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Sample records for intraindividual variability tools

  1. Focus on variability : New tools to study intra-individual variability in developmental data

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    van Geert, P; van Dijk, M

    2002-01-01

    In accordance with dynamic systems theory, we assume that variability is an important developmental phenomenon. However, the standard methodological toolkit of the developmental psychologist offers few instruments for the study of variability. In this article we will present several new methods that

  2. Intra-individual variability as a predictor of learning

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    Matija Svetina

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Learning is one of the most important aspects of children's behaviour. A new theory that emerged from evolutionary principles and information-processing models assumes learning to be run by two basic mechanisms: variability and selection. The theory is based on the underlying assumption that intra-individual variability of strategies that children use to solve a problem, is a core mechanism of learning change. This assumption was tested in the case of multiple classification (MC task. 30 6-year-old children were tested for intelligence, short-term memory, and MC. Procedure followed classical pre-test/learning/post-test scheme. Amount of learning was measured through percentage of correct answers before and after learning sessions, whereas intra-individual variability was assessed through children's explanations of their answers on MC problems. The results yielded intra-individual variability to explain learning changes beyond inter-individual differences in intelligence or short-term memory. Although the results rose some new questions to be considered in further research, the data supported the hypothesis of intra-individual variability as predictor of learning change.

  3. Intraindividual variability in attentional vigilance in children with epilepsy.

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    Srnka, Kyle; Seidenberg, Michael; Hermann, Bruce; Jones, Jana

    2018-02-01

    Attentional vigilance, the ability to maintain focus over time, is frequently impaired in childhood epilepsy. Typically, indices of Omissions (failure to detect a target) and Commissions (responding to a nontarget) are considered primary indices of attentional vigilance. Recently, the concept of intraindividual variability (IIV) has been identified as an important measure of attentional vigilance in several pediatric and adult clinical populations, but has not yet been systematically examined in childhood epilepsy. Here, we examined IIV on the Connors Continuous Performance Task-II (CCPT-II) for 144 newly diagnosed children with epilepsy (age 8-18years) and a matched age group of healthy children (n=82). Intraindividual variability showed a large effect size difference (d=0.68) between groups. In addition, IIV significantly predicted both intellectual functioning and academic achievement. These findings support the utility of examining IIV in the assessment of attentional ability in childhood epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Modeling intraindividual variability with repeated measures data methods and applications

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    Hershberger, Scott L

    2013-01-01

    This book examines how individuals behave across time and to what degree that behavior changes, fluctuates, or remains stable.It features the most current methods on modeling repeated measures data as reported by a distinguished group of experts in the field. The goal is to make the latest techniques used to assess intraindividual variability accessible to a wide range of researchers. Each chapter is written in a ""user-friendly"" style such that even the ""novice"" data analyst can easily apply the techniques.Each chapter features:a minimum discussion of mathematical detail;an empirical examp

  5. Cognitive Intraindividual Variability and White Matter Integrity in Aging

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    Nathalie Mella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The intraindividual variability (IIV of cognitive performance has been shown to increase with aging. While brain research has generally focused on mean performance, little is known about neural correlates of cognitive IIV. Nevertheless, some studies suggest that IIV relates more strongly than mean level of performance to the quality of white matter (WM. Our study aims to explore the relation between WM integrity and cognitive IIV by combining functional (fMRI and structural (diffusion tensor imaging, DTI imaging. Twelve young adults (aged 18–30 years and thirteen older adults (61–82 years underwent a battery of neuropsychological tasks, along with fMRI and DTI imaging. Their behavioral data were analyzed and correlated with the imaging data at WM regions of interest defined on the basis of (1 the fMRI-activated areas and (2 the Johns Hopkins University (JHU WM tractography atlas. For both methods, fractional anisotropy, along with the mean, radial, and axial diffusivity parameters, was computed. In accord with previous studies, our results showed that the DTI parameters were more related to IIV than to mean performance. Results also indicated that age differences in the DTI parameters were more pronounced in the regions activated primarily by young adults during a choice reaction-time task than in those also activated in older adults.

  6. Age and Sex Differences in Intra-Individual Variability in a Simple Reaction Time Task

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    Ghisletta, Paolo; Renaud, Olivier; Fagot, Delphine; Lecerf, Thierry; de Ribaupierre, Anik

    2018-01-01

    While age effects in reaction time (RT) tasks across the lifespan are well established for level of performance, analogous findings have started appearing also for indicators of intra-individual variability (IIV). Children are not only slower, but also display more variability than younger adults in RT. Yet, little is known about potential…

  7. Aerobic Fitness and Intra-Individual Variability of Neurocognition in Preadolescent Children

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    Moore, Robert Davis; Wu, Chien-Ting; Pontifex, Matthew B.; O'Leary, Kevin C.; Scudder, Mark R.; Raine, Lauren B.; Johnson, Christopher R.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined behavioral and neuroelectric intra-individual variability (IIV) in preadolescent children during a task requiring variable amounts of cognitive control. The current study further examined whether IIV was moderated by aerobic fitness level. Participants performed a modified flanker task, comprised of congruent and incongruent…

  8. Varieties of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder-related intra-individual variability

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    Castellanos, F.X.; Sonuga-Barke, E.J.S.; Scheres, A.P.J.; Martino, A. Di; Hyde, C.; Walters, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    Intra-individual variability in behavior and functioning is ubiquitous among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but it has not been systematically examined or integrated within causal models. This article seeks to provide a conceptual, methodologic, and analytic framework

  9. Intraindividual response variability is malleable: Feedback- and education-related reductions in variability with age

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    Douglas D. Garrett

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Intraindividual variability (IIV in trial-to-trial reaction time is a robust and stable within-person marker of aging. However, it remains unknown whether IIV can be modulated experimentally. In a sample of healthy younger and older adults, we examined the effects of motivation- and performance-based feedback, age, and education level on IIV in a choice RT task (four blocks over 15 minutes. We found that IIV was reduced with block-by-block feedback, particularly for highly educated older adults. Notably, the baseline difference in IIV levels between this group and the young adults was reduced by 50%; by the final testing block, this advantaged older group had improved such that they were statistically indistinguishable from young adults on two of three preceding testing blocks. Our findings confirmed that response IIV is indeed modifiable, within mere minutes of feedback and testing.

  10. Both Reaction Time and Accuracy Measures of Intraindividual Variability Predict Cognitive Performance in Alzheimer's Disease

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    Björn U. Christ

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dementia researchers around the world prioritize the urgent need for sensitive measurement tools that can detect cognitive and functional change at the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Sensitive indicators of underlying neural pathology assist in the early detection of cognitive change and are thus important for the evaluation of early-intervention clinical trials. One method that may be particularly well-suited to help achieve this goal involves the quantification of intraindividual variability (IIV in cognitive performance. The current study aimed to directly compare two methods of estimating IIV (fluctuations in accuracy-based scores vs. those in latency-based scores to predict cognitive performance in AD. Specifically, we directly compared the relative sensitivity of reaction time (RT—and accuracy-based estimates of IIV to cognitive compromise. The novelty of the present study, however, centered on the patients we tested [a group of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD] and the outcome measures we used (a measure of general cognitive function and a measure of episodic memory function. Hence, we compared intraindividual standard deviations (iSDs from two RT tasks and three accuracy-based memory tasks in patients with possible or probable Alzheimer's dementia (n = 23 and matched healthy controls (n = 25. The main analyses modeled the relative contributions of RT vs. accuracy-based measures of IIV toward the prediction of performance on measures of (a overall cognitive functioning, and (b episodic memory functioning. Results indicated that RT-based IIV measures are superior predictors of neurocognitive impairment (as indexed by overall cognitive and memory performance than accuracy-based IIV measures, even after adjusting for the timescale of measurement. However, one accuracy-based IIV measure (derived from a recognition memory test also differentiated patients with AD from controls, and significantly predicted episodic memory

  11. Intra-individual variability in cerebrovascular and respiratory chemosensitivity: Can we characterize a chemoreflex "reactivity profile"?

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    Borle, Kennedy J; Pfoh, Jamie R; Boulet, Lindsey M; Abrosimova, Maria; Tymko, Michael M; Skow, Rachel J; Varner, Amy; Day, Trevor A

    2017-08-01

    Intra-individual variability in the magnitude of human cerebrovascular and respiratory chemoreflex responses is largely unexplored. By comparing response magnitudes of cerebrovascular CO 2 reactivity (CVR; middle and posterior cerebral arteries; MCA, PCA), central (CCR; CO 2 ) and peripheral respiratory chemoreflexes (PCR; CO 2 and O 2 ), we tested the hypothesis that a within-individual reactivity magnitude profile could be characterized. The magnitudes of CVR and CCR were tested with hyperoxic rebreathing and PCR magnitudes were tested through transient respiratory tests (TT-CO 2 , hypercapnia; TT-N 2 , hypoxia). No significant intra-individual relationships were found between CCR vs. CVR (MCA and PCA), CCR vs. PCR (TT-N 2 or TT-CO 2 ) (r0.3) response magnitudes. Statistically significant relationships were found between MCA vs. PCA reactivity (r=0.45, Pvariability that exists in human cerebrovascular and respiratory chemoreflexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. ITS1 intra-individual variability of Ascaris isolates from Brazil.

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    Leles, Daniela; Araújo, Adauto; Vicente, Ana Carolina Paulo; Iñiguez, Alena Mayo

    2010-03-01

    The zoonotic potential of Ascaris infecting pigs has stimulated studies of molecular epidemiology with internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) as the target. The aim of this study was to determine the value of Ascaris ITS1 as a molecular marker through assessing the intra-individual genetic diversity of Ascaris isolates from two geographical areas of Brazil. DNA was extracted from single isolated eggs, ITS1 PCR was performed, and the PCR products were cloned and sequenced. Clone analysis showed high ITS1 intra-individual variability revealed by 2-4 ITS1 genotypes/haplotypes per sample (egg). Two genotypes, G1 and G6, and 13 new haplotypes were detected and characterized. The most prevalent in humans, G1 and/or the Brazilian G6, were detected in all samples. Except for genotype G1, no relationship was observed between Brazilian ITS1 genotypes/haplotypes and those previously described in China, Bangladesh, Japan, United Kingdom, Australia, and Denmark, with respect to geographic origin or host affiliation. However, an association between the two geographically separated Brazilian ITS1 isolates was observed. The ITS1 intra-individual variability revealed in this study indicated that the use of this genetic region to discriminate human and pig Ascaris genotypes should be reconsidered. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Intraindividual Variability in Domain-Specific Cognition and Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia

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    Leslie Vaughan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraindividual variability among cognitive domains may predict dementia independently of interindividual differences in cognition. A multidomain cognitive battery was administered to 2305 older adult women (mean age 74 years enrolled in an ancillary study of the Women’s Health Initiative. Women were evaluated annually for probable dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI for an average of 5.3 years using a standardized protocol. Proportional hazards regression showed that lower baseline domain-specific cognitive scores significantly predicted MCI (N=74, probable dementia (N=45, and MCI or probable dementia combined (N=101 and that verbal and figural memory predicted each outcome independently of all other cognitive domains. The baseline intraindividual standard deviation across test scores (IAV Cognitive Domains significantly predicted probable dementia and this effect was attenuated by interindividual differences in verbal episodic memory. Slope increases in IAV Cognitive Domains across measurement occasions (IAV Time explained additional risk for MCI and MCI or probable dementia, beyond that accounted for by interindividual differences in multiple cognitive measures, but risk for probable dementia was attenuated by mean decreases in verbal episodic memory slope. These findings demonstrate that within-person variability across cognitive domains both at baseline and longitudinally independently accounts for risk of cognitive impairment and dementia in support of the predictive utility of within-person variability.

  14. Intra-individual gait pattern variability in specific situations: Implications for forensic gait analysis.

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    Ludwig, Oliver; Dillinger, Steffen; Marschall, Franz

    2016-07-01

    In this study, inter- and intra-individual gait pattern differences are examined in various gait situations by means of phase diagrams of the extremity angles (cyclograms). 8 test subjects walked along a walking distance of 6m under different conditions three times each: barefoot, wearing sneakers, wearing combat boots, after muscular fatigue, and wearing a full-face motorcycle helmet restricting vision. The joint angles of foot, knee, and hip were recorded in the sagittal plane. The coupling of movements was represented by time-adjusted cyclograms, and the inter- and intra-individual differences were captured by calculating the similarity between different gait patterns. Gait pattern variability was often greater between the defined test situations than between the individual test subjects. The results have been interpreted considering neurophysiological regulation mechanisms. Footwear, masking, and fatigue were interpreted as disturbance parameters, each being a cause for gait pattern variability and complicating the inference of identity of persons in video recordings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Intra-individual Variability in Prodromal Huntington Disease and Its Relationship to Genetic Burden.

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    Musso, Mandi; Westervelt, Holly James; Long, Jeffrey D; Morgan, Erin; Woods, Steven Paul; Smith, Megan M; Lu, Wenjing; Paulsen, Jane S

    2015-01-01

    The current study sought to examine the utility of intra-individual variability (IIV) in distinguishing participants with prodromal Huntington disease (HD) from nongene-expanded controls. IIV across 15 neuropsychological tasks and within-task IIV using a self-paced timing task were compared as a single measure of processing speed (Symbol Digit Modalities Test [SDMT]) in 693 gene-expanded and 191 nongene-expanded participants from the PREDICT-HD study. After adjusting for depressive symptoms and motor functioning, individuals estimated to be closest to HD diagnosis displayed higher levels of across- and within-task variability when compared to controls and those prodromal HD participants far from disease onset (F ICV(3,877)=11.25; pdisease onset. However, individual neuropsychological tasks, including a measure of within-task variability, produced larger effect sizes than an index of across-task IIV in this sample.

  16. Intra-individual variability in gait and in cognitive performance are not related in the elderly.

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    Sukits, Alison L; Nebes, Robert D; Chambers, April J; Ledgerwood, Aaron; Halligan, Edythe M; Perera, Subashan; Cham, Rakié

    2014-01-01

    As humans age, the amount of intra-individual variability (IIV) present in both their gait and their cognitive performance tends to increase. Both gait and cognitive IIV are associated with attentional control and with cerebrovascular disease, suggesting that the IIV in gait and cognitive function should be strongly correlated in the elderly. In this study temporal gait variability was determined from a 60-second period of walking. Cognitive variability was determined from two decision-time tasks assessing inhibition. Despite the presence of substantial amounts of gait and cognitive IIV in 71 elderly individuals, there were no significant correlations between measures of cognitive and gait IIV, suggesting that different factors drive IIV in the motor and cognitive performance of older individuals. These results are not consistent with the common cause theory of aging, which predicts that cognitive and sensorimotor performance should show related declines due to age-related disruption of a common neurological substrate.

  17. Change in intraindividual variability over time as a key metric for defining performance-based cognitive fatigability.

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    Wang, Chao; Ding, Mingzhou; Kluger, Benzi M

    2014-03-01

    Cognitive fatigability is conventionally quantified as the increase over time in either mean reaction time (RT) or error rate from two or more time periods during sustained performance of a prolonged cognitive task. There is evidence indicating that these mean performance measures may not sufficiently reflect the response characteristics of cognitive fatigue. We hypothesized that changes in intraindividual variability over time would be a more sensitive and ecologically meaningful metric for investigations of fatigability of cognitive performance. To test the hypothesis fifteen young adults were recruited. Trait fatigue perceptions in various domains were assessed with the Multidimensional Fatigue Index (MFI). Behavioral data were then recorded during performance of a three-hour continuous cued Stroop task. Results showed that intraindividual variability, as quantified by the coefficient of variation of RT, increased linearly over the course of three hours and demonstrated a significantly greater effect size than mean RT or accuracy. Change in intraindividual RT variability over time was significantly correlated with relevant subscores of the MFI including reduced activity, reduced motivation and mental fatigue. While change in mean RT over time was also correlated with reduced motivation and mental fatigue, these correlations were significantly smaller than those associated with intraindividual RT variability. RT distribution analysis using an ex-Gaussian model further revealed that change in intraindividual variability over time reflects an increase in the exponential component of variance and may reflect attentional lapses or other breakdowns in cognitive control. These results suggest that intraindividual variability and its change over time provide important metrics for measuring cognitive fatigability and may prove useful for inferring the underlying neuronal mechanisms of both perceptions of fatigue and objective changes in performance. Copyright © 2014

  18. Growth Trajectories and Detrended Intraindividual Variability to Assess Case Managers' Competency in Continuing Education.

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    Park, Claire Su-Yeon; Kang, Kyong-Hwa; Yun, Soon-Nyoung

    2017-05-01

    Tracking the effectiveness of CE over time beyond simply confirming its efficacy in continuing education (CE) in nursing is crucial. However, research evidence on the analysis of change of the effectiveness of CE over time is limited, particularly in the context of case management. This methodological study aimed to introduce both a growth curve modeling and an intra-individual variability index and demonstrate step-by-step procedures and interpretations of those analyses to assess case manager competency over time, using secondary data analysis. Data were collected from 22 case managers affiliated with the Korean National Health Insurance Corporation who attended three series of CE to improve their competency between May 2008 and August 2009. Unexpected results revealed a negative fixed effect of education level in the overall estimation of case managers' competency trajectory and a negative correlation between education level and case managers' intra-individual competency inconsistency over time. J Contin Nurs Educ. 2017;48(5):230-238. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Intraindividual variability and the effect of acute illness on immune senescence markers.

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    High, Kevin P; Trader, Melissa; Pahor, Marco; Loeb, Mark

    2005-10-01

    To determine the intraindividual variability and effect of acute illness on two markers of immune senescence. Cohort study with repeated measures. Clinical research center and emergency department at two academic medical centers. Seventy-three subjects aged 65 and older enrolled in three groups: chronic underlying conditions but no acute illness, acutely ill with infection (community-acquired pneumonia), and acutely ill without infection. CD16 density on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and the proportion of CD8+ T cells that express CD28 determined twice in the nonacutely ill group and three times (Days 0, 30, and 60) in the acute illness groups. In the nonacutely ill group, PMN CD16 density demonstrated wide intraindividual variation, but there was a strong correlation for repeated measures of the percentage of CD8+ T cells expressing CD28 (correlation coefficient (r)=0.77, PDay 0 versus Day 30 for either immune marker. In contrast, a strong correlation existed between Day 30 and Day 60 values, particularly for CD8+/CD28+ percentage (r=0.58-0.86; P=.006 to days of convalescence appears adequate for it to return to baseline.

  20. Intraindividual reaction time variability affects P300 amplitude rather than latency

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    Anusha eRamchurn

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The neural correlates of intraindividual response variability were investigated in a serial choice reaction time (CRT task. Reaction times (RTs from the faster and slower portions of the RT distribution for the task were separately aggregated and associated P300 event-related potentials computed. Independent behavioral measures of executive function and IQ were also recorded. Across frontal, fronto-central, central, centro-parietal and parietal scalp regions, P300 amplitudes were significantly greater for faster relative to slower behavioral responses. However, P300 peak amplitude latencies did not differ according to the speed of the behavioral RT. Importantly, controlling for select independent measures of executive function attenuated shared variance in P300 amplitude for faster and slower trials. The findings suggest that P300 amplitude rather than latency is associated with the speed of behavioral RTs, and the possibility that fluctuations in executive control underlie variability in speeded responding.

  1. Neuroticism, intelligence, and intra-individual variability in elementary cognitive tasks: testing the mental noise hypothesis.

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    Colom, Roberto; Quiroga, Ma Angeles

    2009-08-01

    Some studies show positive correlations between intraindividual variability in elementary speed measures (reflecting processing efficiency) and individual differences in neuroticism (reflecting instability in behaviour). The so-called neural noise hypothesis assumes that higher levels of noise are related both to smaller indices of processing efficiency and greater levels of neuroticism. Here, we test this hypothesis measuring mental speed by means of three elementary cognitive tasks tapping similar basic processes but varying systematically their content (verbal, numerical, and spatial). Neuroticism and intelligence are also measured. The sample comprised 196 undergraduate psychology students. The results show that (1) processing efficiency is generally unrelated to individual differences in neuroticism, (2) processing speed and efficiency correlate with intelligence, and (3) only the efficiency index is genuinely related to intelligence when the colinearity between speed and efficiency is controlled.

  2. Mean-Level Change and Intraindividual Variability in Self-Esteem and Depression among High-Risk Children

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    Kim, Jungmeen; Cicchetti, Dante

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated mean-level changes and intraindividual variability of self-esteem among maltreated (N = 142) and nonmaltreated (N = 109) school-aged children from low-income families. Longitudinal factor analysis revealed higher temporal stability of self-esteem among maltreated children compared to nonmaltreated children. Cross-domain…

  3. Intra-individual variability among children with ADHD on a working memory task: an ex-Gaussian approach.

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    Buzy, Wendy M; Medoff, Deborah R; Schweitzer, Julie B

    2009-09-01

    Intra-individual variability on a computer-based working memory task was examined among 25 children/adolescents with ADHD and 24 typically developing peers. Participants completed the Visual Serial Addition Task (VSAT) and reaction time data were fit to an ex-Gaussian distribution. ADHD participants demonstrated significantly more variable performance than controls, and effects of working memory load were observed. Event rate, however, had no influence on group differences in performance. Follow-up correlations revealed associations between VSAT performance and ADHD symptomatology. This study supports intra-individual variability as a hallmark feature of ADHD beyond the domain of response inhibition and reinforces the need to consider variability in ADHD more broadly.

  4. Assessing intraindividual variability in sustained attention: reliability, relation to speed and accuracy, and practice effects

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    HAGEN C. FLEHMIG

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the psychometric properties of competing measures of sustained attention. 179 subjects were assessed twice within seven day's time with a test designed to measure sustained attention, or concentration, respectively. In addition to traditional performance indices [i.e., speed (MRT and accuracy (E%], we evaluated two intraindividual response time (RT variability measures: standard deviation (SDRT and coefficient of variation (CVRT. For the overall test, both indices were reliable. SDRT showed good to acceptable retest reliability for all subtests. For CVRT, retest reliability coefficients ranged from very good to not satisfactory. While the reversed-word recognition test proved highly reliable, the mental calculation test and the arrows test were not sufficiently reliable. CVRT was only slightly correlated but SDRT was highly correlated with MRT. In contrast to substantial practice gains for MRT, SDRT and E%, only CVRT proved to be stable. In conclusion, CVRT appears to be a potential index for assessing performance variability: it is reliable for the overall test, only moderately correlated with speed, and virtually not affected by practice. However, before applying CVRT in practical assessment settings, additional research is required to elucidate the impact of task-specific factors on the reliability of this performance measure.

  5. Intraindividual variability of boldness is repeatable across contexts in a wild lizard.

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    Laura Highcock

    Full Text Available Animals do not behave in exactly the same way when repeatedly tested in the same context or situation, even once systematic variation, such as habituation, has been controlled for. This unpredictability is called intraindividual variability (IIV and has been little studied in animals. Here we investigated how IIV in boldness (estimated by flight initiation distances changed across two seasons--the dry, non-breeding season and the wet, breeding season--in a wild population of the Namibian rock agama, Agama planiceps. We found significant differences in IIV both between individuals and seasons, and IIV was higher in the wet season, suggesting plasticity in IIV. Further, IIV was highly repeatable (r = 0.61 between seasons and we found strong negative correlations between consistent individual differences in flight initiation distances, i.e. their boldness, and individuals' IIVs. We suggest that to understand personality in animals, researchers should generate a personality 'profile' that includes not only the relative level of a trait (i.e. its personality, but also its plasticity and variability under natural conditions.

  6. Sleep and Physiological Dysregulation: A Closer Look at Sleep Intraindividual Variability.

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    Bei, Bei; Seeman, Teresa E; Carroll, Judith E; Wiley, Joshua F

    2017-09-01

    Variable daily sleep (ie, higher intraindividual variability; IIV) is associated with negative health consequences, but potential physiological mechanisms are poorly understood. This study examined how the IIV of sleep timing, duration, and quality is associated with physiological dysregulation, with diurnal cortisol trajectories as a proximal outcome and allostatic load (AL) as a multisystem distal outcome. Participants are 436 adults (Mage ± standard deviation = 54.1 ± 11.7, 60.3% women) from the Midlife in the United States study. Sleep was objectively assessed using 7-day actigraphy. Diurnal cortisol was measured via saliva samples (four/day for 4 consecutive days). AL was measured using 23 biomarkers from seven systems (inflammatory, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, metabolic glucose and lipid, cardiovascular, parasympathetic, sympathetic) using a validated bifactor model. Linear and quadratic effects of sleep IIV were estimated using a validated Bayesian model. Controlling for covariates, more variable sleep timing (p = .04 for risetime, p = .097 for bedtime) and total sleep time (TST; p = .02), but not mean sleep variables, were associated with flatter cortisol diurnal slope. More variable sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset, later average bedtime, and shorter TST were associated with higher AL adjusting for age and sex (p-values sleep patterns were associated with blunted diurnal cortisol trajectories but not with higher multisystem physiological dysregulation. The associations between sleep IIV and overall health are likely complex, including multiple biopsychosocial determinants and require further investigation. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Actigraphy Detects Greater Intra-Individual Variability During Gait in Non-Manifesting LRRK2 Mutation Carriers.

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    van den Heuvel, Lieneke; Lim, Andrew S; Visanji, Naomi P; Huang, Jana; Ghate, Taneera; Mestre, Tiago A; AlDakheel, Amaal; Connolly, Barbara S; Gasca-Salas, Carmen; Kern, Drew S; Jain, Jennifer; Slow, Elizabeth J; Pondal, Margarita; Faust-Socher, Achinoam; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Tomlinson, George; Lang, Anthony E; Marras, Connie

    2018-01-01

    With recent advances in the search for disease-modifying therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD) the importance of identifying prodromal markers becomes greater. Non-manifesting LRRK2 mutation carriers (NMC) are at risk for developing PD, and provide a population in which to identify possible markers. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that NMC have differences in daily activity, fragmentation of sleep, arm swing asymmetry, and movement variability during walking, detectable by actigraphy, as compared to matched control subjects. Eleven NMC, fourteen PD patients (4 LRRK2-PD, 10 idiopathic PD (iPD)), and twenty-nine controls wore wristbands containing an accelerometer for seven days, and performed a daily walking task. Outcome measures included daily activity, fragmentation of activity, fragmentation of sleep, arm swing asymmetry during walking, and intra-individual variability. Compared to healthy controls, both NMC and LRRK2/iPD showed higher intra-individual variability in activity during walking compared to healthy controls. Individuals with LRRK2-PD/iPD, but not NMC, tend to have lower activity levels, more arm swing asymmetry and less increase of arm swing with transition from slow to faster walking speed compared to healthy controls. Higher intra-individual variability of gait-associated movements might be a useful biomarker of prodromal PD. These results encourage replication in a larger sample and longitudinal analysis is warranted.

  8. Intra-individual variability in information processing speed reflects white matter microstructure in multiple sclerosis.

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    Mazerolle, Erin L; Wojtowicz, Magdalena A; Omisade, Antonina; Fisk, John D

    2013-01-01

    Slowed information processing speed is commonly reported in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), and is typically investigated using clinical neuropsychological tests, which provide sensitive indices of mean-level information processing speed. However, recent studies have demonstrated that within-person variability or intra-individual variability (IIV) in information processing speed may be a more sensitive indicator of neurologic status than mean-level performance on clinical tests. We evaluated the neural basis of increased IIV in mildly affected relapsing-remitting MS patients by characterizing the relation between IIV (controlling for mean-level performance) and white matter integrity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Twenty women with relapsing-remitting MS and 20 matched control participants completed the Computerized Test of Information Processing (CTIP), from which both mean response time and IIV were calculated. Other clinical measures of information processing speed were also collected. Relations between IIV on the CTIP and DTI metrics of white matter microstructure were evaluated using tract-based spatial statistics. We observed slower and more variable responses on the CTIP in MS patients relative to controls. Significant relations between white matter microstructure and IIV were observed for MS patients. Increased IIV was associated with reduced integrity in more white matter tracts than was slowed information processing speed as measured by either mean CTIP response time or other neuropsychological test scores. Thus, despite the common use of mean-level performance as an index of cognitive dysfunction in MS, IIV may be more sensitive to the overall burden of white matter disease at the microstructural level. Furthermore, our study highlights the potential value of considering within-person fluctuations, in addition to mean-level performance, for uncovering brain-behavior relationships in neurologic disorders with widespread white matter pathology.

  9. Intraindividual variability in inhibitory function in adults with ADHD--an ex-Gaussian approach.

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    Dennis Gmehlin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Attention deficit disorder (ADHD is commonly associated with inhibitory dysfunction contributing to typical behavioral symptoms like impulsivity or hyperactivity. However, some studies analyzing intraindividual variability (IIV of reaction times in children with ADHD (cADHD question a predominance of inhibitory deficits. IIV is a measure of the stability of information processing and provides evidence that longer reaction times (RT in inhibitory tasks in cADHD are due to only a few prolonged responses which may indicate deficits in sustained attention rather than inhibitory dysfunction. We wanted to find out, whether a slowing in inhibitory functioning in adults with ADHD (aADHD is due to isolated slow responses. METHODS: Computing classical RT measures (mean RT, SD, ex-Gaussian parameters of IIV (which allow a better separation of reaction time (mu, variability (sigma and abnormally slow responses (tau than classical measures as well as errors of omission and commission, we examined response inhibition in a well-established GoNogo task in a sample of aADHD subjects without medication and healthy controls matched for age, gender and education. RESULTS: We did not find higher numbers of commission errors in aADHD, while the number of omissions was significantly increased compared with controls. In contrast to increased mean RT, the distributional parameter mu did not document a significant slowing in aADHD. However, subjects with aADHD were characterized by increased IIV throughout the entire RT distribution as indicated by the parameters sigma and tau as well as the SD of reaction time. Moreover, we found a significant correlation between tau and the number of omission errors. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings question a primacy of inhibitory deficits in aADHD and provide evidence for attentional dysfunction. The present findings may have theoretical implications for etiological models of ADHD as well as more practical implications for

  10. Intraindividual Variability across Neuropsychological Tests: Dispersion and Disengaged Lifestyle Increase Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Drew W. R. Halliday

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Increased intraindividual variability (IIV in function has been linked to various age-related outcomes including cognitive decline and dementia. Most studies have operationalized IIV as fluctuations across trials (e.g., response latencies for a single task, with comparatively few studies examining variability across multiple tasks for a given individual. In the present study, we derive a multivariable operationalization of dispersion across a broad profile of neuropsychological measures and use this index along with degree of engaged lifestyle to predict risk of cognitive impairment. Participants and Methods: Participants (n = 60 were community-dwelling older adults aged 65+ years (M = 74.1, SD = 6.5 participating in a cross-sectional investigation of risk factors for amnestic mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI and probable Alzheimer’s Disease (AD. Participants were classified into three subgroups based on test performance and clinical judgement. Healthy controls (n = 30 scored better than −1 SD relative to existing norms on all classification measures, in the absence of memory complaints or functional impairments. The a-MCI group (n = 23 had self- or informant-reported memory complaints and scored 1 SD or more below the mean for at least one memory task while scoring better than 1 SD below the mean for all other cognitive domains, in the absence of functional impairments. The AD group (n = 7 scored at least 2 SD below the mean for two cognitive domains (including memory with impairments in functioning. Measures spanned a range of cognitive domains (episodic memory, executive function, language, with the derived dispersion estimates reflecting variability across an individual’s neuropsychological profile relative to the group average. Further, an Activities Lifestyle Questionnaire, indexing social, cognitive, and physical behaviors, was administered to assess the protective benefits of engaged lifestyle. Results: Multinomial

  11. Resting heart rate variability is associated with ex-Gaussian metrics of intra-individual reaction time variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Derek P; Williams, DeWayne P; Speller, Lassiter F; Brooks, Justin R; Thayer, Julian F

    2018-03-01

    The relationships between vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) and the cognitive mechanisms underlying performance can be elucidated with ex-Gaussian modeling-an approach that quantifies two different forms of intra-individual variability (IIV) in reaction time (RT). To this end, the current study examined relations of resting vmHRV to whole-distribution and ex-Gaussian IIV. Subjects (N = 83) completed a 5-minute baseline while vmHRV (root mean square of successive differences; RMSSD) was measured. Ex-Gaussian (sigma, tau) and whole-distribution (standard deviation) estimates of IIV were derived from reaction times on a Stroop task. Resting vmHRV was found to be inversely related to tau (exponential IIV) but not to sigma (Gaussian IIV) or the whole-distribution standard deviation of RTs. Findings suggest that individuals with high vmHRV can better prevent attentional lapses but not difficulties with motor control. These findings inform the differential relationships of cardiac vagal control to the cognitive processes underlying human performance. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasma Beta-Trace Protein as a Marker of Residual Renal Function: The Effect of Different Hemodialysis Modalities and Intra-Individual Variability over Time

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    Amaryllis H. van Craenenbroeck

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Beta-trace protein (BTP is a low-molecular-weight molecule, which may be used to assess residual renal function (RRF in dialysis patients. Here we evaluated the influence of hemodialysis (HD and hemodiafiltration (HDF on plasma BTP, and analyzed the inter- and intra-individual variability of plasma BTP over time in HD and peritoneal dialysis (PD patients. Methods: In 12 prevalent HD patients, the effect of a single session of low-flux HD, high-flux HD and HDF on plasma BTP was studied. Blood samples were taken at baseline, after 120 and 240 minutes, and at the start of the next dialysis session. In 13 HD patients and 10 PD patients, inter- and intra-individual variability over three months was studied (monthly and weekly, respectively. Plasma BTP was measured using a nephelometric method. Results: No significant decrease in plasma BTP was seen following a session of low-flux HD. Both high-flux HD and HDF resulted in a significant decrease immediately after dialysis (22% and 61% median decrease, respectively. A significant reduction of the molecule persisted only in HDF and a significant decrease (-15% was still found immediately before the start of the next dialysis session. In both HD and PD patients, the reproducibility over time was excellent with intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.96 (0.93-0.99 and 0.92 (0.86-0.99 respectively. In a small cohort of PD patients, fair agreement existed between mGFR (average of renal urea and creatinine clearance from a 24 hours urine collection and the BTP-based GFR estimation. Conclusion: BTP is a stable marker and a promising tool for RRF estimations in PD and HD patients. In patients receiving HDF, plasma levels of BTP should be interpreted with caution.

  13. Intraindividual Variability Is a Fundamental Phenomenon of Aging: Evidence from an 8-Year Longitudinal Study across Young, Middle, and Older Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielak, Allison A. M.; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Bunce, David; Anstey, Kaarin J.

    2014-01-01

    Moment-to-moment intraindividual variability (IIV) in cognitive speed is a sensitive behavioral indicator of the integrity of the aging brain and brain damage, but little information is known about how IIV changes from being relatively low in young adulthood to substantially higher in older adulthood. We evaluated possible age group, sex, and task…

  14. Beyond interference control impairment in ADHD: evidence from increased intraindividual variability in the color-stroop test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, Erika; de Ribaupierre, Anik; Cornoldi, Cesare; Chicherio, Christian

    2013-09-01

    The present study investigates intraindividual variability (IIV) in the Color-Stroop test and in a simple reaction time (SRT) task. Performance level and variability in reaction times (RTs)-quantified with different measures such as individual standard deviation (ISD) and coefficient of variation (ICV), as well as ex-Gaussian parameters (mu, sigma, tau)-were analyzed in 24 children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and 24 typically developing children (TDC). Children with ADHD and TDC presented equivalent Color-Stroop interference effects when mean RTs were considered, and the two groups did not differ in the SRT task. Interestingly, compared to TDC, children with ADHD were more variable in their responses, showing increased ISD and ICV in the Color-Stroop interference condition and in the SRT task. Moreover, children with ADHD exhibited higher tau values-that is, more frequent abnormally long RTs-in the Color-Stroop interference condition than did the TDC, but comparable tau values in the SRT, suggesting more variable responses. These results speak in favor of a general deficit in more basic and central processes that only secondarily may affect the efficiency of inhibitory processes in children with ADHD. Overall the present findings confirm the role of IIV as a cornerstone in the ADHD cognitive profile and support the search for fine-grained analysis of performance fluctuations.

  15. Beyond the mean: A systematic review on the correlates of daily intraindividual variability of sleep/wake patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Bei; Wiley, Joshua F; Trinder, John; Manber, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    Features of an individual's sleep/wake patterns across multiple days are governed by two dimensions, the mean and the intraindividual variability (IIV). The existing literature focuses on the means, while the nature and correlates of sleep/wake IIV are not well understood. A systematic search of records in five major databases from inception to November 2014 identified 53 peer-reviewed empirical publications that examined correlates of sleep/wake IIV in adults. Overall, this literature appeared unsystematic and post hoc, with under-developed theoretical frameworks and inconsistent methodologies. Correlates most consistently associated with greater IIV in one or more aspects of sleep/wake patterns were: younger age, non-White race/ethnicity, living alone, physical health conditions, higher body mass index, weight gain, bipolar and unipolar depression symptomatology, stress, and evening chronotype; symptoms of insomnia and poor sleep were associated with higher sleep/wake IIV, which was reduced following sleep interventions. The effects of experimentally reduced sleep/wake IIV on daytime functioning were inconclusive. In extending current understanding of sleep/wake patterns beyond the mean values, IIV should be incorporated as an additional dimension when sleep is examined across multiple days. Theoretical and methodological shortcomings in the existing literature, and opportunities for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Intraindividual Variability and Long-Term Changes of Thermal Quantitative Sensory Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Thomas; Sothynathan, Isaivani; Sindrup, Søren H

    2015-01-01

    Thermal threshold examinations are widely used in the clinical setting and in studies to assess the function of the peripheral sensory nervous system. Little is known about the variation from one side of the body to the other and the long-term temporal changes and variability. In this study, 134...

  17. Evaluation of intra-individual test–re-test variability of uroflowmetry in healthy women and women suffering from stress, urge, and mixed urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunacek, Libor; Gärtner, Marcel; Krhut, Jan

    2018-01-01

    -individual difference in any of the recorded parameters was identified among the three UFM recordings in groups A, C, and D. The intra-individual variability of the following parameters reached statistical significance in patients suffering from stress urinary incontinence (group B): Qmax (p = 0.0016), Qave (p = 0.0005......), and cQave (p = 0.0389). A significant difference was only observed in comparison between the first and second consecutive recordings. Conclusions: This study provides evidence supporting the high yield and good intra-individual reproducibility of UFM....... incontinence were enrolled in the study. Thirty-five women suffered from stress urinary incontinence (group B), 35 women suffered from mixed urinary incontinence (group C), and 35 women with overactive bladder both dry and wet (group D). All participants were asked to perform UFM measurement three times...

  18. Too Long, Too Short, or Too Variable? Sleep Intraindividual Variability and Its Associations With Perceived Sleep Quality and Mood in Adolescents During Naturalistically Unconstrained Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Bei; Manber, Rachel; Allen, Nicholas B; Trinder, John; Wiley, Joshua F

    2017-02-01

    Research has extensively examined the relationship between adolescents' mental health and average sleep duration/quality. Using rigorous methodology, this study characterized adolescents' objective sleep intraindividual variability (IIV) and examined its role on mood beyond the effects of their respective individual mean (IIM) values. One hundred forty-six community-dwelling adolescents (47.3% male) aged 16.2 ± 1.0 (M ± SD) years wore an actigraph that assessed bedtime, risetime, time-in-bed (TIB), and sleep onset latency (SOL) throughout a 15-day vacation with relatively unconstrained sleep opportunity. Self-report sleep quality (SSQ), negative mood (MOOD), and other covariates were assessed using questionnaires. For each sleep variable, individuals' mean values (IIM) and IIV were used to simultaneously predict MOOD with SSQ as a mediator. Models were estimated in a Bayesian IIV framework; both linear and quadratic effects of the IIM and IIV were examined. Longer and more variable TIB, as well as more variable SOL (but not mean SOL), were associated with poorer SSQ (ps sleep opportunity, more variable TIB and SOL were associated with more negative mood, mediated by poorer perceived sleep quality. Significant effects of IIV were over and above that of mean values, suggesting that unique aspects of sleep IIV are relevant to how adolescents perceive sleep quality and their mood. © Sleep Research Society 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. General functions to transform associate data to host data, and their use in phylogenetic inference from sequences with intra-individual variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimm Guido W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amongst the most commonly used molecular markers for plant phylogenetic studies are the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacers (ITS. Intra-individual variability of these multicopy regions is a very common phenomenon in plants, the causes of which are debated in literature. Phylogenetic reconstruction under these conditions is inherently difficult. Our approach is to consider this problem as a special case of the general biological question of how to infer the characteristics of hosts (represented here by plant individuals from features of their associates (represented by cloned sequences here. Results Six general transformation functions are introduced, covering the transformation of associate characters to discrete and continuous host characters, and the transformation of associate distances to host distances. A pure distance-based framework is established in which these transformation functions are applied to ITS sequences collected from the angiosperm genera Acer, Fagus and Zelkova. The formulae are also applied to allelic data of three different loci obtained from Rosa spp. The functions are validated by (1 phylogeny-independent measures of treelikeness; (2 correlation with independent host characters; (3 visualization using splits graphs and comparison with published data on the test organisms. The results agree well with these three measures and the datasets examined as well as with the theoretical predictions and previous results in the literature. High-quality distance matrices are obtained with four of the six transformation formulae. We demonstrate that one of them represents a generalization of the Sørensen coefficient, which is widely applied in ecology. Conclusion Because of their generality, the transformation functions may be applied to a wide range of biological problems that are interpretable in terms of hosts and associates. Regarding cloned sequences, the formulae have a high potential to

  20. Intra-individual response variability assessed by ex-gaussian analysis may be a new endophenotype for Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder

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    Marcela Patricia Henríquez-Henríquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-individual variability of Response Times (RTisv is considered as potential endophenotype for Attentional Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD. Traditional methods for estimating RTisv lose information regarding Response Times (RTs distribution along the task, with eventual effects on statistical power. Ex-Gaussian analysis captures the dynamic nature of RTisv, estimating normal and exponential components for RT distribution, with specific phenomenological correlates. Here, we applied ex-Gaussian analysis to explore whether intra-individual variability of RTs agrees with criteria proposed by Gottesman and Gould for endophenotypes. Specifically, we evaluated if Normal and/or exponential components of RTs may a Present the stair-like distribution expected for endophenotypes (ADHD>Siblings>Typically Developing children (TD without familiar history of ADHD and b Represent a phenotypic correlate for previously described genetic risk variants. This is a pilot study including 55 subjects (20 ADHD-discordant sibling-pairs and 15 TD children, all aged between 8 and 13 years. Participants resolved a visual Go/Nogo with 10% Nogo probability. Ex-Gaussian distributions were fitted to individual RT data and compared among the three samples. In order to test whether intra-individual variability may represent a correlate for previously described genetic risk variants, VNTRs at DRD4 and SLC6A3 were identified in all sibling pairs following standard protocols. Groups were compared adjusting independent general linear models for the exponential and normal components from the ex-gaussian analysis. Identified trends were confirmed by the non-parametric Jonckheere-Terpstra test. Stair-like distributions were observed for μ (p=0.036 and σ (p=0.009. An additional DRD4-genotype X clinical status interaction was present for τ (p=0,014 reflecting a possible severity factor. Thus, Normal and exponential RTisv components are suitable as ADHD endophenotypes.

  1. Intra-Individual Response Variability Assessed by Ex-Gaussian Analysis may be a New Endophenotype for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez-Henríquez, Marcela Patricia; Billeke, Pablo; Henríquez, Hugo; Zamorano, Francisco Javier; Rothhammer, Francisco; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intra-individual variability of response times (RTisv) is considered as potential endophenotype for attentional deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Traditional methods for estimating RTisv lose information regarding response times (RTs) distribution along the task, with eventual effects on statistical power. Ex-Gaussian analysis captures the dynamic nature of RTisv, estimating normal and exponential components for RT distribution, with specific phenomenological correlates. Here, we applied ex-Gaussian analysis to explore whether intra-individual variability of RTs agrees with criteria proposed by Gottesman and Gould for endophenotypes. Specifically, we evaluated if normal and/or exponential components of RTs may (a) present the stair-like distribution expected for endophenotypes (ADHD > siblings > typically developing children (TD) without familiar history of ADHD) and (b) represent a phenotypic correlate for previously described genetic risk variants. This is a pilot study including 55 subjects (20 ADHD-discordant sibling-pairs and 15 TD children), all aged between 8 and 13 years. Participants resolved a visual Go/Nogo with 10% Nogo probability. Ex-Gaussian distributions were fitted to individual RT data and compared among the three samples. In order to test whether intra-individual variability may represent a correlate for previously described genetic risk variants, VNTRs at DRD4 and SLC6A3 were identified in all sibling-pairs following standard protocols. Groups were compared adjusting independent general linear models for the exponential and normal components from the ex-Gaussian analysis. Identified trends were confirmed by the non-parametric Jonckheere–Terpstra test. Stair-like distributions were observed for μ (p = 0.036) and σ (p = 0.009). An additional “DRD4-genotype” × “clinical status” interaction was present for τ (p = 0.014) reflecting a possible severity factor. Thus, normal and exponential RTisv components

  2. Assessing inter- and intra-individual cognitive variability in patients at risk for cognitive impairment: the case of minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisiacchi, Patrizia; Cona, Giorgia; Tarantino, Vincenza; Schiff, Sami; Montagnese, Sara; Amodio, Piero; Capizzi, Giovanna

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence reveals that inter- and intra-individual variability significantly affects cognitive performance in a number of neuropsychological pathologies. We applied a flexible family of statistical models to elucidate the contribution of inter- and intra-individual variables on cognitive functioning in healthy volunteers and patients at risk for hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Sixty-five volunteers (32 patients with cirrhosis and 33 healthy volunteers) were assessed by means of the Inhibitory Control Task (ICT). A Generalized Additive Model for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) was fitted for jointly modeling the mean and the intra-variability of Reaction Times (RTs) as a function of socio-demographic and task related covariates. Furthermore, a Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM) was fitted for modeling accuracy. When controlling for the covariates, patients without minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) did not differ from patients with MHE in the low-demanding condition, both in terms of RTs and accuracy. Moreover, they showed a significant decline in accuracy compared to the control group. Compared to patients with MHE, patients without MHE showed faster RTs and higher accuracy only in the high-demanding condition. The results revealed that the application of GAMLSS and GLMM models are able to capture subtle cognitive alterations, previously not detected, in patients' subclinical pathologies.

  3. Intra-individual reaction time variability based on ex-Gaussian distribution as a potential endophenotype for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H-Y; Hwang-Gu, S-L; Gau, S S-F

    2015-07-01

    Intra-individual variability in reaction time (IIV-RT), defined by standard deviation of RT (RTSD), is considered as an endophenotype for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Ex-Gaussian distributions of RT, rather than RTSD, could better characterize moment-to-moment fluctuations in neuropsychological performance. However, data of response variability based on ex-Gaussian parameters as an endophenotypic candidate for ADHD are lacking. We assessed 411 adolescents with clinically diagnosed ADHD based on the DSM-IV-TR criteria as probands, 138 unaffected siblings, and 138 healthy controls. The output parameters, mu, sigma, and tau, of an ex-Gaussian RT distribution were derived from the Conners' continuous performance test. Multi-level models controlling for sex, age, comorbidity, and use of methylphenidate were applied. Compared with unaffected siblings and controls, ADHD probands had elevated sigma value, omissions, commissions, and mean RT. Unaffected siblings formed an intermediate group in-between probands and controls in terms of tau value and RTSD. There was no between-group difference in mu value. Conforming to a context-dependent nature, unaffected siblings still had an intermediate tau value in-between probands and controls across different interstimulus intervals. Our findings suggest IIV-RT represented by tau may be a potential endophenotype for inquiry into genetic underpinnings of ADHD in the context of heterogeneity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Developmental Associations between Short-Term Variability and Long-Term Changes: Intraindividual Correlation of Positive and Negative Affect in Daily Life and Cognitive Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülür, Gizem; Hoppmann, Christiane A.; Ram, Nilam; Gerstorf, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Conceptual notions and empirical evidence suggest that the intraindividual correlation (iCorr) of positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) is a meaningful characteristic of affective functioning. PA and NA are typically negatively correlated within-person. Previous research has found that the iCorr of PA and NA is relatively stable over time…

  5. Intra-individual cognitive imbalance in ASD between perceptual reasoning and ambiguity-solving related to tool use: Comparison among children exhibiting ASD, AD/HD, and typical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakusawa, Keisuke; Nara, Chieko; Kubota, Yuki; Tomizawa, Yayoi; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Kobayashi, Satoru; Suzuki-Muromoto, Sato; Hirose, Mieko; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Nara, Takahiro; Kure, Shigeo; Mori, Norio; Takei, Noriyoshi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2018-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that objective deficits in the processing of abstract information in conjunction with an enhanced ability to process concrete information is a definitive characteristic of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, this cognitive imbalance is not necessarily clear in high-functioning autistic individuals who do not display absolute differences relative to typically developing (TD) populations. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify this cognitive tendency in high-functioning autistic individuals using intra-individual cognitive comparisons. The reaction times (RTs) of TD children, children with ASD, and children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) (n=17 in each group, mean age=11.9years, age range=9.8-15.8years) were compared using the Which/How-to-Apply Tools (W/HAT) test, which consists of tasks requiring the adaptive use of novel tools and familiar tools in atypical and typical situations. Differences in RTs between the atypical and typical trials ([A-T]) were used to assess intra-individual cognitive imbalances. As predicted, the [A-T] scores of the ASD group were significantly higher than those of the TD group even though the RTs in the atypical and typical trials did not differ. Additionally, the [A-T] values were significantly higher in the ASD group than in the AD/HD group, which indicates that the cognitive imbalance was specific to ASD individuals. No significant interaction was detected between the trial and subject group. The findings of this study demonstrate that a cognitive imbalance in ASD individuals may enhance the current understanding of the pathophysiology of this disorder, which is found in a range of individuals, including those with obvious cortical dysfunction to those with only intra-individual imbalances. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. No further gain can be achieved by calculating Disease Activity Score in 28 joints with high-sensitivity assay of C-reactive protein because of high intraindividual variability of C-reactive protein: A cross-sectional study and theoretical consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Inger M J; Emamifar, Amir; Andreasen, Rikke A; Antonsen, Steen

    2017-01-01

    Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) is commonly used to evaluate disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is a guide to treatment decision.The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of lower reporting limit for C-reactive protein (CRP), with respect to intraindividual biological variability, on the calculation of DAS28 and subsequent patient classification.This study consists of 2 sections: a theoretical consideration discussing the performance of CRP in calculating DAS28 taking intraindividual biological variation and lower reporting limit for CRP into account and a cross-sectional study of RA patients applying our theoretical results. Therefore, we calculated DAS28 twice, with the actual CRP values and CRP = 9 mg/L, the latter to elucidate the positive effects of reducing the lower reporting limit of CRP from <10 to <3 mg/L.Lower-reporting limit of <10 mg/L leads to overestimate DAS28. However, reducing lower reporting limit for CRP to <3 mg/L results in optimizing DAS28 calculation. Further lowering of reporting limit for CRP to <3 mg/L does not increase the precision of DAS28 owing to the relatively large intraindividual biological variation.Five hundred twelve patients were included. There was a significant difference between recalculated and patients DAS28 (P < 0.001). One hundred nine patients had DAS28 deviation (compatible to remission to low: 66, low to moderate: 39. and moderate to high: 4).Owing to significant impact of intraindividual biologic variation on DAS28 and patient classification, special attention should be paid to calculate DAS28 when CRP values are within normal range. Furthermore, we conclude that results of different studies evaluating DAS28 and treatment response are not comparable if the reporting limits of CRP are unknown.

  7. Characterization of a standardized glucagon challenge test as a pharmacodynamic tool in pharmacological research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, M. G. J.; Geerts, B. F.; Bhanot, S.; Morgan, E. S.; de Kam, M. L.; Moerland, M.; Romijn, J. A.; Cohen, A. F.; Burggraaf, J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize a glucagon challenge test as a tool in diabetes research by assessing the inter- and intra-individual variability, and investigating the activity of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) during the challenge, as this might have an indirect impact on glucose

  8. Analysis and Prediction of Micromilling Stability with Variable Tool Geometry

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    Ziyang Cao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Micromilling can fabricate miniaturized components using micro-end mill at high rotational speeds. The analysis of machining stability in micromilling plays an important role in characterizing the cutting process, estimating the tool life, and optimizing the process. A numerical analysis and experimental method are presented to investigate the chatter stability in micro-end milling process with variable milling tool geometry. The schematic model of micromilling process is constructed and the calculation formula to predict cutting force and displacements is derived. This is followed by a detailed numerical analysis on micromilling forces between helical ball and square end mills through time domain and frequency domain method and the results are compared. Furthermore, a detailed time domain simulation for micro end milling with straight teeth and helical teeth end mill is conducted based on the machine-tool system frequency response function obtained through modal experiment. The forces and displacements are predicted and the simulation result between variable cutter geometry is deeply compared. The simulation results have important significance for the actual milling process.

  9. Volumetric measurements of pulmonary nodules: variability in automated analysis tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juluru, Krishna; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William; King, Tara; Siddiqui, Khan; Siegel, Eliot

    2007-03-01

    Over the past decade, several computerized tools have been developed for detection of lung nodules and for providing volumetric analysis. Incidentally detected lung nodules have traditionally been followed over time by measurements of their axial dimensions on CT scans to ensure stability or document progression. A recently published article by the Fleischner Society offers guidelines on the management of incidentally detected nodules based on size criteria. For this reason, differences in measurements obtained by automated tools from various vendors may have significant implications on management, yet the degree of variability in these measurements is not well understood. The goal of this study is to quantify the differences in nodule maximum diameter and volume among different automated analysis software. Using a dataset of lung scans obtained with both "ultra-low" and conventional doses, we identified a subset of nodules in each of five size-based categories. Using automated analysis tools provided by three different vendors, we obtained size and volumetric measurements on these nodules, and compared these data using descriptive as well as ANOVA and t-test analysis. Results showed significant differences in nodule maximum diameter measurements among the various automated lung nodule analysis tools but no significant differences in nodule volume measurements. These data suggest that when using automated commercial software, volume measurements may be a more reliable marker of tumor progression than maximum diameter. The data also suggest that volumetric nodule measurements may be relatively reproducible among various commercial workstations, in contrast to the variability documented when performing human mark-ups, as is seen in the LIDC (lung imaging database consortium) study.

  10. Tools for Optimizing Management of a Spatially Variable Organic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Panagopoulos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Geostatistical tools were used to estimate spatial relations between wheat yield and soil parameters under organic farming field conditions. Thematic maps of each factor were created as raster images in R software using kriging. The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (GRASS calculated the principal component analysis raster images for soil parameters and yield. The correlation between the raster arising from the PC1 of soil and yield parameters showed high linear correlation (r = 0.75 and explained 48.50% of the data variance. The data show that durum wheat yield is strongly affected by soil parameter variability, and thus, the average production can be substantially lower than its potential. Soil water content was the limiting factor to grain yield and not nitrate as in other similar studies. The use of precision agriculture tools helped reduce the level of complexity between the measured parameters by the grouping of several parameters and demonstrating that precision agriculture tools can be applied in small organic fields, reducing costs and increasing wheat yield. Consequently, site-specific applications could be expected to improve the yield without increasing excessively the cost for farmers and enhance environmental and economic benefits.

  11. Intra-individual variability in day-to-day and month-to-month measurements of physical activity and sedentary behaviour at work and in leisure-time among Danish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, E S L; Danquah, I H; Petersen, C B; Tolstrup, J S

    2016-12-03

    Accelerometers can obtain precise measurements of movements during the day. However, the individual activity pattern varies from day-to-day and there is limited evidence on measurement days needed to obtain sufficient reliability. The aim of this study was to examine variability in accelerometer derived data on sedentary behaviour and physical activity at work and in leisure-time during week days among Danish office employees. We included control participants (n = 135) from the Take a Stand! Intervention; a cluster randomized controlled trial conducted in 19 offices. Sitting time and physical activity were measured using an ActiGraph GT3X+ fixed on the thigh and data were processed using Acti4 software. Variability was examined for sitting time, standing time, steps and time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day by multilevel mixed linear regression modelling. Results of this study showed that the number of days needed to obtain a reliability of 80% when measuring sitting time was 4.7 days for work and 5.5 days for leisure time. For physical activity at work, 4.0 days and 4.2 days were required to measure steps and MVPA, respectively. During leisure time, more monitoring time was needed to reliably estimate physical activity (6.8 days for steps and 5.8 days for MVPA). The number of measurement days needed to reliably estimate activity patterns was greater for leisure time than for work time. The domain specific variability is of great importance to researchers and health promotion workers planning to use objective measures of sedentary behaviour and physical activity. Clinical trials NCT01996176 .

  12. Intra-individual variability in day-to-day and month-to-month measurements of physical activity and sedentary behaviour at work and in leisure-time among Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde Pedersen, Eva Sophie; Danquah, I H; Petersen, C B

    2016-01-01

    time, more monitoring time was needed to reliably estimate physical activity (6.8 days for steps and 5.8 days for MVPA). CONCLUSIONS: The number of measurement days needed to reliably estimate activity patterns was greater for leisure time than for work time. The domain specific variability is of great...... in accelerometer derived data on sedentary behaviour and physical activity at work and in leisure-time during week days among Danish office employees. METHODS: We included control participants (n = 135) from the Take a Stand! Intervention; a cluster randomized controlled trial conducted in 19 offices. Sitting time....... RESULTS: Results of this study showed that the number of days needed to obtain a reliability of 80% when measuring sitting time was 4.7 days for work and 5.5 days for leisure time. For physical activity at work, 4.0 days and 4.2 days were required to measure steps and MVPA, respectively. During leisure...

  13. Modeling Intraindividual Dynamics Using Stochastic Differential Equations: Age Differences in Affect Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Julie; Oravecz, Zita; Vogel, Nina; Benson, Lizbeth; Chow, Sy-Miin; Cole, Pamela; Conroy, David E; Pincus, Aaron L; Ram, Nilam

    2017-12-15

    Life-span theories of aging suggest improvements and decrements in individuals' ability to regulate affect. Dynamic process models, with intensive longitudinal data, provide new opportunities to articulate specific theories about individual differences in intraindividual dynamics. This paper illustrates a method for operationalizing affect dynamics using a multilevel stochastic differential equation (SDE) model, and examines how those dynamics differ with age and trait-level tendencies to deploy emotion regulation strategies (reappraisal and suppression). Univariate multilevel SDE models, estimated in a Bayesian framework, were fit to 21 days of ecological momentary assessments of affect valence and arousal (average 6.93/day, SD = 1.89) obtained from 150 adults (age 18-89 years)-specifically capturing temporal dynamics of individuals' core affect in terms of attractor point, reactivity to biopsychosocial (BPS) inputs, and attractor strength. Older age was associated with higher arousal attractor point and less BPS-related reactivity. Greater use of reappraisal was associated with lower valence attractor point. Intraindividual variability in regulation strategy use was associated with greater BPS-related reactivity and attractor strength, but in different ways for valence and arousal. The results highlight the utility of SDE models for studying affect dynamics and informing theoretical predictions about how intraindividual dynamics change over the life course. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. On the Importance of Intraindividual Variability in Cognitive Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anik de Ribaupierre

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Developmental cognitive psychology (as well as cognitive psychology in general has a long-standing tradition to ignore all variations other than age, as if individual variations were only measurement error or noise[...

  15. Psychological methodology will change profoundly due to the necessity to focus on intra-individual variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Peter C M

    2007-03-01

    I am in general agreement with Toomela's (Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science doi:10.1007/s12124-007-9004-0, 2007) plea for an alternative psychological methodology inspired by his description of the German-Austrian orientation. I will argue, however, that this alternative methodology has to be based on the classical ergodic theorems, using state-of-the-art statistical time series analysis of intra-individual variation as its main tool. Some more specific points made by Toomela will be criticized, while for others a more extreme elaboration along the lines indicated by Toomela is proposed.

  16. Systems and software variability management concepts, tools and experiences

    CERN Document Server

    Capilla, Rafael; Kang, Kyo-Chul

    2013-01-01

    The success of product line engineering techniques in the last 15 years has popularized the use of software variability as a key modeling approach for describing the commonality and variability of systems at all stages of the software lifecycle. Software product lines enable a family of products to share a common core platform, while allowing for product specific functionality being built on top of the platform. Many companies have exploited the concept of software product lines to increase the resources that focus on highly differentiating functionality and thus improve their competitiveness

  17. Variable fused deposition modelling - concept design and tool path generation

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Hadley Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Current Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) techniques use fixed diameter nozzles to deposit a filament of plastic layer by layer. The consequence is that the same small nozzle, essential for fine details, is also used to fill in relatively large volumes. In practice a Pareto-optimal nozzle diameter is chosen that attempts to maximise resolution while minimising build time. This paper introduces a concept for adapting an additive manufacturing system, which exploits a variable diameter nozzle fo...

  18. Variability of building environmental assessment tools on evaluating carbon emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, S. Thomas; Chen Yuan; Wong, James M.W.

    2013-01-01

    With an increasing importance of sustainability in construction, more and more clients and designers employ building environmental assessment (BEA) tools to evaluate the environmental friendliness of their building facilities, and one important aspect of evaluation in the BEA models is the assessment of carbon emissions. However, in the absence of any agreed framework for carbon auditing and benchmarking, the results generated by the BEA tools might vary significantly which could lead to confusion or misinterpretation on the carbon performance of a building. This study thus aims to unveil the properties of and the standard imposed by the current BEA models on evaluating the life cycle carbon emissions. The analyses cover the (i) weighting of energy efficiency and emission levels among various environmental performance indicators; (ii) building life cycle stages in which carbon is taken into consideration; (iii) objectiveness of assessment; (iv) baseline set for carbon assessment; (v) mechanism for benchmarking the emission level; and (v) limitations of the carbon assessment approaches. Results indicate that the current BEA schemes focus primarily on operational carbon instead of the emissions generated throughout the entire building life cycle. Besides, the baseline and benchmark for carbon evaluation vary significantly among the BEA tools based on the analytical results of a hypothetical building. The findings point to the needs for a more transparent framework for carbon auditing and benchmarking in BEA modeling. - Highlights: ► Carbon emission evaluation in building environmental assessment schemes are studied. ► Simulative carbon emission is modeled for building environmental assessment schemes. ► Carbon assessments focus primarily on operational stage instead of entire lifecycle. ► Baseline and benchmark of carbon assessment vary greatly among BEA schemes. ► A more transparent and comprehensive framework for carbon assessment is required.

  19. Heart rate variability: a tool to explore the sleeping brain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eChouchou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is divided into two main sleep stages: 1 non-rapid eye movement sleep (non-REMS, characterized among others by reduced global brain activity; and 2 rapid eye movement sleep (REMS, characterized by global brain activity similar to that of wakefulness. Results of heart rate variability (HRV analysis, which is widely used to explore autonomic modulation, have revealed higher parasympathetic tone during normal non-REMS and a shift toward sympathetic predominance during normal REMS. Moreover, HRV analysis combined with brain imaging has identified close connectivity between autonomic cardiac modulation and activity in brain areas such as the amygdala and insular cortex during REMS, but no connectivity between brain and cardiac activity during non-REMS. There is also some evidence for an association between HRV and dream intensity and emotionality. Following some technical considerations, this review addresses how brain activity during sleep contributes to changes in autonomic cardiac activity, organized into three parts: 1 the knowledge on autonomic cardiac control, 2 differences in brain and autonomic activity between non-REMS and REMS, and 3 the potential of HRV analysis to explore the sleeping brain, and the implications for psychiatric disorders.

  20. Variability in Predictions from Online Tools: A Demonstration Using Internet-Based Melanoma Predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabor, Emily C; Coit, Daniel; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; McMasters, Kelly M; Michaelson, James S; Stromberg, Arnold J; Panageas, Katherine S

    2018-02-22

    Prognostic models are increasingly being made available online, where they can be publicly accessed by both patients and clinicians. These online tools are an important resource for patients to better understand their prognosis and for clinicians to make informed decisions about treatment and follow-up. The goal of this analysis was to highlight the possible variability in multiple online prognostic tools in a single disease. To demonstrate the variability in survival predictions across online prognostic tools, we applied a single validation dataset to three online melanoma prognostic tools. Data on melanoma patients treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center between 2000 and 2014 were retrospectively collected. Calibration was assessed using calibration plots and discrimination was assessed using the C-index. In this demonstration project, we found important differences across the three models that led to variability in individual patients' predicted survival across the tools, especially in the lower range of predictions. In a validation test using a single-institution data set, calibration and discrimination varied across the three models. This study underscores the potential variability both within and across online tools, and highlights the importance of using methodological rigor when developing a prognostic model that will be made publicly available online. The results also reinforce that careful development and thoughtful interpretation, including understanding a given tool's limitations, are required in order for online prognostic tools that provide survival predictions to be a useful resource for both patients and clinicians.

  1. Next-Generation Model-based Variability Management: Languages and Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Acher , Mathieu; Heymans , Patrick; Collet , Philippe; Lahire , Philippe

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Variability modelling and management is a key activity in a growing number of software engineering contexts, from software product lines to dynamic adaptive systems. Feature models are the defacto standard to formally represent and reason about commonality and variability of a software system. This tutorial aims at presenting next generation of feature modelling languages and tools, directly applicable to a wide range of model-based variability problems and application...

  2. Intraindividual relations between achievement goals and discrete achievement emotions: An experience sampling approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Goetz T; Sticca F; Pekrun. R.; Murayama K.; Elliot A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Theories on the link between achievement goals and achievement emotions focus on their within person functional relationship (i.e. intraindividual relations). However empirical studies have failed to analyze these intraindividual relations and have instead examined between person covariation of the two constructs (i.e. interindividual relations). Aiming to better connect theory and empirical research the present study (N = 120 10th grade students) analyzed intraindividual relations by assessi...

  3. Final report on LDRD project: Simulation/optimization tools for system variability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. Bierbaum; R. F. Billau; J. E. Campbell; K. D. Marx; R. J. Sikorski; B. M. Thompson; S. D. Wix

    1999-10-01

    >This work was conducted during FY98 (Proposal Number 98-0036) and FY99 (Proposal Number 99-0818) under the auspices of the Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. Electrical simulation typically treats a single data point in the very large input space of component properties. For electrical simulation to reach its full potential as a design tool, it must be able to address the unavoidable variability and uncertainty in component properties. Component viability is strongly related to the design margin (and reliability) of the end product. During the course of this project, both tools and methodologies were developed to enable analysis of variability in the context of electrical simulation tools. Two avenues to link relevant tools were also developed, and the resultant toolset was applied to a major component.

  4. Heart Rate Variability – a Tool to Differentiate Positive and Negative Affective States in Pigs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The causal neurophysiological processes, such as autonomic nervous system activity, that mediate behavioral and physiological reactivity to an environment have largely been ignored. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a clinical diagnostic tool used to assess affective states (stressful and ple...

  5. Response Mixture Modeling of Intraindividual Differences in Responses and Response Times to the Hungarian WISC-IV Block Design Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, D.; Bolsinova, M.; Rozsa, S.; De Boeck, P.

    2016-01-01

    Response times may constitute an important additional source of information about cognitive ability as it enables to distinguishing between different intraindividual response processes. In this paper, we present a method to disentangle interindividual variation from intraindividual variation in the

  6. Tools for Assessing the Impacts of Climate Variability and Change on Wildfire Regimes in Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hety Herawati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fire is an intrinsic element of many forest ecosystems; it shapes their ecological processes, determines species composition and influences landscape structure. However, wildfires may: have undesirable effects on biodiversity and vegetation coverage; produce carbon emissions to the atmosphere; release smoke affecting human health; and cause loss of lives and property. There have been increasing concerns about the potential impacts of climate variability and change on forest fires. Climate change can alter factors that influence the occurrence of fire ignitions, fuel availability and fuel flammability. This review paper aims to identify tools and methods used for gathering information about the impacts of climate variability and change on forest fires, forest fuels and the probability of fires. Tools to assess the impacts of climate variability and change on forest fires include: remote sensing, dynamic global vegetation and landscape models, integrated fire-vegetation models, fire danger rating systems, empirical models and fire behavior models. This review outlines each tool in terms of its characteristics, spatial and temporal resolution, limitations and applicability of the results. To enhance and improve tool performance, each must be continuously tested in all types of forest ecosystems.

  7. Intra-individual variation and evolution of modular structure in Draba plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorieva, Olga V; Cherdantsev, Vladimir G

    2014-09-01

    We studied the evolution of quantitative traits related to shoot system architecture in a large genus Draba (Brassicaceae) making emphasis on the dynamics of relationship between individual and intra-individual variation. The results suggest that selection leading to origin of different life forms arises mainly from a necessity of moderation of the non-adaptive contest between the egoistic plant modules, taking care of self-reproduction of their own. We separated two evolutionary trends, one leading to the formation of short-lived monocarpic, and the other to long-lived polycarpic forms from the short-lived polycarpic plants. The first trend concerns with transformation of the innovation shoots into the axillary inflorescences by shortening of their vegetative developmental phase, while the second one - with individuation of the plant modules owing to acquisition of the capacity of rooting and separating from the mother plant. In both trends, the turning points of the evolution are those of originating of the negative for individual plants interactions between the plant modules being indirect non-adaptive consequences of the previous adaptive evolution and initiating selection for rebuilding of the plant modular structure. The difference between selection operating on intra-individual and individual variations is that, in the first case, combining of the characters of different individuals is infeasible. This leaves no choice for the evolution but to change the developmental mechanisms. In the case considered in this work, this is a change in shoot architecture using the material afforded by the natural variability of developmental pathways of the plant modules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Intra-individual metameric variation expressed at the enamel-dentine junction of lower post-canine dentition of South African fossil hominins and modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lei; Thackeray, John Francis; Dumoncel, Jean; Zanolli, Clément; Oettlé, Anna; de Beer, Frikkie; Hoffman, Jakobus; Duployer, Benjamin; Tenailleau, Christophe; Braga, José

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the degree and patterning of inter- and intra-individual metameric variation in South African australopiths, early Homo and modern humans. Metameric variation likely reflects developmental and taxonomical issues, and could also be used to infer ecological and functional adaptations. However, its patterning along the early hominin postcanine dentition, particularly among South African fossil hominins, remains unexplored. Using microfocus X-ray computed tomography (µXCT) and geometric morphometric tools, we studied the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) morphology and we investigated the intra- and inter-individual EDJ metameric variation among eight australopiths and two early Homo specimens from South Africa, as well as 32 modern humans. Along post-canine dentition, shape changes between metameres represented by relative positions and height of dentine horns, outlines of the EDJ occlusal table are reported in modern and fossil taxa. Comparisons of EDJ mean shapes and multivariate analyses reveal substantial variation in the direction and magnitude of metameric shape changes among taxa, but some common trends can be found. In modern humans, both the direction and magnitude of metameric shape change show increased variability in M 2 -M 3 compared to M 1 -M 2 . Fossil specimens are clustered together showing similar magnitudes of shape change. Along M 2 -M 3 , the lengths of their metameric vectors are not as variable as those of modern humans, but they display considerable variability in the direction of shape change. The distalward increase of metameric variation along the modern human molar row is consistent with the odontogenetic models of molar row structure (inhibitory cascade model). Though much remains to be tested, the variable trends and magnitudes in metamerism in fossil hominins reported here, together with differences in the scale of shape change between modern humans and fossil hominins may provide valuable information

  9. Geometric Parameters of Cutting Tools that Can be Used for Forming Sided Surfaces with Variable Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razumov M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article describes machining technology of polyhedral surfaces with varying profile, which is provided by planetary motion of multiblade block tools. The features of the technology and urgency of the problem is indicated. The purpose of the study is to determine the minimum value of the clearance angle of the tool. Also, the study is carried out about changing the value of the front and rear corners during the formation of polygonal surface using a planetary gear. The scheme of calculating the impact of various factors on the value of the minimum clearance angle of the tool and kinematic front and rear corners of the instrument is provided. The mathematical formula for calculating the minimum clearance angle of the tool is given. Also, given the formula for determining the front and rear corners of the tool during driving. This study can be used in the calculation of the design operations forming multifaceted external surfaces with a variable profile by using the planetary gear.

  10. CRITICAL RADAR: TOOL AND METHODOLOGY FOR EVALUATING CURRENT PROJECTS USING MULTIPLE VARIABLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André M. Ferrari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Many resources are invested in measurement processes of projects indicators without, however, give a clear view of which projects deserves the right attention at the right time. This paper proposes the use of statistics, through the analysis of multiple variables and their interrelationships, to give better basis to a critical assessment methodology of current projects used in a multinational mining company. The contribution of the research is to report the methodology called Critical Radar which is based on a graphical tool with simple operationalization that can support the decision making in complex environments, and has great flexibility across the different market scenarios and possible changes in companies guidelines. The tool has great potential to help evaluate current projects due to their characteristics of flexible use in different business areas; high degree of freedom for improvement; use of known market tool in its development; ease of viewing the results through charts and notes and user freedom to use any existing indicators in the company if complied with some statistical data quality characteristics.

  11. Measurement Variability of Vertical Scanning Interferometry Tool Used for Orbiter Window Defect Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Santo, II

    2009-01-01

    The ability to sufficiently measure orbiter window defects to allow for window recertification has been an ongoing challenge for the orbiter vehicle program. The recent Columbia accident has forced even tighter constraints on the criteria that must be met in order to recertify windows for flight. As a result, new techniques are being investigated to improve the reliability, accuracy and resolution of the defect detection process. The methodology devised in this work, which is based on the utilization of a vertical scanning interferometric (VSI) tool, shows great promise for meeting the ever increasing requirements for defect detection. This methodology has the potential of a 10-100 fold greater resolution of the true defect depth than can be obtained from the currently employed micrometer based methodology. An added benefit is that it also produces a digital elevation map of the defect, thereby providing information about the defect morphology which can be utilized to ascertain the type of debris that induced the damage. However, in order to successfully implement such a tool, a greater understanding of the resolution capability and measurement repeatability must be obtained. This work focused on assessing the variability of the VSI-based measurement methodology and revealed that the VSI measurement tool was more repeatable and more precise than the current micrometer based approach, even in situations where operator variation could affect the measurement. The analysis also showed that the VSI technique was relatively insensitive to the hardware and software settings employed, making the technique extremely robust and desirable

  12. Antecedents of teachers’ emotions in the classroom: an intraindividual approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Eva S.; Keller, Melanie M.; Goetz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne C.; Taxer, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    Using a preexisting, but as yet empirically untested theoretical model, the present study investigated antecedents of teachers’ emotions in the classroom. More specifically, the relationships between students’ motivation and discipline and teachers’ enjoyment and anger were explored, as well as if these relationships are mediated by teachers’ subjective appraisals (goal conduciveness and coping potential). The study employed an intraindividual approach by collecting data through a diary. The sample consisted of 39 teachers who each participated with one of their 9th or 10th grade mathematics classes (N = 758 students). Both teachers and students filled out diaries for 2–3 weeks pertaining to 8.10 lessons on average (N = 316 lessons). Multilevel structural equation modeling revealed that students’ motivation and discipline explained 24% of variance in teachers’ enjoyment and 26% of variance in teachers’ anger. In line with theoretical assumptions, after introducing teachers’ subjective appraisals as a mediating mechanism into the model, the explained variance systematically increased to 65 and 61%, for teachers’ enjoyment and anger respectively. The effects of students’ motivation and discipline level on teachers’ emotions were partially mediated by teachers’ appraisals of goal conduciveness and coping potential. The findings imply that since teachers’ emotions depend to a large extent on subjective evaluations of a situation, teachers should be able to directly modify their emotional experiences during a lesson through cognitive reappraisals. PMID:26042067

  13. Differences in Psychosocial and Behavioral Variables by Dietary Screening Tool Risk Category in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Geoffrey W; Lofgren, Ingrid; Paulin, Chelsea; Greaney, Mary L; Clark, Phillip G

    2018-01-01

    The Dietary Screening Tool (DST) has been validated as a dietary screening instrument for older adults defining three categories of potential nutritional risk based on DST score cutoffs. Previous research has found that older adults classified as being "at risk" differed from those categorized as being "not at risk" for a limited number of health-related variables. The relationship between risk categories and a wide variety of variables has not yet been explored. This research will contribute to an increased understanding of clustering of multiple health concerns in this population. The aim of this study was to determine whether DST risk categories differed by demographic, anthropometric, cognitive, functional, psychosocial, or behavioral variables in older adults. This study utilized a cross-sectional design with data collected from September 15, 2009 to July 31, 2012. Participants completed an interviewer-administered survey including the DST and other measures. Community-dwelling older adults (n=255) participating in the Study of Exercise and Nutrition in Older Rhode Islanders Project were included if they met study inclusion criteria (complete DST data with depression and cognitive status scores above cutoffs). DST scores were used to classify participants' dietary risk (at risk, possible risk, and not at risk). Multiple analysis of variance and χ 2 analyses examined whether DST risk categories differed by variables. Significant predictors were entered into a logistic regression equation predicting at-risk compared to other risk categories combined. Participants' mean age was 82.5±4.9 years. Nearly half (49%, n=125) were classified as being at possible risk, with the remainder 26% (n=66) not at risk and at risk 25% (n=64). At-risk participants were less likely to be in the Action/Maintenance Stages of Change (PDST in assessment of older adults and suggests a clustering of health concerns among those classified as at risk. Copyright © 2018 Academy of

  14. Utilization of Forming Tool with Variable Blankholder Force for Drawing of Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solfronk, P.; Sobotka, J.

    Drawing of stampings technology is nowadays the most using technology for sheets processing. Because of stamping's weight reduction is these days actual sheet processing from aluminium alloys which by their properties differ a lot from commonly using deep-drawing sheets. To achieve maximal plastic deformation with material fracture is necessary to use sheet with required mechanical properties and properly chosen forming technological properties. Common tools for deep-drawing don't enable to lively reply of necessity to change blankholder force during sheet drawing. On the experimental tool for deep-drawing with variable blankholder force are in the paper evaluated two variants of drawing methods for irregular shape of stamping. In the first case was stamping from AA6016 alloy designed with constant blankholder force. In the second case was blankholder force optimized and during drawing was changed in dependence on drawing depth. Calculation of blankholder force in dependence on drawing depth was carried out by means of numerical simulation in software PAM-STAMP 2G. Result of optimalization was strain distribution change in critical places of stamping. Strain distribution on stamping is measured by means of optical system ARGUS.

  15. Inter- vs intra-individual variation and temporal repeatability of escape responses in the coral reef fish Amblyglyphidodon curacao

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maïwenn Jornod

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fast-start escape responses are critical behaviours used by fishes during predator-prey encounters and some interactions with hetero- and conspecifics. In experimental studies, escape responses are often measured once per individual and considered representative of maximum performance. However, few studies have compared variability and repeatability in escape performances within and among individuals. Using the tropical damselfish Amblyglyphidodon curacao, we quantified inter- and intra-individual variation in behavioural and kinematic components of escape performance during repeated presentations of a stimulus at 15 min intervals. Individual maximum escape performance was repeatable through time, but there was considerable variation in the magnitude of responses both among and within fish. We found no evidence of habituation or fatigue due to repeated stimulations, suggesting that fish can be stimulated multiple times to ensure that an accurate estimate of maximum escape performance is obtained.

  16. Inter- and intra-individual differences in teachers' self-efficacy : A multilevel factor exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, M.; Koomen, H.M.Y.; Jellesma, F.C.; Geerlings, J.; de Jong, P.F.

    2016-01-01

    This study explored inter- and intra-individual differences in teachers' self-efficacy (TSE) by adapting Tschannen-Moran and Woolfolk Hoy's (2001) Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES) to the domain- and student-specific level. Multilevel structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the

  17. Investigation of the effect of tool edge geometry upon cutting variables, tool wear and burr formation using finite element simulation - A progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartkulvanich, Partchapol; Al-Zkeri, Ibrahim; Yen Yungchang; Altan, Taylan

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes some of the progress made on FEM simulations of metal cutting processes conducted at the Engineering Research Center (ERC/NSM). Presented research focuses on the performance of various cutting edge geometries (hone and chamfer edges) for different tool materials and specifically on: 1) the effect of round and chamfer edge geometries on the cutting variables in machining carbon steels and 2) the effect of the edge hone size upon the flank wear and burr formation behavior in face milling of A356-T6 aluminum alloy. In the second task, an innovative design of edge preparation with varying hone size around the tool nose is also explored using FEM.In order to model three-dimensional conventional turning and face milling with two-dimensional orthogonal cutting simulations, 2D simulation cross-sections consisting of the cutting speed direction and chip flow direction are selected at different locations along the tool nose radius. Then the geometries of the hone and chamfer edges and their associated tool angles as well as uncut chip thickness are determined on these planes and employed in cutting simulations. The chip flow direction on the tool rake face are obtained by examining the wear grooves on the experimental inserts or estimated by using Oxley's approximation theory of oblique cutting. Simulation results are compared with the available experimental results (e.g. cutting forces) both qualitatively and quantitatively

  18. A tool for protected area management: multivariate control charts 'cope' with rare variable communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringell, Thomas B; Bamber, Roger N; Burton, Mark; Lindenbaum, Charles; Skates, Lucie R; Sanderson, William G

    2013-06-01

    Performance assessment, impact detection, and the assessment of regulatory compliance are common scientific problems for the management of protected areas. Some habitats in protected areas, however, are rare and/or variable and are not often selected for study by ecologists because they preclude comparison with controls and high community variability makes meaningful change detection difficult. Shallow coastal saline lagoons are habitats that experience comparatively high levels of stress due to high physical variability. Lagoons are rare, declining habitats found in coastal regions throughout Europe (and elsewhere) where they are identified as one of the habitats most in need of protected area management. The infauna in the sediments of 25 lagoons were sampled. Temporal and spatial variation in three of these [protected] lagoons was investigated further over 5 years. In a multivariate analysis of community structure similarities were found between some lagoons, but in other cases communities were unique or specific to only two sites. The protected lagoons with these unique/specific communities showed significant temporal and spatial variation, yet none of the changes observed were attributed to human impacts and were interpreted as inherent variability. Multivariate control charts can operate without experimental controls and were used to assess community changes within the context of 'normal' lagoon variability. The aim of control chart analysis is to characterize background variability in a parameter and identify when a new observation deviates more than expected. In only 1 year was variability more than expected and corresponded with the coldest December in over 100 years. Multivariate control charts are likely to have wide application in the management of protected areas and other natural systems where variability and/or rarity preclude conventional analytical and experimental approaches but where assessments of condition, impact or regulatory compliance are

  19. Students' daily emotions in the classroom : Intra-individual variability and appraisal correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Wondimu; van der Werf, Greetje; Minnaert, Alexander; Kuyper, Hans

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent literature on emotions in education has shown that competence- and value-related beliefs are important sources of students' emotions; nevertheless, the role of these antecedents in students' daily functioning in the classroom is not yet well-known. More importantly, to date we

  20. Developmental Change and Intraindividual Variability: Relating Cognitive Aging to Cognitive Plasticity, Cardiovascular Lability, and Emotional Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Nilam; Gerstorf, Denis; Lindenberger, Ulman; Smith, Jacqui

    2010-01-01

    Repeated assessments obtained over years can be used to measure individuals’ developmental change, whereas repeated assessments obtained over a few weeks can be used to measure individuals’ dynamic characteristics. Using data from a burst of measurement embedded in the Berlin Aging Study (BASE: Baltes & Mayer, 1999), we illustrate and examine how long-term changes in cognitive ability are related to short-term changes in cognitive performance, cardiovascular function, and emotional experience. Our findings suggest that “better” cognitive aging over approximately13 years was associated with greater cognitive plasticity, less cardiovascular lability, and less emotional diversity over approximately 2 weeks at age 90 years. The study highlights the potential benefits of multi-time scale longitudinal designs for the study of individual function and development. PMID:21443355

  1. A Comprehensive Comparison of Quantifications of Intraindividual Variability in Response Times: A Measurement Burst Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawski, Robert S; MacDonald, Stuart W S; Brewster, Paul W H; Munoz, Elizabeth; Cerino, Eric S; Halliday, Drew W R

    2017-09-28

    To formally identify and contrast the most commonly-employed quantifications of response time inconsistency (RTI) and elucidate their utility for understanding within-person (WP) and between-person (BP) variation in cognitive function with increasing age. Using two measurement burst studies of cognitive aging, we systematically identified and computed five RTI quantifications from select disciplines to examine: (a) correlations among RTI quantifications; (b) the distribution of BP and WP variation in RTI; and (c) the comparability of RTI quantifications for predicting attention switching. Comparable patterns were observed across studies. There was significant variation in RTI BP as well as WP across sessions and bursts. Correlations among RTI quantifications were generally strong and positive both WP and BP, except for the coefficient of variation. Independent prediction models indicated that slower mean response time (RT) and greater RTI were associated with slower attention switching both WP and BP. For selecting simultaneous prediction models, collinearity resulted in inflated standard errors and unstable model estimates. RTI reflects a novel dimension of performance that is a robust and theoretically informative predictor of BP and WP variation in cognitive function. Among the plenitude of RTI quantifications, not all are interchangeable, nor of comparable predictive utility. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Variable Stars in (Not Only) Dwarf Galaxies : Key Tools to Constrain Distances and Stellar Content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiorentino, G.; Koleva, M; Prugniel, P; Vauglin,

    2011-01-01

    The important role of Cepheid and RR Lyrae variable stars and what they teach us about dwarf galaxies is discussed. Despite ever improving star formation histories of Local Group dwarf galaxies uncertainties remain, in particular in the identification and characterisation of the oldest stellar

  3. Novel Modeling Tools for Propagating Climate Change Variability and Uncertainty into Hydrodynamic Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding impacts of climate change on hydrodynamic processes and ecosystem response within the Great Lakes is an important and challenging task. Variability in future climate conditions, uncertainty in rainfall-runoff model forecasts, the potential for land use change, and t...

  4. VOLUMETRIC METHOD FOR EVALUATION OF BEACHES VARIABILITY BASED ON GIS-TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Dolotov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In frame of cadastral beach evaluation the volumetric method of natural variability index is proposed. It base on spatial calculations with Cut-Fill method and volume accounting ofboththe common beach contour and specific areas for the each time.

  5. A VARIABLE PRICE SUPPORT FARM PROGRAM: A TRANSITION TOOL TO A FREE MARKET

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Wen-Yuan; Hyberg, Bengt; Segarra, Eduardo

    1990-01-01

    This paper analyzes a variable price support program (VPS) as an alternative to the current farm income support program. The VPS program can control U.S. agricultural production while protecting income of small farmers. The VPS is designed to alter farm level production decisions by reducing commodity support prices for each additional unit of production produced. This will serve to discourage excess aggregate production. The VPS program can be a mechanism to stabilize income of efficient sma...

  6. Building Design Variables Usage as a Tool of Value Engineering During Designing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahid Nur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The deployment of construction economics has become more desirable today, mainly due to need to establish how building costs are spent, and be able to come up with the most optimum alternatives. This research article therefore, explored 1 the various costs inputs called design variables used by design consultants, plus their underlying factors, 2 how the practice of value engineering (VE impacts on projects in Indonesia. A qualitative methodology, was used inform of a questionnaire, designed based on a 5 pointer liker scale approach, and distributed among 30 respondents consisting of consultants and clients in areas of Surakarta. The collected data was processed using statistical method of relative importance index, followed by descriptive analysis inform of bar and pie charts. The results obtained were that building plane shape (index 83.2, was mostly used, which itself depended on external features of building membrane and shape of building site (80.0 each, then other variables were building complexity (82.1; and building façade (77.9, meanwhile the least used was sharing walls (index 62.1, Lastly, VE was found to benefit the industry by producing designs which meet time, cost and quality targets, on the other hand material wastages and loss of confidence was reported once VE was neglected.

  7. The boolean algebra with restricted variables as a tool for fault tree modularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldarola, L.; Wickenhaeuser, A.

    1981-08-01

    The number of minimal cut sets (m.c.s.) of very complex and highly interconnected fault trees can become extremely large (e.g. more than 10 7 ). In this case the usual analytical approach of dissecting the fault tree TOP variable into m.c.s. is not only computationally prohibitively expensive, but also meaningless because it does not offer any synthetic overview of system behavior. The method proposed in this paper overcomes the deficiencies of the analytical method. It is shown that, by applying boolean algebra with restricted variables (b.a.w.r.v.), the concept of fault tree modularization can be straightforwardly extended from a single gate to a set of gates. Thus, large fault trees are divided into smaller fault trees (modules), which are connected to each other according to a simple scheme. This scheme is represented by a block diagram in which each block is a module. The modules are analyzed separately by the m.c.s. method, and the results are combined according of the TOP event. The method allows the calculation of very large fault trees in a short time and offers a synthetic overview of systems behavior through the block diagram. Numerical examples are also included. Calculations have been carried out by using the computer code MUSTAMO, which is based on the theory developed in this paper. (orig.) [de

  8. Variable Correlation Digital Noise Source on FPGA — A Versatile Tool for Debugging Radio Telescope Backends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Kaushal D.; Gupta, Yashwant; Ajith Kumar, B.

    Contemporary wideband radio telescope backends are generally developed on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) or hybrid (FPGA+GPU) platforms. One of the challenges faced while developing such instruments is the functional verification of the signal processing backend at various stages of development. In the case of an interferometer or pulsar backend, the typical requirement is for one independent noise source per input, with provision for a common, correlated signal component across all the inputs, with controllable level of correlation. This paper describes the design of a FPGA-based variable correlation Digital Noise Source (DNS), and its applications to built-in testing and debugging of correlators and beamformers. This DNS uses the Central Limit Theorem-based approach for generation of Gaussian noise, and the architecture is optimized for resource requirements and ease of integration with existing signal processing blocks on FPGA.

  9. MORPHOLOGICAL TRAITS AS TOOL TO VERIFY GENETIC VARIABILITY OF INTERSPECIFIC DRAGON FRUIT HYBRIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIANA DE CASTRO CORREIA DA SILVA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT With recent cultivation in Brazil, the dragon fruit still have lacks related to the selection of promising materials and there are not yet commercial varieties in the country. Therefore, manual pollination cross were held in 2010, between plants of H. undatus x H. polyrhizus and H. undatus x H. setaceus. Aiming evaluate the genetic diversity of the progenies for future use in breeding program, based on cladodes characteristics, six characters were assessed: length and diameter of stem, distance between areoles, arch height, number and size of spines/areole. From the Euclidean distance matrix analysis was constructed a dendrogram by the UPGMA method. There was great variability among hybrids, and eight of them have shown promise for use in breeding program.

  10. Variable Geometry Casting of Concrete Elements Using Pin-Type Tooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Holm; Lenau, Torben Anker

    2010-01-01

    that are rich in detail. Variable geometry moulds (VGM) offer a different approach to small production volume. A die or mould can change shape between the castings, and parts with different geometry can be made in the same mould. VGM is used in a multitude of applications such as sheet metal forming of parts......Background: Today, free form parts are made in small production volume with time consuming methods and a significant amount of material waste. These methods include CNC machining and the layered rapid prototyping techniques SLA, SLS, FDM, 3D print etc., which are well suited for smaller parts...... for aircrafts, trains and cranial prostheses. The present project focuses on VGM for free form concrete facade elements, which in contrast to previous VGM projects uses a liquid raw material and involves the use of only a small amount of force. Method of Approach: The present VGM process is based on the so...

  11. Reducing variability of workforce as a tool to improve plan reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandahl, Søren; Yicheng, S.; Zygmunt, K. J.

    , a plan reliability can be improved, therefore, three different construction labour data sets have been examined by utilizing Monte Carlo Simulation, to analyze the probability to finish simulated projects within a certain time. The research findings revealed that reducing variance in the workforce flow......Variability of flow is recognized as the greatest obstacle to production management. Since the work flow and labour flow are two dominators of work performance, it is important to manage them simultaneously. The objective of this paper is to examine whether by reducing the variance of a labour flow...... does not necessarily shorten the project length, nevertheless it increases probability to finish the tasks within a critical path duration. Additionally, it was concluded, that reducing the variance of crew allocation can improve the productivity....

  12. Reducing Variability of Workforce as a Tool to Improve Plan Reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Yicheng; Zygmunt, Katarzyna Julia; Wandahl, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Variability of flow is recognized as one of the greatest obstacles to production management. Since the work flow and labour flow are two dominators of work performance, it is important to manage them simultaneously. The objective of this paper is to examine if an increased plan reliability could...... be reached by reducing the variance of a labour flow. Therefore, three different construction labour data sets have been examined by utilizing Monte Carlo Simulation, to analyze the probability to finish simulated projects within a certain time. The research findings revealed that reducing variance...... of the workforce flow does not necessarily shorten the project length, nevertheless it increases probability to finish the tasks within a critical path duration. Additionally, it was concluded, that reducing the variance of crew allocation can improve the productivity....

  13. Combined mixture-process variable approach: a suitable statistical tool for nanovesicular systems optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Basant A; AbouGhaly, Mohamed H H

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to illustrate the applicability of combined mixture-process variable (MPV) design and modeling for optimization of nanovesicular systems. The D-optimal experimental plan studied the influence of three mixture components (MCs) and two process variables (PVs) on lercanidipine transfersomes. The MCs were phosphatidylcholine (A), sodium glycocholate (B) and lercanidipine hydrochloride (C), while the PVs were glycerol amount in the hydration mixture (D) and sonication time (E). The studied responses were Y1: particle size, Y2: zeta potential and Y3: entrapment efficiency percent (EE%). Polynomial equations were used to study the influence of MCs and PVs on each response. Response surface methodology and multiple response optimization were applied to optimize the formulation with the goals of minimizing Y1 and maximizing Y2 and Y3. The obtained polynomial models had prediction R(2) values of 0.645, 0.947 and 0.795 for Y1, Y2 and Y3, respectively. Contour, Piepel's response trace, perturbation, and interaction plots were drawn for responses representation. The optimized formulation, A: 265 mg, B: 10 mg, C: 40 mg, D: zero g and E: 120 s, had desirability of 0.9526. The actual response values for the optimized formulation were within the two-sided 95% prediction intervals and were close to the predicted values with maximum percent deviation of 6.2%. This indicates the validity of combined MPV design and modeling for optimization of transfersomal formulations as an example of nanovesicular systems.

  14. GeneratorSE: A Sizing Tool for Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethuraman, Latha [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dykes, Katherine L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-22

    This report documents a set of analytical models employed by the optimization algorithms within the GeneratorSE framework. The initial values and boundary conditions employed for the generation of the various designs and initial estimates for basic design dimensions, masses, and efficiency for the four different models of generators are presented and compared with empirical data collected from previous studies and some existing commercial turbines. These models include designs applicable for variable-speed, high-torque application featuring direct-drive synchronous generators and low-torque application featuring induction generators. In all of the four models presented, the main focus of optimization is electromagnetic design with the exception of permanent-magnet and wire-wound synchronous generators, wherein the structural design is also optimized. Thermal design is accommodated in GeneratorSE as a secondary attribute by limiting the winding current densities to acceptable limits. A preliminary validation of electromagnetic design was carried out by comparing the optimized magnetic loading against those predicted by numerical simulation in FEMM4.2, a finite-element software for analyzing electromagnetic and thermal physics problems for electrical machines. For direct-drive synchronous generators, the analytical models for the structural design are validated by static structural analysis in ANSYS.

  15. The Variable Scale Evacuation Model (VSEM: a new tool for simulating massive evacuation processes during volcanic crises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Marrero

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions are among the most awesome and powerful displays of nature's force, constituting a major natural hazard for society (a single eruption can claim thousands of lives in an instant. Consequently, assessment and management of volcanic risk have become critically important goals of modern volcanology. Over recent years, numerous tools have been developed to evaluate volcanic risk and support volcanic crisis management: probabilistic analysis of future eruptions, hazard and risk maps, event trees, etc. However, there has been little improvement in the tools that may help Civil Defense officials to prepare Emergency Plans. Here we present a new tool for simulating massive evacuation processes during volcanic crisis: the Variable Scale Evacuation Model (VSEM. The main objective of the VSEM software is to optimize the evacuation process of Emergency Plans during volcanic crisis. For this, the VSEM allows the simulation of an evacuation considering different strategies depending on diverse impact scenarios. VSEM is able to calculate the required time for the complete evacuation taking into account diverse evacuation scenarios (number and type of population, infrastructure, road network, etc. and to detect high-risk or "blackspots" of the road network. The program is versatile and can work at different scales, thus being capable of simulating the evacuation of small villages as well as huge cities.

  16. Bayesian nonparametric variable selection as an exploratory tool for discovering differentially expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbaba, Babak; Johnson, Wesley O

    2013-05-30

    High-throughput scientific studies involving no clear a priori hypothesis are common. For example, a large-scale genomic study of a disease may examine thousands of genes without hypothesizing that any specific gene is responsible for the disease. In these studies, the objective is to explore a large number of possible factors (e.g., genes) in order to identify a small number that will be considered in follow-up studies that tend to be more thorough and on smaller scales. A simple, hierarchical, linear regression model with random coefficients is assumed for case-control data that correspond to each gene. The specific model used will be seen to be related to a standard Bayesian variable selection model. Relatively large regression coefficients correspond to potential differences in responses for cases versus controls and thus to genes that might 'matter'. For large-scale studies, and using a Dirichlet process mixture model for the regression coefficients, we are able to find clusters of regression effects of genes with increasing potential effect or 'relevance', in relation to the outcome of interest. One cluster will always correspond to genes whose coefficients are in a neighborhood that is relatively close to zero and will be deemed least relevant. Other clusters will correspond to increasing magnitudes of the random/latent regression coefficients. Using simulated data, we demonstrate that our approach could be quite effective in finding relevant genes compared with several alternative methods. We apply our model to two large-scale studies. The first study involves transcriptome analysis of infection by human cytomegalovirus. The second study's objective is to identify differentially expressed genes between two types of leukemia. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Integrated Variable-Fidelity Tool Set For Modeling and Simulation of Aeroservothermoelasticity -Propulsion (ASTE-P) Effects For Aerospace Vehicles Ranging From Subsonic to Hypersonic Flight, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research program aims at developing a variable-fidelity software tool set for aeroservothermoelastic-propulsive (ASTE-P) modeling that can be routinely...

  18. Intra-individual gait patterns across different time-scales as revealed by means of a supervised learning model using kernel-based discriminant regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Fabian; Eekhoff, Alexander; Newell, Karl M; Schöllhorn, Wolfgang I

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, gait analysis has been centered on the idea of average behavior and normality. On one hand, clinical diagnoses and therapeutic interventions typically assume that average gait patterns remain constant over time. On the other hand, it is well known that all our movements are accompanied by a certain amount of variability, which does not allow us to make two identical steps. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in the intra-individual gait patterns across different time-scales (i.e., tens-of-mins, tens-of-hours). Nine healthy subjects performed 15 gait trials at a self-selected speed on 6 sessions within one day (duration between two subsequent sessions from 10 to 90 mins). For each trial, time-continuous ground reaction forces and lower body joint angles were measured. A supervised learning model using a kernel-based discriminant regression was applied for classifying sessions within individual gait patterns. Discernable characteristics of intra-individual gait patterns could be distinguished between repeated sessions by classification rates of 67.8 ± 8.8% and 86.3 ± 7.9% for the six-session-classification of ground reaction forces and lower body joint angles, respectively. Furthermore, the one-on-one-classification showed that increasing classification rates go along with increasing time durations between two sessions and indicate that changes of gait patterns appear at different time-scales. Discernable characteristics between repeated sessions indicate continuous intrinsic changes in intra-individual gait patterns and suggest a predominant role of deterministic processes in human motor control and learning. Natural changes of gait patterns without any externally induced injury or intervention may reflect continuous adaptations of the motor system over several time-scales. Accordingly, the modelling of walking by means of average gait patterns that are assumed to be near constant over time needs to be reconsidered in the context of

  19. Long-term intra-individual reproducibility of heart rate dynamics during exercise and recovery in the UK Biobank cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Orini

    Full Text Available The heart rate (HR response to exercise provides useful information about the autonomic function and has prognostic value, but its reproducibility over a long period of time, a critical requirement for using it as a clinical biomarker, is undetermined.To determine the intra-individual reproducibility of HR dynamics during sub-maximum exercise and one minute recovery.1187 individuals from the Cardio physical fitness assessment test of the UK Biobank repeated a standard exercise stress test twice (recall time 34.2 ± 2.8 months and were prospectively studied.821 individuals complied with inclusion criteria for reproducibility analysis, including peak workload differences between assessments ≤10 W. Intra-individual correlation between HR profile during the first and the second assessment was very high and higher than inter-individual correlation (0.92±0.08 vs 0.87±0.11, p<0.01. Intra-individual correlation of indices describing HR dynamics was: ρ = 0.81 for maximum HR during exercise; ρ = 0.71 for minimum HR during recovery; ρ = 0.70 for HR changes during both exercise and recovery; Intra-individual correlation was higher for these indices of HR dynamics than for resting HR (ρ = 0.64. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated good agreement between HR indices estimated during the first and second assessment. A small but consistent bias was registered for all repeated measurements. The intra-individual consistency of abnormal values was about 60-70%.The HR dynamics during exercise and recovery are reproducible over a period of 3 years, with moderate to strong intra-individual reproducibility of abnormal values.

  20. Long-term intra-individual reproducibility of heart rate dynamics during exercise and recovery in the UK Biobank cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Andrew; Munroe, Patricia B.; Lambiase, Pier D.

    2017-01-01

    Background The heart rate (HR) response to exercise provides useful information about the autonomic function and has prognostic value, but its reproducibility over a long period of time, a critical requirement for using it as a clinical biomarker, is undetermined. Aim To determine the intra-individual reproducibility of HR dynamics during sub-maximum exercise and one minute recovery. Methods 1187 individuals from the Cardio physical fitness assessment test of the UK Biobank repeated a standard exercise stress test twice (recall time 34.2 ± 2.8 months) and were prospectively studied. Results 821 individuals complied with inclusion criteria for reproducibility analysis, including peak workload differences between assessments ≤10 W. Intra-individual correlation between HR profile during the first and the second assessment was very high and higher than inter-individual correlation (0.92±0.08 vs 0.87±0.11, p<0.01). Intra-individual correlation of indices describing HR dynamics was: ρ = 0.81 for maximum HR during exercise; ρ = 0.71 for minimum HR during recovery; ρ = 0.70 for HR changes during both exercise and recovery; Intra-individual correlation was higher for these indices of HR dynamics than for resting HR (ρ = 0.64). Bland-Altman plots demonstrated good agreement between HR indices estimated during the first and second assessment. A small but consistent bias was registered for all repeated measurements. The intra-individual consistency of abnormal values was about 60–70%. Conclusions The HR dynamics during exercise and recovery are reproducible over a period of 3 years, with moderate to strong intra-individual reproducibility of abnormal values. PMID:28873397

  1. Capturing the dynamics of response variability in the brain in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna van Belle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ADHD is characterized by increased intra-individual variability in response times during the performance of cognitive tasks. However, little is known about developmental changes in intra-individual variability, and how these changes relate to cognitive performance. Twenty subjects with ADHD aged 7–24 years and 20 age-matched, typically developing controls participated in an fMRI-scan while they performed a go-no-go task. We fit an ex-Gaussian distribution on the response distribution to objectively separate extremely slow responses, related to lapses of attention, from variability on fast responses. We assessed developmental changes in these intra-individual variability measures, and investigated their relation to no-go performance. Results show that the ex-Gaussian measures were better predictors of no-go performance than traditional measures of reaction time. Furthermore, we found between-group differences in the change in ex-Gaussian parameters with age, and their relation to task performance: subjects with ADHD showed age-related decreases in their variability on fast responses (sigma, but not in lapses of attention (tau, whereas control subjects showed a decrease in both measures of variability. For control subjects, but not subjects with ADHD, this age-related reduction in variability was predictive of task performance. This group difference was reflected in neural activation: for typically developing subjects, the age-related decrease in intra-individual variability on fast responses (sigma predicted activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate gyrus (dACG, whereas for subjects with ADHD, activity in this region was related to improved no-go performance with age, but not to intra-individual variability. These data show that using more sophisticated measures of intra-individual variability allows the capturing of the dynamics of task performance and associated neural changes not permitted by more traditional measures.

  2. Inter- and intra-individual differences in teachers' self-efficacy: A multilevel factor exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, Marjolein; Koomen, Helma M Y; Jellesma, Francine C; Geerlings, Jolien; de Jong, Peter F

    2016-04-01

    This study explored inter- and intra-individual differences in teachers' self-efficacy (TSE) by adapting Tschannen-Moran and Woolfolk Hoy's (2001) Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES) to the domain- and student-specific level. Multilevel structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the factor structure underlying this adapted instrument, and to test for violations of measurement invariance over clusters. Results from 841 third- to sixth-grade students and their 107 teachers supported the existence of one higher-order factor (Overall TSE) and four lower-order factors (Instructional Strategies, Behavior Management, Student Engagement, and Emotional Support) at both the between- and within-teacher level. In this factor model, intra-individual differences in TSE were generally larger than inter-individual differences. Additionally, the presence of cluster bias in 18 of 24 items suggested that the unique domains of student-specific TSE at the between-teacher level cannot merely be perceived as the within-teacher level factors' aggregates. These findings underscore the importance of further investigating TSE in relation to teacher, student, and classroom characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Technical note: Validation of a semi-automated software tool to determine gait-cycle variables in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaaod, M; Kredel, R; Hofer, B; Steiner, A

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents the validation of a software tool called Cow-Gait-Analyzer (University of Bern, Switzerland) to determine gait-cycle variables in lame and non-lame dairy cows using features derived from low-cost, stand-alone 3-dimensional accelerometers (400 Hz). The Cow-Gait-Analyzer automatically extracts the relevant gait events of foot load and toe off, which characterize gait-cycle duration, stance phase, and swing phase during walking. A nonautomatic step is visual inspection of the pedograms. If the software does not automatically choose the right peaks according to pedogram definitions, peaks can be manually chosen. We validated the algorithms by comparing the accelerometer data (pedogram) with the synchronized video data, which we used as a gold standard. We carried out the measurements at the metatarsal level of paired hind limbs during walking. We included 12 non-lame cows and 5 lame cows and expressed overall differences between the Cow-Gait-Analyzer and the gold standard as relative measurement error (RME). We analyzed 34 hind limbs with a mean of 9 gait cycles. The median RME for gait-cycle duration and stance phases were 0 and 1.69%, respectively. The peaks of gait-cycle variables showed RME of 0.67 and 0.24% for foot load and toe off, respectively. The semi-automated Cow-Gait-Analyzer can accurately determine gait-cycle variables in both lame and non-lame cows, and could be used to assess gait patterns in routine clinical and research practice focusing on individual cows. The Authors. Published by the Federation of Animal Science Societies and Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Dairy Science Association®. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

  4. Intra-individual changes in DNA methylation not mediated by cell-type composition are correlated with aging during childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervin, Kristina; Andreassen, Bettina Kulle; Hjorthaug, Hanne Sagsveen; Carlsen, Karin C Lødrup; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Undlien, Dag Erik; Lyle, Robert; Munthe-Kaas, Monica Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported age-associated changes in DNA methylation in the first few years of life and in adult populations, but the extent of such changes during childhood is less well studied. The goals of this study were to investigate to what degree intra-individual changes in DNA methylation are associated with aging during childhood and dissect the methylation changes directly associated with aging from the effect mediated through variation in cell-type composition (CTC). We performed reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) in peripheral whole-blood samples collected at 2, 10, and 16 years of age. We identified age-associated longitudinal changes in DNA methylation at 346 CpGs in 178 genes. Analyses separating the effect mediated by CTC variability across age identified 26 CpGs located in 12 genes that associated directly with age. Hence, the CTC changes across age appear to act as a mediator of the observed DNA methylation associated with age. The results were replicated using EpiTYPER in a second sample set selected from the same cohort. Gene ontology analyses revealed enrichment of transcriptional regulation and developmental processes. Further, comparisons of the mean DNA methylation differences between the time points reveal greater differences between 2 to 10 years and 10 to 16 years, suggesting that the identified age-associated DNA methylation patterns manifests in early childhood. This study reveals insights into the epigenetic dynamics associated with aging early in life. Such information could ultimately provide clues and point towards molecular pathways that are susceptible to aging-related disease-associated epigenetic dysregulation.

  5. Intra-individual changes in anxiety and depression during 12-month follow-up in percutaneous coronary intervention patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damen, Nikki L; Pelle, Aline J; van Geuns, Robert-Jan M

    2011-01-01

    Only a paucity of studies focused on intra-individual changes in anxiety and depression over time and its correlates in cardiac patients, which may contribute to the identification of high-risk patients and point to targets for intervention. We examined changes in anxiety and depression over a 12...

  6. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis as a tool for subtyping Listeria monocytogenes strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Katharine E Volpe; Kathariou, Sophia; Edwards, Justin S; Wolf, Leslie A

    2008-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, like many other food-borne bacteria, has certain strains that are commonly linked to outbreaks. Due to the relatively low numbers of affected individuals, outbreaks of L. monocytogenes can be difficult to detect. The current technique of molecular subtyping in PulseNet laboratories to identify genetically similar strains is pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). While PFGE is state-of-the-art, interlaboratory comparisons are difficult because the results are highly susceptible to discrepancies due to even minor variations in experimental conditions and the subjectivity of band marking. This research was aimed at the development of a multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) that can be implemented in PulseNet laboratories to replace or complement existing protocols. MLVA has proven to be a rapid and highly discriminatory tool for subtyping many bacteria. In this study, a novel MLVA method for L. monocytogenes strains was developed utilizing eight loci multiplexed into two PCRs. The PCR products were separated by capillary gel electrophoresis for high throughput and accurate sizing, and the fragment sizes were analyzed and clustered based on the number of repeats. When tested against a panel of 193 epidemiologically linked and nonlinked isolates, this MLVA for L. monocytogenes strains demonstrates strong epidemiological concordance. Since MLVA is a high-throughput screening method that is fairly inexpensive, easy to perform, rapid, and reliable, it is well suited to interlaboratory comparisons during epidemiological investigations of food-borne illness.

  7. Magnetic Measurements as a Useful Tool for the Evaluation of Spatial Variability of the Arable Horizon Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattakhova, Leysan; Shinkarev, Alexandr; Ryzhikh, Lyudmila; Kosareva, Lina

    2017-04-01

    In normal practice, the thickness of the arable horizon is determined on the basis of field morphological descriptions, allowing the subjectivity of perception and judgment at the crucial role of experience of the researcher. The subject of special interest are independent analytical and technically relatively simple in design approaches to the diagnosis of the lower boundary of the blended plowing the profiles part. Theoretical premises to use spectrophotometry and magnetometry to arable horizon depth diagnose is based on the concept of regular color and magnetic properties vertical differentiation in a profile of virgin soils. This work is devoted to the comparative assessment of the possibility to objectively and reliably diagnose the lower boundary of the arable horizon in gray forest soils by determining the color characteristics and the magnetic susceptibility of their layer-wise samples. It was shown with arable gray forest soil (Cutanic Luvisols (Anthric)) as example that the magnetic susceptibility profile distribution curves can provide more reliable and objective assessment of the arable horizon thickness spatial variability than the profile curves of the color characteristics in the CIELAB coordinates. Therefore, magnetic measurements can be a useful tool for the tillage erosion estimation in the monitoring of soil characteristics in connection with the development of precision agriculture technologies and the organizing of agricultural field plot experiments.

  8. Intraindividual comparison of gastric peristalsis after ingestion of a semiliquid and solid test meal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, R.; Tatsch, K.; Muenzing, W.; Vorderholzer, W.; Schindlbeck, N.; Hahn, K.

    1997-01-01

    Aim: Patients with various disorders of gastric function were studied with radiolabeled test meals of different consistency to elaborate the effect of ingested media on gastric peristalsis and emptying. Methods: In 12 patients parameters of gastric function were intraindividually compared after ingestion of a semiliquid and a solid test meal. In addition to the standard evaluation derived from time activity curves condensed images were established from two fixed time intervals (early and late period). These images were used to evaluate the amplitude and frequency of gastric contractions using Fourier analysis. Results: As expected gastric emptying was influenced by the consistency of the test meal. Mean emptying rates for the solid meal were significant lower than those for the semiliquid one (p [de

  9. Consistently Showing Your Best Side? Intra-individual Consistency in #Selfie Pose Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindell, Annukka K.

    2017-01-01

    Painted and photographic portraits of others show an asymmetric bias: people favor their left cheek. Both experimental and database studies confirm that the left cheek bias extends to selfies. To date all such selfie studies have been cross-sectional; whether individual selfie-takers tend to consistently favor the same pose orientation, or switch between multiple poses, remains to be determined. The present study thus examined intra-individual consistency in selfie pose orientations. Two hundred selfie-taking participants (100 male and 100 female) were identified by searching #selfie on Instagram. The most recent 10 single-subject selfies for the each of the participants were selected and coded for type of selfie (normal; mirror) and pose orientation (left, midline, right), resulting in a sample of 2000 selfies. Results indicated that selfie-takers do tend to consistently adopt a preferred pose orientation (α = 0.72), with more participants showing an overall left cheek bias (41%) than would be expected by chance (overall right cheek bias = 31.5%; overall midline bias = 19.5%; no overall bias = 8%). Logistic regression modellng, controlling for the repeated measure of participant identity, indicated that sex did not affect pose orientation. However, selfie type proved a significant predictor when comparing left and right cheek poses, with a stronger left cheek bias for mirror than normal selfies. Overall, these novel findings indicate that selfie-takers show intra-individual consistency in pose orientation, and in addition, replicate the previously reported left cheek bias for selfies and other types of portrait, confirming that the left cheek bias also presents within individuals’ selfie corpora. PMID:28270790

  10. Variable rules meet Impoverishment theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parrott, Jeffrey K.; Nevins, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    This paper revives the sociolinguistic notion of ‘variable rules’ (Labov 1969, Cedergren and Sankoff 1974, Guy 1991) as a specific and restricted mechanism within the theoretical framework of Distributed Morphology (Halle and Marantz 1993, Embick and Noyer 2007). We propose that intra-individual ......This paper revives the sociolinguistic notion of ‘variable rules’ (Labov 1969, Cedergren and Sankoff 1974, Guy 1991) as a specific and restricted mechanism within the theoretical framework of Distributed Morphology (Halle and Marantz 1993, Embick and Noyer 2007). We propose that intra......-individual paradigm ‘leveling’ variation (or, variable syncretism) can be effectively modeled as resulting from post-syntactic feature deletion rules that apply variably. In other words, variable rules enact a structural change only probabilistically, rather than deterministically, when their structural description...... is met. By hypothesis, morphological ‘Impoverishment’ operations (Bonet 1991, Halle 1997, Noyer 1998) are induced by the inherent and universal markedness of particular morphosyntactic features or their combination (Greenberg 1966, Croft 2003). We examine markedness-driven variable Impoverishment through...

  11. The Screening Tool of Feeding Problems Applied to Children (STEP-CHILD): Psychometric Characteristics and Associations with Child and Parent Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiverling, Laura; Hendy, Helen M.; Williams, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated the 23-item Screening Tool for Feeding Problems (STEP; Matson & Kuhn, 2001) with a sample of children referred to a hospital-based feeding clinic to examine the scale's psychometric characteristics and then demonstrate how a children's revision of the STEP, the STEP-CHILD is associated with child and parent variables.…

  12. Class Evolution Tree: A Graphical Tool to Support Decisions on the Number of Classes in Exploratory Categorical Latent Variable Modeling for Rehabilitation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriston, Levente; Melchior, Hanne; Hergert, Anika; Bergelt, Corinna; Watzke, Birgit; Schulz, Holger; von Wolff, Alessa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our study was to develop a graphical tool that can be used in addition to standard statistical criteria to support decisions on the number of classes in explorative categorical latent variable modeling for rehabilitation research. Data from two rehabilitation research projects were used. In the first study, a latent profile analysis was…

  13. Direct Aggression and Generalized Anxiety in Adolescence: Heterogeneity in Development and Intra-Individual Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeus, Wim; Van de Schoot, Rens; Hawk, Skyler T; Hale, William W; Branje, Susan

    2016-02-01

    Co-occurrence of aggression and anxiety might change during adolescence, or stay stable. We studied change and stability of four types of co-occurrence regarding direct aggression and anxiety in adolescence: an anxious and non-aggressive type, an aggressive and non-anxious type, a comorbid aggressive-anxious type and a no problems type. We applied a person-centered approach to assess increases and decreases of these types, and tested various models of intra-individual change of the types: the stability, acting out and failure models. We used data from a five-wave study of 923 early-to-middle and 390 middle-to-late adolescents (48.5 % male), thereby covering the ages of 12-20. We observed accelerated development in the older cohort: adolescents tended to grow faster out of the aggressive types in middle-to-late adolescence than in early-to-middle adolescence. We observed one other group-dependent pattern of heterogeneity in development, namely "gender differentiation": gender differences in aggression and generalized anxiety became stronger over time. We found support for two perspectives on intra-individual change of the four types, namely the stability and the acting out perspective. The no problems--and to a lesser extent the anxious--type proved to be stable across time. Acting out was found in early-to-middle adolescents, males, and adolescents with poorer-quality friendships. In all three groups, there were substantial transitions from the anxious type to the aggressive type during 4 years (between 20 and 41 %). Remarkably, acting out was most prevalent in subgroups that, generally speaking, are more vulnerable for aggressive behavior, namely early-to-middle adolescents and males. We interpret acting out as the attempt of adolescents to switch from anxiety to instrumental aggression, in order to become more visible and obtain an autonomous position in the adolescent world. Acting out contributed to the explanation of accelerated development and gender

  14. Adolescents' and Best Friend's Depressive Symptoms and Conflict Management: Intraindividual and Interpersonal Processes Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma-van Dam, Elise; Hale, Bill; Koot, Hans; Meeus, Wim; Branje, Susan

    2016-12-12

    This 6-year longitudinal study examined the relation between 3 conflict management styles (i.e., problem solving, conflict engagement, and compliance) and depressive symptoms in adolescent-best friend relationships. Participants were 479 Dutch adolescents and their best friend who reported annually on depressive symptoms and conflict management styles toward each other. Bidirectional effects between conflict management styles and depressive symptoms were studied both within adolescents (intraindividual) and between adolescent best friends (interpersonal). A positive interpersonal effect of depressive symptoms of one dyad member on depressive symptoms of the other member was found. Similarly, higher positive problem solving and conflict engagement of one dyad member predicted respectively higher problem solving and conflict engagement of the other dyad member. Adolescents who reported more depressive symptoms reported more conflict engagement and compliance over time. In addition, for boys, higher levels of depressive symptoms of one dyad member were related to more problem solving by the other member over time. The current study contributed to the literature by showing that depressive symptoms and conflict management are related constructs in adolescents and that both intrapersonal and interpersonal processes contribute to this relation.

  15. Stability and Variability in Young Children's Understanding of Floating and Sinking during One Single-Task Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meindertsma, Heidi B.; van Dijk, Marijn W. G.; Steenbeek, Henderien W.; van Geert, Paul L. C.

    2014-01-01

    Intraindividual variability is a key component in explaining children's development and learning. Studying this type of variability on the micro-timescale can help us understand real-time constructive processes and the subsequent long-term development. The aim of this article is to study the process of children's understanding of…

  16. Variability of energy input into selected subsystems of the human-glove-tool system: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Tomasz; Dobry, Marian Witalis

    2017-05-31

    This article presents an application of the energy method to assess the energy input introduced into two subsystems of the human-glove-tool system. To achieve this aim, a physical model of the system was developed. This consists of dynamic models of the human body and the glove described in Standard No. ISO 10068:2012, and a model of a hand-held power tool. The energy input introduced into the subsystems, i.e., the human body and the glove, was analysed in the domain of energy and involved calculating three component energy inputs of forces. The energy model was solved using numerical simulation implemented in the MATLAB/simulink environment. This procedure demonstrates that the vibration energy was distributed quite differently in the internal structure of the two subsystems. The results suggest that the operating frequency of the tool has a significant impact on the level of energy inputs transmitted into both subsystems.

  17. Intra-individual double burden of overweight and micronutrient deficiencies among Vietnamese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laillou, Arnaud; Yakes, Elizabeth; Le, Thi Hop; Wieringa, Frank Tammo; Le, Bach Mai; Moench-Pfanner, Regina; Berger, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Vietnamese Living Standard Surveys showed that the rate of overweight and obese in Vietnamese adults doubled between 1992 and 2002, from 2% to 5.5%, respectively with no significant difference in the proportions of overweight/obesity between men and women. Considering the increasing public health concern over the double burden of malnutrition in Vietnam, we investigated micronutrient deficiencies among women of reproductive age according to their Body Mass Index. A transversal study was conducted in 2010 among 1530 women of reproductive age from 19 provinces. Participating women were asked to give a non-fasting blood sample for plasma iron, vitamin A, folate, vitamin B12 and zinc assessment. Although % body fat was associated with haemoglobin, ferritin, retinol and zinc concentrations, BMI category was only associated with marginal vitamin A status (19% among underweight vs 7% among overweight/obese; poverweight/obese women; prevalence of zinc deficiency and marginal/deficient folate status was much higher, affecting respectively 61.1% and 25.8%. Intra-individual double burden of malnutrition (overweight/obesity (OW) and micronutrient deficiency) was observed among 2.0% for OW-anemia, 2.3% OW-iron deficient, 3.0% for OW-Vitamin B12 deficiency, 12.2% for OW-Zinc deficiency and 5.2% for OW-marginal/deficient folate status. This large, cross-sectional survey demonstrated that micronutrient deficiencies are an issue across the weight spectrum among women in Vietnam, with only vitamin A status being better among overweight than underweight women. It is therefore essential for Vietnam to actively prevent women of reproductive age from overweight/obesity and at same time to control micronutrient deficiencies in this population to limit their economic and health consequences.

  18. Intraindividual right-left comparison of sonographic features in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köninger, Angela; Koch, Laura; Edimiris, Philippos; Nießen, Stefanie; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine; Kimmig, Rainer; Strowitzki, Thomas; Schmidt, Börge

    2014-10-01

    Sonographic features of polycystic ovaries consist of elevated antral follicle count or ovarian volume of at least one ovary. The aim of this prospective cross-sectional study was to estimate intraindividual differences in sonographic measurements between the both ovaries of PCOS patients and controls and clinical consequences. Both ovaries of 85 PCOS patients and 48 controls were scanned transvaginally and agreement of sonographic measurements was analyzed using the Bland-Altman method. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) were computed. Mean differences between right and left ovaries were 0.24 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: -0.32-0.80) follicles for AFC and 1.14 (95% CI: 0.34-1.92)ml for OV in the whole study population, 0.14 (95% CI: -0.68-0.96) follicles for AFC and 1.48 (95% CI: 0.39-2.58)ml for OV in PCOS patients, 0.42 (95% CI: -0.19-1.02) follicles for AFC and 0.53 (95% CI: -0.50-1.56)ml for OV in controls. Rather wide limits of agreement and low CCCs (ovaries for both sonographic measurements. Width between lower and upper limits of agreement was higher for PCOS patients than for controls. 23.5% of the PCOS patients showed polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) only in one ovary, resulting in 9.4% potentially missed PCOS diagnosis according to the Rotterdam ESHRE/ASRM-Sponsored PCOS Consensus Workshop Group. Substantial differences in antral follicle count and ovarian volume between the right and left ovary were observed. In approximately 10% of the PCOS patients in our study only the examination of both ovaries has led to a reliable diagnosis of PCOS. In clinical practice it is recommended to scan both ovaries for a reliable diagnosis of abnormal sonographic findings in PCOM and PCOS diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid decision support tool based on novel ecosystem service variables for retrofitting of permeable pavement systems in the presence of trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Miklas; Uzomah, Vincent C

    2013-08-01

    The retrofitting of sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) such as permeable pavements is currently undertaken ad hoc using expert experience supported by minimal guidance based predominantly on hard engineering variables. There is a lack of practical decision support tools useful for a rapid assessment of the potential of ecosystem services when retrofitting permeable pavements in urban areas that either feature existing trees or should be planted with trees in the near future. Thus the aim of this paper is to develop an innovative rapid decision support tool based on novel ecosystem service variables for retrofitting of permeable pavement systems close to trees. This unique tool proposes the retrofitting of permeable pavements that obtained the highest ecosystem service score for a specific urban site enhanced by the presence of trees. This approach is based on a novel ecosystem service philosophy adapted to permeable pavements rather than on traditional engineering judgement associated with variables based on quick community and environment assessments. For an example case study area such as Greater Manchester, which was dominated by Sycamore and Common Lime, a comparison with the traditional approach of determining community and environment variables indicates that permeable pavements are generally a preferred SuDS option. Permeable pavements combined with urban trees received relatively high scores, because of their great potential impact in terms of water and air quality improvement, and flood control, respectively. The outcomes of this paper are likely to lead to more combined permeable pavement and tree systems in the urban landscape, which are beneficial for humans and the environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A longitudinal study of basal cortisol in infants : Intra-individual variability, circadian rhythm and developmental trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weerth, C.; Van Geert, P. L. C.

    2002-01-01

    Mothers with normally developing babies were visited in their homes during 13 consecutive weeks, when the babies were around 5-8 months of age. Basal salival cortisol measures were taken for both the baby and the mother on arrival. The infants' basal cortisol decreased linearly with age, was

  1. Types and variables : Towards a congenial procedure for handling personality data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstee, WKB

    Standard procedures for processing and interpreting data in personality assessment run the risk of losing their audience. Most notably, relative scaling of data, whether through interindividual or intra-individual comparison, leads to losing either the persons or the variables from view. I set out

  2. Variability of fasting and post-menthionine plasma homocysteine levels in normo- and hyperhomocysteinaemic individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, M.; de Jong, S.C.; Devilli, W.; Rauwerda, J.A.; Jakobs, C.A.J.M.; Pals, G.; Boers, G.H.J.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.

    1999-01-01

    To assess the variability of plasma homocysteine levels, fasting and post-methionine homocysteine levels were measured twice, at baseline and after follow-up of 1-4 months, in 16 individuals with normal and 26 with elevated homocysteine levels after methionine loading. The intra-individual

  3. Does Response Variability Predict Distractibility among Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Zachary W.; Roberts, Walter M.; Milich, Richard; Fillmore, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    Increased intraindividual variability in response time (RTSD) has been observed reliably in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and has often been used as a measure of inattention. RTSD is assumed to reflect attentional lapses and distractibility, though evidence for the validity of this connection is lacking. We assessed whether RTSD…

  4. Thermal infrared imagery as a tool for analysing the variability of surface saturated areas at various temporal and spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Barbara; Antonelli, Marta; Pfister, Laurent; Klaus, Julian

    2017-04-01

    Surface saturated areas are important for the on- and offset of hydrological connectivity within the hillslope-riparian-stream continuum. This is reflected in concepts such as variable contributing areas or critical source areas. However, we still lack a standardized method for areal mapping of surface saturation and for observing its spatiotemporal variability. Proof-of-concept studies in recent years have shown the potential of thermal infrared (TIR) imagery to record surface saturation dynamics at various temporal and spatial scales. Thermal infrared imagery is thus a promising alternative to conventional approaches, such as the squishy boot method or the mapping of vegetation. In this study we use TIR images to investigate the variability of surface saturated areas at different temporal and spatial scales in the forested Weierbach catchment (0.45 km2) in western Luxembourg. We took TIR images of the riparian zone with a hand-held FLIR infrared camera at fortnightly intervals over 18 months at nine different locations distributed over the catchment. Not all of the acquired images were suitable for a derivation of the surface saturated areas, as various factors influence the usability of the TIR images (e.g. temperature contrasts, shadows, fog). Nonetheless, we obtained a large number of usable images that provided a good insight into the dynamic behaviour of surface saturated areas at different scales. The images revealed how diverse the evolution of surface saturated areas can be throughout the hydrologic year. For some locations with similar morphology or topography we identified diverging saturation dynamics, while other locations with different morphology / topography showed more similar behaviour. Moreover, we were able to assess the variability of the dynamics of expansion / contraction of saturated areas within the single locations, which can help to better understand the mechanisms behind surface saturation development.

  5. Key indicator tools for shallow slope failure assessment using soil chemical property signatures and soil colour variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Rashidi; Hasni, Shah Irani; Baharuddin, Zainul Mukrim; Hashim, Khairusy Syakirin Has-Yun; Mahamod, Lukman Hakim

    2017-10-01

    Slope failure has become a major concern in Malaysia due to the rapid development and urbanisation in the country. It poses severe threats to any highway construction industry, residential areas, natural resources and tourism activities. The extent of damages that resulted from this catastrophe can be lessened if a long-term early warning system to predict landslide prone areas is implemented. Thus, this study aims to characterise the relationship between Oxisols properties and soil colour variables to be manipulated as key indicators to forecast shallow slope failure. The concentration of each soil property in slope soil was evaluated from two different localities that consist of 120 soil samples from stable and unstable slopes located along the North-South Highway (PLUS) and East-West Highway (LPT). Analysis of variance established highly significant difference (P < 0.0001) between the locations, the total organic carbon (TOC), soil pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), soil texture, soil chromaticity and all combinations of interactions. The overall CIELAB analysis leads to the conclusion that the CIELAB variables lightness L*, c* (Chroma) and h* (Hue) provide the most information about soil colour and other related soil properties. With regard to the relationship between colour variables and soil properties, the analysis detected that soil texture, organic carbon, iron oxide and aluminium concentration were the key factors that strongly correlate with soil colour variables at the studied area. Indicators that could be used to predict shallow slope failure were high value of L*(62), low values of c* (20) and h* (66), low concentration of iron (53 mg kg -1 ) and aluminium oxide (37 mg kg -1 ), low soil TOC (0.5%), low CEC (3.6 cmol/kg), slightly acidic soil pH (4.9), high amount of sand fraction (68%) and low amount of clay fraction (20%).

  6. Narrow intra-individual variation of maternal thyroid function in pregnancy based on a longitudinal study on 132 women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, M.; Forman, Julie Lyng; Juul, A.

    2009-01-01

    nonpregnant adults, intra-individual variations of thyroid hormones were smaller than inter-individual variations also during pregnancy. In the evaluation of thyroid function in pregnancy, the individual longitudinal course of thyroid hormones rather than absolute values should be considered. We present......, serial blood samples were obtained and ultrasound scans were performed throughout pregnancy. METHODS: Serum levels of TSH, free and total thyroxine (T(4)), free and total triiodothyronine (T(3)) as well as autoantibodies against thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin were measured in 979 serum samples.......017; presented. CONCLUSIONS: In accordance with the data from...

  7. Study of inter- and intra-individual variations in the salivary microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Patrice

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral bacterial communities contain species that promote health and others that have been implicated in oral and/or systemic diseases. Culture-independent approaches provide the best means to assess the diversity of oral bacteria because most of them remain uncultivable. Results The salivary microbiota from five adults was analyzed at three time-points by means of the 454 pyrosequencing technology. The V1-V3 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes was amplified by PCR using saliva lysates and broad-range primers. The bar-coded PCR products were pooled and sequenced unidirectionally to cover the V3 hypervariable region. Of 50,708 obtained sequences, 31,860 passed the quality control. Non-bacterial sequences (2.2% were removed leaving 31,170 reads. Samples were dominated by seven major phyla: members of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and candidate division TM7 were identified in all samples; Fusobacteria and Spirochaetes were identified in all individuals, but not at all time-points. The dataset was represented by 3,011 distinct sequences (100%-ID phylotypes of ~215 nucleotides and 583 phylotypes defined at ≥97% identity (97%-ID phylotypes. We compared saliva samples from different individuals in terms of the phylogeny of their microbial communities. Based on the presence and absence of phylotypes defined at 100% or 97% identity thresholds, samples from each subject formed separate clusters. Among individual taxa, phylum Bacteroidetes and order Clostridiales (Firmicutes were the best indicators of intraindividual similarity of the salivary flora over time. Fifteen out of 81 genera constituted 73 to 94% of the total sequences present in different samples. Of these, 8 were shared by all time points of all individuals, while 15-25 genera were present in all three time-points of different individuals. Representatives of the class Sphingobacteria, order Sphingobacteriales and family Clostridiaceae were

  8. Variable temperature infrared spectroscopy: a convenient tool for studying the thermodynamics of weak solid-gas interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrone, Edoardo; Otero Areán, Carlos

    2005-10-01

    This tutorial review describes the use of variable temperature infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed species (VTIR), a recent method for studying the thermodynamics of weak solid-gas interactions. Examples show how a fundamental relationship of thermodynamics (the van't Hoff equation, used long since in several fields of physical chemistry) can describe equilibrium processes at the solid-gas interface. The VTIR method is fully exploited by measuring absorbance of an IR band, temperature and pressure over a wide temperature range: an estimation of the interaction energy is, however, possible even ignoring the equilibrium pressure. Precise thermodynamic characterization of solid-gas interactions is required in several fields: on the applied side, gas sensing, separation and storage, which involve such areas as work-place security, air pollution control and the energy sector; regarding fundamental knowledge, weak solid-gas interactions are relevant to a number of fields, including hydrogen bonding, coordination chemistry and surface phenomena in a broad sense. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy of (gas) molecules adsorbed on a solid is frequently used to characterize both, the adsorbed species and the adsorbing centres at the solid surface. The potential of the technique can be greatly enhanced by obtaining IR spectra over a temperature range, and simultaneously measuring IR absorbance, temperature and equilibrium pressure. When this is done, variable temperature infrared (VTIR) spectroscopy can be used not only for a more detailed surface characterization, but also for precise studies on the thermodynamics of solid-gas interactions. Furthermore, when weak interactions are concerned, the technique shows favourable features compared to adsorption calorimetry, or to other classical methods. The potential of the VTIR method is highlighted by reviewing recently reported studies on dihydrogen, dinitrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption on zeolites. To facilitate understanding, an

  9. Acute Mental Discomfort Associated with Suicide Behavior in a Clinical Sample of Patients with Affective Disorders: Ascertaining Critical Variables Using Artificial Intelligence Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Susana; Barros, Jorge; Echávarri, Orietta; García, Fabián; Osses, Alex; Moya, Claudia; Maino, María Paz; Fischman, Ronit; Núñez, Catalina; Szmulewicz, Tita; Tomicic, Alemka

    2017-01-01

    In efforts to develop reliable methods to detect the likelihood of impending suicidal behaviors, we have proposed the following. To gain a deeper understanding of the state of suicide risk by determining the combination of variables that distinguishes between groups with and without suicide risk. A study involving 707 patients consulting for mental health issues in three health centers in Greater Santiago, Chile. Using 345 variables, an analysis was carried out with artificial intelligence tools, Cross Industry Standard Process for Data Mining processes, and decision tree techniques. The basic algorithm was top-down, and the most suitable division produced by the tree was selected by using the lowest Gini index as a criterion and by looping it until the condition of belonging to the group with suicidal behavior was fulfilled. Four trees distinguishing the groups were obtained, of which the elements of one were analyzed in greater detail, since this tree included both clinical and personality variables. This specific tree consists of six nodes without suicide risk and eight nodes with suicide risk (tree decision 01, accuracy 0.674, precision 0.652, recall 0.678, specificity 0.670, F measure 0.665, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) 73.35%; tree decision 02, accuracy 0.669, precision 0.642, recall 0.694, specificity 0.647, F measure 0.667, ROC AUC 68.91%; tree decision 03, accuracy 0.681, precision 0.675, recall 0.638, specificity 0.721, F measure, 0.656, ROC AUC 65.86%; tree decision 04, accuracy 0.714, precision 0.734, recall 0.628, specificity 0.792, F measure 0.677, ROC AUC 58.85%). This study defines the interactions among a group of variables associated with suicidal ideation and behavior. By using these variables, it may be possible to create a quick and easy-to-use tool. As such, psychotherapeutic interventions could be designed to mitigate the impact of these variables on the emotional state of individuals, thereby reducing

  10. Upgrades to the GALEX photon tools for production of databases of GALEX UV photometry and variability at short timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Chase

    This project will make use of gPhoton, a database and software suite of individual photons detected by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) UV survey telescope mission that has recently become available at the Mikulski Archive at Space Telescope, making studies of astrophysical phenomena observed by this mission on short time scales (seconds to minutes) feasible for the first time since the end of the mission. This project will extend the capabilities of gPhoton to make it computationally feasible to conduct studies of this type across the whole mission. That new capability will then be leveraged to search for, analyze, and build a comprehensive of short time domain behavior for a particularly interesting class of object: dwarf flares. The frequency, energy, and nature of these energetic stellar events have important consequences for habitability of orbiting exoplants. Their dynamic origin is also not currently fully understood, and the catalog produced by this work will provide an important observational resource in wavelengths and energies not available in other surveys. The proposed work will create a new software tool, in the form of a source extraction stage of gPhoton, that makes it computationally feasible to systematically and comprehensively mine the entire GALEX data set on short time domains. The proposed work will also generate and archive a new high level database product derived from the legacy GALEX mission data set in the form of a catalog of short time domain UV lightcurves of flares, extending the value and utility of the GALEX data beyond what currently exists. The proposed work is therefore responsive to ``1.3.3 Astrophysical databases and development of new data products/analysis tools'' of this solicitation and falls under ADAP Research Area ``10. Astrophysical Databases.'' The proposed work also includes a scientific focus on the structure and evolution of main sequence stars with consequences for exoplanets and is therefore responsive to

  11. Enhancement of abdominal structures on MRI at 1.5 and 3 T: a retrospective intraindividual crossover comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlObaidy, Mamdoh [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Department of Radiology, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Radiology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Ramalho, Miguel; Velloni, Fernanda; Matos, Antonio P.; Herman, Kevin; Semelka, Richard C. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Radiology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2017-04-15

    To quantitatively compare the extent of enhancement of abdominal structures on MRI in an intraindividual fashion at 1.5 and 3 T. HIPAA-compliant, retrospective, longitudinal, intraindividual, crossover study, with waived informed consent, of consecutive individuals scanned at both 1.5 and 3 T closed-bore magnets using gadobenate dimeglumine during different phases of enhancement at tightly controlled arterial phase timing. Quantitative ROI measurements and qualitative sub-phase arterial phase assignments were independently performed by two radiologists. Qualitative discrepancies were resolved by a senior radiologist. Final population included 60 patients [41 female and 19 male; age, 49.35 ± 18.31 years (range 16-81); weight, 78.88 ± 20.3 kg (range 44.5-136)]. Similar enhancement peak patterns were noted at both field strengths. Interobserver agreement of quantitative evaluations was substantial. Significantly higher amplitudes of enhancement peaks were noted for all abdominal solid organs during all phases at 3 T, except for the pancreas (p = 0.17-0.30). Significantly higher amplitudes of enhancement peaks of the abdominal aorta at 1.5 T were noted. Similar peak patterns of enhancement for abdominal structures were observed at 1.5 and 3 T, with solid abdominal organs showing a higher percentage enhancement at 3 T, while unexpectedly higher aortic higher percentage enhancement was observed at 1.5 T. (orig.)

  12. Development and application of an automatic tool for the selection of control variables based on the self-optimizing control methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Rules for control structure design for industrial processes have been extensively proposed in the literature. Some model-based methodologies have a sound mathematical basis, such as the self-optimizing control technology. The procedure can be applied with the aid of available commercial simulators, e.g., PRO/IITM and AspenPlus®, from which the converging results are obtained more suitably for industrial applications, lessening the effort needed to build an appropriate mathematical model of the plant. Motivated by this context, this work explores the development and application of a tool designed to automatically generate near-optimal controlled structures for process plants based on the self-optimizing control technology. The goal is to provide a means to facilitate the way possible arrangements of controlled variables are generated. Using the local minimum singular value rule supported by a modified version of a branch-and-bound algorithm, the best sets of candidate controlled variables can be identified that minimize the loss between real optimal operation and operation under constant set-point policy. A case study consisting of a deethanizer is considered to show the main features of the proposed tool. The conclusion indicates the feasibility of merging complex theoretical contents within the framework of a user-friendly interface simple enough to generate control structures suitable for real world implementation.

  13. Dealing with variability in food production chains: a tool to enhance the sensitivity of epidemiological studies on phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Matthijs; Verkerk, Ruud

    2003-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies have tried to associate the intake of certain food products with a reduced risk for certain diseases. Results of these studies are often ambiguous, conflicting, or show very large deviations of trends. Nevertheless, a clear and often reproduced inverse association is observed between total vegetable and fruit consumption and cancer risk. Examples of components that have been indicated to have a potential protective effect in food and vegetables include antioxidants, allium compounds and glucosinolates. The food production chain can give a considerable variation in the level of bioactive components in the products that are consumed. In this paper the effects of this variability in levels of phytochemicals in food products on the sensitivity of epidemiological studies are assessed. Information on the effect of variation in different steps of the food production chain of Brassica vegetables on their glucosinolate content is used to estimate the distributions in the levels in the final product that is consumed. Monte Carlo simulations of an epidemiological cohort study with 30,000 people have been used to assess the likelihood of finding significant associations between food product intake and reduced cancer risk. By using the Monte Carlo simulation approach, it was shown that if information on the way of preparation of the products by the consumer was quantified, the statistical power of the study could at least be doubled. The statistical power could be increased by at least a factor of five if all variation of the food production chain could be accounted for. Variability in the level of protective components arising from the complete food production chain can be a major disturbing factor in the identification of associations between food intake and reduced risk for cancer. Monte Carlo simulation of the effect of the food production chain on epidemiological cohort studies has identified possible improvements in the set up of such studies

  14. New UV-source catalogs, UV spectral database, UV variables and science tools from the GALEX surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Luciana; de la Vega, Alexander; Shiao, Bernard; Bohlin, Ralph

    2018-03-01

    We present a new, expanded and improved catalog of Ultraviolet (UV) sources from the GALEX All-Sky Imaging survey: GUVcat_AIS (Bianchi et al. in Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 230:24, 2017). The catalog includes 83 million unique sources (duplicate measurements and rim artifacts are removed) measured in far-UV and near-UV. With respect to previous versions (Bianchi et al. in Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 411:2770 2011a, Adv. Space Res. 53:900-991, 2014), GUVcat_AIS covers a slightly larger area, 24,790 square degrees, and includes critical corrections and improvements, as well as new tags, in particular to identify sources in the footprint of extended objects, where pipeline source detection may fail and custom-photometry may be necessary. The UV unique-source catalog facilitates studies of density of sources, and matching of the UV samples with databases at other wavelengths. We also present first results from two ongoing projects, addressing respectively UV variability searches on time scales from seconds to years by mining the GALEX photon archive, and the construction of a database of ˜120,000 GALEX UV spectra (range ˜1300-3000 Å), including quality and calibration assessment and classification of the grism, hence serendipitous, spectral sources.

  15. On Comparison of SimTandem with State-of-the-Art Peptide Identification Tools, Efficiency of Precursor Mass Filter and Dealing with Variable Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novák Jiří

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The similarity search in theoretical mass spectra generated from protein sequence databases is a widely accepted approach for identification of peptides from query mass spectra produced by shotgun proteomics. Growing protein sequence databases and noisy query spectra demand database indexing techniques and better similarity measures for the comparison of theoretical spectra against query spectra. We employ a modification of previously proposed parameterized Hausdorff distance for comparisons of mass spectra. The new distance outperforms the original distance, the angle distance and state-of-the-art peptide identification tools OMSSA and X!Tandem in the number of identified peptides even though the q-value is only 0.001. When a precursor mass filter is used as a database indexing technique, our method outperforms OMSSA in the speed of search. When variable modifications are not searched, the search time is similar to X!Tandem. We show that the precursor mass filter is an efficient database indexing technique for high-accuracy data even though many variable modifications are being searched. We demonstrate that the number of identified peptides is bigger when variable modifications are searched separately by more search runs of a peptide identification engine. Otherwise, the false discovery rates are affected by mixing unmodified and modified spectra together resulting in a lower number of identified peptides. Our method is implemented in the freely available application SimTandem which can be used in the framework TOPP based on OpenMS.

  16. Integrated Variable-Fidelity Tool Set for Modeling and Simulation of Aeroservothermoelasticity-Propulsion (ASTE-P) Effects for Aerospace Vehicles Ranging From Subsonic to Hypersonic Flight, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research program aims at developing a variable-fidelity software tool set for aeroservothermoelastic-propulsive (ASTE-P) modeling that can be routinely...

  17. VARIABILITY OF CONTINUOUSLY MEASURED ARTERIAL PH AND BLOOD-GAS VALUES IN THE NEAR-TERM FETAL LAMB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOUDSTRA, BR; DEWOLF, BTHM; SMITS, TM; NATHANIELSZ, PW; ZIJLSTRA, WG; AARNOUDSE, JG

    1995-01-01

    In fetal sheep, arterial blood gas values show considerable spontaneous fluctuations. The aim of the present study was to obtain quantitative data on fetal blood gas variability. Accurate assessment of the intraindividual variations can hardly be obtained from intermittent blood samples, but

  18. Validation of the ICU-DaMa tool for automatically extracting variables for minimum dataset and quality indicators: The importance of data quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirgo, Gonzalo; Esteban, Federico; Gómez, Josep; Moreno, Gerard; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Blanch, Lluis; Guardiola, Juan José; Gracia, Rafael; De Haro, Lluis; Bodí, María

    2018-04-01

    Big data analytics promise insights into healthcare processes and management, improving outcomes while reducing costs. However, data quality is a major challenge for reliable results. Business process discovery techniques and an associated data model were used to develop data management tool, ICU-DaMa, for extracting variables essential for overseeing the quality of care in the intensive care unit (ICU). To determine the feasibility of using ICU-DaMa to automatically extract variables for the minimum dataset and ICU quality indicators from the clinical information system (CIS). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Fisher's exact test were used to compare the values extracted from the CIS with ICU-DaMa for 25 variables from all patients attended in a polyvalent ICU during a two-month period against the gold standard of values manually extracted by two trained physicians. Discrepancies with the gold standard were classified into plausibility, conformance, and completeness errors. Data from 149 patients were included. Although there were no significant differences between the automatic method and the manual method, we detected differences in values for five variables, including one plausibility error and two conformance and completeness errors. Plausibility: 1) Sex, ICU-DaMa incorrectly classified one male patient as female (error generated by the Hospital's Admissions Department). Conformance: 2) Reason for isolation, ICU-DaMa failed to detect a human error in which a professional misclassified a patient's isolation. 3) Brain death, ICU-DaMa failed to detect another human error in which a professional likely entered two mutually exclusive values related to the death of the patient (brain death and controlled donation after circulatory death). Completeness: 4) Destination at ICU discharge, ICU-DaMa incorrectly classified two patients due to a professional failing to fill out the patient discharge form when thepatients died. 5) Length of continuous renal replacement

  19. OPTIMALISASI MRP PARAMATER PADA COMMON MATERIAL UNTUK MEMBERI NILAI TAMBAH PADA PROSES KANBAN DI PT UNELEC INDONESIA (UNINDO DENGAN SIMULASI PART-VARIABLE TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Susatyo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Part-Variable Tools merupakan  aplikasi kecil yang dibuat dengan Ms. Excel, untuk melakukan perhitungan dan usulan MRP parameter dengan mempergunakan data transaksi bahan baku paling sedikit 1 tahun kebelakang.”Common Material” adalah tipe bahan baku yang ada di PT UNINDO yang harus selalu tersedia dalam kotak (bin di Gudang Persediaan dan sumber kebutuhan akan bahan baku ini diminta oleh karyawan Gudang. Permintaan jumlah kuantitinya berdasarkan jumlah akutal yang ada dibandingkan dengan nilai level permintaan kembali (ROP yang tertera pada KARTU KANBAN. Nilai ROP tersebut merupakan parameter MRP yang digunakan dalam perhitungan kebutuhan material.Perhitungan MRP dibutuhkan untuk meningkatkan kualitas, produktifitas, dan efisiensi, perbaikan komunikasi, dan menurunkan biaya-biaya dan hal hal yang tidak diperlukan serta mendekati keinginan konsumen dengan meminimalkan waktu tunggu ( Kootaneel, 2013  

  20. In-process tool rotational speed variation with constant heat input in friction stir welding of AZ31 sheets with variable thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, Gianluca; Campanella, Davide; Forcellese, Archimede; Fratini, Livan; Simoncini, Michela

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, friction stir welding experiments on AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets, characterized by a variable thickness along the welding line, were carried out. The approach adapted during welding consisted in maintaining constant the heat input to the joint. To this purpose, the rotational speed of the pin tool was increased with decreasing thickness and decreased with increasing thickness in order to obtain the same temperatures during welding. The amount by which the rotational speed was changed as a function of the sheet thickness was defined on the basis of the results given by FEM simulations of the FSW process. Finally, the effect of the in-process variation of the tool rotational speed on the mechanical and microstructural properties of FSWed joints was analysed by comparing both the nominal stress vs. nominal strain curves and microstructure of FSWed joints obtained in different process conditions. It was observed that FSW performed by keeping constant the heat input to the joint leads to almost coincident results both in terms of the curve shape, ultimate tensile strength and ultimate elongation values, and microstructure.

  1. Sleep and circadian variability in people with delayed sleep-wake phase disorder versus healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Helen J; Park, Margaret; Wyatt, James K; Rizvydeen, Muneer; Fogg, Louis F

    2017-06-01

    To compare sleep and circadian variability in adults with delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD) to healthy controls. Forty participants (22 DSWPD, 18 healthy controls) completed a ten-day protocol, consisting of DLMO assessments on two consecutive nights, a five-day study break, followed by two more DLMO assessments. All participants were instructed to sleep within one hour of their self-reported average sleep schedule for the last four days of the study break. We analyzed the participants' wrist actigraphy data during these four days to examine intraindividual variability in sleep timing, duration and efficiency. We also examined shifts in the DLMO from before and after the study break. Under the same conditions, people with DSWPD had significantly more variable wake times and total sleep time than healthy controls (p ≤ 0.015). Intraindividual variability in sleep onset time and sleep efficiency was similar between the two groups (p ≥ 0.30). The DLMO was relatively stable across the study break, with only 11% of controls but 27% of DSWPDs showed more than a one hour shift in the DLMO. Only in the DSWPD sample was greater sleep variability associated with a larger shift in the DLMO (r = 0.46, p = 0.03). These results suggest that intraindividual variability in sleep can be higher in DSWPD versus healthy controls, and this may impact variability in the DLMO. DSWPD patients with higher intraindividual variability in sleep are more likely to have a shifting DLMO, which could impact sleep symptoms and the optimal timing of light and/or melatonin treatment for DSWPD. Circadian Phase Assessments at Home, http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01487252, NCT01487252. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Intra-individual polymorphism in diploid and apomictic polyploid hawkweeds (Hieracium, Lactuceae, Asteraceae: disentangling phylogenetic signal, reticulation, and noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrtek Jindřich

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hieracium s.str. is a complex species-rich group of perennial herbs composed of few sexual diploids and numerous apomictic polyploids. The existence of reticulation and the near-continuity of morphological characters across taxa seriously affect species determination, making Hieracium one of the best examples of a 'botanist's nightmare'. Consequently, its species relationships have not previously been addressed by molecular methods. Concentrating on the supposed major evolutionary units, we used nuclear ribosomal (ETS and chloroplast (trnT-trnL sequences in order to disentangle the phylogenetic relationships and to infer the origins of the polyploids. Results Despite relatively low interspecific variation, the nuclear data revealed the existence of two major groups roughly corresponding to species with a Western or Eastern European origin. Extensive reticulation was mainly inferred from the character additivity of parental ETS variants. Surprisingly, many diploid species were of hybrid origin whilst several polyploid taxa showed no evidence of reticulation. Intra-individual ETS sequence polymorphism generally exceeded interspecific variation and was either independent of, or additional to, additive patterns accounted for by hybrid origin. Several ETS ribotypes occurred in different hybrid taxa, but never as the only variant in any species analyzed. Conclusion The high level of intra-individual ETS polymorphism prevented straightforward phylogenetic analysis. Characterization of this variation as additive, shared informative, homoplasious, or unique made it possible to uncover the phylogenetic signal and to reveal the hybrid origin of 29 out of 60 accessions. Contrary to expectation, diploid sexuals and polyploid apomicts did not differ in their molecular patterns. The basic division of the genus into two major clades had not previously been intimated on morphological grounds. Both major groups are thought to have survived in

  3. Handheld mechanical nociceptive threshold testing in dairy cows - intra-individual variation, inter-observer agreement and variation over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raundal, Peter M; Andersen, Pia H; Toft, Nils; Forkman, Björn; Munksgaard, Lene; Herskin, Mette S

    2014-11-01

    To examine the use of handheld methodology to assess mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) on cows kept loose-housed. Prospective randomized partial cross-over experimental study. A one-factor (test day) design was used to evaluate MNT over time. One hundred and fifteen healthy, loose-housed Danish Holstein cattle. We evaluated intra-individual variation, inter-observer agreement and variation over time of MNT using two handheld devices and two stimulation sites. Mechanical, ramped stimulations were performed with an algometer (6.5 mm diameter steel probe, 0-10.0 kgf) or an electronic von Frey device (plastic tip with diameter 0.8 mm, 0-1000 gf). Each cow received 5-6 consecutive stimulations within a 2 × 5 cm skin area on the dorsal or lateral aspect of the left third metatarsus until an avoidance reaction occurred. We investigated the difference in precision [expressed as coefficient of variation (CV)] between the combinations of devices and stimulation sites. The inter-observer agreement and the difference in MNT between test day 1, 3, 7, 10 and 24 were investigated for selected combinations. Data were analysed in mixed models and Bland-Altman as relevant. The CVs did not differ [range 0.34-0.52 (p = 0.1)]. Difference between observers (95% limits) was 0.2 kgf (2.8) and 4 gf (369) for the algometer and von Frey device, respectively. Mechanical nociceptive threshold increased from 361 on test day one to 495 gf on test day 24 (p < 0.01). All methods showed a high degree of intra-individual variation, and no combination of device and stimulation site showed superior precision. Mean difference between observers was low, and MNT was not consistent over time. Further development of the methods is required before they can be used in research to investigate possible relations between claw lesions and hyperalgesia. © 2014 The Authors Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the

  4. Reaction time variability in ADHD: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Leanne; Narad, Megan E; Antonini, Tanya N; O'Brien, Kathleen M; Hawk, Larry W; Epstein, Jeffery N

    2012-07-01

    For the past decade, intra-individual variability in reaction times on computerized tasks has become a central focus of cognitive research on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Numerous studies document increased reaction time variability among children and adults with ADHD, relative to typically developing controls. However, direct comparisons with other disorders with heightened reaction time variability are virtually nonexistent, despite their potential to inform our understanding of the phenomenon. A growing literature examines the sensitivity of reaction time variability to theoretically and clinically relevant manipulations. There is strong evidence that stimulus treatment reduces reaction time variability during a range of cognitive tasks, but the literature is mixed regarding the impact of motivational incentives and variation in stimulus event rate. Most studies of reaction time variability implicitly assume that heightened reaction time variability reflects occasional lapses in attention, and the dominant neurophysiological interpretation suggests this variability is linked to intrusions of task-negative brain network activity during task performance. Work examining the behavioral and neurophysiological correlates of reaction time variability provides some support for these hypotheses, but considerably more work is needed in this area. Finally, because conclusions from each of domains reviewed are limited by the wide range of measures used to measure reaction time variability, this review highlights the need for increased attention to the cognitive and motivational context in which variability is assessed and recommends that future work always supplement macro-level variability indices with metrics that isolate particular components of reaction time variability.

  5. Variable-density groundwater flow simulations and particle tracking. Numerical modelling using DarcyTools. Preliminary site description of the Simpevarp area, version 1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follin, Sven [SF GeoLogic AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Stigsson, Martin; Berglund, Sten [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Svensson, Urban [Computer-aided Fluid Engineering AB, Norrkoeping (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    SKB is conducting site investigations for a high-level nuclear waste repository in fractured crystalline rocks at two coastal areas in Sweden, Forsmark and Simpevarp. The investigations started in 2002 and have been planned since the late 1990s. The work presented here investigates the possibility of using hydrogeochemical measurements in deep boreholes to reduce parameter uncertainty in a regional modelling of groundwater flow in fractured rock. The work was conducted with the aim of improving the palaeohydrogeological understanding of the Simpevarp area and to give recommendations to the preparations of the next version of the Preliminary Site Description (1.2). The study is based on a large number of numerical simulations of transient variable density groundwater flow through a strongly heterogeneous and anisotropic medium. The simulations were conducted with the computer code DarcyTools, the development of which has been funded by SKB. DarcyTools is a flexible porous media code specifically designed to treat groundwater flow and salt transport in sparsely fractured crystalline rock and it is noted that some of the features presented in this report are still under development or subjected to testing and verification. The simulations reveal the sensitivity of the results to different hydrogeological modelling assumptions, e.g. the sensitivity to the initial groundwater conditions at 10,000 BC, the size of the model domain and boundary conditions, and the hydraulic properties of deterministically and stochastically modelled deformation zones. The outcome of these simulations was compared with measured salinities and calculated relative proportions of different water types (mixing proportions) from measurements in two deep core drilled boreholes in the Laxemar subarea. In addition to the flow simulations, the statistics of flow related transport parameters were calculated for particle flowpaths from repository depth to ground surface for two subareas within the

  6. Effects of estradiol and progesterone on the variability of the micronucleus assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeyens, Ans; Vandersickel, Veerle; Thierens, Hubert; Ridder, Leo De; Vral, Anne

    2005-01-01

    To investigate chromosomal radiosensitivity of lymphocytes the micronucleus (MN) assay has been used for many years. The results of these studies suggest the use of the MN assay as a biomarker for cancer predisposition. However, the MN assay has still some limitations associated with the reproducibility and sensitivity. Especially a high intra-individual variability has been observed. An explanation for this high intra-individual variability is not yet available. In literature it is suggested that the high variability among females is attributable to hormonal status. In this study we investigated if the high intra-individual variability in micronucleus formation in lymphocytes of females after in vitro exposure to ionising radiation is caused by variations in hormone levels of estradiol (E2) and progesterone (PROG). For this, the MN assay was performed on blood samples of 18 healthy women during 7 consecutive weeks while the estradiol and progesterone levels were determined at the same time. The MN assay was also examined in cultures of isolated blood lymphocytes with estradiol or progesterone levels added in vitro. The results demonstrated that estradiol and progesterone levels have no influence on the variations in radiation-induced MN yields observed in blood samples of healthy women. These conclusions were confirmed by the 'in vitro' experiments as no correlation between the MN yields and the concentrations of hormones (estradiol or progesterone) added in vitro to isolated lymphocytes cultures was observed

  7. MRI in multiple sclerosis: an intra-individual, randomized and multicentric comparison of gadobutrol with gadoterate meglumine at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saake, Marc; Weibart, Marina; Doerfler, Arnd [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neuroradiology, Erlangen (Germany); Langner, Soenke; Hosten, Norbert [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany); Schwenke, Carsten [SCO:SSiS, Statistical Consulting, Berlin (Germany); Jansen, Olav [University of Kiel, Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Kiel (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    To compare contrast effects of gadobutrol with gadoterate meglumine for brain MRI in multiple sclerosis (MS) in a multicentre, randomized, prospective, intraindividual study at 3 T. Institutional review board approval was obtained. Patients with known or suspected active MS lesions were included. Two identical MRIs were performed using randomized contrast agent order. Four post-contrast T1 sequences were acquired (start time points 0, 3, 6 and 9 min). If no enhancing lesion was present in first MRI, second MRI was cancelled. Quantitative (number and signal intensity of enhancing lesions) and qualitative parameters (time points of first and all lesions enhancing; subjective preference regarding contrast enhancement and lesion delineation; global preference) were evaluated blinded. Seventy-four patients (male, 26; mean age, 35 years) were enrolled in three centres. In 45 patients enhancing lesions were found. Number of enhancing lesions increased over time for both contrast agents without significant difference (median 2 for both). Lesions signal intensity was significantly higher for gadobutrol (p < 0.05 at time points 3, 6 and 9 min). Subjective preference rating showed non-significant tendency in favour of gadobutrol. Both gadobutrol and gadoterate meglumine can be used for imaging of acute inflammatory MS lesions. However, gadobutrol generates higher lesion SI. (orig.)

  8. Does Response Variability Predict Distractibility among Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder?

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Zachary W.; Roberts, Walter M.; Milich, Richard; Fillmore, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    Increased intra-individual variability in response time (RTSD) has been observed reliably in ADHD and is often used as a measure of inattention. RTSD is assumed to reflect attentional lapses and distractibility, though evidence for the validity of this connection is lacking. We assessed whether RTSD is an indicator of inattention by comparing RTSD on the stop-signal task (SST) to performance on the Delayed Oculomotor Response (DOR) Task, a measure of distractibility. Participants included 30 ...

  9. Preliminary evaluations related to the ranges of hematological and biochemical variables in hospitalized patients with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Chitsaz

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Any considerable alter in patients′ biochemical and hematological figures (BS, Hgb, Plt and Lymph may necessitate further attention related to inter- and intra-individual variability in clinical supervision and drug′s assortment. Therefore, success in treatment could be achieved by the close management of clinical, biochemical, hematological, and pharmacological manifestation. To reduce disability, mortality, and morbidity in Iranian stroke population further clinical studies are needed to correlate drugs and laboratory markers to associated clinical events in order.

  10. Intraindividual differences in motivation and cognition in students with and without learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintrich, P R; Anderman, E M; Klobucar, C

    1994-01-01

    The present study examines several cognitive and motivational variables that distinguish children with learning disabilities (n = 19) from children without learning disabilities (n = 20). The total sample included 30 males and 9 females and was composed of white, fifth-grade students from a middle-class community in the Midwest. Results showed that although the students with learning disabilities displayed lower levels of metacognitive knowledge and reading comprehension, they did not differ from the students without learning disabilities on self-efficacy, intrinsic orientation, or anxiety. In addition, they did not show any signs of learned helplessness, although they did tend to attribute success and failure to external causes more often than the students without learning disabilities. Using a cluster analysis that grouped individuals, we found that differences in the motivational and cognitive variables cut across a priori categories of children with and without learning disabilities. Three clusters were formed: one with high comprehension, motivation, and metacognition (mostly children without learning disabilities); one with low levels of comprehension and metacognition but high intrinsic motivation (all children with learning disabilities); and one with low intrinsic motivation but average comprehension, metacognition, and attributional style (approximately equal numbers of children with and without learning disabilities). Implications for diagnosis and intervention for students with learning disabilities are discussed.

  11. Future time perspective and promotion focus as determinants of intraindividual change in work motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooij, Dorien T A M; Bal, P Matthijs; Kanfer, Ruth

    2014-06-01

    In the near future, workforces will increasingly consist of older workers. At the same time, research has demonstrated that work-related growth motives decrease with age. Although this finding is consistent with life span theories, such as the selection optimization and compensation (SOC) model, we know relatively little about the process variables that bring about this change in work motivation. Therefore, we use a 4-wave study design to examine the mediating role of future time perspective and promotion focus in the negative association between age and work-related growth motives. Consistent with the SOC model, we found that future time perspective was negatively associated with age, which, in turn, was associated with lower promotion focus, lower work-related growth motive strength, and lower motivation to continue working. These findings have important theoretical implications for the literature on aging and work motivation, and practical implications for how to motivate older workers. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. An fMRI Study of Intra-Individual Functional Topography in the Human Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine J. Stoodley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies report cerebellar activation during both motor and non-motor paradigms, and suggest a functional topography within the cerebellum. Sensorimotor tasks activate the anterior lobe, parts of lobule VI, and lobule VIII, whereas higher-level tasks activate lobules VI and VII in the posterior lobe. To determine whether these activation patterns are evident at a single-subject level, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during five tasks investigating sensorimotor (finger tapping, language (verb generation, spatial (mental rotation, working memory (N-back, and emotional processing (viewing images from the International Affective Picture System. Finger tapping activated the ipsilateral anterior lobe (lobules IV-V as well as lobules VI and VIII. Activation during verb generation was found in right lobules VII and VIIIA. Mental rotation activated left-lateralized clusters in lobules VII-VIIIA, VI-Crus I, and midline VIIAt. The N-back task showed bilateral activation in right lobules VI-Crus I and left lobules VIIB-VIIIA. Cerebellar activation was evident bilaterally in lobule VI while viewing arousing vs. neutral images. This fMRI study provides the first proof of principle demonstration that there is topographic organization of motor execution vs. cognitive/emotional domains within the cerebellum of a single individual, likely reflecting the anatomical specificity of cerebro-cerebellar circuits underlying different task domains. Inter-subject variability of motor and non-motor topography remains to be determined.

  13. Intraindividual Increase of Homeostatic Sleep Pressure Across Acute and Chronic Sleep Loss: A High-Density EEG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Angelina; Lustenberger, Caroline; Werth, Esther; Baumann, Christian R; Poryazova, Rositsa; Huber, Reto

    2017-09-01

    To compare intraindividually the effects of acute sleep deprivation (ASD) and chronic sleep restriction (CSR) on the homeostatic increase in slow wave activity (SWA) and to relate it to impairments in basic cognitive functioning, that is, vigilance. The increase in SWA after ASD (40 hours of wakefulness) and after CSR (seven nights with time in bed restricted to 5 hours per night) relative to baseline sleep was assessed in nine healthy, male participants (age = 18-26 years) by high-density electroencephalography. The SWA increase during the initial part of sleep was compared between the two conditions of sleep loss. The increase in SWA was related to the increase in lapses of vigilance in the psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) during the preceding days. While ASD induced a stronger increase in initial SWA than CSR, the increase was globally correlated across the two conditions in most electrodes. The increase in initial SWA was positively associated with the increase in PVT lapses. The individual homeostatic response in SWA is globally preserved across acute and chronic sleep loss, that is, individuals showing a larger increase after ASD also do so after CSR and vice versa. Furthermore, the increase in SWA is globally correlated to vigilance impairments after sleep loss over both conditions. Thus, the increase in SWA might therefore provide a physiological marker for individual differences in performance impairments after sleep loss. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Evaluating Emdogain and healing of replanted teeth using an intra-individual experimental-control study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridström, Margareta; Schollin, Jens; Crossner, Claes-Göran

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to use an intra-individual experimental-control study design to explore if application of Emdogain prior to re-plantation after a dry extra-alveolar period of 60 min would promote a favorable healing of the periodontal ligament cells. Ten patients, for whom already decisions had been taken to extract two maxillary premolars because of crowding, participated in the study. The teeth were extracted and endodontic treatment was performed extra orally. The experimental tooth and its alveolar socket were covered with Emdogain prior to replantation. The contra lateral tooth served as a control and was replanted without any prior treatment. The teeth were stabilized with a retainer for 3-7 days and the patients were followed up every third week. After 13 weeks, the teeth were finally extracted and prepared for histological examination. Radiographs were taken before the study period, at day 29 and prior to the final extraction. The results were in favor of Emdogain, but the overall difference between the Emdogain-treated tooth and its control was rather small, and it seemed questionable if the registered differences could be of any obvious practical clinical importance. Histologically, all the teeth showed some degree of pathology after such a long dry extra-oral time and the outcome seemed to be more correlated to the individual than to the treatment. Given more favorable conditions regarding storage medium and/or extra-oral time, Emdogain might still be of value for an uncomplicated healing after replantation.

  15. Inter-Observer, Intra-Observer and Intra-Individual Reliability of Uroflowmetry Tests in Aged Men: A Generalizability Theory Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying-Buh; Yang, Stephen S; Hsieh, Cheng-Hsing; Lin, Chia-Da; Chang, Shang-Jen

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the inter-observer, intra-observer and intra-individual reliability of uroflowmetry and post-void residual urine (PVR) tests in adult men. Healthy volunteers aged over 40 years were enrolled. Every participant underwent two sets of uroflowmetry and PVR tests with a 2-week interval between the tests. The uroflowmetry tests were interpreted by four urologists independently. Uroflowmetry curves were classified as bell-shaped, bell-shaped with tail, obstructive, restrictive, staccato, interrupted and tower-shaped and scored from 1 (highly abnormal) to 5 (absolutely normal). The agreements between the observers, interpretations and tests within individuals were analyzed using kappa statistics and intraclass correlation coefficients. Generalizability theory with decision analysis was used to determine how many observers, tests, and interpretations were needed to obtain an acceptable reliability (> 0.80). Of 108 volunteers, we randomly selected the uroflowmetry results from 25 participants for the evaluation of reliability. The mean age of the studied adults was 55.3 years. The intra-individual and intra-observer reliability on uroflowmetry tests ranged from good to very good. However, the inter-observer reliability on normalcy and specific type of flow pattern were relatively lower. In generalizability theory, three observers were needed to obtain an acceptable reliability on normalcy of uroflow pattern if the patient underwent uroflowmetry tests twice with one observation. The intra-individual and intra-observer reliability on uroflowmetry tests were good while the inter-observer reliability was relatively lower. To improve inter-observer reliability, the definition of uroflowmetry should be clarified by the International Continence Society. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Short interactive workshops reduce variability in contouring treatment volumes for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy: Experience with the ESTRO FALCON programme and EduCase™ training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bari, Berardino; Dahele, Max; Palmu, Miika; Kaylor, Scott; Schiappacasse, Luis; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2017-11-20

    We report the results of 4, 2-h contouring workshops on target volume definition for spinal stereotactic radiotherapy. They combined traditional teaching methods with a web-based contouring/contour-analysis platform and led to a significant reduction in delineation variability. Short, interactive workshops can reduce interobserver variability in spine SBRT target volume delineation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of visual feedback-induced variability on motor learning of handrim wheelchair propulsion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika T Leving

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that a higher intra-individual variability benefits the motor learning of wheelchair propulsion. The present study evaluated whether feedback-induced variability on wheelchair propulsion technique variables would also enhance the motor learning process. Learning was operationalized as an improvement in mechanical efficiency and propulsion technique, which are thought to be closely related during the learning process.17 Participants received visual feedback-based practice (feedback group and 15 participants received regular practice (natural learning group. Both groups received equal practice dose of 80 min, over 3 weeks, at 0.24 W/kg at a treadmill speed of 1.11 m/s. To compare both groups the pre- and post-test were performed without feedback. The feedback group received real-time visual feedback on seven propulsion variables with instruction to manipulate the presented variable to achieve the highest possible variability (1st 4-min block and optimize it in the prescribed direction (2nd 4-min block. To increase motor exploration the participants were unaware of the exact variable they received feedback on. Energy consumption and the propulsion technique variables with their respective coefficient of variation were calculated to evaluate the amount of intra-individual variability.The feedback group, which practiced with higher intra-individual variability, improved the propulsion technique between pre- and post-test to the same extent as the natural learning group. Mechanical efficiency improved between pre- and post-test in the natural learning group but remained unchanged in the feedback group.These results suggest that feedback-induced variability inhibited the improvement in mechanical efficiency. Moreover, since both groups improved propulsion technique but only the natural learning group improved mechanical efficiency, it can be concluded that the improvement in mechanical efficiency and propulsion technique do not

  18. Intra- and inter-individual variability of Aspergillus fumigatus reactive T-cell frequencies in healthy volunteers in dependency of mould exposure in residential and working environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Sebastian; Weis, Philipp; Page, Lukas; Helm, Johanna; Lazariotou, Maria; Einsele, Hermann; Ullmann, Andrew J

    2017-10-01

    Invasive aspergillosis remains a deadly disease in immunocompromised patients, whereas the combination of an exaggerated immune response and continuous exposure lead to various hyperinflammatory diseases. This pilot study aimed to gain an overview of the intra- and inter-individual variability in Aspergillus fumigatus reactive T-helper cells in healthy adults and the correlation with environmental mould exposure. In this flow cytometric study, the frequencies of CD154 + A. fumigatus reactive T cells were evaluated in 70 healthy volunteers. All subjects completed a standardised questionnaire addressing their mould exposure. Subjects with intensive mould exposure in their professional or residential surrounding demonstrated considerably higher mean frequencies of A. fumigatus reactive T-helper and T-memory cells. Comparative evaluation of multiple measurements over time demonstrated relatively conserved reactive T-cell frequencies in the absence of major changes to the exposure profile, whereas those frequently exposed in professional environment or with changes to their risk score demonstrated a marked dependency of antigen reactive T-cell frequencies on recent mould exposure. This pilot study was the first to provide data on the intra-individual variability in A. fumigatus reactive T-cell frequencies and its linkage to mould encounter. Fungus reactive T cells are to be considered a valued tool for the assessment of environmental mould exposure. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Intraindividual comparison of T1 relaxation times after gadobutrol and Gd-DTPA administration for cardiac late enhancement imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeblin, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.doeblin@charite.de [Department of Cardiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Schilling, Rene, E-mail: rene.schilling@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Wagner, Moritz, E-mail: moritz.wagner@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Luhur, Reny, E-mail: renyluhur@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Huppertz, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.huppertz@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Imaging Science Institute, Charité, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd, E-mail: bernd.hamm@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Taupitz, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.taupitz@harite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); and others

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate T1-relaxation times of chronic myocardial infarction (CMI) using gadobutrol and gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) over time and to determine the optimal imaging window for late enhancement imaging with both contrast agents. Material and methods: Twelve patients with CMI were prospectively included and examined on a 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) system using relaxivity-adjusted doses of gadobutrol (0.15 mmol/kg) and Gd-DTPA (0.2 mmol/kg) in random order. T1-relaxation times of remote myocardium (RM), infarcted myocardium (IM), and left ventricular cavity (LVC) were assessed from short-axis TI scout imaging using the Look–Locker approach and compared intraindividually using a Wilcoxon paired signed-rank test (α < 0.05). Results: Within 3 min of contrast agent administration (CA), IM showed significantly lower T1-relaxation times than RM with both contrast agents, indicating beginning cardiac late enhancement. Differences between gadobutrol and Gd-DTPA in T1-relaxation times of IM and RM were statistically not significant through all time points. However, gadobutrol led to significantly higher T1-relaxation times of LVC than Gd-DTPA from 6 to 9 min (220 ± 15 ms vs. 195 ± 30 ms p < 0.01) onwards, resulting in a significantly greater ΔT1 of IM to LVC at 9–12 min (−20 ± 35 ms vs. 0 ± 35 ms, p < 0.05) and 12–15 min (−25 ± 45 ms vs. −10 ± 60 ms, p < 0.05). Using Gd-DTPA, comparable ΔT1 values were reached only after 25–35 min. Conclusion: This study indicates good delineation of IM to RM with both contrast agents as early as 3 min after administration. However, we found significant differences in T1 relaxation times with greater ΔT1 IM–LVC using 0.15 mmol/kg gadobutrol compared to 0.20 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA after 9–15 min post-CA suggesting earlier differentiability of IM and LVC using gadobutrol.

  20. Intraindividual comparison of two different skin care conceptions in patients undergoing radiotherapy of the head-and-neck region. Creme or powder?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreck, U.; Paulsen, F.; Bamberg, M.; Budach, W.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated for the first time in intraindividual comparison the conception of care with creme or powder. Acute skin reactions on the left and right side of the neck during symmetrically performed radiotherapy and subjective impairment were assessed. Patients and Methods: Twelve patients receiving radiotherapy of the head-and-neck region up to 50, 60, 66 and 72 Gy, respectively, were asked to treat one side of the neck with creme, the contralateral side with powder after random assignment. Objective and subjective assessment and photodocumentation were performed at therapy onset and weekly during therapy. The photodocumentation provides an impressive course of acute skin reactions under these care concepts. Results: Altogether we saw no relevant difference in favor of care with creme or powder according to objective as well as subjective assessment criteria (Figures 2 and 3). In this intraindividual comparison the results are independent from interindividual different sensitivity to radiotherapy, total dose or fractionation. Therefore the small patient number is a minor limitation for evidence. Our results are in accordance to trials comparing other care concepts. Conclusions: A relevant effect concerning onset and degree of acute skin reactions or differences in symptom relief could not be demonstrated. Both conceptions are to be regarded equal in terms of subjective symptom relief and in extent of acute skin reactions. The lack of differences may be explained by the fact that the underlying pathophysiological processes cannot be influenced by topical agents. (orig.)

  1. Variable importance in latent variable regression models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kvalheim, O.M.; Arneberg, R.; Bleie, O.; Rajalahti, T.; Smilde, A.K.; Westerhuis, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    The quality and practical usefulness of a regression model are a function of both interpretability and prediction performance. This work presents some new graphical tools for improved interpretation of latent variable regression models that can also assist in improved algorithms for variable

  2. Positional variability of a tandem applicator system in HDR brachytherapy for primary treatment of cervix cancer. Analysis of the anatomic pelvic position and comparison of the applicator positions during five insertions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulf, J.; Popp, K.; Oppitz, U.; Baier, K.; Flentje, M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: evaluation of the inter- and intraindividual applicator variability of multiple high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy applications for primary treatment of cancer of the uterine cervix. Material and methods: retrospective analysis of 460 pairs of orthogonal X-ray films for conventional treatment in 92 patients with five intrauterine applications using an HDR tandem applicator. Measurement of the position of the applicator origin relative to a bony reference system in three dimensions. Evaluation of the differences of the applicator position in all 460 applications (interindividual variability), of the five applications in a single patient (intraindividual variability) and of the intraindividual variability relative to the applicator position at the first application. Results: the position of the applicator origin in the pelvis ranged from 23 mm cranial and 55 mm caudal to the top of femoral heads, 23 mm right and 27 mm left to the pelvic midline, and 6-53 mm dorsal to the mid of the femoral heads. Standard deviation (SD) of interindividual applicator variability was 12.9 mm (minimum/maximum -55/+23 mm, mean -13.6 mm) in longitudinal, 5.1 mm (-27/+23 mm, mean 1.6 mm) in lateral, and 7.6 mm (6/53 mm, mean 26 mm) in anterior-posterior [AP] direction. SD of intraindividual variability was 5.5 mm (-21/+23 mm, mean 0 mm) in longitudinal, 2.5 mm (-17/+19 mm, mean 0 mm) in lateral, and 4.2 mm (-15/+18 mm, mean 0 mm) in AP direction compared to intraindividual variability relative to the first insertion with an SD of 8.9 mm (-23/+36 mm, mean 2.8 mm) in longitudinal, 4.0 mm (-11/+23 mm, mean 0 mm) in lateral, and 6.8 mm (-27/+17 mm, mean -0.8 mm) in AP direction. Conclusion: intraindividual applicator variability is significantly smaller than interindividual variability. Applicator-related procedures such as midline shielding or dose matching of tele- and brachytherapy should be performed with information on at least one individual applicator position. (orig.)

  3. Positional variability of a tandem applicator system in HDR brachytherapy for primary treatment of cervix cancer. Analysis of the anatomic pelvic position and comparison of the applicator positions during five insertions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulf, J.; Popp, K.; Oppitz, U.; Baier, K.; Flentje, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Purpose: evaluation of the inter- and intraindividual applicator variability of multiple high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy applications for primary treatment of cancer of the uterine cervix. Material and methods: retrospective analysis of 460 pairs of orthogonal X-ray films for conventional treatment in 92 patients with five intrauterine applications using an HDR tandem applicator. Measurement of the position of the applicator origin relative to a bony reference system in three dimensions. Evaluation of the differences of the applicator position in all 460 applications (interindividual variability), of the five applications in a single patient (intraindividual variability) and of the intraindividual variability relative to the applicator position at the first application. Results: the position of the applicator origin in the pelvis ranged from 23 mm cranial and 55 mm caudal to the top of femoral heads, 23 mm right and 27 mm left to the pelvic midline, and 6-53 mm dorsal to the mid of the femoral heads. Standard deviation (SD) of interindividual applicator variability was 12.9 mm (minimum/maximum -55/+23 mm, mean -13.6 mm) in longitudinal, 5.1 mm (-27/+23 mm, mean 1.6 mm) in lateral, and 7.6 mm (6/53 mm, mean 26 mm) in anterior-posterior [AP] direction. SD of intraindividual variability was 5.5 mm (-21/+23 mm, mean 0 mm) in longitudinal, 2.5 mm (-17/+19 mm, mean 0 mm) in lateral, and 4.2 mm (-15/+18 mm, mean 0 mm) in AP direction compared to intraindividual variability relative to the first insertion with an SD of 8.9 mm (-23/+36 mm, mean 2.8 mm) in longitudinal, 4.0 mm (-11/+23 mm, mean 0 mm) in lateral, and 6.8 mm (-27/+17 mm, mean -0.8 mm) in AP direction. Conclusion: intraindividual applicator variability is significantly smaller than interindividual variability. Applicator-related procedures such as midline shielding or dose matching of tele- and brachytherapy should be performed with information on at least one individual applicator position. (orig.)

  4. L1 vertebral density on CT is too variable with different scanning protocols to be a useful screening tool for osteoporosis in everyday practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerety, Emma-Louise; Bearcroft, Philip Wp

    2018-04-01

    To determine whether a single L1 density threshold can be used to screen all patients undergoing CT at a busy tertiary referral centre for those at risk of osteoporosis. 200 patients, who had been randomly selected for an audit of CT reporting of incidental vertebral fractures, had their L1 density measured on 864 routine CT examinations. These had been performed with a variety of kVp and intravenous (i.v.) contrast protocols, reflecting the wide range of imaging indications. L1 density measured on thick axial, thin axial or sagittal images had an excellent intraclass correlation coefficient (0.996). For the same patients imaged twice within 6 months, there was mean intraexamination L1 density difference of 27.5 HU. Variability due to i.v. contrast medium administration resulted in a mean difference of 24.5 HU. Mean difference due to acquisition kVp was 24.1 HU. Once matched for sex, age, kVp and i.v. contrast, there was a significant difference between the L1 density in patients with vertebral fractures compared to those without fractures (mean 30.19 HU). There is significant variability in the L1 vertebral body CT density due to differences in acquisition variables such as kVp and timing post-i.v. contrast medium. Advances in knowledge: Previous studies suggested that L1 CT density could be used to screen for osteoporosis. The current study cautions that it is not possible to define a single L1 density threshold for screening, due to the number of variables within a wide range of scanning protocols for different imaging indications in everyday practice.

  5. Age-Related Change of the Mean Level and Intraindividual Variability of Saccadic Reaction Time Performance in Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haishi, Koichi; Okuzumi, Hideyuki; Kokubun, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined age-related change of saccadic reaction time (SRT) in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). Participants were 29 persons with intellectual disabilities aged between 14 and 34 years whose IQs were between 14 and 70. Participants were divided into Group I (IQ greater than or equal to 35) and Group II (IQ less than…

  6. Inter- and Intra-Individual Variability in the Process of Change in the Use of Analogical Strategies to Solve Geometric Tasks in Children: A Microgenetic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunteler, Erika; Pronk, Christine M. E.; Resing, Wilma C. M.

    2008-01-01

    This study focused on unprompted changes in children's analogical reasoning on geometric tasks and the additional effect of a short training procedure. Participants were 36 grade 1 level children (M = 6;8 years) divided over a not-trained and a trained condition. The study was a 5-sessions migrogenetic procedure, with a follow-up test session…

  7. Intra-individual variability in the urine concentrations of inhaled salmeterol in male subjects with reference to doping analysis – impact of urine specific gravity correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostrup, Morten; Kalsen, Anders; Hemmersbach, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Since 2010, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has introduced urinary thresholds for some beta2-agonists. In doping analysis urine samples of beta2-agonists are not corrected for the Urine Specific Gravity (USG) by the WADA laboratories. Several studies have observed high differences in the urine...

  8. Novel application of multi dynamic trend analysis as a sensitive tool for detecting the effects of aging and congestive heart failure on heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Lo, Men-Tzung; Peng, Chung-Kang; Huang, Norden E.; Yang, Cheryl C. H.; Kuo, Terry B. J.

    2016-02-01

    The complex fluctuations in heart rate variability (HRV) reflect cardiac autonomic modulation and are an indicator of congestive heart failure (CHF). This paper proposes a novel nonlinear approach to HRV investigation, the multi dynamic trend analysis (MDTA) method, based on the empirical mode decomposition algorithm of the Hilbert-Huang transform combined with a variable-sized sliding-window method. Electrocardiographic signal data obtained from the PhysioNet database were used. These data were from subjects with CHF (mean age = 59.4 ± 8.4), an age-matched elderly healthy control group (59.3 ± 10.6), and a healthy young group (30.3 ± 4.8); the HRVs of these subjects were processed using the MDTA method, time domain analysis, and frequency domain analysis. Among all HRV parameters, the MDTA absolute value slope (MDTS) and MDTA deviation (MDTD) exhibited the greatest area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics in distinguishing between the CHF group and the healthy controls (AUC = 1.000) and between the healthy elderly subject group and the young subject group (AUC = 0.834 ± 0.067 for MDTS; 0.837 ± 0.066 for MDTD). The CHF subjects presented with lower MDTA indices than those of the healthy elderly subject group. Furthermore, the healthy elderly subjects exhibited lower MDTA indices than those of the young controls. The MDTA method can adaptively and automatically identify the intrinsic fluctuation on variable temporal and spatial scales when investigating complex fluctuations in the cardiac autonomic regulation effects of aging and CHF.

  9. Possible biomedical applications and limitations of a variable-force centrifuge on the lunar surface: A research tool and an enabling resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowing, Keith L.

    1992-01-01

    Centrifuges will continue to serve as a valuable research tool in gaining an understanding of the biological significance of the inertial acceleration due to gravity. Space- and possibly lunar-based centrifuges will play a significant and enabling role with regard to the human component of future lunar and martian exploration, both as a means of accessing potential health and performance risks and as a means of alleviating these risks. Lunar-based centrifuges could be particularly useful as part of a program of physiologic countermeasures designed to alleviate the physical deconditioning that may result from prolonged exposure to a 1/6-g environment. Centrifuges on the lunar surface could also be used as part of a high-fidelity simulation of a trip to Mars. Other uses could include crew readaptation to 1 g, waste separation, materials processing, optical mirror production in situ on the Moon, and laboratory specimen separation.

  10. Dealing with randomness and vagueness in business and management sciences: the fuzzy-probabilistic approach as a tool for the study of statistical relationships between imprecise variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Maturo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In practical applications relating to business and management sciences, there are many variables that, for their own nature, are better described by a pair of ordered values (i.e. financial data. By summarizing this measurement with a single value, there is a loss of information; thus, in these situations, data are better described by interval values rather than by single values. Interval arithmetic studies and analyzes this type of imprecision; however, if the intervals has no sharp boundaries, fuzzy set theory is the most suitable instrument. Moreover, fuzzy regression models are able to overcome some typical limitation of classical regression because they do not need the same strong assumptions. In this paper, we present a review of the main methods introduced in the literature on this topic and introduce some recent developments regarding the concept of randomness in fuzzy regression.

  11. MODIS time series analysis as a tool for forest drought detection in Catalonia (NE Iberian Peninsula): integration of remote sensing and climatic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Cristina; Cristóbal, Jordi; Ninyerola, Miquel; Pons, Xavier

    2013-04-01

    Climate warming may accelerate the hydrological cycle as a result of enhanced evaporative demand in some regions where water is not limiting. However, the combination of warmer temperatures with constant or reduced precipitation in other regions may lead to a large decrease in water availability for natural and agricultural systems as well as for human needs, especially in arid or semiarid areas such as the Mediterranean basin, increasing drought occurrence. Nowadays drought remains a phenomenon that affects a wide variety of natural areas in many parts of the globe. Droughts are considered the abiotic factor with most harmful effects on forest areas, thus it is especially important to identify the locations with highest potential impact. Its temporal and spatial distribution, as well as the different types of drought defined, makes difficult its prediction and the impact degree that their appearance involve. Climatic drought, characterized by a temporal sequence with a higher frequency of atmospheric conditions that are unfavorable to the development of precipitation over a region, is the trigger of the process associated with the risk of biological drought. One methodology used to identify periods of climatic drought is mainly based on the analysis of climatic variables such as precipitation or temperature. However, these analyses don't take into account the physiological state of vegetation, a highly important variable that should be used to monitor the status of forest ecosystems vulnerable to droughts. In this work we evaluate the potential of satellite images regarding the identification of Mediterranean forest areas that could potentially have had a maximum affection during drought periods. A long temporal series of images of MODIS sensors onboard TERRA satellite, for the period 2000-2011 together with climatic data from the Digital Atlas of Catalonia were integrated to detect drought in forest canopies. This integration may provide a readily applicable

  12. Patient Satisfaction After Femoral Arterial Access Site Closure Using the ExoSeal(®) Vascular Closure Device Compared to Manual Compression: A Prospective Intra-individual Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Claus Christian; Thomas, Daniel; Nadal, Jennifer; Willinek, Winfried A; Schild, Hans Heinz; Meyer, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    To intra-individually compare discomfort levels and patient satisfaction after arterial access closure using the ExoSeal(®) vascular closure device (VCD) and manual compression (MC) in a prospective study design. Patients undergoing two planned interventions from 07/2013 to 09/2014 could participate in the study. Access closure was performed with an ExoSeal(®)-VCD in one and MC in the other intervention. Patients were clinically and sonographically examined and were given questionnaires 1 day after intervention [groin- and back-pain during bedrest (100-point visual analog scale; 0: no pain); comfortability of bedrest (10-point Likert scale, 1: comfortable), satisfaction with closure (10-point Likert scale, 1: very satisfied)]. Results were analyzed in a cross-over design. 48 patients (29 male, median age 62.5 (32-88) years) were included. An ExoSeal(®)-VCD was used first in 25 cases. As four of these subsequently refused MC as second intervention, data from 44 patients could be analyzed. All closures were technically successful (successful device deployment) without major complications. Groin- and back-pain after VCD-use/MC was 0 (0-15) vs. 10 (0-80) and 0 (0-75) vs. 25 (0-90), respectively (p < 0.0001). Bedrest after VCD-use was more comfortable than after MC [1 (range 1-7) vs. 6 (2-10); p < 0.0001]. Satisfaction with the closure procedure and with the intervention in general was higher after VCD-use compared to MC [1 (1-3) vs. 5 (2-10) and 1 (1-2) vs. 2 (1-4), respectively; p < 0.0001]. Intra-individual comparison showed pain levels and discomfort to be significantly lower after ExoSeal(®) use compared to MC. VCD closure was associated with higher satisfaction both with the closure itself and with the intervention in general.

  13. Symbolic dynamics of heart rate variability - a promising tool to investigate cardiac sympathovagal control in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonhajzerova, Ingrid; Farsky, Ivan; Mestanik, Michal; Visnovcova, Zuzana; Mestanikova, Andrea; Hrtanek, Igor; Ondrejka, Igor

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate complex cardiac sympathovagal control in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) by using heart rate variability (HRV) nonlinear analysis - symbolic dynamics. We examined 29 boys with untreated ADHD and 25 healthy boys (age 8-13 years). ADHD symptoms were evaluated by ADHD-RS-IV scale. ECG was recorded in 3 positions: baseline supine position, orthostasis, and clinostasis. Symbolic dynamics indices were used for the assessment of complex cardiac sympathovagal regulation: normalised complexity index (NCI), normalised unpredictability index (NUPI), and pattern classification measures (0V%, 1V%, 2LV%, 2UV%). The results showed that HRV complexity was significantly reduced at rest (NUPI) and during standing position (NCI, NUPI) in ADHD group compared to controls. Cardiac-linked sympathetic index 0V% was significantly higher during all posture positions and cardiovagal index 2LV% was significantly lower to standing in boys suffering from ADHD. Importantly, ADHD symptom inattention positively correlated with 0V%, and negatively correlated with NCI, NUPI. Concluding, symbolic dynamics revealed impaired complex neurocardiac control characterised by potential cardiac beta-adrenergic overactivity and vagal deficiency at rest and to posture changes in boys suffering from ADHD that is correlated with inattention. We suggest that symbolic dynamics indices could represent promising cardiac biomarkers in ADHD.

  14. Characterization of a single-chain variable fragment recognizing a linear epitope of aβ: a biotechnical tool for studies on Alzheimer's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Dornieden

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with devastating effects. Currently, therapeutic options are limited to symptomatic treatment. For more than a decade, research focused on immunotherapy for the causal treatment of AD. However, clinical trials with active immunization using Aβ encountered severe complications, for example meningoencephalitis. Consequently, attention focused on passive immunization using antibodies. As an alternative to large immunoglobulins (IgGs, Aβ binding single-chain variable fragments (scFvs were used for diagnostic and therapeutic research approaches. scFvs can be expressed in E. coli and may provide improved pharmacokinetic properties like increased blood-brain barrier permeability or reduced side-effects in vivo. In this study, we constructed an scFv from an Aβ binding IgG, designated IC16, which binds the N-terminal region of Aβ (Aβ(1-8. scFv-IC16 was expressed in E. coli, purified and characterized with respect to its interaction with different Aβ species and its influence on Aβ fibril formation. We were able to show that scFv-IC16 strongly influenced the aggregation behavior of Aβ and could be applied as an Aβ detection probe for plaque staining in the brains of transgenic AD model mice. The results indicate potential for therapy and diagnosis of AD.

  15. Dealing with Climate Change and Variability in the Growing Season: a U2U Decision Support Tool for Central United States Corn Producers Based on Corn Growing Degree Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, J. R.; Todey, D.; Massey, R.; Widhalm, M.; Biehl, L. L.; Andresen, J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate extremes are a major challenge for corn producers in the central United States. Among those extremes are wet springs that lead to planting delays, late spring and early fall frosts that can damage crops, and extreme summer temperatures either too warm or too cool. A newly-operational corn growing degree-day (CGDD) tool helps producers manage and adapt to these extremes. For example, a challenge in recent years has been exceptionally wet springs that have led to significant planting delays. Producers have been forced to re-assess their planting strategies on short notice, such as switching to a faster-growing but lower-yielding hybrids. With this pattern of wetter springs projected to continue or worsen in the central United States, the problem will remain and likely get worse. Another example is helping producers identify the risk of early or late frost/freezes. The CGDD tool puts current conditions into a 30-year historical perspective and offers trend projections (based on climatology or forecasts) through the end of the calendar year. Corn, or sometimes called modified, growing degree-days use a temperature base of 10 C (50 F) and a ceiling of 30 C (86 F) and is strongly correlated with the development of the corn crop. This tool was developed as part of USDA-supported U2U Useful to Usable Project for transforming climate variability and change information for cereal crop producers.

  16. Artificial wetlands as tools for frog conservation: stability and variability of reproduction characteristics in Sahara frog populations in Tunisian man-made lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellakhal, Meher; Neveu, André; Fertouna-Bellakhal, Mouna; Aleya, Lotfi

    2017-12-01

    Amphibian populations are in decline principally due to climate change, environmental contaminants, and the reduction in wetlands. Even though data concerning current population trends are scarce, artificial wetlands appear to play a vital role in amphibian conservation. This study concerns the reproductive biology of the Sahara frog over a 2-year period in four Tunisian man-made lakes. Each month, gonad state (parameters: K, GSI, LCI), fecundity, and fertility of females (using 1227 clutches) were evaluated in the field under controlled conditions. Clutches were present for 110-130 days at two of the sites, but only for 60-80 days at the other two. Maximum egg laying occurred in May, corresponding to the highest point in the gonad somatic index. Clutch densities were higher in the smaller lakes. Female fecundity was in relation to body size; mean clutch fecundity attained 1416 eggs, with no differences observed according to site. Egg fertility varied over a 1-year period, with a maximum in May followed by a decrease when water temperature was at its highest. Eggs were smaller at the beginning of spawning; maximum size was in May, which might explain the higher fertility, but no maternal influence was detected. Embryonic development was strictly dependent on temperature. The population at each site appeared as a small patch within a metapopulation in overall good health, as shown by the relative temporal stability in reproduction variables. Constructed wetlands may therefore play an important role in the conservation of amphibians, especially in semi-arid zones.

  17. The Association of Glucose Variability and Home Discharge Among Survivors of Critical Illness Managed With a Computerized Decision-Support Tool for Glycemic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Lavi; Spellman, Craig

    2014-03-01

    In-intensive care unit (ICU) glucose variability (GV) is associated with increased mortality. However, the impact of GV on hospital survivors' morbidity and associated changes in destination at time of hospital discharge are unknown. We studied a retrospective patient cohort in a medical/surgical ICU, requiring insulin infusion, using computer-guided insulin dosing software. Standard deviation (Glu SD ) and coefficient of variation (Glu CV ) were used as GV measures. We examined rates of home discharge (H) in the whole cohort and selected subgroups across GV quartiles, between patients with and without H, determinants of H, and determinants of GV and its association with patients' ICU length of stay (LOS). A total of 351 patients met study criteria. The association of GV and H varied among examined subgroups. H increased with GV quartile (Glu SD ; P = .004). GV was higher in patients with H than non-H (Glu SD 36.1 vs 30.0 mg/dl, respectively; P = .002). Increased GV was not a predictor of reduced H on multivariate analysis. GV was inversely associated with patients' ICU LOS in all examined subgroups. Increased number of hypoglycemic events and time to attain target glycemia were independent predictors of reduced H. GV was not associated with adverse impact on H in the present cohort, and its prognostic impact should be considered in the context of ICU LOS of examined patient populations. Further studies are needed to examine the morbidity effects of GV and other glycemia-related measures among hospital survivors of critical illness across varying ICU populations, glycemic control approaches, and glycemic targets. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  18. Climatic controls of the interannual to decadal variability in Saudi Arabian dust activity: Towards the development of a seasonal prediction tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y.; Notaro, M.; Liu, Z.; Alkolibi, F.; Fadda, E.; Bakhrjy, F.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric dust significantly influences the climate system, as well as human life in Saudi Arabia. Skillful seasonal prediction of dust activity with climatic variables will help prevent some negative social impacts of dust storms. Yet, the climatic regulators on Saudi Arabian dust activity remain largely unaddressed. Remote sensing and station observations show consistent seasonal cycles in Saudi Arabian dust activity, which peaks in spring and summer. The climatic controls on springtime and summertime Saudi Arabian dust activity during 1975-2010 are studied using observational and reanalysis data. Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) of the observed Saudi Arabian dust storm frequency shows a dominant homogeneous pattern across the country, which has distinct interannual and decadal variations, as revealed by the power spectrum. Regression and correlation analyses reveal that Saudi Arabian dust activity is largely tied to precipitation on the Arabian Peninsula in spring and northwesterly (Shamal) wind in summer. On the seasonal-interannual time scale, warm El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phase (El Niño) in winter-to-spring inhibits spring dust activity by increasing the precipitation over the Rub'al Khali Desert, a major dust source region on the southern Arabian Peninsula; warm ENSO and warm Indian Ocean Basin Mode (IOBM) in winter-to-spring favor less summer dust activity by producing anomalously low sea-level pressure over eastern north Africa and Arabian Peninsula, which leads to the reduced Shamal wind speed. The decadal variation in dust activity is likely associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), which impacts Sahel rainfall and North African dust, and likely dust transport to Saudi Arabia. The Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and tropical Indian Ocean SST also have influence on the decadal variation in Saudi Arabian dust activity, by altering precipitation over the Arabian Peninsula and summer Shamal wind speed. Using eastern

  19. Variability modifies life satisfaction's association with mortality risk in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Julia K.; Winning, Ashley; Segerstrom, Suzanne; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2015-01-01

    Life satisfaction is associated with greater longevity, but its variability across time has not been examined relative to longevity. We investigated whether mean levels of life satisfaction across time, variability in life satisfaction across time, and their interaction were associated with mortality over 9 years of follow-up. Participants were 4,458 Australians initially ≥50 years old. During the follow-up, 546 people died. Adjusting for age, greater mean life satisfaction was associated with reduced risk and greater variability in life satisfaction was associated with increased risk of mortality. These findings were qualified by a significant interaction such that individuals with low mean satisfaction and high variability in satisfaction had the greatest risk of mortality over the follow-up period. In combination with mean levels of life satisfaction, variability in life satisfaction is relevant for mortality risk among older adults. Considering intraindividual variability provides additional insight into associations between psychological characteristics and health. PMID:26048888

  20. Handheld mechanical nociceptive threshold testing in dairy cows – intra-individual variation, inter-observer agreement and variation over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raundal, Peter M; Andersen, Pia H; Toft, Nils; Forkman, Björn; Munksgaard, Lene; Herskin, Mette S

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the use of handheld methodology to assess mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) on cows kept loose-housed. Study design Prospective randomized partial cross-over experimental study. A one-factor (test day) design was used to evaluate MNT over time. Animals One hundred and fifteen healthy, loose-housed Danish Holstein cattle. Methods We evaluated intra-individual variation, inter-observer agreement and variation over time of MNT using two handheld devices and two stimulation sites. Mechanical, ramped stimulations were performed with an algometer (6.5 mm diameter steel probe, 0–10.0 kgf) or an electronic von Frey device (plastic tip with diameter 0.8 mm, 0–1000 gf). Each cow received 5–6 consecutive stimulations within a 2 × 5 cm skin area on the dorsal or lateral aspect of the left third metatarsus until an avoidance reaction occurred. We investigated the difference in precision [expressed as coefficient of variation (CV)] between the combinations of devices and stimulation sites. The inter-observer agreement and the difference in MNT between test day 1, 3, 7, 10 and 24 were investigated for selected combinations. Data were analysed in mixed models and Bland-Altman as relevant. Results The CVs did not differ [range 0.34–0.52 (p = 0.1)]. Difference between observers (95% limits) was 0.2 kgf (2.8) and 4 gf (369) for the algometer and von Frey device, respectively. Mechanical nociceptive threshold increased from 361 on test day one to 495 gf on test day 24 (p < 0.01). Conclusion and clinical relevance All methods showed a high degree of intra-individual variation, and no combination of device and stimulation site showed superior precision. Mean difference between observers was low, and MNT was not consistent over time. Further development of the methods is required before they can be used in research to investigate possible relations between claw lesions and hyperalgesia. PMID:24734991

  1. Intra-individual comparison of magnesium citrate and sodium phosphate for bowel preparation at CT colonography: automated volumetric analysis of residual fluid for quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannas, P; Bakke, J; Munoz del Rio, A; Pickhardt, P J

    2014-11-01

    To perform an objective, intra-individual comparison of residual colonic fluid volume and attenuation associated with the current front-line laxative magnesium citrate (MgC) versus the former front-line laxative sodium phosphate (NaP) at CT colonography (CTC). This retrospective Health Insurance and Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. The study cohort included 250 asymptomatic adults (mean age at index 56.1 years; 124 male/126 female) who underwent CTC screening twice over a 5 year interval. Colon catharsis at initial and follow-up screening employed single-dose NaP and double-dose MgC, respectively, allowing for intra-patient comparison. Automated volumetric analysis of residual colonic fluid volume and attenuation was performed on all 500 CTC studies. Colonic fluid volume volumetric analysis suggests that the replacement of NaP by MgC as the front-line laxative for CTC has not compromised overall examination quality. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Examining the Interplay of Processes Across Multiple Time-Scales: Illustration With the Intraindividual Study of Affect, Health, and Interpersonal Behavior (iSAHIB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Nilam; Conroy, David E.; Pincus, Aaron L.; Lorek, Amy; Rebar, Amanda; Roche, Michael J.; Coccia, Michael; Morack, Jennifer; Feldman, Josh; Gerstorf, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Human development is characterized by the complex interplay of processes that manifest at multiple levels of analysis and time-scales. We introduce the Intraindividual Study of Affect, Health and Interpersonal Behavior (iSAHIB) as a model for how multiple time-scale study designs facilitate more precise articulation of developmental theory. Combining age heterogeneity, longitudinal panel, daily diary, and experience sampling protocols, the study made use of smartphone and web-based technologies to obtain intensive longitudinal data from 150 persons age 18–89 years as they completed three 21-day measurement bursts (t = 426 bursts, t = 8,557 days) wherein they provided reports on their social interactions (t = 64,112) as they went about their daily lives. We illustrate how multiple time-scales of data can be used to articulate bioecological models of development and the interplay among more ‘distal’ processes that manifest at ‘slower’ time-scales (e.g., age-related differences and burst-to-burst changes in mental health) and more ‘proximal’ processes that manifest at ‘faster’ time-scales (e.g., changes in context that progress in accordance with the weekly calendar and family influence processes). PMID:26989350

  3. Water baths for farmed mink: intra-individual consistency and inter-individual variation in swimming behaviour, and effects on stereotyped behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. MONONEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Swimming behaviour and effects of water baths on stereotyped behaviour in farmed mink (Mustela vison were studied in three experiments. The singly-housed mink had access from their home cages to extra cages with 20.5 litre water baths. Two short-term experiments aimed to investigate how quickly adult and juvenile mink start using and how consistently they use water baths over 10 days, and whether the extent of the use correlates between dams and their females kits. A four-month experiment was designed to compare the development of stereotyped behaviour in juvenile mink housed with and without swimming opportunity. The behavioural analyses were based on several 24-hour video recordings carried out in all three experiments. There were obvious inter-individual differences and intra-individual consistency in swimming frequency and time. Farmed mink’s motivation to swim can be assessed in short-term experiments, and measurement of water losses from the swimming baths and use of instantaneous sampling with 10 min sampling intervals provide quite reliable measures of the amount of swimming. The bath use of the juveniles correlated with that of their dams, indicating that an individual mink’s eagerness to swim may have a genetic component. The lower amount of stereotyped behaviour in mink housed with water baths indicates that long-term access to baths may alleviate frustration in singly-housed juvenile farmed mink.;

  4. Public Relations Sebagai Tools Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhriz, Dewi Wulandari

    2015-01-01

    This study, entitled "Public Relations As Marketing Tools In Increasing image in Hotel Inna Dharma Deli". The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of public relations activities as marketing tools to the image at the Hotel Inna Dharma Deli. A correlational study aimed to see how far the variable public relations activities as marketing tools affect the company's image variables. The theories used is communications, public relations, marketing, marketing public relations, an...

  5. Intra-individual comparison of magnesium citrate and sodium phosphate for bowel preparation at CT colonography: Automated volumetric analysis of residual fluid for quality assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannas, P.; Bakke, J.; Munoz del Rio, A.; Pickhardt, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To perform an objective, intra-individual comparison of residual colonic fluid volume and attenuation associated with the current front-line laxative magnesium citrate (MgC) versus the former front-line laxative sodium phosphate (NaP) at CT colonography (CTC). Materials and methods: This retrospective Health Insurance and Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. The study cohort included 250 asymptomatic adults (mean age at index 56.1 years; 124 male/126 female) who underwent CTC screening twice over a 5 year interval. Colon catharsis at initial and follow-up screening employed single-dose NaP and double-dose MgC, respectively, allowing for intra-patient comparison. Automated volumetric analysis of residual colonic fluid volume and attenuation was performed on all 500 CTC studies. Colonic fluid volume <200 ml and mean attenuation between 300–900 HU were considered optimal. Paired t-test and McNemar's test were used to compare differences. Results: Residual fluid volumes <200 ml were recorded in 192 examinations (76.8%) following MgC and in 204 examinations (81.6%) following NaP (p = 0.23). The mean total residual fluid volume was 155 ± 114 ml for MgC and 143 ± 100 ml for NaP (p = 0.01). The attenuation range of 300–900 HU was significantly more frequent for MgC (n = 220, 88%) than for NaP (n = 127, 50.8%; p < 0.001). Mean fluid attenuation was significantly lower for MgC (700 ± 165 HU) than for NaP (878 ± 155 HU; p < 0.001). Concomitant presence of both optimal fluid volume and attenuation was significantly more frequent for MgC 65.2% than for NaP (38%; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Objective intra-individual comparison using automated volumetric analysis suggests that the replacement of NaP by MgC as the front-line laxative for CTC has not compromised overall examination quality. - Highlights: • Automated volumetric analysis provides

  6. Intraindividual comparison of gastric peristalsis after ingestion of a semiliquid and solid test meal; Intraindividueller Vergleich der Magenperistaltik nach Gabe von semiliquiden und festen Testmahlzeiten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, R. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Tatsch, K. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Muenzing, W. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Vorderholzer, W. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik Innenstadt; Schindlbeck, N. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik Innenstadt; Hahn, K. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1997-06-01

    Aim: Patients with various disorders of gastric function were studied with radiolabeled test meals of different consistency to elaborate the effect of ingested media on gastric peristalsis and emptying. Methods: In 12 patients parameters of gastric function were intraindividually compared after ingestion of a semiliquid and a solid test meal. In addition to the standard evaluation derived from time activity curves condensed images were established from two fixed time intervals (early and late period). These images were used to evaluate the amplitude and frequency of gastric contractions using Fourier analysis. Results: As expected gastric emptying was influenced by the consistency of the test meal. Mean emptying rates for the solid meal were significant lower than those for the semiliquid one (p<0,01). The amplitude and frequency of gastric contractions, however, did not depend on the consistency of the test meal. Within the course of the examination contraction amplitudes significantly increased (p<0,05) from the early to the late period using both, solid as well as semiliquid test meals. The frequency of gastric contractions remained unchanged. Conclusion: As shown by an intraindividual data comparison amplitude and frequency of gastric contractions seem to be independent of the consistency of ingested test meals whereas gastric emptying is significantly influenced by the administered media. Semiliquid meals offer advantages with respect to the shorter examination time and simpler preparation and therefore may be preferred for routine use. Since amplitudes seem to vary within the observation period standardized acquisition protocols are recommended for the evaluation of this parameter. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: An einem heterogenen Kollektiv von Patienten mit gastrointestinalen Beschwerden wurde der Einfluss von Testspeisen unterschiedlicher Konsistenz auf Peristaltik und Entleerungsrate des Magens untersucht. Methodik: Bei 12 Patienten wurde nach Gabe von

  7. Exact monitoring of aortic diameters in Marfan patients without gadolinium contrast: intraindividual comparison of 2D SSFP imaging with 3D CE-MRA and echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veldhoen, Simon; Behzadi, Cyrus; Derlin, Thorsten; Henes, Frank Oliver; Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter; Rybczinsky, Meike; Kodolitsch, Yskert von; Sheikhzadeh, Sara; Bley, Thorsten Alexander

    2015-01-01

    To assess whether ECG-gated non-contrast 2D steady-state free precession (SSFP) imaging allows for exact monitoring of aortic diameters in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients using non-ECG-gated contrast-enhanced 3D magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and echocardiography for intraindividual comparison. Non-ECG-gated CE-MRA and ECG-gated non-contrast SSFP at 1.5 T were prospectively performed in 50 patients. Two readers measured aortic diameters on para-sagittal images identically aligned with the aortic arch at the sinuses of Valsalva, sinotubular junction, ascending/descending aorta and aortic arch. Image quality was assessed on a three-point scale. Aortic root diameters acquired by echocardiography were used as reference. Intra- and interobserver variances were smaller for SSFP at the sinuses of Valsalva (p = 0.002; p = 0.002) and sinotubular junction (p = 0.014; p = 0.043). Image quality was better in SSFP than in CE-MRA at the sinuses of Valsalva (p < 0.0001), sinotubular junction (p < 0.0001) and ascending aorta (p = 0.02). CE-MRA yielded higher diameters than SSFP at the sinuses of Valsalva (mean bias, 2.5 mm; p < 0.0001), and comparison with echocardiography confirmed a higher bias for CE-MRA (7.2 ± 3.4 mm vs. SSFP, 4.7 ± 2.6 mm). ECG-gated non-contrast 2D SSFP imaging provides superior image quality with higher validity compared to non-ECG-gated contrast-enhanced 3D imaging. Since CE-MRA requires contrast agents with potential adverse effects, non-contrast SSFP imaging is an appropriate alternative for exact and riskless aortic monitoring of MFS patients. (orig.)

  8. Exact monitoring of aortic diameters in Marfan patients without gadolinium contrast: intraindividual comparison of 2D SSFP imaging with 3D CE-MRA and echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldhoen, Simon [University Medical Center Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Bavaria (Germany); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Behzadi, Cyrus; Derlin, Thorsten; Henes, Frank Oliver; Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Rybczinsky, Meike; Kodolitsch, Yskert von; Sheikhzadeh, Sara [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of General and Interventional Cardiology, Hamburg (Germany); Bley, Thorsten Alexander [University Medical Center Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Bavaria (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    To assess whether ECG-gated non-contrast 2D steady-state free precession (SSFP) imaging allows for exact monitoring of aortic diameters in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients using non-ECG-gated contrast-enhanced 3D magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and echocardiography for intraindividual comparison. Non-ECG-gated CE-MRA and ECG-gated non-contrast SSFP at 1.5 T were prospectively performed in 50 patients. Two readers measured aortic diameters on para-sagittal images identically aligned with the aortic arch at the sinuses of Valsalva, sinotubular junction, ascending/descending aorta and aortic arch. Image quality was assessed on a three-point scale. Aortic root diameters acquired by echocardiography were used as reference. Intra- and interobserver variances were smaller for SSFP at the sinuses of Valsalva (p = 0.002; p = 0.002) and sinotubular junction (p = 0.014; p = 0.043). Image quality was better in SSFP than in CE-MRA at the sinuses of Valsalva (p < 0.0001), sinotubular junction (p < 0.0001) and ascending aorta (p = 0.02). CE-MRA yielded higher diameters than SSFP at the sinuses of Valsalva (mean bias, 2.5 mm; p < 0.0001), and comparison with echocardiography confirmed a higher bias for CE-MRA (7.2 ± 3.4 mm vs. SSFP, 4.7 ± 2.6 mm). ECG-gated non-contrast 2D SSFP imaging provides superior image quality with higher validity compared to non-ECG-gated contrast-enhanced 3D imaging. Since CE-MRA requires contrast agents with potential adverse effects, non-contrast SSFP imaging is an appropriate alternative for exact and riskless aortic monitoring of MFS patients. (orig.)

  9. Intra-Individual Comparison between 2-D Shear Wave Elastography (GE System) and Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification (Siemens System) in Grading Liver Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, Rosa M S; El Kaffas, Ahmed; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2017-12-01

    Ultrasound-based shear wave elastography (SWE) has recently gained substantial attention for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to perform an intra-individual comparison between 2-D shear wave elastography (2-D-SWE with a GE system) and Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification (VTTQ with a Siemens system) to assess whether these can be used interchangeably to grade fibrosis. Ninety-three patients (51 men, 42 women; mean age, 54 y) with liver disease of various etiologies (hepatitis B virus = 47, hepatitis C virus = 22; alcohol = 6, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis = 5, other = 13) were included. Using published system-specific shear wave speed cutoff values, liver fibrosis was classified into clinically non-significant (F0/F1) and significant (≥F2) fibrosis. Results indicated that intra-modality repeatability was excellent for both techniques (GE 2-D-SWE: intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.89 [0.84-0.93]; VTTQ: intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.90 [0.86-0.93]). Intra-modality classification agreement for fibrosis grading was good to excellent (GE 2-D-SWE: κ = 0.65, VTTQ: κ = 0.82). However, inter-modality agreement for fibrosis grading was only fair (κ = 0.31) using published system-specific shear wave speed cutoff values of fibrosis. In conclusion, although both GE 2-D-SWE and Siemens VTTQ exhibit good to excellent intra-modality repeatability, inter-modality agreement is only fair, suggesting that these should not be used interchangeably. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reconciling the Log-Linear and Non-Log-Linear Nature of the TSH-Free T4 Relationship: Intra-Individual Analysis of a Large Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothacker, Karen M; Brown, Suzanne J; Hadlow, Narelle C; Wardrop, Robert; Walsh, John P

    2016-03-01

    The TSH-T4 relationship was thought to be inverse log-linear, but recent cross-sectional studies report a complex, nonlinear relationship; large, intra-individual studies are lacking. Our objective was to analyze the TSH-free T4 relationship within individuals. We analyzed data from 13 379 patients, each with six or more TSH/free T4 measurements and at least a 5-fold difference between individual median TSH and minimum or maximum TSH. Linear and nonlinear regression models of log TSH on free T4 were fitted to data from individuals and goodness of fit compared by likelihood ratio testing. Comparing all models, the linear model achieved best fit in 31% of individuals, followed by quartic (27%), cubic (15%), null (12%), and quadratic (11%) models. After eliminating least favored models (with individuals reassigned to best fitting, available models), the linear model fit best in 42% of participants, quartic in 43%, and null model in 15%. As the number of observations per individual increased, so did the proportion of individuals in whom the linear model achieved best fit, to 66% in those with more than 20 observations. When linear models were applied to all individuals and averaged according to individual median free T4 values, variations in slope and intercept indicated a nonlinear log TSH-free T4 relationship across the population. The log TSH-free T4 relationship appears linear in some individuals and nonlinear in others, but is predominantly linear in those with the largest number of observations. A log-linear relationship within individuals can be reconciled with a non-log-linear relationship in a population.

  11. Exact monitoring of aortic diameters in Marfan patients without gadolinium contrast: intraindividual comparison of 2D SSFP imaging with 3D CE-MRA and echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhoen, Simon; Behzadi, Cyrus; Derlin, Thorsten; Rybczinsky, Meike; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Sheikhzadeh, Sara; Henes, Frank Oliver; Bley, Thorsten Alexander; Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter

    2015-03-01

    To assess whether ECG-gated non-contrast 2D steady-state free precession (SSFP) imaging allows for exact monitoring of aortic diameters in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients using non-ECG-gated contrast-enhanced 3D magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and echocardiography for intraindividual comparison. Non-ECG-gated CE-MRA and ECG-gated non-contrast SSFP at 1.5 T were prospectively performed in 50 patients. Two readers measured aortic diameters on para-sagittal images identically aligned with the aortic arch at the sinuses of Valsalva, sinotubular junction, ascending/descending aorta and aortic arch. Image quality was assessed on a three-point scale. Aortic root diameters acquired by echocardiography were used as reference. Intra- and interobserver variances were smaller for SSFP at the sinuses of Valsalva (p = 0.002; p = 0.002) and sinotubular junction (p = 0.014; p = 0.043). Image quality was better in SSFP than in CE-MRA at the sinuses of Valsalva (p < 0.0001), sinotubular junction (p < 0.0001) and ascending aorta (p = 0.02). CE-MRA yielded higher diameters than SSFP at the sinuses of Valsalva (mean bias, 2.5 mm; p < 0.0001), and comparison with echocardiography confirmed a higher bias for CE-MRA (7.2 ± 3.4 mm vs. SSFP, 4.7 ± 2.6 mm). ECG-gated non-contrast 2D SSFP imaging provides superior image quality with higher validity compared to non-ECG-gated contrast-enhanced 3D imaging. Since CE-MRA requires contrast agents with potential adverse effects, non-contrast SSFP imaging is an appropriate alternative for exact and riskless aortic monitoring of MFS patients.

  12. Intraindividual comparison of image quality using retrospective and prospective respiratory gating for the acquisition of thin sliced four dimensional multidetector CT of the thorax in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Cyrus; Groth, Michael; Henes, Frank Oliver; Schwarz, Dorothee; Deibele, André; Begemann, Philipp G C; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2015-01-01

    To intraindividually compare image quality and anatomical depiction of the lung and mediastinum using retrospective and prospective respiratory gating techniques for the acquisition of 4D-multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) of the chest in a porcine model. Twelve trachealy intubated domestic pigs underwent 64-row MDCT of the thorax. For retrospective and prospective gating the automated respiratory frequency was adjusted to 10, 14, 18, and 22 respiratory cycles per minute. Further, free breathing MDCT scans of the lung were performed at the same respiratory settings. A breathhold scan was acquired which served as the reference standard. Three reviewers independently analyzed the MDCT data applying a 4-point-grading scale regarding the degree of artifacts observed and anatomical depiction (1, excellent, no artifacts; 4, nondiagnostic due to severe artifacts). For statistical analysis the Wilcoxon matched pairs and Chi-square test were used. Breathhold imaging allowed for the highest image quality (mean value: trachea, 1.00; bronchi, 1.10; lung parenchyma, 1.08; diaphragm, 1.00; pericardium, 1.80). Retrospective gating proved to be of superior image quality compared to prospective gating for all respiratory frequencies. With the respiratory frequency set to 14/min retrospective gating even enabled an identical image quality score as at breathhold. Performing image acquisition during continuous breathing lead to a severe decrease in image quality. High image quality can be acquired using respiratory gating techniques for 4D-MDCT of the thorax. Retrospective is superior to prospective gating and can be of an equivalent image quality as standard breathhold imaging, but at the cost of a significantly higher radiation dose.

  13. Variability Bugs:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melo, Jean

    Many modern software systems are highly configurable. They embrace variability to increase adaptability and to lower cost. To implement configurable software, developers often use the C preprocessor (CPP), which is a well-known technique, mainly in industry, to deal with variability in code....... Although many researchers suggest that preprocessor-based variability amplifies maintenance problems, there is little to no hard evidence on how actually variability affects programs and programmers. Specifically, how does variability affect programmers during maintenance tasks (bug finding in particular...... be exploited. Variability bugs are not confined to any particular type of bug, error-prone feature, or location. In addition to introducing an exponential number of program variants, variability increases the complexity of bugs due to unintended feature interactions, hidden features, combinations of layers...

  14. Machine tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Myeong Sun

    1981-01-01

    This book indicates machine tool, which includes cutting process and processing by cutting process, theory of cutting like tool angle and chip molding, cutting tool such as milling cutter and drill, summary and introduction of following machine ; spindle drive and feed drive, pivot and pivot bearing, frame, guide way and table, drilling machine, boring machine, shaper and planer, milling machine, machine tool for precision finishing like lapping machine and super finishing machine gear cutter.

  15. Pulsating variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The study of stellar pulsations is a major route to the understanding of stellar structure and evolution. At the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) the following stellar pulsation studies were undertaken: rapidly oscillating Ap stars; solar-like oscillations in stars; 8-Scuti type variability in a classical Am star; Beta Cephei variables; a pulsating white dwarf and its companion; RR Lyrae variables and galactic Cepheids. 4 figs

  16. Simulation tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jenni, F

    2006-01-01

    In the last two decades, simulation tools made a significant contribution to the great progress in development of power electronics. Time to market was shortened and development costs were reduced drastically. Falling costs, as well as improved speed and precision, opened new fields of application. Today, continuous and switched circuits can be mixed. A comfortable number of powerful simulation tools is available. The users have to choose the best suitable for their application. Here a simple rule applies: The best available simulation tool is the tool the user is already used to (provided, it can solve the task). Abilities, speed, user friendliness and other features are continuously being improved—even though they are already powerful and comfortable. This paper aims at giving the reader an insight into the simulation of power electronics. Starting with a short description of the fundamentals of a simulation tool as well as properties of tools, several tools are presented. Starting with simplified models ...

  17. Intra-individual comparison of CAIPIRINHA VIBE technique with conventional VIBE sequences in contrast-enhanced MRI of focal liver lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, M.H., E-mail: MoritzAlbrecht@gmx.net [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Bodelle, B., E-mail: boris.bodelle@kgu.de [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Varga-Szemes, A., E-mail: vargaasz@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Dewes, P., E-mail: patricia.dewes@kgu.de [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Bucher, A.M., E-mail: andreas.bucher@kgu.de [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Ball, B.D., E-mail: BallBr@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); De Cecco, C.N., E-mail: dececco@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U.J., E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Zhu, X., E-mail: zhuxun@shzu.edu.cn [Shihezi University, Department of Psychology, Beisi Road, Xinjiang (China); Zangos, S., E-mail: Zangos@em.uni-frankfurt.de [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Gruber-Rouh, T., E-mail: tatjanagruber2004@yahoo.de [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Wichmann, J.L., E-mail: dochwichmann@gmail.com [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); and others

    2017-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of controlled aliasing in parallel imaging results in higher acceleration (CAIPIRINHA) volume interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique on image quality, reader confidence, and inter-observer agreement for the assessment of focal liver lesions in comparison with the standard VIBE approach. Material and methods: In this IRB-approved intra-individual comparison study, abdominal arterial and portal-venous contrast-enhanced MRI studies were retrospectively analyzed in 38 patients with malignant liver lesions. Each patient underwent both CAIPIRINHA and conventional VIBE 3 T MRI within 3 months, showing stable disease. Images were evaluated using 5-point rating scales by two blinded radiologists with more than 20 and 5 years of experience in MRI, respectively. Readers scored dignity of liver lesions and assessed which liver segments were affected by malignancy (ranging from 1 = definitely benign/not affected to 5 = definitely malignant/affected by malignancy). Readers also rated overall image quality, sharpness of intrahepatic veins, and diagnostic confidence (ranging from 1 = poor to 5 = excellent). Results: Reviewers achieved a higher inter-observer reliability using CAIPIRINHA when they reported which liver segments were affected by malignancy compared to traditional VIBE series (κ = 0.62 and 0.54, respectively, p < 0.05). Similarly, CAIPIRINHA showed a slightly higher inter-rater agreement for the dignity of focal liver lesions versus the standard VIBE images (κ = 0.50 and 0.49, respectively, p < 0.05). CAIPIRINHA series also scored higher in comparison to standard VIBE sequences (mean scores: image quality, 4.2 and 3.5; sharpness of intrahepatic vessels, 3.8 and 3.2, respectively, p < 0.05) for both reviewers and allowed for higher subjective diagnostic confidence (ratings, 3.8 and 3.2, respectively, p < 0.05). Conclusion: Compared to the standard VIBE approach, CAIPIRINHA VIBE technique

  18. Inter- and intra-individual variation in allele-specific DNA methylation and gene expression in children conceived using assisted reproductive technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Turan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have reported a higher incidence of rare disorders involving imprinted genes among children conceived using assisted reproductive technology (ART, suggesting that ART procedures may be disruptive to imprinted gene methylation patterns. We examined intra- and inter-individual variation in DNA methylation at the differentially methylated regions (DMRs of the IGF2/H19 and IGF2R loci in a population of children conceived in vitro or in vivo. We found substantial variation in allele-specific methylation at both loci in both groups. Aberrant methylation of the maternal IGF2/H19 DMR was more common in the in vitro group, and the overall variance was also significantly greater in the in vitro group. We estimated the number of trophoblast stem cells in each group based on approximation of the variance of the binomial distribution of IGF2/H19 methylation ratios, as well as the distribution of X chromosome inactivation scores in placenta. Both of these independent measures indicated that placentas of the in vitro group were derived from fewer stem cells than the in vivo conceived group. Both IGF2 and H19 mRNAs were significantly lower in placenta from the in vitro group. Although average birth weight was lower in the in vitro group, we found no correlation between birth weight and IGF2 or IGF2R transcript levels or the ratio of IGF2/IGF2R transcript levels. Our results show that in vitro conception is associated with aberrant methylation patterns at the IGF2/H19 locus. However, very little of the inter- or intra-individual variation in H19 or IGF2 mRNA levels can be explained by differences in maternal DMR DNA methylation, in contrast to the expectations of current transcriptional imprinting models. Extraembryonic tissues of embryos cultured in vitro appear to be derived from fewer trophoblast stem cells. It is possible that this developmental difference has an effect on placental and fetal growth.

  19. Intra-individual comparison of CAIPIRINHA VIBE technique with conventional VIBE sequences in contrast-enhanced MRI of focal liver lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, M.H.; Bodelle, B.; Varga-Szemes, A.; Dewes, P.; Bucher, A.M.; Ball, B.D.; De Cecco, C.N.; Schoepf, U.J.; Zhu, X.; Zangos, S.; Gruber-Rouh, T.; Wichmann, J.L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of controlled aliasing in parallel imaging results in higher acceleration (CAIPIRINHA) volume interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique on image quality, reader confidence, and inter-observer agreement for the assessment of focal liver lesions in comparison with the standard VIBE approach. Material and methods: In this IRB-approved intra-individual comparison study, abdominal arterial and portal-venous contrast-enhanced MRI studies were retrospectively analyzed in 38 patients with malignant liver lesions. Each patient underwent both CAIPIRINHA and conventional VIBE 3 T MRI within 3 months, showing stable disease. Images were evaluated using 5-point rating scales by two blinded radiologists with more than 20 and 5 years of experience in MRI, respectively. Readers scored dignity of liver lesions and assessed which liver segments were affected by malignancy (ranging from 1 = definitely benign/not affected to 5 = definitely malignant/affected by malignancy). Readers also rated overall image quality, sharpness of intrahepatic veins, and diagnostic confidence (ranging from 1 = poor to 5 = excellent). Results: Reviewers achieved a higher inter-observer reliability using CAIPIRINHA when they reported which liver segments were affected by malignancy compared to traditional VIBE series (κ = 0.62 and 0.54, respectively, p < 0.05). Similarly, CAIPIRINHA showed a slightly higher inter-rater agreement for the dignity of focal liver lesions versus the standard VIBE images (κ = 0.50 and 0.49, respectively, p < 0.05). CAIPIRINHA series also scored higher in comparison to standard VIBE sequences (mean scores: image quality, 4.2 and 3.5; sharpness of intrahepatic vessels, 3.8 and 3.2, respectively, p < 0.05) for both reviewers and allowed for higher subjective diagnostic confidence (ratings, 3.8 and 3.2, respectively, p < 0.05). Conclusion: Compared to the standard VIBE approach, CAIPIRINHA VIBE technique

  20. Patient Satisfaction After Femoral Arterial Access Site Closure Using the ExoSeal® Vascular Closure Device Compared to Manual Compression: A Prospective Intra-individual Comparative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieper, Claus Christian; Thomas, Daniel; Nadal, Jennifer; Willinek, Winfried A.; Schild, Hans Heinz; Meyer, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo intra-individually compare discomfort levels and patient satisfaction after arterial access closure using the ExoSeal ® vascular closure device (VCD) and manual compression (MC) in a prospective study design.MethodsPatients undergoing two planned interventions from 07/2013 to 09/2014 could participate in the study. Access closure was performed with an ExoSeal ® -VCD in one and MC in the other intervention. Patients were clinically and sonographically examined and were given questionnaires 1 day after intervention [groin- and back-pain during bedrest (100-point visual analog scale; 0: no pain); comfortability of bedrest (10-point Likert scale, 1: comfortable), satisfaction with closure (10-point Likert scale, 1: very satisfied)]. Results were analyzed in a cross-over design.Results48 patients (29 male, median age 62.5 (32–88) years) were included. An ExoSeal ® -VCD was used first in 25 cases. As four of these subsequently refused MC as second intervention, data from 44 patients could be analyzed. All closures were technically successful (successful device deployment) without major complications. Groin- and back-pain after VCD-use/MC was 0 (0–15) vs. 10 (0–80) and 0 (0–75) vs. 25 (0–90), respectively (p < 0.0001). Bedrest after VCD-use was more comfortable than after MC [1 (range 1–7) vs. 6 (2–10); p < 0.0001]. Satisfaction with the closure procedure and with the intervention in general was higher after VCD-use compared to MC [1 (1–3) vs. 5 (2–10) and 1 (1–2) vs. 2 (1–4), respectively; p < 0.0001].ConclusionIntra-individual comparison showed pain levels and discomfort to be significantly lower after ExoSeal ® use compared to MC. VCD closure was associated with higher satisfaction both with the closure itself and with the intervention in general

  1. Cognitive Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Children's thinking is highly variable at every level of analysis, from neural and associative levels to the level of strategies, theories, and other aspects of high-level cognition. This variability exists within people as well as between them; individual children often rely on different strategies or representations on closely related problems…

  2. Low luminance/eyes closed and monochromatic stimulations reduce variability of flash visual evoked potential latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Kumar Subramanian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Visual evoked potentials are useful in investigating the physiology and pathophysiology of the human visual system. Flash visual evoked potential (FVEP, though technically easier, has less clinical utility because it shows great variations in both latency and amplitude for normal subjects. Aim: To study the effect of eye closure, low luminance, and monochromatic stimulation on the variability of FVEPs. Subjects and Methods: Subjects in self-reported good health in the age group of 18-30 years were divided into three groups. All participants underwent FVEP recording with eyes open and with white light at 0.6 J luminance (standard technique. Next recording was done in group 1 with closed eyes, group 2 with 1.2 and 20 J luminance, and group 3 with red and blue lights, while keeping all the other parameters constant. Two trials were given for each eye, for each technique. The same procedure was repeated at the same clock time on the following day. Statistical Analysis: Variation in FVEP latencies between the individuals (interindividual variability and the variations within the same individual for four trials (intraindividual variability were assessed using coefficient of variance (COV. The technique with lower COV was considered the better method. Results: Recording done with closed eyes, 0.6 J luminance, and monochromatic light (blue > red showed lower interindividual and intraindividual variability in P2 and N2 as compared to standard techniques. Conclusions: Low luminance flash stimulations and monochromatic light will reduce FVEP latency variability and may be clinically useful modifications of FVEP recording technique.

  3. Integrated Variable Fidelity Conceptual Design Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CADNexus proposes to develop an Integrated Variable Fidelity Conceptual Design tool. The application will enable design and analysis of unconventional and advanced...

  4. Variability in the arterial pressure of newborns as compared to that of adults and old men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menghetti, E; Stainier, C; Bocconcelli, P; Colosimo, A; Guarini, G

    1995-10-01

    The systolic and diastolic blood pressure was monitored on healthy subjects of different ages, spanning from newborns (24-48 hs old, to elderly age (70-80 years old). Each subject was monitored for 15 minutes, and the pressure values collected every minute. This protocol allowed a statistical evaluation of both inter- and intraindividual variabilities among and within different class ages. As expected, increasing age is paralleled by a marked increase in the average values of systolic blood pressure; the trend of variabilities around the average, however, as traced by standard deviations, is just the opposite: a marked decrease going from newborns to adults is accompanied--in most cases--by a statistically significant difference in the same direction also between adults and old men. This can be rationalized, in the light of recent findings on the role of deterministic chaos in the functional behaviour of complex biological systems, in terms of decreased functional flexibility characteristic of the aging process.

  5. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Stephen D

    1999-01-01

    The most important topics in the theory and application of complex variables receive a thorough, coherent treatment in this introductory text. Intended for undergraduates or graduate students in science, mathematics, and engineering, this volume features hundreds of solved examples, exercises, and applications designed to foster a complete understanding of complex variables as well as an appreciation of their mathematical beauty and elegance. Prerequisites are minimal; a three-semester course in calculus will suffice to prepare students for discussions of these topics: the complex plane, basic

  6. Tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, C.

    2001-01-01

    On designing a tool steel, its composition and heat treatment parameters are chosen to provide a hardened and tempered martensitic matrix in which carbides are evenly distributed. In this condition the matrix has an optimum combination of hardness andtoughness, the primary carbides provide...... resistance against abrasive wear and secondary carbides (if any) increase the resistance against plastic deformation. Tool steels are alloyed with carbide forming elements (Typically: vanadium, tungsten, molybdenumand chromium) furthermore some steel types contains cobalt. Addition of alloying elements...... serves primarily two purpose (i) to improve the hardenabillity and (ii) to provide harder and thermally more stable carbides than cementite. Assuming proper heattreatment, the properties of a tool steel depends on the which alloying elements are added and their respective concentrations....

  7. Short- and Long-term Biologic Variability of Galectin-3 and Other Cardiac Biomarkers in Patients with Stable Heart Failure and Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Emily I; Szymanski, Jeffrey J; Hock, Karl G; Geltman, Edward M; Scott, Mitchell G

    2016-02-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3) has been suggested as a prognostic biomarker in heart failure (HF) patients that may better reflect disease progression than traditional markers, including B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and cardiac troponins. To fully establish the utility of any biomarker in HF, its biologic variability must be characterized. To assess biologic variability, 59 patients were prospectively recruited, including 23 male and 16 female patients with stable HF and 10 male and 10 female healthy individuals. Gal-3, BNP, and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hs-cTnI) were assayed at 5 time points within a 3-week period to assess short-term biologic variability. Long-term (3-month) biologic variability was assessed with samples collected at enrollment and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Among healthy individuals, mean short-term biologic variability, expressed as intraindividual CV (CVI), was 4.5% for Gal-3, 29.0% for BNP, and 14.5% for hs-cTnI; long-term biologic variability was 5.5% for Gal-3, 34.7% for BNP, and 14.7% for hs-cTnI. In stable HF patients, mean short-term biologic variability was 7.1% for Gal-3, 22.5% for BNP, and 8.5% for hs-cTnI, and mean long-term biologic variability was 7.7% for Gal-3, 27.6% for BNP, and 9.6% for hs-cTnI. The finding that Gal-3 has minimal intraindividual biological variability adds to its potential as a useful biomarker in HF patients. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  8. Fatigue shifts and scatters heart rate variability in elite endurance athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Schmitt

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This longitudinal study aimed at comparing heart rate variability (HRV in elite athletes identified either in 'fatigue' or in 'no-fatigue' state in 'real life' conditions. METHODS: 57 elite Nordic-skiers were surveyed over 4 years. R-R intervals were recorded supine (SU and standing (ST. A fatigue state was quoted with a validated questionnaire. A multilevel linear regression model was used to analyze relationships between heart rate (HR and HRV descriptors [total spectral power (TP, power in low (LF and high frequency (HF ranges expressed in ms(2 and normalized units (nu] and the status without and with fatigue. The variables not distributed normally were transformed by taking their common logarithm (log10. RESULTS: 172 trials were identified as in a 'fatigue' and 891 as in 'no-fatigue' state. All supine HR and HRV parameters (Beta±SE were significantly different (P<0.0001 between 'fatigue' and 'no-fatigue': HRSU (+6.27±0.61 bpm, logTPSU (-0.36±0.04, logLFSU (-0.27±0.04, logHFSU (-0.46±0.05, logLF/HFSU (+0.19±0.03, HFSU(nu (-9.55±1.33. Differences were also significant (P<0.0001 in standing: HRST (+8.83±0.89, logTPST (-0.28±0.03, logLFST (-0.29±0.03, logHFST (-0.32±0.04. Also, intra-individual variance of HRV parameters was larger (P<0.05 in the 'fatigue' state (logTPSU: 0.26 vs. 0.07, logLFSU: 0.28 vs. 0.11, logHFSU: 0.32 vs. 0.08, logTPST: 0.13 vs. 0.07, logLFST: 0.16 vs. 0.07, logHFST: 0.25 vs. 0.14. CONCLUSION: HRV was significantly lower in 'fatigue' vs. 'no-fatigue' but accompanied with larger intra-individual variance of HRV parameters in 'fatigue'. The broader intra-individual variance of HRV parameters might encompass different changes from no-fatigue state, possibly reflecting different fatigue-induced alterations of HRV pattern.

  9. Variability of gastric emptying time using standardized radiolabeled meals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian, P.E.; Brophy, C.M.; Egger, M.J.; Taylor, A.; Moore, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    To define the range of inter- and intra-subject variability on gastric emptying measurements, eight healthy male subjects (ages 19-40) received meals on four separate occasions. The meal consisted of 150 g of beef stew labeled with Tc-99m SC labeled liver (600 μCi) and 150 g of orange juice containing In-111 DTPA (100 μCi) as the solid- and liquid-phase markers respectively. Images of the solid and liquid phases were obtained at 20 min intervals immediately after meal ingestion. The stomach region was selected from digital images and data were corrected for radionuclide interference, radioactive decay and the geometric mean of anterior and posterior counts. More absolute variability was seen with the solid than the liquid marker emptying for the group. The mean solid half-emptying time was 58 +- 17 min (range 29-92) while the mean liquid half-emptying time was 24 +- 8 min (range 12-37). A nested random effects analysis of variance showed moderate intra-subject variability for solid half-emptying times (rho = 0.4594), and high intra-subject variability was implied by a low correlation (rho = 0.2084) for liquid half-emptying. The average inter-subject differences were 58.3% of the total variance for solids (rho = 0.0017). For liquids, the inter-subject variability was 69.1% of the total variance, but was only suggestive of statistical significance (rho = 0.0666). The normal half emptying time for gastric emptying of liquids and solids is a variable phenomenon in healthy subjects and has great inter- and intra-individual day-to-day differences

  10. Design tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton TenWolde; Mark T. Bomberg

    2009-01-01

    Overall, despite the lack of exact input data, the use of design tools, including models, is much superior to the simple following of rules of thumbs, and a moisture analysis should be standard procedure for any building envelope design. Exceptions can only be made for buildings in the same climate, similar occupancy, and similar envelope construction. This chapter...

  11. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Flanigan, Francis J

    2010-01-01

    A caution to mathematics professors: Complex Variables does not follow conventional outlines of course material. One reviewer noting its originality wrote: ""A standard text is often preferred [to a superior text like this] because the professor knows the order of topics and the problems, and doesn't really have to pay attention to the text. He can go to class without preparation."" Not so here-Dr. Flanigan treats this most important field of contemporary mathematics in a most unusual way. While all the material for an advanced undergraduate or first-year graduate course is covered, discussion

  12. A new approach for the quantification of synchrony of multivariate non-stationary psychophysiological variables during emotion eliciting stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustin eKelava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Emotion eliciting situations are accompanied by reactions on multiple response variables on subjective, physiological, and behavioral levels. The quantification of the overall simultaneous synchrony of psychophysiological reactions, plays a major role in emotion theories and has received increasing attention in recent research. From a psychometric perspective, the reactions represent multivariate non-stationary intra-individual time series. In this paper, we present a new time-frequency based latent variable approach for the quantification of the synchrony of the responses. The approach is applied to empirical data collected during an emotion eliciting situation. The results are compared with a complementary inter-individual approach of Hsieh et al. (2011. Finally, the proposed approach is discussed in the context of emotion theories, and possible future applications and limitations are provided.

  13. Cardinality-dependent Variability in Orthogonal Variability Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mærsk-Møller, Hans Martin; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2012-01-01

    During our work on developing and running a software product line for eco-sustainable greenhouse-production software tools, which currently have three products members we have identified a need for extending the notation of the Orthogonal Variability Model (OVM) to support what we refer...

  14. Determining anthropometric variables as a tool in the preparation of furniture and designs of interior spaces: the case of children 6 to 11 years old of Vicosa, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanuncio, Sharinna Venturim; Mafra, Simone Caldas Tavares; Antônio, Carlos Emílio Barbosa; Filho, Jugurta Lisboa; Vidigal Guimarães, Elza Maria; da Silva, Vania Eugênia; de Souza, Amaury Paulo; Minette, Luciano José

    2012-01-01

    The adequacy of facilities and the individual securities in their different age groups is importance to ensure greater functionality to them, allowing full development of daily activities. For this to occur more efficiently it is necessary the use of ergonomics which can ensure more comfort and safety for end users of products and spaces. The present study aimed to measure body dimensions of a representative sample of children aged 6 to 11 years old, children of graduate and pos graduate students, faculty and staff of the Federal University of Vicosa and also residents of the city of Vicosa, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, coming from different municipalities of State of Minas Gerais, to organize a database that will provide the furniture industry, anthropometric variables more appropriate to design products for both the leisure activities, and for the school sector. To realize this research we used the methodology proposed by the authors Panero and Zelnik, based on samples distributed in six age groups, and providing a measurement of 10 variables. By applying the methodology to the field was possible to compare the observed data, with the tables of the aforementioned authors. The main results revealed a significant variation of the 10 variables analyzed, and it is believed that this variation could lead to possible flaws in the designs of products that use the data from these authors. The completion of the study provided data on Vicosa considered more appropriate for the design of products and environments for the population of the study, considering age and region, of Brazil (State of Minas Gerais) and it is believed that the future may expand to the Brazilian population, with the progress of study of this nature.

  15. Integrating Hydrologic and Water Quality Models as a Decision Support Tool for Implementation of Low Impact Development in a Coastal Urban Watershed under Climate Variability and Sea Level Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, N. B.

    2016-12-01

    Many countries concern about development and redevelopment efforts in urban regions to reduce the flood risk by considering hazards such as high-tide events, storm surge, flash floods, stormwater runoff, and impacts of sea level rise. Combining these present and future hazards with vulnerable characteristics found throughout coastal communities such as majority low-lying areas and increasing urban development, create scenarios for increasing exposure of flood hazard. As such, the most vulnerable areas require adaptation strategies and mitigation actions for flood hazard management. In addition, in the U.S., Numeric Nutrient Criteria (NNC) are a critical tool for protecting and restoring the designated uses of a waterbody with regard to nitrogen and phosphorus pollution. Strategies such as low impact development (LID) have been promoted in recent years as an alternative to traditional stormwater management and drainage to control both flooding and water quality impact. LID utilizes decentralized multifunctional site designs and incorporates on-site storm water management practices rather than conventional storm water management approaches that divert flow toward centralized facilities. How to integrate hydrologic and water quality models to achieve the decision support becomes a challenge. The Cross Bayou Watershed of Pinellas County in Tampa Bay, a highly urbanized coastal watershed, is utilized as a case study due to its sensitivity to flood hazards and water quality management within the watershed. This study will aid the County, as a decision maker, to implement its stormwater management policy and honor recent NNC state policy via demonstration of an integrated hydrologic and water quality model, including the Interconnected Channel and Pond Routing Model v.4 (ICPR4) and the BMPTRAIN model as a decision support tool. The ICPR4 can be further coupled with the ADCIRC/SWAN model to reflect the storm surge and seal level rise in coastal regions.

  16. Next-generation genomic shotgun sequencing indicates greater genetic variability in the mitochondria of Hypophthalmichthys molitrix relative to H. nobilis from the Mississippi River, USA and provides tools for research and detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John J; Eackles, Michael S.; Stauffer, Jay R; King, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    We characterized variation within the mitochondrial genomes of the invasive silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) and bighead carp (H. nobilis) from the Mississippi River drainage by mapping our Next-Generation sequences to their publicly available genomes. Variant detection resulted in 338 single-nucleotide polymorphisms for H. molitrix and 39 for H. nobilis. The much greater genetic variation in H. molitrix mitochondria relative to H. nobilis may be indicative of a greater North American female effective population size of the former. When variation was quantified by gene, many tRNA loci appear to have little or no variability based on our results whereas protein-coding regions were more frequently polymorphic. These results provide biologists with additional regions of DNA to be used as markers to study the invasion dynamics of these species.

  17. Spontaneous fluctuations in sensory processing predict within-subject reaction time variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Ribeiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available When engaged in a repetitive task our performance fluctuates from trial-to-trial. In particular, inter-trial reaction time variability has been the subject of considerable research. It has been claimed to be a strong biomarker of attention deficits, increases with frontal dysfunction, and predicts age-related cognitive decline. Thus, rather than being just a consequence of noise in the system, it appears to be under the control of a mechanism that breaks down under certain pathological conditions. Although the underlying mechanism is still an open question, consensual hypotheses are emerging regarding the neural correlates of reaction time inter-trial intra-individual variability. Sensory processing, in particular, has been shown to covary with reaction time, yet the spatio-temporal profile of the moment-to-moment variability in sensory processing is still poorly characterized. The goal of this study was to characterize the intra-individual variability in the time course of single-trial visual evoked potentials and its relationship with inter-trial reaction time variability. For this, we chose to take advantage of the high temporal resolution of the electroencephalogram (EEG acquired while participants were engaged in a 2-choice reaction time task. We studied the link between single trial event-related potentials (ERPs and reaction time using two different analyses: 1 time point by time point correlation analyses thereby identifying time windows of interest, and 2 correlation analyses between single trial measures of peak latency and amplitude and reaction time. To improve extraction of single trial ERP measures related with activation of the visual cortex, we used an independent component analysis procedure.Our ERP analysis revealed a relationship between the N1 visual evoked potential and reaction time. The earliest time point presenting a significant correlation of its respective amplitude with reaction time occurred 175 ms after stimulus

  18. Psychobiological Factors Affecting Cortisol Variability in Human-Dog Dyads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöberl, Iris; Wedl, Manuela; Beetz, Andrea; Kotrschal, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Stress responses within dyads are modulated by interactions such as mutual emotional support and conflict. We investigated dyadic psychobiological factors influencing intra-individual cortisol variability in response to different challenging situations by testing 132 owners and their dogs in a laboratory setting. Salivary cortisol was measured and questionnaires were used to assess owner and dog personality as well as owners' social attitudes towards the dog and towards other humans. We calculated the individual coefficient of variance of cortisol (iCV = sd/mean*100) over the different test situations as a parameter representing individual variability of cortisol concentration. We hypothesized that high cortisol variability indicates efficient and adaptive coping and a balanced individual and dyadic social performance. Female owners of male dogs had lower iCV than all other owner gender-dog sex combinations (F = 14.194, pDogs of owners high in Neuroticism (NEO-FFI) and of owners who were insecure-ambivalently attached to their dogs (FERT), had low iCV (F = 4.290, p = 0.041 and F = 5.948, p = 0.016), as had dogs of owners with human-directed separation anxiety (RSQ) or dogs of owners with a strong desire of independence (RSQ) (F = 7.661, p = 0.007 and F = 9.192, p = 0.003). We suggest that both owner and dog social characteristics influence dyadic cortisol variability, with the human partner being more influential than the dog. Our results support systemic approaches (i.e. considering the social context) in science and in counselling. PMID:28178272

  19. Psychobiological Factors Affecting Cortisol Variability in Human-Dog Dyads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Schöberl

    Full Text Available Stress responses within dyads are modulated by interactions such as mutual emotional support and conflict. We investigated dyadic psychobiological factors influencing intra-individual cortisol variability in response to different challenging situations by testing 132 owners and their dogs in a laboratory setting. Salivary cortisol was measured and questionnaires were used to assess owner and dog personality as well as owners' social attitudes towards the dog and towards other humans. We calculated the individual coefficient of variance of cortisol (iCV = sd/mean*100 over the different test situations as a parameter representing individual variability of cortisol concentration. We hypothesized that high cortisol variability indicates efficient and adaptive coping and a balanced individual and dyadic social performance. Female owners of male dogs had lower iCV than all other owner gender-dog sex combinations (F = 14.194, p<0.001, whereas owner Agreeableness (NEO-FFI scaled positively with owner iCV (F = 4.981, p = 0.028. Dogs of owners high in Neuroticism (NEO-FFI and of owners who were insecure-ambivalently attached to their dogs (FERT, had low iCV (F = 4.290, p = 0.041 and F = 5.948, p = 0.016, as had dogs of owners with human-directed separation anxiety (RSQ or dogs of owners with a strong desire of independence (RSQ (F = 7.661, p = 0.007 and F = 9.192, p = 0.003. We suggest that both owner and dog social characteristics influence dyadic cortisol variability, with the human partner being more influential than the dog. Our results support systemic approaches (i.e. considering the social context in science and in counselling.

  20. Longitudinal intra- and inter-individual variability in young swimmers' performance and determinant competition factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Estrela Morais

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to follow-up the intra- and inter-individual variability of young swimmers' performance and determinant factors over two competitive seasons. Thirty young swimmers (14 boys: 12.33±0.65 years-old; 16 girls: 11.15±0.55 years-old were followed-up throughout two consecutive seasons (seven evaluation moments. Performance (100m freestyle, anthropometric, kinematic, hydrodynamic and efficiency features were evaluated. A gender and skill-level effect was observed. Boys improved in a higher amount (% comparing to girls. Overall, swimmers in skill-level 2 (both genders presented a higher intra-individual variability. Performance and anthropometrics showed a significant inter-individual variability in most moments, but hydrodynamics, kinematics and efficiency did not. Within each skill-level hydrodynamics, kinematics and efficiency were the variables that showed a high inter-individual variability. As a gender and skill-level effect was noticed in an age-group of young swimmers, coaches and practitioners should put the focus in specific and customized training plans for each skill-level of swimmers.

  1. Indispensable tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Arthur

    2001-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has become an indispensable research tool for a growing number of scientists in a seemingly ever expanding number of disciplines. We can thank the European Synchrotron Research Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble for taking an innovative step toward achieving the educational goal of explaining the nature and benefits of synchrotron radiation to audiences ranging from the general public (including students) to government officials to scientists who may be unfamiliar with x-ray techniques and synchrotron radiation. ESRF is the driving force behind a new CD-ROM playable on both PCs and Macs titled Synchrotron light to explore matter. Published by Springer-Verlag, the CD contains both English and French versions of a comprehensive overview of the subject

  2. Breath acetone concentration; biological variability and the influence of diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Španěl, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Rejšková, Alžběta; Chippendale, Thomas W E; Smith, David

    2011-01-01

    Previous measurements of acetone concentrations in the exhaled breath of healthy individuals and the small amount of comparable data for individuals suffering from diabetes are briefly reviewed as a prelude to the presentation of new data on the sporadic and wide variations of breath acetone that occur in ostensibly healthy individuals. Data are also presented which show that following a ketogenic diet taken by eight healthy individuals their breath acetone concentrations increased up to five times over the subsequent 6 h. Similarly, the breath acetone increased six and nine times when a low carbohydrate diet was taken by two volunteers and remained high for the several days for which the diet was continued. These new data, together with the previous data, clearly indicate that diet and natural intra-individual biological and diurnal variability result in wide variations in breath acetone concentration. This places an uncertainty in the use of breath acetone alone to monitor blood glucose and glycaemic control, except and unless the individual acts as their own control and is cognizant of the need for dietary control. (note)

  3. Breath acetone concentration; biological variability and the influence of diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaněl, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Rejšková, Alžběta; Chippendale, Thomas W E; Smith, David

    2011-08-01

    Previous measurements of acetone concentrations in the exhaled breath of healthy individuals and the small amount of comparable data for individuals suffering from diabetes are briefly reviewed as a prelude to the presentation of new data on the sporadic and wide variations of breath acetone that occur in ostensibly healthy individuals. Data are also presented which show that following a ketogenic diet taken by eight healthy individuals their breath acetone concentrations increased up to five times over the subsequent 6 h. Similarly, the breath acetone increased six and nine times when a low carbohydrate diet was taken by two volunteers and remained high for the several days for which the diet was continued. These new data, together with the previous data, clearly indicate that diet and natural intra-individual biological and diurnal variability result in wide variations in breath acetone concentration. This places an uncertainty in the use of breath acetone alone to monitor blood glucose and glycaemic control, except and unless the individual acts as their own control and is cognizant of the need for dietary control.

  4. Test-to-test variability in motor activity during the suggested immobilization test in restless legs patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba-Rubio, José; Sforza, Emilia

    2006-10-01

    To evaluate the test-to-test variability of the suggested immobilization test (SIT) in patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS). Twenty patients with primary RLS (12 men and eight women; age: 53.3+/-11.3 years) were selected for the study. We compared the results of two SITs performed on two consecutive evenings prior to polysomnographic recordings. Overall, the periodic leg movement index during the SIT (SIT PLM) and the SIT PLM index associated with sensory manifestations (SIT PLM+) were not significantly different between tests. The number of PLM sequences per SIT, the mean PLM duration and the PLM interval did not significantly change between the two consecutive tests. The pattern of temporal evolution of motor activity across the SIT was very reproducible, SIT PLM showing a clear tendency to a progressive increase across the test, with the SIT PLM+ index decreasing in the second half of the test. Despite good reproducibility, there were marked intra-individual differences. Considering the proposed cut-off value of 12 for the SIT PLM index to confirm RLS, 11 patients were positive at the first test and four additional patients became positive at the second test. SIT PLM index changes did not correlate with age, severity of disease and polysomnographic measures. Quantitative analysis of motor activity during two consecutive SITs in RLS patients showed a significant inter-test intra-individual variability unrelated to demographic, clinical or polysomnographic parameters. SIT PLM index variability suggests that a single test would not be sensitive enough for diagnostic purposes in unclear cases and that new criteria need to be applied to increase its specificity and sensitivity.

  5. Platelet-rich plasma differs according to preparation method and human variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocca, Augustus D; McCarthy, Mary Beth R; Chowaniec, David M; Cote, Mark P; Romeo, Anthony A; Bradley, James P; Arciero, Robert A; Beitzel, Knut

    2012-02-15

    Varying concentrations of blood components in platelet-rich plasma preparations may contribute to the variable results seen in recently published clinical studies. The purposes of this investigation were (1) to quantify the level of platelets, growth factors, red blood cells, and white blood cells in so-called one-step (clinically used commercial devices) and two-step separation systems and (2) to determine the influence of three separate blood draws on the resulting components of platelet-rich plasma. Three different platelet-rich plasma (PRP) separation methods (on blood samples from eight subjects with a mean age [and standard deviation] of 31.6 ± 10.9 years) were used: two single-spin processes (PRPLP and PRPHP) and a double-spin process (PRPDS) were evaluated for concentrations of platelets, red and white blood cells, and growth factors. Additionally, the effect of three repetitive blood draws on platelet-rich plasma components was evaluated. The content and concentrations of platelets, white blood cells, and growth factors for each method of separation differed significantly. All separation techniques resulted in a significant increase in platelet concentration compared with native blood. Platelet and white blood-cell concentrations of the PRPHP procedure were significantly higher than platelet and white blood-cell concentrations produced by the so-called single-step PRPLP and the so-called two-step PRPDS procedures, although significant differences between PRPLP and PRPDS were not observed. Comparing the results of the three blood draws with regard to the reliability of platelet number and cell counts, wide variations of intra-individual numbers were observed. Single-step procedures are capable of producing sufficient amounts of platelets for clinical usage. Within the evaluated procedures, platelet numbers and numbers of white blood cells differ significantly. The intra-individual results of platelet-rich plasma separations showed wide variations in

  6. Estimating variation in stomatal frequency at intra-individual, intra-site, and inter-taxonomic levels in populations of the Leonardoxa africana (Fabaceae) complex over environmental gradients in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsinger, Walter; Dos Santos, Thibaut; McKey, Doyle

    2013-07-01

    Variation of stomatal frequency (stomatal density and stomatal index) includes genetically-based, potentially-adaptive variation, and variation due to phenotypic plasticity, the degree of which may be fundamental to the ability to maintain high water-use efficiency and thus to deal with environmental change. We analysed stomatal frequency and morphology (pore length, pore width) in leaves from several individuals from nine populations of four sub-species of the Leonardoxa africana complex. The dataset represents a hierarchical sampling wherein factors are nested within each level (leaves in individuals, individuals in sites, etc.), allowing estimation of the contribution of different levels to overall variation, using variance-component analysis. SI showed significant variation among sites ("site" is largely confounded with "sub-species"), being highest in the sub-species localized in the highest-elevation site. However, most of the observed variance was accounted for at intra-site and intra-individual levels. This variance could reflect great phenotypic plasticity, presumably in response to highly local variation in micro-environmental conditions.

  7. Value of 100 kVp scan with sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction algorithm on a single-source CT system during whole-body CT for radiation and contrast medium dose reduction: an intra-individual feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Y; Nakaura, T; Oda, S; Tsuji, A; Urata, J; Furusawa, M; Tanoue, S; Utsunomiya, D; Yamashita, Y

    2018-02-01

    To perform an intra-individual investigation of the usefulness of a contrast medium (CM) and radiation dose-reduction protocol using single-source computed tomography (CT) combined with 100 kVp and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) for whole-body CT (WBCT; chest-abdomen-pelvis CT) in oncology patients. Forty-three oncology patients who had undergone WBCT under both 120 and 100 kVp protocols at different time points (mean interscan intervals: 98 days) were included retrospectively. The CM doses for the 120 and 100 kVp protocols were 600 and 480 mg iodine/kg, respectively; 120 kVp images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP), whereas 100 kVp images were reconstructed with FBP (100 kVp-F) and the SAFIRE (100 kVp-S). The size-specific dose estimate (SSDE), iodine load and image quality of each protocol were compared. The SSDE and iodine load of 100 kVp protocol were 34% and 21%, respectively, lower than of 120 kVp protocol (SSDE: 10.6±1.1 versus 16.1±1.8 mGy; iodine load: 24.8±4versus 31.5±5.5 g iodine, pquality. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of automated tube voltage selection, integrated circuit detector and advanced iterative reconstruction on radiation dose and image quality of 3rd generation dual-source aortic CT angiography: An intra-individual comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Stefanie; De Cecco, Carlo N; Wichmann, Julian L; Canstein, Christian; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Caruso, Damiano; Fuller, Stephen R; Bamberg, Fabian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2016-05-01

    To compare, on an intra-individual basis, the effect of automated tube voltage selection (ATVS), integrated circuit detector and advanced iterative reconstruction on radiation dose and image quality of aortic CTA studies using 2nd and 3rd generation dual-source CT (DSCT). We retrospectively evaluated 32 patients who had undergone CTA of the entire aorta with both 2nd generation DSCT at 120kV using filtered back projection (FBP) (protocol 1) and 3rd generation DSCT using ATVS, an integrated circuit detector and advanced iterative reconstruction (protocol 2). Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated. Image quality was subjectively evaluated using a five-point scale. Radiation dose parameters were recorded. All studies were considered of diagnostic image quality. CNR was significantly higher with protocol 2 (15.0±5.2 vs 11.0±4.2; pquality analysis revealed no significant differences for evaluation of attenuation (p=0.08501) but image noise was rated significantly lower with protocol 2 (p=0.0005). Mean tube voltage and effective dose were 94.7±14.1kV and 6.7±3.9mSv with protocol 2; 120±0kV and 11.5±5.2mSv with protocol 1 (pquality in comparison to 120kV imaging with FBP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cadmium variability in leaves of a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luyssaert, S.; Meirvenne, M. Van; Lust, N

    2001-01-01

    Abstract: Plant analysis is a valuable tool to evaluate the pollution level. However, leaf sampling is complicated because of the high variability within the crown. To investigate the variability of cadmium (Cd) in the leaves of a tree, we sampled one Salix fragilis L. at 292 locations, each with a

  10. The first approach to biostatistics: classification of variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Shoemaker

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The variable is a characteristic or property of the object of study. The variable can take different values. The variables can be classified in different ways according to the information contained, therefore it is the way that determining how are summarized. This article illustrates the variable´s definition and its classification as basic tools for clinical research.

  11. Glycemic variability: Clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surabhi Venkata Satya Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycemic control and its benefits in preventing microvascular diabetic complications are convincingly proved by various prospective trials. Diabetes control and complications trial (DCCT had reported variable glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C as a cause of increased microvascular complications in conventional glycemic control group versus intensive one. However, in spite of several indirect evidences, its link with cardiovascular events or macrovascular complications is still not proved. Glycemic variability (GV is one more tool to explain relation between hyperglycemia and increased cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients. In fact GV along with fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar, HbA1C, and quality of life has been proposed to form glycemic pentad, which needs to be considered in diabetes management. Postprandial spikes in blood glucose as well as hypoglycemic events, both are blamed for increased cardiovascular events in Type 2 diabetics. GV includes both these events and hence minimizing GV can prevent future cardiovascular events. Modern diabetes management modalities including improved sulfonylureas, glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1-based therapy, newer basal insulins, and modern insulin pumps address the issue of GV effectively. This article highlights mechanism, clinical implications, and measures to control GV in clinical practice.

  12. Hip but Not Thigh Intramuscular Adipose Tissue is Associated with Poor Balance and Increased Temporal Gait Variability in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Odessa; Young, Patricia; Inacio, Mario; Bair, Woei-Nan; Prettyman, Michelle G.; Beamer, Brock A.; Ryan, Alice S.; Rogers, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) of the lower extremity is a strong negative predictor of mobility function. Variability in temporal gait factors is another important predictor of mobility function. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between IMAT in the hip and thigh muscles, balance, and temporal gait variability in older adults. Methods Forty-eight healthy community dwelling older adults (74 +/− 1 year) underwent a CT scan to quantify IMAT in the gluteus maximus (Gmax), gluteus medius/minimus (Gmed/min), hamstrings, vastus lateralis, and adductor muscles. Temporal Gait measures were collected on a GAITRite walkway and gait variability was determined by calculating intra-individual standard deviations. Individuals were divided by tertiles of temporal gait variability into categories of high, medium, and low variability. Differences in the IMAT of the hip abductors were calculated for those with high and low gait variability and partial correlations for gait variability and all muscle composition measures were determined for all variables with normalized gait speed as a covariate. Results Gmed/min IMAT was greater in those with higher gait variability compared to those with lower gait variability (p<0.05). Gmed/min IMAT was related to stride width variability (r=0.30, p<0.05). Gmax IMAT was also related to time variability of swing (r=0.42), stance (r=0.26), double limb support (r=0.43), double support loading (r=0.44), and double support unloading (r=0.50) (all p<0.05). Conclusion Increased IMAT in the proximal hip muscles, particularly the hip abductors, was associated with increased gait variability and poorer balance. These findings may have implications for the assessment and treatment of balance and falls such that interventions for enhancing balance and mobility among older individuals should take into account the importance of gluteal muscle composition. PMID:24998419

  13. Individual Variability and Test-Retest Reliability Revealed by Ten Repeated Resting-State Brain Scans over One Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changle; Wang, Luoyu; Yang, Ning; Wang, Ze; Dong, Hao-Ming; Yang, Zhi; Zang, Yu-Feng; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Weng, Xu-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Individual differences in mind and behavior are believed to reflect the functional variability of the human brain. Due to the lack of a large-scale longitudinal dataset, the full landscape of variability within and between individual functional connectomes is largely unknown. We collected 300 resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI) datasets from 30 healthy participants who were scanned every three days for one month. With these data, both intra- and inter-individual variability of six common rfMRI metrics, as well as their test-retest reliability, were estimated across multiple spatial scales. Global metrics were more dynamic than local regional metrics. Cognitive components involving working memory, inhibition, attention, language and related neural networks exhibited high intra-individual variability. In contrast, inter-individual variability demonstrated a more complex picture across the multiple scales of metrics. Limbic, default, frontoparietal and visual networks and their related cognitive components were more differentiable than somatomotor and attention networks across the participants. Analyzing both intra- and inter-individual variability revealed a set of high-resolution maps on test-retest reliability of the multi-scale connectomic metrics. These findings represent the first collection of individual differences in multi-scale and multi-metric characterization of the human functional connectomes in-vivo, serving as normal references for the field to guide the use of common functional metrics in rfMRI-based applications. PMID:26714192

  14. Effects of Sex on Intra-Individual Variance in Urinary Solutes in Stone-Formers Collected from a Single Clinical Laboratory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy M L Perry

    Full Text Available Our work in a rodent model of urinary calcium suggests genetic and gender effects on increased residual variability in urine chemistries. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that sex would similarly be associated with residual variation in human urine solutes. Sex-related effects on residuals might affect the establishment of physiological baselines and error in medical assays.We tested the effects of sex on residual variation in urine chemistry by estimating coefficients of variation (CV for urinary solutes in paired sequential 24-h urines (≤72 hour interval in 6,758 females and 9,024 males aged 16-80 submitted to a clinical laboratory.Females had higher CVs than males for urinary phosphorus overall at the False Discovery Rate (P0.3. Males had higher CVs for citrate (P<0.01 from ages 16-45 and females higher CVs for citrate (P<0.01 from ages 56-80, suggesting effects of an extant oestral cycle on residual variance.Our findings indicate the effects of sex on residual variance of the excretion of urinary solutes including phosphorus and citrate; differences in CV by sex might reflect dietary lability, differences in the fidelity of reporting or genetic differentiation in renal solute consistency. Such an effect could complicate medical analysis by the addition of random error to phenotypic assays. Renal analysis might require explicit incorporation of heterogeneity among factorial effects, and for sex in particular.

  15. High-pitch computed tomography of the lung in pediatric patients. An intraindividual comparison of image quality and radiation dose to conventional 64-MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiflikas, I.; Thomas, C.; Ketelsen, D.; Claussen, C.D.; Schaefer, J.F.; Seitz, G.; Warmann, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of typical artifacts in low-dose pediatric lung examinations using high-pitch computed tomography (HPCT) compared to MDCT, and to estimate the effective radiation dose (E eff ). Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval for this retrospective study was obtained. 35 patients (17 boys, 18 girls; mean age 112 ± 69 months) were included and underwent MDCT and follow-up scan by HPCT or vice versa (mean follow-up time 87 days), using the same tube voltage and current. The total artifact score (0-8) was defined as the sum of artifacts arising from movement, breathing or pulsation of the heart or pulmonary vessels (0 - no; 1 - moderate; 2 - severe artifacts). E eff was estimated according to the European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Multislice Computed Tomography. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze differences between the patient groups. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used for correlation of ordinal variables. Results: The scan time was significantly lower for HPCT compared to MDCT (0.72 ± 0.13 s vs. 3.65 ± 0.81s; p eff was significantly lower in HPCT than in MDCT (1.29±0.31 vs. 1.47±0.37 mSv; p eff was lower. In addition, examinations can be performed without sedation or breath-hold without losing image quality. (orig.)

  16. Usability Evaluation of Variability Modeling by means of Common Variability Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Echeverria

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Common Variability Language (CVL is a recent proposal for OMG's upcoming Variability Modeling standard. CVL models variability in terms of Model Fragments.  Usability is a widely-recognized quality criterion essential to warranty the successful use of tools that put these ideas in practice. Facing the need of evaluating the usability of CVL modeling tools, this paper presents a Usability Evaluation of CVL applied to a Modeling Tool for firmware code of Induction Hobs. This evaluation addresses the configuration, scoping and visualization facets. The evaluation involved the end users of the tool whom are engineers of our Induction Hob industrial partner. Effectiveness and efficiency results indicate that model configuration in terms of model fragment substitutions is intuitive enough but both scoping and visualization require improved tool support. Results also enabled us to identify a list of usability problems which may contribute to alleviate scoping and visualization issues in CVL.

  17. Randomized controlled trials in pregnancy: scientific and ethical aspects. Exposure to different opioid medications during pregnancy in an intra-individual comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Annemarie; Jagsch, Reinhold; Jones, Hendree; Arria, Amelia; Leitich, Harald; Rohrmeister, Klaudia; Aschauer, Constantin; Winklbaur, Berndadette; Bäwert, Andjela; Fischer, Gabriele

    2011-07-01

    Chronic medical conditions such as opioid dependence require evidence-based treatment recommendations. However, pregnant women are under-represented in clinical trials. We describe the first within-subject comparison of maternal and neonatal outcomes for methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed pregnancies. Although methadone is the established treatment of pregnant opioid-dependent women, recent investigations have shown a trend for a milder neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) under buprenorphine. However, it is not only the choice of maintenance medication that determines the occurrence of NAS; other factors such as maternal metabolism, illicit substance abuse and nicotine consumption also influence its severity and duration and represent confounding factors in the assessment of randomized clinical trials. CASE SERIES DESCRIPTION: Three women who were part of the European cohort of a randomized, double-blind multi-center trial with a contingency management tool [the Maternal Opioid Treatment: Human Experimental Research (MOTHER) study], each had two consecutive pregnancies and were maintained on either methadone or buprenorphine for their first and then the respective opposite, still-blinded medication for their second pregnancy. Birth measurements, the total neonatal abstinence score, the total amounts of medication used to treat NAS and the days of NAS treatment duration were assessed. Both medications were effective and safe in reducing illicit opioid relapse and avoiding preterm labor. Methadone maintenance yielded to a significantly higher neonatal birth weight. Data patterns suggest that buprenorphine exposure was associated with lower neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) scores. Findings from this unique case series are consistent with earlier reports using between-group analyses. Buprenorphine has the potential to become an established treatment alternative to methadone for pregnant opioid-dependent women. Under special consideration of ethical boundaries

  18. Progression paths in children's problem solving: The influence of dynamic testing, initial variability, and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resing, Wilma C M; Bakker, Merel; Pronk, Christine M E; Elliott, Julian G

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigated developmental trajectories of analogical reasoning performance of 104 7- and 8-year-old children. We employed a microgenetic research method and multilevel analysis to examine the influence of several background variables and experimental treatment on the children's developmental trajectories. Our participants were divided into two treatment groups: repeated practice alone and repeated practice with training. Each child received an initial working memory assessment and was subsequently asked to solve figural analogies on each of several sessions. We examined children's analogical problem-solving behavior and their subsequent verbal accounts of their employed solving processes. We also investigated the influence of verbal and visual-spatial working memory capacity and initial variability in strategy use on analogical reasoning development. Results indicated that children in both treatment groups improved but that gains were greater for those who had received training. Training also reduced the influence of children's initial variability in the use of analogical strategies with the degree of improvement in reasoning largely unrelated to working memory capacity. Findings from this study demonstrate the value of a microgenetic research method and the use of multilevel analysis to examine inter- and intra-individual change in problem-solving processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A "crossomics" study analysing variability of different components in peripheral blood of healthy caucasoid individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Gruden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Different immunotherapy approaches for the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases are being developed and tested in clinical studies worldwide. Their resulting complex experimental data should be properly evaluated, therefore reliable normal healthy control baseline values are indispensable. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To assess intra- and inter-individual variability of various biomarkers, peripheral blood of 16 age and gender equilibrated healthy volunteers was sampled on 3 different days within a period of one month. Complex "crossomics" analyses of plasma metabolite profiles, antibody concentrations and lymphocyte subset counts as well as whole genome expression profiling in CD4+T and NK cells were performed. Some of the observed age, gender and BMI dependences are in agreement with the existing knowledge, like negative correlation between sex hormone levels and age or BMI related increase in lipids and soluble sugars. Thus we can assume that the distribution of all 39.743 analysed markers is well representing the normal Caucasoid population. All lymphocyte subsets, 20% of metabolites and less than 10% of genes, were identified as highly variable in our dataset. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study shows that the intra-individual variability was at least two-fold lower compared to the inter-individual one at all investigated levels, showing the importance of personalised medicine approach from yet another perspective.

  20. Assessment of metabolic phenotypic variability in children’s urine using 1H NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitre, Léa; Lau, Chung-Ho E.; Vizcaino, Esther; Robinson, Oliver; Casas, Maribel; Siskos, Alexandros P.; Want, Elizabeth J.; Athersuch, Toby; Slama, Remy; Vrijheid, Martine; Keun, Hector C.; Coen, Muireann

    2017-04-01

    The application of metabolic phenotyping in clinical and epidemiological studies is limited by a poor understanding of inter-individual, intra-individual and temporal variability in metabolic phenotypes. Using 1H NMR spectroscopy we characterised short-term variability in urinary metabolites measured from 20 children aged 8-9 years old. Daily spot morning, night-time and pooled (50:50 morning and night-time) urine samples across six days (18 samples per child) were analysed, and 44 metabolites quantified. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and mixed effect models were applied to assess the reproducibility and biological variance of metabolic phenotypes. Excellent analytical reproducibility and precision was demonstrated for the 1H NMR spectroscopic platform (median CV 7.2%). Pooled samples captured the best inter-individual variability with an ICC of 0.40 (median). Trimethylamine, N-acetyl neuraminic acid, 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, 3-hydroxybutyrate/3-aminoisobutyrate, tyrosine, valine and 3-hydroxyisovalerate exhibited the highest stability with over 50% of variance specific to the child. The pooled sample was shown to capture the most inter-individual variance in the metabolic phenotype, which is of importance for molecular epidemiology study design. A substantial proportion of the variation in the urinary metabolome of children is specific to the individual, underlining the potential of such data to inform clinical and exposome studies conducted early in life.

  1. Cerebral neoplastic enhancing lesions: Multicenter, randomized, crossover intraindividual comparison between gadobutrol (1.0 M) and gadoterate meglumine (0.5 M) at 0.1 mmol Gd/kg body weight in a clinical setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzalone, Nicoletta, E-mail: anzalone.nicoletta@hsr.it [Department of Neuroradiology, Scientific Institute H.S. Raffaele, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy); Scarabino, Tommaso, E-mail: tscarabino@hotmail.com [“L. Bonomo” Hospital Center, Viale Istria 1, 70031 Andria (Italy); Venturi, Carlo, E-mail: c.venturi@ao-siena.toscana.it [U.O.C. Neuroimaging and Neurointerventional, “Santa Maria alle Scotte” Polyclinic, Viale Bracci 16, 53100 Siena (Italy); Cristaudo, Concetto, E-mail: concetto.cristaudo@tiscali.it [Cannizzaro Hospital, Via Messina, 829, 98125 Catania (Italy); Tartaro, Armando, E-mail: a.tartaro@radiol.unich.it [Institute for Advanced Biomedical Techniques, Clinical Sciences and Bioimaging Dept., G.D’Annunzio University, Via dei Vestini, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Scotti, Giuseppe, E-mail: scotti.giuseppe@hsr.it [University Scientific Institute, San Raffaele Hospital, Via Olgettina 60, 20090 Milano (Italy); Zimatore, Domenico, E-mail: dszimatore@hotmail.it [Maggiore Borgo Trento City Hospital, Piazzale Stefani 1, 37126 Verona (Italy); Floris, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.floris@uniroma2.it [Dept. of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, UOC of Neuroradiology, Tor Vergata Polyclinics, Viale Oxford 81, 00133 Roma (Italy); Carriero, Alessandro, E-mail: profcarriero@virgilio.it [“Maggiore della Carità” University Hospital, Corso Mazzini, 18, 28100 Novara (Italy); Longo, Marcello, E-mail: longomar@tin.it [“G. Martino” University Polyclinic, Via Consolare Valeria, 1, 98125 Messina (Italy); Cirillo, Mario, E-mail: emmecirillo@libero.it [Second University Hospital c/o CTO, Viale Colli Aminei, 21, 80131 Napoli (Italy); and others

    2013-01-15

    Objective: Two macrocyclic extracellular contrast agents, one-molar neutral gadobutrol and ionic gadoterate meglumine, were compared to determine the overall preference for one or the other in a clinical setting. Materials and methods: Multicenter, randomized, single-blind, intra-individually controlled, comparison study with a corresponding blinded read. Efficacy analysis was based on 136 patients who underwent identical MRI examinations: group A first received 1.0 M gadobutrol followed by 0.5 M gadoterate meglumine 48 h to 7 days later; group B had a reversed administration order. Three independent blinded readers assessed off-site their overall diagnostic preference (primary efficacy parameter) based on a matched pairs approach. Results: Superiority of gadobutrol over gadoterate meglumine was demonstrated for the qualitative assessment of overall preference across all readers by a statistically significant difference between both contrast agents for this primary endpoint. Preferences in lesion enhancement (secondary endpoint) were also found significantly in favor of gadobutrol. For preference in lesion delineation from surrounding tissue/edema and for internal structure only a trend towards a higher proportion for gadobutrol was found (except for internal structure reported by one reader, which showed a result of statistical significance). Lesion contrast and relative lesion enhancement (quantitative parameters) were statistically significantly higher for gadobutrol compared to gadoterate meglumine. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced MRI of neoplastic brain lesions at a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg body weight, assessed in a standardized off-site blinded reading, results in a significantly higher qualitative and quantitative preference for gadobutrol compared to gadoterate meglumine.

  2. Sheet Bending using Soft Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinke, J.

    2011-05-01

    Sheet bending is usually performed by air bending and V-die bending processes. Both processes apply rigid tools. These solid tools facilitate the generation of software for the numerical control of those processes. When the lower rigid die is replaced with a soft or rubber tool, the numerical control becomes much more difficult, since the soft tool deforms too. Compared to other bending processes the rubber backed bending process has some distinct advantages, like large radius-to-thickness ratios, applicability to materials with topcoats, well defined radii, and the feasibility of forming details (ridges, beads). These advantages may give the process exclusive benefits over conventional bending processes, not only for industries related to mechanical engineering and sheet metal forming, but also for other disciplines like Architecture and Industrial Design The largest disadvantage is that also the soft (rubber) tool deforms. Although the tool deformation is elastic and recovers after each process cycle, the applied force during bending is related to the deformation of the metal sheet and the deformation of the rubber. The deformation of the rubber interacts with the process but also with sheet parameters. This makes the numerical control of the process much more complicated. This paper presents a model for the bending of sheet materials using a rubber lower die. This model can be implemented in software in order to control the bending process numerically. The model itself is based on numerical and experimental research. In this research a number of variables related to the tooling and the material have been evaluated. The numerical part of the research was used to investigate the influence of the features of the soft lower tool, like the hardness and dimensions, and the influence of the sheet thickness, which also interacts with the soft tool deformation. The experimental research was focused on the relation between the machine control parameters and the most

  3. CoC GIS Tools (GIS Tool)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This tool provides a no-cost downloadable software tool that allows users to interact with professional quality GIS maps. Users access pre-compiled projects through...

  4. Generalized instrumental variable models

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Chesher; Adam Rosen

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops characterizations of identified sets of structures and structural features for complete and incomplete models involving continuous or discrete variables. Multiple values of unobserved variables can be associated with particular combinations of observed variables. This can arise when there are multiple sources of heterogeneity, censored or discrete endogenous variables, or inequality restrictions on functions of observed and unobserved variables. The models g...

  5. High-pitch computed tomography of the lung in pediatric patients. An intraindividual comparison of image quality and radiation dose to conventional 64-MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiflikas, I.; Thomas, C.; Ketelsen, D.; Claussen, C.D.; Schaefer, J.F. [University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Seitz, G.; Warmann, S. [University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Pediatric Surgery

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of typical artifacts in low-dose pediatric lung examinations using high-pitch computed tomography (HPCT) compared to MDCT, and to estimate the effective radiation dose (E{sub eff}). Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval for this retrospective study was obtained. 35 patients (17 boys, 18 girls; mean age 112 ± 69 months) were included and underwent MDCT and follow-up scan by HPCT or vice versa (mean follow-up time 87 days), using the same tube voltage and current. The total artifact score (0-8) was defined as the sum of artifacts arising from movement, breathing or pulsation of the heart or pulmonary vessels (0 - no; 1 - moderate; 2 - severe artifacts). E{sub eff} was estimated according to the European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Multislice Computed Tomography. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze differences between the patient groups. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used for correlation of ordinal variables. Results: The scan time was significantly lower for HPCT compared to MDCT (0.72 ± 0.13 s vs. 3.65 ± 0.81s; p < 0.0001). In 28 of 35 (80 %) HPCT examinations no artifacts were visible, whereas in MDCT artifacts occurred in all examinations. The frequency of pulsation artifacts and breathing artifacts was higher in MDCT compared to HPCT (100% vs. 17% and 31% vs. 6%). The total artifact score significantly correlated with the patient's age in MDCT (r=-0.42; p=0.01), but not in HPCT (r=-0.32; p=0.07). The estimated E{sub eff} was significantly lower in HPCT than in MDCT (1.29±0.31 vs. 1.47±0.37 mSv; p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Our study indicates that the use of HPCT has advantages for pediatric lung imaging with a reduction of breathing and pulsation artifacts. Moreover, the estimated E{sub eff} was lower. In addition, examinations can be performed without sedation or breath-hold without losing image quality. (orig.)

  6. The power tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAYFIELD, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    POWER Tool--Planning, Optimization, Waste Estimating and Resourcing tool, a hand-held field estimating unit and relational database software tool for optimizing disassembly and final waste form of contaminated systems and equipment

  7. Variable Valve Actuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Gutterman; A. J. Lasley

    2008-08-31

    Many approaches exist to enable advanced mode, low temperature combustion systems for diesel engines - such as premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI), Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) or other HCCI-like combustion modes. The fuel properties and the quantity, distribution and temperature profile of air, fuel and residual fraction in the cylinder can have a marked effect on the heat release rate and combustion phasing. Figure 1 shows that a systems approach is required for HCCI-like combustion. While the exact requirements remain unclear (and will vary depending on fuel, engine size and application), some form of substantially variable valve actuation is a likely element in such a system. Variable valve actuation, for both intake and exhaust valve events, is a potent tool for controlling the parameters that are critical to HCCI-like combustion and expanding its operational range. Additionally, VVA can be used to optimize the combustion process as well as exhaust temperatures and impact the after treatment system requirements and its associated cost. Delphi Corporation has major manufacturing and product development and applied R&D expertise in the valve train area. Historical R&D experience includes the development of fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train on research engines as well as several generations of mechanical VVA for gasoline systems. This experience has enabled us to evaluate various implementations and determine the strengths and weaknesses of each. While a fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train system might be the 'ideal' solution technically for maximum flexibility in the timing and control of the valve events, its complexity, associated costs, and high power consumption make its implementation on low cost high volume applications unlikely. Conversely, a simple mechanical system might be a low cost solution but not deliver the flexibility required for HCCI operation. After modeling more than 200 variations of

  8. Route Availabililty Planning Tool -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Route Availability Planning Tool (RAPT) is a weather-assimilated decision support tool (DST) that supports the development and execution of departure management...

  9. Variability of insulin-stimulated myocardial glucose uptake in healthy elderly subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofoed, Klaus F.; Hove, Jens D.; Freiberg, Jacob; Hoest, Ulla; Kelbaek, Henning [Cardiovascular PET Research Unit, Section 9201, Medical Department B, The Heart Center, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Mariesvej 24, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Holm, Soeren [The Cyclotron and PET Unit, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess regional and global variability of insulin-stimulated myocardial glucose uptake in healthy elderly subjects and to evaluate potentially responsible factors. Twenty men with a mean age of 64 years, no history of cardiovascular disease, and normal blood pressure, bicycle exercise test, electrocardiogram and echocardiography were studied [P(coronary artery disease) <5%]. Whole-body insulin sensitivity and insulin-stimulated myocardial glucose uptake were measured during hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic glucose clamp with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose, and myocardial rest and hyperaemic blood flow during dipyridamole infusion were measured with nitrogen-13 ammonia and positron emission tomography in 16 left ventricular myocardial segments. Intra-individual and inter-individual variability of insulin-stimulated myocardial glucose uptake [relative dispersion = (standard deviation/mean)] was 13% and 29% respectively. Although inter-individual variability of glucose uptake and blood flow at rest was of the same magnitude, no correlation was found between these measures. Regional and global insulin-stimulated myocardial glucose uptake correlated linearly with whole-body insulin sensitivity (r=0.51, P<0.05 and r=0.56, P<0.01). The strongest independent association by multivariate linear regression analysis was found between myocardial glucose uptake and hyperaemic blood flow (r=0.63, P<0.005). We conclude that in healthy elderly subjects, insulin-stimulated myocardial glucose uptake is homogeneous throughout the left ventricle, but has moderate inter-individual variability. Inter-individual variability of insulin-stimulated myocardial glucose uptake is primarily explained by variability in coronary vascular reactivity and tissue insulin sensitivity. (orig.)

  10. Integrating variability in half-lives and dietary intakes to predict mercury concentration in hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Isabelle; Villeret, Grégory; Paris, Alain; Verger, Philippe

    2010-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a bioaccumulative environmental toxin that exerts its effect on fetal and infant neurodevelopment. Mercury concentration in hair is a good biomarker of MeHg accumulation in the body, with seafood being the main source of MeHg in humans. Therefore, modeling the link between food intake and mercury concentration in hair is a key step in assessing the risk of MeHg exposure. Using repeated measurements of diet and mercury concentration in hair, we studied 125 French pregnant women who consumed seafood (e.g., fish, mollusks and crustaceans) and compared their individual estimated dietary MeHg intakes with their hair mercury concentrations. We used a one-compartment toxicokinetic model for these comparisons. We integrated and estimated the between-person variability in MeHg half-life into the model. In a second model, we took into account an intra-individual MeHg intake variability to improve the performance of the toxicokinetic model. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Light induced intraspecific variability in response to thermal stress in the hard coral Stylophora pistillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen Tilstra

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent research suggests that prior exposure of several months to elevated irradiance induces enhanced thermal tolerance in scleractinian corals. While this tolerance has been reported at the species level, individual coral colonies may react differently due to individual variability in thermal tolerance. As thermal anomalies are predicted to become common in the upcoming future, intraspecific variation may be key to the survival of coral populations. In order to study light-history based thermal stress responses on individual colonies, we developed a preliminary microcosm experiment where three randomly chosen, aquacultured colonies of the model coral Stylophora pistillata were exposed to two irradiance treatments (200 and 400 μmol photons m−2 s−1 for 31 days, followed by artificially induced heat stress (∼33.4 °C. We found different responses to occur at both the intraspecific and the intracolonial levels, as indicated by either equal, less severe, delayed, and/or even non-necrotic responses of corals previously exposed to the irradiance of 400 compared to 200 μmol photons m−2 s−1. In addition, all individual colonies revealed light-enhanced calcification. Finally, elevated irradiance resulted in a lower chlorophyll a concentration in one colony compared to the control treatment, and the same colony displayed more rapid bleaching compared to the other ones. Taken together, this study highlights the potential importance of intra-individual variability in physiological responses of scleractinian corals and provides recommendations for improving methodological designs for future studies.

  12. Daily variability in working memory is coupled with negative affect: the role of attention and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brose, Annette; Schmiedek, Florian; Lövdén, Martin; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2012-06-01

    Across days, individuals experience varying levels of negative affect, control of attention, and motivation. We investigated whether this intraindividual variability was coupled with daily fluctuations in working memory (WM) performance. In 100 days, 101 younger individuals worked on a spatial N-back task and rated negative affect, control of attention, and motivation. Results showed that individuals differed in how reliably WM performance fluctuated across days, and that subjective experiences were primarily linked to performance accuracy. WM performance was lower on days with higher levels of negative affect, reduced control of attention, and reduced task-related motivation. Thus, variables that were found to predict WM in between-subjects designs showed important relationships to WM at the within-person level. In addition, there was shared predictive variance among predictors of WM. Days with increased negative affect and reduced performance were also days with reduced control of attention and reduced motivation to work on tasks. These findings are in line with proposed mechanisms linking negative affect and cognitive performance.

  13. Classifying variability modeling techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinnema, Marco; Deelstra, Sybren

    Variability modeling is important for managing variability in software product families, especially during product derivation. In the past few years, several variability modeling techniques have been developed, each using its own concepts to model the variability provided by a product family. The

  14. distribution of hourly variability index of sky clearness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    ABSTRACT. Clouds affect the values of insolation for solar technology and other applications. To detect the presence of variability in the sky clearness, an hourly variability index ( 3) is calculated. The present study examined the frequency distribution of this variable as a tool for assessing the utilizability of solar radiation at ...

  15. Distribution of hourly variability index of sky clearness | Madhlopa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clouds affect the values of insolation for solar technology and other applications. To detect the presence of variability in the sky clearness, an hourly variability index ( 3) is calculated. The present study examined the frequency distribution of this variable as a tool for assessing the utilizability of solar radiation at a site.

  16. A Core Language for Separate Variability Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iosif-Lazăr, Alexandru Florin; Wasowski, Andrzej; Schaefer, Ina

    2014-01-01

    Separate variability modeling adds variability to a modeling language without requiring modifications of the language or the supporting tools. We define a core language for separate variability modeling using a single kind of variation point to define transformations of software artifacts in object...... models. Our language, Featherweight VML, has several distinctive features. Its architecture and operations are inspired by the recently proposed Common Variability Language (CVL). Its semantics is considerably simpler than that of CVL, while remaining confluent (unlike CVL). We simplify complex......, which makes it suitable to serve as a specification for implementations of trustworthy variant derivation. Featherweight VML offers insights in the execution of other variability modeling languages such as the Orthogonal Variability Model and Delta Modeling. To the best of our knowledge...

  17. The EPICS process variable Gateway Version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, K.

    2005-01-01

    The EPICS Process Variable Gateway is both a Channel Access Server and Channel Access Client that provides a means for many clients, typically on different subnets, to access a process variable while making only one connection to the server that owns the process variable. It also provides additional access security beyond that implemented on the server. It thus protects critical servers while providing suitably restricted access to needed process variables. The original version of the Gateway worked with EPICS Base 3.13 but required a special version, since the changes necessary for its operation were never incorporated into EPICS Base. Version 2 works with any standard EPICS Base 3.14.6 or later and has many improvements in both performance and features over the older version. The Gateway is now used at many institutions and has become a stable, high-performance application. It is capable of handling tens of thousands of process variables with hundreds of thousands of events per second. It has run for over three months in a production environment without having to be restarted. It has many internal process variables that can be used to monitor its state using standard EPICS client tools, such as MEDM and StripTool. Other internal process variables can be used to stop the Gateway, make several kinds of reports, or change the access security without stopping the Gateway. It can even be started on remote workstations from MEDM by using a Secure Shell script. This paper will describe the new Gateway and how it is used. The Gateway is both a server (like an EPICS Input/Output Controller (IOC)) and a client (like the EPICS Motif Editor and Display Manager (MEDM), StripTool, and others). Clients connect to the server side, and the client side connects to IOCs and other servers, possibly other Gateways. See Fig. 1. There are perhaps three principal reasons for using the Gateway: (1) it allows many clients to access a process variable while making only one connection to

  18. An Integrated Workflow To Assess Technical and Biological Variability of Cell Population Frequencies in Human Peripheral Blood by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burel, Julie G; Qian, Yu; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia; Weiskopf, Daniela; Zapardiel-Gonzalo, Jose; Taplitz, Randy; Gilman, Robert H; Saito, Mayuko; de Silva, Aruna D; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Scheuermann, Richard H; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2017-02-15

    In the context of large-scale human system immunology studies, controlling for technical and biological variability is crucial to ensure that experimental data support research conclusions. In this study, we report on a universal workflow to evaluate both technical and biological variation in multiparameter flow cytometry, applied to the development of a 10-color panel to identify all major cell populations and T cell subsets in cryopreserved PBMC. Replicate runs from a control donation and comparison of different gating strategies assessed the technical variability associated with each cell population and permitted the calculation of a quality control score. Applying our panel to a large collection of PBMC samples, we found that most cell populations showed low intraindividual variability over time. In contrast, certain subpopulations such as CD56 T cells and Temra CD4 T cells were associated with high interindividual variability. Age but not gender had a significant effect on the frequency of several populations, with a drastic decrease in naive T cells observed in older donors. Ethnicity also influenced a significant proportion of immune cell population frequencies, emphasizing the need to account for these covariates in immune profiling studies. We also exemplify the usefulness of our workflow by identifying a novel cell-subset signature of latent tuberculosis infection. Thus, our study provides a universal workflow to establish and evaluate any flow cytometry panel in systems immunology studies. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Feeling old today? Daily health, stressors, and affect explain day-to-day variability in subjective age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotter-Grühn, Dana; Neupert, Shevaun D; Stephan, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Subjective age is an important correlate of health, well-being, and longevity. So far, little is known about short-term variability in subjective age and the circumstances under which individuals feel younger/older in daily life. This study examined whether (a) older adults' felt age fluctuates on a day-to-day basis, (b) daily changes in health, stressors, and affect explain fluctuations in felt age, and (c) the daily associations between felt age and health, stressors, or affect are time-ordered. Using an eight-day daily diary approach, N = 43 adults (60-96 years, M = 74.65, SD = 8.19) filled out daily questionnaires assessing subjective age, health, daily stressors, and affect. Data were analysed using multilevel modelling. Subjective age, health, daily stressors, affect. Intra-individual variability in felt age was not explained by time but by short-term variability in other variables. Specifically, on days when participants experienced more than average health problems, stress, or negative affect they felt older than on days with average health, stress, or negative affect. No time-ordered effects were found. Bad health, many stressors, and negative affective experiences constitute circumstances under which older adults feel older than they typically do. Thus, daily measures of subjective age could be markers of health and well-being.

  20. Less is better? Intraindividual and interindividual comparison between 0.075 mmol/kg of gadobenate dimeglumine and 0.1 mmol/kg of gadoterate meglumine for cranial MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khouri Chalouhi, Katia, E-mail: khouri.katia@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Festa del Perdono 7, 20122 Milan (Italy); Papini, Giacomo D.E., E-mail: docgde@gmail.com [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Bandirali, Michele, E-mail: michele.bandirali@hotmail.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Festa del Perdono 7, 20122 Milan (Italy); Sconfienza, Luca M., E-mail: io@lucasconfienza.it [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milano (Italy); Di Leo, Giovanni, E-mail: gianni.dileo77@gmail.com [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Sardanelli, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.sardanelli@unimi.it [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milano (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare a reduced dose (RD) (0.075 mmol/kg) of gadobenate dimeglumine (RD-gadobenate) with standard single dose (SSD) (0.1 mmol/kg) of gadoterate meglumine (SSD-gadoterate) for cranial MRI. Materials and methods: Thirty-one patients (12 males; aged 52 ± 16 years) underwent cranial MRI with SSD-gadoterate and repeated the examination with RD-gadobenate after a median interval of 10 months. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was obtained on contrast-enhanced images for enhancing lesions (n = 10) as well as for right and left transverse venous sinuses, internal carotid arteries, and parotid glands. Moreover, a consecutive series of 100 cranial MRI with SSD-gadoterate (49 males; aged 51 ± 19 years) was compared with a consecutive series of 100 cranial MRI with RD-gadobenate (45 males; aged 54 ± 18 years). Two blinded neuroradiologists (R1, R2) judged contrast enhancement as sufficient, good, or optimal. Wilcoxon, Mann–Whitney, χ{sup 2}, and Cohen κ statistics were used. Results: At intraindividual analysis, median SNR ranged 57–88 for SSD-gadoterate and 79–99 for RD-gadobenate, the latter being systematically higher, the difference being significant for both transverse venous sinuses (p ≤ 0.011), not significant for both internal carotid arteries and both parotid glands, and enhancing lesions (p ≤ 0.101). The two series of interindividual analysis were not significantly different for gender/age (p > 0.415). Contrast enhancement was optimal in 59% (R1) and 76% (R2) of patients using RD-gadobenate, in 39% (R1) and 49% (R2) of patients using SSD-gadoterate (p ≤ 0.016), with substantial reproducibility (κ ≥ 0.606). Conclusion: Both analyses showed an equal or better contrast enhancement when using RD-gadobenate compared to SSD-gadoterate for routine cranial MRI. The high relaxivity of gadobenate allowed for a 25% dose reduction.

  1. Patient Satisfaction After Femoral Arterial Access Site Closure Using the ExoSeal{sup ®} Vascular Closure Device Compared to Manual Compression: A Prospective Intra-individual Comparative Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, Claus Christian, E-mail: claus.christian.pieper@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Thomas, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.thomas@ukb.uni-bonn.de [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Nadal, Jennifer, E-mail: jennifer.nadal@ukb.uni-bonn.de [University of Bonn, Institute for Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology (Germany); Willinek, Winfried A., E-mail: w.willinek@bk-trier.de; Schild, Hans Heinz, E-mail: hans.schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Meyer, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.meyer@ukb.uni-bonn.de [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    PurposeTo intra-individually compare discomfort levels and patient satisfaction after arterial access closure using the ExoSeal{sup ®} vascular closure device (VCD) and manual compression (MC) in a prospective study design.MethodsPatients undergoing two planned interventions from 07/2013 to 09/2014 could participate in the study. Access closure was performed with an ExoSeal{sup ®}-VCD in one and MC in the other intervention. Patients were clinically and sonographically examined and were given questionnaires 1 day after intervention [groin- and back-pain during bedrest (100-point visual analog scale; 0: no pain); comfortability of bedrest (10-point Likert scale, 1: comfortable), satisfaction with closure (10-point Likert scale, 1: very satisfied)]. Results were analyzed in a cross-over design.Results48 patients (29 male, median age 62.5 (32–88) years) were included. An ExoSeal{sup ®}-VCD was used first in 25 cases. As four of these subsequently refused MC as second intervention, data from 44 patients could be analyzed. All closures were technically successful (successful device deployment) without major complications. Groin- and back-pain after VCD-use/MC was 0 (0–15) vs. 10 (0–80) and 0 (0–75) vs. 25 (0–90), respectively (p < 0.0001). Bedrest after VCD-use was more comfortable than after MC [1 (range 1–7) vs. 6 (2–10); p < 0.0001]. Satisfaction with the closure procedure and with the intervention in general was higher after VCD-use compared to MC [1 (1–3) vs. 5 (2–10) and 1 (1–2) vs. 2 (1–4), respectively; p < 0.0001].ConclusionIntra-individual comparison showed pain levels and discomfort to be significantly lower after ExoSeal{sup ®} use compared to MC. VCD closure was associated with higher satisfaction both with the closure itself and with the intervention in general.

  2. Handbook of latent variable and related models

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sik-Yum

    2011-01-01

    This Handbook covers latent variable models, which are a flexible class of models for modeling multivariate data to explore relationships among observed and latent variables.- Covers a wide class of important models- Models and statistical methods described provide tools for analyzing a wide spectrum of complicated data- Includes illustrative examples with real data sets from business, education, medicine, public health and sociology.- Demonstrates the use of a wide variety of statistical, computational, and mathematical techniques.

  3. Dutch Risk Assessment tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, A.

    2015-01-01

    The ‘Risico- Inventarisatie- en Evaluatie-instrumenten’ is the name for the Dutch risk assessment (RA) tools. A RA tool can be used to perform a risk assessment including an evaluation of the identified risks. These tools were among the first online risk assessment tools developed in Europe. The

  4. A tool for learning the programming style of Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masayuki

    2013-03-01

    We developed a tool for learning the programming style of Java. The tool has the following functions: (1) recommends the use of CamelCase and English words for the names of classes, methods, and variables; (2) recommends setting the correct scope level of variables and the appropriate length of variable names; (3) recommends writing comments in source programs; (4) shows sample source programs according to the programming style of Java.

  5. New QC 7 tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    This book tells of new QC with 7 tools which includes TQC and new QC with 7 tools which is for better propel, what is QC method to think? what is new QC 7 tool ? like KJ law, PDPC law, arrow and diagram law, and matrix diagram law, application of new QC 7 tools such as field to apply, application of new QC 7 tools for policy management the method of new QC 7 tools including related regulations KJ law, matrix and data analysis, PDPC law and education and introduction of new QC 7 tools.

  6. Building Simple Annotation Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    The right annotation tool does not always exist for processing a particular natural language task. In these scenarios, researchers are required to build new annotation tools to fit the tasks at hand. However, developing new annotation tools is difficult and inefficient. There has not been careful consideration of software complexity in current annotation tools. Due to the problems of complexity, new annotation tools must reimplement common annotation features despite the availability of imple...

  7. Reproducibility, stability, and biological variability of thrombin generation using calibrated automated thrombography in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuq, Benoît; Blois, Shauna L; Wood, R Darren; Monteith, Gabrielle; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C; Bédard, Christian; Wood, Geoffrey A

    2018-03-26

    Thrombin plays a central role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Calibrated automated thrombography (CAT), a thrombin generation assay, may be a useful test for hemostatic disorders in dogs. To describe CAT results in a group of healthy dogs, and assess preanalytical variables and biological variability. Forty healthy dogs were enrolled. Lag time (Lag), time to peak (ttpeak), peak thrombin generation (peak), and endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) were measured. Direct jugular venipuncture and winged-needle catheter-assisted saphenous venipuncture were used to collect samples from each dog, and results were compared between methods. Sample stability at -80°C was assessed over 12 months in a subset of samples. Biological variability of CAT was assessed via nested ANOVA using samples obtained weekly from a subset of 9 dogs for 4 consecutive weeks. Samples for CAT were stable at -80°C over 12 months of storage. Samples collected via winged-needle catheter venipuncture showed poor repeatability compared to direct venipuncture samples; there was also poor agreement between the 2 sampling methods. Intra-individual variability of CAT parameters was below 25%; inter-individual variability ranged from 36.9% to 78.5%. Measurement of thrombin generation using CAT appears to be repeatable in healthy dogs, and samples are stable for at least 12 months when stored at -80°C. Direct venipuncture sampling is recommended for CAT. Low indices of individuality suggest that subject-based reference intervals are more suitable when interpreting CAT results. © 2018 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  8. An investigation of chatter and tool wear when machining titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, I. A.

    1974-01-01

    The low thermal conductivity of titanium, together with the low contact area between chip and tool and the unusually high chip velocities, gives rise to high tool tip temperatures and accelerated tool wear. Machining speeds have to be considerably reduced to avoid these high temperatures with a consequential loss of productivity. Restoring this lost productivity involves increasing other machining variables, such as feed and depth-of-cut, and can lead to another machining problem commonly known as chatter. This work is to acquaint users with these problems, to examine the variables that may be encountered when machining a material like titanium, and to advise the machine tool user on how to maximize the output from the machines and tooling available to him. Recommendations are made on ways of improving tolerances, reducing machine tool instability or chatter, and improving productivity. New tool materials, tool coatings, and coolants are reviewed and their relevance examined when machining titanium.

  9. Analytic functions of several complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Gunning, Robert C

    2009-01-01

    The theory of analytic functions of several complex variables enjoyed a period of remarkable development in the middle part of the twentieth century. After initial successes by Poincaré and others in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the theory encountered obstacles that prevented it from growing quickly into an analogue of the theory for functions of one complex variable. Beginning in the 1930s, initially through the work of Oka, then H. Cartan, and continuing with the work of Grauert, Remmert, and others, new tools were introduced into the theory of several complex variables that resol

  10. Software reference for SaTool - a Tool for Structural Analysis of Automated Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Torsten; Blanke, Mogens

    2004-01-01

    . The list of such variables and functional relations constitute the system’s structure graph. Normal operation means all functional relations are intact. Should faults occur, one or more functional relations cease to be valid. In a structure graph, this is seen as the disappearance of one or more nodes...... of the graph. SaTool makes analysis of the structure graph to provide knowledge about fundamental properties of the system in normal and faulty conditions. Salient features of SaTool include rapid analysis of possibility to diagnose faults and ability to make autonomous recovery should faults occur.......This software reference details the functions of SaTool – a tool for structural analysis of technical systems. SaTool is intended used as part of an industrial systems design cycle. Structural analysis is a graph-based technique where principal relations between variables express the system’s...

  11. Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Primary ... PIDDs Genetics & Inheritance Talking to Your Doctor Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by low levels of ...

  12. Nanocomposites for Machining Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Sidorenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Machining tools are used in many areas of production. To a considerable extent, the performance characteristics of the tools determine the quality and cost of obtained products. The main materials used for producing machining tools are steel, cemented carbides, ceramics and superhard materials. A promising way to improve the performance characteristics of these materials is to design new nanocomposites based on them. The application of micromechanical modeling during the elaboration of composite materials for machining tools can reduce the financial and time costs for development of new tools, with enhanced performance. This article reviews the main groups of nanocomposites for machining tools and their performance.

  13. Nanocomposites for Machining Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenko, Daria; Loginov, Pavel; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Levashov, Evgeny

    2017-10-13

    Machining tools are used in many areas of production. To a considerable extent, the performance characteristics of the tools determine the quality and cost of obtained products. The main materials used for producing machining tools are steel, cemented carbides, ceramics and superhard materials. A promising way to improve the performance characteristics of these materials is to design new nanocomposites based on them. The application of micromechanical modeling during the elaboration of composite materials for machining tools can reduce the financial and time costs for development of new tools, with enhanced performance. This article reviews the main groups of nanocomposites for machining tools and their performance.

  14. Improved tool grinding machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dial, C.E. Sr.

    The present invention relates to an improved tool grinding mechanism for grinding single point diamond cutting tools to precise roundness and radius specifications. The present invention utilizes a tool holder which is longitudinally displaced with respect to the remainder of the grinding system due to contact of the tool with the grinding surface with this displacement being monitored so that any variation in the grinding of the cutting surface such as caused by crystal orientation or tool thicknesses may be compensated for during the grinding operation to assure the attainment of the desired cutting tool face specifications.

  15. Wilmar Planning Tool, user guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, Helge V.

    2006-01-01

    This is a short user guide to the Wilmar Planning Tool developed in the project Wind Power Integration in Liberalised Electricity Markets (WILMAR) supported by EU (Contract No. ENK5-CT-2002-00663). A User Shell implemented in an Excel workbook controls the Wilmar Planning Tool. All data are contained in Access databases that communicate with various sub-models through text files that are exported from or imported to the databases. In the User Shell various scenario variables and control parameters are set, and export of model data from the input database, activation of the models, as well as import of model results to the output database are triggered from the shell. (au)

  16. 42 Variability Bugs in the Linux Kernel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abal, Iago; Brabrand, Claus; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    , serving to evaluate tool implementations of feature-sensitive analyses by testing them on real bugs. We present a qualitative study of 42 variability bugs collected from bug-fixing commits to the Linux kernel repository. We analyze each of the bugs, and record the results in a database. In addition, we...

  17. 40 Variability Bugs in the Linux Kernel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abal Rivas, Iago; Brabrand, Claus; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    is a requirement for goal-oriented research, serving to evaluate tool implementations of feature-sensitive analyses by testing them on real bugs. We present a qualitative study of 40 variability bugs collected from bug-fixing commits to the Linux kernel repository. We investigate each of the 40 bugs, recording...

  18. Political Discourse and Its Sociolinguistic Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Rodriguez, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Linguistically, political discourses have generally been discussed within qualitative approaches (e.g., Blackledge, 2005; Chilton, 2004; Chomsky, 2004; van Dijk, 2005; Wodak, 2002). This paper presents tools to design a quantitative research relating political speech with sociolinguistic variables. Notions such as Accommodation Theory (Giles &…

  19. Amplification factor variable amplifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akitsugu, Oshita; Nauta, Bram

    2007-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide an amplification factor variable amplifier capable of achieving temperature compensation of an amplification factor over a wide variable amplification factor range. ; SOLUTION: A Gilbert type amplification factor variable amplifier 11 amplifies an input signal and

  20. Amplification factor variable amplifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akitsugu, Oshita; Nauta, Bram

    2010-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide an amplification factor variable amplifier capable of achieving temperature compensation of an amplification factor over a wide variable amplification factor range. ;SOLUTION: A Gilbert type amplification factor variable amplifier 11 amplifies an input signal and can

  1. Quantum engineering of continuous variable quantum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabuncu, Metin

    2009-01-01

    Quantum information with continuous variables is a field attracting increasing attention recently. In continuous variable quantum information one makes use of the continuous information encoded into the quadrature of a quantized light field instead of binary quantities such as the polarization state of a single photon. This brand new research area is witnessing exciting theoretical and experimental achievements such as teleportation, quantum computation and quantum error correction. The rapid development of the field is mainly due higher optical data rates and the availability of simple and efficient manipulation tools in continuous-variable quantum information processing. We in this thesis extend the work in continuous variable quantum information processing and report on novel experiments on amplification, cloning, minimal disturbance and noise erasure protocols. The promising results we obtain in these pioneering experiments indicate that the future of continuous variable quantum information is bright and many advances can be foreseen. (orig.)

  2. Quantum engineering of continuous variable quantum states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabuncu, Metin

    2009-10-29

    Quantum information with continuous variables is a field attracting increasing attention recently. In continuous variable quantum information one makes use of the continuous information encoded into the quadrature of a quantized light field instead of binary quantities such as the polarization state of a single photon. This brand new research area is witnessing exciting theoretical and experimental achievements such as teleportation, quantum computation and quantum error correction. The rapid development of the field is mainly due higher optical data rates and the availability of simple and efficient manipulation tools in continuous-variable quantum information processing. We in this thesis extend the work in continuous variable quantum information processing and report on novel experiments on amplification, cloning, minimal disturbance and noise erasure protocols. The promising results we obtain in these pioneering experiments indicate that the future of continuous variable quantum information is bright and many advances can be foreseen. (orig.)

  3. The Effects of Exercise Intensity vs. Metabolic State on the Variability and Magnitude of Left Ventricular Twist Mechanics during Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Craig; Samuel, Jake; Yarlett, Andrew; Cooper, Stephen-Mark; Stembridge, Mike; Stöhr, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Increased left ventricular (LV) twist and untwisting rate (LV twist mechanics) are essential responses of the heart to exercise. However, previously a large variability in LV twist mechanics during exercise has been observed, which complicates the interpretation of results. This study aimed to determine some of the physiological sources of variability in LV twist mechanics during exercise. Sixteen healthy males (age: 22 ± 4 years, [Formula: see text]O2peak: 45.5 ± 6.9 ml∙kg-1∙min-1, range of individual anaerobic threshold (IAT): 32-69% of [Formula: see text]O2peak) were assessed at rest and during exercise at: i) the same relative exercise intensity, 40%peak, ii) at 2% above IAT, and, iii) at 40%peak with hypoxia (40%peak+HYP). LV volumes were not significantly different between exercise conditions (P > 0.05). However, the mean margin of error of LV twist was significantly lower (F2,47 = 2.08, P 0.05). Overall, LV twist mechanics were linearly related to rate pressure product. During exercise, the intra-individual variability of LV twist mechanics is smaller at the same relative exercise intensity compared with IAT. However, the absolute magnitude (degrees) of LV twist mechanics appears to be associated with the prevailing rate pressure product. Exercise tests that evaluate LV twist mechanics should be standardised by relative exercise intensity and rate pressure product be taken into account when interpreting results.

  4. The Effects of Exercise Intensity vs. Metabolic State on the Variability and Magnitude of Left Ventricular Twist Mechanics during Exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Armstrong

    Full Text Available Increased left ventricular (LV twist and untwisting rate (LV twist mechanics are essential responses of the heart to exercise. However, previously a large variability in LV twist mechanics during exercise has been observed, which complicates the interpretation of results. This study aimed to determine some of the physiological sources of variability in LV twist mechanics during exercise. Sixteen healthy males (age: 22 ± 4 years, [Formula: see text]O2peak: 45.5 ± 6.9 ml∙kg-1∙min-1, range of individual anaerobic threshold (IAT: 32-69% of [Formula: see text]O2peak were assessed at rest and during exercise at: i the same relative exercise intensity, 40%peak, ii at 2% above IAT, and, iii at 40%peak with hypoxia (40%peak+HYP. LV volumes were not significantly different between exercise conditions (P > 0.05. However, the mean margin of error of LV twist was significantly lower (F2,47 = 2.08, P 0.05. Overall, LV twist mechanics were linearly related to rate pressure product. During exercise, the intra-individual variability of LV twist mechanics is smaller at the same relative exercise intensity compared with IAT. However, the absolute magnitude (degrees of LV twist mechanics appears to be associated with the prevailing rate pressure product. Exercise tests that evaluate LV twist mechanics should be standardised by relative exercise intensity and rate pressure product be taken into account when interpreting results.

  5. The Effects of Exercise Intensity vs. Metabolic State on the Variability and Magnitude of Left Ventricular Twist Mechanics during Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Craig; Samuel, Jake; Yarlett, Andrew; Cooper, Stephen-Mark; Stembridge, Mike; Stöhr, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Increased left ventricular (LV) twist and untwisting rate (LV twist mechanics) are essential responses of the heart to exercise. However, previously a large variability in LV twist mechanics during exercise has been observed, which complicates the interpretation of results. This study aimed to determine some of the physiological sources of variability in LV twist mechanics during exercise. Sixteen healthy males (age: 22 ± 4 years, V˙O2peak: 45.5 ± 6.9 ml∙kg-1∙min-1, range of individual anaerobic threshold (IAT): 32–69% of V˙O2peak) were assessed at rest and during exercise at: i) the same relative exercise intensity, 40%peak, ii) at 2% above IAT, and, iii) at 40%peak with hypoxia (40%peak+HYP). LV volumes were not significantly different between exercise conditions (P > 0.05). However, the mean margin of error of LV twist was significantly lower (F2,47 = 2.08, P 0.05). Overall, LV twist mechanics were linearly related to rate pressure product. During exercise, the intra-individual variability of LV twist mechanics is smaller at the same relative exercise intensity compared with IAT. However, the absolute magnitude (degrees) of LV twist mechanics appears to be associated with the prevailing rate pressure product. Exercise tests that evaluate LV twist mechanics should be standardised by relative exercise intensity and rate pressure product be taken into account when interpreting results. PMID:27100099

  6. The tools of mathematical reasoning

    CERN Document Server

    Lakins, Tamara J

    2016-01-01

    This accessible textbook gives beginning undergraduate mathematics students a first exposure to introductory logic, proofs, sets, functions, number theory, relations, finite and infinite sets, and the foundations of analysis. The book provides students with a quick path to writing proofs and a practical collection of tools that they can use in later mathematics courses such as abstract algebra and analysis. The importance of the logical structure of a mathematical statement as a framework for finding a proof of that statement, and the proper use of variables, is an early and consistent theme used throughout the book.

  7. Tools of online Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, M. S.; Rahman, M. F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Online marketing is the most crucial issue in the modern marketing era but there was no previous research that could identify the tools of internet marketing before this study and it was the first study on the field of online marketing tools. This research was descriptive in nature and it has attempted to identify the major tools of internet marketing from the concepts of traditional marketing tools. Worldwide network is known as Internet that can exchange information between use...

  8. OOTW COST TOOLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

    1998-09-01

    This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

  9. Variable mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontela, Paula Caitano; Prestes, Renata Bernardy; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Friedman, Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    To review the literature on the use of variable mechanical ventilation and the main outcomes of this technique. Search, selection, and analysis of all original articles on variable ventilation, without restriction on the period of publication and language, available in the electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE®, and PubMed, by searching the terms "variable ventilation" OR "noisy ventilation" OR "biologically variable ventilation". A total of 36 studies were selected. Of these, 24 were original studies, including 21 experimental studies and three clinical studies. Several experimental studies reported the beneficial effects of distinct variable ventilation strategies on lung function using different models of lung injury and healthy lungs. Variable ventilation seems to be a viable strategy for improving gas exchange and respiratory mechanics and preventing lung injury associated with mechanical ventilation. However, further clinical studies are necessary to assess the potential of variable ventilation strategies for the clinical improvement of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation.

  10. Dust control effectiveness of drywall sanding tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young-Corbett, Deborah E; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2009-07-01

    In this laboratory study, four drywall sanding tools were evaluated in terms of dust generation rates in the respirable and thoracic size classes. In a repeated measures study design, 16 participants performed simulated drywall finishing tasks with each of four tools: (1) ventilated sander, (2) pole sander, (3) block sander, and (4) wet sponge. Dependent variables of interest were thoracic and respirable breathing zone dust concentrations. Analysis by Friedman's Test revealed that the ventilated drywall sanding tool produced significantly less dust, of both size classes, than did the other three tools. The pole and wet sanders produced significantly less dust of both size classes than did the block sander. The block sander, the most commonly used tool in drywall finishing operations, produced significantly more dust of both size classes than did the other three tools. When compared with the block sander, the other tools offer substantial dust reduction. The ventilated tool reduced respirable concentrations by 88% and thoracic concentrations by 85%. The pole sander reduced respirable concentrations by 58% and thoracic by 50%. The wet sander produced reductions of 60% and 47% in the respirable and thoracic classes, respectively. Wet sponge sanders and pole sanders are effective at reducing breathing-zone dust concentrations; however, based on its superior dust control effectiveness, the ventilated sander is the recommended tool for drywall finishing operations.

  11. Hole-Aligning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Frank A.; Saude, Frank; Sep, Martin J.

    1996-01-01

    Tool designed for use in aligning holes in plates or other structural members to be joined by bolt through holes. Holes aligned without exerting forces perpendicular to planes of holes. Tool features screw-driven-wedge design similar to (but simpler than) that of some automotive exhaust-pipe-expanding tools.

  12. Pro Tools HD

    CERN Document Server

    Camou, Edouard

    2013-01-01

    An easy-to-follow guide for using Pro Tools HD 11 effectively.This book is ideal for anyone who already uses ProTools and wants to learn more, or is new to Pro Tools HD and wants to use it effectively in their own audio workstations.

  13. Vehicle Detection Tool - VDtect

    OpenAIRE

    Prateek, GV; Hari, KVS

    2012-01-01

    The report talks about the implementation of Vehicle Detection tool using opensource software - WxPython. The main functionality of this tool includes collection of data, plotting of magnetometer data and the count of the vehicles detected. The report list about how installation process and various functionality of the tool.

  14. Nanocomposites for Machining Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidorenko, Daria; Loginov, Pavel; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2017-01-01

    . A promising way to improve the performance characteristics of these materials is to design new nanocomposites based on them. The application of micromechanical modeling during the elaboration of composite materials for machining tools can reduce the financial and time costs for development of new tools......, with enhanced performance. This article reviews the main groups of nanocomposites for machining tools and their performance....

  15. Within-Stool and Within-Day Sample Variability of Fecal Calprotectin in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lillian; Foshaug, Rae; Huang, Vivian W; Kroeker, Karen I; Dieleman, Levinus A; Halloran, Brendan P; Wong, Karen; Fedorak, Richard N

    2018-03-01

    The use of fecal calprotectin (FC) as a stool biomarker for differentiating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from IBS has been well validated, and there is a strong correlation between FC and the presence of endoscopic inflammatory lesions. However, recent studies have demonstrated intraindividual sample variability in patients with IBD, possibly limiting the reliability of using a single sample for monitoring disease activity. Our aim was to assess the within-stool and within-day sample variability of FC concentrations in patients with IBD. We examined a cross-sectional cohort of 50 adult IBD patients. Eligible patients were instructed to collect 3 samples from different parts of the stool from their first bowel movement of the day and 3 samples from each of up to 2 additional bowel movements within 24 hours. FC concentrations were measured by a rapid, quantitative point-of-care test using lateral flow technology (Quantum Blue). Descriptive statistics were used to assess FC variability within a single bowel movement and between different movements at different FC positivity cutoffs. Within a single bowel movement, there was clinically significant sample variability ranging from 8% to 23% depending on the time of the day or on the FC positivity cutoff value. Between bowel movements, there was clinically significant sample variability ranging from 13% to 26% depending on the FC positivity cutoff. Considering a single FC sample, the first sample of the day with an FC positivity cutoff of 250 μg/g provided the most reliable indication of disease activity.

  16. Detecting intraannual dietary variability in wild mountain gorillas by stable isotope analysis of feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Scott A; Chritz, Kendra L; Rothman, Jessica M; Cerling, Thure E

    2012-12-26

    We use stable isotope ratios in feces of wild mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei) to test the hypothesis that diet shifts within a single year, as measured by dry mass intake, can be recovered. Isotopic separation of staple foods indicates that intraannual changes in the isotopic composition of feces reflect shifts in diet. Fruits are isotopically distinct compared with other staple foods, and peaks in fecal δ(13)C values are interpreted as periods of increased fruit feeding. Bayesian mixing model results demonstrate that, although the timing of these diet shifts match observational data, the modeled increase in proportional fruit feeding does not capture the full shift. Variation in the isotopic and nutritional composition of gorilla foods is largely independent, highlighting the difficulty for estimating nutritional intake with stable isotopes. Our results demonstrate the potential value of fecal sampling for quantifying short-term, intraindividual dietary variability in primates and other animals with high temporal resolution even when the diet is composed of C(3) plants.

  17. Spatially variable coevolution between a haemosporidian parasite and the MHC of a widely distributed passerine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew R; Cheviron, Zachary A; Carling, Matthew D

    2015-03-01

    The environment shapes host-parasite interactions, but how environmental variation affects the diversity and composition of parasite-defense genes of hosts is unresolved. In vertebrates, the highly variable major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene family plays an essential role in the adaptive immune system by recognizing pathogen infection and initiating the cellular immune response. Investigating MHC-parasite associations across heterogeneous landscapes may elucidate the role of spatially fluctuating selection in the maintenance of high levels of genetic variation at the MHC. We studied patterns of association between an avian haemosporidian blood parasite and the MHC of rufous-collared sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis) that inhabit environments with widely varying haemosporidian infection prevalence in the Peruvian Andes. MHC diversity peaked in populations with high infection prevalence, although intra-individual MHC diversity was not associated with infection status. MHC nucleotide and protein sequences associated with infection absence tended to be rare, consistent with negative frequency-dependent selection. We found an MHC variant associated with a ∽26% decrease in infection probability at middle elevations (1501-3100 m) where prevalence was highest. Several other variants were associated with a significant increase in infection probability in low haemosporidian prevalence environments, which can be interpreted as susceptibility or quantitative resistance. Our study highlights important challenges in understanding MHC evolution in natural systems, but may point to a role of negative frequency-dependent selection and fluctuating spatial selection in the evolution of Z. capensisMHC.

  18. Detecting intraannual dietary variability in wild mountain gorillas by stable isotope analysis of feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Scott A.; Chritz, Kendra L.; Rothman, Jessica M.; Cerling, Thure E.

    2012-01-01

    We use stable isotope ratios in feces of wild mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei) to test the hypothesis that diet shifts within a single year, as measured by dry mass intake, can be recovered. Isotopic separation of staple foods indicates that intraannual changes in the isotopic composition of feces reflect shifts in diet. Fruits are isotopically distinct compared with other staple foods, and peaks in fecal δ13C values are interpreted as periods of increased fruit feeding. Bayesian mixing model results demonstrate that, although the timing of these diet shifts match observational data, the modeled increase in proportional fruit feeding does not capture the full shift. Variation in the isotopic and nutritional composition of gorilla foods is largely independent, highlighting the difficulty for estimating nutritional intake with stable isotopes. Our results demonstrate the potential value of fecal sampling for quantifying short-term, intraindividual dietary variability in primates and other animals with high temporal resolution even when the diet is composed of C3 plants. PMID:23236160

  19. Pickering tool management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, E.H.; Green, A.H.

    1997-01-01

    Tools were being deployed in the station with no process in effect to ensure that they are maintained in good repair so as to effectively support the performance of Maintenance activities. Today's legal requirements require that all employers have a process in place to ensure that tools are maintained in a safe condition. This is specified in the Ontario Health and Safety Act. The Pickering Tool Management System has been chosen as the process at Pickering N.D to manage tools. Tools are identified by number etching and bar codes. The system is a Windows application installed on several file servers

  20. Machine tool structures

    CERN Document Server

    Koenigsberger, F

    1970-01-01

    Machine Tool Structures, Volume 1 deals with fundamental theories and calculation methods for machine tool structures. Experimental investigations into stiffness are discussed, along with the application of the results to the design of machine tool structures. Topics covered range from static and dynamic stiffness to chatter in metal cutting, stability in machine tools, and deformations of machine tool structures. This volume is divided into three sections and opens with a discussion on stiffness specifications and the effect of stiffness on the behavior of the machine under forced vibration c

  1. Understanding Brown Dwarf Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Surveys of brown dwarf variability continue to find that roughly half of all brown dwarfs are variable. While variability is observed amongst all types of brown dwarfs, amplitudes are typically greatest for L-T transition objects. In my talk I will discuss the possible physical mechanisms that are responsible for the observed variability. I will particularly focus on comparing and contrasting the effects of changes in atmospheric thermal profile and cloud opacity. The two different mechanisms will produce different variability signatures and I will discuss the extent to which the current datasets constrain both mechanisms. By combining constraints from studies of variability with existing spectral and photometric datasets we can begin to construct and test self-consistent models of brown dwarf atmospheres. These models not only aid in the interpretation of existing objects but also inform studies of directly imaged giant planets.

  2. Ultrasonic variables affecting inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautzenheiser, C.E.; Whiting, A.R.; McElroy, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    There are many variables which affect the detection of the effects and reproducibility of results when utilizing ultrasonic techniques. The most important variable is the procedure, as this document specifies, to a great extent, the controls that are exercised over the other variables. The most important variable is personnel with regards to training, qualification, integrity, data recording, and data analysis. Although the data is very limited, these data indicate that, if the procedure is carefully controlled, reliability of defect detection and reproducibility of results are both approximately 90 percent for reliability of detection, this applies to relatively small defects as reliability increases substantially as defect size increases above the recording limit. (author)

  3. The nebular variables

    CERN Document Server

    Glasby, John S

    1974-01-01

    The Nebular Variables focuses on the nebular variables and their characteristics. Discussions are organized by type of nebular variable, namely, RW Aurigae stars, T Orionis stars, T Tauri stars, and peculiar nebular objects. Topics range from light variations of the stars to their spectroscopic and physical characteristics, spatial distribution, interaction with nebulosity, and evolutionary features. This volume is divided into four sections and consists of 25 chapters, the first of which provides general information on nebular variables, including their stellar associations and their classifi

  4. Expert tool use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Kathrine Liedtke; Ravn, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    and autoethnographic material from one former elite skipper, we take some initial steps toward the development of a more nuanced understanding of the concept of incorporation; one that is able to accommodate the experiences of expert tool users. In sum, our analyses indicate that the possibility for experiencing...... a tool as incorporated depends on the existence of an extraordinary kind of relationship between the tool and the expert tool user. This relation, that can persist even when successful manipulation of the tool fails, is not only cultivated through deliberate practice of physical skills, but also through...... the collective sense-making process going on within a particular community of practice. Therefore, expert tool users may experience a more profound kind of incorporation that can persist even when normal motor incorporation fails....

  5. Useful design tools?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole

    2005-01-01

    the use or lack of use of current tools in the development of future design tools for sustainable buildings? Why are some used while others are not? Who is using them? The paper deals with design management, with special focus on sustainable building in Denmark, and the challenge of turning the generally......Tools for design management are on the agenda in building projects in order to set targets, to choose and prioritise between alternative environmental solutions, to involve stakeholders and to document, evaluate and benchmark. Different types of tools are available, but what can we learn from...... of a new sustainable settlement. The use of design tools is discussed in relation to innovation and stakeholder participation, and it is stressed that the usefulness of design tools is context dependent....

  6. Open Health Tools: Tooling for Interoperable Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skip McGaughey

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The Open Health Tools initiative is creating an ecosystem focused on the production of software tooling that promotes the exchange of medical information across political, geographic, cultural, product, and technology lines. At its core, OHT believes that the availability of high-quality tooling that interoperates will propel the industry forward, enabling organizations and vendors to build products and systems that effectively work together. This will ?raise the interoperability bar? as a result of having tools that just work. To achieve these lofty goals, careful consideration must be made to the constituencies that will be most affected by an OHT-influenced world. This document outlines a vision of OHT?s impact to these stakeholders. It does not explain the OHT process itself or how the OHT community operates. Instead, we place emphasis on the impact of that process within the health industry. The catchphrase ?code is king? underpins this document, meaning that the manifestation of any open source community lies in the products and technology it produces.

  7. The comfort triangles : A new tool for bioclimatic design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents a new graphic tool to identify and select bioclimatic strategies according to climate conditions and comfort requirements. The Comfort Triangle relates outdoor daily temperature variations with the modification of thermal performance achieved indoors, using two key variables,

  8. Influences of mood variability, negative moods, and depression on adolescent cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Sally M; Mermelstein, Robin J

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the emotional risk factors for cigarette smoking in adolescence can greatly inform prevention efforts. The current study examined prospective relationships between 3 affective dimensions--negative mood variability, overall negative mood, and depression---affect-related smoking motives, and future smoking patterns among adolescents. The current study expands on prior research by using real-time methods to assess mood and by focusing on a key developmental transition in smoking behavior: the progression from experimentation or low level, infrequent use to higher use. Ninth- and 10th-grade students (N = 461; 55% girls) provided data on cigarette use at a baseline and follow-up 15-month wave, and also provided ecological momentary assessments of negative moods via palmtop computers for 1 week at each wave. Negative mood was examined via the means of negative mood reports at each wave, and mood variability was examined via the intraindividual standard deviations of negative mood reports at each wave. Depressive symptoms and smoking motives were also assessed. Findings supported a complex self-medication model of smoking escalation in adolescence whereby mood-smoking relationships differed by affect dimension and gender. For girls, greater negative mood variability at baseline significantly predicted rapid escalation in smoking over time, whereas depressive symptoms and overall negative mood were unrelated to girls' smoking patterns. In contrast, overall negative mood significantly predicted boys' smoking escalation among those with affect-related motives for smoking. Results thus suggest that inconsistent mood-smoking relations in past work may be driven by the complex interrelationships among affect vulnerabilities, gender, and smoking patterns. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Intra- and Inter-Patient Symptom Variability in Fibromyalgia: Results of a 90-Day Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Loren; Vincent, Ann; McAllister, Samantha J; Whipple, Mary

    2015-06-01

    Symptoms of fibromyalgia (FM)--chronic widespread pain, fatigue, unrefreshing sleep, dyscognition etcetera--present with varying degrees of severity in different individuals; however, studies reporting daily estimates of variability of symptoms are sparse. Given the limited literature on the stability and variability of FM symptoms, the purpose of the present study was to determine the feasibility of daily visual analogue, self-report measures to assess daily variability and time trends in core FM symptoms. Ten female patients completed daily assessments of common FM symptoms (pain, fatigue, anxiety, depression, stress, cognitive dysfunction, unrefreshing sleep and lightheadedness) for approximately 90 days. The completion rate was excellent (89.6%). The results demonstrated that average symptom intensity differs markedly across the different symptoms that were measured. Unrefreshing sleep, fatigue and pain are clearly higher in intensity than other symptoms and are followed by memory problems, stress, anxiety and depression. There is also notable average intra-individual change across time (10-15 points on a 100-point scale). Average symptom intensity does not appear to be related to the amount of symptom change within individuals. The results of the present study confirm that intensive longitudinal study, using comprehensive symptom assessment in patients with FM, is both possible and informative, in the sense that a rich description of the daily experience of living with FM can be obtained. Future work, utilizing larger samples, will offer the opportunity to investigate better the causes, consequences and correlates of the daily ups and downs of key symptoms that compromise quality of life in patients with FM. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Influences of Mood Variability, Negative Moods, and Depression on Adolescent Cigarette Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Sally M.; Mermelstein, Robin J.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the emotional risk factors for cigarette smoking in adolescence can greatly inform prevention efforts. The current study examined prospective relationships between three affective dimensions – negative mood variability, overall negative mood, and depression, affect-related smoking motives, and future smoking patterns among adolescents. The current study expands on prior research by using real-time methods to assess mood and by focusing on a key developmental transition in smoking behavior: the progression from experimentation or low level, infrequent use to higher use. Ninth and 10th grade students (N = 461; 55% girls) provided data on cigarette use at a baseline and follow-up 15-month wave, and also provided ecological momentary assessments of negative moods via palmtop computers for one week at each wave. Negative mood was examined via the means of negative mood reports at each wave, and mood variability was examined via the intraindividual standard deviations of negative mood reports at each wave. Depressive symptoms and smoking motives were also assessed. Findings supported a complex self-medication model of smoking escalation in adolescence whereby mood-smoking relationships differed by affect dimension and gender. For girls, greater negative mood variability at baseline significantly predicted rapid escalation in smoking over time, whereas depressive symptoms and overall negative mood were unrelated to girls’ smoking patterns. In contrast, overall negative mood significantly predicted boys’ smoking escalation among those with affect-related motives for smoking. Results thus suggest that inconsistent mood-smoking relations in past work may be driven by the complex interrelationships among affect vulnerabilities, gender, and smoking patterns. PMID:23438244

  11. Biologic variability of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in adult healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Autumn N; Estrada, Amara H; Gallagher, Alexander E; Winter, Brandy; Lamb, Kenneth E; Bohannon, Mary; Hanscom, Jancy; Mainville, Celine A

    2017-02-01

    Objectives The biologic variability of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and its impact on diagnostic utility is unknown in healthy cats and those with cardiac disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the biologic variation of NT-proBNP within-day and week-to-week in healthy adult cats. Methods Adult cats were prospectively evaluated by complete blood count (CBC), biochemistry, total thyroxine, echocardiography, electrocardiography and blood pressure, to exclude underlying systemic or cardiac disease. Adult healthy cats were enrolled and blood samples were obtained at 11 time points over a 6 week period (0, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h, 10 h and at weeks 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6). The intra-individual (coefficient of variation [CV I ]) biologic variation along with index of individuality and reference change values (RCVs) were calculated. Univariate models were analyzed and included comparison of the six different time points for both daily and weekly samples. This was followed by a Tukey's post-hoc adjustment, with a P value of <0.05 being significant. Results The median daily and weekly CV I for the population were 13.1% (range 0-28.7%) and 21.2% (range 3.9-68.1%), respectively. The index of individuality was 0.99 and 1 for daily and weekly samples, respectively. The median daily and weekly RCVs for the population were 39.8% (range 17.0-80.5%) and 60.5% (range 20.1-187.8%), respectively. Conclusions and relevance This study demonstrates high individual variability for NT-proBNP concentrations in a population of adult healthy cats. Further research is warranted to evaluate NT-proBNP variability, particularly how serial measurements of NT-proBNP may be used in the diagnosis and management of cats with cardiac disease.

  12. HbA1c variability as an independent risk factor for diabetic retinopathy in type 1 diabetes: a German/Austrian multicenter analysis on 35,891 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M Hermann

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to analyze the effect of HbA1c variability on the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy in type 1 diabetes patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 35,891 patients with childhood, adolescent or adult onset of type 1 diabetes from a large multicentre survey, the German/Austrian prospective documentation system (DPV, were analysed. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine whether intra-individual HbA1c variability expressed as variation coefficient is an independent risk factor for the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy. RESULTS: Kaplan-Meier curves stratified by median HbA1c and variation coefficient revealed that retinopathy-free survival probability is lower when both median HbA1c and HbA1c variability are above the 50th percentile. Cox regression models confirmed this finding: After adjustment for age at diabetes onset, gender and median HbA1c, HbA1c variability was independently associated with the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy. Time-covariate interactions used to model non-proportionality indicated an effect decreasing with duration of diabetes for both median HbA1c and HbA1c variability. Predictive accuracy increased significantly when adding HbA1c variability to the Cox regression model. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with type 1 diabetes, HbA1c variability adds to the risk of diabetic retinopathy independently of average metabolic control.

  13. Software variability management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, J; Nord, RL

    2004-01-01

    During recent years, the amount of variability that has to be supported by a software artefact is growing considerably and its management is evolving into a major challenge during development, usage, and evolution of software artefacts. Successful management of variability in software leads to

  14. Variability: A Pernicious Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noddings, Nel

    1992-01-01

    The hypothesis of greater male variability in test results is discussed in its historical context, and reasons feminists have objected to the hypothesis are considered. The hypothesis acquires political importance if it is considered that variability results from biological, rather than cultural, differences. (SLD)

  15. Reinforcing Saccadic Amplitude Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paeye, Celine; Madelain, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Saccadic endpoint variability is often viewed as the outcome of neural noise occurring during sensorimotor processing. However, part of this variability might result from operant learning. We tested this hypothesis by reinforcing dispersions of saccadic amplitude distributions, while maintaining constant their medians. In a first experiment we…

  16. Interdependence Among Organizational Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, M. C.

    1975-01-01

    The interrelationship between a set of organizational variables was investigated at 14 work organizations within a company. The variables were production, quality, costs, job satisfaction of operatives, job satisfaction of supervisors, work anxiety, accidents, absence, labor turnover, and industrial unrest. (Author)

  17. Collective variables and dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, R.

    1984-09-01

    This is an introduction to some basic concepts of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. We emphasize in particular the relevant entropy relative to a given set of collective variables, the meaning of the projection method in the Liouville space, its use to establish the generalized transport equations for these variables, and the interpretation of dissipation in the framework of information theory

  18. Variable volume combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a variable volume combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The variable volume combustor may include a liner, a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within the liner, and a linear actuator so as to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles axially along the liner.

  19. Agreement Workflow Tool (AWT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Agreement Workflow Tool (AWT) is a role-based Intranet application used for processing SSA's Reimbursable Agreements according to SSA's standards. AWT provides...

  20. Qlikview Audit Tool (QLIKVIEW) -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This tool supports the cyclical financial audit process. Qlikview supports large volumes of financial transaction data that can be mined, summarized and presented to...

  1. Java Power Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Smart, John

    2008-01-01

    All true craftsmen need the best tools to do their finest work, and programmers are no different. Java Power Tools delivers 30 open source tools designed to improve the development practices of Java developers in any size team or organization. Each chapter includes a series of short articles about one particular tool -- whether it's for build systems, version control, or other aspects of the development process -- giving you the equivalent of 30 short reference books in one package. No matter which development method your team chooses, whether it's Agile, RUP, XP, SCRUM, or one of many other

  2. Manifold tool guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, A.

    1982-07-08

    A tool guide that makes possible the insertion of cleaning and/or inspection tools into a manifold pipe that will dislocate and extract the accumulated sediment in such manifold pipes. The tool guide basically comprises a right angled tube (or other angled tube as required) which can be inserted in a large tube and locked into a radially extending cross pipe by adjustable spacer rods and a spring-loaded cone, whereby appropriate cleaning tools can be inserted into to cross pipe for cleaning, inspection, etc.

  3. Instant Spring Tool Suite

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. A tutorial guide that walks you through how to use the features of Spring Tool Suite using well defined sections for the different parts of Spring.Instant Spring Tool Suite is for novice to intermediate Java developers looking to get a head-start in enterprise application development using Spring Tool Suite and the Spring framework. If you are looking for a guide for effective application development using Spring Tool Suite, then this book is for you.

  4. First International Workshop on Variability in Software Architecture (VARSA 2011)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galster, Matthias; Avgeriou, Paris; Weyns, Danny; Mannisto, Tomi

    2011-01-01

    Variability is the ability of a software artifact to be changed for a specific context. Mechanisms to accommodate variability include software product lines, configuration wizards and tools in commercial software, configuration interfaces of software components, or the dynamic runtime composition of

  5. Soil variability in engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessia, Giovanna

    2014-05-01

    Natural geomaterials, as soils and rocks, show spatial variability and heterogeneity of physical and mechanical properties. They can be measured by in field and laboratory testing. The heterogeneity concerns different values of litho-technical parameters pertaining similar lithological units placed close to each other. On the contrary, the variability is inherent to the formation and evolution processes experienced by each geological units (homogeneous geomaterials on average) and captured as a spatial structure of fluctuation of physical property values about their mean trend, e.g. the unit weight, the hydraulic permeability, the friction angle, the cohesion, among others. The preceding spatial variations shall be managed by engineering models to accomplish reliable designing of structures and infrastructures. Materon (1962) introduced the Geostatistics as the most comprehensive tool to manage spatial correlation of parameter measures used in a wide range of earth science applications. In the field of the engineering geology, Vanmarcke (1977) developed the first pioneering attempts to describe and manage the inherent variability in geomaterials although Terzaghi (1943) already highlighted that spatial fluctuations of physical and mechanical parameters used in geotechnical designing cannot be neglected. A few years later, Mandelbrot (1983) and Turcotte (1986) interpreted the internal arrangement of geomaterial according to Fractal Theory. In the same years, Vanmarcke (1983) proposed the Random Field Theory providing mathematical tools to deal with inherent variability of each geological units or stratigraphic succession that can be resembled as one material. In this approach, measurement fluctuations of physical parameters are interpreted through the spatial variability structure consisting in the correlation function and the scale of fluctuation. Fenton and Griffiths (1992) combined random field simulation with the finite element method to produce the Random

  6. An approach to ergonomics evaluation of hand tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadefors, R; Areskoug, A; Dahlman, S; Kilbom, A; Sperling, L; Wikström, L; Oster, J

    1993-06-01

    Based on current knowledge of cumulative trauma disorders in the hand and forearm, related to the use of hand tools, an analysis was undertaken of variables to be considered in ergonomics evaluation of hand tools. Measurement methods were developed and an evaluation station was implemented. Measurement methods are physical, physiological or psychophysical. They focus on the tool, and on the effect of typical use of the tool on the operator. The evaluation station serves as a resource in the development, selection, and testing of tools for a given purpose.

  7. Annual Research Review: Reaction time variability in ADHD and autism spectrum disorders: measurement and mechanisms of a proposed trans-diagnostic phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalunas, Sarah L.; Geurts, Hilde M.; Konrad, Kerstin; Bender, Stephan; Nigg, Joel T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Intraindividual variability in reaction time (RT) has received extensive discussion as an indicator of cognitive performance, a putative intermediate phenotype of many clinical disorders, and a possible trans-diagnostic phenotype that may elucidate shared risk factors for mechanisms of psychiatric illnesses. Scope and Methodology Using the examples of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), we discuss RT variability. We first present a new meta-analysis of RT variability in ASD with and without comorbid ADHD. We then discuss potential mechanisms that may account for RT variability and statistical models that disentangle the cognitive processes affecting RTs. We then report a second meta-analysis comparing ADHD and non-ADHD children on diffusion model parameters. We consider how findings inform the search for neural correlates of RT variability. Findings Results suggest that RT variability is increased in ASD only when children with comorbid ADHD are included in the sample. Furthermore, RT variability in ADHD is explained by moderate to large increases (d = 0.63–0.99) in the ex-Gaussian parameter τ and the diffusion parameter drift rate, as well as by smaller differences (d = 0.32) in the diffusion parameter of nondecision time. The former may suggest problems in state regulation or arousal and difficulty detecting signal from noise, whereas the latter may reflect contributions from deficits in motor organization or output. The neuroimaging literature converges with this multicomponent interpretation and also highlights the role of top-down control circuits. Conclusion We underscore the importance of considering the interactions between top-down control, state regulation (e.g. arousal), and motor preparation when interpreting RT variability and conclude that decomposition of the RT signal provides superior interpretive power and suggests mechanisms convergent with those implicated using other cognitive

  8. Maailma suurim tool

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    AS Tartu näitused, Tartu Kunstikool ja ajakiri 'Diivan' korraldavad 9.-11. III Tartu messikeskuse I paviljonis näituse 'Tool 2000'. Eksponeeritakse 2000 tooli, mille hulgast valitakse TOP 12. Messikeskuse territooriumile on kavas püstitada maailma suurim tool. Samal ajal II paviljonis kaksikmess 'Sisustus 2000' ja 'Büroo 2000'.

  9. Design mentoring tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 a design engineer on-line mentoring tool was developed and implemented The purpose of the tool was to assist senior engineers : mentoring new engineers to the INDOT design process and improve their technical competency. This approach saves se...

  10. Tool Storage Problem Solved!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenke, Andrew M.; Dell, Tim W.

    2007-01-01

    Graduates of the automotive technology program at Pittsburg State University (PSU) generally enter the workforce in some type of automotive management role. As a result, the program does not require students to purchase their own tools, and it does not have room for all 280 majors to roll around a personal tool chest. Each instructor must maintain…

  11. Rapidly variable relatvistic absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, M.; Pinto, C.; Fabian, A.; Lohfink, A.; Buisson, D.; Alston, W.; Jiang, J.

    2017-10-01

    I will present results from the 1.5Ms XMM-Newton observing campaign on the most X-ray variable AGN, IRAS 13224-3809. We find a series of nine absorption lines with a velocity of 0.24c from an ultra-fast outflow. For the first time, we are able to see extremely rapid variability of the UFO features, and can link this to the X-ray variability from the inner accretion disk. We find a clear flux dependence of the outflow features, suggesting that the wind is ionized by increasing X-ray emission.

  12. Language Management Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum

    This paper offers a review of existing literature on the topic of language management tools – the means by which language is managed – in multilingual organisations. By drawing on a combination of sociolinguistics and international business and management studies, a new taxonomy of language...... management tools is proposed, differentiating between three categories of tools. Firstly, corporate policies are the deliberate control of issues pertaining to language and communication developed at the managerial level of a firm. Secondly, corporate measures are the planned activities the firm’s leadership...... may deploy in order to address the language needs of the organisation. Finally, front-line practices refer to the use of informal, emergent language management tools available to staff members. The language management tools taxonomy provides a framework for operationalising the management of language...

  13. OOTW Force Design Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  14. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF MONETARY POLICY INDICATORS VARIABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANAMARIA POPESCU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to characterize through statistical indicators of statistical data that we have available. The purpose of this paper is to present statistical indicators, primary and secondary, simple and synthetic, which is frequently used for statistical characterization of statistical series. We can thus analyze central tendency, and data variability, form and concentration distributions package data using analytical tools in Microsoft Excel that enables automatic calculation of descriptive statistics using Data Analysis option from the Tools menu. We will also study the links which exist between statistical variables can be studied using two techniques, correlation and regression. From the analysis of monetary policy in the period 2003 - 2014 and information provided by the website of the National Bank of Romania (BNR seems to be a certain tendency towards eccentricity and asymmetry of financial data series.

  15. Variable Heat Rejection (VHR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop advanced technologies to enable a variable heat rejection Thermal Control System (TCS) capable of operating through a wide range of thermal environments...

  16. Variable-Rate Premiums

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation — These interest rates are used to value vested benefits for variable rate premium purposes as described in PBGC's regulation on Premium Rates (29 CFR Part 4006) and...

  17. Variable Attitude Test Stand

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Variable Attitude Test Stand designed and built for testing of the V-22 tilt rotor aircraft propulsion system, is used to evaluate the effect of aircraft flight...

  18. Classical pulsating variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacke, G.

    1987-01-01

    The nature of the three types of classical pulsating variables (δ-Cephei stars, W-Virginis stars and RR-Lyrae stars) is studied. Problems of the light-curve analysis such as (1) the frequency distribution of periods for the three types of classical pulsating variables, (2) spurions periods, (3) changes of periods and multiple periodicity as well as (4) the Blazhko-effect and other changes of the light-curve form are discussed

  19. Calculus of one variable

    CERN Document Server

    Grossman, Stanley I

    1986-01-01

    Calculus of One Variable, Second Edition presents the essential topics in the study of the techniques and theorems of calculus.The book provides a comprehensive introduction to calculus. It contains examples, exercises, the history and development of calculus, and various applications. Some of the topics discussed in the text include the concept of limits, one-variable theory, the derivatives of all six trigonometric functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and infinite series.This textbook is intended for use by college students.

  20. Software Testing Requires Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    2003-01-01

    Software variability is the ability of a software system or artefact to be changed, customized or configured for use in a particular context. Variability in software systems is important from a number of perspectives. Some perspectives rightly receive much attention due to their direct economic...... impact in software production. As is also apparent from the call for papers these perspectives focus on qualities such as reuse, adaptability, and maintainability....

  1. Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle: Dynamics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A. Y.; Le, N. T.; Marriott, A. T.

    1997-01-01

    The Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle (VDTV) concept has been proposed as a tool to evaluate collision avoidance systems and to perform driving-related human factors research. The goal of this study is to analytically investigate to what extent a VDTV with adjustable front and rear anti-roll bar stiffnesses, programmable damping rates, and four-wheel-steering can emulate the lateral dynamics of a broad range of passenger vehicles.

  2. The induction on a continuous variable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingzhong.

    1989-06-01

    Mathematical induction is a useful tool. But it could be used to prove only the proposition with form P(n) for the natural number n. Could the natural number n be replaced by a continuous variable x? Yes, and then we have the continuous induction. The continuous induction is very easy to grasp by the students who have learned mathematical induction. And it can be used to prove many basic propositions in the elementary calculus. (author)

  3. Evacuation performance evaluation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farra, Sharon; Miller, Elaine T; Gneuhs, Matthew; Timm, Nathan; Li, Gengxin; Simon, Ashley; Brady, Whittney

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals conduct evacuation exercises to improve performance during emergency events. An essential aspect in this process is the creation of reliable and valid evaluation tools. The objective of this article is to describe the development and implications of a disaster evacuation performance tool that measures one portion of the very complex process of evacuation. Through the application of the Delphi technique and DeVellis's framework, disaster and neonatal experts provided input in developing this performance evaluation tool. Following development, content validity and reliability of this tool were assessed. Large pediatric hospital and medical center in the Midwest. The tool was pilot tested with an administrative, medical, and nursing leadership group and then implemented with a group of 68 healthcare workers during a disaster exercise of a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The tool has demonstrated high content validity with a scale validity index of 0.979 and inter-rater reliability G coefficient (0.984, 95% CI: 0.948-0.9952). The Delphi process based on the conceptual framework of DeVellis yielded a psychometrically sound evacuation performance evaluation tool for a NICU.

  4. Tools for Detecting Causality in Space Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J.; Wing, S.

    2017-12-01

    Complex systems such as the solar and magnetospheric envivonment often exhibit patterns of behavior that suggest underlying organizing principles. Causality is a key organizing principle that is particularly difficult to establish in strongly coupled nonlinear systems, but essential for understanding and modeling the behavior of systems. While traditional methods of time-series analysis can identify linear correlations, they do not adequately quantify the distinction between causal and coincidental dependence. We discuss tools for detecting causality including: granger causality, transfer entropy, conditional redundancy, and convergent cross maps. The tools are illustrated by applications to magnetospheric and solar physics including radiation belt, Dst (a magnetospheric state variable), substorm, and solar cycle dynamics.

  5. AN Fitting Reconditioning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jason

    2011-01-01

    A tool was developed to repair or replace AN fittings on the shuttle external tank (ET). (The AN thread is a type of fitting used to connect flexible hoses and rigid metal tubing that carry fluid. It is a U.S. military-derived specification agreed upon by the Army and Navy, hence AN.) The tool is used on a drill and is guided by a pilot shaft that follows the inside bore. The cutting edge of the tool is a standard-size replaceable insert. In the typical Post Launch Maintenance/Repair process for the AN fittings, the six fittings are removed from the ET's GUCP (ground umbilical carrier plate) for reconditioning. The fittings are inspected for damage to the sealing surface per standard operations maintenance instructions. When damage is found on the sealing surface, the condition is documented. A new AN reconditioning tool is set up to cut and remove the surface damage. It is then inspected to verify the fitting still meets drawing requirements. The tool features a cone-shaped interior at 36.5 , and may be adjusted at a precise angle with go-no-go gauges to insure that the cutting edge could be adjusted as it wore down. One tool, one setting block, and one go-no-go gauge were fabricated. At the time of this reporting, the tool has reconditioned/returned to spec 36 AN fittings with 100-percent success of no leakage. This tool provides a quick solution to repair a leaky AN fitting. The tool could easily be modified with different-sized pilot shafts to different-sized fittings.

  6. Graphitic packing removal tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Kurt Edward; Kolsun, George J.

    1997-01-01

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece. he packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  7. TOOLS FOR DETECTING CHAOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah BEDRİ ÖZER

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available I n this study, useful tools for detecting chaos are explained. To observe the state variabtes (time series}, the phase portrait, the Poincare map, the power spectrum, the Lyapunov exponents and bifurcation diagram are used to detect chaos in dynamical systems. In this paper, the driven pendulum was choosen indicating chaos with the help of these tools. The existence of chaos in driven pendulum was shown with all methods. Simulation results obtained from all tools agree with each other. Also, control of chaos in driven pendulum was realized in this study

  8. Machine tool evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunsford, B.E.

    1976-01-01

    Continued improvement in numerical control (NC) units and the mechanical components used in the construction of today's machine tools, necessitate the use of more precise instrumentation to calibrate and determine the capabilities of these systems. It is now necessary to calibrate most tape-control lathes to a tool-path positioning accuracy of +-300 microinches in the full slide travel and, on some special turning and boring machines, a capability of +-100 microinches must be achieved. The use of a laser interferometer to determine tool-path capabilities is described

  9. Electricity of machine tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gijeon media editorial department

    1977-10-01

    This book is divided into three parts. The first part deals with electricity machine, which can taints from generator to motor, motor a power source of machine tool, electricity machine for machine tool such as switch in main circuit, automatic machine, a knife switch and pushing button, snap switch, protection device, timer, solenoid, and rectifier. The second part handles wiring diagram. This concludes basic electricity circuit of machine tool, electricity wiring diagram in your machine like milling machine, planer and grinding machine. The third part introduces fault diagnosis of machine, which gives the practical solution according to fault diagnosis and the diagnostic method with voltage and resistance measurement by tester.

  10. Interactive knowledge acquisition tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudziak, Martin J.; Feinstein, Jerald L.

    1987-01-01

    The problems of designing practical tools to aid the knowledge engineer and general applications used in performing knowledge acquisition tasks are discussed. A particular approach was developed for the class of knowledge acquisition problem characterized by situations where acquisition and transformation of domain expertise are often bottlenecks in systems development. An explanation is given on how the tool and underlying software engineering principles can be extended to provide a flexible set of tools that allow the application specialist to build highly customized knowledge-based applications.

  11. New Conceptual Design Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugnale, Alberto; Holst, Malene Kirstine; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss recent approaches in using more and more frequently computer tools as supports for the conceptual design phase of the architectural project. The present state-of-the-art about software as conceptual design tool could be summarized in two parallel tendencies. On the one...... with the problem of software as conceptual design tool by means of 'scripting', in other words by self-developing codes able to solve specific and well defined design problems. Starting with a brief historical recall and the discussion of relevant researches and practical experiences, this paper investigates...... for conceptual design in architecture....

  12. A Comparison of Pseudo-Maximum Likelihood and Asymptotically Distribution-Free Dynamic Factor Analysis Parameter Estimation in Fitting Covariance-Structure Models to Block-Toeplitz Representing Single-Subject Multivariate Time-Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, P.C.M.; Nesselroade, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    The study of intraindividual variability pervades empirical inquiry in virtually all subdisciplines of psychology. The statistical analysis of multivariate time-series data - a central product of intraindividual investigations - requires special modeling techniques. The dynamic factor model (DFM),

  13. Correlation between moderate daily physical activity and neurocognitive variability in healthy elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Ken; Yasunaga, Akitomo; Wang, Li-Qun

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that moderate physical activity in daily life contributes to maintenance of a proper state of cognitive function in elderly individuals. The present study investigated the validity of correlations between moderate physical activity and cognitive function using more objective and detailed assessments of both physical activity and neurocognitive function. Participants comprised 72 healthy elderly individuals who wore an electronic accelerometer during waking hours for 3 months. This device recorded the number of steps per day as well as the duration of each intensity level in daily life; levels 1-3 were the equivalent of easy-paced walking (light activity), while levels 4-6 corresponded to brisk walking (moderate activity). To estimate executive cognitive ability in healthy elderly individuals, performance variability of executive control was examined with a task-switching reaction time (RT) test measuring intra-individual variability (IIV) in RTs. In 43 consenting participants, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the task-switching RT trial was analyzed to assess differences in brain activity patterns as a function of daily physical activity. Daily duration of level 4 physical activity correlated negatively with and significantly predicted IIV. Moreover, fMRI analysis confirmed that the higher physical activity group (duration of level 4 activity ≥ 26.4 min/day) showed significantly reduced age-related functional attenuation of prefrontal activations during the task-switching RT trial. The study discusses the possibility that enhancing the moderate daily physical activity could be helpful for lowering the rate of neurocognitive degradations in healthy elderly individuals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Time variability of C-reactive protein: implications for clinical risk stratification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bogaty

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is proposed as a screening test for predicting risk and guiding preventive approaches in coronary artery disease (CAD. However, the stability of repeated CRP measurements over time in subjects with and without CAD is not well defined. We sought to determine the stability of serial CRP measurements in stable subjects with distinct CAD manifestations and a group without CAD while carefully controlling for known confounders.We prospectively studied 4 groups of 25 stable subjects each 1 a history of recurrent acute coronary events; 2 a single myocardial infarction ≥7 years ago; 3 longstanding CAD (≥7 years that had never been unstable; 4 no CAD. Fifteen measurements of CRP were obtained to cover 21 time-points: 3 times during one day; 5 consecutive days; 4 consecutive weeks; 4 consecutive months; and every 3 months over the year. CRP risk threshold was set at 2.0 mg/L. We estimated variance across time-points using standard descriptive statistics and Bayesian hierarchical models.Median CRP values of the 4 groups and their pattern of variability did not differ substantially so all subjects were analyzed together. The median individual standard deviation (SD CRP values within-day, within-week, between-weeks and between-months were 0.07, 0.19, 0.36 and 0.63 mg/L, respectively. Forty-six percent of subjects changed CRP risk category at least once and 21% had ≥4 weekly and monthly CRP values in both low and high-risk categories.Considering its large intra-individual variability, it may be problematic to rely on CRP values for CAD risk prediction and therapeutic decision-making in individual subjects.

  15. Sequence History Update Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanampompan, Teerapat; Gladden, Roy; Fisher, Forest; DelGuercio, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Sequence History Update Tool performs Web-based sequence statistics archiving for Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Using a single UNIX command, the software takes advantage of sequencing conventions to automatically extract the needed statistics from multiple files. This information is then used to populate a PHP database, which is then seamlessly formatted into a dynamic Web page. This tool replaces a previous tedious and error-prone process of manually editing HTML code to construct a Web-based table. Because the tool manages all of the statistics gathering and file delivery to and from multiple data sources spread across multiple servers, there is also a considerable time and effort savings. With the use of The Sequence History Update Tool what previously took minutes is now done in less than 30 seconds, and now provides a more accurate archival record of the sequence commanding for MRO.

  16. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  17. Clean Energy Finance Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    State and local governments interested in developing a financing program can use this Excel tool to support energy efficiency and clean energy improvements for large numbers of buildings within their jurisdiction.

  18. Tool Inventory and Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, W. Forrest

    1976-01-01

    Vocational agriculture teachers are encouraged to evaluate curriculum offerings, the new trends in business and industry, and develop a master tool purchase and replacement plan over a 3- to 5-year period. (HD)

  19. Chatter and machine tools

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Focussing on occurrences of unstable vibrations, or Chatter, in machine tools, this book gives important insights into how to eliminate chatter with associated improvements in product quality, surface finish and tool wear. Covering a wide range of machining processes, including turning, drilling, milling and grinding, the author uses his research expertise and practical knowledge of vibration problems to provide solutions supported by experimental evidence of their effectiveness. In addition, this book contains links to supplementary animation programs that help readers to visualise the ideas detailed in the text. Advancing knowledge in chatter avoidance and suggesting areas for new innovations, Chatter and Machine Tools serves as a handbook for those desiring to achieve significant reductions in noise, longer tool and grinding wheel life and improved product finish.

  20. Green Infrastructure Modeling Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modeling tools support planning and design decisions on a range of scales from setting a green infrastructure target for an entire watershed to designing a green infrastructure practice for a particular site.

  1. Neighborhood Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This tool assists the public and Choice Neighborhoods applicants to prepare data to submit with their grant application by allowing applicants to draw the exact...

  2. Game development tool essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Berinstein, Paula; Ardolino, Alessandro; Franco, Simon; Herubel, Adrien; McCutchan, John; Nedelcu, Nicusor; Nitschke, Benjamin; Olmstead, Don; Robinet, Fabrice; Ronchi, Christian; Turkowski, Rita; Walter, Robert; Samour, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Offers game developers new techniques for streamlining the critical game tools pipeline. Inspires game developers to share their secrets and improve the productivity of the entire industry. Helps game industry practitioners compete in a hyper-competitive environment.

  3. Water Budget Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you're designing a new landscape or rethinking your current one, the WaterSense Water Budget Tool will tell you if you have designed a landscape that will use an appropriate amount of water for your climate.

  4. Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Office of Minority Health has designed an interactive map, the Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool, to identify areas of disparities between subgroups of...

  5. Recovery Action Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Recovery Action Mapping Tool is a web map that allows users to visually interact with and query actions that were developed to recover species listed under the...

  6. Tools and their uses

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    Teaches names, general uses, and correct operation of all basic hand and power tools, fasteners, and measuring devices you are likely to need. Also, grinding, metal cutting, soldering, and more. 329 illustrations.

  7. Tile-bonding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynie, C. C.; Holt, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Device applies uniform, constant, precise pressure to hold tiles in place during bonding. Tool consists of pressure bladders supported by adjustable pole. Pole can accomodate single or multiple bladders. Tiles can be flat or contoured.

  8. Landscape Water Budget Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense created the Water Budget Tool as one option to help builders, landscape professionals, and irrigation professionals certified by a WaterSense labeled program meet the criteria specified in the WaterSense New Home Specification.

  9. Cash Reconciliation Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — CART is a cash reconciliation tool that allows users to reconcile Agency cash disbursements with Treasury fund balances; track open unreconciled items; and create an...

  10. Chemical Data Access Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This tool is intended to aid individuals interested in learning more about chemicals that are manufactured or imported into the United States. Health and safety...

  11. ATO Resource Tool -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Cru-X/ART is a shift management tool designed for?use by operational employees in Air Traffic Facilities.? Cru-X/ART is used for shift scheduling, shift sign in/out,...

  12. Microgrid Analysis Tools Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Antonio [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Haase, Scott G [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mathur, Shivani [Formerly NREL

    2018-03-05

    The over-arching goal of the Alaska Microgrid Partnership is to reduce the use of total imported fuel into communities to secure all energy services by at least 50% in Alaska's remote microgrids without increasing system life cycle costs while also improving overall system reliability, security, and resilience. One goal of the Alaska Microgrid Partnership is to investigate whether a combination of energy efficiency and high-contribution (from renewable energy) power systems can reduce total imported energy usage by 50% while reducing life cycle costs and improving reliability and resiliency. This presentation provides an overview of the following four renewable energy optimization tools. Information is from respective tool websites, tool developers, and author experience. Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) Microgrid Design Toolkit (MDT) Renewable Energy Optimization (REopt) Tool Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewables (HOMER).

  13. Neuroanatomical variability of religiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Barbey, Aron K; Su, Michael; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2009-09-28

    We hypothesized that religiosity, a set of traits variably expressed in the population, is modulated by neuroanatomical variability. We tested this idea by determining whether aspects of religiosity were predicted by variability in regional cortical volume. We performed structural magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in 40 healthy adult participants who reported different degrees and patterns of religiosity on a survey. We identified four Principal Components of religiosity by Factor Analysis of the survey items and associated them with regional cortical volumes measured by voxel-based morphometry. Experiencing an intimate relationship with God and engaging in religious behavior was associated with increased volume of R middle temporal cortex, BA 21. Experiencing fear of God was associated with decreased volume of L precuneus and L orbitofrontal cortex BA 11. A cluster of traits related with pragmatism and doubting God's existence was associated with increased volume of the R precuneus. Variability in religiosity of upbringing was not associated with variability in cortical volume of any region. Therefore, key aspects of religiosity are associated with cortical volume differences. This conclusion complements our prior functional neuroimaging findings in elucidating the proximate causes of religion in the brain.

  14. Scheme Program Documentation Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses two different Scheme documentation tools. The first is SchemeDoc, which is intended for documentation of the interfaces of Scheme libraries (APIs). The second is the Scheme Elucidator, which is for internal documentation of Scheme programs. Although the tools...... as named functions in Scheme. Finally, the Scheme Elucidator is able to integrate SchemeDoc resources as part of an internal documentation resource....

  15. Population Density Modeling Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    194 POPULATION DENSITY MODELING TOOL by Davy Andrew Michael Knott David Burke 26 June 2012 Distribution...MARYLAND NAWCADPAX/TR-2012/194 26 June 2012 POPULATION DENSITY MODELING TOOL by Davy Andrew Michael Knott David Burke...information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 26

  16. CMS offline web tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metson, S; Newbold, D; Belforte, S; Kavka, C; Bockelman, B; Dziedziniewicz, K; Egeland, R; Elmer, P; Eulisse, G; Tuura, L; Evans, D; Fanfani, A; Feichtinger, D; Kuznetsov, V; Lingen, F van; Wakefield, S

    2008-01-01

    We describe a relatively new effort within CMS to converge on a set of web based tools, using state of the art industry techniques, to engage with the CMS offline computing system. CMS collaborators require tools to monitor various components of the computing system and interact with the system itself. The current state of the various CMS web tools is described along side current planned developments. The CMS collaboration comprises of nearly 3000 people from all over the world. As well as its collaborators, its computing resources are spread all over globe and are accessed via the LHC grid to run analysis, large scale production and data transfer tasks. Due to the distributed nature of collaborators effective provision of collaborative tools is essential to maximise physics exploitation of the CMS experiment, especially when the size of the CMS data set is considered. CMS has chosen to provide such tools over the world wide web as a top level service, enabling all members of the collaboration to interact with the various offline computing components. Traditionally web interfaces have been added in HEP experiments as an afterthought. In the CMS offline we have decided to put web interfaces, and the development of a common CMS web framework, on an equal footing with the rest of the offline development. Tools exist within CMS to transfer and catalogue data (PhEDEx and DBS/DLS), run Monte Carlo production (ProdAgent) and submit analysis (CRAB). Effective human interfaces to these systems are required for users with different agendas and practical knowledge of the systems to effectively use the CMS computing system. The CMS web tools project aims to provide a consistent interface to all these tools

  17. VDC Monitoring Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Porat, Itay Gershon

    2017-01-01

    Electron drift velocity is an important parameter for muon path reconstruction capabilities of CMS drift tube chambers. The parameter is monitored independently by six dedicated drift velocity chambers (VDC). This report presents monitoring tools developed to study key VDC parameters such as anode voltage and current, as well as gas source. These graphical tools can be used to learn about VDC operation and performance, and contribute to understanding anode wire aging in the systems.

  18. Behavioral variability and consistency: Experimental bases for a psychological theory of personality (Variabilidad y Consistencia individual: Bases experimentales de la teoría de la personalidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Santacreu Mas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explain how and why individual differences emerge despite accounting for biological andsocio-cultural differences, why people behave differently in the same context, and how behavior becomes stable and consistent. We review the experimental work on variability and stereotypy. In animal research, in contrast to expectations, there is interindividual variability in behavior under extreme environmental control. In addition, intraindividual consistency (stereotypy is detected in animals whose behavior is not fully adjusted to the contingencies. The differences in what is learned (the kind of contingency relations among laboratory animals can be explained by: a the differences between effective contingencies and programmed contingencies, and b the relationship between exploration and rate of reinforcement. In experimental studies in humans, learning differences in identical environments depend, further to the above, onwhat was previously learned by the individual (experience and education and the thoroughness and internal consistency of task instructions. From these concepts, we propose a psychological theory of personality that explains: (a how we learn different relationships from the same experience; (b how behavioral individual differences emerge (variability; and (cwhy each individual’s behavior becomes stable and consistent.

  19. Purposeful selection of variables in logistic regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams David Keith

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main problem in many model-building situations is to choose from a large set of covariates those that should be included in the "best" model. A decision to keep a variable in the model might be based on the clinical or statistical significance. There are several variable selection algorithms in existence. Those methods are mechanical and as such carry some limitations. Hosmer and Lemeshow describe a purposeful selection of covariates within which an analyst makes a variable selection decision at each step of the modeling process. Methods In this paper we introduce an algorithm which automates that process. We conduct a simulation study to compare the performance of this algorithm with three well documented variable selection procedures in SAS PROC LOGISTIC: FORWARD, BACKWARD, and STEPWISE. Results We show that the advantage of this approach is when the analyst is interested in risk factor modeling and not just prediction. In addition to significant covariates, this variable selection procedure has the capability of retaining important confounding variables, resulting potentially in a slightly richer model. Application of the macro is further illustrated with the Hosmer and Lemeshow Worchester Heart Attack Study (WHAS data. Conclusion If an analyst is in need of an algorithm that will help guide the retention of significant covariates as well as confounding ones they should consider this macro as an alternative tool.

  20. Benford's law and continuous dependent random variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Thealexa; Burt, David; Corcoran, Taylor C.; Greaves-Tunnell, Alec; Iafrate, Joseph R.; Jing, Joy; Miller, Steven J.; Porfilio, Jaclyn D.; Ronan, Ryan; Samranvedhya, Jirapat; Strauch, Frederick W.; Talbut, Blaine

    2018-01-01

    Many mathematical, man-made and natural systems exhibit a leading-digit bias, where a first digit (base 10) of 1 occurs not 11% of the time, as one would expect if all digits were equally likely, but rather 30%. This phenomenon is known as Benford's Law. Analyzing which datasets adhere to Benford's Law and how quickly Benford behavior sets in are the two most important problems in the field. Most previous work studied systems of independent random variables, and relied on the independence in their analyses. Inspired by natural processes such as particle decay, we study the dependent random variables that emerge from models of decomposition of conserved quantities. We prove that in many instances the distribution of lengths of the resulting pieces converges to Benford behavior as the number of divisions grow, and give several conjectures for other fragmentation processes. The main difficulty is that the resulting random variables are dependent. We handle this by using tools from Fourier analysis and irrationality exponents to obtain quantified convergence rates as well as introducing and developing techniques to measure and control the dependencies. The construction of these tools is one of the major motivations of this work, as our approach can be applied to many other dependent systems. As an example, we show that the n ! entries in the determinant expansions of n × n matrices with entries independently drawn from nice random variables converges to Benford's Law.

  1. Tools used for hand deburring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1981-03-01

    This guide is designed to help in quick identification of those tools most commonly used to deburr hand size or smaller parts. Photographs and textual descriptions are used to provide rapid yet detailed information. The data presented include the Bendix Kansas City Division coded tool number, tool description, tool crib in which the tool can be found, the maximum and minimum inventory requirements, the cost of each tool, and the number of the illustration that shows the tool.

  2. Didactic tools for understanding respiratory physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehoe, P Donnelly; Bratovich, C; Perrone, Ms; Castells, L Mendez [Catedra de FisiologIa y BiofIsica - Facultad de Ingenieria - Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios - Ruta Provincial N011 Km. 10, 5 - Oro Verde C.P. 3101 - Entre Rios (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    The challenges in Bioengineering are not only the application of engineering knowledge to the measurement of physiological variables, but also the simulation of biological systems. Experience has shown that the physiology of the respiratory system involves a set of concepts that cannot be effectively taught without the help of a group of didactic tools that contribute to the measurement of characteristic specific variables and to the simulation of the system itself. This article describes a series of tools designed to optimize the teaching of the respiratory system, including the use of spirometers and software developed entirely by undergraduate Bioengineering students from Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios (UNER). The impact these resources have caused on the understanding of the topic and how each of them has facilitated the interpretation of the concepts by the students is also discussed.

  3. Pulsating red variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitelock, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The observational characteristics of pulsating red variables are reviewed with particular emphasis on the Miras. These variables represent the last stage in the evolution of stars on the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB). A large fraction of the IRAS sources in the Bulge are Mira variables and a subset of these are also OH/IR sources. Their periods range up to 720 days, though most are between 360 and 560 days. At a given period those stars with the highest pulsation amplitudes have the highest mass-loss rates; this is interpreted as evidence for a causal connection between mass-loss and pulsation. It is suggested that once an AGB star has become a Mira it will evolve with increasing pulsation amplitude and mass-loss, but with very little change of luminosity or logarithmic period. 26 refs

  4. Internal variables in thermoelasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Berezovski, Arkadi

    2017-01-01

    This book describes an effective method for modeling advanced materials like polymers, composite materials and biomaterials, which are, as a rule, inhomogeneous. The thermoelastic theory with internal variables presented here provides a general framework for predicting a material’s reaction to external loading. The basic physical principles provide the primary theoretical information, including the evolution equations of the internal variables. The cornerstones of this framework are the material representation of continuum mechanics, a weak nonlocality, a non-zero extra entropy flux, and a consecutive employment of the dissipation inequality. Examples of thermoelastic phenomena are provided, accompanied by detailed procedures demonstrating how to simulate them.

  5. Resiliencia y variables sociodemograficas

    OpenAIRE

    Calero Martinez, Edgar David

    2015-01-01

    En el presente trabajo se aborda la definición de una de las variables dentro de lo que se denomina Capital psicológico positivo, la Resiliencia, sus principales características y algunas de las variables socio demográficas que en el estudio pretenden ver el nivel de relación existente entre cada una de ellas (indirecta o directamente) en el proceso resiliente de una persona para posteriores discusiones y su implicación dentro de la gestión empresarial y sus direcciones futuras.

  6. Complex variables I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Complex Variables I includes functions of a complex variable, elementary complex functions, integrals of complex functions in the complex plane, sequences and series, and poles and r

  7. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Ryu, Youngryel; Keenan, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    A growing literature is reporting on how the terrestrial carbon cycle is experiencing year-to-year variability because of climate anomalies and trends caused by global change. As CO 2 concentration records in the atmosphere exceed 50 years and as satellite records reach over 30 years in length, we are becoming better able to address carbon cycle variability and trends. Here we review how variable the carbon cycle is, how large the trends in its gross and net fluxes are, and how well the signal can be separated from noise. We explore mechanisms that explain year-to-year variability and trends by deconstructing the global carbon budget. The CO 2 concentration record is detecting a significant increase in the seasonal amplitude between 1958 and now. Inferential methods provide a variety of explanations for this result, but a conclusive attribution remains elusive. Scientists have reported that this trend is a consequence of the greening of the biosphere, stronger northern latitude photosynthesis, more photosynthesis by semi-arid ecosystems, agriculture and the green revolution, tropical temperature anomalies, or increased winter respiration. At the global scale, variability in the terrestrial carbon cycle can be due to changes in constituent fluxes, gross primary productivity, plant respiration and heterotrophic (microbial) respiration, and losses due to fire, land use change, soil erosion, or harvesting. It remains controversial whether or not there is a significant trend in global primary productivity (due to rising CO 2 , temperature, nitrogen deposition, changing land use, and preponderance of wet and dry regions). The degree to which year-to-year variability in temperature and precipitation anomalies affect global primary productivity also remains uncertain. For perspective, interannual variability in global gross primary productivity is relatively small (on the order of 2 Pg-C y -1 ) with respect to a large and uncertain background (123 +/- 4 Pg-C y -1 ), and

  8. Parametric programming of CNC machine tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gołębski Rafał

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the possibilities of parametric programming of CNC machine tools for the SINUMERIK 840D sl control system. The kinds and types of the definition of variables for the control system under discussion described. On the example of the longitudinal cutting cycle, parametric programming possibilities are shown. The program’s code and its implementation in the control system is described in detail. The principle of parametric programming in a high-level language is also explained.

  9. A new approach to assessing intra-subject variability in single-subject designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy Borodkin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Research Aim: One of the methodological challenges of single-subject designs is accounting for intra-individual variability in performance, which is commonly assessed by applying the same testing materials on multiple sessions (McReynolds & Thompson, 1986. This approach might be less feasible in some individuals, such as bilingual speakers with aphasia, who would need to be tested, using the same materials, on several occasions within as well as across languages. Repetitive exposure to the same testing materials can increase practice effects and further reduce the validity of the testing. In the present study, we explored an alternative approach to measuring stability in performance by comparing the use of identical vs. different (but comparable testing materials. Method: Participants were five monolinguals with non-fluent aphasia following a single left CVA. Participants performed an action-naming task and two narrative tasks: a picture sequence and a personal narrative. There were two testing times, several weeks apart using identical materials. Each testing time included three consecutive sessions, using different materials. Action-naming performance was assessed by the number of correct verbs produced. The verbal output in the narrative tasks was scored for amount (number of utterances, grammaticality (percentage of grammatical sentences, and verb diversity (number of different verbs. Pearson correlation coefficients (r were computed to establish the intra-subject variability across testing times and across sessions. The magnitude of the correlations was evaluated using published guidelines (Strauss, Sherman, & Spreen, 2006. Results: For action naming, the correlations ranged from high to very high (.87 to .98 across testing times and from adequate to very high across sessions (.74 to .96. For the narrative tasks, the correlations between the number of utterances across testing times ranged from adequate to very high (.76 to .97 and from low

  10. Response variability in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: a neuronal and glial energetics hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Vivienne A; Oades, Robert D; Tannock, Rosemary; Killeen, Peter R; Auerbach, Judith G; Johansen, Espen B; Sagvolden, Terje

    2006-08-23

    Current concepts of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) emphasize the role of higher-order cognitive functions and reinforcement processes attributed to structural and biochemical anomalies in cortical and limbic neural networks innervated by the monoamines, dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin. However, these explanations do not account for the ubiquitous findings in ADHD of intra-individual performance variability, particularly on tasks that require continual responses to rapid, externally-paced stimuli. Nor do they consider attention as a temporal process dependent upon a continuous energy supply for efficient and consistent function. A consideration of this feature of intra-individual response variability, which is not unique to ADHD but is also found in other disorders, leads to a new perspective on the causes and potential remedies of specific aspects of ADHD. We propose that in ADHD, astrocyte function is insufficient, particularly in terms of its formation and supply of lactate. This insufficiency has implications both for performance and development: H1) In rapidly firing neurons there is deficient ATP production, slow restoration of ionic gradients across neuronal membranes and delayed neuronal firing; H2) In oligodendrocytes insufficient lactate supply impairs fatty acid synthesis and myelination of axons during development. These effects occur over vastly different time scales: those due to deficient ATP (H1) occur over milliseconds, whereas those due to deficient myelination (H2) occur over months and years. Collectively the neural outcomes of impaired astrocytic release of lactate manifest behaviourally as inefficient and inconsistent performance (variable response times across the lifespan, especially during activities that require sustained speeded responses and complex information processing). Multi-level and multi-method approaches are required. These include: 1) Use of dynamic strategies to evaluate cognitive performance under

  11. Response variability in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: a neuronal and glial energetics hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auerbach Judith G

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available 1. Abstract Background Current concepts of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD emphasize the role of higher-order cognitive functions and reinforcement processes attributed to structural and biochemical anomalies in cortical and limbic neural networks innervated by the monoamines, dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin. However, these explanations do not account for the ubiquitous findings in ADHD of intra-individual performance variability, particularly on tasks that require continual responses to rapid, externally-paced stimuli. Nor do they consider attention as a temporal process dependent upon a continuous energy supply for efficient and consistent function. A consideration of this feature of intra-individual response variability, which is not unique to ADHD but is also found in other disorders, leads to a new perspective on the causes and potential remedies of specific aspects of ADHD. The hypothesis We propose that in ADHD, astrocyte function is insufficient, particularly in terms of its formation and supply of lactate. This insufficiency has implications both for performance and development: H1 In rapidly firing neurons there is deficient ATP production, slow restoration of ionic gradients across neuronal membranes and delayed neuronal firing; H2 In oligodendrocytes insufficient lactate supply impairs fatty acid synthesis and myelination of axons during development. These effects occur over vastly different time scales: those due to deficient ATP (H1 occur over milliseconds, whereas those due to deficient myelination (H2 occur over months and years. Collectively the neural outcomes of impaired astrocytic release of lactate manifest behaviourally as inefficient and inconsistent performance (variable response times across the lifespan, especially during activities that require sustained speeded responses and complex information processing. Testing the hypothesis Multi-level and multi-method approaches are required. These include

  12. Biological Sampling Variability Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amidan, Brett G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hutchison, Janine R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-11-08

    There are many sources of variability that exist in the sample collection and analysis process. This paper addresses many, but not all, sources of variability. The main focus of this paper was to better understand and estimate variability due to differences between samplers. Variability between days was also studied, as well as random variability within each sampler. Experiments were performed using multiple surface materials (ceramic and stainless steel), multiple contaminant concentrations (10 spores and 100 spores), and with and without the presence of interfering material. All testing was done with sponge sticks using 10-inch by 10-inch coupons. Bacillus atrophaeus was used as the BA surrogate. Spores were deposited using wet deposition. Grime was coated on the coupons which were planned to include the interfering material (Section 3.3). Samples were prepared and analyzed at PNNL using CDC protocol (Section 3.4) and then cultured and counted. Five samplers were trained so that samples were taken using the same protocol. Each sampler randomly sampled eight coupons each day, four coupons with 10 spores deposited and four coupons with 100 spores deposited. Each day consisted of one material being tested. The clean samples (no interfering materials) were run first, followed by the dirty samples (coated with interfering material). There was a significant difference in recovery efficiency between the coupons with 10 spores deposited (mean of 48.9%) and those with 100 spores deposited (mean of 59.8%). There was no general significant difference between the clean and dirty (containing interfering material) coupons or between the two surface materials; however, there was a significant interaction between concentration amount and presence of interfering material. The recovery efficiency was close to the same for coupons with 10 spores deposited, but for the coupons with 100 spores deposited, the recovery efficiency for the dirty samples was significantly larger (65

  13. Physics analysis tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, P.F.

    1991-04-01

    There are many tools used in analysis in High Energy Physics (HEP). They range from low level tools such as a programming language to high level such as a detector simulation package. This paper will discuss some aspects of these tools that are directly associated with the process of analyzing HEP data. Physics analysis tools cover the whole range from the simulation of the interactions of particles to the display and fitting of statistical data. For purposes of this paper, the stages of analysis is broken down to five main stages. The categories are also classified as areas of generation, reconstruction, and analysis. Different detector groups use different terms for these stages thus it is useful to define what is meant by them in this paper. The particle generation stage is a simulation of the initial interaction, the production of particles, and the decay of the short lived particles. The detector simulation stage simulates the behavior of an event in a detector. The track reconstruction stage does pattern recognition on the measured or simulated space points, calorimeter information, etc., and reconstructs track segments of the original event. The event reconstruction stage takes the reconstructed tracks, along with particle identification information and assigns masses to produce 4-vectors. Finally the display and fit stage displays statistical data accumulated in the preceding stages in the form of histograms, scatter plots, etc. The remainder of this paper will consider what analysis tools are available today, and what one might expect in the future. In each stage, the integration of the tools with other stages and the portability of the tool will be analyzed

  14. INTER-EXAMINER VARIABILITY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To establish whether inter-examiner variability is still a significant factor for the undergraduate orthopaedic clinical ... D. The scores for each student were tabulated and the range, mean, and pass rate determined for each of the examiners. ... has not the heart to reject the man”, consistently gave higher scores (1).

  15. All Those Independent Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meacham, Merle L.

    This paper presents a case study of a sixth grade remedial math class which illustrates the thesis that only the "experimental attitude," not the "experimental method," is appropriate in the classroom. The thesis is based on the fact that too many independent variables exist in a classroom situation to allow precise measurement. The case study…

  16. Variable speed generators

    CERN Document Server

    Boldea, Ion

    2005-01-01

    With the deregulation of electrical energy production and distribution, says Boldea (Polytechnical Institute, Timisoara, Romania) producers are looking for ways to tailor their electricity for different markets. Variable-speed electric generators are serving that purpose, up to the 400 megavolt ampere unit size, in Japan since 1996 and Germany sinc

  17. Variability in GPS sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jauncey, DL; King, EA; Bignall, HE; Lovell, JEJ; Kedziora-Chudczer, L; Tzioumis, AK; Tingay, SJ; Macquart, JP; McCulloch, PM

    2003-01-01

    Flux density monitoring data at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz is presented for a sample of 33 southern hemisphere GPS sources, drawn from the 2.7 GHz Parkes survey. This monitoring data, together with VLBI monitoring data, shows that a small fraction of these sources, similar to10%, vary. Their variability falls

  18. Validation and Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carusi, Annamaria

    2014-01-01

    Systems biology is currently making a bid to show that it is able to make an important contribution to personalised or precision medicine. In order to do so, systems biologists need to find a way of tackling the pervasive variability of biological systems that is manifested in the medical domain...

  19. Surfing wave climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, Antonio; Losada, Iñigo J.; Méndez, Fernando J.

    2014-10-01

    International surfing destinations are highly dependent on specific combinations of wind-wave formation, thermal conditions and local bathymetry. Surf quality depends on a vast number of geophysical variables, and analyses of surf quality require the consideration of the seasonal, interannual and long-term variability of surf conditions on a global scale. A multivariable standardized index based on expert judgment is proposed for this purpose. This index makes it possible to analyze surf conditions objectively over a global domain. A summary of global surf resources based on a new index integrating existing wave, wind, tides and sea surface temperature databases is presented. According to general atmospheric circulation and swell propagation patterns, results show that west-facing low to middle-latitude coasts are more suitable for surfing, especially those in the Southern Hemisphere. Month-to-month analysis reveals strong seasonal variations in the occurrence of surfable events, enhancing the frequency of such events in the North Atlantic and the North Pacific. Interannual variability was investigated by comparing occurrence values with global and regional modes of low-frequency climate variability such as El Niño and the North Atlantic Oscillation, revealing their strong influence at both the global and the regional scale. Results of the long-term trends demonstrate an increase in the probability of surfable events on west-facing coasts around the world in recent years. The resulting maps provide useful information for surfers, the surf tourism industry and surf-related coastal planners and stakeholders.

  20. Spatial Variability of Rainfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, N.E.; Pedersen, Lisbeth

    2005-01-01

    As a part of a Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) calibration exercise 15 km south of Århus, Denmark, the variability in accumulated rainfall within a single radar pixel (500 by 500 m) was measured using nine high-resolution rain gauges. The measured values indicate up to a 100% variation between...

  1. Several real variables

    CERN Document Server

    Kantorovitz, Shmuel

    2016-01-01

    This undergraduate textbook is based on lectures given by the author on the differential and integral calculus of functions of several real variables. The book has a modern approach and includes topics such as: •The p-norms on vector space and their equivalence •The Weierstrass and Stone-Weierstrass approximation theorems •The differential as a linear functional; Jacobians, Hessians, and Taylor's theorem in several variables •The Implicit Function Theorem for a system of equations, proved via Banach’s Fixed Point Theorem •Applications to Ordinary Differential Equations •Line integrals and an introduction to surface integrals This book features numerous examples, detailed proofs, as well as exercises at the end of sections. Many of the exercises have detailed solutions, making the book suitable for self-study. Several Real Variables will be useful for undergraduate students in mathematics who have completed first courses in linear algebra and analysis of one real variable.

  2. Integration i flere variable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    -integralerne. Undervejs introduceres \\texttt{Integrator8}. Det er en pakke med Maple procedurer, som er udviklet specielt med henblik på eksempelbaseret visuel læring af de indledende integrationsbegreber og deres mangfoldige anvendelser. Vi giver eksempler på, hvordan integration i flere variable anvendes til beregning...

  3. Variable Oakleaf Caterpillar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis F. Wilson; Gordon A. Surgeoner

    1979-01-01

    The variable oakleaf caterpillar (Heterocampa manteo (Dbldy.)) is a common insect in deciduous forests of Eastern North America. It has been recorded from most of the Eastern Canadian Provinces and most of the States in the East to North Dakota in the West and south to eastern Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Heavy defoliations of hosts may occur anywhere within this...

  4. Variability and component composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van der Storm (Tijs)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn component-based product populations, feature models have to be described at the component level to be able to benefit from a product family approach. As a consequence, composition of components becomes very complex. We describe how component-level variability can be managed in the

  5. Adaptive Counterterrorism Tools over Silver Bullets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenqvist; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    Forging information network structures to understand spider webs of fixers, go-betweens and jihadists related to acts of terrorism is a complex task. Adapting models to represent the expected structure of networks for future pattern and missing link detection is even more challenging. In this paper...... we present first results of a knowledge management tool for counterterrorism practitioners supporting these and other information analysis tasks. We focus on knowledge management situations where a lot of information must be interpreted rapidly or where a group shares and restructures information...... are the key variables on both sides. Therefore, allowing users to edit the structures of a knowledge base populated with open source intelligence, is required to utilize these individual capacities. The presented counterterrorism tool adheres to a philosophy where humans are in charge, and the tool...

  6. Overview of Simulation Tools for Smart Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    distribution network development, taking into account the most important smart grids features, i.e., resilience to generation and load variability, demand response, energy balance optimisation, grid loss reduction and optimal asset management. Specific attention will be given to all ICT implications. The main......The focus of the Energy Management sub-programme is on the optimization of the management of distribution networks in presence of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) and load control with an energy and market perspective. Technical and economic scenarios will be considered for the active...... aim of this report “D2.1 – Overview of Simulation Tools for Smart Grids” is to provide an overview of the different simulation tools available, i.e. developed and in use, at the different research centres. Required new tool capabilities are identified and extensions to the existing packages...

  7. Large Crater Clustering tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura, Jason; Skinner, James A.; Hunter, Marc A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we present the Large Crater Clustering (LCC) tool set, an ArcGIS plugin that supports the quantitative approximation of a primary impact location from user-identified locations of possible secondary impact craters or the long-axes of clustered secondary craters. The identification of primary impact craters directly supports planetary geologic mapping and topical science studies where the chronostratigraphic age of some geologic units may be known, but more distant features have questionable geologic ages. Previous works (e.g., McEwen et al., 2005; Dundas and McEwen, 2007) have shown that the source of secondary impact craters can be estimated from secondary impact craters. This work adapts those methods into a statistically robust tool set. We describe the four individual tools within the LCC tool set to support: (1) processing individually digitized point observations (craters), (2) estimating the directional distribution of a clustered set of craters, back projecting the potential flight paths (crater clusters or linearly approximated catenae or lineaments), (3) intersecting projected paths, and (4) intersecting back-projected trajectories to approximate the local of potential source primary craters. We present two case studies using secondary impact features mapped in two regions of Mars. We demonstrate that the tool is able to quantitatively identify primary impacts and supports the improved qualitative interpretation of potential secondary crater flight trajectories.

  8. Tides and Decadal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanisms by which oceanic tides and decadal variability in the oceans are connected. We distinguish between variability caused by tides and variability observed in the tides themselves. Both effects have been detected at some level. The most obvious connection with decadal timescales is through the 18.6-year precession of the moon's orbit plane. This precession gives rise to a small tide of the same period and to 18.6-year modulations in the phase and amplitudes of short-period tides. The 18.6-year "node tide" is very small, no more than 2 cm anywhere, and in sea level data it is dominated by the ocean's natural Variability. Some authors have naively attributed climate variations with periods near 19 years directly to the node tide, but the amplitude of the tide is too small for this mechanism to be operative. The more likely explanation (Loder and Garrett, JGR, 83, 1967-70, 1978) is that the 18.6-y modulations in short-period tides, especially h e principal tide M2, cause variations in ocean mixing, which is then observed in temperature and other climatic indicators. Tidally forced variability has also been proposed by some authors, either in response to occasional (and highly predictable) tidal extremes or as a nonlinear low-frequency oscillation caused by interactions between short-period tides. The former mechanism can produce only short-duration events hardly more significant than normal tidal ranges, but the latter mechanism can in principle induce low-frequency oscillations. The most recent proposal of this type is by Keeling and Whorf, who highlight the 1800-year spectral peak discovered by Bond et al. (1997). But the proposal appears contrived and should be considered, in the words of Munk et al. (2002), "as the most likely among unlikely candidates."

  9. Assembly tool design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, Naokazu; Nakahira, Masataka; Ohkawa, Yoshinao; Tada, Eisuke; Seki, Masahiro

    1996-06-01

    The reactor core of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is assembled with a number of large and asymmetric components within a tight tolerance in order to assure the structural integrity for various loads and to provide the tritium confinement. In addition, the assembly procedure should be compatible with remote operation since the core structures will be activated by 14-MeV neutrons once it starts operation and thus personal access will be prohibited. Accordingly, the assembly procedure and tool design are quite essential and should be designed from the beginning to facilitate remote operation. According to the ITER Design Task Agreement, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has performed design study to develop the assembly procedures and associated tool design for the ITER tokamak assembly. This report describes outlines of the assembly tools and the remaining issues obtained in this design study. (author)

  10. RSP Tooling Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-11-20

    RSP Tooling{trademark} is a spray forming technology tailored for producing molds and dies. The approach combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing in a single step. The general concept involves converting a mold design described by a CAD file to a tooling master using a suitable rapid prototyping (RP) technology such as stereolithography. A pattern transfer is made to a castable ceramic, typically alumina or fused silica (Figure 1). This is followed by spray forming a thick deposit of a tooling alloy on the pattern to capture the desired shape, surface texture, and detail. The resultant metal block is cooled to room temperature and separated from the pattern. The deposit's exterior walls are machined square, allowing it to be used as an insert in a standard mold base. The overall turnaround time for tooling is about 3 to 5 days, starting with a master. Molds and dies produced in this way have been used in high volume production runs in plastic injection molding and die casting. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Grupo Vitro has been established to evaluate the feasibility of using RSP Tooling technology for producing molds and dies of interest to Vitro. This report summarizes results from Phase I of this agreement, and describes work scope and budget for Phase I1 activities. The main objective in Phase I was to demonstrate the feasibility of applying the Rapid Solidification Process (RSP) Tooling method to produce molds for the manufacture of glass and other components of interest to Vitro. This objective was successfully achieved.

  11. CMS tracker visualization tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mennea, M.S.; Osborne, I.; Regano, A.; Zito, G.

    2005-01-01

    This document will review the design considerations, implementations and performance of the CMS Tracker Visualization tools. In view of the great complexity of this sub-detector (more than 50 millions channels organized in 16540 modules each one of these being a complete detector), the standard CMS visualization tools (IGUANA and IGUANACMS) that provide basic 3D capabilities and integration within CMS framework, respectively, have been complemented with additional 2D graphics objects. Based on the experience acquired using this software to debug and understand both hardware and software during the construction phase, we propose possible future improvements to cope with online monitoring and event analysis during data taking

  12. CMS tracker visualization tools

    CERN Document Server

    Zito, G; Osborne, I; Regano, A

    2005-01-01

    This document will review the design considerations, implementations and performance of the CMS Tracker Visualization tools. In view of the great complexity of this sub-detector (more than 50 millions channels organized in 16540 modules each one of these being a complete detector), the standard CMS visualization tools (IGUANA and IGUANACMS) that provide basic 3D capabilities and integration within CMS framework, respectively, have been complemented with additional 2D graphics objects. Based on the experience acquired using this software to debug and understand both hardware and software during the construction phase, we propose possible future improvements to cope with online monitoring and event analysis during data taking.

  13. CMS tracker visualization tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mennea, M.S. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica ' Michelangelo Merlin' e INFN sezione di Bari, Via Amendola 173 - 70126 Bari (Italy); Osborne, I. [Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Regano, A. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica ' Michelangelo Merlin' e INFN sezione di Bari, Via Amendola 173 - 70126 Bari (Italy); Zito, G. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica ' Michelangelo Merlin' e INFN sezione di Bari, Via Amendola 173 - 70126 Bari (Italy)]. E-mail: giuseppe.zito@ba.infn.it

    2005-08-21

    This document will review the design considerations, implementations and performance of the CMS Tracker Visualization tools. In view of the great complexity of this sub-detector (more than 50 millions channels organized in 16540 modules each one of these being a complete detector), the standard CMS visualization tools (IGUANA and IGUANACMS) that provide basic 3D capabilities and integration within CMS framework, respectively, have been complemented with additional 2D graphics objects. Based on the experience acquired using this software to debug and understand both hardware and software during the construction phase, we propose possible future improvements to cope with online monitoring and event analysis during data taking.

  14. Tool nimega Sacco

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    Kolmekümneseks on saanud Zanotta kott ehk tool "Sacco", mille 1968. a. disainisid P. Gatti, C. Paolini, F. Teodoro. "Sacco" - polüstüreenist graanulitega täidetud kott. Tähelepanu pälvis ka Zanotta firma täispuhutav tool "Blow" (1967, Scholari, D'Urbino, Lomazzi, De Pas). E. Lucie-Smith neist. 1968. aastale on pühendatud Düsseldorfi Kunstimuuseumi näitus "1968. a. legendid ja sümbolid", kus on eksponeeritud ligi 500 objekti ja mitu rekonstrueeritud interjööri

  15. C-TOOL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup; Hutchings, Nicholas John

    2014-01-01

    -term SOC storage in the profile of well-drained agricultural mineral soils. C-TOOL uses three SOC pools for both the topsoil (0–25 cm) and the subsoil (25–100 cm), and applies temperature-dependent first order kinetics to regulate C turnover. C-TOOL also enables the simulation of 14C turnover. The simple...... a proper model evaluation. Experimental verification of management effects on subsoil C storage, subsoil C inputs from roots, and vertical transport of C in the soil profile remains prioritised research areas....

  16. The GNEMRE Dendro Tool.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Bion John

    2007-10-01

    The GNEMRE Dendro Tool provides a previously unrealized analysis capability in the field of nuclear explosion monitoring. Dendro Tool allows analysts to quickly and easily determine the similarity between seismic events using the waveform time-series for each of the events to compute cross-correlation values. Events can then be categorized into clusters of similar events. This analysis technique can be used to characterize historical archives of seismic events in order to determine many of the unique sources that are present. In addition, the source of any new events can be quickly identified simply by comparing the new event to the historical set.

  17. Technological Capability's Predictor Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Maciel Reichert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the factors that influence in configuration of the technological capability of companies in sectors with medium-low technological intensity. To achieve the goal proposed in this article a survey was carried out. Based on the framework developed by Lall (1992 which classifies firms in basic, intermediate and advanced level of technological capability; it was found that the predominant technological capability is intermediate, with 83.7% of respondent companies (plastics companies in Brazil. It is believed that the main contribution of this study is the finding that the dependent variable named “Technological Capability” can be explained at a rate of 65% by six variables: development of new processes; selection of the best equipment supplier; sales of internally developed new technology to third parties; design and manufacture of equipment; study of the work methods and perform inventory control; and improvement of product quality.

  18. Historical Variable Star Catalogs

    OpenAIRE

    Pagnotta, Ashley; Graur, Or; Murray, Zachary; Kruk, Julia; Christie-Dervaux, Lucien; Chen, Dong Yi

    2015-01-01

    Slides from my talk during one of the Historical Astronomy Division sessions at AAS 225 in Seattle, WA (January 2015). A brief history of the variable star catalogs Henrietta Swan Leavitt and Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin assembled at Harvard, and the update to them that some of our students at AMNH have done.(Figshare only previews the first few slides. Download the PDF to see all of them!)

  19. Complex variable HVPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killingbeck, John P [Mathematics Department, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX (United Kingdom); Grosjean, Alain [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de l' Observatoire de Besancon (CNRS, UPRES-A 6091), 41 bis Avenue de l' Observatoire, BP 1615, 25010 Besancon Cedex (France); Jolicard, Georges [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de l' Observatoire de Besancon (CNRS, UPRES-A 6091), 41 bis Avenue de l' Observatoire, BP 1615, 25010 Besancon Cedex (France)

    2004-08-13

    Complex variable hypervirial perturbation theory is applied to the case of oscillator and Coulomb potentials perturbed by a single term potential of the form Vx{sup n} or Vr{sup n}, respectively. The trial calculations reported show that this approach can produce accurate complex energies for resonant states via a simple and speedy calculation and can also be useful in studies of PT symmetry and tunnelling resonance effects. (addendum)

  20. Georeactor Variability and Integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, J. Marvin

    2005-01-01

    As a deep-Earth energy source, the planetocentric nuclear-fission georeactor concept is on a more secure scientific footing than the previous idea related to the assumed growth of the inner core. Unlike previously considered deep-Earth energy sources, which are essentially constant on a human time-scale, variability in nuclear fission reactors can arise from changes in composition and/or position of fuel, moderators, and neutron absorbers. Tantalizing circumstantial evidence invites inquiry i...

  1. Spreading with variable viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Foit, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Ausbreitung mit variabler Viskosität Die isotherme Ausbreitung eines Volumenstromes, , in Form von dünnen Schichten kann mit Hilfe selbstähnlicher Lösungen beschrieben werden (Huppert). Für die axialsymmetrische Ausbreitung eines konstanten Volumens mit einer variablen Viskosität von der Form existieren ebenfalls selbstähnliche Lösungen (Sakimoto, Zuber). Dieses Ergebnis wird auf den Fall einer eindimensionalen und einer axialsymmetrischen Ausbreitung für alle , erweitert.

  2. TEC variability over Havana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, B.; Alazo, K.; Rodriguez, M.; Calzadilla, A.

    2003-01-01

    The variability of total electron content (TEC) measured over Havana using ATS-6, SMS-1 and GOES-3 geosynchronous satellite signals has been investigated for low, middle and high solar activity periods from 1974 to 1982. The obtained results show that standard deviation is smooth during nighttime hours and maximum at noon or postnoon hours. Strong solar activity dependence of standard deviation with a maximum values during HSA has been found. (author)

  3. Short timescale variability in the faint sky variability survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Rueda, L.; Groot, P.J.; Augusteijn, T.; Nelemans, G.A.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Besselaar, E.J.M. van den

    2006-01-01

    We present the V-band variability analysis of the Faint Sky Variability Survey (FSVS). The FSVS combines colour and time variability information, from timescales of 24 minutes to tens of days, down to V = 24. We find that �1% of all point sources are variable along the main sequence reaching �3.5%

  4. Aging and death-associated changes in serum albumin variability over the course of chronic hemodialysis treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Nakazato

    Full Text Available Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between variability in a number of biological parameters and adverse outcomes. As the variability may reflect impaired homeostatic regulation, we assessed albumin variability over time in chronic hemodialysis (HD patients.Data from 1346 subjects who received chronic HD treatment from May 2001 to February 2015 were analyzed according to three phases of HD treatment: post-HD initiation, during maintenance HD treatment, and before death. The serum albumin values were grouped according to the time interval from HD initiation or death, and the yearly trends for both the albumin levels and the intra-individual albumin variability (quantified by the residual coefficient of variation: Alb-rCV were examined. The HD initiation and death-associated changes were also analyzed using generalized additive mixed models. Furthermore, the long-term trend throughout the maintenance treatment period was evaluated separately using linear regression models.Albumin levels and variability showed distinctive changes during each of the 3 periods. After HD initiation, albumin variability decreased and reached a nadir within a year. During the subsequent maintenance treatment period (interquartile range = 5.2-11.0 years, the log Alb-rCV showed a significant upward trend (mean slope: 0.011 ± 0.035 /year, and its overall mean was -1.49 ± 0.08 (equivalent to an Alb-rCV of 3.22%. During the 1-2 years before death, this upward trend clearly accelerated, and the mean log Alb-rCV in the last year of life was -1.36 ± 0.17. The albumin levels and variability were negatively correlated with each other and exhibited exactly opposite movements throughout the course of chronic HD treatment. Different from the albumin levels, albumin variability was not dependent on chronological age but was independently associated with an individual's aging and death process.The observed upward trend in albumin variability seems to be

  5. Classifying TDSS Stellar Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Rachael Christina; Green, Paul J.; TDSS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS), a subprogram of SDSS-IV eBOSS, obtains classification/discovery spectra of point-source photometric variables selected from PanSTARRS and SDSS multi-color light curves regardless of object color or lightcurve shape. Tens of thousands of TDSS spectra are already available and have been spectroscopically classified both via pipeline and by visual inspection. About half of these spectra are quasars, half are stars. Our goal is to classify the stars with their correct variability types. We do this by acquiring public multi-epoch light curves for brighter stars (rpulsating white dwarfs, and other exotic systems. The key difference between our catalog and others is that along with the light curves, we will be using TDSS spectra to help in the classification of variable type, as spectra are rich with information allowing estimation of physical parameters like temperature, metallicity, gravity, etc. This work was supported by the SDSS Research Experience for Undergraduates program, which is funded by a grant from Sloan Foundation to the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  6. Tools for Authentication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, G

    2008-07-09

    Many recent Non-proliferation and Arms Control software projects include a software authentication component. In this context, 'authentication' is defined as determining that a software package performs only its intended purpose and performs that purpose correctly and reliably over many years. In addition to visual inspection by knowledgeable computer scientists, automated tools are needed to highlight suspicious code constructs both to aid the visual inspection and to guide program development. While many commercial tools are available for portions of the authentication task, they are proprietary, and have limited extensibility. An open-source, extensible tool can be customized to the unique needs of each project (projects can have both common and custom rules to detect flaws and security holes). Any such extensible tool must be based on a complete language compiler infrastructure, that is, one that can parse and digest the full language through its standard grammar. ROSE is precisely such a compiler infrastructure developed within DOE. ROSE is a robust source-to-source analysis and optimization infrastructure currently addressing large, million-line DOE applications in C, C++, and FORTRAN. This year, it has been extended to support the automated analysis of binaries. We continue to extend ROSE to address a number of security-specific requirements and apply it to software authentication for Non-proliferation and Arms Control projects. We will give an update on the status of our work.

  7. Assessment principles and tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Karl C

    2014-01-01

    The goal of ophthalmology residency training is to produce competent ophthalmologists. Competence can only be determined by appropriately assessing resident performance. There are accepted guiding principles that should be applied to competence assessment methods. These principles are enumerated herein and ophthalmology-specific assessment tools that are available are described.

  8. Organisational skills and tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, Paul

    2009-04-01

    While this article mainly applies to practitioners who have responsibilities for leading teams or supervising practitioners, many of the skills and tools described here may also apply to students or junior practitioners. The purpose of this article is to highlight some of the main points about organisation, some of the organisational skills and tools that are available, and some examples of how these skills and tools can be used to make practitioners more effective at organising their workload. It is important to realise that organising work and doing work are two completely different things and shouldn't be mixed up. For example, it would be very difficult to start organising work in the middle of a busy operating list: the organisation of the work must come before the work starts and therefore preparation is often an important first step in organising work. As such, some of the tools and skills described in this article may need to be used hours or even days prior to the actual work taking place.

  9. Tools for Climate Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, H. C.

    2007-05-01

    Full realization of socio-economic benefits of from public investments in climate services remains incomplete because decision makers have difficulty: 1) interpreting individual products, 2) appropriately judging information credibility, and 3) linking different types of information, both conceptually and practically. Addressing these barriers is as important as improving the science leading to improved information. The challenge is creating flexible climate information products and tools that can accommodate unique user needs; the goal is a systemic change in the nature of information delivery and use. The underlying assumption is not that climate information is good and useful, and simply needs to be communicated effectively. Rather, a number of conditions must be met before decision makers can make informed choices about whether to use particular information in a specific situation. Several case studies, of varying success, illustrate user-centric strategies for developing decision support tools: a forecast evaluation tool, a climate information management system, and a hydrologic alert system. However, tools alone will not bridge the barriers in climate services, with training and other capacity- building activities remaining important activities.

  10. The science writing tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhart, Arthur L.

    This is a two-part dissertation. The primary part is the text of a science-based composition rhetoric and reader called The Science Writing Tool. This textbook has seven chapters dealing with topics in Science Rhetoric. Each chapter includes a variety of examples of science writing, discussion questions, writing assignments, and instructional resources. The purpose of this text is to introduce lower-division college science majors to the role that rhetoric and communication plays in the conduct of Science, and how these skills contribute to a successful career in Science. The text is designed as a "tool kit," for use by an instructor constructing a science-based composition course or a writing-intensive Science course. The second part of this part of this dissertation reports on student reactions to draft portions of The Science Writing Tool text. In this report, students of English Composition II at Northern Virginia Community College-Annandale were surveyed about their attitudes toward course materials and topics included. The findings were used to revise and expand The Science Writing Tool.

  11. Electrically powered hand tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kurt S.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2007-01-16

    An electrically powered hand tool is described and which includes a three phase electrical motor having a plurality of poles; an electrical motor drive electrically coupled with the three phase electrical motor; and a source of electrical power which is converted to greater than about 208 volts three-phase and which is electrically coupled with the electrical motor drive.

  12. Tools and Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artis, Margaret, Ed.; And Others

    This guide provides enrichment for students to develop tools and concepts used in various areas of mathematics. The first part presents arithmetic progressions, geometric progressions, and harmonic progression. In the second section, the concept of mathematic induction is developed from intuitive induction, using concrete activities, to the…

  13. Rapid Tooling via Stereolithography

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, composite stereolithography (SL) resins were introduced to the marketplace, offering performance features beyond what traditional SL resins could offer. In particular, the high heat deflection temperatures and high stiffness of these highly filled resins have opened the door to several new rapid prototyping (RP) applications, including wind tunnel test modelling and, more recently, rapid tooling.

  14. Social Data Analytics Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Abid; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, development and demonstrative case studies of the Social Data Analytics Tool, SODATO. Adopting Action Design Framework [1], the objective of SODATO [2] is to collect, store, analyze, and report big social data emanating from the social media engagement of and socia...

  15. Decision Support Tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema van Eck, Gerard; Ceross, Aaron

    The decision support tool is part of the toolkit for policy makers which came out of the FP7 RESPECT project, which dealt with privacy and surveillance. It's aim is to support decision makers at all levels of government who face difficult decisions regarding the implementation of surveillance

  16. New Conceptual Design Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugnale, Alberto; Holst, Malene; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2010-01-01

    with the problem of software as conceptual design tool by means of 'scripting', in other words by self-developing codes able to solve specific and well defined design problems. Starting with a brief historical recall and the discussion of relevant researches and practical experiences, this paper investigates...

  17. Sight Application Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronevetsky, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-17

    The scale and complexity of scientific applications makes it very difficult to optimize, debug and extend them to support new capabilities. We have developed a tool that supports developers’ efforts to understand the logical flow of their applications and interactions between application components and hardware in a way that scales with application complexity and parallelism.

  18. Incident Information Management Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Pejovic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Flaws of\tcurrent incident information management at CMS and CERN\tare discussed. A new data\tmodel for future incident database is\tproposed and briefly described. Recently developed draft version of GIS-­‐based tool for incident tracking is presented.

  19. Tools of the Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porterfield, Kitty; Carnes, Meg

    2010-01-01

    People have known principals who are intellectual giants on issues of instruction and who have a great love of children but who stumble in leadership roles because they either do not or cannot communicate what they know. Good communication skills are among the most important tools a leader carries in his or her toolbox. Not only does good…

  20. Verification of Simulation Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Before qualifying a simulation tool, the requirements shall first be clearly identified, i.e.: - What type of study needs to be carried out? - What phenomena need to be modeled? This phase involves writing a precise technical specification. Once the requirements are defined, the most adapted product shall be selected from the various software options available on the market. Before using a particular version of a simulation tool to support the demonstration of nuclear safety studies, the following requirements shall be met. - An auditable quality assurance process complying with development international standards shall be developed and maintained, - A process of verification and validation (V and V) shall be implemented. This approach requires: writing a report and/or executive summary of the V and V activities, defining a validated domain (domain in which the difference between the results of the tools and those of another qualified reference is considered satisfactory for its intended use). - Sufficient documentation shall be available, - A detailed and formal description of the product (software version number, user configuration, other settings and parameters) in the targeted computing environment shall be available. - Source codes corresponding to the software shall be archived appropriately. When these requirements are fulfilled, the version of the simulation tool shall be considered qualified for a defined domain of validity, in a given computing environment. The functional verification shall ensure that: - the computer architecture of the tool does not include errors, - the numerical solver correctly represents the physical mathematical model, - equations are solved correctly. The functional verification can be demonstrated through certification or report of Quality Assurance. The functional validation shall allow the user to ensure that the equations correctly represent the physical phenomena in the perimeter of intended use. The functional validation can

  1. Risk Management Implementation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Shayla L.

    2004-01-01

    Continuous Risk Management (CM) is a software engineering practice with processes, methods, and tools for managing risk in a project. It provides a controlled environment for practical decision making, in order to assess continually what could go wrong, determine which risk are important to deal with, implement strategies to deal with those risk and assure the measure effectiveness of the implemented strategies. Continuous Risk Management provides many training workshops and courses to teach the staff how to implement risk management to their various experiments and projects. The steps of the CRM process are identification, analysis, planning, tracking, and control. These steps and the various methods and tools that go along with them, identification, and dealing with risk is clear-cut. The office that I worked in was the Risk Management Office (RMO). The RMO at NASA works hard to uphold NASA s mission of exploration and advancement of scientific knowledge and technology by defining and reducing program risk. The RMO is one of the divisions that fall under the Safety and Assurance Directorate (SAAD). I worked under Cynthia Calhoun, Flight Software Systems Engineer. My task was to develop a help screen for the Continuous Risk Management Implementation Tool (RMIT). The Risk Management Implementation Tool will be used by many NASA managers to identify, analyze, track, control, and communicate risks in their programs and projects. The RMIT will provide a means for NASA to continuously assess risks. The goals and purposes for this tool is to provide a simple means to manage risks, be used by program and project managers throughout NASA for managing risk, and to take an aggressive approach to advertise and advocate the use of RMIT at each NASA center.

  2. Extended Testability Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Kevin; Maul, William A.; Fulton, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) Tool is a software application that supports fault management (FM) by performing testability analyses on the fault propagation model of a given system. Fault management includes the prevention of faults through robust design margins and quality assurance methods, or the mitigation of system failures. Fault management requires an understanding of the system design and operation, potential failure mechanisms within the system, and the propagation of those potential failures through the system. The purpose of the ETA Tool software is to process the testability analysis results from a commercial software program called TEAMS Designer in order to provide a detailed set of diagnostic assessment reports. The ETA Tool is a command-line process with several user-selectable report output options. The ETA Tool also extends the COTS testability analysis and enables variation studies with sensor sensitivity impacts on system diagnostics and component isolation using a single testability output. The ETA Tool can also provide extended analyses from a single set of testability output files. The following analysis reports are available to the user: (1) the Detectability Report provides a breakdown of how each tested failure mode was detected, (2) the Test Utilization Report identifies all the failure modes that each test detects, (3) the Failure Mode Isolation Report demonstrates the system s ability to discriminate between failure modes, (4) the Component Isolation Report demonstrates the system s ability to discriminate between failure modes relative to the components containing the failure modes, (5) the Sensor Sensor Sensitivity Analysis Report shows the diagnostic impact due to loss of sensor information, and (6) the Effect Mapping Report identifies failure modes that result in specified system-level effects.

  3. The Storm and Stress (or Calm) of Early Adolescent Self-Concepts: Within- and Between-Person Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Lauren E.; Ram, Nilam; Gest, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    This study uses intraindividual variability and change methods to test theoretical accounts of self-concept and its change across time and context, and the developmental implications of this variability. The five-year longitudinal study of 541 youth in a rural Pennsylvania community from 3rd through 7th grade included twice-yearly assessments of self-concept (academic and social), corresponding external evaluations of competence (e.g., teacher-rated academic skills, peer-nominated “likeability”), and multiple measures of youths' overall adjustment. Multiphase growth models replicate previous research, suggesting significant decline in academic self-concept during middle school, but modest growth in social self-concept from 3rd through 7th grade. Next, a new contribution is made to the literature by quantifying the amount of within-person variability (i.e., “lability”) around these linear self-concept trajectories as a between-person characteristic. Self-concept lability was found to associate with a general profile of poorer competence and adjustment, and to predict poorer academic and social competence at the end of 7th grade above and beyond level of self-concept. Finally, there was substantial evidence that wave-to-wave changes in youths' self-concepts correspond to teacher and peer evaluations of youths' competence, that attention to peer feedback may be particularly strong during middle school, and that these relations may be moderated by between-person indicators of youths' general adjustment. Overall, findings highlight the utility of methods sensitive to within-person variation for clarifying the dynamics of youths' self-system development. PMID:21928883

  4. The Effects of Cryogenic Treatment on Cutting Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satish; Khedkar, Nitin K.; Jagtap, Bhushan; Singh, T. P.

    2017-08-01

    Enhancing the cutting tool life is important and economic factor to reduce the tooling as well as manufacturing cost. The tool life is improved considerably by 92 % after cryogenic treatment. The cryogenic treatment is a one-time permanent, sub-zero heat treatment that entirely changes cross-section of cutting tool. The cryogenic treatment is carried out with deep freezing of cutting tool materials to enhance physical and mechanical properties. The cryogenic treatment improves mechanical such as hardness, toughness and tribological properties such as wear resistance, coefficient of friction, surface finish, dimensional stability and stress relief. The deep cryogenic treatment is the most beneficial treatment applied on cutting tools. The cryogenic treatment is the most advanced heat treatment and popular to improve performance of the cutting tool. The optimization of cryogenic treatment variables is necessary to improve tool life. This study reviews the effects of cryogenic treatment on microstructure, tribological properties of tool steels and machining applications of cutting tool by investigating the surface and performing the surface characterization test like SEM. The economy of cutting tool can be achieved by deep cryogenic treatment.

  5. Pre-analytical variables of circulating cell-free nucleosomes containing 5-methylcytosine DNA or histone modification H3K9Me3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Louise; Herzog, Marielle; Rømer, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate pre-analytical variables of circulating cell-free nucleosomes containing 5-methylcytosine DNA (5mC) or histone modification H3K9Me3 (H3K9Me3). Materials and methods: Six studies were designed to assess the possible influence of pre-analytical variables. Study 1: influence of stas...... significantly lower levels of 5mC or H3K9Me3 compared to levels in healthy individuals. Conclusion: Levels of 5mC or H3K9Me3 appear stable in most pre-analytical settings if blood samples are stored at room temperature until centrifugation.......3K9Me3 measurements were performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: Stasis, white-cell and platelet contamination, within-day variations, varying storage time before centrifugation, colonoscopy, and surgical trauma had no significant influence on levels of 5mC or H3K9Me3. Day......-to-day variations of 12.7% and 11.5% (intra-individual) and 98.1% and 60.8% (inter-individual) were shown for 5mC and H3K9Me3, respectively. Levels of 5mC or H3K9Me3 were significantly higher in samples stored at room temperature until centrifugation compared to samples stored on ice. Patients with cancer had...

  6. Tool use by aquatic animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Janet; Patterson, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Tool-use research has focused primarily on land-based animals, with less consideration given to aquatic animals and the environmental challenges and conditions they face. Here, we review aquatic tool use and examine the contributing ecological, physiological, cognitive and social factors. Tool use among aquatic animals is rare but taxonomically diverse, occurring in fish, cephalopods, mammals, crabs, urchins and possibly gastropods. While additional research is required, the scarcity of tool use can likely be attributable to the characteristics of aquatic habitats, which are generally not conducive to tool use. Nonetheless, studying tool use by aquatic animals provides insights into the conditions that promote and inhibit tool-use behaviour across biomes. Like land-based tool users, aquatic animals tend to find tools on the substrate and use tools during foraging. However, unlike on land, tool users in water often use other animals (and their products) and water itself as a tool. Among sea otters and dolphins, the two aquatic tool users studied in greatest detail, some individuals specialize in tool use, which is vertically socially transmitted possibly because of their long dependency periods. In all, the contrasts between aquatic- and land-based tool users enlighten our understanding of the adaptive value of tool-use behaviour. PMID:24101631

  7. Web Tools: The Second Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascopella, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools and technologies, or second generation tools, help districts to save time and money, and eliminate the need to transfer or move files back and forth across computers. Many Web 2.0 tools help students think critically and solve problems, which falls under the 21st-century skills. The second-generation tools are growing in popularity…

  8. EVALUATION OF MACHINE TOOL QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kuric

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Paper deals with aspects of quality and accuracy of machine tools. As the accuracy of machine tools has key factor for product quality, it is important to know the methods for evaluation of quality and accuracy of machine tools. Several aspects of diagnostics of machine tools are described, such as aspects of reliability.

  9. Zoonoses and climate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Rocio; Sandoval, Claudia M; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J; Vivas, Paul

    2008-12-01

    Leishmaniasis in the Americas is transmitted by Lutzomyia spp., which have many animal reservoirs. Previous studies indicated potential changes in vectors of climate-related distribution, but impact outcomes need to be further studied. We report climatic and El Niño events during 1985-2002 that may have had an impact on leishmaniasis in 11 southern departments of Colombia: Amazonas, Caquetá, Cauca (Ca), Huila, Meta (Mt), Nariño, Putumayo (Py), Tolima, Valle (Va), Vaupes (Vp), and Vichada. Climatic data were obtained by satellite and epidemiologic data were obtained from the Health Ministry. NOAA climatic classification and SOI/ONI indexes were used as indicators of global climate variability. Yearly variation comparisons and median trend deviations were made for disease incidence and climatic variability. During this period there was considerable climatic variability, with a strong El Niño for 6 years and a strong La Niña for 8. During this period, 19,212 cases of leishmaniasis were registered, for a mean of 4756.83 cases/year. Disease in the whole region increased (mean of 4.98%) during the El Niño years in comparison to the La Niña years, but there were differences between departments with increases during El Niño (Mt 6.95%, Vp 4.84%), but the rest showed an increase during La Niña (1.61%-64.41%). Differences were significant in Va (P= 0.0092), Py (P= 0.0001), Ca (P= 0.0313), and for the whole region (P= 0.0023), but not in the rest of the departments. The importance of climate change is shown by shifts in insect and animal distributions. These data reflect the importance of climate on transmission of leishmaniasis and open further investigations related to forecasting and monitoring systems, where understanding the relationship between zoonoses and climate variability could help to improve the management of these emerging and reemerging diseases.

  10. Variable camshaft timing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterfield, R.P.; Smith, F.R.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes an improvement in a variable camshaft timing system for an internal combustion engine having intake and exhaust valves and a camshaft for each of the intake and exhaust valves, an intake sprocket and an exhaust sprocket keyed to their respective camshaft, only one of the camshafts being directly driven by an engine crankshaft, and a timing chain engaging both sprockets. The improvement comprising a single bracket carrying at least one idler sprocket engaging the timing chain, the bracket being mounted for movement to alter the timing relationship between the intake and exhaust sprockets.

  11. Complex variables II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Complex Variables II includes elementary mappings and Mobius transformation, mappings by general functions, conformal mappings and harmonic functions, applying complex functions to a

  12. Disentangling Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia in Heart Rate Variability Records

    OpenAIRE

    Topçu, Çağdaş; Frühwirth, Matthias; Moser, Maximilian; Rosenblum, Michael; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2018-01-01

    Different measures of heart rate variability and particularly of respiratory sinus arrhythmia are widely used in research and clinical applications. Inspired by the ideas from the theory of coupled oscillators, we use simultaneous measurements of respiratory and cardiac activity to perform a nonlinear decomposition of the heart rate variability into the respiratory-related component and the rest. We suggest to exploit the technique as a universal preprocessing tool, both for the analysis of r...

  13. Context matters! sources of variability in weekend physical activity among families: a repeated measures study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Noonan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family involvement is an essential component of effective physical activity (PA interventions in children. However, little is known about the PA levels and characteristics of PA among families. This study used a repeated measures design and multiple data sources to explore the variability and characteristics of weekend PA among families. Methods Families (including a ‘target’ child aged 9–11 years, their primary caregiver(s and siblings aged 6–8 years were recruited through primary schools in Liverpool, UK. Participants completed a paper-based PA diary and wore an ActiGraph GT9X accelerometer on their left wrist for up to 16 weekend days. ActiGraph.csv files were analysed using the R-package GGIR version 1.1–4. Mean minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA for each weekend of measurement were calculated using linear mixed models, and variance components were estimated for participant (inter-individual, weekend of measurement, and residual error (intra-individual. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC were calculated from the proportion of total variance accounted for by inter-individual sources, and used as a measure of reliability. Diary responses were summed to produce frequency counts. To offer contextual insight into weekend PA among family units, demographic, accelerometer, and diary data were combined to form two case studies representative of low and high active families. Results Twenty-five participants from 7 families participated, including 7 ‘target’ children (mean age 9.3 ± 1.1 years, 4 boys, 6 siblings (mean age 7.2 ± 0.7 years; 4 boys and 12 adults (7 mothers and 5 fathers. There was a high degree of variability in target children’s (ICC = 0.55, siblings (ICC = 0.38, and mothers’ MVPA (ICC = 0.58, but not in fathers’ MVPA (ICC = 0.83. Children’s weekend PA was mostly unstructured in nature and undertaken with friends, whereas a greater proportion of parents’ weekend

  14. Graphical tools for model selection in generalized linear models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K; Heritier, S; Müller, S

    2013-11-10

    Model selection techniques have existed for many years; however, to date, simple, clear and effective methods of visualising the model building process are sparse. This article describes graphical methods that assist in the selection of models and comparison of many different selection criteria. Specifically, we describe for logistic regression, how to visualize measures of description loss and of model complexity to facilitate the model selection dilemma. We advocate the use of the bootstrap to assess the stability of selected models and to enhance our graphical tools. We demonstrate which variables are important using variable inclusion plots and show that these can be invaluable plots for the model building process. We show with two case studies how these proposed tools are useful to learn more about important variables in the data and how these tools can assist the understanding of the model building process. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Building energy analysis tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackney, Larry; Parker, Andrew; Long, Nicholas; Metzger, Ian; Dean, Jesse; Lisell, Lars

    2016-04-12

    A building energy analysis system includes a building component library configured to store a plurality of building components, a modeling tool configured to access the building component library and create a building model of a building under analysis using building spatial data and using selected building components of the plurality of building components stored in the building component library, a building analysis engine configured to operate the building model and generate a baseline energy model of the building under analysis and further configured to apply one or more energy conservation measures to the baseline energy model in order to generate one or more corresponding optimized energy models, and a recommendation tool configured to assess the one or more optimized energy models against the baseline energy model and generate recommendations for substitute building components or modifications.

  16. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhaus, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs

  17. Balancing the tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leroyer, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the potential of a new combination of functions in lexicographic tools for tourists. So far lexicography has focused on the communicative information needs of tourists, i.e. helping tourists decide what to say in a number of specific tourist situations......, in othe words communicative functions. However, this kind of help should not stand alone. It is argued that tourists also have experiential information needs that are lexicographically relevant. These needs can be satisfied by lexicographic tools that help tourists decide what to do in various specific...... tourist situations, wherever and whenever needed. It is demonstrated how this type of objective knowledge, which is conventionally represented in tourist guides and on tourist web sites, could benefit from being arranged in a lexicographic design....

  18. Remote vehicle survey tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, G.A.; Burks, B.L.; Kress, R.L.; Wagner, D.G.; Ward, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Remote Vehicle Survey Tool (RVS7) is a color graphical display tool for viewing remotely acquired scientific data. The RVST displays the data in the form of a color two-dimensional world model map. The world model map allows movement of the remote vehicle to be tracked by the operator and the data from sensors to be graphically depicted in the interface. Linear and logarithmic meters, dual channel oscilloscopes, and directional compasses are used to display sensor information. The RVST is user-configurable by the use of ASCII text files. The operator can configure the RVST to work with any remote data acquisition system and teleoperated or autonomous vehicle. The modular design of the RVST and its ability to be quickly configured for varying system requirements make the RVST ideal for remote scientific data display in all environmental restoration and waste management programs

  19. The GEDI Performance Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, S.; Armston, J.; Tang, H.; Patterson, P. L.; Healey, S. P.; Marselis, S.; Duncanson, L.; Hofton, M. A.; Kellner, J. R.; Luthcke, S. B.; Sun, X.; Blair, J. B.; Dubayah, R.

    2017-12-01

    NASA's Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation will mount a multi-track, full-waveform lidar on the International Space Station (ISS) that is optimised for the measurement of forest canopy height and structure. GEDI will use ten laser tracks, two 10 mJ "power beams" and eight 5 mJ "coverage beams" to produce global (51.5oS to 51.5oN) maps of above ground biomass (AGB), canopy height, vegetation structure and other biophysical parameters. The mission has a requirement to generate a 1 km AGB map with 80% of pixels with ≤ 20% standard error or 20 Mg·ha-1, whichever is greater. To assess performance and compare to mission requirements, an end-to-end simulator has been developed. The simulator brings together tools to propagate the effects of measurement and sampling error on GEDI data products. The simulator allows us to evaluate the impact of instrument performance, ISS orbits, processing algorithms and losses of data that may occur due to clouds, snow, leaf-off conditions, and areas with an insufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). By evaluating the consequences of operational decisions on GEDI data products, this tool provides a quantitative framework for decision-making and mission planning. Here we demonstrate the performance tool by using it to evaluate the trade-off between measurement and sampling error on the 1 km AGB data product. Results demonstrate that the use of coverage beams during the day (lowest GEDI SNR case) over very dense forests (>95% canopy cover) will result in some measurement bias. Omitting these low SNR cases increased the sampling error. Through this an SNR threshold for a given expected canopy cover can be set. The other applications of the performance tool are also discussed, such as assessing the impact of decisions made in the AGB modelling and signal processing stages on the accuracy of final data products.

  20. Communication tools in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowper, D.

    1995-01-01

    This document deals with the means and tools that are used for communicating with elected representatives. First, messages need to be simple, few in number and accurate. It is also advised to seek a first briefing because there is some information to be given, and not because some help is needed. On top of that, contacts should be made often enough to assure of a continued interest. (TEC)

  1. Program Management Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawadiak, Yuri; Wong, Alan; Maluf, David; Bell, David; Gurram, Mohana; Tran, Khai Peter; Hsu, Jennifer; Yagi, Kenji; Patel, Hemil

    2007-01-01

    The Program Management Tool (PMT) is a comprehensive, Web-enabled business intelligence software tool for assisting program and project managers within NASA enterprises in gathering, comprehending, and disseminating information on the progress of their programs and projects. The PMT provides planning and management support for implementing NASA programmatic and project management processes and requirements. It provides an online environment for program and line management to develop, communicate, and manage their programs, projects, and tasks in a comprehensive tool suite. The information managed by use of the PMT can include monthly reports as well as data on goals, deliverables, milestones, business processes, personnel, task plans, monthly reports, and budgetary allocations. The PMT provides an intuitive and enhanced Web interface to automate the tedious process of gathering and sharing monthly progress reports, task plans, financial data, and other information on project resources based on technical, schedule, budget, and management criteria and merits. The PMT is consistent with the latest Web standards and software practices, including the use of Extensible Markup Language (XML) for exchanging data and the WebDAV (Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning) protocol for collaborative management of documents. The PMT provides graphical displays of resource allocations in the form of bar and pie charts using Microsoft Excel Visual Basic for Application (VBA) libraries. The PMT has an extensible architecture that enables integration of PMT with other strategic-information software systems, including, for example, the Erasmus reporting system, now part of the NASA Integrated Enterprise Management Program (IEMP) tool suite, at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The PMT data architecture provides automated and extensive software interfaces and reports to various strategic information systems to eliminate duplicative human entries and minimize data integrity

  2. ECONOMETRIC TOOLS OF CONTROLLING

    OpenAIRE

    Orlov A. I.

    2015-01-01

    Econometrics is one of the most effective mathematical tools of controlling. The article deals with general problems of application of econometric methods in solving problems of controlling. Econometric methods - is primarily a statistical analysis of concrete economic data, of course, with the help of computers. In our country, they are still relatively little known, even though we have the most powerful scientific school in the foundations of econometrics - the probability theory. The artic...

  3. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etingov, Pavel V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kosterev, Dmitry [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dai, T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  4. Dynamic Contingency Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-01-14

    The Dynamic Contingency Analysis Tool (DCAT) is an open-platform and publicly available methodology to help develop applications that aim to improve the capabilities of power system planning engineers to assess the impact and likelihood of extreme contingencies and potential cascading events across their systems and interconnections. Outputs from the DCAT will help find mitigation solutions to reduce the risk of cascading outages in technically sound and effective ways. The current prototype DCAT implementation has been developed as a Python code that accesses the simulation functions of the Siemens PSS/E planning tool (PSS/E). It has the following features: It uses a hybrid dynamic and steady-state approach to simulating the cascading outage sequences that includes fast dynamic and slower steady-state events. It integrates dynamic models with protection scheme models for generation, transmission, and load. It models special protection systems (SPSs)/remedial action schemes (RASs) and automatic and manual corrective actions. Overall, the DCAT attempts to bridge multiple gaps in cascading-outage analysis in a single, unique prototype tool capable of automatically simulating and analyzing cascading sequences in real systems using multiprocessor computers.While the DCAT has been implemented using PSS/E in Phase I of the study, other commercial software packages with similar capabilities can be used within the DCAT framework.

  5. Fuel pin transfer tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randazza, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    A fuel pin transfer tool has a tubular housing of sufficient length to enable it to be suspended in a body of water in which a fuel pin assembly is submerged with the upper end of the housing above the water and with the tool in vertical alignment with a selected fuel pin from which the lower end of the tool is closely spaced. The housing has a cylinder spaced from its ends in which there is a piston having a tubular piston rod extending slidably through both ends of the cylinder. An actuator, the control for which has first and second positions, is fixed on the upper end of the piston rod and has a member extending freely downwardly therethrough which on short downward travel, resulting when the control is in its second position, effects the pin-releasing position of a latching device secured to the lower end of the piston rod. The pin-releasing position is held until the control is returned to its first position with the latching device held in its pin-gripping position until the control is again in its second position. When the piston is in its low position and the control is in its second position, the selected pin may then be gripped by the latching device when the control is in its first position

  6. The Variability of Seasonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzulli, S.; Stephenson, D. B.; Hannachi, A.

    2005-01-01

    Seasons are the complex nonlinear response of the physical climate system to regular annual solar forcing. There is no a priori reason why they should remain fixed/invariant from year to year, as is often assumed in climate studies when extracting the seasonal component. The widely used econometric variant of Census Method II Seasonal Adjustment Program (X-11), which allows for year-to-year variations in seasonal shape, is shown here to have some advantages for diagnosing climate variability. The X-11 procedure is applied to the monthly mean Niño-3.4 sea surface temperature (SST) index and global gridded NCEP-NCAR reanalyses of 2-m surface air temperature. The resulting seasonal component shows statistically significant interannual variations over many parts of the globe. By taking these variations in seasonality into account, it is shown that one can define less ambiguous ENSO indices. Furthermore, using the X-11 seasonal adjustment approach, it is shown that the three cold ENSO episodes after 1998 are due to an increase in amplitude of seasonality rather than being three distinct La Niña events. Globally, variations in the seasonal component represent a substantial fraction of the year-to-year variability in monthly mean temperatures. In addition, strong teleconnections can be discerned between the magnitude of seasonal variations across the globe. It might be possible to exploit such relationships to improve the skill of seasonal climate forecasts.

  7. Automatically-Programed Machine Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, L.; Clerman, N.

    1985-01-01

    Software produces cutter location files for numerically-controlled machine tools. APT, acronym for Automatically Programed Tools, is among most widely used software systems for computerized machine tools. APT developed for explicit purpose of providing effective software system for programing NC machine tools. APT system includes specification of APT programing language and language processor, which executes APT statements and generates NC machine-tool motions specified by APT statements.

  8. Micromachining with Nanostructured Cutting Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the brief is to explain how nanostructured tools can be used to machine materials at the microscale.  The aims of the brief are to explain to readers how to apply nanostructured tools to micromachining applications. This book describes the application of nanostructured tools to machining engineering materials and includes methods for calculating basic features of micromachining. It explains the nature of contact between tools and work pieces to build a solid understanding of how nanostructured tools are made.

  9. Distribution view: a tool to write and simulate distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, José; Branco, Fernando; Oliveira, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    In our work we present a tool to write and simulate distributions. This tool allows to write mathematical expressions which can contain not only functions and variables, but also statistical distributions, including mixtures. Each time the expression is evaluated, for all inner distributions, is generated a value according to the distribution and is used for expression value determination. The inversion method can be used in this language, allowing to generate all distributions...

  10. The ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Tool User's Guide; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, C.K.

    2001-01-01

    The ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Tool consists of a Modulating HPDM (Heat Pump Design Model) and a parametric-analysis (contour-data generating) front-end. Collectively the program is also referred to as MODCON which is in reference to the modulating and the contour data generating capabilities. The program was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Department of Energy to provide a publicly-available system design tool for variable- and single-speed heat pumps

  11. On botulinum neurotoxin variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecucco, Cesare; Rasotto, Maria Berica

    2015-01-06

    The rapidly growing number of botulinum neurotoxin sequences poses the problem of the possible evolutionary significance of the variability of these superpotent neurotoxins for toxin-producing Clostridium species. To progress in the understanding of this remarkable phenomenon, we suggest that researchers should (i) abandon an anthropocentric view of these neurotoxins as human botulism-causing agents or as human therapeutics, (ii) begin to investigate in depth the role of botulinum neurotoxins in animal botulism in the wilderness, and (iii) devote large efforts to next-generation sequencing of soil samples to identify novel botulinum neurotoxins. In order to compare the fitness of the different toxins, we suggest that assays of all the steps from toxin production to animal death should be performed. Copyright © 2015 Montecucco and Rasotto.

  12. Variable cycle engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, A.P.; Sprunger, E.V.

    1980-09-16

    A variable cycle turboshaft engine includes a remote fan system and respective high and low pressure systems for selectively driving the fan system in such a manner as to provide VTOL takeoff capability and minimum specific fuel consumption (SFC) at cruise and loiter conditions. For takeoff the fan system is primarily driven by the relatively large low pressure system whose combustor receives the motive fluid from a core bypass duct and, for cruise and loiter conditions, the fan system is driven by both a relatively small high pressure core and the low pressure system with its combustor inoperative. A mixer is disposed downstream of the high pressure system for mixing the relatively cold air from the bypass duct and the relatively hot air from the core prior to its flow to the low pressure turbine.

  13. Modeling Shared Variables in VHDL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan; Brage, Jens P.

    1994-01-01

    A set of concurrent processes communicating through shared variables is an often used model for hardware systems. This paper presents three modeling techniques for representing such shared variables in VHDL, depending on the acceptable constraints on accesses to the variables. Also a set of guide......A set of concurrent processes communicating through shared variables is an often used model for hardware systems. This paper presents three modeling techniques for representing such shared variables in VHDL, depending on the acceptable constraints on accesses to the variables. Also a set...

  14. “TIME SERIES WORKSHOP” OBSERVATIONS DATA PROCESSING TOOL

    OpenAIRE

    Shapovalova, L. L

    2017-01-01

    The new tool for mathematical and visual processing of time series is reresented. The program ”Time Series WorkShop” (TSW) is specialized for processing visual observations of variable stars. An open structure of the allows to apply any old and new mathematical methods for searching any parameters of variability. The program also allows to visualize the time series and any  calculation results (periodograms, histograms, light curves and their smoothing curves) in a camera-ready form. The foll...

  15. Creating reusable tools from scripts: the Galaxy Tool Factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Ross; Kaspi, Antony; Ziemann, Mark

    2012-12-01

    Galaxy is a software application supporting high-throughput biology analyses and work flows, available as a free on-line service or as source code for local deployment. New tools can be written to extend Galaxy, and these can be shared using public Galaxy Tool Shed (GTS) repositories, but converting even simple scripts into tools requires effort from a skilled developer. The Tool Factory is a novel Galaxy tool that automates the generation of all code needed to execute user-supplied scripts, and wraps them into new Galaxy tools for upload to a GTS, ready for review and installation through the Galaxy administrative interface. The Galaxy administrative interface supports automated installation from the main GTS. Source code and support are available at the project website, https://bitbucket.org/fubar/galaxytoolfactory. The Tool Factory is implemented as an installable Galaxy tool. ross.lazarus@channing.harvard.edu.

  16. Express Tool Delivery Service/Virtual Tool Crib

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wegand, John

    2001-01-01

    .... The outlined plan describes the role of NAVSEA, NRL, and SIMA in development of two conceptual approaches "Express Tool Delivery Service" and "Virtual Tool Crib" to better serve the Fleet at naval...

  17. ANT Advanced Neural Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrador, I.; Carrasco, R.; Martinez, L.

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes a practical introduction to the use of Artificial Neural Networks. Artificial Neural Nets are often used as an alternative to the traditional symbolic manipulation and first order logic used in Artificial Intelligence, due the high degree of difficulty to solve problems that can not be handled by programmers using algorithmic strategies. As a particular case of Neural Net a Multilayer Perception developed by programming in C language on OS9 real time operating system is presented. A detailed description about the program structure and practical use are included. Finally, several application examples that have been treated with the tool are presented, and some suggestions about hardware implementations. (Author) 15 refs.

  18. ANT Advanced Neural Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labrador, I.; Carrasco, R.; Martinez, L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a practical introduction to the use of Artificial Neural Networks. Artificial Neural Nets are often used as an alternative to the traditional symbolic manipulation and first order logic used in Artificial Intelligence, due the high degree of difficulty to solve problems that can not be handled by programmers using algorithmic strategies. As a particular case of Neural Net a Multilayer Perception developed by programming in C language on OS9 real time operating system is presented. A detailed description about the program structure and practical use are included. Finally, several application examples that have been treated with the tool are presented, and some suggestions about hardware implementations. (Author) 15 refs

  19. Jupiter Environment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Erick J.; Monahue, Kenneth M.; Biehl, James P.; Kokorowski, Michael; Ngalande, Cedrick,; Boedeker, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    The Jupiter Environment Tool (JET) is a custom UI plug-in for STK that provides an interface to Jupiter environment models for visualization and analysis. Users can visualize the different magnetic field models of Jupiter through various rendering methods, which are fully integrated within STK s 3D Window. This allows users to take snapshots and make animations of their scenarios with magnetic field visualizations. Analytical data can be accessed in the form of custom vectors. Given these custom vectors, users have access to magnetic field data in custom reports, graphs, access constraints, coverage analysis, and anywhere else vectors are used within STK.

  20. Contamination Analysis Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieda, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    This talk presents 3 different tools developed recently for contamination analysis:HTML QCM analyzer: runs in a web browser, and allows for data analysis of QCM log filesJava RGA extractor: can load in multiple SRS.ana files and extract pressure vs. time dataC++ Contamination Simulation code: 3D particle tracing code for modeling transport of dust particulates and molecules. Uses residence time to determine if molecules stick. Particulates can be sampled from IEST-STD-1246 and be accelerated by aerodynamic forces.

  1. Variability in subpopulation formation propagates into biocatalytic variability of engineered Pseudomonas putida strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindmeyer, Martin; Jahn, Michael; Vorpahl, Carsten; Müller, Susann; Schmid, Andreas; Bühler, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Pivotal challenges in industrial biotechnology are the identification and overcoming of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in microbial processes. While the development of subpopulations of isogenic cells in bioprocesses is well described (intra-population variability), a possible variability between genetically identical cultures growing under macroscopically identical conditions (clonal variability) is not. A high such clonal variability has been found for the recombinant expression of the styrene monooxygenase genes styAB from Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120 in solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E using the alk-regulatory system from P. putida GPo1. In this study, the oxygenase subunit StyA fused to eGFP was used as readout tool to characterize the population structure in P. putida DOT-T1E regarding recombinant protein content. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that in individual cultures, at least two subpopulations with highly differing recombinant StyA-eGFP protein contents appeared (intra-population variability). Interestingly, subpopulation sizes varied from culture-to-culture correlating with the specific styrene epoxidation activity of cells derived from respective cultures (clonal variability). In addition, flow cytometric cell sorting coupled to plasmid copy number (PCN) determination revealed that detected clonal variations cannot be correlated to the PCN, but depend on the combination of the regulatory system and the host strain employed. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first work reporting that intra-population variability (with differing protein contents in the presented case study) causes clonal variability of genetically identical cultures. Respective impacts on bioprocess reliability and performance and strategies to overcome respective reliability issues are discussed. PMID:26483771

  2. Internet tools to enhance breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachar, Shlomit Strulov; Muss, Hyman B

    2016-01-01

    Internet tools have become a great aid in the daily practice of physicians who treat breast cancer patients. In cancer care there are frequent and important intersections where major decisions need to be made; these include (1) whether or not to give chemotherapy; (2) how much toxicity to expect, and (3) the life expectancy of the patient, considering non-breast cancer comorbidities. These decisions can be made more accurately using calculators based on data sets of thousands of patients as opposed to physician intuition. Such tools also help patients and caregivers in optimal decision making, as they estimate the absolute benefits and risks of treatment. In this perspective we describe selected internet sites that are useful across several domains of care, including the potential benefits of different adjuvant regimens for early breast cancer, prognosis after neoadjuvant therapy, prognosis for ductal carcinoma in situ , and toxicity and life expectancy estimates. We review the variables required to use the tools, the results obtained, the methods of validation, and the advantages and disadvantages of each tool.

  3. Geometric reasoning about assembly tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Planning for assembly requires reasoning about various tools used by humans, robots, or other automation to manipulate, attach, and test parts and subassemblies. This paper presents a general framework to represent and reason about geometric accessibility issues for a wide variety of such assembly tools. Central to the framework is a use volume encoding a minimum space that must be free in an assembly state to apply a given tool, and placement constraints on where that volume must be placed relative to the parts on which the tool acts. Determining whether a tool can be applied in a given assembly state is then reduced to an instance of the FINDPLACE problem. In addition, the author presents more efficient methods to integrate the framework into assembly planning. For tools that are applied either before or after their target parts are mated, one method pre-processes a single tool application for all possible states of assembly of a product in polynomial time, reducing all later state-tool queries to evaluations of a simple expression. For tools applied after their target parts are mated, a complementary method guarantees polynomial-time assembly planning. The author presents a wide variety of tools that can be described adequately using the approach, and surveys tool catalogs to determine coverage of standard tools. Finally, the author describes an implementation of the approach in an assembly planning system and experiments with a library of over one hundred manual and robotic tools and several complex assemblies.

  4. OMIRIS educational tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, X.; Artus, J.C.; Gonin, M.; Bidard, F.; Hickman, B.

    2004-01-01

    The biological effects of ionizing radiations are one of the most important issues for workers exposed to these radiations in nuclear plants. To deliver information to workers about this topic, the 'Utility Medical Work Officers' wanted an educational tool. This tool named 'OMIRIS' was prepared under the authority of the federation of professors in radiology, radiobiology and radioprotection and the industrial nuclear partners in France (ANDRA, AREVA/COGEMA and FRAMATOME-ANP, CEA and EDF). The use of animation techniques helps to present in a simple way this complex topic using an interactive, pleasant and comprehensible form. Detailed information is given about 5 themes: 1) the various sources of ionizing radiation whatever they are natural, medical, industrial or military; 2) the various types of exposure, whether internal or external, their characteristics: duration, target organs and radiological toxicity and the different means of protection; 3) the concept of dose, the importance of dose rate and the reference values of doses; 4) the biological effects on the human organism, notions of dose threshold and aims, results and limitations of epidemiological surveys; and 5) the regulation based on radiological protection studies

  5. Hydraulic release oil tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mims, M.G.; Mueller, M.D.; Ehlinger, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a hydraulic release tool. It comprises a setting assembly; a coupling member for coupling to drill string or petroleum production components, the coupling member being a plurality of sockets for receiving the dogs in the extended position and attaching the coupling member the setting assembly; whereby the setting assembly couples to the coupling member by engagement of the dogs in the sockets of releases from and disengages the coupling member in movement of the piston from its setting to its reposition in response to a pressure in the body in exceeding the predetermined pressure; and a relief port from outside the body into its bore and means to prevent communication between the relief port and the bore of the body axially of the piston when the piston is in the setting position and to establish such communication upon movement of the piston from the setting position to the release position and reduce the pressure in the body bore axially of the piston, whereby the reduction of the pressure signals that the tool has released the coupling member

  6. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. A. Rynearson; M. M. Plum

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE-owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that a treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem

  7. FASTBUS simulation tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, T.D.; Haney, M.J.

    1991-10-01

    A generalized model of a FASTBUS master is presented. The model is used with simulation tools to aid in the specification, design, and production of FASTBUS slave modules. The model provides a mechanism to interact with the electrical schematics and software models to predict performance. The model is written in the IEEE std 1076-1987 hardware description language VHDL. A model of the ATC logic is also presented. VHDL was chosen to provide portability to various platforms and simulation tools. The models, in conjunction with most commercially available simulators, will perform all of the transactions specified in IEEE std 960-1989. The models may be used to study the behavior of electrical schematics and other software models and detect violations of the FASTBUS protocol. For example, a hardware design of a slave module could be studied, protocol violations detected and corrected before committing money to prototype development. The master model accepts a stream of high level commands from an ASCII file to initiate FASTBUS transactions. The high level command language is based on the FASTBUS standard routines listed in IEEE std 1177-1989. Using this standard-based command language to direct the model of the master, hardware engineers can simulate FASTBUS transactions in the language used by physicists and programmers to operate FASTBUS systems. 15 refs., 6 figs

  8. Tools for computational finance

    CERN Document Server

    Seydel, Rüdiger U

    2017-01-01

    Computational and numerical methods are used in a number of ways across the field of finance. It is the aim of this book to explain how such methods work in financial engineering. By concentrating on the field of option pricing, a core task of financial engineering and risk analysis, this book explores a wide range of computational tools in a coherent and focused manner and will be of use to anyone working in computational finance. Starting with an introductory chapter that presents the financial and stochastic background, the book goes on to detail computational methods using both stochastic and deterministic approaches. Now in its sixth edition, Tools for Computational Finance has been significantly revised and contains:    Several new parts such as a section on extended applications of tree methods, including multidimensional trees, trinomial trees, and the handling of dividends; Additional material in the field of generating normal variates with acceptance-rejection methods, and on Monte Carlo methods...

  9. Cutting forces during turning with variable depth of cut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sadílek

    2016-03-01

    The proposed research for the paper is an experimental work – measuring cutting forces and monitoring of the tool wear on the cutting edge. It compares the turning where standard roughing cycle is used and the turning where the proposed roughing cycle with variable depth of cut is applied.

  10. Market Design Simulations with Variable Energy Resources (VERs) (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ela, E.

    2011-06-01

    Presented at the FERC Technical Conference, 29 June 2011, Washington, D.C. This presentation describes NREL research regarding variable generation resources, operating reserves, unit commitment, economic dispatch, and introduces a new and novel modeling tool called 'FESTIV.'

  11. The effect of teachers' quality variables on nursery school pupils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Education is a veritable tool for national development; the key facilitators of this development are teachers. The foundation of education starts at nursery school since it is a crucial stage for achild's development. This causal-comparative research investigated the effect of teacher quality variables such as age, professional ...

  12. Management Competences, not Tools and Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy; Pedersen, Keld; Hosbond, Jens Henrik

    2007-01-01

    competences and desired project outcomes, we collected data through interviews, focus groups and one large plenary meeting with most of the company's project managers. Data analysis employed content analysis for concept (variable) development and causal mapping to trace relationships between variables......Traditional software project management theory often focuses on desk-based development of software and algorithms, much in line with the traditions of the classical project management and software engineering. This can be described as a tools and techniques perspective, which assumes that software...... involved, project members, project leaders, managers. The competence approach is developed through an investigation of the experiences of project managers in a medium sized software development company (WM-data) in Denmark. Starting with a simple model relating project conditions, project management...

  13. Energy conservation by reducing process variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wising, Ulrika; Lafourcade, Sebastien [Pepite S.A., Liege (Belgium); Mack, Philippe [Pepite Technologies Inc., Montreal (Canada)

    2011-12-21

    Energy conservation is becoming an increasingly important instrument to stay competitive in today is increasingly global market. Important investments have been made in infrastructure and personnel in order to improve the management of energy such as increased metering, energy dashboards, energy managers, etc. Despite these investments, the results have not materialized and there is still a significant potential to further reduce energy consumption. In this paper a new methodology will be presented that helps industry better operate existing assets in order to reduce energy consumption, without having to make capital investments. The methodology uses a combination of advanced data analysis tools and a specific implementation scheme that has lead to significant savings in industry. The advanced data analysis tools are used to analyze the variability of the process in order to assess when the plant has been operated well or not so well in the past. By finding the root causes of these variations and the key variables that can explain them, improved operating guidelines and models can be developed and implemented. The specific implementation scheme is an important part of the methodology as it involves the people operating the plant. Several user cases will be presented showing an energy conservation of between 10%-20% without capital investments necessary. (author)

  14. Preservice Teachers' Understanding of Variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sue; Bergman, Judy

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the research on middle school students' understanding of variables and explores preservice elementary and middle school teachers' knowledge of variables. According to research studies, middle school students have limited understanding of variables. Many studies have examined the performance of middle school students and offered…

  15. Present and Future Modes of Low Frequency Climate Variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cane, Mark A.

    2014-02-20

    This project addressed area (1) of the FOA, “Interaction of Climate Change and Low Frequency Modes of Natural Climate Variability”. Our overarching objective is to detect, describe and understand the changes in low frequency variability between model simulations of the preindustrial climate and simulations of a doubled CO2 climate. The deliverables are a set of papers providing a dynamical characterization of interannual, decadal, and multidecadal variability in coupled models with attention to the changes in this low frequency variability between pre-industrial concentrations of greenhouse gases and a doubling of atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The principle mode of analysis, singular vector decomposition, is designed to advance our physical, mechanistic understanding. This study will include external natural variability due to solar and volcanic aerosol variations as well as variability internal to the climate system. An important byproduct is a set of analysis tools for estimating global singular vector structures from the archived output of model simulations.

  16. Soomlase disainitud tool sai preemia

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Isku OY disaineri Tapio Anttila loodud tool Haiku sai rahvusvahelisel disainikonkursil ADEX 2004 mööbli kategoorias Adex Silveri preemia. Mullu sai sama tool Chicago arhitektuuri- ja disainimuuseumi preemia Good Design Award

  17. Case and Administrative Support Tools

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Case and Administrative Support Tools (CAST) is the secure portion of the Office of General Counsel (OGC) Dashboard business process automation tool used to help...

  18. Hinged Shields for Machine Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallande, J. B.; Poland, W. W.; Tull, S.

    1985-01-01

    Flaps guard against flying chips, but fold away for tool setup. Clear plastic shield in position to intercept flying chips from machine tool and retracted to give operator access to workpiece. Machine shops readily make such shields for own use.

  19. Transformational Tools and Technologies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Transformational Tools and Technologies (TTT) Project advances state-of-the-art computational and experimental tools and technologies that are vital to aviation...

  20. Variables moderadoras del estres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Richaud de Minzi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente trabajo es analizar la influenciadel estilo atribucional, la confianza interpersonal y el soporte social sobre la percepción de la amenaza. Se administraron la Escala de Estilo Atribucional; la Manheim Interview 01 Social Support, la Escala de Confianza Interpersonal; y el Inventario de Situaciones y Respuestas de Ansiedad, a 260 sujetos de ambos sexos, de 30 años de edad promedio, de nivel socioeconómico medio, residentes en la ciudad de Buenos Aires. El soporte social no demostró influencia significativa sobre la percepción de la amenaza. Con respecto a la influencia del estilo atribucional se puede decir que las personas indefensas perciben más amenaza, especialmente expresada como ansiedad cognitiva y, en menor grado, como ansiedad motora o conductual. La confianza interpersonal demostró ser una variable importante en la percepción de la amenaza. Los sujetos que presentaron alta desconfianza hacia las personas de su entorno perciben un mundo amenazante, que se manifiesta como ansiedad cognitiva, fisiológica y motora o conductual.