webb, Lawrence X.; Teasdall, Robert D.; Birkedal, John Peter; Martin, David Franklin; Ruch, David S.; Kilgus, Douglas J.; Pollock, David C.; Harris, Mitchel Brion; Wiesler, Ethan Ron; Ward, William G.; Shilt, Jeffrey Scott; Koman, Andrew L.; Poehling, Gary G.; Kulp, Brenda; Creevy, William R.; Stein, Andrew B.; Bono, Christopher T.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Brown, T. Desmond; Pacicca, Donna; Sledge, John B.; Foster, Timothy E.; Voloshin, Ilva; Bolton, Jill; Carlisle, Hope; Shaughnessy, Lisa; Ombremsky, William T.; LeCroy, C. Michael; Meinberg, Eric G.; Messer, Terry M.; Craig, William L.; Dirschl, Douglas R.; Caudle, Robert; Harris, Tim; Elhert, Kurt; Hage, William; Jones, Robert; Piedrahita, Luis; Schricker, Paul O.; Driver, Robin; Godwin, Jean; Hansley, Gloria; Obremskey, William Todd; Kregor, Philip James; Tennent, Gregory; Truchan, Lisa M.; Sciadini, Marcus; Shuler, Franklin D.; Driver, Robin E.; Nading, Mary Alice; Neiderstadt, Jacky; Vap, Alexander R.; Vallier, Heather A.; Patterson, Brendan M.; Wilber, John H.; Wilber, Roger G.; Sontich, John K.; Moore, Timothy Alan; Brady, Drew; Cooperman, Daniel R.; Davis, John A.; Cureton, Beth Ann; Mandel, Scott; Orr, R. Douglas; Sadler, John T. S.; Hussain, Tousief; Rajaratnam, Krishan; Petrisor, Bradley; Drew, Brian; Bednar, Drew A.; Kwok, Desmond C. H.; Pettit, Shirley; Hancock, Jill; Cole, Peter A.; Smith, Joel J.; Brown, Gregory A.; Lange, Thomas A.; Stark, John G.; Levy, Bruce; Swiontkowski, Marc F.; Garaghty, Mary J.; Salzman, Joshua G.; Schutte, Carol A.; Tastad, Linda Toddie; Vang, Sandy; Seligson, David; Roberts, Craig S.; Malkani, Arthur L.; Sanders, Laura; Gregory, Sharon Allen; Dyer, Carmen; Heinsen, Jessica; Smith, Langan; Madanagopal, Sudhakar; Coupe, Kevin J.; Tucker, Jeffrey J.; Criswell, Allen R.; Buckle, Rosemary; Rechter, Alan Jeffrey; Sheth, Dhiren Shaskikant; Urquart, Brad; Trotscher, Thea; Anders, Mark J.; Kowalski, Joseph M.; Fineberg, Marc S.; Bone, Lawrence B.; Phillips, Matthew J.; Rohrbacher, Bernard; Stegemann, Philip; Mihalko, William M.; Buyea, Cathy; Augustine, Stephen J.; Jackson, William Thomas; Solis, Gregory; Ero, Sunday U.; Segina, Daniel N.; Berrey, Hudson B.; Agnew, Samuel G.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Campbell, Lakina C.; Derting, Lynn; McAdams, June; Goslings, J. Carel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Luitse, Jan; Kloen, Peter; Joosse, Pieter; Winkelhagen, Jasper; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Teague, David C.; Davey, Joseph; Sullivan, J. Andy; Ertl, William J. J.; Puckett, Timothy A.; Pasque, Charles B.; Tompkins, John F.; Gruel, Curtis R.; Kammerlocher, Paul; Lehman, Thomas P.; Puffinbarger, William R.; Carl, Kathy L.; Weber, Donald W.; Jomha, Nadr M.; Goplen, Gordon R.; Masson, Edward; Beaupre, Lauren A.; Greaves, Karen E.; Schaump, Lori N.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Goetz, David R.; Westberry, Davd E.; Broderick, J. Scott; Moon, Bryan S.; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Powell, James N.; Buckley, Richard E.; Elves, Leslie; Connolly, Stephen; Abraham, Edward P.; Eastwood, Donna; Steele, Trudy; Ellis, Thomas; Herzberg, Alex; Brown, George A.; Crawford, Dennis E.; Hart, Robert; Hayden, James; Orfaly, Robert M.; Vigland, Theodore; Vivekaraj, Maharani; Bundy, Gina L.; Miclau, Theodore; Matityahu, Amir; Coughlin, R. Richard; Kandemir, Utku; McClellan, R. Trigg; Lin, Cindy Hsin-Hua; Karges, David; Cramer, Kathryn; Watson, J. Tracy; Moed, Berton; Scott, Barbara; Beck, Dennis J.; Orth, Carolyn; Puskas, David; Clark, Russell; Jones, Jennifer; Egol, Kenneth A.; Paksima, Nader; France, Monet; Wai, Eugene K.; Johnson, Garth; Wilkinson, Ross; Gruszczynski, Adam T.; Vexler, Liisa

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate sample size and power in randomized trials can result in misleading findings. This study demonstrates the effect of sample size in a large clinical trial by evaluating the results of the Study to Prospectively evaluate Reamed Intramedullary Nails in Patients with Tibial fractures (SPRINT)

  20. Shoulder function after surgical treatment of displaced fractures of the humeral shaft: a randomized trial comparing antegrade intramedullary nailing with minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benegas, Eduardo; Ferreira Neto, Arnaldo Amado; Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Assunção, Jorge Henrique; Prada, Flávia De Santis; Bolliger Neto, Raul; Mattar, Rames

    2014-06-01

    Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis for humeral shaft fractures has been described recently, but there are no randomized studies comparing the clinical results for shoulder function between this technique and locking intramedullary nailing. A prospective randomized study was performed. Forty-one humeral shaft fractures (40 patients) were randomized to be treated with a minimally invasive plate (n = 21) or a locking intramedullary nail (n = 19). Clinical and radiographic outcome assessments were conducted at 1 year postoperatively. Shoulder function was the primary outcome, as measured by the University of California, Los Angeles Shoulder Scale. Elbow function was measured by the Broberg-Morrey score, and fracture consolidation and complications were the main secondary outcomes. At 1 year postoperatively, no significant difference was found with regard to shoulder function according to the University of California, Los Angeles scale between the minimally invasive plate and locking intramedullary nail (31.4 points vs 31.2 points, P = .98). There was also no difference in elbow function (94.8 points vs 94.1 points, P = .96). Complications were similar between the groups, without significant differences regarding infection (P > .99), symptomatic shoulder stiffness (P = .488), and neurapraxia of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm (P = .475). Fracture union was achieved in all but 1 patient (2.4%) in the intramedullary nail group within 1 year after the surgical procedure. There is no significant difference in shoulder function between antegrade intramedullary nailing and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis for the treatment of displaced humeral shaft fractures, despite the limited power of our study. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Management of distal femur fractures with modern plates and nails: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Michael J; Gary, Joshua L; Collinge, Cory A

    2015-04-01

    Fractures of the distal femur, even those with articular extension, are well suited to surgical fixation with modern precontoured anatomic plates and nails. Numerous adjuvant techniques are available to the treating surgeon to obtain and maintain reduction while preserving fracture biology. Yet despite their proven track record and benefits over older implants, technical errors are common and must be overcome with proper preoperative planning and intraoperative attention to detail. This review summarizes the current state of the art regarding distal femur fractures, with an emphasis on relevant modern plate and nail surgical techniques, tempered by our current understanding of implant biomechanics, fracture healing, and long-term outcomes.

  2. [Minimal invasive elastic intramedullary nails and external fixation for treatment of comminuted closed fracture of tibia-fibula shaft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Chen, Wei-kai; Cui, Wei; Zhou, Yi-fei; Chen, Hua; Yang, Lei

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the clinical results of external fixation and AO titanium elastic intramedullary nailing for treatment of tibia-fibula comminuted closed fractures. From June 2010 to June 2012,58 patients with tibia-fibula comminuted closed fractures were treated with external fixation and AO titanium elastic intramedullary nailing, including 31 males and 27 females with an average age of 38.5 years old ranging from 21 to 57 years old. According to the system of AO Classification, the fractures were classified as type B1 in 9 cases,type B2 in 7 cases, type B3 in 10 cases, type Cl in 14 cases, type C2 in 12 cases,and type C3 in 6 cases. According to the system of Winquist-Hanson,the fractures' comminuted were classified as grade 1 in 23 cases, grade 2 in 17 cases, grade 3 in 12 cases, and grade 4 in 6 cases. According to the system of Johner-Wruhs, clinical results were compared between different type and grade groups by the time of last followed-up. All 58 patients were followed up with an average time of 6.8 months (ranged from 18 to 36 weeks). All fractures had clinical healing with an average time of 28 weeks (ranged from 24 to 32 weeks). The total rate of good to excellent results was 91.4%. The rate of good to excellent in the group of grade 1 was higher than that of other grades. The complication rates and fracture healing time would increase respectively with higher Winquist-Hanson's grade. The complication rates in the group of type C3 was higher than that of other types, but the rate of good to excellent was lower than that of other types. The complication rates in the group of type B1 was lower than that of other types,but the rate of good to excellent was higher than that of other types. Minimal invasiveusing AO titanium elastic intramedullary nailing combined with external fixation for treatment of tibia-fibula fractures especially for the multiple-segment,long spiral mild-to-moderate comminuted with hidden fracture can get satisfactory reduction and

  3. Mid-term results of the elastic intramedullary nailing in paediatric long bone shaft fractures: a prospective study of 102 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Ibrahim; Halici, Mehmet; Kafadar, Ibrahim H; Guney, Ahmet; Oner, Mithat; Gurbuz, Kağan; Karaman, Zehra F

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mid-term results of a large series of paediatric patients with long bone shaft fractures who were treated with elastic intramedullary nailing. Between November 2009 and November 2010, 108 long bone shaft fractures in 102 patients were treated with elastic intramedullary nails. The number of nails used, admission time, nail diameter/medullary canal diameter ratio of the nontraumatized extremity, weeks until radiological consolidation, weeks until full weight bearing for the femur and tibia shaft fractures, weeks until the nails were removed, number of radiographs from the diagnosis time to the removal time of nail(s), clinical complications and radiological results were recorded; the union rate, time to union, nonunion, delayed union, malrotation, malalignment, follow-up time and functional outcomes (Flynn outcome scoring) were also recorded. The mean follow-up time was 22.2 (14-30) months. The mean age of the patients was 9.6 (6-15) years for all cases. The mean nail removal time for all cases was 19.2 (17-29) weeks. Eighteen patients developed complications: six had insufficient reductions; two had refractures; four developed a deep infection; one had delayed union that needed revision; two had lower extremity length discrepancies of more than 15 mm; and three had skin impingements. The mean admission time was 19 (6-32) h; the mean number of radiographs from the diagnosis time to the removal time of nail(s) was 14 (8-20) for each fracture. All patients showed excellent or satisfactory results according to Flynn's criteria. The mean time to full weight bearing for the femur and tibia shaft fractures was 62.4 (52-88) days. A nail diameter/medullary canal diameter ratio of over 0.4 showed good results; short union time, less lower extremity length discrepancy and less malalignment were recorded. When patients were informed about possible complications as well as the advantages, almost all chose the operative approach

  4. Infection Rate of Intramedullary Nailing in Closed Fractures of the Femoral Diaphysis After Temporizing External Fixation in an Austere Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Joseph W; Dannenbaum, Joseph H; Tubb, Creighton C; Poepping, Thomas P; Grassbaugh, Jason A; Arrington, Edward D

    2015-09-01

    To determine the infection rate of intramedullary (IM) nailing of closed diaphyseal femur fractures after temporary stabilization with external fixation in an austere combat environment. Retrospective case series. Iraq and Afghanistan Theater and Military Medical Treatment Centers in the United States and Landstuhl, Germany. Military personnel who underwent temporizing external fixation of a closed diaphyseal femur fracture (OTA 32) with later conversion to an IM nail between 2003 and 2012. Patients were identified from the Joint Theater Trauma Registry and Department of Defense electronic medical record, and a retrospective review was performed. Variables measured included age, gender, mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score, associated injuries (to include thoracic and abdominal injuries), base deficit, history of massive transfusion, date of injury, date and place of external and IM fixations, time to conversion procedure, report of superficial or deep infection, report of fracture union, and date of last follow-up. One hundred twenty-two patients, mean age 25 (18-43) years, sustained 125 closed femoral diaphyseal fractures from May 2003 to July 2012. External fixation was performed at a mean of 0.2 days (median of the day of injury) and a range of 0-3 days. Mean time to IM nail conversion procedure was 6.9 (1-20) days. Infection rate was 2.5%, with a P of 0.188. Average follow-up was 41.4 (12-119) months. Acceptable low infection rates can be achieved after IM nailing of closed diaphyseal femur fractures treated with initial external fixation in an austere combat environment. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  5. Decreased QOL and muscle strength are persistent 1 year after intramedullary nailing of a tibial shaft fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter; Elsoe, Rasmus; Laessoe, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    was measured with the questionnaire Eq5D-5L and compared to norm data from a reference population. Recordings of pain and contralateral muscle strength (isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for knee flexion and extension were collected at 6 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Ipsilateral MVCs......INTRODUCTION:To evaluate the development in patient-reported quality of life (QOL) and muscle strength in the period from surgery to 12 months postoperatively after intramedullary nailing of a tibial shaft fracture. MATERIALS AND METHODS:The design was a prospective, follow-up cohort study. QOL...... compared to the reference population. Six and 12 months after surgery patients demonstrated decreased muscle strength in the injured leg compared to the non-injured leg for knee extension and flexion (P muscle strength during knee...

  6. Radiation‑free Insertion of Distal Interlocking Screw in Tibial and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suhm N, Messmer P, Zuna I, Jacob LA, Regazzoni P. Fluoroscopic guidance versus surgical navigation for distal locking of intramedullary implants. A prospective, controlled clinical study. Injury 2004;35:567‑74. 15. Kirousis G, Delis H, Megas P, Lambiris E, Panayiotakis G. Dosimetry during intramedullary nailing of the tibia.

  7. Displaced Tibial Shaft Fractures With Intact Fibula in Children: Nonoperative Management Versus Operative Treatment With Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavese, Federico; Botnari, Alexei; Andreacchio, Antonio; Marengo, Lorenza; Samba, Antoine; Dimeglio, Alain; Pereira, Bruno; Mansour, Mounira; Rousset, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of displaced tibial shaft fractures with intact fibula in children after nonoperative management and operative treatment by elastic stable intramedullary nailing. A study was performed on 80 consecutive children, 56 males, 24 females from 2 Institutions, with displaced and closed tibial shaft fracture with intact fibula. All patients underwent regular clinical and radiographic follow-up visits for at least 2 years after injury. In total, 26 patients (group A-Institution I) were treated surgically by elastic stable intramedullary nailing and 54 patients (18 patients from group B-Institution I and 36 patients from group C-Institution II) were treated nonoperatively with closed reduction and casting. groups A, B, and C did not significantly differ on sex (P=0.37), side (P=0.54), and fracture site (P=0.14).Valgus deformity was significantly controlled in group A patients only (P=0.001); during follow-up in group B patients (P=0.017), and showed no significant change between pretreatment images and last follow-up in group C patients (P=0.71). Procurvatum deformity was significantly controlled in group A patients only (P=0.001); it showed no significant improvement after conservative treatment in group B (P=0.73) and C patients (P=0.8). Recurvatum was significantly improved in group A (Pfracture of tibial diaphysis without associated fibula fracture.On the basis of the findings reported here, it is not contraindicated to operate skeletally immature patients with displaced fracture of tibial diaphysis without associated fibula fracture. However, results were essentially the same and either method is a satisfactory choice for pediatric tibia shaft fractures with an intact fibula. In particular, we found that conservative treatment was as efficacious as surgical treatment apart from the length of time for immobilization. Level III.

  8. The risk factors of perioperative hemoglobin and hematocrit drop after intramedullary nailing treatment for intertrochanteric fracture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Wei, Jie; Wang, Manyi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the risk factors associated with the hemoglobin and hematocrit drops in the early postoperative period for intertrochanteric fracture patients with intramedullary nailing treatment. From January 2003 to December 2013, 634 intertrochanteric fracture patients with complete information were recruited into the study. Their age, gender, operating time, medical diseases, blood routine examination at admission and postoperative first day, and the days between the trauma and operation were recorded. The hemoglobin (HGB) change of patients (75 years) (P = 0.039). Meanwhile, the change of hematocrit (HCT) level of patients (75 years), but the difference was not significant (P = 0.062). The gender had no significant influence on HCT and HGB. The HGB and HCT change of patients with diabetes (ΔHCT, 8.47 ± 3.36 %; ΔHGB, 29.19 ± 13.10 g/l) were statistically greater than that of patients without diabetes (ΔHCT, 5.52 ± 3.84 %; ΔHGB, 19.81 ± 14.68 g/l) (P = 0.006, P = 0.022). The hypertension and coronary heart disease had no significant influence on the change of HCT and HGB levels. The operation time had a significant influence on the change of HCT and HGB. The ΔHCT and ΔHGB in the group for which the time was more than 48 h between the trauma and operation were greater than that in the group with less than 48 h between the trauma and operation but not significantly different (ΔHCT, P = 0.672; ΔHGB, P = 0.66). The factors of age, medical disease such as diabetes, operation time, and time between the trauma and operation may be associated with the change of perioperative hemoglobin and hematocrit levels for intertrochanteric fracture patients after intramedullary nailing treatment in the early postoperative period.

  9. Failure of exchange reamed intramedullary nails for ununited femoral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weresh, M J; Hakanson, R; Stover, M D; Sims, S H; Kellam, J F; Bosse, M J

    2000-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of exchange reamed nails for treatment of aseptic femoral delayed unions and nonunions. Retrospective chart review. Nineteen patients admitted to the Carolinas Medical Center Level I trauma center from 1990 to 1996 for repair of femoral shaft fracture nonunion following contemporary locked nailing performed at least six months previously. These patients showed no radiographic evidence of progression of fracture healing for three months and had clinical symptoms of nonunion. Exchange reamed nails to treat ununited femoral shaft fracture. Radiographic and clinical evidence of union of the fracture or of the necessity for additional procedures. In 53 percent of the patients the secondary procedure resulted in fracture union, whereas in 47 percent, one or more additional procedures were required. Eight of the nine fractures that did not unite with exchange nailing united after a subsequent procedure (bone grafting, compression plating, or nail dynamization). Neither the type of nonunion, the location of the shaft fracture, the use of static versus dynamic cross-locking, nor the use of tobacco products was statistically predictive of the need for additional procedures. Reevaluation of routine exchange nailing as the recommended treatment for aseptic femoral delayed union or nonunion may be required. A significant number of patients who undergo reamed exchange nailing will require additional procedures to achieve fracture healing.

  10. Erişkin femur cisim kınklarının kilitli intramedüller çivileme ile tedavisi (Distal kilitlemede kolay bir teknik)

    OpenAIRE

    Arazi, Mehmet; Yel, Mustafa; Oktar, M.; Ogun, Tunc; Memik, Recep

    2004-01-01

    We describe an easy method for distal screw insertion in locked intramedullary nailing procedure and also present the early results of the femoral shaft fractures treated using this method and interlocking nailing. Between 1995 and 1997, 35 femoral shaft fractures which were not suitable for non-interlocked nailing because of localization and comminution were treated by interlocking nailing. The fractures were located in the proximal third of femur in 12 cases, middle in 15, and distal in 8. ...

  11. Use of intra-medullary stacked nailing in the reduction of proximal plastic deformity in a pediatric Monteggia fracture: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huntley James S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In a Monteggia fracture dislocation, it is important to reduce the ulnar fracture completely. Extensive plastic deformation of the proximal ulna may make reduction by closed manipulation impossible. Case presentation We report the case of a four-year-old Caucasian boy in whom the plastic deformation of the proximal ulna was reduced, and this reduction was maintained, using intra-medullary stacked nailing. Conclusion The technique of stacked nailing is a useful addition to the armamentarium in the management of the potentially awkward Monteggia fracture.

  12. "Cotton nail cast": a simple solution for mild and painful lateral and distal nail embedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Mendoza, Daniela; De Anda Juárez, Mariana; Ávalos, Verónica Fonte; Martínez, Gisela Reyes; Domínguez-Cherit, Judith

    2015-03-01

    Onychocryptosis is one of the most common painful nail conditions. Conservative treatment may take a long time to obtain effective results. The purpose of this study is to show the effectiveness of a conservative treatment of ingrown nails that shows rapid results. Patients with painful Stage 1 to 2 onychocryptosis who were not candidates or refused surgery were treated with the cotton cast. The severity and cause of onychocryptosis was clinically evaluated during a 2-month period. A questionnaire was applied to all patients to evaluate pain, final treatment, and possible complications. All patients noticed results in less than 72 hours. Pain subsided in less than 24 hours in half of the patients and before 72 hours in 100% of the patients without the need of other treatments. The use of the cast prevented surgery and the accompanying morbidities in most of the patients (80%). The "cotton nail cast" is an effective conservative method for mild nail embedding. It is easy to apply, inexpensive, relieves pain rapidly, and avoids surgery in most patients.

  13. Treatment of infected non union tibia: A novel technique - lengthening using limb reconstruction system over intramedullary nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahantesh Y Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess combination of an intramedullary interlocking (IMIL nail with limb reconstruction system (LRS in cases of infected nonunion tibia and to show influence of nail in predicting good outcome. Materials and Methods: From 2009 to 2011, records of 20 patients (17 men and three women aged 18 to 65 years (mean, 38.4 years with infected nonunion of the tibia treated with the LRS over IMIL Nail technique were prospectively reviewed. According to Jain et al., patients were classified into five cases of A1, five cases of type A2, seven cases of type B1, and three cases of type B2. All cases underwent LRS and IMIL. Mean amount of target lengthening was 54.65 mm. The mean follow-up was 14 months. Results: Mean amount of tibia lengthening was 51.70 mm. Leg length equalization was achieved in 19 cases (±5. According to modified scoring by Paley et al., 12 patients had excellent results, three patients had good, four patients had fair outcome, and one patient had poor outcome. Mean distraction index was 0.97. Mean maturation index was 2.43. Mean consolidation index was 3.47. Mean healing index was 1.40. One case had proximal locking screw failure. One case developed pre mature consolidation as distraction was started at delayed period due to non-compliance. Two cases developed decreased dorsi flexion of ankle. Two cases required flap surgeries for cover of bone. One case had pin breakage, which had to be exchanged. One case developed re-infection. Conclusion: The advantages of this technique include complete eradication of infective foci, reduced risk of deformity during lengthening, decrease risk of fractures post external fixator removal and reduction of time required for external fixator use thus decreasing healing index: Number of days of external fixation required per centimetre of lengthening.

  14. Staged protocol for the treatment of chronic femoral shaft osteomyelitis with Ilizarov's technique followed by the use of intramedullary locked nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Hsin Chou

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: In the treatment of chronic femur osteomyelitis, the staged protocol of Ilizarov distraction osteogenesis followed by intramedullary nailing was safe and successful, and allowed for union, realignment, reorientation, and leg-length restoration. With regard to the soft tissue, this technique provides a unique type of reconstructive closure for infected wounds. It is suggested that the staged protocol is reliable in providing successful simultaneous reconstruction for bone and soft tissue defects without flap coverage.

  15. A CLINICAL STUDY OF SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF DIAPHYSEAL FRACTURES OF TIBIA WITH INTRAMEDULLARY INTERLOCKING NAIL

    OpenAIRE

    Radhakrishna; Shivananda; Santhosh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intramedullary interlocking is currently considered the treatment of choice for tibial shaft fractures, with high rates of fracture union, advantage of early stabilization which decreases the morbidity and mortality rate in patients, allows early mobilization, reduces the incidence of infection, malunion, non-union or implant failure. OBJECTIVES: To assess and study diaphyseal fractures of tibia and to evaluate the functional outcome of patients with tibial shaft fracture treated ...

  16. Arthrodesis of distal interphalangeal joints in the hand with interosseous wiring and intramedullary K-wire fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Soo Hong; Cha, Yoon Sik; Song, Won Tae

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of intramedullary K-wire fixation and interosseous wiring in the arthrodesis of the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint with description of surgical procedure. We retrospectively analyzed 9 cases (7 women and 2 men) of DIP joint arthrodesis. The average age of patients was 44.2 years (range, 21 to 71 years) and the mean follow-up period was 19.6 months. Joint union was evaluated on the follow-up radiographs together with postoperative complications. All cases achieved radiologic union of the arthrodesis site. There was no surgical complication except for one case of skin irritation by the interosseous wire knot which was removed during the follow-up period. Intramedullary K-wire fixation and interosseous wiring could be an alternative procedure of arthrodesis in the DIP joint.

  17. Close Intramedullary Interlocking Nailing Versus Locking Compression Plating In the Treatment of Closed Fracture Shaft of the Tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, I K; Datta, N K; Chowdhury, A Z; Das, K P; Tarik, M M; Faisal, M A

    2016-07-01

    Fracture of tibial shaft is the commonest site of long bone fractures due to its superficial location involving young or middle-age people. Proper management is an important issue regarding the future effective movements. In this study patients were grouped in closed Intra medullary interlocking nailing and locking compression plating. Post-operative follow up at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 3 months thereafter up to 6 months were done. Each of the patients was evaluated clinically and radiologically by tucker criteria of Tuker et al. Patients were assessed for pain on full weight bearing and kneeling, shortening and range of motion of knee and ankle joints. Radiological assessment for union of fracture, alignment of fracture and angulations and position of nail and screws and infection were observed during follow up. A total number of 32 patients were selected but only 27 patients were available for follow up for a period of 6 months. They were grouped into Group A, consisting of 15 patients who took the treatment in the form of closed intramedullary interlocking nailing and Group B, consisting of 12 patients those underwent ORIF with locking compression plating. In both of the groups Motor Vehicle Accident was the main mechanism of trauma. Fracture involving the middle 3rd of the tibia is common in both the groups. During post-operative follow up, four patients in Group A complained anterior knee pain, one patient in Group B had superficial infection, most of the patients had no restriction of movement in the ankle and knee joints and a single patient in Group B showed 1.5cm shortening of the lower limb. Period of hospital stay and fracture union time were less in Group A, which was statistically significant. Both groups showed excellent result with minimum complications. So this study permits to conclude that close IM interlocking nailing and open reduction and internal fixation by locking compression plating is equally effective for the management of close

  18. Displaced isolated fractures of the tibial shaft treated with either a cast or intramedullary nailing. An outcome analysis of matched pairs of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, L B; Sucato, D; Stegemann, P M; Rohrbacher, B J

    1997-09-01

    A study of ninety-nine patients who had a unilateral, displaced, isolated closed fracture of the tibial shaft was performed to determine the effect of the type of treatment on the clinical outcome. Forty-seven patients were managed with closed intramedullary nailing with reaming, and fifty-two were managed with closed reduction and a cast. The two groups were comparable with regard to the ages of the patients, the locations and amounts of displacement of the fractures, and the number of patients who had a history of smoking. The time to union was shorter in the patients who had been managed with intramedullary nailing than in those who had been managed with a cast (mean, eighteen compared with twenty-six weeks; p = 0.02). A non-union occurred in one patient (2 per cent) who had been managed with nailing and in five patients (10 per cent) who had been managed with a cast. There were no infections in either group. Removal of the nail was performed electively in twenty-six patients. Twenty-five patients who had been managed with nailing and twenty-five who had been managed with a cast were followed for a mean of 4.4 years. With use of the Iowa Knee Evaluation and the Ankle-Evaluation Rating System, the patients who had had nailing had mean scores of 96 points (range, 68 to 100 points) and 97 points (range, 74 to 100 points) for the knee and the ankle, respectively, compared with 89 points (range, 62 to 100 points) and 84 points (range, 62 to 100 points) for those who had been managed with a cast (p nailing than after treatment with a cast (a mean of 85 points [range, 27 to 99 points] compared with a mean of 74 points [range, 20 to 97 points]; p treatment of displaced closed fractures of the tibial shaft with closed intramedullary nailing with reaming provides functional results that are superior to those obtained with use of a cast.

  19. Biomechanics of intramedullary fracture fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, R F

    1985-11-01

    Intramedullary rodding allows excellent control of bending forces on long bone fractures when adequate sized rods are used. This is made possible by reaming when necessary. Torsional stability is poor if adequate bone nail contact is not obtained and there is little bone fragment interdigitation. This can be optimized with the interlocking system, especially with proximal and distal fractures. Intramedullary rods allow transmission of compressive load so there must be adequate bone to bone contact without comminution to prevent shortening. If a great deal of comminution is present, an interlocking system must be used to resist compressive loads. The interlocked devices have not been proven to be a detriment to union and indeed are a semi-rigid fixation system when used in comminuted shaft fractures. The strength of an osteosynthesis with an intramedullary rod depends on the geometry of the rod and the geometry of the fracture complex. Both locked and nonlocked intramedullary rods perform extremely well when one understands the mechanical principles involved in intramedullary rodding and pays close attention to detail.

  20. The challenge of non-union in subtrochanteric fractures with breakage of intramedullary nail: evaluation of outcomes in surgery revision with angled blade plate and allograft bone strut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollo, G; Tartaglia, N; Falzarano, G; Pichierri, P; Stasi, A; Medici, A; Meccariello, L

    2017-12-01

    Subtrochanteric fractures have a bimodal age distribution. They usually require open reduction and internal fixation. Closed reduction and intramedullary nail fixation rate are increased for this type of fracture. As a result, the hardware breakage and non-union rate is high among such patients. Our purpose is to evaluate the outcomes of the role of blade plate and bone strut allograft in the management of subtrochanteric non-union by femoral nailing. We reported a group of 22 patients with subtrochanteric non-union, associated with breakage of the intramedullary nail with medial femoral allograft bone and lateral blade plate and wire (PS) s; and a group of 13 patients with subtrochanteric non-union, associated with breakage of the intramedullary nail treated with lateral blade plate and screws (CG). The chosen criteria to evaluate the two group during the clinical and radiological follow-up were the quality of life, measured by The Short Form (12) Health Survey (SF-12), the hip function and quality of life related to it, measured by the Harris Hip Score (HHS), bone healing, measured by Radiographic Union Score (RUS) by XR and CT at 1 year after the surgery, and postoperative complications. The evaluation endpoint was set at 12 months. The Bone healing measured by RUS occurred and also the full recovery before the first trauma measured by SF-12 and HHS are better in PS group. We only had three unimportant complications in PS while four breakage hardware in CG. We conclude that in complicated non-unions, the use of blade plate and bone strut allograft has a definite positive role in the management of such cases.

  1. Causes and treatments of lag screw's cut out after intramedullary nailing osteosinthesis for trochanteric fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzotti, Gabriele; Matino, Giovanni; Tsatsis, Christos; Sacchetti, GianLuigi; Baudi, Paolo; Catani, Fabio

    2014-08-20

    Background. Superior cut-out of a lag screw remains a serious complication in the treatment of trochanteric or subtrochanteric fractures and it is related to many factors: the type of fracture, osteoporosis and the stability of fracture reduction. Little is known about the outcome after revision surgery for complications of the gamma nail. We assessed the outcome in patients who had revision surgery because of lag screw's cut out after gamma nailing for a trochanteric fracture.Material and Method. We present a study of 20 consecutive patients who underwent treatment after 20 cut-out of the lag screw fixation of a trochanteric fracture with Gamma Locking Nail from September 2004 to November 2010. In 16 patients hip prothesis was performed, in 1 the removal of the implant and in 3 the reosteosynthesis. We reviewed 13 patients: 10 total hip arthroplasty, 2 endoprothesis and 1 reosteosynthesis of nail and lag screw (mean follow up: 26 months, mean age: 73 years old), 7 patients died. Patients were reviewed retrospectively by an independent observer. Clinical evaluation was performed, Oxford score and Harris Hip score were measured. X-Ray examination was performed after a minimum of 12 months of follow up.Results. Mean Harris Hip Score mean was 67 and mean Oxford score was 32 in hip prothesis group (12 patients). We had several complications, Implant-related complications were: 2 ipometria > 2cm, 2 recurrent hip arthroplasty dislocations (1 reoperated), 4 persistent thigh pain. In only 4 patients none complications were observed. Another patient,  who had been subjected to reosteosinthesis, obtained better results (HHS:95, Oxford score:45) but with a 2 cm ipometria and occasional pain in the thigh.Conclusion. Cut out after gamma nail is consequent to biological or mechanical causes. Treatment of this complication is hip prosthesis (parzial or total hip arthroplasty), reosteosynthesis of the lag screw and/or the nail and the removal of the implant. Conversion to total

  2. Intragrade intramedullary nailing of an open tibial shaft fracture in a patient with concomitant ipsilateral total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Nicholas; Goyal, Kanu; Tarkin, Ivan

    2015-03-01

    Open tibial shaft fracture occurring below an ipsilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a unique injury pattern that presents an additional degree of complexity to an already challenging treatment algorithm. Tibial shaft fracture is a surgical emergency requiring respect for the soft-tissue envelope and consideration of the biomechanical and biologic factors involved in healing. Treatment with an intramedullary nail relative to other types of internal or external fixation methods optimizes these factors and minimizes the risks of nonunion, malunion, infection, soft-tissue compromise, and reoperation, which are prevalent after this fracture. However, tibial shaft fracture associated with an ipsilateral TKA complicates standard treatment principles and increases the risks after surgery. In many instances, this type of injury pattern in a patient with medical comorbidities that would impede fracture and wound healing would make a limb amputation the preferred method of treatment. However, in this case report, we examine treatment options for an open tibial shaft fracture in the setting of an ipsilateral TKA and propose a method of limb salvage in a patient with medical comorbidities sustaining this injury pattern.

  3. Use of Huckstep nail in the periimplant femoral shaft fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Kyun; Noh, Kyu Cheol; Chung, Kook Jin; Hwang, Ji Hyo

    2012-11-01

    87-year-old female underwent open reduction of distal femoral fracture and internal fixation with locking compression plate and bone graft. She was operated for ipsilateral proximal femoral fractures and stabilized by intramedullary interlocked nail 5 years ago. She developed stress fracture proximal to locked plate. We inserted Huckstep nail after removal of the previous operated proximal femoral nail without removing the remaining plate and screws. At 15 month followup the fractures have united. The Huckstep nail has multiple holes available for screw fixation at any level in such difficult situations.

  4. A prospective, randomized study of intramedullary nails inserted with and without reaming for the treatment of open and closed fractures of the tibial shaft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkemeier, C G; Schmidt, A H; Kyle, R F; Templeman, D C; Varecka, T F

    2000-01-01

    To determine if there are differences in healing, complications, or number of procedures required to obtain union among open and closed tibia fractures treated with intramedullary (IM) nails inserted with and without reaming. Prospective, surgeon-randomized comparative study. Level One trauma center. Ninety-four consecutive patients with unstable closed and open (excluding Gustilo Grade IIIB and IIIC) fractures of the tibial shaft treated with IM nail insertion between November 1, 1994, and June 30, 1997. Interlocked IM nail insertion with and without medullary canal reaming. Time to union, type and incidence of complications, and number of secondary procedures performed to obtain union. For open fractures, there were no significant differences in the time to union or number of additional procedures performed to obtain union in patients with reamed nail insertion compared with those without reamed insertion. A higher percentage of closed fractures were healed at four months after reamed nail insertion compared with unreamed insertion (p = 0.040), but there was not a difference at six and twelve months. More secondary procedures were needed to obtain union after unreamed nail insertion for the treatment of closed tibia fractures, but the difference was not statistically significant given the limited power of our study (p = 0.155). Broken screws were seen only in patients treated with smaller-diameter nails inserted without reaming, and the majority occurred in patients who were noncompliant with weight-bearing restrictions. There were no differences in rates of infection or compartment syndrome. Our findings support the use of reamed insertion of IM nails for the treatment of closed tibia fractures, which led to earlier time to union without increased complications. In addition, canal reaming did not increase the risk of complications in open tibia fractures.

  5. Evaluation of malrotation following intramedullary nailing in a femoral shaft fracture model: Can a 3D c-arm improve accuracy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramme, Austin J; Egol, Jonathan; Chang, Gregory; Davidovitch, Roy I; Konda, Sanjit

    2017-07-01

    Difficulty determining anatomic rotation following intramedullary (IM) nailing of the femur continues to be problematic for surgeons. Clinical exam and fluoroscopic imaging of the hip and knee have been used to estimate femoral version, but are inaccurate. We hypothesize that 3D c-arm imaging can be used to accurately measure femoral version following IM nailing of femur fractures to prevent rotational malreduction. A midshaft osteotomy was created in a femur Sawbone to simulate a transverse diaphyseal fracture. An intramedullary (IM) nail was inserted into the Sawbone femur without locking screws or cephalomedullary fixation. A goniometer was used to simulate four femoral version situations after IM nailing: 20° retroversion, 0° version, 15° anteversion, and 30° anteversion. In each simulated position, 3D c-arm imaging and, for comparison purposes, perfect lateral radiographs of the knee and hip were performed. The femoral version of each simulated 3D and fluoroscopic case was measured and the results were tabulated. The measured version from the 3D c-arm images was 22.25° retroversion, 0.66° anteversion, 19.53° anteversion, and 25.15° anteversion for the simulated cases of 20° retroversion, 0° version, 15° anteversion, and 30° anteversion, respectively. The lateral fluoroscopic views were measured to be 9.66° retroversion, 12.12° anteversion, 20.91° anteversion, and 18.77° anteversion for the simulated cases, respectively. This study demonstrates the utility of a novel intraoperative method to evaluate femur rotational malreduction following IM nailing. The use of 3D c-arm imaging to measure femoral version offers accuracy and reproducibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of the suprapatellar approach in intramedullary nailing of a multi-fragmentary dislocated tibia fracture with a hypermobile intermediate fragment in a young patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Haubruck

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of an adolescent female patient who suffered from first grade open multi-fragment fracture of the tibia (AO42-C2 with a large hypermobile intermediate fragment is presented in this case report. Intramedullary nailing of the tibia remains the treatment of choice despite a high risk of malformation and anterior knee pain especially in multi-fragment fractures. Here the suprapatellar approach as a semiextended nailing technique seems favorable. The specialty in our case was an early change of procedures necessary due to persistent swelling during external fixation based on the hypermobile intermediate fragment. Decision in favor of this surgical technique was conducted in order to achieve beneficial alignment and union while protecting the softtissue despite the hypermobile intermediate fragment and decrease the risk of anterior knee pain. In our case we achieved successful alignment and proper bone healing without any signs of anterior knee pain or limitations in the range of motion of the knee. With this report we would like to recommend the suprapatellar approach as a favorable alternative in intramedullary nailing in this type of fracture also in young patients.

  7. Dynamic intramedullary crosspinning technique for repair of distal femoral fractures in dogs and cats: 71 cases (1981-1985)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, W.O.; Schrader, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    Dynamic intramedullary crosspinning was used in the surgical treatment of supracondylar and distal physeal fractures of the femur in 129 dogs and cats over a 5-year period; the records of the 44 dogs and 27 cats with follow-up information up to time of bony union were evaluated. The results were good or excellent in 66 of 71 animals (93%). The mean follow-up period was 22 months. Distal pin migration was the major complication (10 animals; 14%). The pin migrated before bony union in 2 animals because of instability and collapse at the fracture site. The pin migrated in 8 animals after bony union and was associated with intermittent lameness. In 5 of these, pin removal was performed and the lameness resolved

  8. [Proximal interlocking of humeral intramedullary nails and risk of axillary nerve injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, J; Rommens, P M

    2002-01-01

    Possible injuries to the axillary nerve are criticised in antegrade and retrograde endomedullary nailing of the humeral shaft during proximal interlocking. Clinical experience seems not to support the theory of a high risk of nerve injury. The real risk although remains unknown under anatomical-morphological aspects. Eight complete human cadaveric shoulder-arm regions with original soft-tissue coverage had been used. Four times the unreamed humeral nail (UHN) had been inserted retrograde, and four times antegrade, distributed in each pair. Antegrade interlocking was performed after skin incision and spreading of soft tissues through the aiming devices. This involved one oblique bolt from lateral to medial. Retrograde proximal interlocking was performed under image intensifier. This involved triple interlocking, once dorso-ventrally and twice latero-medially. The incision paths have been marked. After preparation of the nerve stem in the lateral axillary portal the different branches have been searched and exposed. The spatial relations of bolts and nerve branches have been measured and the insertion path of the bolts has been revised, finally lesions of nerve structures have been documented. We found the latero-medially inserted bolt heads of the retrograde approach and the oblique bolt head of the antegrade approach being placed in a safe distance from the medio-dorsally positioned stem of the axillary nerve. On the other hand the dorsoventrally inserted bolt head (retrograde approach) showed in most cases a very tight relation to the nerve stem. Exploring the axillary nerve and its branches showed in no case a direct nerve lesion. We suggest to perform only a sharp cutaneous incision and then to prepare the muscle only by careful spreading until touching bone, with tissue retraction during drilling. In retrograde nailing the dorso-ventral bolt should only be used in extreme proximal fractures.

  9. Fixator-Assisted Lengthening and Deformity Correction Over an Intramedullary Nail in a Patient with Achondroplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Uzun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Achondroplasia is the most frequently encountered form of nonlethal skeletal dysplasia and a type of rhizomelic dwarfism. It results in considerable physical and psychologic handicaps owing to the disproportionate stature of the body and difficulty in performing routine activities of daily living. They also have major musculoskeletal problems including symptomatic malalignment of the lower limbs. Limb lengthening has been used in patients with achondroplasia by different techniques (Intramedullar nailing, monolateral or circular external fixator. We report our treatment of a patient 17 years of age with achondroplasia for bilateral lower limb length discrepancy and bilateral tibial varus deformity.

  10. Elastic stable intramedullary nailing is best for mid-shaft clavicular fractures without comminution: results in 60 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smekal, Vinzenz; Irenberger, Alexander; Attal, Rene El; Oberladstaetter, Juergen; Krappinger, Dietmar; Kralinger, Franz

    2011-04-01

    Elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) of displaced mid-shaft clavicular fractures is a minimally invasive technique which was reported to be an easy procedure with low complication rates, good cosmetic and functional results, restoration of clavicular length and fast return to daily activities. Recent studies, however, also report on higher complication rates and specific problems with the use of this technique. This prospective study compares ESIN with non-operative treatment of displaced mid-shaft clavicular fractures. Between December 2003 and August 2007, 120 patients volunteered to participate. Of these, 112 patients completed the study (60 in the operative and 52 in the non-operative group). Patients in the non-operative group were treated with a simple shoulder sling. In the operative group, intramedullary stabilisation was performed within 3 days of the trauma. Clavicular shortening was determined after trauma and after osseous consolidation on thorax posteroanterior radiographs as the proportional length difference between the left and right side with the uninjured side serving as a control for clavicular length (100%). Radiographic union was assessed every 4 weeks on 20 degrees cephalad anteroposterior and posteroanterior radiographs of the clavicle. Constant shoulder scores and DASH scores (DASH, disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand) were assessed at final follow-up after 2 years. ESIN led to faster osseous healing and better restoration of clavicular length in simple fractures. We were not able to restore clavicular length in comminuted fractures using ESIN. Functional outcome at a mean follow-up of 24 months (range: 22-27 months) was better in the operative group. Delayed union and non-union accounted for the majority of complications in the non-operative group. In the operative group, telescoping was the main complication, which occurred in complex fractures with severe post-traumatic shortening only. We recommend ESIN for all simple

  11. A new, lateral, continuous, combined, femoral–sciatic nerve approach via a single skin puncture for postoperative analgesia in intramedullary tibial nail insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imbelloni LE

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni,1,2 Carlos Rava,1,3 Marildo A Gouveia21Faculdade de Medicina Nova Esperança, 2Institute for Regional Anesthesia, 3Complexo Hospitalar de Mangabeira Governador Tarcisio Burity, João Pessoa, BrazilBackground: The prevalence of anterior knee pain following intramedullary tibial nail insertion is high. Continuous peripheral nerve blockade is an alternative method of pain control to opiods. This case illustrates the use of femoral nerve and sciatic nerve peripheral catheters with an elastomeric infusion pump for major intramedullary nailing surgery.Case report: A 36-year-old male with fractures to the left leg bones presented for placement of an intramedullary nail under spinal anesthesia. At the end of the procedure, access to the lateral femoral and sciatic continuous nerve block was achieved by using a stimulator connected to a 110 mm 18G Tuohy needle. Postoperative analgesia was provided with a 40-hour infusion of 0.1% bupivacaine (400 mL at a rate of 10 mL hour-1 with an elastomeric pump. Anesthetic dispersion and contrast were investigated. The analog scale remained with scores below 3 during the 40 hours after surgery, and boluses were not necessary.Conclusion: The use of a femoral and sciatic nerve peripheral catheter offered an alternative to conventional pain control. Continuous femoral–sciatic peripheral blockade via a skin puncture with an infusion of 0.1% bupivacaine with elastomeric pumps is a safe and effective procedure in adults.Keywords: local anesthetic, bupivacaine, continuous peripheral nerve block, orthopedic surgery, tibia, elastomeric pump

  12. Outcome of Distal Both Bone Leg Fractures Fixed by Intramedulary Nail for Fibula & MIPPO in Tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anil; Anjum, Rashid; Singh, Navdeep; Hackla, Shafiq

    2015-04-01

    Fractures of the distal third of the tibia are mostly associated with a fibular fracture that often requires fixation. The preferred treatment of distal tibial fracture is the minimally invasive percutaneous plate osteosynthesis (MIPPO) procedure. However, there are no clear cut guidelines on fixation of the fibular fracture and currently most orthopedic surgeons use a plate osteosynthesis for the fibula as well. A common complication associated with dual plating is an increased chance of soft tissue necrosis, infection, and in some cases resulting in an exposed implant. We conducted a prospective study to analyze the results of fractures of the distal in both leg bones managed by the MIPPO procedure for tibial fractures and a rush nail for fibular fractures. The study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital from November 2012 to May 2014, a total of 30 fractures in 30 patients (18 males, 12 females) with a mean age of 42.4 years (26-60 years) were treated in our institution in the aforesaid time period with MIPPO for tibia and rush nail for fibular fractures. All the cases were operated on by a single surgeon in emergency within 24 hours. The patients with skin blistering and compound fractures were excluded from this study. Rehabilitative measures were proceeded as per patient's pain profile, isometric and isotonic exercises were started on the first post-operative day, with full weight bearing at 10-12 weeks after assessing clinical and radiological union. Regular follow up of patients was done, radiographs were taken at the immediate post-operative period and at 3, 6, 12 and 24 weeks. All the patients were available for regular follow up. Radiological and clinical union proceeded normally in all the patients, no patients had signs of any deep infection, delayed union or nonunion, three patients had a superficial infection of the tibial incision that healed with a change in antibiotic. The use of dual plating for fixation of the lower tibia and fibula

  13. Percutaneous Intramedullary Screw Fixation of Distal Fibula Fractures: A Case Series and Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loukachov, Vladimir V.; Birnie, Merel F. N.; Dingemans, Siem A.; de Jong, Vincent M.; Schepers, Tim

    2017-01-01

    The current reference standard for unstable ankle fractures is open reduction and internal fixation using a plate and lag screws. This approach requires extensive dissection and wound complications are not uncommon. The use of intramedullary screw fixation might overcome these issues. The aim of our

  14. [Complication rate in the treatment of inter- and subtrochanteric femur fractures with two intramedullary osteosyntheses. Comparison of a conventional nailing system and a rotation stable fixation of the head-neck-fragment, gammanail and glidingnail].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckel, A; Helwig, P; Schirmer, A; Garbrecht, M; Mocke, U

    2003-03-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate typical complications in osteosynthesis of inter- and subtrochanteric femur fractures with intramedullary nailing systems. In the literature screw perforation of the femoral head into the acetabulum, postoperative fracture of the femur shaft, intraoperative shaft fracture, problems in placing of distal locking screws and deep infections are mostly described. In a retrospective study the complication rate of 100 consecutive gammanail osteosyntheses (GAN) and 96 glidingnail osteosyntheses (GLN) was analysed. 93 % of GAN and 89.3 % of GLN were followed up. Cutting out rate of GAN/GLN was 7.0 %/3.1 %, postoperative shaft fractures occurred in 1.0 %/0 %, intraoperative shaft fractures in 1.0 %/2.1 %, problems with distal locking in 2.0 %/1.0 % and deep infections in 3.0 %/1.0 %. In an analysis of internationally published data on 2 241 GAN and 365 GLN the cut-out rate was 2.3 %/0.5 %, postoperative shaft fracture 2.2 %/1.4 %, intraoperative shaft fracture 1.2 %/0.3 % and deep infection 1.2 %/2.2 %. GLN shows lower complication rates with regard to femoral head perforation and late shaft fracture than GAN.

  15. Intramedullary nail versus dynamic compression plate fixation in treating humeral shaft fractures: grading the evidence through a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JianXiong Ma

    Full Text Available There is a debate regarding the choice of operative intervention in humeral shaft fractures that require surgical intervention. The choices for operative interventions include intramedullary nailing (IMN and dynamic compression plate (DCP. This meta-analysis was performed to compare fracture union, functional outcomes, and complication rates in patients treated with IMN or DCP for humeral shaft fractures and to develop GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation-based recommendations for using the procedures to treat humeral shaft fractures. A systematic search of all the studies published through December 2012 was conducted using the Medline, Embase, Sciencedirect, OVID and Cochrane Central databases. The randomized controlled trials (RCTs and quasi-RCTs that compared IMN with DCP in treating adult patients with humeral shaft fractures and provided data regarding the safety and clinical effects were identified. The demographic characteristics, adverse events and clinical outcomes were manually extracted from all of the selected studies. Ten studies that included a total of 448 patients met the inclusion criteria. The results of a meta-analysis indicated that both IMN and DCP can achieve similar fracture union with a similar incidence of radial nerve injury and infection. IMN was associated with an increased risk of shoulder impingement, more restriction of shoulder movement, an increased risk of intraoperative fracture comminution, a higher incidence of implant failure, and an increased risk of re-operation. The overall GRADE system evidence quality was very low, which reduces our confidence in the recommendations of this system. DCP may be superior to IMN in the treatment of humeral shaft fractures. Because of the low quality evidence currently available, high-quality RCTs are required.

  16. [Role of centro-medullary nailing in fractures of the distal quarter of the leg: about 30 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margad, Omar; Boukhris, Jalal; Sallahi, Hicham; Azriouil, Ouahb; Daoudi, Mohamed; Koulali, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    The fractures of the distal quarter of the leg are characterized by fracture line located at the level of the lower quarter of the tibia, according to Gerard and Evrard definition [1]. They are serious and pose problems for consolidation, immobilization and stability. We here describe our experience in the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology at the Avicenne Military Hospital, Marrakech. We report 30 cases of closed fractures of the lower quarter of the leg treated with centro-medullary nailing over a period of 10 years (January 2001-December 2010). Locked nailing was performed in 80% of cases and simple nailing was performed in the other cases. The average age of patients was 36 years. There was a clear male predominance (27 men, 3 women). The average time for consolidation was 17 weeks and functional outcomes were satisfactory. A single case of infection occurred 6 months after surgery (3.3%) and no other complication was reported. Malunion was detected in 30% of patients. Our epidemiological data and results were almost identical to those in the literature. Angular results were significantly lower than those obtained with the series of plates. By contrast, data on infections called for caution and some nails produced excellent angular results when nail fixation was stable. In the light of these results, codified indications for locked centro-medullary nailing should be extended to the fractures of the lower quarter of the leg, provided that stable fixation using double screw distal locking and primary osteosynthesis of distal fibula fractures are performed.

  17. Locking compression plate distal ulna hook plate fixation versus intramedullary screw fixation for displaced avulsion fifth Metatarsal Base fractures: a comparative retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Lin; Guo, Xin; Zhang, Shu-Jun; Fang, Zhen-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Background Intramedullary screw (IMS) fixation was wildly used in fifth metatarsal base fractures (FMBFs) and the results were satisfactory. However, in the comminuted osteoporosis or small displaced avulsion FMBFs, anatomical reduction and stable fixation could not be achieved with IMS. The Locking Compression Plate (LCP) distal ulna hook plate fixation was a novel alternative fixation method. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to determine if LCP distal ulna hook plate fixation ...

  18. Antegrade nailing of femoral shaft fractures combined with neck or distal femur fractures. A retrospective review of 25 cases, with a follow-up of 36-150 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okcu, Güvenir; Aktuglu, Kemal

    2003-12-01

    Complex femoral fractures pose considerable therapeutic challenges to orthopedic surgeons. We present a retrospective review of 25 patients with complex femoral fractures treated with intramedullary locked nailing and supplemental screw fixation. Fifteen patients with ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures (group 1) and 10 patients with ipsilateral femoral shaft and distal femur fractures (group 2) were treated from 1990 to 1998. High-energy injuries occurred in all patients. There were 4 open fractures. Antegrade, locked nailing of diaphyseal fractures was performed in all cases. Supplemental screws for the neck were used in all patients in group 1 and in 3 patients in group 2. All of the fractures united during the follow-up. Five patients in group 1 underwent reoperation (33.3%): one due to a delayed union, the second due to an implant failure, the third due to a nonunion of a neck fracture, and the last two because of an initially missed femoral neck fracture. None of the patients in group 2 underwent reoperation. Angular malalignment of the shaft was found in 6 fractures in group 1 (average 4.8 degree, range 3 degree-11 degree) and in 4 fractures in group 2 (average 6 degree, range 3 degree-12 degree). Shortening of the limb occurred in 3 patients in group 1 (average 1.4 cm, range 1-1.8) and in 1 patient in group 2 (2 cm). Loss of fixation was seen in 1 patient in each group. Avascular necrosis and infection were not seen in any case in both groups. Femoral intramedullary nails with antegrade or retrograde options for insertion and different locking possibilities have extended the indications to include both diaphyseal and metaphyseal fractures. New nail designs, usually more expensive than the conventional nails, have been introduced into the market for this purpose. One has to keep in mind that antegrade, locked nailing of femoral shaft fractures combined with neck or distal femur fractures is a technically demanding but efficacious procedure. The

  19. Postoperative malrotation of humeral shaft fracture after plating compared with intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Manyi; Huang, Lei; Huang, Qiang

    2011-09-01

    We supposed difference of rotation alignment of postoperative humeral shaft fracutres between open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) and intramedullay nailing (IMN) could be identified and the difference might influence the involved shoulder. This study evaluated and compared the extent of malrotation and shoulder function after humeral shaft fractures treated operatively with IMN or ORIF. Fifty humeral shaft fractures were randomly allocated into 2 groups. Group I underwent antegrade IMN and group II underwent ORIF. Malrotation was measured postoperatively by computed tomography scan (CT). Fracture union and functional outcomes were recorded at 12 months. The final analysis comprised 45 patients. Group I had lower functional scores than group II (P shaft fracture. The study can provide baseline data for larger series and longer follow-up periods. Patients who underwent IMN had lower functional scores and a decreased range of motion postoperatively and also had a greater degree of malrotation than the ORIF group, which had none. The degree of malrotation correlated with a decreased range of motion and may possibly be a reason for degenerative arthritis at long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Treatment of two-part fractures of the surgical neck of the humerus using a locked metaphyseal intramedullary nail proximally with angular stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Viecili

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the functional results from patients with surgical neck fractures treated with a locked metaphyseal intramedullary nail and angular stability.METHODS: Twenty-two patients between the ages of 21 and 69 years were evaluated prospectively between January 2010 and January 2011. Their time taken for consolidation, age, sex, complications and functional results were correlated using the modified protocol of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA.RESULTS: The mean time taken for consolidation was 9.26 weeks ± confidence interval (CI of 0.40 weeks. One case (4.5% did not become consolidated. There were no cases of infection. There was one case (4.5% of adhesive capsulitis with good evolution through clinical treatment. Five patients (22.7% presented occasional mild pain and one case (4.5% reported medium-intensity pain associated with the subacromial impact of the implant. The mean score on the modified UCLA scale was 30.4 ± CI 1.6 points, obtained at the end of 12 weeks of evaluation: 18 cases (81.8% with "excellent" and "good" scores, three cases (13.6% with "fair" scores and one case (4.5% with a "poor" score.CONCLUSION: In the group of patients evaluated, treatment of two-part surgical neck fractures by means of a locked metaphyseal intramedullary nail and angular stability demonstrated satisfactory functional results and a low complication rate, similar to what is seen in the literature.

  1. Can fluoroscopy-based computer navigation improve entry point selection for intramedullary nailing of femur fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookshank, Meghan C; Edwards, Max R; Sellan, Michael; Whyne, Cari M; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2014-09-01

    The entry point is crucial to an accurate reduction in femoral nailing. Fluoroscopy-based navigation was developed to aid in reducing femur fractures and selecting entry points. We asked: (1) Can the piriformis fossa (PF) and tip of the greater trochanter (TT) be identified with high reproducibility? (2) What is the range of nonneutral images clinically acceptable for entry point selection? (3) Does navigation improve accuracy and precision of landmarking the TT and PF? And (4) does off-angle fluoroscopy within the acceptable range affect landmark accuracy? Three orthopaedic surgeons digitized the PF and TT under direct visualization on 10 cadaveric femurs, quantifying the reproducibility of the targeted PF and TT landmarks. Arcs of acceptable AP and lateral images of each femur were acquired in increments of 5° with a C-arm. An experienced orthopaedic surgeon rejected or accepted images for entry point selection by qualitatively assessing the relative positions and sizes of the greater trochanter, lesser trochanter, and femoral neck. Entry points were identified on each image using fluoroscopy and navigation. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to compare accuracy and precision between navigation and fluoroscopy and the effects of image angle. A 29° average arc of acceptable images was found. Reproducibility of the target landmarks for the PF and TT under direct visualization was excellent. Navigation had similar accuracy to fluoroscopy for PF localization but less for TT. Navigation increased precision compared to fluoroscopy for both PF and TT. Image angle affected accuracy of the PF and TT under fluoroscopy and navigation. Nonorthogonal images reduce accuracy of PF and TT identification with both navigation and fluoroscopy. Navigation increased precision but decreased accuracy and cannot overcome inaccuracies induced by nonorthogonal images.

  2. Subtrochanteric and Distal Femur Fractures in a Patient with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was an improvement of the preinjury function attributed to the osteotomy of the femoral diaphyseal, which alleviated the anterior thigh discomfort. Keywords: Amputation, Distal femur fracture, Femoral shaft fracture, Femur, Femur fractures, Fracture fixation, Fracture malunion, Fractures, Intramedullary nail, Knee ...

  3. Short-Term Radiographic Outcome After Distal Chevron Osteotomy for Hallux Valgus Using Intramedullary Plates With an Amended Algorithm for the Surgical Management of Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takumi; Gross, Christopher E; Parekh, Selene G

    2018-03-01

    Distal Chevron osteotomy is a well-established surgical procedure for mild to moderate hallux valgus deformity. Many methods have been described for fixation of osteotomy site; secure fixation, enabling large displacement of the metatarsal head, is one of the essentials of this procedure. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the short-term radiographic outcome of a distal Chevron osteotomy using an intramedullary plate for the correction of hallux valgus deformity. The present study evaluated 37 patients (40 feet) who underwent distal Chevron osteotomy using an intramedullary plate by periodic radiographs obtained preoperatively and at 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively. Correction of the hallux valgus angle averaged 17.8°, intermetatarsal angle 7.4°, distal metatarsal articular angle 2.7°, and sesamoid position 1.4 stages at 3 months postoperatively. The average lateral shift of the capital fragment was 6.5 mm. All patients achieved bone union, and there were no cases of dislocation, displacement, or avascular necrosis of the metatarsal head fragment. In conclusion, a distal Chevron osteotomy using an intramedullary plate was a favorable method for the correction of mild to moderate hallux valgus deformity. Level IV: Case series.

  4. Clinical results of trochanteric fractures treated with the TARGON® proximal femur intramedullary nailing fixation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawatani, Yosuke; Nishida, Kimiaki; Anraku, Yoshihisa; Kunitake, Katsuhiko; Tsutsumi, Yasujiro

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of 352 (71 males) patients with trochanteric fractures that were treated with the TARGON® PF nail. The mean age was 83 years. According to the Jensen classification, there were 35 cases in type 1,94 cases in type 2,75 in type 3,63 in type 4 and 85 in type 5. Postoperative all patients were allowed to fully weight bear from the first postoperative day. Clinical and radiological data were collected at regular time intervals. The average waiting time to surgical reconstruction for the 352 cases was 3.5 days (1-7). The mean length of hospital stay was 14 days (5-22). The operative times ranged from 11 to 125 minutes with an average time of 32 minutes. Fifty percent of the patients regained their mobility to their pre-injury level at the final follow up. Out of 310 patients (88%) who were available for radiographie assessment, all fractures united except one case. 300 (85%) of the lag screws were placed in the inferior area in the anteroposterior view and in the central area in the lateral view (IM), which is regarded as the optimal position. The lag screws back-slided between 0 and 19 mms with an average of 6 mm. Sliding distance of the lag screw for over 10 mm was seen in 42 cases (13%). Varus collapse of the femoral head-and-neck greater than 10° was observed in 6 cases. Postoperative complications developed in 6 cases (1.7%), including wound infection in two cases, and secondary fracture at the subtrochanteric region, nonunion, back-out of the guiding sleeve and medial perforation of the lag screw, each in one case. The presented case series indicates that the TARGON® PF system is an effective and safe internal fixation device for trochanteric proximal femoral fractures. Further, prospective comparative evidence regarding the use of this system is needed to analyse and validate the presented clinical impression of our centre. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of intramedullary nails composed of a new β-type Ti-Nb-Sn alloy with low Young's modulus on fracture healing in mouse tibiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Hirokazu; Mori, Yu; Kogure, Atsushi; Tanaka, Hidetatsu; Kamimura, Masayuki; Masahashi, Naoya; Hanada, Shuji; Itoi, Eiji

    2018-01-23

    The influence of Young's moduli of materials on the fracture healing process remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the effects of intramedullary nails composed of materials with low Young's moduli on fracture repair. We previously developed a β-type Ti-Nb-Sn alloy with low Young's modulus close to that of human cortical bone. Here, we prepared two Ti-Nb-Sn alloys with Young's moduli of 45 and 78 GPa by heat treatment, and compared their effects on fracture healing. Fracture and nailing were performed in the right tibiae of C57BL/6 mice. The bone healing process was evaluated by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), histomorphometry, and RT-PCR. We found larger bone volumes of fracture callus in the mice treated with the 45-GPa Ti-Nb-Sn alloy as compared with the 78-GPa Ti-Nb-Sn alloy in micro-CT analyses. This was confirmed with histology at day 14, with accelerated new bone formation and cartilage absorption in the 45-GPa Ti-Nb-Sn group compared with the 78-GPa Ti-Nb-Sn group. Acp5 expression was lower in the 45-GPa Ti-Nb-Sn group than in the 78-GPa Ti-Nb-Sn group at day 10. These findings indicate that intramedullary fixation with nails with a lower Young's modulus offer a greater capacity for fracture repair. Our 45-GPa Ti-Nb-Sn alloy is a promising material for fracture treatment implants. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Femoral Medialization, Fixation Failures, and Functional Outcome in Trochanteric Hip Fractures Treated With Either a Sliding Hip Screw or an Intramedullary Nail From Within a Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretherton, Christopher P; Parker, Martyn J

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if femoral medialization influences residual pain and mobility and to determine if fixation method or fracture pattern influences the tendency to medialize. This study used data from within a randomized controlled trial. Peterborough City Hospital, UK. Eight hundred forty-four patients presenting with a trochanteric hip fracture were randomized. Five hundred thirty-eight were available for 1-year follow-up. Fractures were classified according to OTA/AO classification as 31 A1, A2, and A3. Randomized to fixation with a Targon proximal femoral nail or sliding hip screw (SHS). Femoral medialization was calculated from follow-up x-rays at a minimum of 28 days post-fixation. Pain and mobility scores were assessed at 1 year by an independent blinded observer. Fixation failure and revision procedures were assessed at a minimum of 1 year from injury. Patients with >50% medialization had worse pain (P = 0.012) and mobility scores (P = 0.013) at 1 year. They also had more fracture healing complications (P = 0.021) and required more revision procedures (P = 0.014). Fractures treated with SHS were more likely to medialize >50% compared with intramedullary nail (P fractures were more likely to medialize, and A3 fractures were more likely to undergo >50% medialization (P fractures treated with SHS to undergo femoral medialization and correlates this with worse functional outcomes. It supports the use of intramedullary nails for A3 fractures, which have a significant tendency to medialize. Prognostic level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  7. Histopathological examination of bone debris from reaming of interlocking intra-medullary nail fixation of long bone fractures with concomitant head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khallaf, Fathy G; Kehinde, Elijah O

    2015-12-01

    The aim of study was to test, for the presence of osteoblasts in the reaming debris of intramedullary nailing of femoral and tibial fracture in patients with and without severe head injury. Two groups of patients were studied. Group A (n = 32) had long bone fractures in addition to having head injuries. Group B (n = 35) had only long bone fractures. The fractures in the 2 groups of patients was treated by inter medullary nailing. Osteoblasts in the debris of the inter medullary nailing was compared between the 2 groups of patients. The results demonstrated that histopathological specimens from reaming debris of fractured femur and tibia in patients with head injury showed osteoblasts in (82.9%) and in (27.5%) of patients with isolated long bone fractures (p fractures and concomitant head injury confirm fast and adequate healing in these patients and the presence of plenty of osteoblasts in their reaming debris may reflect a proof of accelerated fracture healing environment.

  8. Outcome of Distal Both Bone Leg Fractures Fixed by Intramedulary Nail for Fibula & MIPPO in Tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Gupta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Fractures of the distal third of the tibia are mostly associated with a fibular fracture that often requires fixation. The preferred treatment of distal tibial fracture is the minimally invasive percutaneous plate osteosynthesis  (MIPPO procedure. However, there are no clear cut guidelines on fixation of the fibular fracture and currently most orthopedic surgeons use a plate osteosynthesis for the fibula as well. A common complication associated with dual plating is an increased chance of soft tissue necrosis, infection, and in some cases resulting in an exposed implant. We conducted a prospective study to analyze the results of fractures of the distal in both leg bones managed by the MIPPO procedure for tibial fractures and a rush nail for fibular fractures.  Methods:  The study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital from November 2012 to May 2014, a total of 30 fractures in 30 patients (18 males, 12 females with a mean age of 42.4 years (26-60 years were treated in our institution in the aforesaid time period with MIPPO for tibia and rush nail for fibular fractures. All the cases were operated on by a single surgeon in emergency within 24 hours. The patients with skin blistering and compound fractures were excluded from this study. Rehabilitative measures were proceeded as per patient’s pain profile, isometric and isotonic exercises were started on the first post-operative day, with full weight bearing at 10-12 weeks after assessing clinical and radiological union. Regular follow up of patients was done, radiographs were taken at the immediate post-operative period and at 3, 6, 12 and 24 weeks.  Results:  All the patients were available for regular follow up. Radiological and clinical union proceeded normally in all the patients, no patients had signs of any deep infection, delayed union or nonunion, three patients had a superficial infection of the tibial incision that healed with a change in

  9. [Intramedullary stabilisation of metastatic fractures of long bones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatek, S; Westphal, T; Bischoff, J; Schubert, S; Holmenschlager, F; Winckler, S

    2003-02-01

    Surgical treatment of metastatic fractures of long bones is mostly a palliative one. Intramedullary stabilisation without resection of metastases follows the aim of the palliative therapy concept. From 01.01.1995 to 30.08.2001 36 manifest and 4 impending long bone fractures were registered in 22 female and 16 male patients, with a mean age of 63 years. In addition, one revision was necessary due to persisting instability after humeral intramedullary bundle nailing. Pathological fractures were found in the humerus (n=11), femoral neck (n=6), per- and subtrochanteric region (n=12), femoral shaft (n=10) and tibia (n=2). Most of them were malignancies of the kidneys (n=13), bronchi (n=7) and breast (n=6). One patient with a solitary metastasis in the humerus received curative treatment by resection, open reduction and internal fixation. All other cases underwent palliative stabilisation. Metastatic lesions of the femoral neck were treated by resection and prosthetic replacement. The remaining fractures were stabilized intramedullarily without resection of metastases or use of bone cement. In 9 cases, a locking nail was implanted in the humerus, and one patient received humeral bundle nailing. In the lower extremities, we used a classic-nail or gamma-nail in 15 and a locking nail in 8 cases. Two moribund patients did not undergo surgery. No intraoperative complications occurred. 63 % of the patients with stabilisation of the leg were able to walk at the time of discharge. The mean survival time (Kaplan-Meier) of patients after palliative operation amounted to 161.5 days (95 % CI 92.7; 230.3). We found 6 postoperative complications: temporary palsy of the radial nerve (n=1), soft tissue infection (n=1), dislocation of the nail (n=2), loosening of the distal locking screw (n=1), proceeding osteolysis with high fracture risk (n=1). Intramedullary stabilisation without resection of metastases using locking nails meets the requirements of palliative therapy. This procedure

  10. Distal tibial fractures: evaluation of different fixation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöstl, Julian; Tiefenböck, Thomas Manfred; Hofbauer, Marcus; Winnisch, Markus; Lang, Nikolaus; Hajdu, Stefan; Sarahrudi, Kambiz

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was the comparison of the most commonly used surgical techniques (external fixation, intramedullary nailing, and plate fixation) for the treatment of distal tibial fractures (AO/OTA classification 42-A, B, C or 43-A, B1). A retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent surgical treatment for distal tibial fractures between 1992 and 2011 was performed. A total of 93 patients (52 male/41 female) met inclusion criteria. Statistically significant differences were found regarding the consolidation time of the intramedullary-nailing (147.32 ± 91.16 days) and the plate-fixation group (135.75 ± 110.75 days) versus the external-fixation group (163.12 ± 96.79 days; P = 0.001; P = 0.01). Significant differences were also observed in the range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint in the intramedullary-nailing and plate-fixation group versus the ROM in the external-fixation group (P = 0.044; P = 0.025). The overall complication rate was 13/93 (14 %). Out of 66 patients treated with intramedullary nailing, 8 (12 %) suffered from complications. Out of the 15 patients treated with plate and 12 patients with external fixation, 2 (13 %) and 3 (25 %) showed complications, respectively. Our results demonstrate advantages in terms of shorter mobilization time and a better ROM of the ankle joint for intramedullary nailing and plate fixation compared with external fixation. Due to our results, we suggest internal fixation (intramedullary nailing or plate fixation) whenever patient's condition and the local fracture situation allow it.

  11. Staged protocol for the treatment of chronic femoral shaft osteomyelitis with Ilizarov's technique followed by the use of intramedullary locked nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Po-Hsin; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Su, Yu-Pin; Chiang, Chao-Ching; Chang, Ming-Chau; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2017-06-01

    Infected nonunion of the femoral shaft is uncommon, and usually presents with challenging therapeutic and reconstructive problems. There are still controversies over treating infected nonunion of the femoral shaft. The purposes of this retrospective study were to review the treatment outcomes and describe a staged protocol for spontaneous wound healing. Six patients with chronic femoral shaft infected-nonunion from October 2002 to September 2010 were included in this retrospective study. Serial plain films and triple films of lower legs were performed to evaluate the alignment of the treated femoral shaft and bony union following our staged protocol of Ilizarov distraction osteogenesis and intramedullary nailing. An average bone defect of 7 cm was noted after staged osteotomy. Mean follow-up was 87.5 (range, 38-133) months. Union was achieved in all six patients, with an average external fixation time of 6.8 (range, 5-11) months. There was no reinfection. One complication of a 4-cm leg discrepancy was noted, with an initial shortening of 15 cm. The mean knee ranges of motion (ROM) before staged protocols and at final follow-up were 64.2±8.6 (range, 60-75)° and 53.3±9.3 (range, 40-65)°, respectively. The ROM at the knee joint statistically decreased following staged protocols. In the treatment of chronic femur osteomyelitis, the staged protocol of Ilizarov distraction osteogenesis followed by intramedullary nailing was safe and successful, and allowed for union, realignment, reorientation, and leg-length restoration. With regard to the soft tissue, this technique provides a unique type of reconstructive closure for infected wounds. It is suggested that the staged protocol is reliable in providing successful simultaneous reconstruction for bone and soft tissue defects without flap coverage. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  12. Utilization of the bicipital groove axis for confirming alignment of the humerus with transepicondylar and ulnar shaft axes during intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriç, Gökhan; Zeybek, Gülşah; Kıray, Amaç; Atik, Aziz; Budeyri, Aydın; Koşay, Can

    2015-01-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the preferred surgical treatment of humerus shaft fractures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the bicipital groove and specific anatomical landmarks in achieving correct alignment of the humerus during intramedullary nailing, and to describe these anatomical landmarks. Thirty (15 right; 15 left) total upper cadaver extremities were used in this study. After the anatomical landmarks were identified and marked, humeral head axis, transepicondylar axis, ulnar shaft axis, bicipital groove axis, and angular measurements of these were obtained. The mean angle between the bicipital groove axis and transepicondylar axis was 48.17°±12.35º (range: 20.10º to 74.6º). The mean angle between the bicipital groove axis and ulna diaphysis axis was 41.82º±11.56 º (range: 17.91º to 68.27º). The mean angle between the humeral head axis and bicipital groove axis was 20.53°±3.90º (range: 11.85º to 31.81º). The mean retroversion angle between the humeral head axis and transepicondylar axis was 27.52±11.37º (range: 4.26º to 49.36º). The mean angle between the humeral head axis and ulna diaphysis axis was 61.73º±12.08º (range: 33.97º to 86.37º). The mean torsion angle was 62.58º±11.28 º (range: 40.74º to 85.74º). Measurement and utilization of the relationship between the bicipital groove, ulna diaphysis and transepicondylar axes may be used for restoring humeral rotation.

  13. Intramedullary Nail Fixation of Atypical Femur Fractures With Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate Leads to Faster Union: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovy, Andrew J; Kim, Jun S; Di Capua, John; Somani, Sulaiman; Shim, Stephanie; Keswani, Aakash; Hasija, Rohit; Wu, Yangguan; Joseph, David; Ghillani, Richard

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) use in the treatment of AFF. Retrospective case control. Level 1 trauma center. Complete AFF, defined according to American Society of Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) criteria, from September 2009 to April 2015 with minimum 1-year follow-up. Operative treatment with antegrade intramedullary nails. Beginning June 2014, BMAC from the ipsilateral iliac crest was added to all AFFs. Time to union as determined by a blinded panel of 3 attending orthopaedic surgeons, union rates, complications. Thirty-five patients with 36 AFFs were reviewed, of which 33 AFFs were included and 11 received BMAC. Alendronate was the most commonly prescribed bisphosphonate, with a similar mean duration of use in controls and BMAC cases (5.6 versus 6 years, P = 0.79). BMAC use significantly decreased time to union (3.5 versus 6.8 months, P = 0.004). Varus malreduction was associated with a significant delay in union (9.7 versus 4.7 months, P = 0.04). Overall, 1 year union rate was 86.2% and nonsignificantly higher in BMAC compared with controls (100.0% versus 77.3%, P = 0.11). Multivariate analysis revealed BMAC and varus malreduction as independent predictors of time to union. There were no complications related to BMAC use. Our findings support intramedullary nailing of AFFs as an effective treatment option with a low surgical complication rate and highlight the importance of avoiding varus malreduction. BMAC use significantly reduced time to fracture union without an increase in surgical complication rates. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  14. Management of Nonunited Talar Fractures With Avascular Necrosis by Resection of Necrotic Bone, Bone Grafting, and Fusion With an Intramedullary Nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Ella, Mohamed Mokhtar; Galhoum, Ahmed; Abdelrahman, Amr Farouk; Walther, Markus

    2017-08-01

    The presence of nonunion of a talar fracture with displacement, together with complete avascular necrosis, is a challenging entity to treat. Twelve patients, 8 men (66.7%) and 4 women (33.3%), with nonunited talar fractures and extensive avascular necrosis of the talus were included. The average age was 27.7 years (range, 19-38 years). After exclusion of infection, the patients underwent resection of necrotic bone, bulk autograft, and fusion using an intramedullary nail. The posterior approach was used in 11 patients and the anterior approach in 1 patient. The primary outcome was solid osseous union at the ankle and subtalar level and between the talar head anteriorly and the posterior construct, as evidenced by computed tomographic examination. Functional assessment was performed with the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society score and subjective patient satisfaction Results: After a mean follow-up duration of 23 months (range, 12-60 months), solid osseous union was achieved in 8 patients (66.7%). Stable fibrous union was seen in 1 patient (8.3%). Three patients (25%) required reoperation, and osseous fusion was finally achieved. American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society score improved from a mean of 39.3 (range, 12-56) preoperatively to 76.6 (range, 62-86) at last follow-up. Subjective patient satisfaction was graded good or excellent in all cases. Resection of necrotic talar body and bulk autograft with tibiotalocalcaneal fusion by an intramedullary nail through a posterior approach was a reasonable option for the management of type IV posttraumatic talar deformity. Level IV, case series.

  15. Subtrochanteric Femoral Fracture during Trochanteric Nailing for the Treatment of Femoral Shaft Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Ho Hyun; Oh, Chi Hun; Yi, Ju Won

    2013-01-01

    We report on three cases of subtrochanteric femoral fractures during trochanteric intramedullary nailing for the treatment of femoral shaft fractures. Trochanteric intramedullary nails, which have a proximal lateral bend, are specifically designed for trochanteric insertion. When combined with the modified insertion technique, trochanteric intramedullary nails reduce iatrogenic fracture comminution and varus malalignment. We herein describe technical aspects of trochanteric intramedullary nai...

  16. Revision of a nonunited subtrochanteric femoral fracture around a failed intramedullary nail with the use of RIA products, BMP-7 and hydroxyapatite: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsiridis Eleftherios

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Femoral subtrochanteric fractures are commonly treated using intramedullary devices. Failure of the implant and subsequent nonunion is still an issue, however, and limited evidence exists regarding the most appropriate treatment. Case presentation We report the case of an 80-year-old Caucasian woman with a subtrochanteric fracture originally treated using a trochanteric gamma nail which failed, resulting in a nonunion and fracture of its proximal end. The nonunion was revised with the removal of the broken trochanteric gamma nail, application of a condylar blade plate, ipsilateral Reamer/Irrigator/Aspirator autografting, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-7 and injectable hydroxyapatite cement. The fracture united fully at ten months following revision surgery, with no signs of femoral head avascular necrosis at 18-month follow-up. Conclusion The essential requirements for success when revising a nonunited fracture are to provide anatomical reduction, mechanical stability, bone defect augmentation and biological stimulation to achieve healing. Current advances in molecular biology, such as recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-7, and biotechnology such as the Reamer/Irrigator/Aspirator system and hydroxyapatite injectable cement can improve patient outcomes over the use of our traditional revision techniques.

  17. Displaced tibia shaft fractures in children treated by elastic stable intramedullary nailing: results and complications in children weighing 50 kg (110 lb) or more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marengo, Lorenza; Paonessa, Matteo; Andreacchio, Antonio; Dimeglio, Alain; Potenza, Alberto; Canavese, Federico

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of displaced tibia shaft fractures in children weighing 50 kg (110 lb) or more treated by elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN). Translation, sagittal and coronal angulations were assessed on plain radiographs in all the patients. Twenty-six out of 106 patients met the inclusion criteria. The average patient age at the time of injury was 13.5 ± 1.3 years (range 11.3-16.1). The mean patient weight was 57 ± 8 kg (range 50-80). This study demonstrates that the use of ESIN for displaced tibia shaft fractures in children and adolescents weighing 50 kg (110 lb) or more, or older than 13 years of age, is not contraindicated. In contrast to data in femoral shaft fractures, we did not find poorer outcomes in older or heavier patients. No correlation between nail size/medullary canal diameter ratio and outcome was observed.

  18. Individual risk factors for deep infection and compromised fracture healing after intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures: a single centre experience of 480 patients.

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    Metsemakers, W-J; Handojo, K; Reynders, P; Sermon, A; Vanderschot, P; Nijs, S

    2015-04-01

    Despite modern advances in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures, complications including nonunion, malunion, and infection remain relatively frequent. A better understanding of these injuries and its complications could lead to prevention rather than treatment strategies. A retrospective study was performed to identify risk factors for deep infection and compromised fracture healing after intramedullary nailing (IMN) of tibial shaft fractures. Between January 2000 and January 2012, 480 consecutive patients with 486 tibial shaft fractures were enrolled in the study. Statistical analysis was performed to determine predictors of deep infection and compromised fracture healing. Compromised fracture healing was subdivided in delayed union and nonunion. The following independent variables were selected for analysis: age, sex, smoking, obesity, diabetes, American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) classification, polytrauma, fracture type, open fractures, Gustilo type, primary external fixation (EF), time to nailing (TTN) and reaming. As primary statistical evaluation we performed a univariate analysis, followed by a multiple logistic regression model. Univariate regression analysis revealed similar risk factors for delayed union and nonunion, including fracture type, open fractures and Gustilo type. Factors affecting the occurrence of deep infection in this model were primary EF, a prolonged TTN, open fractures and Gustilo type. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed polytrauma as the single risk factor for nonunion. With respect to delayed union, no risk factors could be identified. In the same statistical model, deep infection was correlated with primary EF. The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors of poor outcome after IMN of tibial shaft fractures. The univariate regression analysis showed that the nature of complications after tibial shaft nailing could be multifactorial. This was not confirmed in a multiple logistic regression model, which

  19. The effect of intact fibula on functional outcome of reamed intramedullary interlocking nail in open and closed isolated tibial shaft fractures: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, S Muthukumar; Chandra, P Madhu; Devadoss, Sathish; Devadoss, A

    2016-01-01

    Isolated tibial shaft (ITS) fracture with intact fibula is a common injury but records often fail to mention it. Our primary aim was to study the effect of the intact fibula in ITS fractures in closed and open injuries and that these fractures can unite without a primary fibulectomy. 56 patients who sustained an ITS fracture with an intact fibula who underwent closed or open reduction and reamed intramedullary interlocking nailing (IM IL nail) for closed and open fractures between August 2008 and April 2014 were included in this study. Four patients were lost to followup. One patient died due to causes not related to the surgery. At the time of final followup, 51 patients with 51 ITS fractures were available for the analysis. There were 33 closed and 18 open fractures. Patients were followed up at 4 weekly intervals until radiological signs of union were noted. They were assessed for functional outcome using the IOWA knee and ankle score systems at the time of final followup. The average time to union was 19.7 weeks. Closed fractures united in 17.7 weeks as compared to 23.5 weeks for open fractures (P fractures failed to unite (2 open). The functional outcome as per the knee score and ankle score evaluation system was 93.13 and 92.54, respectively. The knee scores were 93.81 and 91.8 for closed and open ITS fractures, respectively (P > 0.05). Similarly, the ankle scores were 94.96 and 88.1 for closed and open ITS fractures, respectively (P fracture with intact fibula is a common occurrence, and they can be treated safely with reamed IM nailing that provides good union rates and the excellent functional result even in open fractures.

  20. Distal femoral flexion deformity from growth disturbance treated with a two-level osteotomy and internal lengthening nail

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    Austin T. Fragomen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salter Harris fractures of the distal femur can lead to growth disturbance with resulting leg length inequality and knee deformity. We have looked at a case series (3 of patients who presented with a distal femur flexion malunion and shortening treated with a distal femoral osteotomy and plating and a proximal femoral osteotomy with a magnetic internal lengthening nail. Does a two-level osteotomy and internal fixation approach provide a reliable result both radiographically and functionally? The average knee extension loss was 12°, LLD 47 mm, PDFA 65°, MAD 2 mm. The patients were treated with an acute, posterior, opening wedge osteotomy of the distal femur stabilized with a lateral plate and screws and grafted with cancellous chips and putty. A second osteotomy was made proximally in the femur percutaneously, and the internal lengthening nail was inserted. Lengthening was done at approximately 1 mm/day. The average extension gain was 12°; amount of lengthening at the proximal site was 40 mm, LLD was 3 mm. The average PDFA was 81°, and MAD 3 mm. There were no complications. Functional results were excellent. Bone healing index was 24 days/cm. The average distance from the distal osteotomy to the joint line was 57 mm. The technique of two-level femur osteotomy stabilized with a plate and lengthening nail yielded excellent results with acceptable correction of deformity, full knee extension, and improved function. There were no complications including implant failure, infection, need for blood transfusion, knee stiffness, nonunion, compartment syndrome, or malunion.

  1. [Treatment of Tibial Shaft Fractures with the Stable Angle Tibial Nail Targon TX].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielnicki, M; Prokop, A

    2016-10-01

    Tibial shaft fractures are among the most common long bone fractures in humans. The incidence is 1-2 per 100,000. The gold standard of treatment for AO type 42 A-C fractures is a locking intramedullary nail. The development of new implants has extended the indications for this minimally invasive technique, so that now AO types 41 and 43 can also be treated with special nails. Fixed-angle screw anchors increase primary stability and supplemental locking devices located proximally and distally extend the spectrum of use to metaphyseal fractures. The cannulated Targon TX titanium nail can be introduced, either with or without reaming. Using an operative video, the treatment of a tibial fracture with an intramedullary nail is demonstrated in stages and the operative steps further illustrated on artificial bone. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. [The results of the treatment of tibia shaft fractures in relation to the method of intramedullary nailing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bołtuć, Witold; Golec, Edward

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the results of treatment of tibial shaft fracture related to the method of intramedullary union with or without reaming of the marrow cavity. The clinical material was obtained from the traumatic-orthopaedic surgery department and rehabilitation department of the County Hospital in Dabrowa Tarnowska. A group of 128 patients treated with intramedullary blocking stabilization was evaluated. The clinical, radiological and functional indicators were assessed. The results of the study showed that the method of surgical union of tibial shaft fracture with the reaming of the marrow cavity was more favourable with regard to the assessed clinical and radiological parameters, complications concerning synostosis, infections and deviations of the long axis. The functional results were dependent, to a large degree, on the patients' age, and to some degree on the adopted operational technique.

  3. Novel management of distal tibial and fibular fractures with Acumed fibular nail and minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tie-Jun; Ju, Wei-Na; Qi, Bao-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Anatomical characteristics, such as subcutaneous position and minimal muscle cover, contribute to the complexity of fractures of the distal third of the tibia and fibula. Severe damage to soft tissue and instability ensure high risk of delayed bone union and wound complications such as nonunion, infection, and necrosis. Patient concerns: This case report discusses management in a 54-year-old woman who sustained fractures of the distal third of the left tibia and fibula, with damage to overlying soft tissue (swelling and blisters). Plating is accepted as the first choice for this type of fracture as it ensures accurate reduction and rigid fixation, but it increases the risk of complications. Diagnosis: Closed fracture of the distal third of the left tibia and fibula (AO: 43-A3). Interventions: After the swelling was alleviated, the patient underwent closed reduction and fixation with an Acumed fibular nail and minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis (MIPO), ensuring a smaller incision and minimal soft-tissue dissection. Outcomes: At the 1-year follow-up, the patient had recovered well and had regained satisfactory function in the treated limb. The Kofoed score of the left ankle was 95. Lessons: Based on the experience from this case, the operation can be undertaken safely when the swelling has been alleviated. The minimal invasive technique represents the best approach. Considering the merits and good outcome in this case, we recommend the Acumed fibular nail and MIPO technique for treatment of distal tibial and fibular fractures. PMID:28328865

  4. [Femoral nail osteosynthesis. Mechanical factors influencing the femoral antetorsion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citak, M; Kendoff, D; Citak, M; Gardner, M J; Oszwald, M; Krettek, C; Hüfner, T

    2008-04-01

    Antegrade or retrograde intramedullary nailing is a common and well established procedure for the treatment of femoral shaft fractures. One drawback of this technique is the high incidence of clinically relevant malalignment. Despite intra-operative and radiological improvements this problem has not yet been solved efficiently. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the mechanical influence on the antetorsion angle of intramedullary nails during and after interlocking in femoral shaft fractures. A mechanical instrument was developed allowing a defined torque to be administered to the distal femur fragment. As an optical measurement system for the assessment of the antetorsion angle, a navigation system was applied. Initially the influence of the interlocking mechanism of the nail on the antetorsion deviation was investigated. The distal interlocking hole was fixed free handed or by using a navigation system. The multidirectional movement of the distal femur fragment was documented. Furthermore, the influence of the rotational stability on the antetorsion angle after mechanical stress of 4 NM was investigated by measuring the remaining rotational capacity of the distal femur fragment. The average remaining rotational capacity of the distal femur fragment was 5.8 degrees after locking the nail by hand. The navigated locking resulted in a deviation of only 2 degrees , a significant difference compared to the free-hand procedure. The rotational stability under stress showed an average of 15.4 degrees deviation of the distal fragment. Even after complete interlocking of the intramedullary nail a 14.2 degrees rotational deviation was observed. It could be shown that mechanical stability as well as the interlocking itself of femoral nails have a relevant impact on the antetorsional angle of the femur. Potential sources of error of the femoral antetorsion angle can be caused by the interlocking process as well as by forced rotation of the femur after interlocking

  5. Use of a long distally fixed intramedullary stem to treat a periprosthetic femoral fracture following total hip arthroplasty using a thrust plate hip prosthesis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Hiroyuki; Motomura, Goro; Ikemura, Satoshi; Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Yusuke; Utsunomiya, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Nakashima, Yasuharu

    2017-01-01

    The thrust plate hip prosthesis (TPP; Zimmer, Winterthur, Switzerland) is a hip prosthesis that is no longer in production. Few reports have focused on periprosthetic fractures following total hip arthroplasty (THA) with the use of a TPP. We report a 57-year-old woman with a periprosthetic femoral fracture 13 years after THA with the use of a TPP. A plain radiograph showed a displaced subtrochanteric fracture of the right femur just below the distal tip of the lateral plate without implant loosening. She underwent revision surgery with a long distally fixed intramedullary stem in conjunction with a plate and cable system. Three months after surgery, bone union was confirmed using radiography and the patient was clinically asymptomatic. We encountered three major problems while planning surgical treatment, these being, discontinuation of the TPP system, loss of proximal femoral cancellous bone, and difficulties with the type of subtrochanteric fracture. After considering these problems, we planned revision surgery using a long distally fixed intramedullary stem in conjunction with a plate and cable system. This case shows that sufficient implant preparation based on precise preoperative planning is necessary to obtain good clinical results for the surgical treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures following THA with the use of a TPP. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Locking intramedullary nailing with and without reaming for open fractures of the tibial shaft. A prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, J F; O'Brien, P J; Blachut, P A; Meek, R N; Broekhuyse, H M

    1997-03-01

    Ninety-one patients who had ninety-four open fractures of the tibial shaft were randomized into two treatment groups. Fifty fractures (nine type-I, eighteen type-II, sixteen type-IIIA, and seven type-IIIB fractures, according to the classification of Gustilo et al.) were treated with nailing after reaming, and forty-four fractures (five type-I, sixteen type-II, nineteen type-IIIA, and four type-IIIB fractures) were treated with nailing without reaming. The average diameter of the nail was 11.5 millimeters (range, nine to fourteen millimeters) in the group treated with reaming and 9.2 millimeters (range, eight to ten millimeters) in the group treated without reaming. Follow-up information was adequate for forty-five patients (forty-seven fractures) who had been managed with reaming and forty patients (forty-one fractures) who had been managed without reaming. No clinically important differences were found between the two groups with regard to the technical aspects of the procedure or the rate of early postoperative complications. The average time to union was thirty weeks (range, thirteen to seventy-two weeks) in the group treated with reaming and twenty-nine weeks (range, thirteen to fifty weeks) in the group treated without reaming. Four (9 per cent) of the fractures treated with reaming and five (12 per cent) of the fractures treated without reaming did not unite (p = 0.73). There were two infections in the group treated with reaming and one in the group treated without reaming. Significantly more screws broke in the group treated without reaming (twelve; 29 per cent) than in the group treated with reaming (four; 9 per cent) (p = 0.014). There was no difference between the two groups with regard to the frequency of broken nails (two nails that had been inserted after reaming broke, compared with one that had been inserted without reaming). The functional outcome, in terms of pain in the knee, range of motion, return to work, and recreational activity, did not

  7. Complications of elastic stable intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures in children weighing fifty kilograms (one hundred and ten pounds) and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavese, Federico; Marengo, Lorenza; Andreacchio, Antonio; Mansour, Mounira; Paonessa, Matteo; Rousset, Marie; Samba, Antoine; Dimeglio, Alain

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess treatment outcomes in children weighing 50 kg (110 pounds) or more with displaced femur shaft fractures treated by elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) and to identify potential correlations between nail size/medullary canal diameter ratio and outcome. Twenty out of 117 consecutive children surgically treated by ESIN for displaced fractures of the femoral shaft with no associated neurovascular injury weighed 50 kg (110 pounds) or more. All patients underwent regular clinical and radiographic follow-up for at least one year after their index surgery. The average patient age at the time of injury was 13.1 years (25th and 75th interquartile range [IQR] = 11.7-14.5). The mean follow-up was 27.4 months (IQR = 18.4-36.8). Overall, nine (45 %) adverse events were observed. The rate of complications was higher among children weighting 55 kg and over (67 %) than in children weighing less than 55 kg (35 %) and among children aged 13 years old or older (72 %) than among children younger than 13 years old (11 %). Femoral shaft fractures in children and adolescents weighing 50 kg (110 pounds) and over and older than ten years of age have an increased rate of complications. Heavier patients have a greater chance of complications. In particular, patients younger than 13 years old and weighing less than 55 kg can be safely managed with ESIN, but older and heavier patients should preferably be treated with rigid fixation systems due to a greater complication rate. However, further studies are needed to consolidate the conclusions.

  8. Intramedullary nails versus sliding hip screws for AO/OTA 31-A2 trochanteric fractures in adults: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qianzheng; Xu, Xiaodong; Yang, Xi; Chen, Xingzuo; Wang, Liqiang; Liu, Chenggang; Lin, Peng

    2017-07-01

    The optimum treatment with intramedullary nails (IMN) or sliding hip screws (SHS) for type 31-A2 trochanteric fractures remains controversial. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to compare IMN with SHS in AO/OTA 31-A2 trochanteric fractures. Databases including PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase were searched to identify RCTs published before December 2016, which compared IMN with SHS for intraoperative and postoperative outcomes in AO/OTA 31-A2 trochanteric fractures. A total of 909 patients from six RCTs were subjected to the meta-analysis. The results showed that the IMN group was associated with less operative blood loss, leg shortening, wound infections, length of hospital stay, and days to mobilization with walking aids and also yielded a higher Parker score as compared to the SHS group. No significant difference was seen in the other parameters including operative details, fracture fixation complications, postoperative complications, and 1 year mortality. IMN fixation was found to be the superior treatment of choice for 31-A2 trochanteric fractures as compared with SHS fixation in our meta-analysis. The adverse effects appeared comparable between the two groups. However, due to the variations in the included studies, more large-sample, measures-unified, and high-quality RCTs are needed to validate these conclusions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Elastic stable intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures in children: Particularities and results at Sylvanus Olympio teaching hospital of Lomé, Togo

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    Akakpo-Numado Gamedzi Komlatsè

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN presently seems the best technique in the surgical treatment of femoral shaft fractures (FSF in >6-year-old children. We hereby report technical difficulties and therapeutic results after our first 8 years of experience. Patients and Methods: It′s a retrospective study over a period of 8 years from January 2005 to December 2012 in the Paediatric Surgery Department of Sylvanus Olympio Teaching Hospital of Lomé. Indications, technical particularities and results were studied. Results: There were 32 patients, 17 were boys and 15 were girls, with a mean age of 11 years old. The mean time to surgery was 21 days (range: 14 and 51 days. A callus was always removed before reduction. The osteosynthesis was stable in 22 cases, but in 10 others, it had been completed with a cast immobilisation. The operation needed a blood transfusion in 18 cases. With a mean follow-up of 3.5 years, the results were excellent in 29 patients (90.63% and good in 3 patients (9.37%. Conclusion: Although undertaking an ESIN can be difficult, due to the lack of adequate equipment the procedure produces satisfactory outcome.

  10. A STUDY OF EXCHANGE OF FAILED IMPLANT WITH INTRAMEDULLARY INTERLOCKING NAIL IN FRACTURES OF FEMUR AND TIBIA

    OpenAIRE

    Rapaka; Maheshwar; Gouru

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the fracture treatment is to achieve union with timely functional recovery. Internal fixation with adherence to strict biomechanical principles is often required to achieve this. However, a fixation device may fail to hold a redu ced fracture until union, giving rise to non - union or delayed union with implant failure. The aim of this study was to see the efficacy of exchange of failed implant with an intra - medullary interlocking nail. PATIENTS AND ...

  11. Unreamed intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures: operative technique and early clinical experience with the standard locking option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krettek, C; Rudolf, J; Schandelmaier, P; Guy, P; Könemann, B; Tscherne, H

    1996-05-01

    Nailing techniques have changed in recent years in ways which are not just limited to omitting the reaming process. These changes concern positioning patients, techniques of reduction and selecting implants. Techniques of approach and exposure have been modified to new, less-invasive procedures to fulfill technical, functional and cosmetic requirements. In addition, techniques have been developed to avoid fragment diastasis, rotational and sagittal malalignment, and leg-length discrepancy. Finally, simple algorithms have been elaborated for the management of specific fracture patterns (bilateral shaft fractures, ipsilateral tibial fractures or associated femoral neck fractures) and to determine the number and location of locking bolts. We developed these algorithms, techniques and procedures in a series of 133 femoral shafts, which were stabilized with the AO unreamed femoral nail (URFN) in a prospective study between 1991 and 1994. Of these, the first 57 cases with a mean follow-up of 17.9 months (range, 5-44) after injury were reviewed. Fractures were classified according to Müller's 1990 system: 12 type A, 29 type B and 16 type C. Closed soft-tissue injuries were classified by our classification of 1982: 17 type C 0/I, 42 type C II. Of 15 open fractures, six were OI, six OII, two OIIIA and one was OIIIB by Gustilo's classification of 1984. The major complications were two broken locking bolts, one nail breaking after 9 weeks, one case of osteitis and one of intra-operative lung embolism.

  12. Subtrochanteric femoral fracture during trochanteric nailing for the treatment of femoral shaft fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Ho Hyun; Oh, Chi Hun; Yi, Ju Won

    2013-09-01

    We report on three cases of subtrochanteric femoral fractures during trochanteric intramedullary nailing for the treatment of femoral shaft fractures. Trochanteric intramedullary nails, which have a proximal lateral bend, are specifically designed for trochanteric insertion. When combined with the modified insertion technique, trochanteric intramedullary nails reduce iatrogenic fracture comminution and varus malalignment. We herein describe technical aspects of trochanteric intramedullary nailing for femoral shaft fractures to improve its application and prevent implant-derived complications.

  13. Open fractures of the tibia treated by immediate intramedullary tibial nail insertion without reaming: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakar, S; Tornetta, P

    2007-03-01

    Does immediate tibial nail insertion without reaming as part of protocol-driven management provide a safe and effective treatment for open tibia fractures? Prospective cohort. Level 1 trauma center. A consecutive series of 161 patients with Gustilo grade I-IIIb open tibia fractures. Emergent incision and debridement of the wound with immediate tibial nail insertion without reaming, repeat incision and debridement, and soft-tissue coverage within 14 days. Time to union, number of secondary procedures performed to obtain union, implant failures, and the type and incidence of complications. One hundred and forty-three fractures were followed to union. Follow up averaged 2.2 years (0.6-5.5 years). Seventy-six fractures united in less than 6 months, 35 took between 6 and 9 months, and 32 took longer than 9 months. Twenty-five additional procedures were needed to obtain union in 16 of the delayed unions (12 nail exchanges, 4 bone grafts, 9 dynamizations). Complications included 3 patients with cellulitis, 1 superficial infection, 4 deep infections (1 grade I, 2 grade II, 1 grade IIIb), 3 loose screws, 2 broken screws, 5 malunions greater than 5 degrees, and 30 patients with decreased ankle motion when compared with the uninjured side. Not counting the ankle loss of motion, 18 complications occurred in 143 fractures (13%). Twenty-nine patients (20%) had complaints of minor knee pain and 30 (21%) had occasional fracture site pain after activity despite clinical and radiographic evidence of union. Eleven patients (8%) considered themselves completely disabled. Five patients were not treated by the standard protocol and are not included in the previously listed statistics; 3 were grade IIIB that did not have adequate coverage by 14 days, and 2 were grade II injuries that did not have a second debridement. Four of these 5 patients developed a complication. Protocol-driven management emphasizing meticulous soft-tissue management and the use of immediate tibial nailing without

  14. Do Cerclage Cables Delay the Time to Bone Union in Patients with an Unstable Humeral Shaft Fracture Treated with Intramedullary Nails?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Doo Hyung; Bang, Joon Young

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the time to bone union after open reduction and internal fixation with cerclage cables followed by intramedullary nailing (IMN) for unstable humeral shaft fractures. Patients with a humeral shaft fracture treated by IMN were enrolled. One group of patients was treated via open reduction and internal fixation with cables followed by IMN (cable group; n=32), while the other group was treated with a conventional closed IMN (non-cable group; n=64). The length of time to bone union and functional scores [Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) scores] were measured for all patients. No significant differences were found in terms of age, gender, injury type, or smoking history between the two groups, except for the type of fracture. The cable group had significantly more complex types of fracture than the non-cable group (punion was 3.9 months in the cable group, while in the non-cable group, it was 4.4 months (p=0.041). The incidence of postoperative complications, such as non-union, delayed union, and radial nerve palsy, was similar between the two groups (p>0.05). No differences were identified in terms of DASH and UCLA scores (28.8 and 32.1 in the cable group and 26.4 and 32.6 in the non-cable group, respectively; p=0.335 and 0.264). In unstable humeral shaft fractures treated by IMN, open reduction and internal fixation with additional cerclage cables do not delay the length of time to bone union or increase the rate of other complications. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  15. Intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures in polytraumatized patients. a longitudinal, prospective and observational study of the procedure-related impact on cardiopulmonary- and inflammatory responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husebye Elisabeth E

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early intramedullary nailing (IMN of long bone fractures in severely injured patients has been evaluated as beneficial, but has also been associated with increased inflammation, multi organ failure (MOF and morbidity. This study was initiated to evaluate the impact of primary femoral IMN on coagulation-, fibrinolysis-, inflammatory- and cardiopulmonary responses in polytraumatized patients. Methods Twelve adult polytraumatized patients with femoral shaft fractures were included. Serial blood samples were collected to evaluate coagulation-, fibrinolytic-, and cytokine activation in arterial blood. A flow-directed pulmonary artery (PA catheter was inserted prior to IMN. Cardiopulmonary function parameters were recorded peri- and postoperatively. The clinical course of the patients and complications were monitored and recorded daily. Results Mean Injury Severity Score (ISS was 31 ± 2.6. No procedure-related effect of the primary IMN on coagulation- and fibrinolysis activation was evident. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α increased significantly from 6 hours post procedure to peak levels on the third postoperative day. Interleukin-6 (IL-6 increased from the first to the third postoperative day. Interleukin-10 (IL-10 peaked on the first postoperative day. A procedure-related transient hemodynamic response was observed on indexed pulmonary vascular resistance (PVRI two hours post procedure. 11/12 patients developed systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, 7/12 pneumonia, 3/12 acute lung injury (ALI, 3/12 adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, 3/12 sepsis, 0/12 wound infection. Conclusion In the polytraumatized patients with femoral shaft fractures operated with primary IMN we observed a substantial response related to the initial trauma. We could not demonstrate any major additional IMN-related impact on the inflammatory responses or on the cardiopulmonary function parameters. These results have to be interpreted

  16. Fingertip replantation at or distal to the nail base: use of the technique of artery-only anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyürek, M; Safak, T; Keçik, A

    2001-06-01

    The authors describe the functional and aesthetic results of microsurgical replantation of 21 fingertip amputations at or distal to the nail base-namely, zone I amputations. There were 15 male and 6 female patients, with an average age of 26 years (age range, 1-41 years). Replantations were performed using the anastomosis of the artery-only technique, with neither vein nor nerve repair. Venous drainage was provided by an external bleeding method with a fish-mouth incision in "distal" zone I amputations for approximately 7 days, and by the use of leeches in more "proximal" zone I amputations for 10 to 12 days. Results indicated that the overall survival rate was 76%, with 16 of 21 digits surviving. Sensory evaluation at an average follow-up of 12 months (range, 6-18 months) revealed an average static two-point discrimination of 6.1 mm (range, 2.0-8.0 mm). Considering the unfavorable results and the donor site morbidity of various fingertip reconstructions, a microsurgical fingertip replantation should always be considered except in extremely distal, clean-cut, pediatric cases, in which case a composite graft is a possibility. The results of this series indicate that an amputated fingertip in zone I can be salvaged successfully by microvascular anastomosis of the artery only, with a nonmicrosurgical method of venous drainage. Furthermore, acceptable sensory recovery can be expected without any nerve coaptation.

  17. Outcomes of long bone fractures treated by open intramedullary nailing at the St. Ann's Bay Hospital, Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, D; McDowell, D

    2010-10-01

    Between May 2001 to August 2004, 35 patients had open nailing of long bones. There were 40 fractures fixed. Of these 40 fractures, there were 25 femoral fractures, 11 were tibial fractures and 4 were humeral fractures. There were 33 (82.5%) closed fractures and 7 (17.5%) open fractures. In the group of patients with open fractures, there were two Grade I, two Grade II and three Grade IIIB. Seven (20%) patients were lost to follow-up; all of whom had closed fractures. The final analysis as it relates to complications was done using 28 patients with 32 fractures. The majority of fractures healed without significant complication. All the patients with closed fractures went on to bony union. There was one non-union and three delayed unions. There were two infections (osteomyelitis) and this was from the open fracture cohort. This represents an infection rate of 28.6% in this cohort. Two (7.0%) patients had persistent pain and one (3.6%) patient had early removal of the nail because of failure of fixation. The mean time from injury to surgery for the fractured femur was 15.5 (range 0-49) days; fractured tibia 24.4 (range 0-40), days and fractured humerus 41.5 (20-81) days. The mean hospital stay was 18.9 (range 9-37) days for patients with fractured femur; for fractured tibia, it was 20.5 (range 3-82) days and for fractured humerus, it was 22.7 (range 3-82) days. The mean postoperative stay was 4.1 (range 1-14) days for fractured femur, 4.5 (range 1-14) days for fractured tibia and 4.0 (range 1-10) days for fractured humerus. The mean time to healing (consolidation) as defined by X-rays was 5.0 (range 3-11) months for fractured femur 5.2 (range 3-11) months for tibia and 7.0 (range 6-8) months for fractured humerus.

  18. A biomechanical comparison of proximal femoral nails and locking proximal anatomic femoral plates in femoral fracture fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Korhan; Türkmen, İsmail; Sahin, Adem; Yildiz, Yavuz; Erturk, Selim; Soylemez, Mehmet Salih

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of fractures in the trochanteric area has risen with the increasing numbers of elderly people with osteoporosis. Although dynamic hip screw fixation is the gold standard for the treatment of stable intertrochanteric femur fractures, treatment of unstable intertrochanteric femur fractures still remains controversial. Intramedullary devices such as Gamma nail or proximal femoral nail and proximal anatomic femur plates are in use for the treatment of intertrochanteric femur fractures. There are still many investigations to find the optimal implant to treat these fractures with minimum complications. For this reason, we aimed to perform a biomechanical comparison of the proximal femoral nail and the locking proximal anatomic femoral plate in the treatment of unstable intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: Twenty synthetic, third generation human femur models, obtained for this purpose, were divided into two groups of 10 bones each. Femurs were provided as a standard representation of AO/Orthopedic Trauma Associationtype 31-A2 unstable fractures. Two types of implantations were inserted: the proximal femoral intramedullary nail in the first group and the locking anatomic femoral plate in the second group. Axial load was applied to the fracture models through the femoral head using a material testing machine, and the biomechanical properties of the implant types were compared. Result: Nail and plate models were locked distally at the same level. Axial steady load with a 5 mm/m velocity was applied through the mechanical axis of femur bone models. Axial loading in the proximal femoral intramedullary nail group was 1.78-fold greater compared to the plate group. All bones that had the plate applied were fractured in the portion containing the distal locking screw. Conclusion: The proximal femoral intramedullary nail provides more stability and allows for earlier weight bearing than the locking plate when used for the treatment of

  19. Immediate versus delayed intramedullary nailing for open fractures of the tibial shaft: A multivariate analysis of factors affecting deep infection and fracture healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate contributing factors affecting deep infection and fracture healing of open tibia fractures treated with locked intramedullary nailing (IMN by multivariate analysis. Materials and Methods: We examined 99 open tibial fractures (98 patients treated with immediate or delayed locked IMN in static fashion from 1991 to 2002. Multivariate analyses following univariate analyses were derived to determine predictors of deep infection, nonunion, and healing time to union. The following predictive variables of deep infection were selected for analysis: age, sex, Gustilo type, fracture grade by AO type, fracture location, timing or method of IMN, reamed or unreamed nailing, debridement time (≤6 h or> 6 h, method of soft-tissue management, skin closure time (≤1 week or> 1 week, existence of polytrauma (ISS< 18 or ISS≥18, existence of floating knee injury, and existence of superficial/pin site infection. The predictive variables of nonunion selected for analysis was the same as those for deep infection, with the addition of deep infection for exchange of pin site infection. The predictive variables of union time selected for analysis was the same as those for nonunion, excluding of location, debridement time, and existence of floating knee and superficial infection. Results: Six (6.1%; type II Gustilo n=1, type IIIB Gustilo n=5 of the 99 open tibial fractures developed deep infections. Multivariate analysis revealed that timing or method of IMN, debridement time, method of soft-tissue management, and existence of superficial or pin site infection significantly correlated with the occurrence of deep infection ( P < 0.0001. In the immediate nailing group alone, the deep infection rate in type IIIB + IIIC was significantly higher than those in type I + II and IIIA ( P = 0.016. Nonunion occurred in 17 fractures (20.3%, 17/84. Multivariate analysis revealed that Gustilo type, skin closure time, and

  20. exchange femoral nailings at kenyatta national hospital abstract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conventional Kuntscher nail and a Russel-Taylor interlocking nail. Conclusions: Exchange femoral nailing was undertaken in only 0.24% of Kuntscher nailings over this ten year's study period. INTRODUCTION. Intramedullary nailing has been the standard treatment method for acute adult femur shaft fracture for decades(1).

  1. Intramedullary Tibial Nailing Reduces the Attachment Area and Ultimate Load of the Anterior Medial Meniscal Root: A Potential Explanation for Anterior Knee Pain in Female Patients and Smaller Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPrade, Matthew D; LaPrade, Christopher M; Hamming, Mark G; Ellman, Michael B; Turnbull, Travis Lee; Rasmussen, Matthew T; Wijdicks, Coen A; LaPrade, Robert F

    2015-07-01

    Intramedullary (IM) nailing is the treatment of choice among orthopaedic surgeons for tibial shaft fractures. However, because of the close proximity of the nail's insertion site to the anterior medial (AM) meniscal root on the tibial plateau, there is increased risk of iatrogenic injury to the meniscal root during nailing. To quantify the area of the AM meniscal root footprint damaged by IM tibial reaming and determine its subsequent effects on the ultimate failure load in female versus male knees. Controlled laboratory study. Twelve matched pairs (6 male and 6 female pairs; average age, 50.2 years) of human cadaveric knees were randomly assigned to native and reamed groups. In the reamed group, knees were reamed within the "safe zone" according to current guidelines for IM tibial nail insertion (3 mm lateral to the center of the tibial tubercle and adjacent to the anterior margin of the tibial plateau). The attachment areas and ultimate failure load were quantified and compared with paired knees in the native group. Intra-articular reaming within the "safe zone" for IM tibial nail insertion did not significantly decrease the AM root attachment area or ultimate failure load in male specimens, as only 2 of the 6 knees were damaged by reaming. In contrast, all 6 of the AM roots in the female knees were damaged by reaming, and on average, reaming decreased the female AM root attachment area by 19% and significantly decreased ultimate failure load by 37% (P = .028). There was a strong negative correlation (R(2) = 0.77) between reamed tunnel-AM root overlap area and medial-lateral width in female but not in male knees. Standard reaming for an IM tibial nail induced significant damage to the AM meniscal root in smaller, female specimens, whereas larger, male specimens were not affected. These findings may suggest that improvements in current guidelines and surgical techniques are warranted to prevent iatrogenic injury to the AM meniscal root during intramedullary

  2. Fraturas instáveis do fêmur em crianças tratadas com hastes intramedulares elásticas de titânio Unstable femoral fractures treated with titanium elastic intramedullary nails, in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Faissal Soni

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar as indicações, epidemiologia, lesões associadas, complicações e prognóstico das fraturas diafisárias instáveis do fêmur na criança tratadas com hastes intramedulares elásticas de titânio. MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo composto por 24 pacientes com fraturas diafisárias instáveis do fêmur com idade entre cinco e 12 anos, submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico com hastes intramedulares elásticas de titânio no Hospital Universitário Cajuru - Curitiba, PR. Pacientes atendidos no período de abril de 2002 a março de 2008, com seguimento mínimo de 36 meses, submetidos à avaliação de dados epidemiológicos, desvios angulares, encurtamento e consolidação óssea. RESULTADOS: Foram reavaliados os prontuários de 113 casos operados de abril de 2002 a março de 2008, destes, incluídos no estudo 24 casos com fraturas de fêmur diafisárias instáveis tratadas com hastes intramedulares elásticas de titânio com inserção retrógrada. Apresentando duas fraturas bilaterais, duas fraturas expostas, sete pacientes do sexo feminino e 17 masculinos, com idade média de 8,3 anos. Apresentaram, ao final do estudo: encurtamento, desvios em varo ou valgo, retrocurvato ou antecurvato final igual a zero, não havendo ainda presença de retardo de consolidação ou pseudartrose. CONCLUSÕES: As hastes intramedulares elásticas de titânio são de fácil colocação e remoção. Consideramos a utilização das hastes intramedulares elásticas de titânio uma boa opção para a fixação de fraturas instáveis do fêmur em crianças.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the indications, epidemiology, associated lesions, complications and prognosis among children with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who were treated with titanium elastic intramedullary nails. METHOD: This was a retrospective analysis on 24 patients aged 5-12 years with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who underwent surgical treatment with elastic titanium intramedullary

  3. Cephalomedullary screws as the standard proximal locking screws for nailing femoral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinge, Cory; Liporace, Frank; Koval, Kenneth; Gilbert, George T

    2010-12-01

    In 2004, we modified our technique for the stabilization of femoral shaft fractures so that all fractures were stabilized using a reconstruction nail with proximal locking screws oriented into the femoral head. The rationale for this was twofold: first, potentially "missed" associated femoral neck fractures would be stabilized. Second, hip fractures that might occur later in life above the intramedullary nail might be avoided. The purpose of this study therefore was to determine whether there were any risks to patients treated for femoral shaft fractures with antegrade nails using cephalomedullary proximal locking screws. Retrospective. Two regional trauma centers. Eighty-seven consecutive patients were treated for a femoral shaft fracture treated with antegrade femoral nailing with a cephalomedullary locked nail. Reamed, trochanteric insertion of an intramedullary nail with proximal locking screws placed in a cephalomedullary direction. Patient and injury data, radiographic analyses, and complications of treatment were assessed at a minimum of 12 months. Sixty-one of 87 patients (70%) were available at a mean of 19.8 months (range, 12-44 months). Sixty of 61 fractures united after the index procedure. Complications included one delayed union successfully treated with exchange nailing, one distal locking screw fracture (allowing dynamization and completion of fracture healing), two patients with postoperative deformity that required a derotation procedure, and two drill bits that broke intraoperatively and were retained. There were no major complications at the hip, no migration or failure of proximal locking screws, and no screws required removal. Using a reconstruction nail and cephalomedullary proximal locking screws for antegrade femoral nailing of femoral shaft fractures was not associated with major complications in this series. This modification of standard femoral nailing offers potential advantages, including fixation of any "missed" associated femoral

  4. Falhas na utilização de poliacetal e poliamida em forma de haste intramedular bloqueada para imobilização de fratura femural induzida em bovinos jovens Failures in the use of polyacetal and polyamide in the form of intramedullary interlocking nail for immobilization of induced femoral fracture in young cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odael Spadeto Junior

    2010-04-01

    of femoral fractures in calves. Five calves were submitted to general anesthesia and the left femur was fractured and then fixed using polyacetal or polyamide rods (nails interlocked with four cortical screws (stainless steel equally applied to the distal and proximal fracture line. In the postoperative period, calves were clinically assessed during 60 days by clinical and radiographic exams. Fractures occurred in four of the five polyacetal nails implanted in the first time and in two of the four polyamide nails implanted after the polyacetal nail failures. All failures occurred in the first 14 days after implantation. No rejection signs against the polymers were observed. In conclusion, polyacetal and polyamide did not have enough resistance to be used as intramedullary interlocking nails in this system designed to promote early femoral fractures immobilization in young calves.

  5. Effectiveness and complications of SIGN intramedullary interlocking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Interlocking intramedullary nailing is the current state-of-the-art management of the shaft fractures of long bones. Objective: To assess the functional outcome of SIGN nailing of femoral and tibial fractures at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital. Design: Retrospective analytical, study over a three year period ...

  6. Conservative management or closed nailing for tibial shaft fractures. A randomised prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, G J; Keddell, R G; Penny, I D

    1991-01-01

    We performed a prospective randomised trial on matched groups of patients with displaced tibial shaft fractures to compare conservative treatment with closed intramedullary nailing. The results showed conclusively that intramedullary nailing gave more rapid union with less malunion and shortening. Nailed patients had less time off work with a more predictable and rapid return to full function. We therefore consider that closed intramedullary nailing is the most efficient treatment for displaced fractures of the tibial shaft.

  7. Effectiveness of plate augmentation for femoral shaft nonunion after nailing

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    Chin-Jung Lin

    2012-08-01

    Conclusion: Plate augmentation with retention of the nail with autologous bone grafting may be an effective and reliable alternative in treating nonunion of the femoral shaft fracture after open reduction and internal fixation with intramedullary nail.

  8. Biomechanical considerations in intramedullary fixation of lower-extremity fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhofe, P D

    1992-08-01

    Since Gerhard Kuntscher's first cloverleaf design was introduced in the early 1940s, intramedullary nail geometry has become increasingly complex. Many design changes have been introduced, and these have had profound effects upon the mechanical performance of intramedullary devices, making them more versatile. The subset of long-bone fractures amenable to intramedullary fixation is expanding, largely because of these advancements in nail design. Selection of the appropriate nail and bone-nail construct for each fracture configuration requires a knowledge of basic biomechanical principles behind nail design and the implant-host interface. Appropriate clinical application of this knowledge not only ensures the best possible intramedullary fixation of long-bone fractures, but it also aids in avoiding some of the complications that may occur.

  9. Comparision of the Expandable Nail with Locked Nail in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... Korkmaz M, Demirel H. Extreme complications of Fixion nail in treatment of long bone fractures. Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2008;128:301-06. 31. Rose DM, Smith TO, Nielsen D, Hing CB. Expandable intramedullary nails for humeral fractures: A systematic review of clinical and radiological outcomes.

  10. Cortical encroachment after cephalomedullary nailing of the proximal femur: evaluation of a more anatomic radius of curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazylewicz, Daniel B; Egol, Kenneth A; Koval, Kenneth J

    2013-06-01

    : A unique complication of using full-length intramedullary nails for pertrochanteric and subtrochanteric femur fractures is nail penetration of the anterior cortex at the distal end of the femur because of a mismatch of the anatomic femoral bow with that of currently available cephalomedullary nails (CMNs). This study was performed to determine the rate of distal femoral cortical penetration after stabilization of the proximal femur in a consecutive series of patients using a long CMN with a curvature of 180 cm and to examine the final location of the nails within the femoral canal. : Retrospective chart review. : Level 1 trauma center with tertiary care. : Between June 2005 and September 2008, 271 consecutive proximal femoral fractures or impending fractures were stabilized using a specially designed CMN [pertrochanteric nail (PTN) system; Biomet, Warsaw, IN]. Fifty-seven fractures were excluded because of inadequate lateral radiographs, leaving 214 nails in 212 patients available for analysis. : The proximal femur fractures or impending fractures were stabilized with a full-length CMN with a shaft diameter of 11 mm and a radius of curvature of 180 cm. : Nail position was determined from the lateral radiograph, which included the minimal distance from the nail to the anterior cortex of the distal femur and the relative position of the nail within the medullary canal, at a level within 2 cm proximal to the superior pole of the patella. Based on the nail position within the distal femoral canal, the following were calculated: (1) the overall rate of distal femoral anterior cortical penetration, (2) the distribution of nail distances to the anterior cortex, and (3) the proportion of nails lying in each quarter of the space available for the nail. : Four surgeries (1.9%) were performed for pathologic fracture and 22 (10.3%) for impending pathologic fracture. The remaining 188 CMNs were used to stabilize OTA Type 31A1 fractures (52 nails, 24.3%), Type 31A2 fractures

  11. Hindfoot Valgus following Interlocking Nail Treatment for Tibial Diaphysis Fractures: Can the Fibula Be Neglected?

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    Metin Uzun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We evaluated whether intramedullary nail fixation for tibial diaphysis fractures with concomitant fibula fractures (except at the distal one-third level managed conservatively with an associated fibula fracture resulted in ankle deformity and assessed the impact of the ankle deformity on lower extremity function. Methods. Sixty middle one-third tibial shaft fractures with associated fibular fractures, except the distal one-third level, were included in this study. All tibial shaft fractures were anatomically reduced and fixed with interlocking intramedullary nails. Fibular fractures were managed conservatively. Hindfoot alignment was assessed clinically. Tibia and fibular lengths were compared to contralateral measurements using radiographs. Functional results were evaluated using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS and the Foot and Ankle Disability Index Score (FADI. Results. Anatomic union, defined as equal length in operative and contralateral tibias, was achieved in 60 fractures (100%. Fibular shortening was identified in 42 fractures (68%. Mean fibular shortening was 1.2 cm (range, 0.5–2 cm. Clinical exams showed increased hindfoot valgus in 42 fractures (68%. The mean KOOS was 88.4, and the mean FADI score was 90. Conclusion. Fibular fractures in the middle or proximal one-third may need to be stabilized at the time of tibial intramedullary nail fixation to prevent development of hindfoot valgus due to fibular shortening.

  12. Femur cisim kırıklarının kilitli intramedüller çivi ile tedavisinde tek distal vida kullanımının sonuçları

    OpenAIRE

    Solak, Sukru; Aydin, Erbil; Boysan, Ersan; Kamiloglu, Sinan; Adabag, Cem

    2004-01-01

    The results of a single distal locking screw on 18 femoral fractures, treated with interlocking intramedullary mailing were evaluated. Average follow-up time was one year (range 4 months to 2 years). The average time to healing was 4.5 months (range 3 to 7.5 months). There was no nonunion or implant failure. There were 2 symptomatic screw migrations. We concluded that during the treatment of the femoral fractures with interlocking intramedullary nailing, two distal locking screws are not alwa...

  13. Novel management of distal tibial and fibular fractures with Acumed fibular nail and minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis technique: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tie-Jun; Ju, Wei-Na; Qi, Bao-Chang

    2017-03-01

    Anatomical characteristics, such as subcutaneous position and minimal muscle cover, contribute to the complexity of fractures of the distal third of the tibia and fibula. Severe damage to soft tissue and instability ensure high risk of delayed bone union and wound complications such as nonunion, infection, and necrosis. This case report discusses management in a 54-year-old woman who sustained fractures of the distal third of the left tibia and fibula, with damage to overlying soft tissue (swelling and blisters). Plating is accepted as the first choice for this type of fracture as it ensures accurate reduction and rigid fixation, but it increases the risk of complications. Closed fracture of the distal third of the left tibia and fibula (AO: 43-A3). After the swelling was alleviated, the patient underwent closed reduction and fixation with an Acumed fibular nail and minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis (MIPO), ensuring a smaller incision and minimal soft-tissue dissection. At the 1-year follow-up, the patient had recovered well and had regained satisfactory function in the treated limb. The Kofoed score of the left ankle was 95. Based on the experience from this case, the operation can be undertaken safely when the swelling has been alleviated. The minimal invasive technique represents the best approach. Considering the merits and good outcome in this case, we recommend the Acumed fibular nail and MIPO technique for treatment of distal tibial and fibular fractures.

  14. [Tibia nonunion after intramedullar nailing for fracture: decortication and osteosynthesis by medial plating].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriou, P; Martin, J-N; Garreau de Loubresse, C; Judet, T

    2005-05-01

    Intramedullar nailing is now widely used for fractures of the tibia. Extension of nailing indications to proximal, distal, and comminuted fractures has led to a significant rate of complications. The purpose of this study was to analyze decortication and medial plating for the treatment of tibial nonunion after intramedullary nailing. Eighteen cases of aseptic tibial nonunion after nailing for fracture were treated in three women and fifteen men, mean age 39 years (19-57). The initial classification was open (n = 8), segmental (n = 3), single-focus (n = 15). The fracture site was inferior (n = 6), middle (n = 7), and superior (n = 2). Primary nailing used reaming in 15 cases (83%), unreamed in 3 (17%) static in 13 and dynamic in 5. Four plaster cabts were also applied. Complications were: infection (n = 1), compartmental syndrome (n = 2), tibial nerve palsy (n = 1), dysesthesia (n = 2), and protrusion of the nail into the knee (n = 1). Dynamization was performed in 11 patients, one with additional bone graft and fibulectomy. Repeated reamed nailing was performed in one patient. Seven nonunions were atrophic and 11 were hypertrophic. There were 13 malpositionings associated with the nonunion. Treatment of the nonunion was performed 300 days on average (90-900) after nailing: cancellous bone graft was associated with decortication in four cases because of bone loss (n = 3) or atrophic nonunion (n = 1). Union rate was 94%. Mean time for union was 108 days (80-180) with no significant difference (Student t-test) between atrophic (119 days) and hypertrophic (103 days) nonunion. Correction of the malposition was incomplete in seven patients, with angular malunion of less than 6 degrees in five patients and greater than 10 degrees in two. One late infection occurred and finally healed after external fixation and antibiotic therapy. No skin necrosis occurred. Five patients had pain on the hardware. Removal was performed in one time and pain resolved. Improvement of knee

  15. "Clothesline technique" for proximal tibial shaft fracture fixation using conventional intramedullary nail: a simple, useful, and inexpensive technique to prevent fracture malalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belangero, William Dias; Santos Pires, Robinson Esteves; Livani, Bruno; Rossi, Felipe Lins; de Andrade, Andre Luis Lugnani

    2018-01-23

    Treatment of proximal tibial shaft fractures is always challenging. Despite the development of modern techniques, the literature still shows high complication rates, especially regarding proximal fragment malalignment. It is well known that knee position in flexion during tibial nailing is responsible for extension and valgus deformities of the proximal fragment. Unlike in tibial shaft fractures, nails do not reduce proximal tibial fractures due to the medullary canal width. This study aims to describe a simple, useful, and inexpensive technique to prevent valgus and extension deformities when treating proximal tibial fractures using conventional nails: the so-called clothesline technique.

  16. Comparision of the expandable nail with locked nail in the treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Expandable nails achieve stability only by hydraulic expansion; therefore suggest less radiation exposure and operation time. In this study, we aimed to compare the results of expandable femoral nails with locked intramedullary nails in the treatment of diaphyseal fractures of femur. Materials and Methods: ...

  17. The effect of intact fibula on functional outcome of reamed intramedullary interlocking nail in open and closed isolated tibial shaft fractures: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Muthukumar Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: ITS fracture with intact fibula is a common occurrence, and they can be treated safely with reamed IM nailing that provides good union rates and the excellent functional result even in open fractures.

  18. A biomechanical comparison study of a modern fibular nail and distal fibular locking plate in AO/OTA 44C2 ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switaj, Paul J; Fuchs, Daniel; Alshouli, Mohammed; Patwardhan, Avinash G; Voronov, Leonard I; Muriuki, Muturi; Havey, Robert M; Kadakia, Anish R

    2016-09-15

    A lateral approach with open reduction and internal fixation with a plate is a very effective technique for the majority of distal fibular fractures. However, this open approach for ankle fixation may be complicated by wound dehiscence and infection, especially in high-risk patients. An alternative to plating is an intramedullary implant, which allows maintenance of length, alignment, and rotation and which allows for decreased soft tissue dissection. While there has been clinical data suggesting favorable short-term outcomes with these implants, there is no current biomechanical literature investigating this technology in this particular fracture pattern. This study sought to biomechanically compare an emerging technology with an established method of fixation for distal fibular fractures that traditionally require an extensive exposure. Ten matched cadaveric pairs from the proximal tibia to the foot were prepared to simulate an Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen/Orthopaedic Trauma Association (AO/OTA) 44C2 ankle fracture and randomized to fixation with a distal fibular locking plate or intramedullary fibular rod. A constant 700-N axial load was applied, and all specimens underwent testing for external rotation stiffness, external rotation cyclic loading, and torque to failure. The syndesmotic diastasis, stiffness, torque to failure, angle at failure, and mode of failure were obtained from each specimen. There was no significant difference in syndesmotic diastasis during cyclic loading or at maximal external rotation between the rod and plate groups. Post-cycle external rotation stiffness across the syndesmosis was significantly higher for the locking plate than the fibular rod. There was no significant difference between the rod and plate in torque at failure or external rotation angle. The majority of specimens had failure at the syndesmotic screw. In the present cadaveric study of an AO/OTA 44C2 ankle fracture, a modern fibular rod demonstrated less

  19. Study of Ender’s Nailing in Paediatric Tibial Shaft Fractures

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    Himanshu G. Ladani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Closed reduction & plaster is standard and effective form of treatment in majority of paediatric tibial shaft fractures. Operative intervention is necessary in unstable fractures, open fractures, poly trauma patients and compartment syndrome or severe soft tissue compromise. Historically, external fixation and plating were the treatment options available, but having complications like infection, overgrowth and refracture. Reamed locked intramedullary nails pose unnecessary risk to the proximal tibial growth plate. Flexible intramedullary nailing in long bone fractures in children has gained wide spread popularity because of its clinical effectiveness & low risk of complications. Methodology: This is a study of 15 patients of unstable tibial shaft fractures in children treated with Ender’s nailing. 12 were closed & 3 were open grade I fractures with only punctured wounds. Age was ranging from 7 to 16 yrs. There were 8 middle third, one upper third and 6 distal third shaft tibia fractures. In all patients 3.5 Ender’s nails were used, two nails in 11 patients and three nails in 4 patients there was no post-operative wound infection. Average operative time was 40 minutes and average blood loss was 35 cc. Results: Average union time was 9 wks. All fractures united without 2nd operative intervention. In 2 patients there was some proximal migration of nails causing some knee irritation. In all patients implant removed 6 to 7 months after surgery. At final follow-up there were full knee & ankle movements. 2 patients had more than 50 malalignment in A-P or M-L plane. No rotational deformity, no limb length discrepancy or physical arrest. Conclusion: Ender’s nailing is an effective method of treatment in these cases, which allows rapid healing of tibial shaft fractures with an acceptable rate of complications. There is short learning curve with this treatment and implants are inexpensive.

  20. [Comparison of two minimally invasive internal fixed methods for the treatment of distal tibio-fibula fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yong-Zeng; Hong, Jian-Jun; Peng, Lei; Shui, Xiao-Long; Tang, Jun; Chen, Lin-Wei; Guo, Xiao-Shan

    2011-02-01

    To compare the outcome of two minimally invasive internal fixed methods for the treatment of distal tibio-fibula fractures. The clinical data of 50 patients with distal tibio-fibula fractures from March 2006 to March 2009 was analyzed retrospectively. Twenty-eight patients were treated with minimally invasive percutaneous locking compression plate fixing tibia combining elastic stable intramedullary nailing fixing fibular (Group P + E). There were 18 male and 10 female patients with a mean age of (45 ± 6) years. Twenty-two patients were treated with interlocking intramedullary nail fixing tibia combining elastic stable intramedullary nailing fixing fibular (Group N + E). There were 12 male and 10 female patients with a mean age of (43 ± 9) years. The index of peri-operation, pain score at 3 d postoperative, bone union time, the clinical outcomes and complications postoperative were statistically compared. There were no statistical significance on operation time, blood loss perioperative and pain score at 3 d postoperative. Bone union time in Group N + E was significantly longer than in Group P + E [(21.1 ± 3.0) weeks vs. (15.4 ± 2.9) weeks]. Meanwhile, the function of ankle score (44.3 ± 1.7 vs. 41.8 ± 2.5) and the line of foot score (8.6 ± 2.3 vs. 6.8 ± 3.6) in Group P + E were respectively significantly higher than that in Group N + E. However, there were no statistical difference on ankle pain, buckling add stretch restricted, turn inward add evaginate restricted and the rate of good and fair between the two groups. There were 3 cases of complications postoperation in Group P + E, significantly less than the 8 cases of Group N + E. Minimally invasive percutaneous locking compression plate fixing tibia combining elastic stable intramedullary nailing fixing fibular shows superiority in treatment of distal tibio-fibula fractures. However, interlocking intramedullary nail fixing tibia combining elastic stable intramedullary nailing fixing fibular has the

  1. Retrograde femoral nailing in elderly patients: outcome and functional results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Thomas; Krawany, Manfred; Leitner, Lukas; Karlbauer, Alois; Wagner, Michael; Plecko, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Functional outcome after retrograde femoral intramedullary nailing was investigated in 35 patients older than 60 years (mean, 86 years) with 36 fractures, comprising 15 (41.7%) shaft and 21 (58.3%) distal fractures; overall, 7 (19.4%) periprosthetic fractures occured. Twenty-two (62.9%) of 35 patients were evaluated at a mean 16.5-month follow-up with the Lyshom-Gillquist score and the SF-8 questionaire. Primary union rate was 97.8%, with no significant differences in duration of surgery, bone healing, mobilization, and weight bearing among different fracture types; periprosthetic fractures revealed a significantly delayed mobilization (P=.03). Complications occured significantly more often among distal femoral fractures (P=.009), including all revision surgeries. The most frequently encountered complication was loosening of distal locking bolts (n=3). Lysholm score results were mainly influenced by age-related entities and revealed fair results in all fractures (mean in the femoral shaft fracture group, 78.1 vs mean in the distal femoral fracture group, 74.9; P=.69), except in the periprosthetic subgroup, which had good results (mean, 84.8; P=.23). This group also had increased physical parameters according to SF-8 score (P=.026). No correlation existed between SF-8 physical parameters and patient age or surgery delay, whereas a negative correlation existed between patient age and SF-8 mental parameters (P=.012). Retrograde femoral intramedullary nailing is commonly used in elderly patients due to reliable bone healing, minimal soft tissue damage, and immediate full weight bearing. It also offers a valid alternative to antegrade nailing in femoral shaft fractures. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Nail bed onychomatricoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Gao, Tianwen; Wang, Gang

    2014-10-01

    Onychomatricoma is a rare tumor originating from the nail matrix, and, in rare conditions, from the ventral aspect of the proximal nailfold. Here we report a rare case of a 51-year-old man presenting with melanonychia mainly involving the distal nail plate. Histopathologic examination showed typical findings of onychomatricoma mainly involving the nail bed, while the nail matrix was largely uninvolved. We also identified fungal infection in a focal area of the distal nail plate. Our findings indicate that onychomatricoma can develop in the surrounding epithelial tissue of the nail unit, including the nail bed, and suggest that fungal infection may represent a secondary phenomenon of onychomatricoma. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Surgical treatment of complex proximal humeral fractures with a technique of nail and osteosuture: "NOS".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garret, J; Houdré, H; Cievet-Bonfils, M; Godenèche, Arnaud; Duparc, Fabrice; Roussignol, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    Open reduction and internal fixation of complex proximal humeral fracture represents a surgical challenge. The main objective of this procedure is to anatomically reduce the tuberosities. We propose a standardized and reproducible technique that we apply to all complex displaced 3- and 4-part fractures of patients under 50 years. We use an antero-lateral trans-deltoid approach; the humeral head and the tuberosities are reduced under fluoroscopic control. The tuberosities are stabilized with an inter-tuberosity osteosuture, and we then introduce a thin and straight intra-medullary nail (Telegraph IV FH Orthopedics) at the hinge point of the humeral head. The osteosynthesis of the tuberosities is completed by 3- or 4-self-stable divergent screws in the nail. A dynamic distal locking stabilizes the humeral shaft in rotation and facilitates consolidation thanks to micro movements. The removal of the nail with an arthroscopic shoulder arthrolysis in case of stiffness is possible secondarily.

  4. Randomized clinical trial on percutaneous minimally invasive osteosynthesis of fractures of the distal extremity of the radius,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Aurélio Aita

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: the purpose of this study was to compare the postoperative radiological and clinical outcomes with minimally invasive percutaneous osteosynthesis using three implants: volar locking plate, intramedullary nail system and nonbridging external fixator for distal radius fractures.METHODS: forty-eight patients (A group, 16; B group 16; C group 16 underwent minimally invasive percutaneous osteosynthesis of reductible and unstable displaced (Type IIB by Rayhack Classification distal radius fractures. In B group intramedullary nail system was used, in A group the patients were treated with volar locking plate and in C group the patients were treated by nonbridging external fixator from January 2011 to December 2012. The mean follow-up period was 12 months. Radiologic parameters, range of motion, grip strength, and disability of the arm, shoulder, and hand score were evaluated at each examination (3rd and 6th week, and 12th months. The visual analog scale of wrist pain and complications were assessed at the final follow-up.RESULTS: the groups did not differ significantly in radiological outcomes after 12 months, but the clinical results, VAS scale and dash score in group A (volar locking plate and B (nail intramedullary were statistically significantly better than that of C group (nonbridging external fixator. One patient underwent an osteosynthesis with nail intramedullary and another with external fixator (C group developed persistent pain near the site of the superficial radial nerve because of the distal's screw and pins, respectively.CONCLUSION: in clinical parameters, significant differences in outcomes were found between groups A and B after six weeks versus C group.

  5. Treatment of fractures of the tibial diaphysis using external fixator compared with locked intramedullary nails Tratamento das fraturas diafisárias da tíbia com fixador externo comparado com a haste intramedular bloqueada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Tavares Cardozo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare efficiency of external fixator in modular form with unilateral and uniplanar intramedullary locked seeking definitive treatment of fractures of the tibia diaphysis. METHODS: Orthopedic surgical treatments were compared to 50 patients with definite diafisária fracture of the tibia, through the use of the external fixator, modular and intramedullary locked. The fractures were treated at emergency hospital school of Orthopedics and Traumatology service in the period from January 2007 to January 2011, with a variation of 15 to 48 weeks. RESULTS: this study has proven functional results and excellent consolidation when locked intramedullary rods were used and the versatility and speed of application of external fixator reaching the necessary stabilization of bony fragments. Consolidation of fractures was obtained in 95 cases when using the intramedullary locked and 90 cases undergoing external fixation. CONCLUSIONS: the definitive treatment of tibial diaphysis fractures by external fixator modular presented themselves as valid alternative treatment in patients who could not be submitted for early conversion to internal osteosynthesis or when the intramedullary nails are not available to the surgeon. OBJETIVO: Comparar a eficiência de fixador externo modular na forma uniplanar e unilateral com haste intramedular bloqueada (HIB buscando tratamento definitivo das fraturas diafisárias da tíbia. MÉTODOS: Foram comparados os tratamentos cirúrgicos ortopédicos definitivos de 50 pacientes com fratura diafisária da tíbia, por meio do uso do fixador externo modular e da haste intramedular bloqueada. As fraturas foram tratadas no setor de emergência de um hospital-escola pelo serviço de ortopedia e traumatologia de janeiro de 2007 a janeiro de 2011, com variação de 15 a 48 semanas. RESULTADOS: Este estudo comprovou resultados funcionais e de consolidação excelentes quando usada a haste intramedular bloqueada e a

  6. Intramedullary femoral nailing through the trochanteric fossa versus greater trochanter tip : a randomized controlled study with in-depth functional outcome results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moein, C. M. Ansari; ten Duis, H. J.; Oey, P. L.; de Kort, G. A. P.; van der Meulen, W.; van der Werken, Chr

    2011-01-01

    In a level 1 university trauma center, an explorative randomized controlled study was performed to compare soft tissue damage and functional outcome after antegrade femoral nailing through a trochanteric fossa (also known as piriform fossa) entry point to a greater trochanter entry point in patients

  7. Necessity for fibular fixation associated with distal tibia fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Benjamin C; Hartley, Brandi R; Formaini, Nathan; Bramwell, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    Intramedullary (IM) nailing is a well-accepted treatment for distal third tibia fractures in combination with injury to the fibula. However, the indications for operative stabilisation of the fibula remain controversial. The authors performed a retrospective review on a consecutive series of patients who underwent intramedullary nailing of a non-comminuted distal third tibia fracture with or without fibular fixation at a Level I urban trauma centre. A review of surgical records identified 120 patients who initially were included in this study, while a total of 98 patients who met the inclusion criteria were included in the final analysis. Our results found no difference in the mean value of coronal and sagittal plane alignment in both the immediate post-operative and follow-up time periods. We also saw no statistically significant difference when comparing malalignment between patients treated with or without fibula fixation. There were no deep infections between the two groups. No significant differences were seen between the fibular fixation group and the non-fixation group. Distal screw removal due to prominence or pain was the most common reason for future surgery in both groups. These findings suggest that the addition of fibular fixation does not affect whether or not alignment is maintained in either the immediate post-operative or short-term follow-up period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Retained portion of latex glove during femoral nailing. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat-Ali, M; Marwah, S; al-Habdan, I

    1996-11-01

    A case of retained glove during Kuntscher intramedullary nailing is described. An abscess around the glove could have lead to osteomyelitis. One need to be cautious feeling the top end of the nail while femoral nailing to avoid such a complication.

  9. Current indications for open Kuntscher nailing of femoral shaft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current indications for open Kuntscher nailing of femoral shaft fractures. A S Bajwa FCS(SA)ORTH. E Schnaid FCS(SA)ORTH. M E B Sweet MD PhD(rned). University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Key Words: Kuntscher nail, intramedullary nail, femoral fracture. We retrospectively reviewed 32 patients with.

  10. bilateral recon nailing of comminuted fracture femur in a severely ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-06

    Sep 6, 2012 ... full weight bearing without support. Recon nails can be employed successfully to treat complex fractures of the femur shaft. INTRODUCTION. Locked intramedullary nails have revolutionized the way we treat diaphyseal fractures of the femur(1). Though standard first generation interlocking nails are very.

  11. Comparative endurance testing of the Biomet Matthews Nail and the Dynamic Compression Screw, in simulated condylar and supracondylar femoral fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Benjamin M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamic compression screw is a plate and screws implant used to treat fractures of the distal femur. The Biomet Matthews Nail is a new retrograde intramedullary nail designed as an alternative surgical option to treat these fractures. The objective of this study was to assess the comparative endurance of both devices. Method The dynamic compression screw (DCS and Biomet Matthews Nail (BMN were implanted into composite femurs, which were subsequently cyclically loaded using a materials testing machine. Simulated fractures were applied to each femur prior to the application of load. Either a Y type fracture or a transverse osteotomy was prepared on each composite femur using a jig to enable consistent positioning of cuts. Results The Biomet Matthews Nail demonstrated a greater endurance limit load over the dynamic compression screw in both fracture configurations. Conclusion The distal locking screws pass through the Biomet Matthews Nail in a unique "cruciate" orientation. This allows for greater purchase in the bone of the femoral condyle and potentially improves the stability of the fracture fixation. As these fractures are usually in weak osteoporotic bone, the Biomet Matthews Nail represents a favourable surgical option in these patients.

  12. Anatomic study of the axillary nerve in a Chinese cadaveric population: correlation of the course of the nerve with proximal humeral fixation with intramedullary nail or external skeletal fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuang-Yi; Chen, Tien-Hua; Shyu, Jia-Fwu; Wang, Shih-Tien; Liu, Jenn-Yuan; Chou, Po-Hsin

    2011-05-01

    The axillary nerve can be injured during external skeletal fixation with Schanz screws or proximal locking screws of intramedullary nails. Being aware of the axillary nerve's anatomic relationship to the proximal humerus is vital for avoiding complications. We investigated the relationship of the axillary nerve to surrounding bony landmarks by studying 88 axillary nerves in 44 embalmed cadaveric adult Chinese males. These measurements were then compared with the results from a similar study among Caucasians using the same reference points. We identified three significantly different parameters between our Chinese and the previously studied Caucasian subjects (P ≤ 0.05): the distances from the superior aspect of the humeral head to the axillary nerve (D1) (5.2 ± 0.7 vs. 6.09 ± 0.65 cm, respectively); surgical neck to axillary nerve (D2) (2.0 ± 0.7 vs. 1.72 ± 0.84 cm); and humeral length (D3) (29.0 ± 2.2 vs. 35.25 ± 5.7 cm). The D1 distance ranged from 4.0 to 6.7 cm; the D2 distance ranged from 1.0 to 4.1 cm; and the entire humeral length (D3) ranged from 23.3 to 33.3 cm. Iatrogenic injury to the axillary nerve could be reduced by placing pins and screws in proper directions using portable C-arm fluoroscopic guidance, drill-guided protective systems, and a mini-open-incision with muscle spreading and drill protective systems directly placed on the bone. Because of physical variability among individual patients and populations, surgeons should consider the possible courses of the axillary nerve when treating proximal humeral fractures.

  13. Radiation-Independent Distal Locking Screw Insertion Using Dual Nail Insertion Handle: Is it a Reliable Method?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Abdel Azim Foda

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: This technique is not reliable enough to replace the classic radiation-dependent free-hand technique. Further development of this idea is needed to get a perfect radiation-independent distal locking technique.

  14. Risk of injury to the axillary nerve during antegrade proximal humeral blade nail fixation - an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelberg, Ben G I; Riley, Nicholas D; Taylor, Geoffrey J

    2014-08-01

    The antegrade intramedullary Locking Blade Nail (Marquardt, Germany) is a device aimed at improving purchase in the humeral head and reducing varus displacement by providing medial buttress support and triangular stability within the humeral head. The aim of this study is to measure the relationship of the proximal fixation screws to the axillary nerve. 13 whole cadavers underwent insertion of an antegrade proximal humeral blade nail via a deltoid split approach to both shoulders. The anatomic proximity of the anterior branch of the axillary nerve to the screws was measured following soft tissue dissection and inspection of the nerve. The mean distance of the nerve from the anterolateral acromion was 62 mm (range 45-81 mm). The nerve lay closest to the distal blade fixation screw 4.9 mm (range 0-19 mm). In three cases the nerve lay directly underneath the washer and in all three cases there was macroscopic evidence of damage to the nerve. In 5 cases the nerve travelled obliquely in a cranial direction to lie 1.8 mm (range 0-3 mm) from the distal blade fixation screw, in 2 of these cases the nerve lay beneath the washer. The anterior branch of the axillary nerve is placed at risk during insertion of the locking screws despite use of protection sleeves and trocars. We advocate that when using antegrade intramedullary nails that incorporate an inferomedial calcar screw an extended anterolateral acromial approach is undertaken. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fracture Union in Closed Interlocking Nail in Humeral Shaft Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramji Lal Sahu

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of the present study indicates that in the presence of proper indications, reamed antegrade intramedullary interlocked nailing appears to be a method of choice for internal fixation of osteoporotic and pathologic fractures.

  16. Is the lag screw sliding effective in the intramedullary nailing in A1 and A2 AO-OTA intertrochanteric fractures? A prospective study of Sliding and None-sliding lag screw in Gamma-III nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Meili, Severin; Zhang, Changqing; Luo, Congfeng; Zeng, Bing-fang

    2012-09-01

    To compare the Sliding with Non-sliding lag screw of a gamma nail in the treatment of A1 and A2 AO-OTA intertrochanteric fractures. 80 patients were prospectively collected. In each group, AO/OTA 31-A were classified into group A. AO/OTA 31-A2.1 was classified as group B. We classified the A2.2 and A2.3 as group C. According to the set-screw locking formation of Gamma-III, the cases were randomly allocated to Sliding subgroup and Non-sliding subgroup in A, B and C groups. Follow-ups were performed 1, 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. In the Sliding group, the bone healing rate 3, 6, 12 months postoperatively reached 85.00%, 97.50%, 100% in group A, B and C. Meanwhile, in Non-sliding group, postoperatively, bone healing rate were 90.00%, 95.00% and 97.50% in group A, B and C, respectively. Both differences were not significant. Lower limb discrepancy between Sliding and Non-sliding pattern was significantly different in group C which represent fracture types of AO/OTA 31-A2.2 and A2.3 (0.573 ± 0.019 mm in Non-sliding group, 0.955 mm ± 0.024 mm in Sliding group, P AO-OTA intertrochanteric fractures. For treating these kinds of fractures, the sliding of the lag screw of an Gamma nail does not improve any clinical results and in certain cases, such as highly comminuted A1 and A2 fractures, can therefore even benefit from a locked lag screw by tightening the set-screw.

  17. Onycomycosis due to artificial nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemer, A; Trau, H; Davidovici, B; Grunwald, M H; Amichai, B

    2008-08-01

    The use of artificial nails (ANs) as part of nail-care cosmetics is very popular. Several side effects and complications, such as contact dermatitis and bacterial and fungal infections, have been reported in patients using ANs. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify the fungal pathogens in nail abnormalities appearing in patients with ANs. We evaluated 68 patients suffering from nail changes and paronychia, which appear after removal of ANs. Mycological samples were obtained from two sites: distal parts of the involved nail and the proximal nail fold. KOH examination and fungal culture were used for detection and identification of fungal infection. Mycological results from the distal part of the nail showed positive KOH test in 57 cases (83.8%), and culture was positive in 67 patients (98.5%). Mycological results obtained from the proximal nail fold showed positive KOH test in 36 patients (52.9%); in 36 of the cases, culture was positive. Candida spp. were the most common pathogen. Both KOH and culture results were significantly better while sampling from the distal part of the nail compared with sampling from the proximal nail fold (P = 0.0001). Onychomycosis was found to be very common in nail changes due to ANs, leading to an increased risk of transmitting microbial infections. Therefore, health care personnel and workers in the food industry should avoid using ANs.

  18. Tibiocalcaneal Arthrodesis With a Porous Tantalum Spacer and Locked Intramedullary Nail for Post-Traumatic Global Avascular Necrosis of the Talus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael M; Kazak, Marat

    2015-01-01

    Global avascular necrosis of the talus is a devastating complication that usually occurs as a result of a post-traumatic or metabolic etiology. When conservative options fail, tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis is generally indicated in conjunction with massive bone grafting to maintain the functional length of the extremity. Several bone grafting options are available, including the use of a freeze-dried or fresh-frozen femoral head allograft or autograft obtained from the iliac crest or fibula, all of which pose their own inherent risks. The noted complications with massive bone grafting techniques have included graft collapse, infection, immune response, donor site morbidity, and nonunion. In an effort to avoid many of these complications, we present a case report involving post-traumatic talar avascular necrosis in a 59-year-old male who was successfully treated with the use of a porous tantalum spacer, an autogenic morselized fibular bone graft, and 30 mL of bone marrow aspirate in conjunction with a retrograde tibiocalcaneal nail. Porous tantalum is an attractive substitute for bone grafting because of its structural integrity, biocompatibility, avoidance of donor site complications, and lack of an immune response. The successful use of porous tantalum has been well-documented in hip and knee surgery. We present a practical surgical approach to tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with a large segmental deficit. To our knowledge, this is the first published report describing an alternative surgical technique to address global avascular necrosis of the talus that could have additional applications in salvaging the ankle with a large bone deficiency. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nail dyschromias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibhu Mendiratta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nail dyschromias have a wide variety of presentation. There are numerous causes of discoloration of the nail affecting the nail plate, nail attachments, or the substance of the nail. The chromonychia may also be caused due to the exogenous deposition of pigments over the nail plate. Careful examination of the nail and few bed side tests may help in identifying the root cause of the nail dyschromia and many a times unravels some underlying systemic disorder too.

  20. Fixation of the midclavicular fractures with the titanium elastic nails in adults – preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Drobnič

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elastic intramedullary fixation is an established operative treatment for fractures in childhood, which is only exceptionally used in adults. A modified intramedullary fixation of midclavicular fractures in adults with titanium elastic nails is presented.Methods: The group was comprised of five adult patients with shortened midclavicular fractures. The prior conservative treatment had been ineffective in three cases, whereas poor functional outcome was expected in the other two, as a result of fracture shortening or instability. According to the new technique titanium elastic nails were first placed into the intramedullar channel of the distal fragment through the fracture, using a mini-open exposure. The nails were advanced retrogradely into the proximal fragment to achieve a stable fixation. The initial post-operative rehabilitation included pendulary exercises in a sling. Active exercises in the range of pain allowance were introduced after the operative wounds had been healed.Results: All fractures were consolidated in the physiological position. The patients were capable of painless movements with the shoulder on the operated side in the full range of motion after six weeks. One transitory complication in the form of skin and subcutaneous decubitus over the protruded nail tip was noted without an influence on the end result.Conclusions: The preliminary results in a limited number of patients showed efficient consolidation of the midclavicular fractures in adults treated with intramedullar titanium elastic nails. The functional results and low invasivity of the procedure support its further use in treatment of midclavicular fractures, which fail to heal conservatively, or which are expected to result in poor functional or cosmetic outcome.

  1. Biomechanical characterization of an osteoporotic artificial bone model for the distal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wähnert, Dirk; Hoffmeier, Konrad L; Klos, Kajetan; Stolarczyk, Yves; Fröber, Rosemarie; Hofmann, Gunther O; Mückley, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of osteoporotic distal femur fractures is still an unsolved problem of trauma surgery. The poor bone stock often leads to secondary loss of reduction and implant failure. Therefore, the development of new implants and their biomechanical testing is essential. In a previous study, we developed and initially characterized an artificial osteoporotic bone model of the distal femur. This follow-up study was performed to characterize this model in a biomechanical comparison. We investigated two different artificial bones: five foam cortical shell (Sawbones) and 10 custom-made artificial femoral condyles. Additionally, eight human femora were used for comparison. For biomechanical testing, two intramedullary nails (distal femur nail (DFN) and supracondylar nail (SCN)) were cyclically axial loaded in an AO 33 C2 unstable distal femoral fracture model. In our testing, the artificial bone showed a decrease in the axial stiffness of 27% for the SCN and 28% for the DFN compared to the human results. Also the number of cycles for a deformation of 2.5 mm was reduced by 55% (SCN) and 62% (DFN). This decrease was homogenous and caused by the relative high bone mineral density of the human specimen used. The modes of failure showed no difference between the artificial and human bones. Our customized artificial bone provides suitable results. In relation to the human bones classified as mildly osteoporotic, we assume that the biomechanical properties match to serve as an osteoporotic bone. Yet, we suggest to check transferability of the results with human material.

  2. Trauma to the nail complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Braga Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the results from surgical intervention to treat trauma of the nail complex.METHODS: we retrospectively reviewed a series of 94 consecutive patients with trauma of the nail complex who were treated between 2000 and 2009. In 42 patients, nail bed suturing was performed. In 27 patients, nail bed suturing was performed subsequent to osteosynthesis of the distal phalanx. In 15, immediate grafting was performed, and in 10, late-stage grafting of the nail bed. The growth, size and shape of the nail were evaluated in comparison with the contralateral finger. The results were obtained by summing scores and classifying them as good, fair or poor.RESULTS: the results were considered to be good particularly in the patients who underwent nail bed suturing or nail bed suturing with osteosynthesis of the distal phalanx. Patients who underwent immediate or late-stage nail grafting had poor results.CONCLUSION: trauma of the nail complex without loss of substance presented better results than did deferred treatment for reconstruction of the nail complex.

  3. Dual head screw hip nailing for trochanteric fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F.; Igoumenou, Vasilios G.; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D.; Panagopoulos, George N.; Galanopoulos, Ioannis P.; Vottis, Christos Th.; Karamanis, Eirinaios; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: There are limited information and inconclusive results for dual head screw intramedullary hip nails for trochanteric fractures. Therefore, we performed a prospective study to evaluate the healing of fractures, and survival, function, and complications of patients operated with this implant. Methods: We prospectively studied 79 patients (61 women and 18 men; mean age: 84.7 years; range: 65–96 years) with a low-energy trochanteric fracture, treated with a dual head screw intramedullary hip nail from 2013 to 2016. The mean follow-up was 2.1 years (range: 1–3 years); seven patients were lost to follow up. This left 72 patients for further analysis. We evaluated the healing of fractures, and survival, function, and complications of patients. Results: Fracture healing was evident in 70 patients (97.2%) at 2–3 months postoperatively. One patient experienced cut-out and z-effect phenomenon of the head screws. Another patient experienced a periprosthetic femoral diaphysis fracture at the distal tip of the nail. A third patient experienced an acute postoperative superficial skin infection that was treated successfully with wound dressing changes and a course of antibiotics. Sixteen patients (22.2%) deceased within 12 months postoperatively. In the remaining patients, the Harris Hip Score (HHS) at 12 months postoperatively was excellent in 16 (28.6%), good in 23 (41.1%), fair in 10 (17.8%), and poor in 7 patients (12.5%). The function declined after the patients’ fracture. Fair and poor results were related to age > 85 years, poor pre-fracture level of function, and AO/OTA-31-A3 fracture types. Conclusion: The dual head screw intramedullary hip nail is associated with high healing and low complication rates for intertrochanteric fractures. The function of the patients is good or excellent in most cases; however, it declines, especially for those patients with age > 85 years, poor pre-fracture level of function, and AO/OTA-31-A3 fracture types

  4. Dual head screw hip nailing for trochanteric fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavrogenis Andreas F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are limited information and inconclusive results for dual head screw intramedullary hip nails for trochanteric fractures. Therefore, we performed a prospective study to evaluate the healing of fractures, and survival, function, and complications of patients operated with this implant. Methods: We prospectively studied 79 patients (61 women and 18 men; mean age: 84.7 years; range: 65–96 years with a low-energy trochanteric fracture, treated with a dual head screw intramedullary hip nail from 2013 to 2016. The mean follow-up was 2.1 years (range: 1–3 years; seven patients were lost to follow up. This left 72 patients for further analysis. We evaluated the healing of fractures, and survival, function, and complications of patients. Results: Fracture healing was evident in 70 patients (97.2% at 2–3 months postoperatively. One patient experienced cut-out and z-effect phenomenon of the head screws. Another patient experienced a periprosthetic femoral diaphysis fracture at the distal tip of the nail. A third patient experienced an acute postoperative superficial skin infection that was treated successfully with wound dressing changes and a course of antibiotics. Sixteen patients (22.2% deceased within 12 months postoperatively. In the remaining patients, the Harris Hip Score (HHS at 12 months postoperatively was excellent in 16 (28.6%, good in 23 (41.1%, fair in 10 (17.8%, and poor in 7 patients (12.5%. The function declined after the patients’ fracture. Fair and poor results were related to age > 85 years, poor pre-fracture level of function, and AO/OTA-31-A3 fracture types. Conclusion: The dual head screw intramedullary hip nail is associated with high healing and low complication rates for intertrochanteric fractures. The function of the patients is good or excellent in most cases; however, it declines, especially for those patients with age > 85 years, poor pre-fracture level of function, and AO/OTA-31-A3

  5. Resultados funcionales y utilización del enclavado endomedular bloqueado en fracturas de tibia. [Functional results and use of locked intramedullary nailing in tibial shaft fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo S. Rotella

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In­tro­duc­ción El enclavado endomedular bloqueado en fracturas diafisarias de tibia probó ser un valioso método de tratamiento, y sus resultados superan a los de la osteosíntesis con placas y el enclavado endomedular elástico con clavos múltiples. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar los resultados funcionales con la utilización de este método en todas las lesiones en las que está indicada la estabilización con este tipo de implante, y con un seguimiento de 2 años. Material­ y­ Métodos Se estudiaron 112 pacientes tratados en el Servicio de Ortopedia y traumatología, desde marzo de 2000 hasta diciembre de 2009, sometidos a enclavado endomedular bloqueado como osteosíntesis primaria, con un seguimiento de 2 años. Las variables recabadas fueron: edad (años, sexo, infección, lesión vascular, deformidad, movilidad, dolor, marcha, actividad, tipo de fractura. Se realizó un análisis descriptivo de las variables involucradas en este estudio y de asociación mediante el puntaje de Jones y Wruhs. El nivel de confiabilidad utilizado fue del 5%. Resultados Ciento siete (96% de las 112 fracturas evaluadas tuvieron consolidación sin otros procedimientos, dentro de las 17 semanas. En la serie, hubo 5 casos de seudoartrosis, pero una fractura en tres niveles de la tibia consolidó en 32 semanas y una fractura de tercio distal consolidó en 24 semanas. Las complicaciones posoperatorias fueron escasas y, al finalizar el tratamiento, la mayoría de los pacientes regresó a sus actividades previas, tanto laborales como de la vida diaria. El índice de infección fue del 8,03%, con un seguimiento promedio de 27,48 meses. Conclusión En nuestra experiencia, es un método seguro, relativamente sencillo, con gran versatilidad y ofrece al paciente un confortable posoperatorio con muy buen resultado funcional. Por ello, lo consideramos de primera elección para tratar fracturas diafisarias de tibia.

  6. Management of long bone fractures using SIGN nail: experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... bone fractures. The major challenges were seen in multiply injured patients with multiple fractures. Also patients that present after several years of injury with malunion and\\or non-union may pose some challenges in treatment using SIGN nail. Keywords: Sign, Intramedullary Nail, Image Intensifier, External Jig, Fractures ...

  7. Outcome of surgical implant generation network nail initiative in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Closed interlocked intra-medullary nailing (IM), the standard method of treating of long bone shaft fracture, has been a dream to most resource poor hospitals ... Methods: Seventy eight consecutive patients with 20 tibia and 60 femur fractures were done SIGN interlocking nail at Embu Provincial Hospital, Kenya ...

  8. Nail cosmetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina A Madnani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nail as an anatomic structure protects the terminal phalanx of the digit from injury. Historically, it has served as a tool for protection and for survival. As civilizations developed, it attained the additional function of adornment. Nail beautification is a big industry today, with various nail cosmetics available, ranging from nail hardeners, polishes, extensions, artificial/sculpted nails, and nail decorations. Adverse events may occur either during the nail-grooming procedure or as a reaction to the individual components of the nail cosmetics. This holds true for both the client and the nail technician. Typically, any of the procedures involves several steps and a series of products. Separate "nail-bars" have been set up dedicated to serve women and men interested in nail beautification. This article attempts to comprehensively inform and educate the dermatologist on the services offered, the products used, and the possible/potential adverse effects related to nail-grooming and nail cosmetics.

  9. Distal locking using an electromagnetic field-guided computer-based real-time system for orthopaedic trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfitt, Maxwell K; Halvorson, Jason J; Scott, Aaron T; Smith, Beth P; Russell, Gregory B; Jinnah, Riyaz H; Miller, Anna N; Carroll, Eben A

    2013-07-01

    To compare the efficacy of distal interlocking during intramedullary nailing using a freehand technique versus an electromagnetic field real-time system (EFRTS). A prospective, randomized controlled trial. Level I academic trauma center. Patients older than 18 years who sustained a femoral or tibial shaft fracture amenable to antegrade intramedullary nailing were prospectively enrolled between August 2010 and November 2011. Exclusion criteria included injuries requiring retrograde nailing and open wounds near the location of the distal interlocks (distal third of the femur, knee, or distal tibia). Each patient had 2 distal interlocking screws placed: one using the freehand method and the other using EFRTS. Techniques were compared on procedural time and number of interlocking screw misses. Two time points were measured: time 1 (time to find perfect circles/time from wand placement to drill initiation) and time 2 (drill initiation until completion of interlocking placement). Twenty-four tibia and 24 femur fractures were studied. EFRTS proved faster at times 1 and 2 (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0002) and total time (P < 0.0001). This difference was larger for junior residents, though reached statistical significance for senior residents. Senior residents were faster with the freehand technique compared with junior residents (P < 0.004), but the 2 were similar using EFRTS (P = 0.41). The number of misses was higher with free hand compared with EFRTS (P = 0.02). These results suggest that EFRTS is faster than the traditional freehand technique and results in fewer screw misses. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  10. Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the tibia: treatment by intramedullary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the tibia: treatment by intramedullary nailing without bone graft. ... In our opinion, the encouraging result obtained may justify proposing this procedure as a first choice option for the treatment of the scierotic form and so avoid the complexzity of autologous bone grafting in children. Nigerian ...

  11. Use of a long distally fixed intramedullary stem to treat a periprosthetic femoral fracture following total hip arthroplasty using a thrust plate hip prosthesis: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Hatanaka, Hiroyuki; Motomura, Goro; Ikemura, Satoshi; Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Yusuke; Utsunomiya, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Nakashima, Yasuharu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The thrust plate hip prosthesis (TPP; Zimmer, Winterthur, Switzerland) is a hip prosthesis that is no longer in production. Few reports have focused on periprosthetic fractures following total hip arthroplasty (THA) with the use of a TPP. Presentation of case: We report a 57-year-old woman with a periprosthetic femoral fracture 13 years after THA with the use of a TPP. A plain radiograph showed a displaced subtrochanteric fracture of the right femur just below the distal tip ...

  12. Inflammatory response after nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakaris, Nikolaos K; Anthony, Christopher; Papasotiriou, Antonios; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2017-06-01

    Intramedullary nailing, as the gold standard stabilisation method of most long bones, has been tailed by its extensive use as the basic tool of investigating the immune response to trauma in many large and small animal models, as well as at the clinical setting. Over the last few decades a complex map of interactions between pro and anti-inflammatory pathways has been the result of these significant global research efforts. Parallel to the evolution of modern nailing and reaming techniques, significant developments at the fields of other disciplines relevant to trauma care, has improved the contemporary management of injured patients, challenging previous concepts and altering clinical barriers. The current article aims to summarise the current understanding of the effect of instrumenting the medullary canal after trauma, and hint on potential future directions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Locking internal fixator with minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis for the proximal and distal tibial fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TONG Da-ke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To investigate the efficacy of the locking internal fixator (LIF, which includes the locking compression plate (LCP and the less invasive stable system (LISS, in the proximal and distal tibial fractures. Methods: We did a retrospective study on a total of 98 patients with either proximal or distal tibial fractures from January 2003 to January 2007, who had received the opera- tion with LIF by the minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO technique. The data consisted of 43 proximal tibial fractures (type AO41C3 and 55 distal tibial fractures (type AO43C3. Results: No complications were observed in all patients after operation. The mean healing time was 8.4 months (range 5-14 months. Only two cases of delayed union occurred at postoperative 10 months. No infections were reported after the definitive surgery even in the cases of open fractures. All patients reached a full range of motion at postoperative 6 to 9 months and regained the normal functions of knee and ankle joints. Conclusion: Using LIF in MIPO technique is a reliable approach towards the proximal and distal tibial fractures that are not suitable for intramedullary nailing. Key words: Internal fixator; Tibial fractures; Fracture fixation, intramedullary; Bone plates

  14. Nail Fungus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nail fungus Overview Nail fungus is a common condition that begins as a white or yellow spot under the tip of your fingernail or toenail. As the fungal infection goes deeper, nail fungus may cause your nail to discolor, thicken and ...

  15. Endomedullar nail of metacarpal and proximal phalanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Olaya, Francisco Javier; Sanchez Mesa, Pedro Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Prospective study, series of cases; it included patients with diaphysis fractures and union diaphysis-neck or union diaphysis-base of metacarpal and proximal phalanges, in whom was practiced anterograde intramedullary nailing previous closed reduction of the fracture, using prevent intramedullary nail of 1.6 mm. (cem 16) for the metacarpal fractures, and two nail prevent of 1.0 mm. (cem 10) for the proximal phalangeal fractures. Indications: transverse and oblique short fractures, spiral and with comminuting bicortical. Pursuit average is 5.7 months. Frequency surgical intervened patient: 2.2 each month, using this surgical technique a total of 20 (twenty) patients have been operated, 21 (twenty one) fractures; 16 (sixteen) metacarcal fractures and 5 (five) proximal phalangeal fractures, all of them tested using clinical and radiological parameters. Results: good 82%, regular 18%, and bad 0% obtaining bony consolidation and early rehabilitation with incorporation to their habitual works

  16. A STUDY OF THE MANAGEMENT OF OPEN FRACTURES OF TIBIA BY UNREAMED INTERLOCKING NAIL

    OpenAIRE

    Kuppa Srinivas; Yerukala Ramana; Dema Rajaiah; Mohammad Akbar Khan; Sujith Omkaram; Venkateswar Reddy

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the results of closed interlocking intramedullary nailing without reaming in the treatment of open fractures of t he tibial shaft and study the difficulties (complications) encountered during the operative study. To compare the efficacy of interlocking intramedullary nailing without reaming in treating open fractures of tibia, Time required for the union of fracture, Range of motion of ankle and knee joint, Rate of malunion and mal rota...

  17. Delayed distal radio-ulnar joint instability after Galeazzi type fracture fixation in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jettoo, P; de Kiewiet, Gp

    2010-10-15

    We report a rare case of delayed distal radio-ulnar joint instability with malunion of a Galeazzi-type radius fracture in a 10- year-old boy. He underwent operative intervention with flexible intramedullary nailing of the radius. He had careful clinical and intra-operative evaluation under image intensifier, and regular clinical and radiological assessments subsequently in clinic, and his distal radio-ulnar joint (DRUJ) was stable. He nonetheless developed DRUJ instability with malunion of radial midshaft fracture at 4 months. Corrective osteotomy for forearm fracture malunion is an uncommon procedure in children. He underwent a corrective radial osteotomy at the site of malunion, held with a Pennig external fixator, with reconstruction of the DRUJ subluxation. He made a good recovery with full restoration of wrist and forearm function, which was maintained at 17 months.

  18. The healing stages of an intramedullary implanted tibia: A stress strain comparative analysis of the calcification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filardi, Vincenzo

    2015-10-01

    The extended usage of unreamed tibial nailing resulted in reports of an increased rate of complications, especially for the distal portion of the tibia. Unreamed nailing favours biology at the expense of the achievable mechanical stability, it is therefore of interest to define the limits of the clinical indications for this method. Extra-articular fractures of the distal tibial metaphysis, meta-diaphyseal junction, and adjacent diaphysis are distinct in their management from impaction derived ''pilon'' type fractures and mid-diaphyseal fractures. The goals of this work were to gain a thorough understanding of the load-sharing mechanism between unreamed nail and bones in a fractured tibia. With this purpose a complete model of the human leg was realised, simulating a mid-diaphyseal fracture, classified as A2 type 1, according to the AO classification. The analysis of the entire chain allows to have a complete picture of the stress distribution and of the most stressed bones and soft tissues, but, more importantly can overcome problems connected with boundary conditions imposed at single bony components. Model consists of six bony structures: pelvis, femur, patella, fibula, tibia, and a simplified lump of the feet, configured in a standing up position. Their articular cartilage layers, were simulated by 3D membranes of opportune stiffness connecting the different segments. Moreover an unreamed intra-medullary nail Expert Tibial Nail (DePuy Synthes(®)) stabilized the fractured tibia. A load of 700 N has been applied at the top of pelvis and a part the feet, at the tip, was rigidly fixed. Five different contact interfaces have been imposed at the different bony surfaces in contact. Three different conditions were analysed: the initially healthy tibia, the A2 type 1 fractured tibia with the Expert tibial nail implanted, and the follow up stage after complete healing of tibia. Non-linear finite element analysis of the models were performed with Abaqus version 5

  19. Outcome of SIGN Nail Initiative in Treatment of Long Bone Fractures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Currently the standard of treatment for femoral shaft fracture and unstable tibia fracture are closed locking intramedullary nail which require fluoroscopy and fracture table. The objective of this review was to evaluate the outcome of Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN ) initiative, locking intramedullary ...

  20. Treatment of unstable trochanteric fractures. Randomised comparison of the gamma nail and the proximal femoral nail.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, I.B.; Steyerberg, E.W.; Castelein, R.M.; Heijden, F.H. van der; Hoed, P.T. den; Kerver, A.J.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2004-01-01

    The proximal femoral nail (PFN) is a recently introduced intramedullary system, designed to improve treatment of unstable trochanteric fractures of the hip. In a multicentre prospective clinical study, the intra-operative use, complications and outcome of treatment using the PFN (n = 211) were

  1. Intramedullary capillary haemangioma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, T

    2012-02-03

    Intramedullary capillary haemangioma is extremely rare and only four cases have been previously reported. We describe a further case, outlining the clinical, radiological, surgical and pathological features.

  2. Sistemas osso-implante ex vivo utilizando haste intramedular polimérica para imobilização de fraturas femorais em bovinos jovens Ex vivo bone-implant systems using polymeric intramedullary nails for fixation of femoral fractures in young calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odael Spadeto Junior

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available O desenvolvimento de novos aparatos usando materiais disponíveis e de baixo custo pode ser uma alternativa viável para o tratamento cirúrgico de fraturas em ossos longos de bovinos. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a resistência mecânica de fêmures de bovinos jovens com fratura diafiseal, imobilizados com hastes intramedulares bloqueadas, compostas por diferentes polímeros. Para tanto, testes físicos de compressão e flexão, por meio de uma máquina universal de ensaios foram realizados em quatro grupos distintos de seis fêmures obtidos de bovinos jovens. Em um dos grupos, os ossos foram mantidos íntegros (grupo controle, enquanto que os outros os ossos, foram fraturados e imobilizados com uma haste intramedular bloqueada, composta por polipropileno, poliacetal ou poliamida (uma para cada grupo. Independente do polímero utilizado, nenhuma das hastes estudadas ofereceu aos fêmures fraturados resistência comparável ao osso íntegro, quando consideradas em conjunto as forças de flexão e compressão. A concordância desses achados com resultados in vivo previamente publicados, demonstra que a metodologia utilizada para testes ex vivo pode ser útil na seleção de materiais mais resistentes para confecção de novos modelos.The development of new devices using available and low cost materials may be an useful alternative for the treatment of long bone fractures in large animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical strength of young bovine femur with diaphyseal fracture fixed with different polymeric intramedullary nails. Bending and compression tests using a universal machine were carried out in 4 distinct groups of 6 femurs from young calves. In one of the groups bones were intact while in the other three fractured bones were fixed using an intramedullary nail made of polypropylene, polyacetal or polyamide (one for each group. Considering bending and compression tests together, none of the used polymers offered

  3. Treatment of pediatric femoral shaft fractures by stainless steel and titanium elastic nail system: A randomized comparative trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tank Gyaneshwar

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Majority of paediatric femoral shaft fractures are now treated operatively by elastic stable intramedullary nails. Operative intervention results in a shorter hospital stay and has economic and social benefits over conservative treatment. The cost of stainless steel nail is one third the cost of titanium nail. However, the clinico-radiological results are not significantly different between titanium and stainless steel nails at one year follow-up as observed by our study.

  4. Assessment of the role of fibular fixation in distal-third tibia-fibula fractures and its significance in decreasing malrotation and malalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manish; Yadav, Sanjay; Sud, Ajaydeep; Arora, Naresh C; Kumar, Narender; Singh, Shambhu

    2013-12-01

    In the treatment of distal-third tibia/fibula fractures treated by interlocking nailing, the role of fibular fixation is not clearly defined. This study aimed to assess the benefits of fibular fixation in such fractures. Sixty patients with fractures of the lower third of the leg were enrolled into the study and divided into two groups based on whether the fibula was fixed (group A) or not (group B). Fracture tibia was treated with interlocked intramedullary nailing and fibular fixation was done using a 3.5-mm Limited Contact Dynamic Compression Plate (LC-DCP). The two groups were compared for differences in rotation at ankle, angulation at the fracture site, time of union and complications. Clinical and functional outcomes were assessed regularly. Merchant-Dietz criteria were used to assess ankle function. The demographics of the two groups were similar. Average valgus angulation was significantly less in group A (average 5°) versus group B (average 9°). The degree of rotational malalignment at the ankle in group A was average 7° versus average 15° in group B. The outcome of two groups for clinical ankle score, time of union and complications showed no significant differences. Fixation of the fibula along with interlocking nailing of the tibia decreases the malalignment of the tibia and malrotation of the ankle in distal-third fractures of the tibia and fibula as compared with only interlocking nailing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Exchange femoral nailings at Kenyatta National Hospital | Ong'ang'o ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Intramedullary nailing is the method of choice in the treatment of acute femoral shaft fractures in adults. It is associated with a high fracture union rate and a low complication rate. Nonunion as well as its other rare complications are treated by exchange femoral nailing. Objective: To look at the use of the ...

  6. Nail infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, K T; Bonar, P L

    1989-04-01

    Nail infections are and will continue to be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to all foot physicians. Attention to basic concepts of accurate detailed history and physical examination will aid in the determination of the etiology of these infections. Following basic guidelines of incision and drainage, gram stain, soaks, and antibiotics will be the cornerstone of initial treatment of pyogenic infections. Upon resolution of the acute infection a permanent treatment plan can be constituted based on the etiology. Nail infections of mycotic nature require an understanding by both patient and doctor as to the difficulty and resistance to treatment of this problem. It is the authors' opinion that aggressive persistent treatment will provide the best long-term result when dealing with mycotic infections. This may require nail removal, local and systemic treatment as well as change in shoe environment. As we have seen and is stated throughout this text, the nail and its pathologic processes can be a mirror of systemic disease. Many times a dystrophic infected nail may be the initial clinical presentation of a much more involved disease process. It is the responsibility and duty of all foot physicians to have a total understanding of knowledge of normal and pathologic process that affect the nail plates, nail bed, and surrounding nail proper. I hope this article will stimulate the foot physician to approach the disease of the nail with a high index of suspicion and respect.

  7. Outcome of surgical implant generation network nail initiative in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in Uganda, was propagated in to Kenya mainly in resource poor hospitals, and has changed long bone fractures' management and outcomes. The goal of this study was to describe applicability of the SIGN initiative in fracture care in a Kenyan hospital. AbstrAct. Background: Closed interlocked intra-medullary nailing (IM), ...

  8. Reaming as an adjuvant to irrigation on bacterial presence and propagation: an open, cadaveric intramedullary fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archdeacon, Michael T; Kazemi, Namdar; Romanowski, James R; Mobberley-Schuman, Paula S; Weiss, Alison A

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the effect of intramedullary reaming on bacterial presence and propagation in an open, cadaveric intramedullary fracture model. Twelve fresh-frozen human cadaveric femurs were osteotomized and inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus, the open, cadaveric intramedullary fracture model. Low-pressure pulsed lavage irrigation was performed to irrigate the osteotomy sites. The specimens were divided into two groups of six paired specimens: CNT, irrigation only; and REAM, irrigation coupled with intramedullary reaming. Intramedullary contents were cultured at the osteotomy site and in 1-cm increments through the distal femoral metaphysis. Mean bacterial colony-forming units were compared between groups using analysis of variance. A statistically significant higher bacterial colony-forming unit count was noted at the osteotomy site (bacterial presence) in the CNT group compared with the REAM group. In terms of bacterial propagation, when compared with the sterile osteotomy site, the CNT group demonstrated significant bacterial propagation only at the 1.1- to 2.0-cm increment and the REAM group demonstrated no significant propagation. In comparing bacterial propagation between the CNT and the REAM groups, no significant differences were noted at any distal increment. In this open, cadaveric intramedullary fracture model, low-pressure pulse lavage coupled with intramedullary reaming demonstrated significantly less bacterial presence at the osteotomy site compared with irrigation without reaming. Additionally, intramedullary reaming does not appear to significantly propagate bacteria into the intramedullary canal nor into the distal metaphysis. These observations might have clinical significance.

  9. Nail histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, B

    2013-09-01

    The structure of the nail unit is complex and many dermatologists and dermatopathologists have an incomplete understanding of it. Familiarity with the anatomy and histology of this unit, however, is a key factor in improving the diagnostic yield of nail biopsy. Inflammatory or infectious conditions that affect the nail can have a marked impact on a patient's quality of life. A wide-ranging variety of tumors can also develop in this region and they may be life-threatening or require surgery that will result in functional defects. The author reviews the anatomy and histology of the nail unit as well as the basic histopathologic findings in the most common conditions affecting the nails. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  10. [Onychomatricoma, a rare lesion of the nail].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommepuy, Isabelle; Roblet, Denis; Blaise, Sophie; Delage-Corre, Manuela; Bonnetblanc, Jean-Marie; Fayol, Jacqueline; Labrousse, François

    2004-09-01

    Onychomatricoma is a rare fibroepithelial lesion of the nail matrix with peculiar clinical and histological features. Clinically, it is characterized by a longitudinal band of yellow thickening of the nail plate with transverse overcurvature and splinter hemorrhages. Nail avulsion exposes a villous tumor of the matrix with filamentous digitations extending into multiple holes of the nail plate. Histologically, a thick keratogenous zone forms a thickened nail plate. The lesion in its proximal portion is characterized by deep epithelial invaginations and by a stroma organized in two layers. The distal zone corresponds to multiple fibroepithelial projections extending into the nail plate. The diagnosis can be difficult in the presence of misleading clinical features or when the specimen is incomplete or examined with an improper orientation. Surgical resection is the recommended treatment.

  11. Complications of resection and reconstruction in giant cell tumour of distal end of radius - An analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraf S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The bulk of literature on the subject focuses on the resection of the tumor followed by reconstruction using autologous fibula, however, papers analyzing the failures of this procedure are scanty. The aim is to analyze the various factors responsible for the failures. Methods: Study included 42 patients of aggressive GCT of distal radius, resected and reconstructed using nonvascularised autologous fibula. Host graft junction was fixed using screws (6, intramedullary nail (21 and plate (15. The minimum follow-up was 2 years or till a complication occurred requiring second surgery. Result: The major complications were recurrence in 6 cases (spillage of tumor tissue in 3, poor biopsy site 2, recurrence along the nail tract one case; failure of host graft union in 8 cases due to inadequate contact at host graft junction, poor implant selection, inadequate immobilization and infection; significant instability at wrist in 6 cases due to poor stabilization at carpo fibular junction in addition to inherent instability due to poor congruity between fibulocarpal articulations. Conclusion: Reconstruction of distal end of radius using auto fibula has much higher complication rates than usually believed. A meticulous planning and its execution is must to minimize the problems. Use of dynamic plate for host graft junction and fixation of fibular head to adjacent ulna/carpal bones improves the results.

  12. Comparing two intramedullary devices for treating trochanteric fractures: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kontogeorgakos Vasileios

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intertrochanteric fractures are surgically treated by using different methods and implants. The optional type of surgical stabilization is still under debate. However, between devices with the same philosophy, different design characteristics may substantially influence fracture healing. This is a prospective study comparing the complication and final functional outcome of two intramedullary devices, the intramedullary hip screw (IMHS and the ENDOVIS nail. Materials and methods Two hundred fifteen patients were randomized on admission in two treatment groups. Epidemiology features and functional status was similar between two treatment groups. Fracture stability was assessed according to the Evan's classification. One hundred ten patients were treated with IMHS and 105 with ENDOVIS nail. Results There were no significant statistical differences between the two groups regarding blood loss, transfusion requirements and mortality rate. In contrast, the number of total complications was significantly higher in the ENDOVIS nail group. Moreover, the overall functional and walking competence was superior in the patients treated with the IMHS nail. Conclusions These results indicate that the choice of the proper implant plays probably an important role in the final outcome of surgical treatment of intertrochanteric fractures. IMHS nail allows for accurate surgical technique, for both static and dynamic compression and high rotational stability. IMHS nail proved more reliable in our study regarding nail insertion and overall uncomplicated outcome.

  13. Use of Titanium Elastic Nails in the Adult Diaphyseal Humerus Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upadhyay AS

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Humerus shaft fractures in adults can be managed conservatively with functional braces or operatively with plate osteosynthesis or with intramedullary nailing. Conventionally humerus intramedullary nailing is done either using humerus interlocking nails or Enders nails. In this study we analyse the outcome of humerus shaft fractures (upper and middle third managed with closed ante- grade intramedullary titanium elastic nailing in terms of union rates, union time, functional results and complications. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 25 patients treated with ante-grade intramedullary titanium elastic nailing was done during the period of August 2014 to June 2016 at our tertiary care centre. Skeletally mature patients with closed and acute fractures of the upper and middle shaft humerus of both sexes were included in the study. RESULTS: Twenty-five (100% fractures united with an average consolidation time of 14.98 weeks (10-32 weeks, and no fractures ended in non-union. Nail impingement was seen in two (8%, shoulder stiffness in one (4%. Functional results were excellent in 22 (88%, moderate in two (8% and poor in one (4%. There were 17 males and eight females with an average age of 39.08 years (range: 18-65 years. The average duration of hospital stay was 3.84±2.30 days. CONCLUSION: Closed ante-grade intramedullary titanium elastic nailing offers a safe and reliable method of fixing fractures of upper humeral shaft in adults. This method provides early fracture union, high union rates and less complications, in addition to early rehabilitation and reduces the hospital stay.

  14. Nail Problems (Toenails)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the nail does not extend treatment modality for fungal nails. beyond the tip of the toe. In some ... discol- ored, or swollen, for example. Treatment of Fungal Nails Treatments may vary, depending on painful nail, which ...

  15. Do intramedullary implants improve survival in elderly patients with trochanteric fractures? A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermesan, D; Prejbeanu, R; Poenaru, D V; Petrescu, H; Apostol, E; Inchingolo, F; Dipalma, G; Abbinante, A; Caprio, M; Potenza, M A; Cagiano, R; Malcangi, G; Inchingolo, A D; Haragus, H

    2015-01-01

    There is currently no consensus regarding superiority of the intramedullary fixation over the sliding hip screw. Regional variation remains high and not backed up by solid evidence. Given these premises we aimed to analyze weather implant preference can influence the postoperative survival. Secondary objectives were determining the trend for implant choice and confounding factors associated with intramedullary nails compared to sliding hip screws. Retrospective data was obtained from patient charts with the main diagnosis of extracapsular/ trochanteric fractures, corresponding to ICD S72.1 codes. Between 2008-2012, 441 patients underwent osteosynthesis with a dynamic hip screw and 155 with intramedullary nail respectively. The living status was determined by comparing the patient identification number against the national population evidence records. The lifetable shows similar survival for both implants over the 5 year period. The yearly mortality was 19.4% for the dynamic hip screw and 21.8% for the intramedullary implant respectively, even though the later were used predominantly in older patients. This age difference is significant according to both parametric and non-parametric tests whereas duration of hospital stay are similar. We found a clear increase in the proportion of intramedullary implants, for a total of 11.2% over the 5 year period. There is no difference for the one year mortality and overall survival between sliding screw plates and intramedullary constructs. A clear increase in the use of intramedullary implants for trochanteric fractures was observed. This is even more apparent for older ages, presumably due to an higher surgeon confidence with the biomechanical stability of the intramedullary constructs.

  16. Significance of the position of the proximal tip of the tibial nail: An important factor related to anterior knee pain

    OpenAIRE

    Tahririan, Mohammad Ali; Ziaei, Ehsan; Osanloo, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for the majority of tibial shaft fractures and anterior knee pain is the most common complication of this surgery; however, its etiology is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess the predicting factors related to anterior knee pain following tibial nailing. Materials and Methods: Patients with isolated, unilateral tibial shaft fracture who had undergone tibial nailing were identified retrospectively. Data includ...

  17. Your Nails

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... easier to scratch an itch or remove a dog hair from your sweater. Nails themselves are made ... and pedicures (done on feet and toenails) are popular services for girls and women (and even some ...

  18. Osteossíntese das fraturas diafisárias da criança com hastes intramedulares flexíveis Osteosynthesis of children shaft fractures with flexible intramedullary nails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Batista Volpon

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available O tratamento de algumas das fraturas da criança tem sofrido modificações nos últimos anos, com o objetivo de obtenção de resultados mais satisfatórios, restrição do tempo de incapacidade e para melhor corresponder às expectativas da família. Isso é especialmente válido para as fraturas diafisárias de alguns ossos longos com o tratamento feito por hastes intramedulares elásticas. Esse tratamento é de baixa morbidade, respeita a biologia e a biomecânica da fratura e permite consolidação óssea por mecanismo secundário, com a formação de calo ósseo. Entretanto, requer implantes, instrumental e conhecimento técnico do cirurgião, pois os maus resultados relacionam-se diretamente com falhas técnicas. Atualmente, os ossos que mais se prestam para esse tipo de fixação, em relação à prioridade, são: fêmur, rádio, ulna, tíbia e úmero. O objetivo deste texto de atualização foi analisar a literatura e fornecer informações fundamentais para o conhecimento do método.The treatment of some fractures in children has changed over the last years aiming at improving results, shortening the time of physical limitation, and meeting family expectations. This is particularly true when long bone shaft fractures are involved and when treatment is carried out with elastic nails. This technique carries low morbidity, respects the biology and the biomechanics of the reparative process and allows secondary healing with osseous callus formation. Nevertheless, the technique requires adequate surgical implants, proper instruments and trained surgeons, since complications are related mainly to technical pitfalls. The technique has been used for the following bones: femur, radius and ulna, tibia and humerus. The objective of the present update was to review and to analyze the literature so as to present basic information about the treatment of diaphyseal fractures of some long bones of children with flexible nails.

  19. An in vivo evaluation of surface polishing of TAN intermedullary nails for ease of removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JS Hayes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Fractures of the tibia and femoral diaphysis are commonly repaired by intra-medullary (IM nailing. Currently IM nails are available in either electropolished stainless steel (SS or in Titanium-Aluminium-Niobium (TAN. After healing, removal of the nails still is common but removal of TAN IM nails often has complications whereas SS IM nails of the same design are less often associated with problems. We believe the differences in removal are due to the ability of TAN to promote strong bone on-growth. We have previously shown in vivo that polishing cortical screws reduces removal torque and the percentage of bone-implant contact. Therefore, we postulate that bony on-growth onto IM nails can be reduced by means of surface polishing, for ease of removal. Here we aim to compare the pull-out forces for removal of standard TAN (TAN-S compared to experimental paste polished TAN (TAN-PP IM nails from a bilateral non-fracture sheep tibia model after 12 months implantation. Histological analysis was also performed to assess tissue on-growth to the nails. We show that polishing significantly reduces (p=0.05 the extraction force required for TAN IM nail removal. This effect in part is attributable to the distinct tissue-material reaction produced. For TAN-S nails direct bone contact was observed while for TAN-PP nails a fibrous tissue interface was noted. Since TAN is preferred over SS for IM nailing due to superior biocompatibility and mechanical properties, we believe these findings could be used to recommend changes to current surface technologies of intramedullary nails to reduce complications seen with nail removal especially in rapidly growing bone in children.

  20. Study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedually nails in patients with tibial fractures (S.P.R.I.N.T.: Study rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgeons agree on the benefits of operative treatment of tibial fractures – the most common of long bone fractures – with an intramedullary rod or nail. Rates of re-operation remain high – between 23% and 60% in prior trials – and the two alternative nailing approaches, reamed or non-reamed, each have a compelling biological rationale and strong proponents, resulting in ongoing controversy regarding which is better. Methods/Design The objective of this trial was to assess the impact of reamed versus non-reamed intramedullary nailing on rates of re-operation in patients with open and closed fractures of the tibial shaft. The study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedullary nails in tibial fractures (S.P.R.I.N.T was a multi-center, randomized trial including 29 clinical sites in Canada, the United States and the Netherlands which enrolled 1200 skeletally mature patients with open (Gustilo Types I-IIIB or closed (Tscherne Types 0–3 fractures of the tibial shaft amenable to surgical treatment with an intramedullary nail. Patients received a statically locked intramedullary nail with either reamed or non-reamed insertion. The first strategy involved fixation of the fracture with an intramedullary nail following reaming to enlarge the intramedullary canal (Reamed Group. The second treatment strategy involved fixation of the fracture with an intramedullary nail without prior reaming of the intramedullary canal (Non-Reamed Group. Patients, outcome assessors, and data analysts were blinded to treatment allocation. Peri-operative care was standardized, and re-operations before 6 months were proscribed. Patients were followed at discharge, 2 weeks post-discharge, and at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post surgery. A committee, blinded to allocation, adjudicated all outcomes. Discussion The primary outcome was re-operation to promote healing, treat infection, or preserve the limb (fasciotomy for compartment syndrome after

  1. Study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedually nails in patients with tibial fractures (S.P.R.I.N.T.): study rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Tornetta, Paul; Schemitsch, Emil; Swiontkowski, Marc; Sanders, David; Walter, Stephen D

    2008-06-23

    Surgeons agree on the benefits of operative treatment of tibial fractures - the most common of long bone fractures - with an intramedullary rod or nail. Rates of re-operation remain high - between 23% and 60% in prior trials - and the two alternative nailing approaches, reamed or non-reamed, each have a compelling biological rationale and strong proponents, resulting in ongoing controversy regarding which is better. The objective of this trial was to assess the impact of reamed versus non-reamed intramedullary nailing on rates of re-operation in patients with open and closed fractures of the tibial shaft. The study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedullary nails in tibial fractures (S.P.R.I.N.T) was a multi-center, randomized trial including 29 clinical sites in Canada, the United States and the Netherlands which enrolled 1200 skeletally mature patients with open (Gustilo Types I-IIIB) or closed (Tscherne Types 0-3) fractures of the tibial shaft amenable to surgical treatment with an intramedullary nail. Patients received a statically locked intramedullary nail with either reamed or non-reamed insertion. The first strategy involved fixation of the fracture with an intramedullary nail following reaming to enlarge the intramedullary canal (Reamed Group). The second treatment strategy involved fixation of the fracture with an intramedullary nail without prior reaming of the intramedullary canal (Non-Reamed Group). Patients, outcome assessors, and data analysts were blinded to treatment allocation. Peri-operative care was standardized, and re-operations before 6 months were proscribed. Patients were followed at discharge, 2 weeks post-discharge, and at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post surgery. A committee, blinded to allocation, adjudicated all outcomes. The primary outcome was re-operation to promote healing, treat infection, or preserve the limb (fasciotomy for compartment syndrome after nailing). The primary outcome was a composite comprising the following

  2. early functional outcome of distal femoral fractures at kenyatta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intramedullary Nail. 65 %. 24 %. 11 %. Forty one (89%) patients had good to excellent early functional outcome, 3 (6.5%) had fair, and 2 (4.3%) had a poor early functional outcome (Figure 5). Figure 5. Proportion of the study population with various early functional outcomes (HSS scores) at 3 months post treatment. 41 %.

  3. A STUDY ON ROLE OF INTERLOCK NAILING IN THE MANAGEMENT OF TIBIAL DIAPHYSEAL FRACTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Venkateswara Rao; Chinta Shyam; Anvesh

    2015-01-01

    Tibial fractures are one of the commonest orthopedic injuries. Tibial fractures are one of the commonest orthopedic injuries. In the past several years there has been a trend towards by use of small diameter nails without remaining in the management of unstable tibial shaft fractures. However it is important to remember that many closed fractures with less severe soft tissue injury, Treatment with an intramedullary nail with reaming allows placement of larger implan...

  4. Treatment outcomes of intertrochanteric femur fractures treated with DLT™ nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Arıcan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Intramedullary nails frequently use in proximal femur fractures. In this study, 49 patients with intertrochanteric fractures were evaluated clinical and radiological results treated with dyna locking trochanteric (DLT™ nail retrospectively. Methods: Twenty-two (44.9% patients were male and 27 (55.1% patients were female. Mean age was 74.29±1.98 (28-99 years and Followed up for a mean of 14.35±3.43 (9-24 months. Thirty-seven (75.6% of the fractures resulted from simple falls while 6 (12.2% caused from traffic accidents and 6 (12.2% fall down from height. There were 24 (49.0% left and 25 (51.0% right lower extremities fractured. According to Orthopaedic Trauma Association classification system; 21 (42.9%, 21 (42.9% and 7 (14.2% fractures were classified as 31A1, 31A2, and 31A3 respectively. One (2.0% patient had claviculae fracture, 3 (6.1% patients had radius distal fracture and 1 (2.0% patient had total knee arthroplasty. After surgery, X-ray was used for radiological results and functional outcomes were evaluated according to the Harris hip scoring system. Results: The average waiting time for the surgery was 2.02±0.18 (1-7 days and hospitalization time was 6.23±0.29 (4-15 days. Mean fracture healing time was 11.74±1.82 (8-15 weeks. Three patients had screw cut-out in the follow-up time and performed hemiarthroplasty. The average Harris hip score was 88.02±1.21 (42-97 points and included 29 (59.2% excellent cases, 17 (34.7% good and 3 (6.1% poor. Conclusion: DLT ™ nail is a safe and successful method because of low complication rates, and capability of detection.

  5. Monitoring and controlling intramedullary pressure increase in long bone instrumentation: a study on sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul N; Leditschke, Anne; McMahon, Damian; Sample, Roxanne R; Perriman, Diana; Prins, Anne; Brüssel, Thomas; Li, Rachel W

    2008-10-01

    Intramedullary reamed nailing causes elevation in intramedullary pressure and extravazation of intramedullary contents into the venous blood system. This study investigated the effect of an intramedullary suction system, recently developed in our laboratory, on the pressure and fat extravazation in isolated bovine bone and a sheep model. During reaming, the pressure with and without suction was recorded at each step of the procedure. Hemodynamic parameters of mean arterial blood pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary arterial CO(2) (PaCO(2)), heart rate, and oxygen saturation were monitored. Blood and lung tissue samples were collected for the examination of medullary fat intravazation. The increases of intramedullary pressure were dramatically reduced in the suction group (p sheep lung tissue in the nonsuction group. Total lipids in lung specimens was lower in the suction group (7.6 mg/g tissue) than in the nonsuction group (13.6 mg/g, p = 0.04). The suction system appears to control the surge in intramedullary pressure and therefore prevent fat embolism. (c) 2008 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  6. Nail psoriasis: clinical features, pathogenesis, differential diagnoses, and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haneke E

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Eckart Haneke1–4 1Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; 2Dermatology Practice Dermaticum, Freiburg, Germany; 3Centro de Dermatología Epidermis, Instituto CUF, Porto, Portugal; 4Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Gent, Belgium Abstract: Psoriasis is the skin disease that most frequently affects the nails. Depending on the very nail structure involved, different clinical nail alterations can be observed. Irritation of the apical matrix results in psoriatic pits, mid-matrix involvement may cause leukonychia, whole matrix affection may lead to red lunulae or severe nail dystrophy, nail bed involvement may cause salmon spots, subungual hyperkeratosis, and splinter hemorrhages, and psoriasis of the distal nail bed and hyponychium causes onycholysis whereas that of the proximal nail fold causes psoriatic paronychia. The more extensive the involvement, the more severe is the nail destruction. Pustular psoriasis may be seen as yellow spots under the nail or, in case of acrodermatitis continua suppurativa, as an insidious progressive loss of the nail organ. Nail psoriasis has a severe impact on quality of life and may interfere with professional and other activities. Management includes patient counseling, avoidance of stress and strain to the nail apparatus, and different types of treatment. Topical therapy may be tried but is rarely sufficiently efficient. Perilesional injections with corticosteroids and methotrexate are often beneficial but may be painful and cannot be applied to many nails. All systemic treatments clearing widespread skin lesions usually also clear the nail lesions. Recently, biologicals were introduced into nail psoriasis treatment and found to be very effective. However, their use is restricted to severe cases due to high cost and potential systemic adverse effects. Keywords: nail psoriasis, etiology, pathology, quality of life, impact, treatment

  7. Open tibial fractures: faster union after unreamed nailing than external fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, K A; Loohagen, G; Einarsdottir, H

    1999-10-01

    Unreamed intramedullary nailing is an alternative to external fixation in the treatment of open tibial fractures. We compared a prospective series of thirty-one patients managed with a solid nail with static interlocking without intramedullary reaming, with a retrospective series of thirty-one patients managed by external fixation. The protocol for soft tissue treatment was the same throughout the study period. Most fractures were caused by high energy trauma and included Grade I to III B injuries. The fracture wound infection rate was equal in both groups; there were two deep and three superficial infections in the nail group and three deep and two superficial infections in the external fixation group. In addition, eleven patients in the external fixation group had severe pin track infections. The mean time to union was five months in the nail group and eight months in the external fixation group. The incidence of delayed union was twice as high in the external fixation group as in the nail group. The number of surgical procedures performed to promote union was three times higher in the external fixation group. The malunion rate did not differ between the groups. Although the treatment groups are not fully comparable, the results indicate that intramedullary nailing is superior to external fixation in the treatment of most open tibial fractures.

  8. Distal digital replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazayeri, Leila; Klausner, Jill Q; Chang, James

    2013-11-01

    Hand surgeons have been hesitant to perform distal digital replantation because of the technical challenges and the perception of a high cost-to-benefit ratio. Recent studies, however, have shown high survival rates and excellent functional and aesthetic results, providing renewed enthusiasm for distal replantation. The authors reviewed the literature and summarize key points regarding the surgical treatment, perioperative care, and outcomes of distal digital replantation. They describe specific techniques and considerations for surgical repair in each of four distal zones as described by Sebastin and Chung. Zone 1A replantation involves an artery-only anastomosis of a longitudinal pulp artery. Venous anastomosis first becomes possible in zone 1B. Zone 1C involves periarticular amputations where arthrodesis of the distal interphalangeal joint is usually indicated. Repair of the artery, vein, and nerve is technically optimal in zone 1D, where venous anastomosis should be performed. Overall, survival rates for distal digital replantation are similar to those reported for more proximal replantation. The literature reports good outcomes regarding nail salvage, fingertip sensibility, and range of motion, with restoration of length and aesthetic appearance. Distal replantation performed at institutions that specialize in microsurgery and specifically tailored to the level of injury is associated with good survival, function, and patient satisfaction and superior aesthetic outcome. More prospective data are needed to evaluate the cost of treatment, psychological outcomes, and functional outcomes of distal replantation compared with revision amputation.

  9. Bending and torsional stiffness in cadaver humeri fixed with a self-locking expandable or interlocking nail system: a mechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Jochen; Karagül, Göksen; Sternstein, Werner; Rommens, Pol M

    2005-09-01

    This study was designed to gain data about a new expandable, noninterlocked intramedullary nail's capacity to stabilize unstable transverse humeral shaft fractures without the need for interlocking, thus making nail implantation simpler and to prove our goal hypothesis: that in a midshaft osteotomy of the humeral shaft the expandable humeral nail will show the same bending and torsional stiffness as an interlocked humeral nail, when implanted correctly according to the manufacturer's instructions. Pair randomization. Mechanical laboratory testing. Eight pairs of freshly harvested cadaveric humeri. Fracture model was a midshaft transverse osteotomy, gapped to 3 mm. Each humerus pair received an expandable humeral nail (Fixion) or an interlocked humerus nail (Synthes) through a retrograde approach. The humeri were fixed in polymethylmethacrylate cylinders and tested in a servo-pneumatic material-testing machine. Torsional stiffness and bending stiffness of the nail-bone-construction. Expandable nails (interlocked nails) showed a lateral bending stiffness of 0.73 +/- 0.14 (0.63 +/- 0.1) KN/mm (P = 0.026) and a frontal bending stiffness of 0.67 +/- 0.18 (0.58 +/- 0.09) KN/mm (P = 0.084). Torsional stiffness values were 0.13 +/- 0.19 (0.43 +/- 0.09 Nm/degrees) (P = 0.012). Lower torsional stiffness in the expandable nail group was observed in humeri with a funnel shaped proximal intramedullary canal. The nail systems showed similar characteristics for frontal bending (P = 0.084), but not for lateral bending (P = 0.026). For lateral bending, the Fixion nail showed significantly more stiffness than the UHN nail (P = 0.026). There was significantly lower torsional stiffness with expandable nails compared with interlocked nails. Clinical correlation would suggest that in rotationally unstable fractures (A2 and A3 diaphyseal fractures), interlocked nails would provide increased stability over expandable nails.

  10. Internal fixation of the fibula in ankle fractures: a prospective, randomized and comparative study: plating versus nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asloum, Y; Bedin, B; Roger, T; Charissoux, J-L; Arnaud, J-P; Mabit, C

    2014-06-01

    Open reduction and internal plate fixation of the fibula is the gold standard treatment for ankle fractures. The aim of this study was to perform a prospective randomized study to compare bone union, complications and functional results of two types of internal fixation of the fibula (plating and the Epifisa FH intramedullary nail). Inclusion criteria were: closed fractures, isolated displaced fractures of the lateral malleolus, inter- and supra-tubercular bimalleolar fractures, and trimalleolar fractures. This study included 71 patients (mean age 53 ± 19): plate fixation group (n=35) and intramedullary nail fixation group (n=36). In seven cases, intramedullary nailing was technically impossible and was converted to plate fixation (the analysis of this sub-group was performed independently). Two patients died and two patients were lost to follow-up. The final comparative series included 32 cases of plate fixation and 28 cases of intramedullary nail fixation. Union, postoperative complications and Kitaoka and Olerud-Molander functional scores were analyzed after one year of follow-up. There was no significant difference in the rate of union (P=0.5605) between the two types of fixation. There were significantly fewer complications (7% versus 56%) and better functional scores (96 versus 82 for the Kitaoka score; 97 versus 83 for the Olerud-Molander score) with intramedullary nailing than with plate fixation. Intramedullary nailing of the lateral malleolus in non-comminuted ankle fractures without syndesmotic injury is a reproducible technique with very few complications that provides better functional results than plate fixation. II (randomized prospective study). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Study of Ender’s Nailing in Paediatric Tibial Shaft Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Himanshu G. Ladani

    2015-01-01

    Background: Closed reduction & plaster is standard and effective form of treatment in majority of paediatric tibial shaft fractures. Operative intervention is necessary in unstable fractures, open fractures, poly trauma patients and compartment syndrome or severe soft tissue compromise. Historically, external fixation and plating were the treatment options available, but having complications like infection, overgrowth and refracture. Reamed locked intramedullary nails pose unnecessary risk to...

  12. A STUDY OF THE MANAGEMENT OF OPEN FRACTURES OF TIBIA BY UNREAMED INTERLOCKING NAIL

    OpenAIRE

    Harsha Kumar

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : 1. To evaluate the results of closed interlocking intramedullary nailing without reaming in the treatment of open fractures of the tibial shaft. (Gustillo type 1, type 2, type 3a, type 3b) . 2. To study the difficulties ( C omplications) encountered during the operative study. 3. To mobilize the patient early. ...

  13. Reinforcing the role of the conventional C-arm - a novel method for simplified distal interlocking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windolf Markus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The common practice for insertion of distal locking screws of intramedullary nails is a freehand technique under fluoroscopic control. The process is technically demanding, time-consuming and afflicted to considerable radiation exposure of the patient and the surgical personnel. A new concept is introduced utilizing information from within conventional radiographic images to help accurately guide the surgeon to place the interlocking bolt into the interlocking hole. The newly developed technique was compared to conventional freehand in an operating room (OR like setting on human cadaveric lower legs in terms of operating time and radiation exposure. Methods The proposed concept (guided freehand, generally based on the freehand gold standard, additionally guides the surgeon by means of visible landmarks projected into the C-arm image. A computer program plans the correct drilling trajectory by processing the lens-shaped hole projections of the interlocking holes from a single image. Holes can be drilled by visually aligning the drill to the planned trajectory. Besides a conventional C-arm, no additional tracking or navigation equipment is required. Ten fresh frozen human below-knee specimens were instrumented with an Expert Tibial Nail (Synthes GmbH, Switzerland. The implants were distally locked by performing the newly proposed technique as well as the conventional freehand technique on each specimen. An orthopedic resident surgeon inserted four distal screws per procedure. Operating time, number of images and radiation time were recorded and statistically compared between interlocking techniques using non-parametric tests. Results A 58% reduction in number of taken images per screw was found for the guided freehand technique (7.4 ± 3.4 (mean ± SD compared to the freehand technique (17.6 ± 10.3 (p p = 0.001. Operating time per screw (from first shot to screw tightened was on average 22% reduced by guided freehand (p = 0

  14. Interventions for nail psoriasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Anna Christa Q.; Bogaards, Nathalie A.; Hooft, Lotty; Velema, Marieke; Pasch, Marcel; Lebwohl, Mark; Spuls, Phyllis I.

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common skin disease that can also involve the nails. All parts of the nail and surrounding structures can become affected. The incidence of nail involvement increases with duration of psoriasis. Although it is difficult to treat psoriatic nails, the condition may respond to therapy.

  15. Interventions for nail psoriasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, A.C. de; Bogaards, N.A.; Hooft, L.; Velema, M.; Pasch, M.C.; Lebwohl, M.; Spuls, P.I.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a common skin disease that can also involve the nails. All parts of the nail and surrounding structures can become affected. The incidence of nail involvement increases with duration of psoriasis. Although it is difficult to treat psoriatic nails, the condition may respond

  16. Supracondylar Femoral Nail in the management of non-union of humeral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, S K; Mohan, N Rama; Kumar, C Senthil

    2004-05-01

    We reviewed seven patients with established non-union of a shaft of humerus fracture, treated by locked intramedullary nailing using the Intramedullary Supracondylar Nail (IMSC Nail; Smith & Nephew Richards, Memphis TN). The mean age of the patients was 65 years (range 48-78 years). Three of the fractures involved the proximal third of the diaphysis while the remaining four involved the middle third. Six of the original fractures were closed and one was an open fracture. The time interval between the original injury and final surgery averaged 9.3 months. All the nailings were done by the ante-grade approach with static locking. Six of the patients had closed nailing and one had open nailing with bone grafting. The mean follow-up was 8 months and osseous union was achieved in all seven cases at a mean of 5.6 months. We conclude that the Supracondylar Femoral Nail is a useful alternative implant in the management of non-union of fractures of the humeral shaft with wide medullary canals.

  17. [Nail diseases in cosmetology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleszka, Romuald; Ratajczak-Stefańska, Violetta; Boer, Magdalena; Kiedrowicz, Magdalena

    2010-01-01

    Clinical symptoms attributed to the nail apparatus and observed in cosmetology include atrophic or hypertrophic lesions, pathologic nail coloration, abnormalities of the nail surface, and disorders of the nail plate and bed junction. These symptoms may reflect pathologic processes limited to the nail apparatus or may be the consequence of a dermal or systemic disease. Even though the etiology of nail lesions is variegated, diseases of the nails are simply classified as infectious or non-infectious. The aim of this work was to present the most common diseases of the nail apparatus encountered in cosmetology. Often, nail diseases worsen the quality of life of the patient. In addition, the variegated symptomatology demonstrates that nail lesions should be viewed in a wider perspective because they often are important signs of pathologic processes taking place in the organism of the patient.

  18. Minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis for mid-distal third humeral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Kejian; Wang, Lei; Lin, Dasheng; Chen, Zhiwen

    2013-08-01

    Mid-distal third humeral shaft fractures can be effectively treated with minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis and intramedullary nailing (IMN). However, these 2 treatments have not been adequately compared. Forty-seven patients (47 fractures) with mid-distal third humeral shaft fractures were randomly allocated to undergo either minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis (n=24) or IMN (n=23). The 2 groups were similar in terms of fracture patterns, fracture location, age, and associated injuries. Intraoperative measurements included blood loss and operative time. Clinical outcome measurements included fracture healing, radial nerve recovery, and elbow and shoulder discomfort. Radiographic measurements included fracture alignment, time to healing, delayed union, and nonunion. Functional outcome was satisfactory in both groups. Mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score and Mayo score were both better for the minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis group than for the IMN group (98.2 vs 97.6, respectively, and 93.5 vs 94.1, respectively; Pshaft fractures. Minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis is more suitable for complex fractures, especially for radial protection and motion recovery of adjacent joints, compared with IMN for simple fractures. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Elastic stable intramedullary nailing in paediatric traumatology at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solid consolidation was achieved in all cases, with no disturbance in standard union times. At a mean follow-up period of 16 months (range, 9-28 months), all but 3 patients with opened joints recovered full range of motion, and none showed either limp and gait anomalies or re-fracture after removal of wires. Conclusion: ...

  20. Elastic stable intramedullary nailing in paediatric traumatology at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data were recorded from their medical charts regarding demographics, fracture patterns, associated injuries, morbidity, and outcome. Results: A total of 38 children (14 boys; mean age, 11.7 years; range, 9-15 years) with 41 fractures, sited at femur (n=15), humerus (n=8), tibia and fi bula (n=6), forearm (n=7), and radial neck ...

  1. Clinical Outcomes after Open Locked Intramedullary Nailing of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... length and alignment, pin tract infection, nonunion, and joint stiffness due to prolonged immobilization.[8,9] Open reduction and internal fixation have reduced some of these complications by enabling early mobilization of the patient after surgery. The gold standard for treating closed femoral shaft fractures ...

  2. Technique tip: use of anterior cruciate ligament jig for hindfoot fusion by calcanio-talo-tibial nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Syed; Sarkar, Jay

    2012-08-01

    The use of intramedullary nail fixation for tibio-talo-calcaneal fusion is gaining popularity. There is chance of failure of procedure following faulty operative technique specially alignment. The article describes a useful application of tibial tunnel jig in inserting the calcanio-talo-tibial guide wire. There is precision of few millimeters in the exit point of guide wire on talus. The authors believe that this helps in better positioning of nail and hence better alignment and better operative outcome.

  3. Transungual delivery of efinaconazole: its deposition in the nail of onychomycosis patients and in vitro fungicidal activity in human nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Misao; Sugimoto, Noriaki; Kawabata, Hideki; Yamakawa, Eiko; Kodera, Nobuyuki; Pillai, Radhakrishnan; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    Effective transungual delivery of topical antifungal agents in onychomycosis has been hampered by poor nail permeation. To be effective they must have antifungal efficacy, and effectively permeate through the dense keratinized nail plate to the site of infection in the nail bed and nail matrix. The therapeutic efficacy of efinaconazole topical solution, 10% has been established in two phase 3 clinical trials in distal lateral subungual onychomycosis. To investigate the transungual delivery of efinaconazole in onychomycosis patients and its fungicidal activity in the toenail. Concentrations of efinaconazole were determined as part of a multi-center, open label study in forty onychomycosis patients following repeated application of efinaconazole topical solution, 5% and 10% to the toenails over 28 days, with a 2-week follow-up. Fungicidal activity against T. rubrum in the ventral layer of human nails was determined using an in vitro human nail infection model (ChubTur®). Efinaconazole concentrations in the nail were four orders of magnitude higher than MIC values of efinaconazole against dermatophytes. Further, nail drug concentrations were not influenced by the presence of disease or nail thickness, and maintained at high antifungal levels post-treatment. Efinaconazole was ef