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Sample records for intrahospital feasibility pilot

  1. Conducting pilot and feasibility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Diane G

    2015-03-01

    Planning a well-designed research study can be tedious and laborious work. However, this process is critical and ultimately can produce valid, reliable study findings. Designing a large-scale randomized, controlled trial (RCT)-the gold standard in quantitative research-can be even more challenging. Even the most well-planned study potentially can result in issues with research procedures and design, such as recruitment, retention, or methodology. One strategy that may facilitate sound study design is the completion of a pilot or feasibility study prior to the initiation of a larger-scale trial. This article will discuss pilot and feasibility studies, their advantages and disadvantages, and implications for oncology nursing research. 
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  2. CONSORT 2010 statement: extension to randomised pilot and feasibility trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Sandra M; Chan, Claire L; Campbell, Michael J; Bond, Christine M; Hopewell, Sally; Thabane, Lehana; Lancaster, Gillian A

    2016-01-01

    The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement is a guideline designed to improve the transparency and quality of the reporting of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). In this article we present an extension to that statement for randomised pilot and feasibility trials conducted in advance of a future definitive RCT. The checklist applies to any randomised study in which a future definitive RCT, or part of it, is conducted on a smaller scale, regardless of its design (eg, cluster, factorial, crossover) or the terms used by authors to describe the study (eg, pilot, feasibility, trial, study). The extension does not directly apply to internal pilot studies built into the design of a main trial, non-randomised pilot and feasibility studies, or phase II studies, but these studies all have some similarities to randomised pilot and feasibility studies and so many of the principles might also apply. The development of the extension was motivated by the growing number of studies described as feasibility or pilot studies and by research that has identified weaknesses in their reporting and conduct. We followed recommended good practice to develop the extension, including carrying out a Delphi survey, holding a consensus meeting and research team meetings, and piloting the checklist. The aims and objectives of pilot and feasibility randomised studies differ from those of other randomised trials. Consequently, although much of the information to be reported in these trials is similar to those in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing effectiveness and efficacy, there are some key differences in the type of information and in the appropriate interpretation of standard CONSORT reporting items. We have retained some of the original CONSORT statement items, but most have been adapted, some removed, and new items added. The new items cover how participants were identified and consent obtained; if applicable, the prespecified criteria used to judge

  3. A Postpartum Sleep and Fatigue Intervention Feasibility Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Jennifer J; Dogan, Sirin

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and cost of a self-management intervention for postpartum fatigue and sleep in socioeconomically disadvantaged urban women. Helping U Get Sleep (HUGS) is a theory-guided intervention developed from the Individual and Family Self-Management Theory. Medicaid-enrolled participants in the United States were recruited from an inpatient postpartum unit. Treatment and attention control interventions were delivered (15 HUGS, 12 comparison) at a week 3 postpartum home visit and 4 follow-up phone calls. Over the 9-week protocol, the HUGS group demonstrated significant improvements in subjective fatigue and subjective sleep disturbance relative to the comparison group. The HUGS intervention was feasible and acceptable, delivered on average, in 100 min and costing US$79 per participant.

  4. Feasibility Pilot Study: Training Soft Skills in Virtual Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshier, Patricia

    2012-04-01

    In a world where funding is limited, training for healthcare professionals is turning more and more to distance learning in an effort to maintain a knowledgeable and skilled work force. In 2010, Cicatelli Associates, Inc. began exploring the feasibility of using games and virtual worlds as an alternative means to teach skills-training in a distance-learning environment. The pilot study was conducted with six individuals familiar with general counseling and communication skills used by the healthcare industry to promote behavior change. Participants reported that the venue, although challenging at first, showed great potential for use with healthcare providers, as it allowed for more interaction and activities than traditional Webinars. However, there are significant limitations that must be overcome in order for this healthcare training modality to be utilized on a large scale. These limitations included a lack of microgestures and issues regarding the technology being used. In spite of the limitations, however, the potential use of virtual worlds for the training of healthcare providers exists and should be researched further. This article discusses the need and intended benefits of virtual world training as well as the results and conclusions of the pilot study.

  5. Pilot Feasibility Study of an Oncology Financial Navigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Veena; Leahy, Tony; Steelquist, Jordan; Watabayashi, Kate; Linden, Hannah; Ramsey, Scott; Schwartz, Naomi; Kreizenbeck, Karma; Nelson, Judy; Balch, Alan; Singleton, Erin; Gallagher, Kathleen; Overstreet, Karen

    2018-02-01

    Few studies have reported on interventions to alleviate financial toxicity in patients with cancer. We developed a financial navigation program in collaboration with our partners, Consumer Education and Training Services (CENTS) and Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF), to improve patient knowledge about treatment costs, provide financial counseling, and to help manage out-of-pocket expenses. We conducted a pilot study to assess the feasibility and impact of this program. Patients with cancer received a financial education course followed by monthly contact with a CENTS financial counselor and a PAF case manager for 6 months. We measured program adherence, self-reported financial burden and anxiety, program satisfaction, and type of assistance provided. Thirty-four patients (median age, 60.5 years) were consented (85% white and 50% commercially insured). Debt, income declines, and loans were reported by 55%, 55%, and 30% of patients, respectively. CENTS counselors assisted most often with budgeting, retirement planning, and medical bill questions. PAF case managers assisted with applications for appropriate insurance coverage, cost of living issues (eg, housing, transportation), and disability applications. High financial burden and anxiety about costs (4 or 5 on a Likert scale) were reported at baseline by 37% and 47% of patients, respectively. Anxiety about costs decreased over time in 33% of patients, whereas self-reported financial burden did not substantially change. Implementing an oncology financial navigation program is feasible, provides concrete assistance in navigating the cost of care, and mitigates anxiety about costs in a subset of patients. Future work will focus on measuring the program's impact on financial and clinical outcomes.

  6. A remotely piloted aircraft system in major incident management: concept and pilot, feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsen, Håkon B

    2015-06-10

    Major incidents are complex, dynamic and bewildering task environments characterised by simultaneous, rapidly changing events, uncertainty and ill-structured problems. Efficient management, communication, decision-making and allocation of scarce medical resources at the chaotic scene of a major incident is challenging and often relies on sparse information and data. Communication and information sharing is primarily voice-to-voice through phone or radio on specified radio frequencies. Visual cues are abundant and difficult to communicate between teams and team members that are not co-located. The aim was to assess the concept and feasibility of using a remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) system to support remote sensing in simulated major incident exercises. We carried out an experimental, pilot feasibility study. A custom-made, remotely controlled, multirotor unmanned aerial vehicle with vertical take-off and landing was equipped with digital colour- and thermal imaging cameras, a laser beam, a mechanical gripper arm and an avalanche transceiver. We collected data in five simulated exercises: 1) mass casualty traffic accident, 2) mountain rescue, 3) avalanche with buried victims, 4) fisherman through thin ice and 5) search for casualties in the dark. The unmanned aerial vehicle was remotely controlled, with high precision, in close proximity to air space obstacles at very low levels without compromising work on the ground. Payload capacity and tolerance to wind and turbulence were limited. Aerial video, shot from different altitudes, and remote aerial avalanche beacon search were streamed wirelessly in real time to a monitor at a ground base. Electromagnetic interference disturbed signal reception in the ground monitor. A small remotely piloted aircraft can be used as an effective tool carrier, although limited by its payload capacity, wind speed and flight endurance. Remote sensing using already existing remotely piloted aircraft technology in pre

  7. Defining Feasibility and Pilot Studies in Preparation for Randomised Controlled Trials: Development of a Conceptual Framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M Eldridge

    Full Text Available We describe a framework for defining pilot and feasibility studies focusing on studies conducted in preparation for a randomised controlled trial. To develop the framework, we undertook a Delphi survey; ran an open meeting at a trial methodology conference; conducted a review of definitions outside the health research context; consulted experts at an international consensus meeting; and reviewed 27 empirical pilot or feasibility studies. We initially adopted mutually exclusive definitions of pilot and feasibility studies. However, some Delphi survey respondents and the majority of open meeting attendees disagreed with the idea of mutually exclusive definitions. Their viewpoint was supported by definitions outside the health research context, the use of the terms 'pilot' and 'feasibility' in the literature, and participants at the international consensus meeting. In our framework, pilot studies are a subset of feasibility studies, rather than the two being mutually exclusive. A feasibility study asks whether something can be done, should we proceed with it, and if so, how. A pilot study asks the same questions but also has a specific design feature: in a pilot study a future study, or part of a future study, is conducted on a smaller scale. We suggest that to facilitate their identification, these studies should be clearly identified using the terms 'feasibility' or 'pilot' as appropriate. This should include feasibility studies that are largely qualitative; we found these difficult to identify in electronic searches because researchers rarely used the term 'feasibility' in the title or abstract of such studies. Investigators should also report appropriate objectives and methods related to feasibility; and give clear confirmation that their study is in preparation for a future randomised controlled trial designed to assess the effect of an intervention.

  8. Feasibility of electro-osmotic belt filter dewatering technology at pilot scale

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Snyman, HG

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available , the feasibility of the technology was tested at pilot scale using waste activated-, anaerobically digested- and dissolved air flotation sludge. The parameters which were investigated include the applied voltage, polyelectrolyte usage and sludge feed rate. Applied...

  9. Feasibility of the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Nispen Ruth MA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demographic ageing will lead to increasing pressure on visual rehabilitation services, which need to be efficiently organised in the near future. The Dutch ICF Activity Inventory (D-AI was developed to assess the rehabilitation needs of visually impaired persons. This pilot study tests the feasibility of the D-AI using a computer-assisted telephone interview. Methods In addition to the regular intake, the first version of the D-AI was assessed in 20 patients. Subsequently, patients and intake assessors were asked to fill in an evaluation form. Based on these evaluations, a new version of the D-AI was developed. Results Mean administration time of the D-AI was 88.8 (± 41.0 minutes. Overall, patients and assessors were positive about the D-AI assessment. However, professionals and 60% of the patients found the administration time to be too long. All included items were considered relevant and only minor adjustments were recommended. Conclusion The systematic character of the revised D-AI will prevent topics from being overlooked and indicate which needs have the highest priority from a patient-centred perspective. Moreover, ongoing assessment of the D-AI will enhance evaluation of the rehabilitation process. To decrease administration time, in the revised D-AI only the top priority goals will be fully assessed. Using the D-AI, a rehabilitation plan based on individual needs can be developed for each patient. Moreover, it enables better evaluation of the effects of rehabilitation. A larger validation study is planned.

  10. Safety Hazards During Intrahospital Transport: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Lina M; Pettersson, Monica E; Chaboyer, Wendy P; Carlström, Eric D; Ringdal, Mona L

    2017-10-01

    To identify, classify, and describe safety hazards during the process of intrahospital transport of critically ill patients. A prospective observational study. Data from participant observations of the intrahospital transport process were collected over a period of 3 months. The study was undertaken at two ICUs in one university hospital. Critically ill patients transported within the hospital by critical care nurses, unlicensed nurses, and physicians. None. Content analysis was performed using deductive and inductive approaches. We detected a total of 365 safety hazards (median, 7; interquartile range, 4-10) during 51 intrahospital transports of critically ill patients, 80% of whom were mechanically ventilated. The majority of detected safety hazards were assessed as increasing the risk of harm, compromising patient safety (n = 204). Using the System Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety, we identified safety hazards related to the work system, as follows: team (n = 61), tasks (n = 83), tools and technologies (n = 124), environment (n = 48), and organization (n = 49). Inductive analysis provided an in-depth description of those safety hazards, contributing factors, and process-related outcomes. Findings suggest that intrahospital transport is a hazardous process for critically ill patients. We have identified several factors that may contribute to transport-related adverse events, which will provide the opportunity for the redesign of systems to enhance patient safety.

  11. 'Birth to Ten' - pilot studies to test the feasibility of a birth cohort study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Birth to Ten' is a birth cohort study currently being conducted in the Johannesburg-Soweto area. This paper describes the various pilot studies that were undertaken to investigate the feasibility of a cohort study in an urban area. These studies were designed to determine the monthly birth rate, the timing, frequency and ...

  12. Feasibility and impact of a physical exercise program in patients with advanced cancer: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dungen, I.A. van den; Verhagen, C.A.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Berg, J.P. van den; Vissers, K.C.P.; Engels, Y.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate the feasibility of completing an exercise program in patients with advanced cancer and to obtain preliminary data of its impact on physical and quality of life (QoL) outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a nonrandomized pilot study. Participants were 26 palliative

  13. EEG Neurofeedback for ADHD: Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Randomized Pilot Feasibility Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, L. Eugene; Lofthouse, Nicholas; Hersch, Sarah; Pan, Xueliang; Hurt, Elizabeth; Bates, Bethany; Kassouf, Kathleen; Moone, Stacey; Grantier, Cara

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Preparing for a definitive randomized clinical trial (RCT) of neurofeedback (NF) for ADHD, this pilot trial explored feasibility of a double-blind, sham-controlled design and adherence/palatability/relative effect of two versus three treatments/week. Method: Unmedicated 6- to 12-year-olds with "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of…

  14. [Feasibility and effectiveness of mindfulness training in adults with ADHD: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Hepark, S.; Kan, C.C.; Speckens, A.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental disorder that often continues into adulthood. Stimulant medication is the common treatment for ADHD. However, there is a need for psychosocial interventions in addition to medication. AIM: To conduct a pilot study which examines the feasibility and effectiveness of mindfulness training for adults with ADHD. METHOD: Eleven adults with ADHD participated in a mindfulness training scheme lasting 10 weeks. ADHD symptoms...

  15. Simulation of prenatal maternal sounds in NICU incubators: a pilot safety and feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotidis, John; Lahav, Amir

    2010-10-01

    This pilot study evaluated the safety and feasibility of an innovative audio system for transmitting maternal sounds to NICU incubators. A sample of biological sounds, consisting of voice and heartbeat, were recorded from a mother of a premature infant admitted to our unit. The maternal sounds were then played back inside an unoccupied incubator via a specialized audio system originated and compiled in our lab. We performed a series of evaluations to determine the safety and feasibility of using this system in NICU incubators. The proposed audio system was found to be safe and feasible, meeting criteria for humidity and temperature resistance, as well as for safe noise levels. Simulation of maternal sounds using this system seems achievable and applicable and received local support from medical staff. Further research and technology developments are needed to optimize the design of the NICU incubators to preserve the acoustic environment of the womb.

  16. Validity and feasibility of a digital diet estimation method for use with preschool children: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of the study was to assess the validity and feasibility of a digital diet estimation method for use with preschool children in Head Start. Preschool children and their caregivers participated in validation (n=22) and feasibility (n=24) pilot studies. Validity was determined in the metabolic...

  17. Text Messaging to Reduce Alcohol Relapse in Prelisting Liver Transplant Candidates: A Pilot Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMartini, Kelly S; Schilsky, Michael L; Palmer, Amanda; Fehon, Dwain C; Zimbrean, Paula; O'Malley, Stephanie S; Lee, Hochang B; Toll, Benjamin A

    2018-03-02

    Many liver transplantation programs require documented alcohol sobriety prior to United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) listing. This pilot study examined the feasibility of the first mobile, alcohol relapse prevention intervention for liver transplant patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). This was a randomized 8-week pilot feasibility trial of a text message-based alcohol intervention. In-treatment assessment was conducted at 4 weeks (4W), and immediate posttreatment assessment was conducted at 8W. Participants were liver transplant candidates (N = 15) diagnosed with ALD who reported at least 1 drinking episode in the past year. Primary feasibility outcomes were percent of messages responded to and posttreatment intervention satisfaction ratings. Preliminary clinical efficacy outcomes were any biologically confirmed alcohol consumption, stress, abstinence self-efficacy, and alcohol craving. On feasibility outcomes, participants responded to 81% of messages received and reported high rates of intervention satisfaction, looked forward to receiving the messages, and found it easy to complete the intervention. On preliminary efficacy outcomes, zero participants in the text message (TM) had positive urine alcohol tests at 8W. Two of the 6 participants in standard care (SC) tested positive at 8W. No effects were seen on craving. For stress, a condition × time interaction emerged. TM participants had less stress at 4W and 8W compared with SC at baseline. They maintained their stress level during the intervention. For self-efficacy, a trend for condition effect emerged. TM participants had higher self-efficacy than SC participants. Participants reported high satisfaction with the intervention, looked forward to the messages, and found it easy to complete. Participants who received the intervention had better treatment outcomes than those who received standard care. They maintained higher levels of self-efficacy and lower stress. Mobile alcohol interventions

  18. Feasibility of NOTES omental plug repair of perforated peptic ulcers: results from a clinical pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingener, Juliane; Loomis, Erica A; Gostout, Christopher J; Zielinski, Martin D; Buttar, Navtej S; Song, Louis M Wong Kee; Baron, Todd H; Ghahfarokhi, Leili Shahgholi; Rajan, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    Ulcer perforation carries up to a 30 % 1-year mortality rate. Intervention-related adverse events are among statistically significant predictors of 1-year mortality. A natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgical (NOTES) approach may be less invasive and may decrease procedure-related adverse events by diminishing the so-called second hit, thus leading to decreased morbidity and mortality. We sought to assess the feasibility of an endoscopic transluminal omental plug technique in patients with perforated gastroduodenal ulcers under laparoscopic guidance. Patients with suspected acute gastroduodenal ulcer perforations were offered participation in this prospective pilot study. Closure of the perforation was attempted using the NOTES omental plug technique. Demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and radiographic data were abstracted, as were data for morbidity, mortality, and pilot data regarding quality of life (QOL). From February 2010 through February 2012, a total of 17 patients presented to a tertiary care center with clinically suspected perforated ulcer. Of seven patients (mean age 79 years, range 64-89 years) who consented to the study, three underwent the study procedure. All patients had multiple comorbidities. Two patients presented with 4-6 mm perforated peptic ulcers and underwent successful laparoscopic-assisted NOTES omental and falciform ligament patch closure, respectively. Postoperative radiographic contrast studies showed no leak, and patients were discharged home on postoperative days 3 and 4. The third patient had undergone enterocutaneous fistula repair with herniorrhaphy 6 weeks before. Although a transluminal endoscopic approach was feasible, the omentum was under too much tension to be secured. This procedure was converted to an open omental patch repair. For all but one patient who provided consent, obtaining QOL data was feasible. Initial results from a laparoscopic-assisted NOTES approach for closure of perforated peptic ulcers appear

  19. Feasibility and acceptability of a multiple risk factor intervention: The Step Up randomized pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Julie

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventions are needed which can successfully modify more than one disease risk factor at a time, but much remains to be learned about the acceptability, feasibility, and effectiveness of multiple risk factor (MRF interventions. To address these issues and inform future intervention development, we conducted a randomized pilot trial (n = 52. This study was designed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the Step Up program, a MRF cognitive-behavioral program designed to improve participants' mental and physical well-being by reducing depressive symptoms, promoting smoking cessation, and increasing physical activity. Methods Participants were recruited from a large health care organization and randomized to receive usual care treatment for depression, smoking, and physical activity promotion or the phone-based Step Up counseling program plus usual care. Participants were assessed at baseline, three and six months. Results The intervention was acceptable to participants and feasible to offer within a healthcare system. The pilot also offered important insights into the optimal design of a MRF program. While not powered to detect clinically significant outcomes, changes in target behaviors indicated positive trends at six month follow-up and statistically significant improvement was also observed for depression. Significantly more experimental participants reported a clinically significant improvement (50% reduction in their baseline depression score at four months (54% vs. 26%, OR = 3.35, 95% CI [1.01- 12.10], p = 0.05 and 6 months (52% vs. 13%, OR = 7.27, 95% CI [1.85 - 37.30], p = 0.004 Conclusions Overall, results suggest the Step Up program warrants additional research, although some program enhancements may be beneficial. Key lessons learned from this research are shared to promote the understanding of others working in this field. Trial registration The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00644995.

  20. Feasibility of newborn hearing screening in a public hospital setting in South Africa: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amisha Kanji

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The current pilot study aimed to explore the feasibility of newborn hearing screening (NHS in a hospital setting with clinical significance for the implementation of NHS. Context-specific objectives included determining the average time required to screen each neonate or infant; the most suitable time for initial hearing screening in the wards; as well as the ambient noise levels in the wards and at the neonatal follow-up clinic where screening would be conducted. Method: A descriptive, longitudinal, repeated measures, within-subjects design was employed. The pilot study comprised 11 participants who underwent hearing screening. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Results: The average time taken to conduct hearing screening using otoacoustic emissions and automated auditory brainstem response was 18.4 minutes, with transient evoked otoacoustic emissions taking the least time. Ambient noise levels differed between wards and clinics with the sound level readings ranging between 50 dBA and 70 dBA. The most suitable screening time was found to be the afternoons, after feeding times. Conclusion: Findings highlight important considerations when embarking on larger scale NHS studies or when planning a hospital NHS programme. Current findings suggest that NHS can be efficiently and effectively conducted in public sector hospitals in South Africa, provided that test time is considered in addition to sensitivity and specificity when deciding on a screening protocol; bar recognised personnel challenges.

  1. Feasibility of Providing Culturally Relevant, Brief Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Antenatal Depression in an Obstetrics Clinic: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Nancy K.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Swartz, Holly A.; Frank, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To minimize barriers to care, ameliorate antenatal depression, and prevent postpartum depression, we conducted a pilot study to assess the feasibility of providing brief interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-B) to depressed, pregnant patients on low incomes in an obstetrics and gynecological (OB/GYN) clinic. Method: Twelve pregnant,…

  2. Feasibility of a Preventive Parenting Intervention for Very Preterm Children at 18 Months Corrected Age: A Randomized Pilot Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flierman, Monique; Koldewijn, Karen; Meijssen, Dominique; van Wassenaer-Leemhuis, Aleid; Aarnoudse-Moens, Cornelieke; van Schie, Petra; Jeukens-Visser, Martine

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and potential efficacy of an age-appropriate additional parenting intervention for very preterm born toddlers. In a randomized controlled pilot study, 60 of 94 eligible very preterm born children who had received a responsive parenting intervention in their first year

  3. Facilitated Extinction Training to Improve Pharmacotherapy for Smoking Cessation: A Pilot Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Thomas H; Unrod, Marina; Drobes, David J; Sutton, Steven K; Hawk, Larry W; Simmons, Vani N; Brandon, Karen O; Roetzheim, Richard G; Meltzer, Lauren R; Miller, Ralph R; Cahill, Shawn P

    2017-09-12

    Varenicline reduces smoking satisfaction during the pre-cessation run-in period, which may contribute to extinction of cravings and smoking behavior. Research indicates that efficacy is enhanced when the run-in period is increased from 1 to 4 weeks, providing a longer extinction opportunity. We hypothesized that efficacy could be further enhanced by harnessing basic and applied research on extinction. We developed a pre-cessation extinction-facilitating intervention and tested its feasibility in a pilot trial. The Facilitated Extinction (FE) intervention comprised brief counseling and a workbook recommending strategies to maximize extinction processes during the run-in, including instructions to smoke at a normal rate across contexts and cues, and use of an extinction cue to enhance generalization. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 varenicline interventions: standard (1-week run-in), extended (4-week run-in), and extended + FE. Interventions were delivered prior to the target quit date (TQD). Assessments were conducted in weeks 1 and 4 pre-TQD and 1 and 3 months post-TQD, with focus on feasibility indices. Recruitment and retention goals were met (N=58). Treatment satisfaction was high across groups. The majority of FE participants adhered to instructions and maintained their usual smoking rate during the run-in period. Greater decreases in craving and smoking satisfaction were observed among participants in both extended groups versus the standard group (p's<.005). Feasibility was demonstrated. Participants adhered to the FE intervention, thereby optimizing the number and variety of extinction trials. Findings support testing the novel FE smoking cessation intervention in a fully-powered trial. This study expands the research on the clinical benefits of extending the pre-cessation run-in period of varenicline. It introduces the hypothesis that further benefit might be achieved by translating basic behavioral research, as well as cue-exposure research

  4. Workplace-based assessment of communication skills: A pilot project addressing feasibility, acceptance and reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weyers, Simone

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Imparting communication skills has been given great importance in medical curricula. In addition to standardized assessments, students should communicate with real patients in actual clinical situations during workplace-based assessments and receive structured feedback on their performance. The aim of this project was to pilot a formative testing method for workplace-based assessment. Our investigation centered in particular on whether or not physicians view the method as feasible and how high acceptance is among students. In addition, we assessed the reliability of the method.Method: As part of the project, 16 students held two consultations each with chronically ill patients at the medical practice where they were completing GP training. These consultations were video-recorded. The trained mentoring physician rated the student’s performance and provided feedback immediately following the consultations using the Berlin Global Rating scale (BGR. Two impartial, trained raters also evaluated the videos using BGR. For qualitative and quantitative analysis, information on how physicians and students viewed feasibility and their levels of acceptance was collected in written form in a partially standardized manner. To test for reliability, the test-retest reliability was calculated for both of the overall evaluations given by each rater. The inter-rater reliability was determined for the three evaluations of each individual consultation.Results: The formative assessment method was rated positively by both physicians and students. It is relatively easy to integrate into daily routines. Its significant value lies in the personal, structured and recurring feedback. The two overall scores for each patient consultation given by the two impartial raters correlate moderately. The degree of uniformity among the three raters in respect to the individual consultations is low.Discussion: Within the scope of this pilot project, only a small sample

  5. Workplace-based assessment of communication skills: A pilot project addressing feasibility, acceptance and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyers, Simone; Jemi, Iman; Karger, André; Raski, Bianca; Rotthoff, Thomas; Pentzek, Michael; Mortsiefer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Imparting communication skills has been given great importance in medical curricula. In addition to standardized assessments, students should communicate with real patients in actual clinical situations during workplace-based assessments and receive structured feedback on their performance. The aim of this project was to pilot a formative testing method for workplace-based assessment. Our investigation centered in particular on whether or not physicians view the method as feasible and how high acceptance is among students. In addition, we assessed the reliability of the method. Method: As part of the project, 16 students held two consultations each with chronically ill patients at the medical practice where they were completing GP training. These consultations were video-recorded. The trained mentoring physician rated the student's performance and provided feedback immediately following the consultations using the Berlin Global Rating scale (BGR). Two impartial, trained raters also evaluated the videos using BGR. For qualitative and quantitative analysis, information on how physicians and students viewed feasibility and their levels of acceptance was collected in written form in a partially standardized manner. To test for reliability, the test-retest reliability was calculated for both of the overall evaluations given by each rater. The inter-rater reliability was determined for the three evaluations of each individual consultation. Results: The formative assessment method was rated positively by both physicians and students. It is relatively easy to integrate into daily routines. Its significant value lies in the personal, structured and recurring feedback. The two overall scores for each patient consultation given by the two impartial raters correlate moderately. The degree of uniformity among the three raters in respect to the individual consultations is low. Discussion: Within the scope of this pilot project, only a small sample of physicians and

  6. Pilot Feasibility Study of a Digital Storytelling Intervention for Immigrant and Refugee Adults With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Mark L; Njeru, Jane W; Hanza, Marcelo M; Boehm, Deborah H; Singh, Davinder; Yawn, Barbara P; Patten, Christi A; Clark, Matthew M; Weis, Jennifer A; Osman, Ahmed; Goodson, Miriam; Porraz Capetillo, Maria D; Hared, Abdullah; Hasley, Rachel; Guzman-Corrales, Laura; Sandler, Rachel; Hernandez, Valentina; Novotny, Paul J; Sloan, Jeff A; Sia, Irene G

    2017-08-01

    Purpose The purpose of this pilot feasibility project was to examine the potential effectiveness of a digital storytelling intervention designed through a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach for immigrants and refugees with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods The intervention was a 12-minute culturally and linguistically tailored video consisting of an introduction, 4 stories, and a concluding educational message. A structured interview was used to assess the intervention for acceptability, interest level, and usefulness among 25 participants with T2DM (15 Latino, 10 Somali) across 5 primary care clinical sites. After watching the video, participants rated their confidence and motivation about managing T2DM as a result of the intervention. Baseline A1C and follow-up values (up to 6 months) were abstracted from medical records. Results All participants reported that the intervention got their attention, was interesting, and was useful; 96% reported that they were more confident about managing their T2DM than before they watched the video, and 92% reported that the video motivated them to change a specific behavior related to T2DM self-management. The mean baseline A1C level for the intervention participants was 9.3% (78 mmol/mol). The change from baseline to first follow-up A1C level was -0.8% (-10 mmol/mol) ( P storytelling intervention for T2DM among immigrant populations in primary care settings is feasible and resulted in self-rated improvement in psychosocial constructs that are associated with healthy T2DM self-management behaviors, and there was some evidence of improvement in glycemic control. A large-scale efficacy trial of the intervention is warranted.

  7. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Whole-systems Ayurvedic Medicine and Yoga Therapy for Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux, Jennifer; Thomson, Cynthia; Howerter, Amy

    2014-01-01

    To develop and test the feasibility of a whole-systems lifestyle intervention for obesity treatment based on the practices of Ayurvedic medicine/ Yoga therapy. A pre-post weight loss intervention pilot study using conventional and Ayurvedic diagnosis inclusion criteria, tailored treatment within a standardized treatment algorithm, and standardized data collection instruments for collecting Ayurvedic outcomes. A convenience sample of overweight/obese adult community members from Tucson, Arizona interested in a "holistic weight loss program" and meeting predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. A comprehensive diet, activity, and lifestyle modification program based on principles of Ayurvedic medicine/yoga therapy with significant self-monitoring of lifestyle behaviors. The 3-month program was designed to change eating and activity patterns and to improve self-efficacy, quality of life, well-being, vitality, and self-awareness around food choices, stress management, and barriers to weight loss. Changes in body weight, body mass index; body fat percentage, fat/lean mass, waist/hip circumference and ratio, and blood pressure. Diet and exercise self-efficacy scales; perceived stress scale; visual analog scales (VAS) of energy, appetite, stress, quality of life, well-being, and program satisfaction at all time points. Twenty-two adults attended an in-person Ayurvedic screening; 17 initiated the intervention, and 12 completed the 3-month intervention. Twelve completed follow-up at 6 months and 11 completed follow-up at 9 months. Mean weight loss at 3 months was 3.54 kg (SD 4.76); 6 months: 4.63 kg, (SD 6.23) and 9 months: 5.9 kg (SD 8.52). Self-report of program satisfaction was more than 90% at all time points. An Ayurveda-/yoga-based lifestyle modification program is an acceptable and feasible approach to weight management. Data collection, including self-monitoring and conventional and Ayurvedic outcomes, did not unduly burden participants, with attrition similar to

  8. Feasibility of using experimental high viscosity silicone oils: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen-Ophir, Shira; Rosner, Mordechai; Rubowitz, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Polydimethyl silicones (silicone oils) are used in complex retinal surgeries, including difficult or recurrent retinal detachments, severe eye trauma, and other indications for long term tamponade. Two major problems with currently available silicone oils are emulsification and recurrent retinal detachment. The primary endpoint of this study was to evaluate the toxicity and safety of high viscosity silicone oils and second, the feasibility of using them with currently available vitrectomy systems. In this experimental study, 8 eyes of 8 New Zealand White rabbits underwent vitrectomy. The vitreous cavities of 2 eyes were filled with medical grade 5500 cS silicone oil, 4 eyes with 12,500 cS oil, and 2 eyes with 30,000 cS oil for 3 months, after which the animals were sacrificed and the eyes sent for histopathological examination. The duration required to inject 5 cc each of 1300, 12,500 and 30,000 cS oils, using a commercially available system (Alcon VFC Pac) were also evaluated. Retinal histopathology was comparable in all eyes, with no excess toxic effect or damage seen in eyes with experimental oils. All oils were readily injectable with the VFC Pac system. High viscosity experimental silicone oils have similar chemical and physical properties to lower viscosity oils currently used. Therefore, toxicities are expected to be similar. In a small pilot sample of 8 rabbit eyes filled with silicone oil for 3 months, histopathology in eyes with 12,500, 30,000 cS or medical grade 5500 cS silicone oil were similar. Injecting these oils using available vitrectomy equipment is feasible. New, high viscosity silicone oils may offer several advantages over currently available oils for some patients.

  9. Development and Feasibility of Bundled Payments for the Multidisciplinary Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer: A Pilot Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, Tracy; Guzman, Alexis; Beadle, Beth M; Lee, Seohyun; Jones, Delrose; Walters, Ron; Incalcaterra, Jim; Hanna, Ehab; Hessel, Amy; Weber, Randal; Denney, Sandra; Newcomer, Lee; Feeley, Thomas W

    2018-02-01

    Despite growing interest in bundled payments to reduce the costs of care, this payment method remains largely untested in cancer. This 3-year pilot tested the feasibility of a 1-year bundled payment for the multidisciplinary treatment of head and neck cancers. Four prospective treatment-based bundles were developed for patients with selected head and neck cancers. These risk-adjusted bundles covered 1 year of care that began with primary cancer treatment. Manual processes were developed for patient identification, enrollment, billing, and payment. Patients were prospectively identified and enrolled, and bundled payments were made at treatment start. Operational metrics tracked incremental effort for pilot processes and average payment cycle time compared with fee-for-service (FFS) payments. This pilot confirmed the feasibility of a 1-year prospective bundled payment for head and neck cancers. Between November 2014 and October 2016, 88 patients were enrolled successfully with prospective bundled payments. Through September 2017, 94% of patients completed the pilot with 6% still enrolled. Manual pilot processes required more effort than anticipated; claims processing was the most time-consuming activity. The production of a bundle bill took an additional 15 minutes versus FFS billing. The average payment cycle time was 37 days (range, 15 to 141 days) compared with a 15-day average under FFS. Prospective bundled payments were successfully implemented in this pilot. Additional pilots should study this payment method in higher-volume cancers. Robust systems are needed to automate patient identification, enrollment, billing, and payment along with policies that reduce administrative burden and allow for the introduction of novel cancer therapies.

  10. Intrahospital Weight and Aerobic Training in Children with Cystic Fibrosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sosa, Elena Santana; Groeneveld, Iris F.; Gonzalez-Saiz, Laura; López-Mojares, Luis M.; Villa-Asensi, José R.; Gonzalez, María I. Barrio; Fleck, Steven J.; Pérez, Margarita; Lucia, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    SOSA, E. S., I. F. GROENEVELD, L. GONZALEZ-SAIZ, L. M. LOPEZ-MOJARES, J. R. VILLA-ASENSI, M. I. BARRIO GONZALEZ, S. J. FLECK, M. PEREZ, and A. LUCIA. Intrahospital Weight and Aerobic Training in Children with Cystic Fibrosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 44, No. 1,

  11. Brain response to taste in overweight children: A pilot feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara Bohon

    Full Text Available Understanding the neural response to food and food cues during early stages of weight gain in childhood may help us determine the drive processes involved in unhealthy eating behavior and risk for obesity. Healthy weight and overweight children ages 6-8 (N = 18; 10 with BMI between 5th and 85th %ile and 8 with BMI >85th %ile underwent fMRI scans while anticipating and receiving tastes of chocolate milkshake. Parents completed a Children's Eating Behaviour Questionnaire. Results reveal greater response to milkshake taste receipt in overweight children in the right insula, operculum, precentral gyrus, and angular gyrus, and bilateral precuneus and posterior cingulate. No group differences were found for brain response to a visual food cue. Exploratory analyses revealed interactions between self-report measures of eating behavior and weight status on brain response to taste. This pilot study provides preliminary evidence of feasibility of studying young children's taste processing and suggests a possible developmental shift in brain response to taste.

  12. Mindfulness-Based Intervention for Adolescents with Recurrent Headaches: A Pilot Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Hesse

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent headaches cause significant burden for adolescents and their families. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs have been shown to reduce stress and alter the experience of pain, reduce pain burden, and improve quality of life. Research indicates that MBIs can benefit adults with chronic pain conditions including headaches. A pilot nonrandomized clinical trial was conducted with 20 adolescent females with recurrent headaches. Median class attendance was 7 of 8 total sessions; average class attendance was 6.10±2.6. Adherence to home practice was good, with participants reporting an average of 4.69 (SD = 1.84 of 6 practices per week. Five participants dropped out for reasons not inherent to the group (e.g., extracurricular scheduling; no adverse events were reported. Parents reported improved quality of life and physical functioning for their child. Adolescent participants reported improved depression symptoms and improved ability to accept their pain rather than trying to control it. MBIs appear safe and feasible for adolescents with recurrent headaches. Although participants did not report decreased frequency or severity of headache following treatment, the treatment had a beneficial effect for depression, quality of life, and acceptance of pain and represents a promising adjunct treatment for adolescents with recurrent headaches.

  13. Homeopathy for Perennial Asthma in Adolescents: Pilot Feasibility Study Testing a Randomised Withdrawal Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchiguian Hotta, Livia; Cardinalli Adler, Ubiratan; de Toledo Cesar, Amarilys; Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi; Demarzo, Marcelo Marcos Piva

    2018-03-26

     Previous findings from a pragmatic trial suggest that usual care compared with usual care plus individualised homeopathy is not a feasible design to address homeopathic interventions for asthma.  The main purpose of this article was to investigate the feasibility of the randomised withdrawal design as a strategy to assess the effectiveness of a standardised clinical-pharmaceutical homeopathic protocol ( Organon.modus ) on perennial asthma in adolescents.  Randomised withdrawal, double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled, 12-week study. 12 to 17 years old adolescents, with the diagnosis of perennial asthma, using inhalatory beclomethasone (plus fenoterol for wheezing episodes), who achieved 3 months of well-controlled asthma, after a variable period of individualised homeopathic treatment according to Organon.modus protocol. a secondary care medical specialist centre. continuation with the individualised homeopathic medicine or with indistinguishable placebo during 12 weeks of beclomethasone step-down. number of days of well-controlled asthma. Secondary measures: number of days of fenoterol use, number of visits to an emergency service (without hospitalisation) and percentage of patients excluded due to an exacerbation characterising a partly controlled asthma. Tolerability was assessed by Adverse Events, registered at every visit.  Nineteen patients were randomised to continue treatment with homeopathy and 21 with placebo. Effectiveness measures for the homeopathy and placebo groups respectively were median number of days of good clinical control: 84 versus 30 ( p  = 0.18); median number of days of fenoterol use per patient: 3 versus 5 ( p  = 0.41); visits to an emergency room: 1 versus 6 ( p  = 0.35); percentage of exclusion due to partly controlled asthma: 36.8% versus 71.4% ( p  = 0.05). Few Adverse Events were reported.  This pilot study supports the feasibility of the double-blind randomised withdrawal design in studies investigating

  14. A telehealth integrated asthma-COPD service for primary care: a proposal for a pilot feasibility study in Crete, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzanakis Nikolaos E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma are considered underdiagnosed and misdiagnosed chronic diseases. In The Netherlands, a COPD-asthma telemedicine service has been developed to increase GPs' ability to diagnose and manage COPD and asthma. A telemedicine COPD-asthma service may benefit Greece as it is a country, partly due to its geography, that does not have easy access to pulmonologists. Findings Therefore, a pilot feasibility study has been designed in Greece in order to establish this telemedicine service. Ten rural practices, in the island of Crete, with an average population of 2000 patients per practice will pilot the project supported by three pulmonologists. This paper presents the translated interfaces, the flowcharts and the steps that are considered as necessary for this feasibility study in Crete, Greece.

  15. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Massage to Reduce Pain in People with Spinal Cord Injury during Acute Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Chase, Theresa; Jha, Amitabh; Brooks, C. A.; Allshouse, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial of massage therapy for patients with new spinal cord injury (SCI) during acute inpatient rehabilitation. Design A pilot single-center, randomized, single-blind, cross-over clinical trial. Setting Free-standing, not-for-profit, comprehensive rehabilitation center specializing in SCI rehabilitation Participants Forty adults ages 18 years and older undergoing acute rehabilitation following spinal cord injury repor...

  16. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 reduces systolic blood pressure in hypertensive adults: A pilot feasibility study☆

    OpenAIRE

    Judd, Suzanne E.; Raiser, Sara N.; Kumari, Meena; Tangpricha, Vin

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D has been reported to lower blood pressure in vivo by regulating the renin-angiotensin system; however, there are limited clinical studies to support this finding in humans. We investigated the effect of vitamin D treatment on hypertension in a three-arm randomized placebo controlled pilot and feasibility study. We tested placebo with two forms of vitamin D: cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) and the active form of vitamin D, calcitriol. Subjects were recruited from the Atlanta Veterans Af...

  17. Integrating an internet-mediated walking program into family medicine clinical practice: a pilot feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Ananda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular participation in physical activity can prevent many chronic health conditions. Computerized self-management programs are effective clinical tools to support patient participation in physical activity. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate an online interface for primary care providers to refer patients to an Internet-mediated walking program called Stepping Up to Health (SUH and to monitor participant progress in the program. Methods In Phase I of the study, we recruited six pairs of physicians and medical assistants from two family practice clinics to assist with the design of a clinical interface. During Phase II, providers used the developed interface to refer patients to a six-week pilot intervention. Provider perspectives were assessed regarding the feasibility of integrating the program into routine care. Assessment tools included quantitative and qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews, surveys, and online usage logs. Results In Phase I, 13 providers used SUH and participated in two interviews. Providers emphasized the need for alerts flagging patients who were not doing well and the ability to review participant progress. Additionally, providers asked for summary views of data across all enrolled clinic patients as well as advertising materials for intervention recruitment. In response to this input, an interface was developed containing three pages: 1 a recruitment page, 2 a summary page, and 3 a detailed patient page. In Phase II, providers used the interface to refer 139 patients to SUH and 37 (27% enrolled in the intervention. Providers rarely used the interface to monitor enrolled patients. Barriers to regular use of the intervention included lack of integration with the medical record system, competing priorities, patient disinterest, and physician unease with exercise referrals. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that patients increased walking by an average of 1493 steps

  18. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01

    Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC36-00GO10529 for the Department of Energy, General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low

  19. Integrating an internet-mediated walking program into family medicine clinical practice: a pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, David E; Buis, Lorraine R; Janney, Adrienne W; Ditty, Megan D; Krause, Christine W; Zheng, Kai; Sen, Ananda; Strecher, Victor J; Hess, Michael L; Piette, John D; Richardson, Caroline R

    2011-06-24

    Regular participation in physical activity can prevent many chronic health conditions. Computerized self-management programs are effective clinical tools to support patient participation in physical activity. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate an online interface for primary care providers to refer patients to an Internet-mediated walking program called Stepping Up to Health (SUH) and to monitor participant progress in the program. In Phase I of the study, we recruited six pairs of physicians and medical assistants from two family practice clinics to assist with the design of a clinical interface. During Phase II, providers used the developed interface to refer patients to a six-week pilot intervention. Provider perspectives were assessed regarding the feasibility of integrating the program into routine care. Assessment tools included quantitative and qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews, surveys, and online usage logs. In Phase I, 13 providers used SUH and participated in two interviews. Providers emphasized the need for alerts flagging patients who were not doing well and the ability to review participant progress. Additionally, providers asked for summary views of data across all enrolled clinic patients as well as advertising materials for intervention recruitment. In response to this input, an interface was developed containing three pages: 1) a recruitment page, 2) a summary page, and 3) a detailed patient page. In Phase II, providers used the interface to refer 139 patients to SUH and 37 (27%) enrolled in the intervention. Providers rarely used the interface to monitor enrolled patients. Barriers to regular use of the intervention included lack of integration with the medical record system, competing priorities, patient disinterest, and physician unease with exercise referrals. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that patients increased walking by an average of 1493 steps/day from pre- to post-intervention (t = (36) = 4.13, p

  20. Physiotherapy Post Lumbar Discectomy: Prospective Feasibility and Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Rushton

    Full Text Available To evaluate: acceptability and feasibility of trial procedures; distribution of scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ, planned primary outcome; and efficient working of trial components.A feasibility and external pilot randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN33808269, assigned 10/12/2012 was conducted across 2 UK secondary care outpatient physiotherapy departments associated with regional spinal surgery centres.Consecutive consenting patients aged >18 years; post primary, single level, lumbar discectomy.Participants were randomised to either 1:1 physiotherapy outpatient management including patient leaflet, or patient leaflet alone.Blinded assessments were made at 4 weeks post surgery (baseline and 12 weeks post baseline (proposed primary end point. Secondary outcomes included: Global Perceived Effect, back/leg pain, straight leg raise, return to work/function, quality of life, fear avoidance, range of movement, medication, re-operation.At discharge, 110 (44% eligible patients gave consent to be contacted. 59 (54% patients were recruited. Loss to follow up was 39% at 12 weeks, with one site contributing 83% losses. Mean (SD RMDQ was 10.07 (5.58 leaflet and 10.52 (5.94 physiotherapy/leaflet at baseline; and 5.37 (4.91 leaflet and 5.53 (4.49 physiotherapy/leaflet at 12 weeks. 5.1% zero scores at 12 weeks illustrated no floor effect. Sensitivity to change was assessed at 12 weeks with mean (SD change -4.53 (6.41, 95%CI -7.61 to -1.44 for leaflet; and -6.18 (5.59, 95%CI -9.01 to -3.30 for physiotherapy/leaflet. RMDQ mean difference (95%CI between change from baseline to twelve weeks was 1.65(-2.46 to 5.75. Mean difference (95%CI between groups at 12 weeks was -0.16 (-3.36 to 3.04. Participant adherence with treatment was good. No adverse events were reported.Both interventions were acceptable, and it is promising that they both demonstrated a trend in reducing disability in this population. A randomised controlled trial, using a

  1. An Internet-based writing intervention for PTSD in veterans: A feasibility and pilot effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupnick, Janice L; Green, Bonnie L; Amdur, Richard; Alaoui, Adil; Belouali, Anas; Roberge, Erika; Cueva, David; Roberts, Miguel; Melnikoff, Elizabeth; Dutton, Mary Ann

    2017-07-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 9(4) of Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy (see record 2016-54154-001). In the article, the names of authors Adil Alaoui and Anas Belouali were misspelled as Adil Aloui and Anas Beloui respectively. All versions of this article have been corrected.] Objective: Veterans suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may avoid or fail to follow through with a full course of face-to-face mental health treatment for a variety of reasons. We conducted a pilot effectiveness trial of an online intervention for veterans with current PTSD to determine the feasibility, safety, and preliminary effectiveness of an online writing intervention (i.e., Warriors Internet Recovery & EDucation [WIRED]) as an adjunct to face-to-face psychotherapy. Method: Veterans ( N = 34) who had served in Iraq or Afghanistan with current PTSD subsequent to deployment-related trauma were randomized to Veterans Affairs (VA) mental health treatment as usual (TAU) or to treatment as usual plus the online intervention (TAU + WIRED). All research participants were recruited from the Trauma Services Program, VA Medical Center, Washington, DC. They completed baseline assessments as well as assessments 12 weeks and 24 weeks after the baseline assessment. The online intervention consisted of therapist-guided writing, using principles of prolonged exposure and cognitive therapy. The intervention was adapted from an evidence-based treatment used in The Netherlands and Germany for individuals who had been exposed to nonmilitary traumas. Results: In addition to showing that the online intervention was both feasible to develop and implement, as well as being safe, the results showed preliminary evidence of the effectiveness of the TAU + WIRED intervention in this patient population, with particular evidence in reducing PTSD symptoms of hyperarousal. Conclusion: With minor modifications to enhance the therapeutic

  2. Physiotherapy Post Lumbar Discectomy: Prospective Feasibility and Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Alison; Goodwin, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate: acceptability and feasibility of trial procedures; distribution of scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ, planned primary outcome); and efficient working of trial components. Design and Setting A feasibility and external pilot randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN33808269, assigned 10/12/2012) was conducted across 2 UK secondary care outpatient physiotherapy departments associated with regional spinal surgery centres. Participants Consecutive consenting patients aged >18 years; post primary, single level, lumbar discectomy. Interventions Participants were randomised to either 1:1 physiotherapy outpatient management including patient leaflet, or patient leaflet alone. Main Outcome Measures Blinded assessments were made at 4 weeks post surgery (baseline) and 12 weeks post baseline (proposed primary end point). Secondary outcomes included: Global Perceived Effect, back/leg pain, straight leg raise, return to work/function, quality of life, fear avoidance, range of movement, medication, re-operation. Results At discharge, 110 (44%) eligible patients gave consent to be contacted. 59 (54%) patients were recruited. Loss to follow up was 39% at 12 weeks, with one site contributing 83% losses. Mean (SD) RMDQ was 10.07 (5.58) leaflet and 10.52 (5.94) physiotherapy/leaflet at baseline; and 5.37 (4.91) leaflet and 5.53 (4.49) physiotherapy/leaflet at 12 weeks. 5.1% zero scores at 12 weeks illustrated no floor effect. Sensitivity to change was assessed at 12 weeks with mean (SD) change -4.53 (6.41), 95%CI -7.61 to -1.44 for leaflet; and -6.18 (5.59), 95%CI -9.01 to -3.30 for physiotherapy/leaflet. RMDQ mean difference (95%CI) between change from baseline to twelve weeks was 1.65(-2.46 to 5.75). Mean difference (95%CI) between groups at 12 weeks was -0.16 (-3.36 to 3.04). Participant adherence with treatment was good. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions Both interventions were acceptable, and it is promising that they both

  3. Feasibility of Measuring Tobacco Smoke Air Pollution in Homes: Report from a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Rosen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoke air pollution (TSAP measurement may persuade parents to adopt smoke-free homes and thereby reduce harm to children from tobacco smoke in the home. In a pilot study involving 29 smoking families, a Sidepak was used to continuously monitor home PM2.5 during an 8-h period, Sidepak and/or Dylos monitors provided real-time feedback, and passive nicotine monitors were used to measure home air nicotine for one week. Feedback was provided to participants in the context of motivational interviews. Home PM2.5 levels recorded by continuous monitoring were not well-accepted by participants because of the noise level. Also, graphs from continuous monitoring showed unexplained peaks, often associated with sources unrelated to indoor smoking, such as cooking, construction, or outdoor sources. This hampered delivery of a persuasive message about the relationship between home smoking and TSAP. By contrast, immediate real-time PM2.5 feedback (with Sidepak or Dylos monitor was feasible and provided unambiguous information; the Dylos had the additional advantages of being more economical and quieter. Air nicotine sampling was complicated by the time-lag for feedback and questions regarding shelf-life. Improvement in the science of TSAP measurement in the home environment is needed to encourage and help maintain smoke-free homes and protect vulnerable children. Recent advances in the use of mobile devices for real-time feedback are promising and warrant further development, as do accurate methods for real-time air nicotine air monitoring.

  4. Improving the efficiency of trials using innovative pilot designs: the next phase in the conduct and reporting of pilot and feasibility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabane, Lehana; Lancaster, Gillian

    2018-01-01

    With continuously increasing costs of conducting trials, use of innovative approaches-such as pragmatic trials, registry-based randomised trials, adaptive trials, personalised medicine trials, platform trials, and basket trials-to the design and conduct of clinical trials has been advocated as one of the most promising solutions. In this editorial, we propose that the next wave of feasibility or pilot studies should focus on assessing the feasibility of trials using these designs, which we see as an imperative in order to unleash their potential to reduce trial costs and accelerate the drug development process and the search for best treatments, so that the right treatments can be delivered as soon as possible to the right patients.

  5. Pilot Feasibility Study of a Telephone-Based Couples Intervention for Physical Intimacy and Sexual Concerns in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jennifer Barsky; Porter, Laura S.; Somers, Tamara J.; Keefe, Francis J.

    2012-01-01

    No studies have tested interventions addressing the sexual concerns of colorectal cancer patients and their partners. We report findings from a pilot feasibility study of a novel telephone-based Intimacy Enhancement protocol that addresses the intimacy and sexual concerns of couples facing colorectal cancer. Based on a flexible coping model (Reese, Keefe, Somers, & Abernethy, 2010), the intervention was designed to help couples make cognitive and behavioral shifts in their intimate relationships. Eighteen individuals (9 dyads) completed the intervention and completed measures of feasibility (frequency, ease of use, and helpfulness of skills, ratings of rapport), program evaluations, and measures of sexual and relationship functioning. Most participants reported that the intervention was “quite a bit” or “extremely helpful” and that they had used the skills taught within the past week. The skills most commonly practiced and perceived as most helpful tended to be behavioral (e.g., trying a new sexual activity). The largest effect sizes (≥ .60) were found for sexual distress, sexual function (female), and sexual communication. Findings from this pilot study suggest that the Intimacy Enhancement protocol is feasible and holds promise for improving sexual and intimacy outcomes in colorectal cancer patients and their partners. Research and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:22900623

  6. A Pilot Study to Assess the Feasibility of Group Exercise and Animal-Assisted Therapy in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Brandon; Artese, Ashley; Schmitt, Karla; Cormier, Eileen; Panton, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    This pilot study assessed the feasibility of incorporating animal-assisted therapy teams (ATT) into a 6-week group exercise program for older adults (77 ± 6 years). Fifteen participants were randomly assigned to an exercise with ATT (E+ATT; n = 8) or exercise only (E; n = 7) group. Groups exercised 3x/week for 45 min. Feasibility was assessed by three objectives: (1) ATT will not need extensive preparation beyond their original therapy training; (2) the study will require minimal cost; and (3) ATT must not impair the effectiveness of the exercise program. By the study conclusion, all objectives were met. Time and cost were minimal for ATT, and adherence was 93% and 90% for E+ATT and E, respectively. There were significant improvements in both groups (p ≤ .05) for arm curls, get-up and go, and 6-min walk. The results of this pilot study suggest that it is feasible to incorporate ATT into group exercise programming for older adults.

  7. Intra-hospital organ and tissue donation coordination project: cost-effectiveness and social benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Vanessa Silva e; Moura, Luciana Carvalho; Leite, Renata Fabiana; Oliveira, Priscilla Caroliny de; Schirmer, Janine; Roza, Bartira De' Aguiar

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the viability of a professional specialist in intra-hospital committees of organ and tissue donation for transplantation. METHODS Epidemiological, retrospective and cross-sectional study (2003-2011 and 2008-2012), which was performed using organ donation for transplants data in the state of Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. Nine hospitals were evaluated (hospitals 1 to 9). Logistic regression was used to evaluate the differences in the number of brain death referrals an...

  8. Factors derived from the intrahospitable laboratories that cause stress in infirmary students

    OpenAIRE

    Basso Musso,Liliana; Ardiles Vargas,Bárbara; Bernal Torres,Milenca; Canovas del Canto,María José; González Meléndez,Catherin; Kroff Balloqui,María Francisca; Soto Cornejo,Angélica

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative, correlation cross-sectional study with descriptive analysis, whose objective was to assess the factors derived from the intra-hospitable laboratories that affect the stress appearance in Infirmary students. The sample consisted of 129 students, which voluntarily acceded to answer questionnaires Evaluative Scale de Hamilton for the Anxiety, validated in 2003, and Questionnaire KEZKAK, both adapted by the investigating group. The obtained data was processed through Microsoft Excel...

  9. Feasibility of developing a pilot car training and certification program in Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    The State of Alabama does not currently require certification for the pilot car drivers who escort : oversize/overweight vehicles. The Alabama Department of Transportation contracted with The University : Transportation Center for Alabama (UTCA) to i...

  10. A single-group pilot feasibility study of cognitive behavioural therapy in people with multiple sclerosis with depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruzander, Charlotte; Gottberg, Kristina; Ytterberg, Charlotte; Backenroth, Gunnel; Fredrikson, Sten; Widén Holmqvist, Lotta; Johansson, Sverker

    2016-12-01

    The aims were to evaluate (a) the feasibility of face-to-face cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in people with MS (PwMS) with depressive symptoms; (b) the feasibility of methods and measurements used; and (c) the outcome of the intervention before the conducting of an equivalence study of comparative methods of face-to-face CBT. A single-group pilot feasibility study. PwMS (n = 15) with sub-threshold to moderate depressive symptoms, recruited at the Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. The intervention consisted of 15-20 sessions of face-to-face CBT. Feasibility outcomes included recruitment rate, recruitment procedure and adverse events. Primary clinical outcome was the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Follow-ups were conducted after 3 weeks and 3 months. An estimated sample size calculation was conducted. The face-to-face CBT intervention, methods and measurements used were feasible. The outcome on BDI-II indicated that face-to-face CBT is an effective method for alleviating sub-threshold to moderate depressive symptoms in PwMS. Face-to-face CBT is feasible for use in PwMS aiming at decrease depressive symptoms. For an equivalence study, a screening process for depressive symptoms and two comparative intervention arms including traditional face-to-face CBT and low-intensity face-to-face CBT is recommended. Primary outcomes should include the BDI-II and also assessment of anxiety symptoms. Implications for Rehabilitation Depression is common among people with MS (PwMS), however, depressed PwMS do not always receive adequate treatment for depression which may lead to increased disability and worse health-related quality of life (HRQL). Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a psychological treatment method that might be beneficial for PwMS with depressive symptoms, but the evidence is still weak and further research is needed. The results from our pilot feasibility study demonstrate that for an effectiveness study of face-to-face CBT for

  11. Home-based neurologic music therapy for arm hemiparesis following stroke: results from a pilot, feasibility randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Alexander J; Magee, Wendy L; Bateman, Andrew; Parker, Michael; Odell-Miller, Helen; Fachner, Jorg

    2018-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial to evaluate music therapy as a home-based intervention for arm hemiparesis in stroke. A pilot feasibility randomized controlled trial, with cross-over design. Randomization by statistician using computer-generated, random numbers concealed in opaque envelopes. Participants' homes across Cambridgeshire, UK. Eleven people with stroke and arm hemiparesis, 3-60 months post stroke, following discharge from community rehabilitation. Each participant engaged in therapeutic instrumental music performance in 12 individual clinical contacts, twice weekly for six weeks. Feasibility was estimated by recruitment from three community stroke teams over a 12-month period, attrition rates, completion of treatment and successful data collection. Structured interviews were conducted pre and post intervention to establish participant tolerance and preference. Action Research Arm Test and Nine-hole Peg Test data were collected at weeks 1, 6, 9, 15 and 18, pre and post intervention by a blinded assessor. A total of 11 of 14 invited participants were recruited (intervention n = 6, waitlist n = 5). In total, 10 completed treatment and data collection. It cannot be concluded whether a larger trial would be feasible due to unavailable data regarding a number of eligible patients screened. Adherence to treatment, retention and interview responses might suggest that the intervention was motivating for participants. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT 02310438.

  12. Feasibility and reliability of physical fitness tests in older adults with intellectual disability : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    Background Physical fitness is relevant for wellbeing and health, but knowledge on the feasibility and reliability of instruments to measure physical fitness for older adults with intellectual disability is lacking. Methods Feasibility and test-retest reliability of a physical fitness test battery

  13. Feasibility and Reliability of Physical Fitness Tests in Older Adults with Intellectual Disability: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Physical fitness is relevant for wellbeing and health, but knowledge on the feasibility and reliability of instruments to measure physical fitness for older adults with intellectual disability is lacking. Methods: Feasibility and test-retest reliability of a physical fitness test battery (Box and Block Test, Response Time Test, walking…

  14. Feasibility and assessment of outcome measures for yoga as self-care for minorities with arthritis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly R. Middleton

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While there is a growing interest in the therapeutic benefits of yoga, minority populations with arthritis tend to be under-represented in the research. Additionally, there is an absence of guidance in the literature regarding the use of multicultural teams and sociocultural health beliefs, when designing yoga studies for a racially diverse population with arthritis. This pilot study examined the feasibility of offering yoga as a self-care modality to an urban, bilingual, minority population with osteoarthritis (OA or rheumatoid arthritis (RA, in the Washington, DC area. Methods The primary objective of the study was to assess the feasibility of offering an 8-week, bilingual yoga intervention adapted for arthritis to a convenience sample of primarily Hispanic and Black/African-American adults. A racially diverse interdisciplinary research team was assembled to design a study to facilitate recruitment and retention. The second objective identified outcome measures to operationalize potential facilitators and barriers to self-care and self-efficacy. The third objective determined the feasibility of using computer-assisted self-interview (CASI for data collection. Results Enrolled participants (n = 30 were mostly female (93%, Spanish speaking (69%, and diagnosed with RA (88.5%. Feasibility was evaluated using practicality, acceptability, adaptation, and expansion of an arthritis-adapted yoga intervention, modified for this population. Recruitment (51% and participation (60% rates were similar to previous research and clinical experience with the study population. Of those enrolled, 18 started the intervention. For adherence, 12 out of 18 (67% participants completed the intervention. All (100%, who completed the intervention, continued to practice yoga 3 months after completing the study. Using nonparametric tests, selected outcome measures showed a measurable change post-intervention suggesting appropriate use in future

  15. Feasibility and assessment of outcome measures for yoga as self-care for minorities with arthritis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Kimberly R; Ward, Michael M; Haaz Moonaz, Steffany; Magaña López, Miriam; Tataw-Ayuketah, Gladys; Yang, Li; Acevedo, Ana T; Brandon, Zavera; Wallen, Gwenyth R

    2018-01-01

    While there is a growing interest in the therapeutic benefits of yoga, minority populations with arthritis tend to be under-represented in the research. Additionally, there is an absence of guidance in the literature regarding the use of multicultural teams and sociocultural health beliefs, when designing yoga studies for a racially diverse population with arthritis. This pilot study examined the feasibility of offering yoga as a self-care modality to an urban, bilingual, minority population with osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in the Washington, DC area. The primary objective of the study was to assess the feasibility of offering an 8-week, bilingual yoga intervention adapted for arthritis to a convenience sample of primarily Hispanic and Black/African-American adults. A racially diverse interdisciplinary research team was assembled to design a study to facilitate recruitment and retention. The second objective identified outcome measures to operationalize potential facilitators and barriers to self-care and self-efficacy. The third objective determined the feasibility of using computer-assisted self-interview (CASI) for data collection. Enrolled participants ( n  = 30) were mostly female (93%), Spanish speaking (69%), and diagnosed with RA (88.5%). Feasibility was evaluated using practicality, acceptability, adaptation, and expansion of an arthritis-adapted yoga intervention, modified for this population. Recruitment (51%) and participation (60%) rates were similar to previous research and clinical experience with the study population. Of those enrolled, 18 started the intervention. For adherence, 12 out of 18 (67%) participants completed the intervention. All (100%), who completed the intervention, continued to practice yoga 3 months after completing the study. Using nonparametric tests, selected outcome measures showed a measurable change post-intervention suggesting appropriate use in future studies. An in-person computerized

  16. A pilot feasibility study of a peer-led mindfulness program for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon Danilewitz

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: A peer-led MMP is feasible and may be a promising approach to enhance medical student wellbeing. Further research is needed to explore strategies to improve program compliance in this student population.

  17. Couple-Based Psychosexual Support Following Prostate Cancer Surgery: Results of a Feasibility Pilot Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Jane; McNamee, Phillip; Molloy, Gerry; Hubbard, Gill; McNeill, Alan; Bollina, Prasad; Kelly, Daniel; Forbat, Liz

    2016-08-01

    Surgery for prostate cancer can result in distressing side effects such as sexual difficulties, which are associated with lower levels of dyadic functioning. The study developed and tested an intervention to address sexual, relational, and emotional aspects of the relationship after prostate cancer by incorporating elements of family systems theory and sex therapy. To develop and test the feasibility and acceptability of relational psychosexual treatment for couples with prostate cancer, determine whether a relational-psychosexual intervention is feasible and acceptable for couples affected by prostate cancer, and determine the parameters for a full-scale trial. Forty-three couples were recruited for this pilot randomized controlled trial and received a six-session manual-based psychosexual intervention or usual care. Outcomes were measured before, after, and 6 months after the intervention. Acceptability and feasibility were established from recruitment and retention rates and adherence to the manual. The primary outcome measurement was the sexual bother subdomain of the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the 15-item Systemic Clinical Outcome and Routine Evaluation (SCORE-15) were used to measure emotional and relational functioning, respectively. The intervention was feasible and acceptable. The trial achieved adequate recruitment (38%) and retention (74%) rates. The intervention had a clinically and statistically significant effect on sexual bother immediately after the intervention. Small decreases in anxiety and depression were observed for the intervention couples, although these were not statistically significant. Practitioners reported high levels of adherence to the manual. The clinically significant impact on sexual bother and positive feedback on the study's feasibility and acceptability indicate that the intervention should be tested in a multicenter trial. The SCORE-15 lacked specificity for this

  18. [Feasibility and effectiveness of mindfulness training in adults with ADHD: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hepark, S.; Kan, C.C.; Speckens, A.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental disorder that often continues into adulthood. Stimulant medication is the common treatment for ADHD. However, there is a need for psychosocial interventions in addition to medication. AIM: To conduct a pilot study which

  19. Pilot Testing for Feasibility in a Study of Student Retention and Attrition in Online Undergraduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Joy; Fahlman, Dorothy; Arscott, Jane; Guillot, Isabelle

    2018-01-01

    Prior to undertaking a descriptive study on attrition and retention of students in two online undergraduate health administration and human service programs, a pilot test was conducted to assess the procedures for participant recruitment, usability of the survey questionnaire, and data collection processes. A retention model provided the…

  20. Developing and pilot-testing a Finding Balance Intervention for older adult bereaved family caregivers: A randomized feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtslander, Lorraine; Duggleby, Wendy; Teucher, Ulrich; Cooper, Dan; Bally, Jill M G; Solar, Jessica; Steeves, Megan

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to test the feasibility of a psychosocially supportive writing intervention focused on finding balance for older adult bereaved family caregivers of advanced cancer patients. The Finding Balance Intervention (FBI) was tested for feasibility, acceptability and potential influence on increasing hope, coping and balance through a multi-method pilot study employing a randomized trial design with 19 older adults with an average age of 72 years. The intervention group received the FBI and a follow up visit from an RN-RA. The control group received the FBI at a second visit. The FBI, a theory-based intervention was developed from grounded theory qualitative data, applying Delphi methods to design a self-administered, psychosocially supportive, writing intervention for older adults who had lost a spouse after caregiving. Feasibility was assessed and specific modifications identified. The FBI was easy to use, acceptable and of benefit. The FBI offered validation of emotions and ways to discover new ideas to find balance, which may enable bereaved caregivers to move forward on a unique journey through grief. The treatment group showed a statistically significant increase in restoration-oriented coping and higher oscillation activity. The results suggest the FBI was easy to use, acceptable and of benefit. A full scale study, with specific modifications to the design, is needed to test the effectiveness of this innovative intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Intra-hospital organ and tissue donation coordination project: cost-effectiveness and social benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Vanessa Silva e; Moura, Luciana Carvalho; Leite, Renata Fabiana; de Oliveira, Priscilla Caroliny; Schirmer, Janine; Roza, Bartira De’ Aguiar

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the viability of a professional specialist in intra-hospital committees of organ and tissue donation for transplantation. METHODS Epidemiological, retrospective and cross-sectional study (2003-2011 and 2008-2012), which was performed using organ donation for transplants data in the state of Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. Nine hospitals were evaluated (hospitals 1 to 9). Logistic regression was used to evaluate the differences in the number of brain death referrals and actual donors (dependent variables) after the professional specialist started work (independent variable) at the intra-hospital committee of organ and tissue donation for transplantation. To evaluate the hospital invoicing, the hourly wage of the doctor and registered nurse, according to the legislation of the Consolidation of Labor Laws, were calculated, as were the investment return and the time elapsed to do so. RESULTS Following the nursing specialist commencement on the committee, brain death referrals and the number of actual donors increased at hospital 2 (4.17 and 1.52, respectively). At hospital 7, the number of actual donors also increased from 0.005 to 1.54. In addition, after the nurse started working, hospital revenues increased by 190.0% (ranging 40.0% to 1.955%). The monthly cost for the nurse working 20 hours was US$397.97 while the doctor would cost US$3,526.67. The return on investment was 275% over the short term (0.36 years). CONCLUSIONS This paper showed that including a professional specialist in intra-hospital committees for organ and tissue donation for transplantation proved to be cost-effective. Further economic research in the area could contribute to the efficient public policy implementation of this organ and tissue harvesting model. PMID:26487290

  2. Intra-hospital organ and tissue donation coordination project: cost-effectiveness and social benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Silva e Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To evaluate the viability of a professional specialist in intra-hospital committees of organ and tissue donation for transplantation.METHODS Epidemiological, retrospective and cross-sectional study (2003-2011 and 2008-2012, which was performed using organ donation for transplants data in the state of Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. Nine hospitals were evaluated (hospitals 1 to 9. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the differences in the number of brain death referrals and actual donors (dependent variables after the professional specialist started work (independent variable at the intra-hospital committee of organ and tissue donation for transplantation. To evaluate the hospital invoicing, the hourly wage of the doctor and registered nurse, according to the legislation of the Consolidation of Labor Laws, were calculated, as were the investment return and the time elapsed to do so.RESULTS Following the nursing specialist commencement on the committee, brain death referrals and the number of actual donors increased at hospital 2 (4.17 and 1.52, respectively. At hospital 7, the number of actual donors also increased from 0.005 to 1.54. In addition, after the nurse started working, hospital revenues increased by 190.0% (ranging 40.0% to 1.955%. The monthly cost for the nurse working 20 hours was US$397.97 while the doctor would cost US$3,526.67. The return on investment was 275% over the short term (0.36 years.CONCLUSIONS This paper showed that including a professional specialist in intra-hospital committees for organ and tissue donation for transplantation proved to be cost-effective. Further economic research in the area could contribute to the efficient public policy implementation of this organ and tissue harvesting model.

  3. Intrahospital Transfer of Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: Increase in Intracranial Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Alex; Kalentiev, George; Yuriev, Michail; Pavlov, Vladislav; Grigoryeva, Vera

    2016-01-01

    To assess the dynamic of intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and dynamic pressure reactivity index (PRx) during intrahospital transport. There were 33 comatose patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The mean age was 36.3 ± 4.8 years (range 19-45 years), and there were 17 men and 16 women. The median Glasgow Coma Scale score at admission was 6.2 ± 0.7. Computed tomography (CT) included native CT, perfusion CT, and CT angiography. The mean CPPs before and after the CT scans were 95.9 ± 10.7 and 81.5 ± 12.5 mmHg respectively. The mean ICP before transport was 19.98 ± 5.3 mmHg (minimum 11.7; maximum 51.7). It was statistically significantly lower (p < 0.001) than during the transfer (26.1 ± 13.5 mmHg). During the period described all patients had increased ICP, especially during vertical movement in an elevator. During horizontal movement on the floor ICP remained higher (p < 0.05). The mean dynamic PRx before and after intrahospital transport was 0.23 ± 0.14 and 0.52 ± 0.04, respectively (p < 0.001). Average duration of the transfer and CT study was 15.3 ± 3.4 min. Intrahospital transport of patients with TBI may lead to a significant increase in ICP, dynamic PRx, and decreased CPP. The results suppose that the decision to perform brain CT in comatose patients with TBI should be carefully considered by clinicians.

  4. Assessing the Feasibility of a Social Media to Promote Weight Management Engagement in Adolescents with Severe Obesity: Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prout Parks, Elizabeth; Moore, Reneé H; Li, Ziyi; Bishop-Gilyard, Chanelle T; Garrett, Andrew R; Hill, Douglas L; Bruton, Yasmeen P; Sarwer, David B

    2018-03-19

    Severe obesity in adolescents has deleterious physical and psychological complications necessitating frequent multi-disciplinary clinic visits. Greater treatment engagement has been equated with weight-loss. However, traditional medical weight-loss programs for adolescents have high attrition rates. Social media is widely used by adolescents and may enhance medical weight management engagement and success. The first objective was to examine the acceptability and feasibility of using a private social media group as an adjunct to medical weight management in youth ages 14 to 20 years with severe obesity [body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m2]. The second objective was to pilot test the use of social media to improve treatment engagement and decrease attrition rates. In this single arm, 12 week pre-post study, participants attended individual clinic visits and participated in a moderated private social media group that received nutrition, exercise, and behavior change social media communications or "posts" 3 to 4 times/week. Youth commented and/or liked posts from the moderator and each other. Social media engagement was measured with the number of likes and comments on social media. Clinic attrition was compared, measuring clinic visit attendance 12 weeks prior, during, and after the intervention with mixed linear regression models. Correlations of social media engagement with changes from baseline for BMI, BMI-z score, and psychosocial measures were fit. All 13 enrolled youth completed the study and reported that the group was enjoyable, helpful, reinforced their weight management program, and would recommend using social media to support other youth. The pilot trial was acceptable and feasible. Youth mean weekly engagement (likes + comments) in social media was greater than once a day (8.6 ±3.6). Compared to 12 weeks prior to the intervention, there was no significant decrease in clinic visit attendance at the end of the intervention (M=.231, P=.69) or 12 weeks at

  5. Pilot social feasibility study for the establishment of a public human umbilical cord blood stem cell bank in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner-Roloff, Madelein; Young, Wendy; Rangaka, Isabella; Lombaard, Hennie; Dhai, Ames; Tsotsi, Norma; Pepper, Michael S

    2012-12-01

    There is a large unmet need in South Africa for bone marrow transplantation. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an important source of stem cells for the treatment of haematological and non-haematological diseases. Access to the two existing private umbilical cord blood stem cell banks (UCB SCBs) in South Africa is limited to individuals that can afford it, which further aggravates the ever increasing divide between families from different socio-economic classes. The problem is compounded by a severe global shortage of genetically compatible samples, representative of the South African demographics. Establishing a public human UCB SCB in South Africa would provide more South Africans with access to previously unavailable treatment in the form of affordable, genetically compatible stem cells for bone marrow transplantation. A public UCB SCB has many facets to consider, one of which is public preparedness and support for the bank. This was assessed in a social feasibility pilot study which is reported here. In addition to the findings of this social feasibility study, other important considerations for establishing a public human UCB SCB in SA include; (a) testing the samples for HIV and other infectious diseases (required for compliance with international regulatory standards); (b) flow cytometric analysis for enumeration of CD34+ UCB stem cells; (c) mapping of HLA genotypes/alleles; and (d) a study of the economic feasibility of this endeavour.The social feasibility study was conducted to gauge public preparedness and support for a public SCB through patient interviews and questionnaires. The process was dynamic due to its novel nature for interviewers and interviewees alike. Many obstacles were met and dealt with which lead to the compilation of results discussed here in the form of a pilot social feasibility study.In the South African context, we are faced with unique and rich challenges relating to cultural and religious differences that are further augmented by

  6. 76 FR 70152 - Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational Device Exemption Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... these studies, iterative device modifications are likely to be made based on clinical experience. Early feasibility studies may be appropriate early in the device development process in a limited number of subjects... advance the development process, making clinical experience necessary. As with all clinical studies, the...

  7. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Text Message-Based Smoking Cessation Program for Young Adults in Lima, Peru: Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitchtein-Winicki, Dora; Zevallos, Karine; Samolski, M Reuven; Requena, David; Velarde, Chaska; Briceño, Patricia; Piazza, Marina; Ybarra, Michele L

    2017-08-04

    In Peru's urban communities, tobacco smoking generally starts during adolescence and smoking prevalence is highest among young adults. Each year, many attempt to quit, but access to smoking cessation programs is limited. Evidence-based text messaging smoking cessation programs are an alternative that has been successfully implemented in high-income countries, but not yet in middle- and low-income countries with limited tobacco control policies. The objective was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of an short message service (SMS) text message-based cognitive behavioral smoking cessation program for young adults in Lima, Peru. Recruitment included using flyers and social media ads to direct young adults interested in quitting smoking to a website where interested participants completed a Google Drive survey. Inclusion criteria were being between ages 18 and 25 years, smoking at least four cigarettes per day at least 6 days per week, willing to quit in the next 30 days, owning a mobile phone, using SMS text messaging at least once in past year, and residing in Lima. Participants joined one of three phases: (1) focus groups and in-depth interviews whose feedback was used to develop the SMS text messages, (2) validating the SMS text messages, and (3) a pilot of the SMS text message-based smoking cessation program to test its feasibility and acceptability among young adults in Lima. The outcome measures included adherence to the SMS text message-based program, acceptability of content, and smoking abstinence self-report on days 2, 7, and 30 after quitting. Of 639 participants who completed initial online surveys, 42 met the inclusion criteria and 35 agreed to participate (focus groups and interviews: n=12; validate SMS text messages: n=8; program pilot: n=15). Common quit practices and beliefs emerged from participants in the focus groups and interviews informed the content, tone, and delivery schedule of the messages used in the SMS text message smoking

  8. Patient-led training on patient safety: a pilot study to test the feasibility and acceptability of an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, V; Winterbottom, A; Symons, J; Thompson, Z; Quinton, N; Corrado, O J; Melville, C; Watt, I; Torgerson, D; Wright, J

    2013-09-01

    Training in patient safety is an important element of medical education. Most educational interventions on patient safety training adopt a 'health-professional lens' with limited consideration on the impact of safety lapses on the patient and their families and little or no involvement of patients in the design or delivery of the training. This paper describes a pilot study to test the feasibility and acceptability of implementing a patient-led educational intervention to facilitate safety training amongst newly qualified doctors. Patients and/or carers who had experienced harm during their care shared narratives of their stories with trainees; this was followed by a focused discussion on patient safety issues exploring the causes and consequences of safety incidents and lessons to be learned from these. The intervention, which will be further tested in an NIHR-funded randomised controlled trial (RCT), was successfully implemented into an existing training programme and found acceptance amongst the patients and trainees. The pilot study proved to be a useful step in refining the intervention for the RCT including identifying appropriate outcome measures and highlighting organisational issues.

  9. Feasibility of training nurses in motivational interviewing to improve patient experience in mental health inpatient rehabilitation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyan, M; Crowley, J; Smedley, N; Mutti, M-F; Cashen, A; Thompson, T; Foster, J

    2017-05-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Recently, concerns have been raised about how well United Kingdom National Health Service nurses care for their patients and their level of compassion. Motivational interviewing (MI) is an established approach to helping people make positive behaviour changes, through directive, person-centred counselling within a collaborative relationship between clinician and recipient. Based on evidence that MI may influence nursing practice positively, an investigation into the feasibility of training nurses on mental health inpatient rehabilitation wards ('rehabilitation') in MI to improve patient experience was reported. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This pilot study demonstrates that training rehabilitation nurses in MI is feasible and provides preliminary evidence suggesting that a larger study to examine efficacy is warranted, including a calculation of sample size required to draw robust statistical conclusions. Nurses evaluated the training as highly relevant to their work. Patients responded well to interviews and focus groups with support from experts-by-experience; they were generally fairly satisfied with the rehabilitation ward and slight improvements in their experience were found following MI training for nurses but not at 6-month follow-up. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Rehabilitation nurses may face conflicting demands between ensuring patients with severe difficulties meet their basic needs and working with them to develop greater independence. Qualitative findings question whether nurse-patient interactions are fully valued as nursing interventions in inpatient rehabilitation. Learning MI might be a useful way of helping nurses think in detail about their interactions with patients and how to improve communications with their patients. The principles of MI should be incorporated into pre-registration training. Introduction There is limited research addressing the experiences of patients in inpatient

  10. Feasibility of digital footprint data for health analytics and services: an explorative pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjumaa, Marja; Saraniemi, Saila; Pekkarinen, Saara; Lappi, Minna; Similä, Heidi; Isomursu, Minna

    2016-11-09

    As a result of digitalization, data is available about almost every aspect of our lives. Personal data collected by individuals themselves or stored by organizations interacting with people is known as a digital footprint. The purpose of this study was to identify prerequisites for collecting and using digital data that could be valuable for health data analytics and new health services. Researchers and their contacts involved in a nationwide research project focusing on digital health in Finland were asked to participate in a pilot study on collecting their own personal data from various organizations of their own choice, such as retail chains, banks, insurance companies, and healthcare providers. After the pilot, a qualitative inquiry was adopted to collect semi-structured interview data from twelve active participants in the pilot. Interviews comprised themes such as the experiences of collecting personal data, as well as the usefulness of the data in general and for the participants themselves. Interview data was then analyzed thematically. Even if the participants had an academic background and were highly motivated to collect and use their data, they faced many challenges, such as quite long delays in the provision of the data, and the unresponsiveness of some organizations. Regarding the usefulness of the acquired personal data, our results show that participants had high expectations, but they were disappointed with the small amount of data and its irrelevant content. For the most part, the data was not in a format that would be useful for health data analytics and new health services. Participants also found that there were actual mistakes in their health data reports. The study revealed that collecting and using digital footprint data, even by knowledgeable individuals, is not an easy task. As the usefulness of the acquired personal health data mainly depended on its form and usability for services or solutions relevant to an individual, rather than on

  11. Pilot In Command: A Feasibility Assessment of Autonomous Flight Management Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, David J.; Ballin, Mark G.; Krishnamurthy, Karthik

    2004-01-01

    Several years of NASA research have produced the air traffic management operational concept of Autonomous Flight Management with high potential for operational feasibility, significant system and user benefits, and safety. Among the chief potential benefits are demand-adaptive or scalable capacity, user flexibility and autonomy that may finally enable truly successful business strategies, and compatibility with current-day operations such that the implementation rate can be driven from within the user community. A concept summary of Autonomous Flight Management is provided, including a description of how these operations would integrate in shared airspace with existing ground-controlled flight operations. The mechanisms enabling the primary benefits are discussed, and key findings of a feasibility assessment of airborne autonomous operations are summarized. Concept characteristics that impact safety are presented, and the potential for initially implementing Autonomous Flight Management is discussed.

  12. Pilot Evaluation of the Feasibility and Acceptability of StressOFF Strategies: A Single-Session School-Based Stress Management Program for Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Amy J.; Heath, Nancy L.; Carsley, Dana

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the pilot evaluation of the feasibility and acceptability of StressOFF Strategies, a "single-session" (45 min) adolescent-targeted, school-based psychoeducational program, which introduces cognitive behavioral techniques and mindfulness-based techniques. Five hundred and sixty-five Grade 9 students (57% female;…

  13. Feasibility and Acceptability of Delivering a Postpartum Weight Loss Intervention via Facebook: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Molly E; Moore Simas, Tiffany A; Oleski, Jessica; Xiao, Rui S; Mulcahy, Julie A; May, Christine N; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a Facebook-delivered postpartum weight loss intervention. Overweight and obese postpartum women received a 12-week weight loss intervention via Facebook. Feasibility outcomes were recruitment, retention, engagement, and acceptability. Weight loss was an exploratory outcome. Participants (n = 19) were 3.5 (SD 2.2) months postpartum with a baseline body mass index of 30.1 (SD 4.2) kg/m 2 . Retention was 95%. Forty-two percent of participants visibly engaged on the last day of the intervention, and 100% in the last 4 weeks; 88% were likely or very likely to participate again and 82% were likely or very likely to recommend the program to a postpartum friend. Average 12-week weight loss was 4.8% (SD 4.2%); 58% lost ≥5%. Findings suggested that this Facebook-delivered intervention is feasible and acceptable and supports research to test efficacy for weight loss. Research is needed to determine how best to engage participants in social network-delivered weight loss interventions. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Pilot Study to Assess the Feasibility of the Spanish Diabetes Self-Management Program in the Basque Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estibaliz Gamboa Moreno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of the Spanish Diabetes Self-Management Program (SDSMP in the primary care setting of the Basque Health Service and offer initial estimations of the randomized controlled trial (RCT effects. Methods. Ten health centers (HCs participated in a single-arm pilot study with a 6-month follow-up period between February 2011 and June 2012. Recruitment was performed via invitation letters, health professionals, and the local media. Each intervention group consisted of 8–15 people. The ability of each HC in forming up to 2 groups, participants’ compliance with the course, and coordination and data collection issues were evaluated. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c was the main outcome variable. Secondary outcomes were cardiovascular risk factors, drugs consumption, medical visits, quality of life, self-efficacy, physical exercise, and diet. Results. Two HCs did not organize a course. A total of 173 patients initiated the program, 2 dropped out without baseline data, and 90% completed it. No pre-post HbA1c differences existed. Certain improvements were observed in blood pressure control, self-efficacy, physical activity, and some dietary habits. Conclusion. The SDSMP is feasible in our setting. Our experience can be of interest when planning and conducting this program in similar health settings. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01642394.

  15. Maintaining Cognitive Functioning in Healthy Seniors with a Technology-Based Foreign Language Program: A Pilot Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Caitlin; Damnee, Souad; Djabelkhir, Leila; Cristancho, Victoria; Wu, Ya-Huei; Benovici, Judith; Pino, Maribel; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Researchers have hypothesized that learning a foreign language could be beneficial for seniors, as language learning requires the use of extensive neural networks. We developed and qualitatively evaluated an English training program for older French adults; our principal objective was to determine whether a program integrating technology is feasible for this population. We conducted a 4-month pilot study (16, 2-h sessions) with 14 French participants, (nine women, five men, average age 75). Questionnaires were administered pre- and post-intervention to measure cognitive level and subjective feelings of loneliness or social isolation; however, these scores did not improve significantly. Post-intervention, semi-directive interviews were carried out with participants, and a content/theme analysis was performed. Five main themes were identified from the interviews: Associations with school, attitudes toward English, motivation for learning English, attitudes toward the program's organization, and social ties. The program was found to be feasible for this age group, yet perceived as quite difficult for participants who lacked experience with English. Nonetheless, most participants found the program to be stimulating and enjoyable. We discuss different suggestions for future programs and future directions for foreign-language learning as a therapeutic and cognitive intervention.

  16. Feasibility and Impact of a Combined Supervised Exercise and Nutritional-Behavioral Intervention following Bariatric Surgery: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich C. Jassil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lifestyle intervention programs after bariatric surgery have been suggested to maximise health outcomes. This pilot study aimed to investigate the feasibility and impact of an 8-week combined supervised exercise with nutritional-behavioral intervention following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. Methods. Eight female patients (44 ± 8 years old, BMI = 38.5 ± 7.2 kgm−2 completed the program. Before and after intervention, anthropometric measures, six-minute walk test (6MWT, physical activity level, eating behavior, and quality of life (QoL were assessed. Percentage weight loss (%WL outcomes were compared with a historical matched control group. Results. The program significantly improved functional capacity (mean increment in 6MWT was 127 ± 107 meters, p=0.043, increased strenuous intensity exercise (44 ± 49 min/week, p=0.043, increased consumption of fruits and vegetables (p=0.034, reduced consumption of ready meals (p=0.034, and improved “Change in Health” in QoL domain (p=0.039. The intervention group exhibited greater %WL in the 3–12-month postsurgery period compared to historical controls, 12.2 ± 7.5% versus 5.1 ± 5.4%, respectively (p=0.027. Conclusions. Lifestyle intervention program following bariatric surgery is feasible and resulted in several beneficial outcomes. A large randomised control trial is now warranted.

  17. A pilot feasibility study of massage to reduce pain in people with spinal cord injury during acute rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, T; Jha, A; Brooks, C A; Allshouse, A

    2013-11-01

    To determine the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial of massage therapy for patients with a new spinal cord injury (SCI) during acute inpatient rehabilitation. A pilot single-center, randomized, single-blind, cross-over clinical trial. Free-standing, not-for-profit, comprehensive rehabilitation center specializing in SCI rehabilitation. Forty adults ages 18 years and older undergoing acute rehabilitation following an SCI reporting any type of pain. Rehabilitation nurses trained to give broad compression massage (BCM) and a control light contact touch (LCT) treatments. Participants were randomized to receive either BCM or LCT first, in six 20-min treatment sessions over 2 weeks, with a 1-week washout between the 2-week treatment periods. Primary outcomes were changes in pain intensity and in fatigue, measured daily. Secondary outcomes included depressive symptoms measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and an assessment of pain medication usage. Pain intensity was higher at baseline and reduced more in the LCT-first group compared with the BCM-first group in period 1 (P=0.014), although this pattern was not found in period 2 (P=0.58). LCT and BCM groups did not significantly differ on any secondary measures except PHQ-9. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using rehabilitation nurses to provide tactile therapy to patients with an SCI and suggests a model for controlled clinical trials examining the efficacy of massage therapies. Although efficacy was difficult to assess, BCM was safe and well tolerated.

  18. Home-based hand rehabilitation with a robotic glove in hemiplegic patients after stroke: a pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernocchi, Palmira; Mulè, Chiara; Vanoglio, Fabio; Taveggia, Giovanni; Luisa, Alberto; Scalvini, Simonetta

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and safety of home rehabilitation of the hand using a robotic glove, and, in addition, its effectiveness, in hemiplegic patients after stroke. In this non-randomized pilot study, 21 hemiplegic stroke patients (Ashworth spasticity index ≤ 3) were prescribed, after in-hospital rehabilitation, a 2-month home-program of intensive hand training using the Gloreha Lite glove that provides computer-controlled passive mobilization of the fingers. Feasibility was measured by: number of patients who completed the home-program, minutes of exercise and number of sessions/patient performed. Safety was assessed by: hand pain with a visual analog scale (VAS), Ashworth spasticity index for finger flexors, opponents of the thumb and wrist flexors, and hand edema (circumference of forearm, wrist and fingers), measured at start (T0) and end (T1) of rehabilitation. Hand motor function (Motricity Index, MI), fine manual dexterity (Nine Hole Peg Test, NHPT) and strength (Grip test) were also measured at T0 and T1. Patients performed, over a mean period 56 (49-63) days, a total of 1699 (1353-2045) min/patient of exercise with Gloreha Lite, 5.1 (4.3-5.8) days/week. Seventeen patients (81%) completed the full program. The mean VAS score of hand pain, Ashworth spasticity index and hand edema did not change significantly at T1 compared to T0. The MI, NHPT and Grip test improved significantly (p = 0.0020, 0.0156 and 0.0024, respectively) compared to baseline. Gloreha Lite is feasible and safe for use in home rehabilitation. The efficacy data show a therapeutic effect which need to be confirmed by a randomized controlled study.

  19. Shared Medical Appointments: A Portal for Nutrition and Culinary Education in Primary Care—A Pilot Feasibility Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Michelle E.; Burgess, Jonathan D.; Eisenberg, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Diseases linked to obesity such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, degenerative joint disease, gastroesophageal reflux, and sleep apnea constitute a large portion of primary care visits. Patients with these conditions often lack knowledge, skills, and support needed to maintain health. Shared medical appointments (SMAs) that include culinary skills and nutrition education offer a novel, cost-effective way to address these diseases in primary care. Methods: Adult patients in a primary care practice at a large academic hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, who had at least 1 cardiovascular risk factor were invited to participate in SMAs that included cooking demonstrations and teaching about nutrition in addition to medical management of their conditions. Sessions were conducted by a physician and an assistant in a conference room of a traditional primary care practice as part of a pilot feasibility project. Results: Seventy patients, contributing a total of 156 patient visits, attended 17 nutrition-focused SMAs over a 4-year period. Patients were surveyed after each visit and indicated that they enjoyed the SMAs, would consider alternating SMAs with traditional one-on-one visits, and would recommend SMAs to others. Half would pay out of pocket or a higher copay to attend SMAs. Financially, the practice broke even compared with traditional one-onone office visits. Conclusion: In this feasibility study, chronic disease SMAs conducted with a culinary/nutrition focus were feasible, cost-effective, and well received by patients. Follow-up studies are needed to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes of this SMA model on obesity-related diseases. PMID:26665019

  20. Shared Medical Appointments: A Portal for Nutrition and Culinary Education in Primary Care-A Pilot Feasibility Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delichatsios, Helen K; Hauser, Michelle E; Burgess, Jonathan D; Eisenberg, David M

    2015-11-01

    Diseases linked to obesity such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, degenerative joint disease, gastroesophageal reflux, and sleep apnea constitute a large portion of primary care visits. Patients with these conditions often lack knowledge, skills, and support needed to maintain health. Shared medical appointments (SMAs) that include culinary skills and nutrition education offer a novel, cost-effective way to address these diseases in primary care. Adult patients in a primary care practice at a large academic hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, who had at least 1 cardiovascular risk factor were invited to participate in SMAs that included cooking demonstrations and teaching about nutrition in addition to medical management of their conditions. Sessions were conducted by a physician and an assistant in a conference room of a traditional primary care practice as part of a pilot feasibility project. Seventy patients, contributing a total of 156 patient visits, attended 17 nutrition-focused SMAs over a 4-year period. Patients were surveyed after each visit and indicated that they enjoyed the SMAs, would consider alternating SMAs with traditional one-on-one visits, and would recommend SMAs to others. Half would pay out of pocket or a higher copay to attend SMAs. Financially, the practice broke even compared with traditional one-onone office visits. In this feasibility study, chronic disease SMAs conducted with a culinary/nutrition focus were feasible, cost-effective, and well received by patients. Follow-up studies are needed to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes of this SMA model on obesity-related diseases.

  1. Feasibility of Pilates exercise to decrease falls risk: a pilot randomized controlled trial in community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Anna L; Talevski, Jason; Bohensky, Megan A; Brand, Caroline A; Cameron, Peter A; Morello, Renata T

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of Pilates exercise in older people to decrease falls risk and inform a larger trial. Pilot Randomized controlled trial. Community physiotherapy clinic. A total of 53 community-dwelling people aged ⩾60 years (mean age, 69.3 years; age range, 61-84). A 60-minute Pilates class incorporating best practice guidelines for exercise to prevent falls, performed twice weekly for 12 weeks. All participants received a letter to their general practitioner with falls risk information, fall and fracture prevention education and home exercises. Indicators of feasibility included: acceptability (recruitment, retention, intervention adherence and participant experience survey); safety (adverse events); and potential effectiveness (fall, fall injury and injurious fall rates; standing balance; lower limb strength; and flexibility) measured at 12 and 24 weeks. Recruitment was achievable but control group drop-outs were high (23%). Of the 20 participants who completed the intervention, 19 (95%) attended ⩾75% of the classes and reported classes were enjoyable and would recommend them to others. The rate of fall injuries at 24 weeks was 42% lower and injurious fall rates 64% lower in the Pilates group, however, was not statistically significant (P = 0.347 and P = 0.136). Standing balance, lower-limb strength and flexibility improved in the Pilates group relative to the control group (P Pilates in older people would be feasible and is warranted given the acceptability and potential positive effects of Pilates on fall injuries and fall risk factors. The protocol for this study is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN1262000224820). © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Piloting the feasibility of head-mounted video technology to augment student feedback during simulated clinical decision-making: An observational design pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Helen; Bucknall, Tracey K; Hutchinson, Alison M

    2016-04-01

    Clinical decision-making is a complex activity that is critical to patient safety. Simulation, augmented by feedback, affords learners the opportunity to learn critical clinical decision-making skills. More detailed feedback following simulation exercises has the potential to further enhance student learning, particularly in relation to developing improved clinical decision-making skills. To investigate the feasibility of head-mounted video camera recordings, to augment feedback, following acute patient deterioration simulations. Pilot study using an observational design. Ten final-year nursing students participated in three simulation exercises, each focussed on detection and management of patient deterioration. Two observers collected behavioural data using an adapted version of Gaba's Clinical Simulation Tool, to provide verbal feedback to each participant, following each simulation exercise. Participants wore a head-mounted video camera during the second simulation exercise only. Video recordings were replayed to participants to augment feedback, following the second simulation exercise. Data were collected on: participant performance (observed and perceived); participant perceptions of feedback methods; and head-mounted video camera recording feasibility and capability for detailed audio-visual feedback. Management of patient deterioration improved for six participants (60%). Increased perceptions of confidence (70%) and competence (80%), were reported by the majority of participants. Few participants (20%) agreed that the video recording specifically enhanced their learning. The visual field of the head-mounted video camera was not always synchronised with the participant's field of vision, thus affecting the usefulness of some recordings. The usefulness of the video recordings, to enhance verbal feedback to participants on detection and management of simulated patient deterioration, was inconclusive. Modification of the video camera glasses, to improve

  3. A pilot study using next-generation sequencing in advanced cancers: feasibility and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Glen J; Liang, Winnie S; Demeure, Michael J; Kiefer, Jeff A; Hostetter, Galen; Izatt, Tyler; Sinari, Shripad; Christoforides, Alexis; Aldrich, Jessica; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Phillips, Lori; Benson, Hollie; Reiman, Rebecca; Baker, Angela; Marsh, Vickie; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Carpten, John D; Craig, David W

    2013-01-01

    New anticancer agents that target a single cell surface receptor, up-regulated or amplified gene product, or mutated gene, have met with some success in treating advanced cancers. However, patients' tumors still eventually progress on these therapies. If it were possible to identify a larger number of targetable vulnerabilities in an individual's tumor, multiple targets could be exploited with the use of specific therapeutic agents, thus possibly giving the patient viable therapeutic alternatives. In this exploratory study, we used next-generation sequencing technologies (NGS) including whole genome sequencing (WGS), and where feasible, whole transcriptome sequencing (WTS) to identify genomic events and associated expression changes in advanced cancer patients. WGS on paired tumor and normal samples from nine advanced cancer patients and WTS on six of these patients' tumors was completed. One patient's treatment was based on targets and pathways identified by NGS and the patient had a short-lived PET/CT response with a significant reduction in his tumor-related pain. To design treatment plans based on information garnered from NGS, several challenges were encountered: NGS reporting delays, communication of results to out-of-state participants and their treating oncologists, and chain of custody handling for fresh biopsy samples for Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) target validation. While the initial effort was a slower process than anticipated due to a variety of issues, we demonstrate the feasibility of using NGS in advanced cancer patients so that treatments for patients with progressing tumors may be improved.

  4. The Feasibility of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound During Uterine Artery Embolization: A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorenberg, Eric J.; Jakobsen, Jarl A.; Brabrand, Knut; Hafsahl, Geir; Smith, Hans-Jorgen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) during uterine artery embolization (UAE) in order to define the correct end-point of embolization with complete devascularization of all fibroids. Methods. In this prospective study of 10 consecutive women undergoing UAE, CEUS was performed in the angiographic suite during embolization. When the angiographic end-point, defined as the 'pruned-tree' appearance of the uterine arteries was reached, CEUS was performed while the angiographic catheters to both uterine arteries were kept in place. The decision whether or not to continue the embolization was based on the findings at CEUS. The results of CEUS were compared with those of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 1 day as well as 3 months following UAE. Results. CEUS was successfully performed in all women. In 4 cases injection of particles was continued based on the findings at CEUS despite angiographically complete embolization. CEUS imaging at completion of UAE correlated well with the findings at MRI. Conclusion. The use of CEUS during UAE is feasible and may increase the quality of UAE

  5. Feasibility of trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy for traumatized children in Japan: a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameoka, Satomi; Yagi, Junko; Arai, Yoko; Nosaka, Sachiko; Saito, Azusa; Miyake, Wakako; Takada, Saeko; Yamamoto, Sayaka; Asano, Yasuko; Tanaka, Eizaburo; Asukai, Nozomu

    2015-01-01

    Trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy is used to treat children who have experienced traumatic events and suffer from trauma-related disorders. Its effectiveness has been demonstrated in several randomized controlled studies. However, most of these studies have been performed in the United States, with few studies conducted in Asian countries. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility of trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy in children who have experienced traumatic events and who suffer from trauma-related disorders in Japan. Thirty-five traumatized children (mean age = 10.9 years; range = 3-17 years; 74.3% girls) who received trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy were included. The effectiveness of the program was evaluated in each case using the University of California at Los Angeles Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Reaction Index for DSM-IV for trauma-related symptoms and the Children's Global Assessment Scale for social functioning. Pre- and post-treatment outcome measures were analyzed using two-tailed paired t tests. The results for 35 participants indicate that post-traumatic stress symptoms were significantly improved following therapy [t(35) = 8.27; p cognitive behavioral therapy is feasible for treating traumatized children of an Asian population. We discuss the implications of this result for clinical practice and future research.

  6. The Feasibility and Validity of a Remote Pulse Oximetry System for Pulmonary Rehabilitation: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary rehabilitation is an effective treatment for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, access to these services is limited especially in rural and remote areas. Telerehabilitation has the potential to deliver pulmonary rehabilitation programs to these communities. The aim of this study was threefold: to establish the technical feasibility of transmitting real-time pulse oximetry data, determine the validity of remote measurements compared to conventional face-to-face measures, and evaluate the participants’ perception of the usability of the technology. Thirty-seven healthy individuals participated in a single remote pulmonary rehabilitation exercise session, conducted using the eHAB telerehabilitation system. Validity was assessed by comparing the participant's oxygen saturation and heart rate with the data set received at the therapist’s remote location. There was an 80% exact agreement between participant and therapist data sets. The mean absolute difference and Bland and Altman’s limits of agreement fell within the minimum clinically important difference for both oxygen saturation and heart rate values. Participants found the system easy to use and felt confident that they would be able to use it at home. Remote measurement of pulse oximetry data for a pulmonary rehabilitation exercise session was feasible and valid when compared to conventional face-to-face methods.

  7. Feasibility of prehospital teleconsultation in acute stroke--a pilot study in clinical routine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Bergrath

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inter-hospital teleconsultation improves stroke care. To transfer this concept into the emergency medical service (EMS, the feasibility and effects of prehospital teleconsultation were investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Teleconsultation enabling audio communication, real-time video streaming, vital data and still picture transmission was conducted between an ambulance and a teleconsultation center. Pre-notification of the hospital was carried out with a 14-item stroke history checklist via e-mail-to-fax. Beside technical assessments possible influences on prehospital and initial in-hospital time intervals, prehospital diagnostic accuracy and the transfer of stroke specific data were investigated by comparing telemedically assisted prehospital care (telemedicine group with local regular EMS care (control group. All prehospital stroke patients over a 5-month period were included during weekdays (7.30 a.m.-4.00 p.m.. In 3 of 18 missions partial dropouts of the system occurred; neurological co-evaluation via video transmission was conducted in 12 cases. The stroke checklist was transmitted in 14 cases (78%. Telemedicine group (n = 18 vs. control group (n = 47: Prehospital time intervals were comparable, but in both groups the door to brain imaging times were longer than recommended (median 59.5 vs. 57.5 min, p = 0.6447. The prehospital stroke diagnosis was confirmed in 61% vs. 67%, p = 0.8451. Medians of 14 (IQR 9 vs. 5 (IQR 2 stroke specific items were transferred in written form to the in-hospital setting, p<0.0001. In 3 of 10 vs. 5 of 27 patients with cerebral ischemia thrombolytics were administered, p = 0.655. CONCLUSIONS: Teleconsultation was feasible but technical performance and reliability have to be improved. The approach led to better stroke specific information; however, a superiority over regular EMS care was not found and in-hospital time intervals were unacceptably long in both groups. The

  8. Feasibility of Virtual Tablet-Based Group Exercise Among Older Adults in Siberia: Findings From Two Pilot Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, Svetlana; Didino, Daniele; Baez, Marcos; Casati, Fabio

    2018-02-27

    Regular physical activity has a positive effect on physical health, well-being, and life satisfaction of older adults. However, engaging in regular physical activity can be challenging for the elderly population because of reduced mobility, low motivation, or lack of the proper infrastructures in their communities. The objective of this paper was to study the feasibility of home-based online group training-under different group cohesion settings-and its effects on adherence and well-being among Russian older adults. We focused particularly on the technology usability and usage and on the adherence to the training (in light of premeasures of social support, enjoyment of physical activity, and leg muscle strength). As a secondary objective, we also explored the effects of the technology-supported intervention on subjective well-being and loneliness. Two pilot trials were carried out exploring two different group cohesion settings (weak cohesion and strong cohesion) in the period from 2015 to 2016 in Tomsk, Russian Federation. A total of 44 older adults (59-83 years) participated in the two pilots and followed a strength and balance training program (Otago) for 8 weeks with the help of a tablet-based virtual gym app. Participants in each pilot were assigned to an interaction condition, representing the online group exercising, and an individual condition, representing a home-based individual training. Both conditions featured persuasion strategies but differed in the ability to socialize and train together. Both interaction and individual groups reported a high usability of the technology. Trainees showed a high level of technology acceptance and, particularly, a high score in intention to future use (4.2-5.0 on a 5-point Likert scale). Private texting (short service message [SMS]) was used more than public texting, and the strong cohesion condition resulted in more messages per user. Joint participations to training sessions (copresence) were higher for the social

  9. A pilot study on the feasibility of European harmonized Human Biomonitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casteleyn, L; Dumez, B; Becker, K

    2015-01-01

    data from 1844 mother-child pairs in the frame of DEMOnstration of a study to COordinate and Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale (DEMOCOPHES).(1) Mercury in hair and urinary cadmium and cotinine were selected as biomarkers of exposure covered by sufficient analytical experience. Phthalate...... study showed that common approaches can be found in a context of considerable differences with respect to experience and expertize, socio-cultural background, economic situation and national priorities. It also evidenced that comparable Human Biomonitoring results can be obtained in such context....... A European network was built, exchanging information, expertize and experiences, and providing training on all aspects of a survey. A key challenge was finding the right balance between a rigid structure allowing maximal comparability and a flexible approach increasing feasibility and capacity building. Next...

  10. A pilot study using next-generation sequencing in advanced cancers: feasibility and challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen J Weiss

    Full Text Available New anticancer agents that target a single cell surface receptor, up-regulated or amplified gene product, or mutated gene, have met with some success in treating advanced cancers. However, patients' tumors still eventually progress on these therapies. If it were possible to identify a larger number of targetable vulnerabilities in an individual's tumor, multiple targets could be exploited with the use of specific therapeutic agents, thus possibly giving the patient viable therapeutic alternatives.In this exploratory study, we used next-generation sequencing technologies (NGS including whole genome sequencing (WGS, and where feasible, whole transcriptome sequencing (WTS to identify genomic events and associated expression changes in advanced cancer patients.WGS on paired tumor and normal samples from nine advanced cancer patients and WTS on six of these patients' tumors was completed. One patient's treatment was based on targets and pathways identified by NGS and the patient had a short-lived PET/CT response with a significant reduction in his tumor-related pain. To design treatment plans based on information garnered from NGS, several challenges were encountered: NGS reporting delays, communication of results to out-of-state participants and their treating oncologists, and chain of custody handling for fresh biopsy samples for Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA target validation.While the initial effort was a slower process than anticipated due to a variety of issues, we demonstrate the feasibility of using NGS in advanced cancer patients so that treatments for patients with progressing tumors may be improved.

  11. Acceptability and feasibility of the 'DASH for Asthma' intervention in a randomized controlled trial pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonstein, Andrea C; Lv, Nan; Camargo, Carlos A; Wilson, Sandra R; Buist, A Sonia; Rosas, Lisa G; Strub, Peg; Ma, Jun

    2016-08-01

    'DASH for Asthma' (n 90) was a 6-month randomized controlled trial that demonstrated potential benefits of a DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) behavioural intervention for improving diet quality and asthma control by comparing intervention to usual care in adults with uncontrolled asthma. The present study examined acceptability and feasibility of the intervention from the perspective of intervention participants and lifestyle coaches. Grounded in Social Cognitive Theory, the 3-month intensive stage, including three individual and eight group sessions, focused on diet modifications and behavioural self-regulation. The 3-month maintenance stage contained telephone consultations. Participants and lifestyle coaches completed surveys including 5-point Likert scales and open-ended questions. We analysed data using descriptive and inductive content analyses. Forty-six intervention participants (survey response rate was 65-72 %) and two lifestyle coaches. Participants and lifestyle coaches were highly satisfied (all mean ratings >4) with individual and group sessions. Participants identified mastery of knowledge and skills (awareness, goal setting, self-monitoring, problem solving), social learning (class members sharing experiences and ideas) and good coaching skills (reflective listening, empathy, motivational counselling) as important contributors to self-efficacy and programme satisfaction. Participants also valued personalized feedback received in individual sessions. Lifestyle coaches viewed participant engagement as a facilitator to effective sessions. Finally, participants and lifestyle coaches identified food tasting as beneficial for observational learning and facilitation of participant engagement. High class attendance and self-monitoring rate also reflected the high engagement among participants. The DASH behavioural intervention was feasible and highly acceptable to participants with uncontrolled asthma and lifestyle coaches.

  12. District level external quality assurance (EQA) of malaria microscopy in Pakistan: pilot implementation and feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Amir; Walley, John D; Munir, Muhammad Arif; Khan, Muhammad Aslam; Khokar, Nayyar Ghias; Tahir, Zarfishan; Nazir, Athar; Shams, Nazia

    2011-02-17

    Prompt, quality assured laboratory diagnosis is key to effective malaria case management and control, especially since the introduction of the more expensive artemisinin combination therapy (ACT). The malaria programme and its non-government partners, on the basis of WHO recommended Lot Quality Assurance methods, have developed a district level external quality assurance (EQA) system. This study was designed to assess the feasibility, under programme conditions, of an integrated district level external quality assurance and supervision approach for malaria microscopy. A prospective study conducted over seven months period (May-November 2007). In addition to the standard WHO EQA elements, three operational innovations were introduced, with the a district laboratory supervisor: a) on site re-checking of slides, b) in ensuring uninterrupted availability of laboratory reagents and supplies at diagnostic centers, and c) supervision of administrative and technical components. The quantitative data for the study came from the service records/documents, whereas the qualitative data came from the key informant interviews. During the seven month period in four districts, a total of 8,118 slides were examined of which 209 (2.6%) were found positive for malaria parasites (slide positivity range between 1.6% to 6.0%). The District Laboratory Supervisors in four districts reexamined a total of 1,770 slides (22%). The proportion of slides found discordant ranged from 0.5% to 1%. The quality of smear preparation was found acceptable in 73% slides. A district-based EQA, based on lot quality assurance methods was implemented, using context-specific operational guidelines, tools and training modules, and other inputs from the malaria control programme and partners. This EQA and supervision approach was found to be feasible and acceptable to those involved. Further study is required on the microscopy quality and cost-effectiveness of adding external quality assurance and supervision

  13. District level external quality assurance (EQA of malaria microscopy in Pakistan: pilot implementation and feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khokar Nayyar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prompt, quality assured laboratory diagnosis is key to effective malaria case management and control, especially since the introduction of the more expensive artemisinin combination therapy (ACT. The malaria programme and its non-government partners, on the basis of WHO recommended Lot Quality Assurance methods, have developed a district level external quality assurance (EQA system. This study was designed to assess the feasibility, under programme conditions, of an integrated district level external quality assurance and supervision approach for malaria microscopy. Design and Methods A prospective study conducted over seven months period (May-November 2007. In addition to the standard WHO EQA elements, three operational innovations were introduced, with the a district laboratory supervisor: a onsite re-checking of slides, b in ensuring uninterrupted availability of laboratory reagents and supplies at diagnostic centers, and c supervision of administrative and technical components. The quantitative data for the study came from the service records/documents, whereas the qualitative data came from the key informant interviews. Results During the seven month period in four districts, a total of 8,118 slides were examined of which 209 (2.6% were found positive for malaria parasites (slide positivity range between1.6% to 6.0%. The District Laboratory Supervisors in four districts reexamined a total of 1,770 slides (22%. The proportion of slides found discordant ranged from 0.5% to 1%. The quality of smear preparation was found acceptable in 73% slides. Conclusions A district-based EQA, based on lot quality assurance methods was implemented, using context-specific operational guidelines, tools and training modules, and other inputs from the malaria control programme and partners. This EQA and supervision approach was found to be feasible and acceptable to those involved. Further study is required on the microscopy quality and cost

  14. Feasibility of assessing the awareness of cardiovascular risk through Health Passport approach: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilamadhab Kar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The risk of cardiovascular disorders is high among the Indian population; however, the awareness about it seems to be a concern. Aim: It was intended to study the feasibility of assessing the awareness of cardiovascular risk at a community level and providing the related information about remedial measures through a Health Passport approach. Methods: Consecutive 38 individuals attending health camp were assessed for specific personal and family history of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease. Current risk factors such as exercise, smoking, drug use, stress, and depression were ascertained, and body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, blood pressure were measured to assess the cardiovascular risk based on Framingham criteria. The individualized information along with some key health facts were provided to the participants in a document termed as Health Passport for their reference. Results: There was a general lack of awareness regarding the cardiovascular risk factors in the studied sample. Most participants were above the threshold for blood pressure (65.8%, BMI (71.1%, and WC (73.7% requiring specific action and more than half (57.9% had higher cardiovascular risk. The assessment completed in a community set up with basic facilities could provide information regarding the existing risks prompting health actions. The participants considered the Health Passport as a comprehensive initial step toward improving their awareness. Conclusion: It was feasible to assess the awareness about cardiovascular risk and provide individualized health-related information through the Health Passport approach which appears adaptable in health care setups and may improve the awareness.

  15. A pilot study on the feasibility of European harmonized human biomonitoring: Strategies towards a common approach, challenges and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteleyn, L., E-mail: Ludwine.Casteleyn@med.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven (Belgium); Dumez, B. [KU Leuven (Belgium); Becker, K.; Kolossa-Gehring, M. [Federal Environment Agency (UBA) (Germany); Den Hond, E.; Schoeters, G. [VITO (Belgium); Castaño, A. [Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain); Koch, H.M.; Angerer, J. [Ruhr Universität Bochum (Germany); Esteban, M. [Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain); Exley, K.; Sepai, O. [Public Health England (United Kingdom); Bloemen, L. [Environmental Health Sciences International (Netherlands); Horvat, M. [Jožef Stefan Institute (Slovenia); Knudsen, L.E. [Kobenhavns Universitet (Denmark); Joas, A.; Joas, R. [BiPRO (Germany); Biot, P. [Federal Public Service Health, Food chain safety and Environment (Belgium); Koppen, G. [VITO (Belgium); Dewolf, M-C. [Hainaut Vigilance Sanitaire (HVS) and Hygiene Publique in Hainaut (HPH) (Belgium); and others

    2015-08-15

    In 2004 the European Commission and Member States initiated activities towards a harmonized approach for Human Biomonitoring surveys throughout Europe. The main objective was to sustain environmental health policy by building a coherent and sustainable framework and by increasing the comparability of data across countries. A pilot study to test common guidelines for setting up surveys was considered a key step in this process. Through a bottom-up approach that included all stakeholders, a joint study protocol was elaborated. From September 2011 till February 2012, 17 European countries collected data from 1844 mother–child pairs in the frame of DEMOnstration of a study to COordinate and Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale (DEMOCOPHES). Mercury in hair and urinary cadmium and cotinine were selected as biomarkers of exposure covered by sufficient analytical experience. Phthalate metabolites and Bisphenol A in urine were added to take into account increasing public and political awareness for emerging types of contaminants and to test less advanced markers/markers covered by less analytical experience. Extensive efforts towards chemo-analytical comparability were included. The pilot study showed that common approaches can be found in a context of considerable differences with respect to experience and expertize, socio-cultural background, economic situation and national priorities. It also evidenced that comparable Human Biomonitoring results can be obtained in such context. A European network was built, exchanging information, expertize and experiences, and providing training on all aspects of a survey. A key challenge was finding the right balance between a rigid structure allowing maximal comparability and a flexible approach increasing feasibility and capacity building. Next steps in European harmonization in Human Biomonitoring surveys include the establishment of a joint process for prioritization of substances to cover and biomarkers to develop

  16. A pilot study on the feasibility of European harmonized human biomonitoring: Strategies towards a common approach, challenges and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casteleyn, L.; Dumez, B.; Becker, K.; Kolossa-Gehring, M.; Den Hond, E.; Schoeters, G.; Castaño, A.; Koch, H.M.; Angerer, J.; Esteban, M.; Exley, K.; Sepai, O.; Bloemen, L.; Horvat, M.; Knudsen, L.E.; Joas, A.; Joas, R.; Biot, P.; Koppen, G.; Dewolf, M-C.

    2015-01-01

    In 2004 the European Commission and Member States initiated activities towards a harmonized approach for Human Biomonitoring surveys throughout Europe. The main objective was to sustain environmental health policy by building a coherent and sustainable framework and by increasing the comparability of data across countries. A pilot study to test common guidelines for setting up surveys was considered a key step in this process. Through a bottom-up approach that included all stakeholders, a joint study protocol was elaborated. From September 2011 till February 2012, 17 European countries collected data from 1844 mother–child pairs in the frame of DEMOnstration of a study to COordinate and Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale (DEMOCOPHES). Mercury in hair and urinary cadmium and cotinine were selected as biomarkers of exposure covered by sufficient analytical experience. Phthalate metabolites and Bisphenol A in urine were added to take into account increasing public and political awareness for emerging types of contaminants and to test less advanced markers/markers covered by less analytical experience. Extensive efforts towards chemo-analytical comparability were included. The pilot study showed that common approaches can be found in a context of considerable differences with respect to experience and expertize, socio-cultural background, economic situation and national priorities. It also evidenced that comparable Human Biomonitoring results can be obtained in such context. A European network was built, exchanging information, expertize and experiences, and providing training on all aspects of a survey. A key challenge was finding the right balance between a rigid structure allowing maximal comparability and a flexible approach increasing feasibility and capacity building. Next steps in European harmonization in Human Biomonitoring surveys include the establishment of a joint process for prioritization of substances to cover and biomarkers to develop

  17. Pilot test of Pickliq{reg_sign} process to determine energy and environmental benefits & economic feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, D.R.

    1997-07-13

    Green Technology Group (GTG) was awarded Grant No. DE-FG01-96EE 15657 in the amount of $99,904 for a project to advance GTG`s Pickliq{reg_sign} Process in the Copper and Steel Industries. The use of the Pickliq{reg_sign} Process can significantly reduce the production of waste acids containing metal salts. The Pickliq{reg_sign} Process can save energy and eliminate hazardous waste in a typical copper rod or wire mill or a typical steel wire mill. The objective of this pilot project was to determine the magnitude of the economic, energy and environmental benefits of the Pickliq{reg_sign} Process in two applications within the metal processing industry. The effectiveness of the process has already been demonstrated at facilities cleaning iron and steel with sulfuric acid. 9207 companies are reported to use sulfuric and hydrochloric acid in the USA. The USEPA TRI statistics of acid not recycled in the US is 2.4 x 10{sup 9} lbs (net) for Hydrochloric Acid and 2.0 x 10{sup 9} lbs (net) for Sulfuric Acid. The energy cost of not reclaiming acid is 10.7 x 10{sup 6} BTU/ton for Hydrochloric Acid and 21.6 x 10{sup 6} BTU/Ton for Sulfuric Acid. This means that there is a very large market for the application of the Pickliq{reg_sign} Process and the widespread use of the process will bring significant world wide savings of energy to the environment.

  18. Sustainability via Active Garden Education (SAGE): results from two feasibility pilot studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rebecca E; Parker, Nathan H; Soltero, Erica G; Ledoux, Tracey A; Mama, Scherezade K; McNeill, Lorna

    2017-03-10

    Low physical activity (PA) and fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption in early childhood are continued public health challenges. This manuscript describes outcomes from two pilot studies for Sustainability via Active Garden Education (SAGE), a program designed to increase PA and F&V consumption among 3 to 5 year old children. SAGE was developed using community-based participatory research (CBPR) and delivered to children (N = 89) in early care and education centers (ECEC, N = 6) in two US cities. Children participated in 12 one-hour sessions that included songs, games, and interactive learning activities involving garden maintenance and taste tests. We evaluated reach, efficacy, adoption, implementation, and potential for maintenance of SAGE following the RE-AIM framework. Reach was evaluated by comparing demographic characteristics among SAGE participants and residents of target geographic areas. Efficacy was evaluated with accelerometer-measured PA, F&V consumption, and eating in the absence of hunger among children, parenting practices regarding PA, and home availability of F&V. Adoption was evaluated by the number of ECEC that participated relative to the number of ECEC that were recruited. Implementation was evaluated by completion rates of planned SAGE lessons and activities, and potential for maintenance was evaluated with a parent satisfaction survey. SAGE reached ECEC in neighborhoods representing a wide range of socioeconomic status, with participants' sociodemographic characteristics representing those of the intervention areas. Children significantly increased PA during SAGE lessons compared to usual lessons, but they also consumed more calories in the absence of hunger in post- vs. pre-intervention tests (both p nutrition guidelines for young children. SAGE successfully translated national PA guidelines to practice for young children but was less successful with nutrition guidelines. High adoption and implementation and favorable parent

  19. Promoting student case creation to enhance instruction of clinical reasoning skills: a pilot feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekar H

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hamsika Chandrasekar,1 Neil Gesundheit,2 Andrew B Nevins,3 Peter Pompei,4 Janine Bruce,5 Sylvia Bereknyei Merrell6 1Department of Pediatrics, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 4Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 5Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 6Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Background: It is a common educational practice for medical students to engage in case-based learning (CBL exercises by working through clinical cases that have been developed by faculty. While such faculty-developed exercises have educational strengths, there are at least two major drawbacks to learning by this method: the number and diversity of cases is often limited; and students decrease their engagement with CBL cases as they grow accustomed to the teaching method. We sought to explore whether student case creation can address both of these limitations. We also compared student case creation to traditional clinical reasoning sessions in regard to tutorial group effectiveness, perceived gains in clinical reasoning, and quality of student–faculty interaction. Methods: Ten first-year medical students participated in a feasibility study wherein they worked in small groups to develop their own patient case around a preassigned diagnosis. Faculty provided feedback on case quality afterwards. Students completed pre- and post-self-assessment surveys. Students and faculty also participated in separate focus groups to compare their case creation experience to traditional CBL sessions. Results: Students reported high levels of team engagement

  20. Feasibility and efficacy of a robotic device for hand rehabilitation in hemiplegic stroke patients: a randomized pilot controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanoglio, Fabio; Bernocchi, Palmira; Mulè, Chiara; Garofali, Francesca; Mora, Chiara; Taveggia, Giovanni; Scalvini, Simonetta; Luisa, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of robot-assisted hand rehabilitation in improving arm function abilities in sub-acute hemiplegic patients. Randomized controlled pilot study. Inpatient rehabilitation centers. Thirty hemiplegic stroke patients (Ashworth spasticity index hand training with Gloreha, a hand rehabilitation glove that provides computer-controlled, repetitive, passive mobilization of the fingers, with multisensory feedback. Patients in the CG received the same amount of time in terms of conventional hand rehabilitation. Hand motor function (Motricity Index, MI), fine manual dexterity (Nine Hole Peg Test, NHPT) and strength (Grip and Pinch test) were measured at baseline and after rehabilitation, and the differences, (Δ) mean(standard deviation), compared between groups. Results Twenty-seven patients concluded the program: 14 in the TG and 13 in the CG. None of the patients refused the device and only one adverse event of rheumatoid arthritis reactivation was reported. Baseline data did not differ significantly between the two groups. In TG, ΔMI 23(16.4), ΔNHPT 0.16(0.16), ΔGRIP 0.27(0.23) and ΔPINCH 0.07(0.07) were significantly greater than in CG, ΔMI 5.2(9.2), ΔNHPT 0.02(0.07), ΔGRIP 0.03(0.06) and ΔPINCH 0.02(0.03)] ( p=0.002, p=0.009, p=0.003 and p=0.038, respectively). Gloreha Professional is feasible and effective in recovering fine manual dexterity and strength and reducing arm disability in sub-acute hemiplegic patients.

  1. The feasibility of exercise videogames for cardiovascular risk reduction among adults: a pilot for "Wii heart fitness".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serber, Eva R; Ciccolo, Joseph; Palmer, Kathy; Cobb, Victoria; Tilkemeier, Peter L; Bock, Beth C

    2016-03-01

    More than 30% of the U.S. population is prehypertensive, and the recommended treatment of lifestyle modification includes increased physical activity. Exercise videogames (EVG) are widely marketed to Americans as a means of increasing fitness. This study aimed to examine EVG among a sample of prehypertensive adults, to determine (1) feasibility and acceptability of EVG for physical activity, and (2) assess changes in (1) estimates of cardiovascular fitness and risk indices, and psychosocial constructs. Participants with prehypertension completed a 12-week program including; 36, 1-hour sessions; supervised EVG program using Nintendo Wii platform and games. Assessments were at baseline and 13 weeks. Paired t-tests were conducted. Fourteen adults (84% female; mean age=53 years; 93% Caucasian; 87% employed) completed the study. The study retention rate was 74% and all participants reported satisfaction and enjoyment in the intervention and using the Wii for exercise. Despite the small sample size, significant improvements were seen in: physical activity minutes (P<0.01), peak heart rate (P=0.02), resting systolic blood pressure (P=0.02), and hip circumference (P=0.03). Significant improvements were also seen in the 36-item short-form survey (SF-36) as for general health (P=0.05), role limitations due to emotional problems (P=0.04), and vitality (P=0.01). Findings support that an EVG program is feasible, acceptable, and promising in promoting benefit to cardiovascular fitness and psychosocial health. These data provide pilot data for the necessary randomized clinical trials to examine efficacy and sustainability of EVG for adult engagement in physical activity for cardiovascular health promotion.

  2. Feasibility and Efficacy of an mHealth Game for Managing Anxiety: "Flowy" Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial and Design Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Quynh; Khatib, Yasmin; Stansfeld, Stephen; Fox, Simon; Green, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Meeting the complex needs of patients with chronic common mental health disorders (CMHDs) may be the greatest challenge facing organized medical practice. On the basis of a well-established and proven theoretical foundation for controlled respiration as a behavioral intervention for CMHDs, as well as preliminary evidence that gamification can improve health outcomes through increasing patient engagement, this randomized controlled pilot study evaluated the feasibility and clinical efficacy of a mobile health game called "Flowy" ( www.flowygame.com ) that digitally delivered breathing retraining exercises for anxiety, panic, and hyperventilation symptom management. We designed an unblinded, Web-based, parallel-group randomized controlled trial focusing on feasibility, clinical efficacy, and design proof of concept. In the intervention condition (n = 31), participants received free access to "Flowy" for 4 weeks. In the control condition (n = 32), participants were placed on a waitlist for 4 weeks before being offered free access to "Flowy." Online measurements using psychological self-report questionnaires were made at 2 and 4 weeks post-baseline. At trial conclusion, participants found "Flowy" acceptable as an anxiety management intervention. "Flowy" engaged participants sufficiently to endorse proactive gameplay. Intent-to-treat analysis revealed a reduction in anxiety, panic, and self-report hyperventilation scores in both trial arms, with the intervention arm experiencing greater quality of life. Participants perceived "Flowy" as a fun and useful intervention, proactively used "Flowy" as part of their care, and would recommend "Flowy" to family and friends. Our results suggest that a digital delivery of breathing retraining exercises through a mobile health game can manage anxiety, panic, and hyperventilation symptoms associated with CMHDs.

  3. Interpersonal psychotherapy for Finnish community patients with moderate to severe major depression and comorbidities: a pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hasse; Säteri, Ulla; Markowitz, John C

    2011-12-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) has shown efficacy in randomized controlled trials. No reports exist on IPT for depressed patients with severe psychiatric comorbidities in public outpatient clinics. This pilot feasibility study assessed preliminary effectiveness and patient satisfaction with IPT for depressed patients with psychiatric comorbidities in municipal outpatient care in Turku, Finland. Because lengthy treatment strains mental healthcare resources, this trial also assessed the potential for IPT, a time-limited treatment, to discharge patients successfully. Seven clinicians in two municipal clinics were briefly trained to deliver IPT, while clinicians in two other clinics provided treatment as usual (TAU). Twenty-six patients with moderate to severe major depressive disorder received IPT for 16 weeks, and a control group (n = 20) received TAU. Seventy-six percent of patients had concurrent anxiety disorders, 73% personality disorders and 20% alcohol dependence. As 61% of patients received concurrent pharmacotherapy, the study lacked statistical power to find outcome differences between treatment groups. Depressive symptoms, social functioning and self-perceived health improved notably in both groups. The mean Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) score decreased from 20 to 10. Using HAMD ≤ 7 as a cutoff, 28.3% of patients achieved remission. Patients receiving IPT reported significantly greater satisfaction with their treatment and were more often able to terminate treatment after 16 sessions. Both treatments were effective in this small, highly comorbid sample. Conducting IPT appeared feasible in municipal outpatient clinics and offered some advantages over TAU. It was possible to train staff quickly. These results warrant a further, larger randomized trial.

  4. Promoting healthier children's meals at quick-service and full-service restaurants: Results from a pilot and feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Nanette V; Folta, Sara C; Glenn, Meaghan E; Lynskey, Vanessa M; Patel, Anjali A; Anzman-Frasca, Stephanie

    2017-10-01

    High-calorie restaurant foods contribute to childhood overweight. Increased consumer demand for healthier kids' meals may motivate the restaurant industry to provide additional healthy options. This study pilot-tested a combination of four strategies (toy incentive, placemats, server prompts, signage) designed to increase demand for healthier kids' meals, which were defined as those eligible for the National Restaurant Association's Kids LiveWell program. Relative sales of healthier kids' meals were examined before (n = 3473 total kids' meal orders) and during Month 1 (n = 3546 total kids' meal orders) and Month 2 of implementation (n = 3645 total kids' meal orders) of an 8-week intervention in two locations each of a quick-service (QSR) and full-service (FSR) restaurant chain. Convenience samples of children (n = 27) and their parents (n = 28) were surveyed regarding parent and child perceptions of intervention components. Findings regarding the effectiveness and feasibility of the intervention were mixed. At the FSRs, the relative percentage of monthly sales from healthier kids' meals increased from 5.0% of kids' meal orders at baseline to 8.3% during Month 1, ending at 6.4% during Month 2. At the QSRs, the relative percentage of monthly sales from healthier kids' entrees decreased from 27.5% at baseline to 25.2% during Month 1, ending at 25.9% during Month 2. Implementation quality tracking showed that consistent implementation of intervention components was a challenge; parent- and child-reported awareness of intervention components supported this finding. Future directions are discussed, aiming to build upon these findings and maximize the feasibility, effectiveness, and sustainability of efforts to promote healthier eating in restaurants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Feasibility of Motor Imagery Training for Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder – A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke L. J. Adams

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD experience movement difficulties that may be linked to processes involved in motor imagery (MI. This paper discusses recent advances in theory that underpin the use of MI training for children with DCD. This knowledge is translated in a new MI training protocol which is compared with the cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance (CO-OP. Children meeting DSM-5 criteria for DCD were assigned to MI (n = 4 or CO-OP (n = 4 interventions and completed nine treatment sessions, including homework exercises. Results were positive, with two children in the MI group and three in the CO-OP group improving their m-ABC-2 score by ≥ 2 standard scores, interpreted as a clinically meaningful change. Moreover, all children and parents noticed improvements in motor skills after training. This is the first study to demonstrate the feasibility of a theoretically principled treatment protocol for MI training in children with DCD, and extends earlier work.Trial registration: The complete trial is registered at the Dutch trial register, www.trialregister.nl (NTR5471. http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=5471

  6. Feasibility of Motor Imagery Training for Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder – A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Imke L. J.; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien; Lust, Jessica M.; Wilson, Peter H.; Steenbergen, Bert

    2017-01-01

    Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) experience movement difficulties that may be linked to processes involved in motor imagery (MI). This paper discusses recent advances in theory that underpin the use of MI training for children with DCD. This knowledge is translated in a new MI training protocol which is compared with the cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance (CO-OP). Children meeting DSM-5 criteria for DCD were assigned to MI (n = 4) or CO-OP (n = 4) interventions and completed nine treatment sessions, including homework exercises. Results were positive, with two children in the MI group and three in the CO-OP group improving their m-ABC-2 score by ≥ 2 standard scores, interpreted as a clinically meaningful change. Moreover, all children and parents noticed improvements in motor skills after training. This is the first study to demonstrate the feasibility of a theoretically principled treatment protocol for MI training in children with DCD, and extends earlier work. Trial registration: The complete trial is registered at the Dutch trial register, www.trialregister.nl (NTR5471). http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=5471 PMID:28798707

  7. Stage 1 treatment of pediatric overweight and obesity: a pilot and feasibility randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovitz, Steven D; Berge, Jerica M; Wetzsteon, Rachel J; Sherwood, Nancy E; Hannan, Peter J; Himes, John H

    2014-02-01

    Staged clinical treatment of pediatric obesity is recommended, but untested. Understanding the lowest intensity stage's effectiveness is necessary for future research. This was a randomized controlled trial of children ages 4 to treatment recommended by an expert committee. Groups were compared for changes, over a 3-month time period, in BMI z-score and parental reports of behavioral issues related to childhood obesity using intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis. Seventy-two (30% of eligible) children were enrolled and 64 were remeasured at 3-month follow-up. ITT analysis revealed that both groups improved mean BMI z-score [adjusted change -0.07, control, and -0.04, intervention; 95% confidence interval (CI) of difference=-0.14-0.20]. Over half of the children in each group improved their BMI z-score (adjusted proportion decreasing=55% in control vs. 72% in intervention; 95% CI of difference=-0.07-0.42). The intervention group improved comparatively to the control group on numerous behavioral indicators. Implementation of the lowest intensity stage of current recommendations is feasible and possibly of benefit toward lifestyle changes. Results of this study can be used by future clinical researchers designing protocols to test the full multi-staged approach for the treatment of pediatric overweight and obesity in primary care clinical settings.

  8. Intra-Hospital Committee for Donation of Organs and Tissues for Transplant: ethical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Cappellaro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to demonstrate ethical aspects involved in the donation, collection and transplantation of organs and tissues through the experiences of workers in an intra-hospital committee for donation of organs and tissues for transplant. Exploratory qualitative research developed with eleven health workers. Data collection was performed at a university hospital in Pelotas, RS, Brazil, in the period of January-March 2010, through interviews. Data analysis resulted in the following categories: understanding of brain death diagnosis as an ethical issue; and, ethical issues experienced by workers in the relationship established with the family. It was concluded that such situations instigate workers to reflect on their attitudes, values, and their role as a health team member and protector of lives.

  9. Leveraging Social Networking Sites for an Autoimmune Hepatitis Genetic Repository: Pilot Study to Evaluate Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerford, Megan; Fogel, Rachel; Bailey, James Robert; Chilukuri, Prianka; Chalasani, Naga; Lammert, Craig Steven

    2018-01-18

    Conventional approaches to participant recruitment are often inadequate in rare disease investigation. Social networking sites such as Facebook may provide a vehicle to circumvent common research limitations and pitfalls. We report our preliminary experience with Facebook-based methodology for participant recruitment and participation into an ongoing study of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). The goal of our research was to conduct a pilot study to assess whether a Facebook-based methodology is capable of recruiting geographically widespread participants into AIH patient-oriented research and obtaining quality phenotypic data. We established a Facebook community, the Autoimmune Hepatitis Research Network (AHRN), in 2014 to provide a secure and reputable distillation of current literature and AIH research opportunities. Quarterly advertisements for our ongoing observational AIH study were posted on the AHRN over 2 years. Interested and self-reported AIH participants were subsequently enrolled after review of study materials and completion of an informed consent by our study coordinator. Participants returned completed study materials, including epidemiologic questionnaires and genetic material, to our facility via mail. Outside medical records were obtained and reviewed by a study physician. We successfully obtained all study materials from 29 participants with self-reported AIH within 2 years from 20 different states. Liver biopsy results were available for 90% (26/29) of participants, of which 81% (21/29) had findings consistent with AIH, 15% (4/29) were suggestive of AIH with features of primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), and 4% (1/29) had PBC alone. A total of 83% (24/29) had at least 2 of 3 proposed criteria: positive autoimmune markers, consistent histologic findings of AIH on liver biopsy, and reported treatment with immunosuppressant medications. Self-reported and physician records were discrepant for immunosuppressant medications or for AIH/PBC diagnoses in 4

  10. Sustainability via Active Garden Education (SAGE: results from two feasibility pilot studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E. Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low physical activity (PA and fruit and vegetable (F&V consumption in early childhood are continued public health challenges. This manuscript describes outcomes from two pilot studies for Sustainability via Active Garden Education (SAGE, a program designed to increase PA and F&V consumption among 3 to 5 year old children. Methods SAGE was developed using community-based participatory research (CBPR and delivered to children (N = 89 in early care and education centers (ECEC, N = 6 in two US cities. Children participated in 12 one-hour sessions that included songs, games, and interactive learning activities involving garden maintenance and taste tests. We evaluated reach, efficacy, adoption, implementation, and potential for maintenance of SAGE following the RE-AIM framework. Reach was evaluated by comparing demographic characteristics among SAGE participants and residents of target geographic areas. Efficacy was evaluated with accelerometer-measured PA, F&V consumption, and eating in the absence of hunger among children, parenting practices regarding PA, and home availability of F&V. Adoption was evaluated by the number of ECEC that participated relative to the number of ECEC that were recruited. Implementation was evaluated by completion rates of planned SAGE lessons and activities, and potential for maintenance was evaluated with a parent satisfaction survey. Results SAGE reached ECEC in neighborhoods representing a wide range of socioeconomic status, with participants’ sociodemographic characteristics representing those of the intervention areas. Children significantly increased PA during SAGE lessons compared to usual lessons, but they also consumed more calories in the absence of hunger in post- vs. pre-intervention tests (both p < .05. Parent reports did not suggest changes in F&V consumption, parenting PA practices, or home F&V availability, possibly due to low parent engagement. ECEC had moderate

  11. Medical complications of intra-hospital patient transports: implications for architectural design and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Roger S; Zhu, Xuemei

    2007-01-01

    Literature on healthcare architecture and evidence-based design has rarely considered explicitly that patient outcomes may be worsened by intra-hospital transport (IHT), which is defined as transport of patients within the hospital. The article focuses on the effects of IHTs on patient complications and outcomes, and the implications of such impacts for designing safer, better hospitals. A review of 22 scientific studies indicates that IHTs are subject to a wide range of complications, many of which occur frequently and have distinctly detrimental effects on patient stability and outcomes. The research suggests that higher patient acuity and longer transport durations are associated with more frequent and serious IHT-related complications and outcome effects. It appears no rigorous research has compared different hospital designs and layouts with respect to having possibly differential effects on transport-related complications and worsened outcomes. Nonetheless, certain design implications can be extracted from the existing research literature, including the importance of minimizing transport delays due to restricted space and congestion, and creating layouts that shorten IHT times for high-acuity patients. Limited evidence raises the possibility that elevator-dependent vertical building layouts may increase susceptibility to transport delays that worsen complications. The strong evidence indicating that IHTs trigger complications and worsen outcomes suggests a powerful justification for adopting acuity-adaptable rooms and care models that substantially reduce transports. A program of studies is outlined to address gaps in knowledge.Key WordsPatient transports, transports within hospitals, patient safety, evidence-based design, hospital design, healthcare architecture, intra-hospital transport complications, acuity-adaptable care, elevators, outcomes.

  12. Safety in intrahospital transportation: evaluation of respiratory and hemodynamic parameters. A prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Franco Mazza

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Intrahospital transportation of mechanically ventilated patients is a high-risk situation. We aimed to determine whether transfers could be safely performed by using a transportation routine. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective cohort study with "before and after" evaluation. METHODS: Mechanically ventilated patients who needed transportation were included. Hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were measured before and after transportation. Statistical analysis consisted of variance analysis and paired Student's t test. Results were considered significant if P 5, FiO2 > 0.4 and vasoactive drug use comprised 42.4%, 24.3%, 21.6% and 33.0% of cases, respectively. Mean duration of transportation was 43.4 ± 18.9 minutes. Complications occurred in 32.4%. There was a significant increase in CO2 (before transportation, 29.6 ± 7.3 and after transportation, 34.9 ± 7.0; P = 0.000; a trend towards improved PO2/FiO2 ratio (before transportation, 318.0 ± 137.0 and after transportation, 356.8 ± 119.9; P = 0.053; increased heart rate (before transportation, 80.9 ± 18.7 and after transportation, 85.5 ± 17.6; P = 0.08; and no significant change in mean arterial blood pressure (P = 0.93. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that intrahospital transportation can be safely performed. Our low incidence of complications was possibly related to both the presence of a multidisciplinary transportation team and proper equipment.

  13. Promoting student case creation to enhance instruction of clinical reasoning skills: a pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, Hamsika; Gesundheit, Neil; Nevins, Andrew B; Pompei, Peter; Bruce, Janine; Merrell, Sylvia Bereknyei

    2018-01-01

    It is a common educational practice for medical students to engage in case-based learning (CBL) exercises by working through clinical cases that have been developed by faculty. While such faculty-developed exercises have educational strengths, there are at least two major drawbacks to learning by this method: the number and diversity of cases is often limited; and students decrease their engagement with CBL cases as they grow accustomed to the teaching method. We sought to explore whether student case creation can address both of these limitations. We also compared student case creation to traditional clinical reasoning sessions in regard to tutorial group effectiveness, perceived gains in clinical reasoning, and quality of student-faculty interaction. Ten first-year medical students participated in a feasibility study wherein they worked in small groups to develop their own patient case around a preassigned diagnosis. Faculty provided feedback on case quality afterwards. Students completed pre- and post-self-assessment surveys. Students and faculty also participated in separate focus groups to compare their case creation experience to traditional CBL sessions. Students reported high levels of team engagement and peer learning, as well as increased ownership over case content and understanding of clinical reasoning nuances. However, students also reported decreases in student-faculty interaction and the use of visual aids ( P study suggest that student-generated cases can be a valuable adjunct to traditional clinical reasoning instruction by increasing content ownership, encouraging student-directed learning, and providing opportunities to explore clinical nuances. However, these gains may reduce student-faculty interaction. Future studies may be able to identify an improved model of faculty participation, the ideal timing for incorporation of this method in a medical curriculum, and a more rigorous assessment of the impact of student case creation on the

  14. The feasibility of aromatherapy massage to reduce symptoms of Idiopathic Environmental Intolerance: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Atsuko; Watanabe, Kazuhiko; Eitaki, Yoko; Kawai, Toshio; Kishi, Reiko

    2012-12-01

    Idiopathic Environmental Intolerance (IEI) is an acquired disorder with multiple recurrent symptoms, which is associated with diverse environmental factors that are tolerated by the majority of people. IEI is an illness of uncertain aetiology, making it difficult to treat using conventional medicine. Therefore, there is a need for novel therapies to control the symptoms of IEI. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and impact of aromatherapy massage for individuals with IEI. Non-blinded crossover trial. IEI patients who attended a clinic in Sapporo city were recruited, and sixteen patients were enrolled. Participants were clinically examined by an experienced medical doctor and met the criteria included in the working definition of IEI disorder. During the active period, participants received four one-hour aromatherapy massage sessions every two weeks. During the control period, the participants did not receive any massages. Scores on the IEI-scales trigger checklist, symptoms, life impact, and the State Anxiety Inventory were assessed before and after each period. Short-term mood enhancement was evaluated using the Profiles of Mood Status (POMS) before and after sessions. Due to period effects, evaluation of the results had to be restricted to the first period, and the result showed no effect of intervention. All six sub-scales of the POMS improved after each session (mean score differences: 4.89-1.33, PAromatherapy was well tolerated by subjects with IEI; however, aromatherapy, as applied in this study, did not suggest any specific effects on IEI condition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Pilot Study on the Feasibility of Interventional Lung Volume Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wansheng; Dong Yonghua; Liu Bin; Zhu Chi; Yu Yongqiang

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of lung volume reduction by transbronchial alcohol and lipiodol suspension infusion with the aid of balloon-tipped catheter occlusion. Twenty-six healthy adult rabbits were divided into four treatment groups: alcohol and lipiodol suspension infusion (n = 8), lipiodol infusion (n = 8), alcohol infusion (n = 5), or bronchial lumen occlusion (n = 5). After selective lobar or segmental bronchial catheterization using a balloon-tipped occlusion catheter, the corresponding drug infusion was performed. Bone cement was used to occlude the bronchial lumen in the occlusion group. The animals were followed up for 10 weeks by chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT), and then the whole lungs were harvested for histological examination. Alcohol and lipiodol suspension or lipiodol could be stably retained in alveoli in the first two groups based on chest X-ray and CT, but obvious collapse only occurred in the group receiving alcohol and lipiodol suspension or the bronchial lumen occlusion group. Histological examination revealed damage and disruption of the alveolar epithelium and fibrosis in related lung tissue in the group receiving alcohol and lipiodol suspension. Similar changes were seen in the bronchial lumen occlusion group, apart from obvious marginal emphysema of the target areas in two animals. Interstitial pneumonia and dilated alveoli existed in some tissue in target areas in the lipiodol group, in which pulmonary fibrosis obliterating alveoli also occurred. Chronic alveolitis and pleural adhesion in target areas occurred in the group infused with alcohol alone, whereas visceral pleura of the other three groups was regular and no pleural effusion or adhesion was found. Alcohol and lipiodol suspension that is stably retained in alveoli can result in significant lung volume reduction. Through alcohol and lipiodol suspension infusion, obstructive emphysema or pneumonia arising from bronchial lumen

  16. The Healthy for Life Taekwondo Pilot Study: A Preliminary Evaluation of Effects on Executive Function and BMI, Feasibility, and Acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakes, Kimberley D; Bryars, Tracy; Sirisinahal, Swetha; Salim, Nimrah; Arastoo, Sara; Emmerson, Natasha; Kang, Daniel; Shim, Lois; Wong, Doug; Kang, Chang Jin

    2013-10-01

    There is growing consensus that exercise improves cognitive functioning, but research is needed to identify exercise interventions that optimize effects on cognition. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate Taekwondo implemented in public middle school physical education (PE). Two classes were randomly assigned to either: five sessions per week of PE or three sessions of PE and two sessions of Taekwondo. In PE sessions, evidence-based curriculum to address the Presidential Core Fitness Guidelines and California Physical Fitness Tests was implemented. Taekwondo sessions included traditional techniques and forms taught in an environment emphasizing respect and self-control. Sixty students were evaluated at baseline and during the last week of the intervention (nine months later). Differences in mean residualized change scores for parent-rated inhibitory behavioral control yielded a significant, large effect size ( d =.95, p =.00), reflecting greater improvement among Taekwondo students. Results from an executive function computer-administered task revealed greater accuracy on the congruent trial ( d = 2.00, p = .02) for Taekwondo students. Differences in mean residualized change scores for BMI z scores yielded a moderate, non-significant effect size ( d = - .51, p = .16). The majority of Taekwondo students reported positive perceptions of Taekwondo and perceived self-improvement in self-control and physical fitness. Results suggest that Taekwondo is an exercise program that improves cognitive functioning and is both feasible and acceptable to implement in a public school setting.

  17. A pilot study on the effects and feasibility of compassion-focused expressive writing in Day Hospice patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imrie, Susan; Troop, Nicholas A

    2012-06-01

    Research has found that writing about stress can confer physical and psychological health benefits on participants and that adopting a self-compassionate stance may have additional benefits. This pilot study evaluated a self-compassionate expressive writing intervention in a Day Hospice setting. Thirteen patients with life-limiting illnesses wrote on two occasions about recent stressful experiences. Half also received a self-compassion instruction for their writing. Outcome measures were taken at baseline and one week after the second writing session, and text analysis was used to identify changes in the types of words used, reflecting changes in psychological processes. Patients given the self-compassion instruction increased in their self-soothing and self-esteem in contrast to patients in the stress-only condition. Happiness broadly increased in both groups although reported levels of stress generally increased in patients given the self-compassion instruction but decreased in patients in the stress-only condition. Those given the self-compassion instruction also increased in their use of causal reasoning words across the two writing sessions compared with those in the stress-only condition. Expressive writing appears to be beneficial in patients at a hospice and was viewed as valuable by participants. The inclusion of a self-compassion instruction may have additional benefits and a discussion of the feasibility of implementing expressive writing sessions in a Day Hospice is offered.

  18. Feasibility of a Mobile Phone App to Support Recovery From Addiction in China: Secondary Analysis of a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hui; Zhang, Jing Ying; Hser, Yih-Ing; Liang, Di; Li, Xu; Wang, Shan Shan; Du, Jiang; Zhao, Min

    2018-02-27

    Mobile health technologies have been found to improve the self-management of chronic diseases. However, there is limited research regarding their feasibility in supporting recovery from substance use disorders (SUDs) in China. The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of a mobile phone-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) app by testing the concordance of drug use assessed by the EMA, urine testing, and a life experience timeline (LET) assessment. A total of 75 participants dependent on heroin or amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS) in Shanghai were recruited to participate in a 4-week pilot study. Of the participants, 50 (67% [50/75]) were randomly assigned to the experimental group and 25 (33% [25/75]) were assigned to the control group. The experimental group used mobile health (mHealth) based EMA technology to assess their daily drug use in natural environments and received 2 short health messages each day, whereas the control group only received 2 short health messages each day from the app. Urine tests and LET assessments were conducted each week and a post-intervention survey was administered to both groups. The correlations among the EMA, the LET assessment, and the urine test were investigated. The mean age of the participants was 41.6 (SD 8.0) years, and 71% (53/75) were male. During the 4 weeks of observation, 690 daily EMA survey data were recorded, with a response rate of 49.29% (690/1400). With respect to drug use, the percent of agreement between the EMA and the LET was 66.7%, 79.2%, 72.4%, and 85.8%, respectively, for each of the 4 weeks, whereas the percent of agreement between the EMA and the urine test was 51.2%, 65.1%, 61.9%, and 71.5%, respectively. The post-intervention survey indicated that 46% (32/70) of the participants preferred face-to-face interviews rather than the mHealth app. This study demonstrated poor agreement between the EMA data and the LET and found that the acceptance of mHealth among individuals with SUDs

  19. A pilot feasibility randomised controlled trial of an adjunct brief social network intervention in opiate substitution treatment services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Ed; Copello, Alex; Seddon, Jennifer L; Christie, Marilyn; Bamber, Deborah; Powell, Charlotte; Bennett, Carmel; Akhtar, Shabana; George, Sanju; Ball, Andrew; Frew, Emma; Goranitis, Ilias; Freemantle, Nick

    2018-01-15

    Approximately 3% of people receiving opioid substitution therapy (OST) in the UK manage to achieve abstinence from prescribed and illicit drugs within three years of commencing treatment. Involvement of families and wider social networks in supporting psychological treatment may be an effective strategy in facilitating recovery, and this pilot study aimed to evaluate the impact of a social network-focused intervention for patients receiving OST. A two-site, open feasibility trial randomised patients receiving OST for at least 12 months but still reporting illicit opiate use in the past 28 days to one of three treatments: 1) treatment as usual (TAU), 2) Brief Social Behaviour and Network Therapy (B-SBNT) + TAU, or 3) Personal Goal Setting (PGS) + TAU. The two active interventions consisted of 4 sessions. There were 3 aims: 1) test the feasibility of recruiting OST patients to a trial of B-SBNT, and following them up over 12 months; 2) test the feasibility of training clinicians to deliver B-SBNT; 3) test whether B-SBNT reduces heroin use 3 and 12 months after treatment, and to explore potential mediating factors. The primary outcome for aim 3 was number of days of heroin use in the past month, and a range of secondary outcome measures were specified in advance (level of drug dependence, mental health, social satisfaction, therapist rapport, treatment satisfaction, social network size and support). A total of 83 participants were randomised, and 70 (84%) were followed-up at 12 months. Fidelity analysis of showed that B-SBNT sessions were clearly distinguishable from PGS and TAU sessions, suggesting it was possible to train clinical staff to an adequate level of competence. No significant differences were found between the 3 intervention arms in the primary or secondary outcome measures. Attendance at psychosocial treatment intervention sessions was low across all three arms (44% overall). Patients receiving OST can be recruited into a trial of a social

  20. Development and evaluation of a dietary self-management programme for older adults with low literacy and heart disease: pilot study of feasibility and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jung-Hua; Chen, Su-Hui

    2016-12-01

    To develop a dietary self-management programme for salt-, fluid-, fat- and cholesterol-intake behaviours for older adults with low literacy and heart disease and evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the programme. Eating behaviours such as fluid, salt, fat and cholesterol intake are an important factor related to heart disease outcomes. People with low literacy have difficulty following recommended health behaviours, but limited research has investigated intervention programmes for this population. Programme development and pilot testing its feasibility and acceptability. Recommendations were also collected from participants and the research assistant for future large-scale interventions. The study had two phases. Phase I consisted of programme development based on previous qualitative findings, a systematic review of the literature, clinical practice experience and expert opinion. In Phase II, we pilot tested the programme from January - June 2014 in a convenience sample of 10 older adults with low literacy, heart disease and recruited from a medical centre in northern Taiwan. Pilot testing showed that our programme was feasible and acceptable to older adults with low literacy and heart disease. Moreover, the final version of the programme was revised based on participants' and the research assistant's recommendations. Our study results suggest that with guidance and assistance, older adults with low literacy and heart disease can be motivated to take action for their health and are empowered by learning how to self-manage their heart-healthy eating behaviours. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Aquatic therapy for children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a pilot feasibility randomised controlled trial and mixed-methods process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hind, Daniel; Parkin, James; Whitworth, Victoria; Rex, Saleema; Young, Tracey; Hampson, Lisa; Sheehan, Jennie; Maguire, Chin; Cantrill, Hannah; Scott, Elaine; Epps, Heather; Main, Marion; Geary, Michelle; McMurchie, Heather; Pallant, Lindsey; Woods, Daniel; Freeman, Jennifer; Lee, Ellen; Eagle, Michelle; Willis, Tracey; Muntoni, Francesco; Baxter, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rare disease that causes the progressive loss of motor abilities such as walking. Standard treatment includes physiotherapy. No trial has evaluated whether or not adding aquatic therapy (AT) to land-based therapy (LBT) exercises helps to keep muscles strong and children independent. To assess the feasibility of recruiting boys with DMD to a randomised trial evaluating AT (primary objective) and to collect data from them; to assess how, and how well, the intervention and trial procedures work. Parallel-group, single-blind, randomised pilot trial with nested qualitative research. Six paediatric neuromuscular units. Children with DMD aged 7-16 years, established on corticosteroids, with a North Star Ambulatory Assessment (NSAA) score of 8-34 and able to complete a 10-m walk without aids/assistance. Exclusions: > 20% variation between baseline screens 4 weeks apart and contraindications. Participants were allocated on a 1 : 1 ratio to (1) optimised, manualised LBT (prescribed by specialist neuromuscular physiotherapists) or (2) the same plus manualised AT (30 minutes, twice weekly for 6 months: active assisted and/or passive stretching regime; simulated or real functional activities; submaximal exercise). Semistructured interviews with participants, parents ( n  = 8) and professionals ( n  = 8) were analysed using Framework analysis. An independent rater reviewed patient records to determine the extent to which treatment was optimised. A cost-impact analysis was performed. Quantitative and qualitative data were mixed using a triangulation exercise. Feasibility of recruiting 40 participants in 6 months, participant and therapist views on the acceptability of the intervention and research protocols, clinical outcomes including NSAA, independent assessment of treatment optimisation and intervention costs. Over 6 months, 348 children were screened - most lived too far from centres or were enrolled in other trials. Twelve

  2. Effect of locally tailored labour management guidelines on intrahospital stillbirths and birth asphyxia at the referral hospital of Zanzibar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maaløe, N.; Housseine, N.; Meguid, T.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate effect of locally tailored labour management guidelines (PartoMa guidelines) on intrahospital stillbirths and birth asphyxia. Design: Quasi-experimental pre-post study investigating the causal pathway through changes in clinical practice. Setting: Tanzanian low-resource ref......Objective: To evaluate effect of locally tailored labour management guidelines (PartoMa guidelines) on intrahospital stillbirths and birth asphyxia. Design: Quasi-experimental pre-post study investigating the causal pathway through changes in clinical practice. Setting: Tanzanian low......-resource referral hospital, Mnazi Mmoja Hospital.Population: Facility deliveries during baseline (1 October 2014 until 31 January 2015) and the 9th to 12th intervention month (1 October 2014 until 31 January 2015). Methods: Birth outcome was extracted from all cases of labouring women during baseline (n = 3690...

  3. The feasibility of using pedometers and brief advice to increase activity in sedentary older women – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Derek W

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People over the age of 70 carry the greatest burden of chronic disease, disability and health care use. Participation in physical activity is crucial for health, and walking accounts for much of the physical activity undertaken by sedentary individuals. Pedometers are a useful motivational tool to encourage increased walking and they are cheap and easy to use. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of the use of pedometers plus a theory-based intervention to assist sedentary older women to accumulate increasing amounts of physical activity, mainly through walking. Methods Female participants over the age of 70 were recruited from primary care and randomised to receive either pedometer plus a theory-based intervention or a theory-based intervention alone. The theory-based intervention consisted of motivational techniques, goal-setting, barrier identification and self-monitoring with pedometers and daily diaries. The pedometer group were further randomised to one of three target groups: a 10%, 15% or 20% monthly increase in step count to assess the achievability and acceptability of a range of targets. The primary outcome was change in daily activity levels measured by accelerometry. Secondary outcome measures were lower limb function, health related quality of life, anxiety and depression. Results 54 participants were recruited into the study, with an average age of 76. There were 9 drop outs, 45 completing the study. All participants in the pedometer group found the pedometers easy to use and there was good compliance with diary keeping (96% in the pedometer group and 83% in the theory-based intervention alone group. There was a strong correlation (0.78 between accelerometry and pedometer step counts i.e. indicating that walking was the main physical activity amongst participants. There was a greater increase in activity (accelerometry amongst those in the 20% target pedometer group compared to the other

  4. Preliminary efficacy and feasibility of embedding high intensity interval training into the school day: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Costigan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (HIIT for improving metabolic health is now well established, it is not known if this type of activity can be effective to improve adolescent health. The primary aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of embedding HIIT into the school day. A 3-arm pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted in one secondary school in Newcastle, Australia. Participants (n = 65; mean age = 15.8(0.6 years were randomized into one of three conditions: aerobic exercise program (AEP (n = 21, resistance and aerobic exercise program (RAP (n = 22 and control (n = 22. The 8-week intervention consisted of three HIIT sessions per week (8–10 min/session, delivered during physical education (PE lessons or at lunchtime. Assessments were conducted at baseline and post-intervention to detect changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (multi-stage shuttle-run, muscular fitness (push-up, standing long jump tests, body composition (Body Mass Index (BMI, BMI-z scores, waist circumference and physical activity motivation (questionnaire, by researchers blinded to treatment allocation. Intervention effects for outcomes were examined using linear mixed models, and Cohen's d effect sizes were reported. Participants in the AEP and RAP groups had moderate intervention effects for waist circumference (p = 0.024, BMI-z (p = 0.037 and BMI (not significant in comparison to the control group. A small intervention effect was also evident for cardiorespiratory fitness in the RAP group.

  5. Feasibility and efficacy of cognitive telerehabilitation in early Alzheimer’s disease: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelcic N

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nela Jelcic,1 Michela Agostini,1 Francesca Meneghello,1 Cinzia Bussè,2 Sara Parise,2 Antonietta Galano,2 Paolo Tonin,1 Mauro Dam,1 Annachiara Cagnin1,2 1Foundation IRCCS San Camillo Hospital, Laboratory of Kinematics and Robotics and Laboratory of Psychology, Neurorehabilitation Department, Venice, Italy; 2Department of Neurosciences: Sciences NPSRR, University of Padova, Padova, Italy Background: This pilot study compared the effects of lexical-semantic stimulation through telecommunication technology (LSS-tele with in-person LSS (LSS-direct and unstructured cognitive treatment (UCS in patients with early Alzheimer’s disease.Methods: Twenty-seven patients with Alzheimer’s disease in the very early stage (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] >26/30 were divided into three groups: seven patients received LSS-tele treatment, ten received standard LSS-direct intervention, and ten participants underwent UCS as control condition. Intervention treatments consisted of two weekly sessions of LSS (through teleconference or face to face depending on group assignment or UCS exercises administered to small groups throughout a 3-month period. The main outcome measures were changes of global cognitive performance, language abilities, and memory function. Secondary outcome measures were changes in attention, working memory, executive functions, and visual-spatial abilities tests.Results: The mean MMSE score improved significantly in LSS-tele and LSS-direct treatments; LSS-tele improved language abilities, both phonemic and semantic, and stabilized delayed verbal episodic memory with respect to an improved performance after the LSS-direct intervention and to a memory decline observed in the control group. Improvement was not achieved in any neuropsychological test score after UCS.Conclusion: Clinical application of telecommunication technology to cognitive rehabilitation of elderly patients with neurodegenerative cognitive impairment is feasible and may

  6. Absence of patient-to-patient intrahospital transmission of Staphylococcus aureus as determined by whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, S Wesley; Beres, Stephen B; Olsen, Randall J; Musser, James M

    2014-10-07

    Nosocomial transmission of pathogens is a major health care challenge. The increasing spread of antibiotic-resistant strains represents an ongoing threat to public health. Previous Staphylococcus aureus transmission studies have focused on transmission of S. aureus between asymptomatic carriers or used low-resolution typing methods such as multilocus sequence typing (MLST) or spa typing. To identify patient-to-patient intrahospital transmission using high-resolution genetic analysis, we sequenced the genomes of a consecutive set of 398 S. aureus isolates from sterile-site infections. The S. aureus strains were collected from four hospitals in the Houston Methodist Hospital System over a 6-month period. Importantly, we discovered no evidence of transmission of S. aureus between patients with sterile-site infections. The lack of intrahospital transmission may reflect a fundamental difference between day-to-day transmission events in the hospital setting and the more frequently studied outbreak scenarios. Importance: Previous studies have suggested that nosocomial transmission of S. aureus is common. Our data revealed an unexpected lack of evidence for intrahospital transmission of S. aureus between patients with invasive infections. This finding has important implications for hospital infection control and public health efforts. In addition, our data demonstrate that highly related pools of S. aureus strains exist in the community which may complicate outbreak investigations. Copyright © 2014 Long et al.

  7. Intra-Hospital Outcomes in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction: Comparison of Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toba Kazemi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We read the interesting article entitled “the Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Short Term Mortality and Morbidity after Isolated Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Surgery” (1. We performed a study on intra-hospital complications in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI in Birjand, east of Iran in 2012. In our study, 479 patients with AMI (243 diabetics and 236 non-diabetics were assessed. The subjects’ mean age was 61.95 ± 13.18 years. Assessment of intra-hospital complications in the two groups revealed that recurrent angina and mortality were significantly higher in the diabetics compared to the non-diabetics (52.5% vs. 39.3%, P = 0.009; 11.2% vs. 2.6%, P = 0.012, respectively. Besides, the mean Ejection Fraction (EF was lower in the diabetics in comparison to the non-diabetics (45.26 ± 11.37% vs. 49.98 ± 10.39%, P = 0.014. Moreover, the incidence rates of intra-hospital mortality and heart failure were higher in the diabetics with AMI. This can be due to the higher prevalence of the associated risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia, in diabetic patients and their effects on the heart. Hyperglycemia occurring after AMI is a strong and independent prognostic marker of post-MI complications. Stress, which occurs following AMI, increases insulin resistance and hyperglycemia and decreases glucose tolerance. Un-controlled diabetes in patients having AMI is accompanied by an unfavorable prognosis and may increase the risk of life-threatening complications (2. The increased risk of complications can be a possible explanation for the increase in intra-hospital mortality after AMI is diabetic patients. Various studies have indicated that initial hyperglycemia associated with failure of ST segment resolution after streptokinase infusion is followed by more extensive infarction revealed in Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT, less blood flow in coronary arteries in

  8. Development and feasibility of Inlife: A pilot study of an online social support intervention for informal caregivers of people with dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Alieske E. H.; van Boxtel, Martin P. J.; Rozendaal, Nico; Verhey, Frans R. J.; de Vugt, Marjolein E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Informal caregivers of individuals with dementia have an increased risk to face social isolation due to progression of the disease. Online social media interventions might offer a new opportunity to increase access to social support and enhance positive interactions and openness in dementia care networks. Objective This explorative pilot study describes (1) the development of an online social support intervention Inlife, and (2) the evaluation of the feasibility of this intervention and the measurements to assess its effectiveness. Methods The Medical Research Council (MRC) framework guided the development of the online social support intervention. This is a stepwise approach that integrates potential users’ views with the development and validation of the program content. The program was developed by combining (1) individual caregiver interviews (n = 10), (2) focus group sessions with experts and web designers (n = 6), and (3) individual think-aloud tests (n = 2). Subsequently, a pilot study with informal caregivers was conducted (n = 25) to examine the program’s feasibility and preliminary effectiveness. Online self-report measures were completed at baseline and at four follow-up time points. Results In total, 23 participants completed the newly developed Inlife intervention. Despite the high number of low-active users (17/23, 73%), Inlife had a good feasibility score of 7.1 (range: 1–10). The Calendar and Timeline were used most frequently and contributed to better care coordination and positive interactions. Conclusions Although the Inlife platform received a sufficient feasibility rating, the uptake was not optimal. Therefore, the Inlife platform was adapted to limit the number of low-active users and improve user friendliness. Recommendations for additional treatment adherence were provided. The development according to the MRC framework and the sufficient feasibility rating of Inlife formed the basis for a future effectiveness study. PMID

  9. Development and feasibility of Inlife: A pilot study of an online social support intervention for informal caregivers of people with dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alieske E H Dam

    Full Text Available Informal caregivers of individuals with dementia have an increased risk to face social isolation due to progression of the disease. Online social media interventions might offer a new opportunity to increase access to social support and enhance positive interactions and openness in dementia care networks.This explorative pilot study describes (1 the development of an online social support intervention Inlife, and (2 the evaluation of the feasibility of this intervention and the measurements to assess its effectiveness.The Medical Research Council (MRC framework guided the development of the online social support intervention. This is a stepwise approach that integrates potential users' views with the development and validation of the program content. The program was developed by combining (1 individual caregiver interviews (n = 10, (2 focus group sessions with experts and web designers (n = 6, and (3 individual think-aloud tests (n = 2. Subsequently, a pilot study with informal caregivers was conducted (n = 25 to examine the program's feasibility and preliminary effectiveness. Online self-report measures were completed at baseline and at four follow-up time points.In total, 23 participants completed the newly developed Inlife intervention. Despite the high number of low-active users (17/23, 73%, Inlife had a good feasibility score of 7.1 (range: 1-10. The Calendar and Timeline were used most frequently and contributed to better care coordination and positive interactions.Although the Inlife platform received a sufficient feasibility rating, the uptake was not optimal. Therefore, the Inlife platform was adapted to limit the number of low-active users and improve user friendliness. Recommendations for additional treatment adherence were provided. The development according to the MRC framework and the sufficient feasibility rating of Inlife formed the basis for a future effectiveness study.

  10. Development and feasibility of Inlife: A pilot study of an online social support intervention for informal caregivers of people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Alieske E H; van Boxtel, Martin P J; Rozendaal, Nico; Verhey, Frans R J; de Vugt, Marjolein E

    2017-01-01

    Informal caregivers of individuals with dementia have an increased risk to face social isolation due to progression of the disease. Online social media interventions might offer a new opportunity to increase access to social support and enhance positive interactions and openness in dementia care networks. This explorative pilot study describes (1) the development of an online social support intervention Inlife, and (2) the evaluation of the feasibility of this intervention and the measurements to assess its effectiveness. The Medical Research Council (MRC) framework guided the development of the online social support intervention. This is a stepwise approach that integrates potential users' views with the development and validation of the program content. The program was developed by combining (1) individual caregiver interviews (n = 10), (2) focus group sessions with experts and web designers (n = 6), and (3) individual think-aloud tests (n = 2). Subsequently, a pilot study with informal caregivers was conducted (n = 25) to examine the program's feasibility and preliminary effectiveness. Online self-report measures were completed at baseline and at four follow-up time points. In total, 23 participants completed the newly developed Inlife intervention. Despite the high number of low-active users (17/23, 73%), Inlife had a good feasibility score of 7.1 (range: 1-10). The Calendar and Timeline were used most frequently and contributed to better care coordination and positive interactions. Although the Inlife platform received a sufficient feasibility rating, the uptake was not optimal. Therefore, the Inlife platform was adapted to limit the number of low-active users and improve user friendliness. Recommendations for additional treatment adherence were provided. The development according to the MRC framework and the sufficient feasibility rating of Inlife formed the basis for a future effectiveness study.

  11. Factors derived from the intrahospitable laboratories that cause stress in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso Musso, Liliana; Ardiles Vargas, Bárbara; Bernal Torres, Milenca; Canovas Del Canto, María José; González Meléndez, Catherin; Kroff Balloqui, María Francisca; Soto Cornejo, Angélica

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative, correlation cross-sectional study with descriptive analysis, whose objective was to assess the factors derived from the intra-hospitable laboratories that affect the stress appearance in Infirmary students. The sample consisted of 129 students, which voluntarily acceded to answer questionnaires Evaluative Scale de Hamilton for the Anxiety, validated in 2003, and Questionnaire KEZKAK, both adapted by the investigating group. The obtained data was processed through Microsoft Excel program, appearing: the 100% of the students presented Stress. From the manifestations of Stress, the tensional anxiety and insomnia appear with the biggest percentages. From the Stress producing Factors, in Student's competitions: "having errors on its work and harming the patient", and in the Educational "receiving contradictory orders" are the ones that present greater frequency of intensity, being the Educational factor the preponderant in the appearance of stress. One concludes that is necessary to adapt the educational positions of a guardian in the clinical practices given greater emphasis to the support that will have to be lend to student, with the purpose of diminishing stress an favoring the learning.

  12. Establishment of a network-based intra-hospital virtual cancer biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lianhai; Wu, Xiaojiang; Hu, Ying; Wang, Xiaohong; He, Zhonghu; Xie, Yuntao; Pan, Kaifeng; Wang, Ning; Dong, Zhihua; Zhang, Lei; Ji, Jiafu

    2015-02-01

    There is a growing interest in integrating biomaterial repositories into larger infrastructures in order to meet research demands. However, even for a single hospital or institute, where both population-based and multiple disease-based biobanks have existed for a long time, the integration of existing separate biobanks into a virtual cancer biobank is still challenging. The guidelines and procedures for biobanking are varied and not universally enforced or followed in separate biobanks. Within the last 2 years, we initiated a project to establish a centralized biobank facility in a common storage environment. Analyzing the challenges and interests of stakeholders for the biobanks, a working group comprised of representatives from the central and separate banks, ethic committees, and research administration offices reached an agreement to implement a central facility by following the ISBER best practices for biobanking, and including regular project reviews by the ethical and scientific boards. Furthermore, by implementing a modified minimum information system with biobank data sharing, a network based intra-hospital virtual cancer bank was established to facilitate sharing information of samples held by separate banks. Meanwhile, this virtual biobank network, which has integrated patient information from hospital health care systems, will gradually integrate follow-up information from the cancer registry office and data from epidemiology studies, providing controlled access for sample providers and resource users. In the future, this infrastructure designed for a single hospital may be helpful for building a broader virtual network for data and specimen exchanges.

  13. Multiple intra-hospital transports during relocation to a new critical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, R-A; Conrick-Martin, I; O'Loughlin, C; Curran, M-R; Marsh, B

    2017-11-01

    Intra-hospital transport (IHT) of critically ill patients is associated with morbidity and mortality. Mass transfer of patients, as happens with unit relocation, is poorly described. We outline the process and adverse events associated with the relocation of a critical care unit. Extensive planning of the relocation targeted patient and equipment transfer, reduction in clinical pressure prior to the event and patient care during the relocation phase. The setting was a 30-bed, tertiary referral, combined medical and surgical critical care unit, located in a 570-bed hospital that serves as the national referral centre for cardiothoracic surgery and spinal injuries. All stakeholders relevant to the critical care unit relocation were involved, including nursing and medical staff, porters, information technology services, laboratory staff, project development managers, pharmacy staff and building contractors. Mortality at discharge from critical care unit and discharge from hospital were the main outcome measures. A wide range of adverse events were prospectively recorded, as were transfer times. Twenty-one patients underwent IHT, with a median transfer time of 10 min. Two transfers were complicated by equipment failure and three patients experienced an episode of hypotension requiring intervention. There were no cases of central venous or arterial catheter or endotracheal tube dislodgement, and hospital mortality at 30 days was 14%. Although IHT is associated with morbidity and mortality, careful logistical planning allows for efficient transfer with low complication rates.

  14. Reach Out Churches: A Community-Based Participatory Research Pilot Trial to Assess the Feasibility of a Mobile Health Technology Intervention to Reduce Blood Pressure Among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Lesli E; Cowdery, Joan; Dome, Mackenzie; Bailey, Sarah; Baek, Jonggyu; Byrd, James Brian; Hartley, Sarah E; Valley, Staci C; Saberi, Sima; Wheeler, Natalie C; McDermott, Mollie; Hughes, Rebecca; Shanmugasundaram, Krithika; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Brown, Devin L

    2017-06-01

    Innovative strategies are needed to reduce the hypertension epidemic among African Americans. Reach Out was a faith-collaborative, mobile health, randomized, pilot intervention trial of four mobile health components to reduce high blood pressure (BP) compared to usual care. It was designed and tested within a community-based participatory research framework among African Americans recruited and randomized from churches in Flint, Michigan. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of the Reach Out processes. Feasibility was assessed by willingness to consent (acceptance of randomization), proportion of weeks participants texted their BP readings (intervention use), number lost to follow-up (retention), and responses to postintervention surveys and focus groups (acceptance of intervention). Of the 425 church members who underwent BP screening, 94 enrolled in the study and 73 (78%) completed the 6-month outcome assessment. Median age was 58 years, and 79% were women. Participants responded with their BPs on an average of 13.7 (SD = 10.7) weeks out of 26 weeks that the BP prompts were sent. All participants reported satisfaction with the intervention. Reach Out, a faith-collaborative, mobile health intervention was feasible. Further study of the efficacy of the intervention and additional mobile health strategies should be considered.

  15. Safety and feasibility of atrial fibrillation ablation using Amigo®system versus manual approach: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarà, Antonio; Sciarra, Luigi; De Ruvo, Ermenegildo; Borrelli, Alessio; Grieco, Domenico; Palamà, Zefferino; Golia, Paolo; De Luca, Lucia; Rebecchi, Marco; Calò, Leonardo

    2017-11-01

    The Amigo ® Remote Catheter System is a relatively new robotic system for catheter navigation. This study compared feasibility and safety using Amigo (RCM) versus manual catheter manipulation (MCM) to treat paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). Contact force (CF) and force-time integral (FTI) values obtained during pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) ablation were compared. Forty patients were randomly selected for either RCM (20) or MCM (20). All were studied with the Thermocool ® SmartTouch ® force-sensing catheter (STc). Contact Force (CF), Force Time Integral (FTI) and procedure-related data, were measured/stored in the CARTO ® 3. All cases achieved complete PVI without major complications. Mean CF was significantly higher in the RCM group (13.3 ± 7.7 g in RCM vs. 12.04 ± 7.42 g in MCM p < 0.001), as was overall mean FTI (425.6 gs ± 199.6 gs with RCM and 407.5 gs ± 288.0 gs in MCM (p = 0.007) and was more likely to fall into the optimal FTI range (400-1000) using RCM (66.1% versus 49.1%, p < 0.001). FTI was significantly more likely to fall within the optimal range in each PV, as was CF within its optimal range in the right PVs, but trended higher in the left PVs. Freedom from atrial tachyarrhythmia was 90.0% for the RCM and 70.0% for the MCM group (p = 0,12) at 540 days follow-up. This pilot study suggests that use of the Amigo RCM system, with STc catheter, seems to be safe and effective for PVI ablation in paroxysmal AF patients. A not statistically significant favorable trend was observed for RCM in term of AF-free survival. Copyright © 2017 Indian Heart Rhythm Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Feasibility of the Participation and Activity Inventory for Children and Youth (PAI-CY) and Young Adults (PAI-YA) with a visual impairment: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Elsman, Ellen Bernadette Maria; van Nispen, Ruth Marie Antoinette; van Rens, Gerardus Hermanus Maria Bartholomeus

    2017-01-01

    Background Having a visual impairment affects quality of life, daily functioning and participation. To assess rehabilitation needs of visually impaired children and young adults, the Participation and Activity Inventory for Children and Youth (PAI-CY) and Young Adults (PAI-YA) were developed. The PAI-CY comprises four questionnaires for different age categories: 0?2 years, 3?6 years, 7?12 years and 13?17 years. This pilot study assesses the feasibility and acceptability of the PAI-CY and PAI-...

  17. Nurse-led immunotreatment DEcision Coaching In people with Multiple Sclerosis (DECIMS) - Feasibility testing, pilot randomised controlled trial and mixed methods process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, A C; Köpke, S; Backhus, I; Kasper, J; Anger, K; Untiedt, B; Alegiani, A; Kleiter, I; Mühlhauser, I; Heesen, C

    2018-02-01

    Treatment decision-making is complex for people with multiple sclerosis. Profound information on available options is virtually not possible in regular neurologist encounters. The "nurse decision coach model" was developed to redistribute health professionals' tasks in supporting immunotreatment decision-making following the principles of informed shared decision-making. To test the feasibility of a decision coaching programme and recruitment strategies to inform the main trial. Feasibility testing and parallel pilot randomised controlled trial, accompanied by a mixed methods process evaluation. Two German multiple sclerosis university centres. People with suspected or relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis facing immunotreatment decisions on first line drugs were recruited. Randomisation to the intervention (n = 38) or control group (n = 35) was performed on a daily basis. Quantitative and qualitative process data were collected from people with multiple sclerosis, nurses and physicians. We report on the development and piloting of the decision coaching programme. It comprises a training course for multiple sclerosis nurses and the coaching intervention. The intervention consists of up to three structured nurse-led decision coaching sessions, access to an evidence-based online information platform (DECIMS-Wiki) and a final physician consultation. After feasibility testing, a pilot randomised controlled trial was performed. People with multiple sclerosis were randomised to the intervention or control group. The latter had also access to the DECIMS-Wiki, but received otherwise care as usual. Nurses were not blinded to group assignment, while people with multiple sclerosis and physicians were. The primary outcome was 'informed choice' after six months including the sub-dimensions' risk knowledge (after 14 days), attitude concerning immunotreatment (after physician consultation), and treatment uptake (after six months). Quantitative process evaluation data

  18. Perfusion-CT guided intravenous thrombolysis in patients with unknown-onset stroke: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Patrik; Ntaios, George; Reichhart, Marc; Schindler, Christian; Bogousslavsky, Julien; Maeder, Philip; Meuli, Reto; Wintermark, Max

    2012-06-01

    Patients with unknown stroke onset are generally excluded from acute recanalisation treatments. We designed a pilot study to assess feasibility of a trial of perfusion computed tomography (PCT)-guided thrombolysis in patients with ischemic tissue at risk of infarction and unknown stroke onset. Patients with a supratentorial stroke of unknown onset in the middle cerebral artery territory and significant volume of at-risk tissue on PCT were randomized to intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase (0.9 mg/kg) or placebo. Feasibility endpoints were randomization and blinded treatment of patients within 2 h after hospital arrival, and the correct application (estimation) of the perfusion imaging criteria. At baseline, there was a trend towards older age [69.5 (57-78) vs. 49 (44-78) years] in the thrombolysis group (n = 6) compared to placebo (n = 6). Regarding feasibility, hospital arrival to treatment delay was above the allowed 2 h in three patients (25%). There were two protocol violations (17%) regarding PCT, both underestimating the predicted infarct in patients randomized in the placebo group. No symptomatic hemorrhage or death occurred during the first 7 days. Three of the four (75%) and one of the five (20%) patients were recanalized in the thrombolysis and placebo group respectively. The volume of non-infarcted at-risk tissue was 84 (44-206) cm(3) in the treatment arm and 29 (8-105) cm(3) in the placebo arm. This pilot study shows that a randomized PCT-guided thrombolysis trial in patients with stroke of unknown onset may be feasible if issues such as treatment delays and reliable identification of tissue at risk of infarction tissue are resolved. Safety and efficiency of such an approach need to be established.

  19. Perfusion-CT guided intravenous thrombolysis in patients with unknown-onset stroke: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot feasibility trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Patrik [Center Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Department of Neurology Service, Lausanne (Switzerland); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Neurology Service, Lausanne (Switzerland); Ntaios, George; Reichhart, Marc [Center Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Department of Neurology Service, Lausanne (Switzerland); Schindler, Christian [Center Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Pharmacy Department, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bogousslavsky, Julien [Genolier Swiss Medical Network, Glion (Switzerland); Maeder, Philip; Meuli, Reto [Center Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Wintermark, Max [University of Virginia, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Patients with unknown stroke onset are generally excluded from acute recanalisation treatments. We designed a pilot study to assess feasibility of a trial of perfusion computed tomography (PCT)-guided thrombolysis in patients with ischemic tissue at risk of infarction and unknown stroke onset. Patients with a supratentorial stroke of unknown onset in the middle cerebral artery territory and significant volume of at-risk tissue on PCT were randomized to intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase (0.9 mg/kg) or placebo. Feasibility endpoints were randomization and blinded treatment of patients within 2 h after hospital arrival, and the correct application (estimation) of the perfusion imaging criteria. At baseline, there was a trend towards older age [69.5 (57-78) vs. 49 (44-78) years] in the thrombolysis group (n = 6) compared to placebo (n = 6). Regarding feasibility, hospital arrival to treatment delay was above the allowed 2 h in three patients (25%). There were two protocol violations (17%) regarding PCT, both underestimating the predicted infarct in patients randomized in the placebo group. No symptomatic hemorrhage or death occurred during the first 7 days. Three of the four (75%) and one of the five (20%) patients were recanalized in the thrombolysis and placebo group respectively. The volume of non-infarcted at-risk tissue was 84 (44-206) cm{sup 3} in the treatment arm and 29 (8-105) cm{sup 3} in the placebo arm. This pilot study shows that a randomized PCT-guided thrombolysis trial in patients with stroke of unknown onset may be feasible if issues such as treatment delays and reliable identification of tissue at risk of infarction tissue are resolved. Safety and efficiency of such an approach need to be established. (orig.)

  20. Perfusion-CT guided intravenous thrombolysis in patients with unknown-onset stroke: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot feasibility trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Patrik; Ntaios, George; Reichhart, Marc; Schindler, Christian; Bogousslavsky, Julien; Maeder, Philip; Meuli, Reto; Wintermark, Max

    2012-01-01

    Patients with unknown stroke onset are generally excluded from acute recanalisation treatments. We designed a pilot study to assess feasibility of a trial of perfusion computed tomography (PCT)-guided thrombolysis in patients with ischemic tissue at risk of infarction and unknown stroke onset. Patients with a supratentorial stroke of unknown onset in the middle cerebral artery territory and significant volume of at-risk tissue on PCT were randomized to intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase (0.9 mg/kg) or placebo. Feasibility endpoints were randomization and blinded treatment of patients within 2 h after hospital arrival, and the correct application (estimation) of the perfusion imaging criteria. At baseline, there was a trend towards older age [69.5 (57-78) vs. 49 (44-78) years] in the thrombolysis group (n = 6) compared to placebo (n = 6). Regarding feasibility, hospital arrival to treatment delay was above the allowed 2 h in three patients (25%). There were two protocol violations (17%) regarding PCT, both underestimating the predicted infarct in patients randomized in the placebo group. No symptomatic hemorrhage or death occurred during the first 7 days. Three of the four (75%) and one of the five (20%) patients were recanalized in the thrombolysis and placebo group respectively. The volume of non-infarcted at-risk tissue was 84 (44-206) cm 3 in the treatment arm and 29 (8-105) cm 3 in the placebo arm. This pilot study shows that a randomized PCT-guided thrombolysis trial in patients with stroke of unknown onset may be feasible if issues such as treatment delays and reliable identification of tissue at risk of infarction tissue are resolved. Safety and efficiency of such an approach need to be established. (orig.)

  1. A tailored intervention to improving the quality of intrahospital nursing handover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergs, Jochen; Lambrechts, Frank; Mulleneers, Ines; Lenaerts, Kim; Hauquier, Caroline; Proesmans, Geert; Creemers, Sarah; Vandijck, Dominique

    2018-01-01

    Nursing handover is a process central to the delivery of high-quality and safe care. We aimed to improve the quality of nursing handover from the emergency department to ward and intensive care unit (ICU). A quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group pre-test - post-test design was applied. Handover quality was measured using the Handover Evaluation Scale (HES). A tailored intervention, inspired by appreciative inquiry, was designed to improve the implementation of an existing handover form and procedure. In total 130 nurses participated, 66 before and 64 after the intervention. Initial structure of the HES showed no good fit to our data; the questions were reshaped into 3 dimensions: Quality of information, Interaction and support, and Relevance of information. Following the intervention, mean changes in HES factor scores ranged from -3.99 to +15.9. No significant difference in factor scoring by ward and ICU nurses was found. Emergency department nurses, however, perceived Interaction and support to be improved following the intervention. The intervention did not result in an improved perception of handover quality by ward and ICU nurses. There was improvement in the perception of Interaction and support among emergency department nurses. The intervention positively effected teamwork and mutual understanding concerning nursing handover practice amongst emergency nurses. In order to improve intrahospital nursing handover, hospital-wide interventions are suggested. These interventions should be aimed at creating a generative story, improving mutual understanding, and establishing a supportive attitude regarding standardised procedures to reduce human error. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Feasibility and acceptability of two incentive-based implementation strategies for mental health therapists implementing cognitive-behavioral therapy: a pilot study to inform a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidas, Rinad S; Becker-Haimes, Emily M; Adams, Danielle R; Skriner, Laura; Stewart, Rebecca E; Wolk, Courtney Benjamin; Buttenheim, Alison M; Williams, Nathaniel J; Inacker, Patricia; Richey, Elizabeth; Marcus, Steven C

    2017-12-15

    Informed by our prior work indicating that therapists do not feel recognized or rewarded for implementation of evidence-based practices, we tested the feasibility and acceptability of two incentive-based implementation strategies that seek to improve therapist adherence to cognitive-behavioral therapy for youth, an evidence-based practice. This study was conducted over 6 weeks in two community mental health agencies with therapists (n = 11) and leaders (n = 4). Therapists were randomized to receive either a financial or social incentive if they achieved a predetermined criterion on adherence to cognitive-behavioral therapy. In the first intervention period (block 1; 2 weeks), therapists received the reward they were initially randomized to if they achieved criterion. In the second intervention period (block 2; 2 weeks), therapists received both rewards if they achieved criterion. Therapists recorded 41 sessions across 15 unique clients over the project period. Primary outcomes included feasibility and acceptability. Feasibility was assessed quantitatively. Fifteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with therapists and leaders to assess acceptability. Difference in therapist adherence by condition was examined as an exploratory outcome. Adherence ratings were ascertained using an established and validated observational coding system of cognitive-behavioral therapy. Both implementation strategies were feasible and acceptable-however, modifications to study design for the larger trial will be necessary based on participant feedback. With respect to our exploratory analysis, we found a trend suggesting the financial reward may have had a more robust effect on therapist adherence than the social reward. Incentive-based implementation strategies can be feasibly administered in community mental health agencies with good acceptability, although iterative pilot work is essential. Larger, fully powered trials are needed to compare the effectiveness of

  3. Feasibility and acceptability of a nursing intervention with family caregiver on self-care among heart failure patients: a randomized pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossette, Sylvie; Belaid, Hayet; Heppell, Sonia; Mailhot, Tanya; Guertin, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Self-care practices in heart failure (HF) contribute to quality of life, symptom stabilization, and extended life expectancy. However, adherence to practices such as liquid and salt restriction or symptom monitoring require high motivation on a daily basis. The aim was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and potential effectiveness of a nursing intervention with family caregivers, aimed at improving self-care practice of HF patients. This pilot study involved 32 HF patient-caregiver dyads (16/group) randomized to an experimental (EG) or control group (CG). The intervention, based on the Self-Determination Theory, was designed to enhance patients' autonomy and motivation in self-care practices, by involving their caregivers' support. Five encounters were planned with the EG dyads-two face-to-face during hospitalization and three by telephone after discharge. The feasibility of delivering the protocol was evaluated as well as the acceptability of the intervention. The potential effectiveness of the intervention was assessed based on patient outcomes, including general self-care management and self-care specific to HF, perceived competence to manage HF, autonomous motivation (A-motivation, external extrinsic motivation, internal extrinsic motivation, and intrinsic motivation), and perceived support from the caregiver. Caregiver outcomes included level of support provided to the patient. Despite recruitment challenges, the intervention was feasible, with 12 of the 16 dyads receiving all 5 encounters delivered per protocol. The 4 other dyads received the two hospital encounters, but at least 1 of the 3 post-discharge planned telephone encounters was not feasible because the patients had been re-hospitalized or was deceased. Participant's satisfaction with the intervention was high. Outcomes favoring the EG include self-care specific to HF, internal extrinsic motivation, intrinsic motivation, and caregiver's feeling that they provide a higher level of support

  4. The Usefulness and Feasibility of Mobile Interface in Tuberculosis Notification (MITUN Voice Based System for Notification of Tuberculosis by Private Medical Practitioners--A Pilot Project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banurekha Velayutham

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a notifiable disease and health care providers are required to notify every TB case to local authorities. We conducted a pilot study to determine the usefulness and feasibility of mobile interface in TB notification (MITUN voice based system for notification of TB cases by private medical practitioners.The study was conducted during September 2013 to October 2014 in three zones of Chennai, an urban setting in South India. Private clinics wherein services are provided by single private medical practitioners were approached. The steps involved in MITUN included: Registration of the practitioners and notification of TB cases by them through voice interactions. Pre and post-intervention questionnaires were administered to collect information on TB notification practices and feasibility of MITUN after an implementation period of 6 months.A total of 266 private medical practitioners were approached for the study. Of them, 184 (69% participated in the study; of whom 11 (6% practitioners used MITUN for TB notification. Reasons for not using MITUN include lack of time, referral of patients to government facility, issues related to patient confidentiality and technical problems. Suggestions for making mobile phone based TB notification process user-friendly included reducing call duration, including only crucial questions and using missed call or SMS options.The performance (feasibility and usefulness of MITUN voice based system for TB notification in the present format was sub-optimal. Perceived problems, logistical and practical issues preclude scale-up of notification of TB by private practitioners.

  5. TextTB: A Mixed Method Pilot Study Evaluating Acceptance, Feasibility, and Exploring Initial Efficacy of a Text Messaging Intervention to Support TB Treatment Adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Iribarren

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess a text messaging intervention to promote tuberculosis (TB treatment adherence. Methods. A mixed-methods pilot study was conducted within a public pulmonary-specialized hospital in Argentina. Patients newly diagnosed with TB who were 18 or older, and had mobile phone access were recruited and randomized to usual care plus either medication calendar (n=19 or text messaging intervention (n=18 for the first two months of treatment. Primary outcomes were feasibility and acceptability; secondary outcomes explored initial efficacy. Results. Feasibility was evidenced by high access to mobile phones, familiarity with texting, most phones limited to basic features, a low rate of participant refusal, and many describing suboptimal TB understanding. Acceptability was evidenced by participants indicating feeling cared for, supported, responsible for their treatment, and many self-reporting adherence without a reminder. Participants in the texting group self-reported adherence on average 77% of the days whereas only 53% in calendar group returned diaries. Exploring initial efficacy, microscopy testing was low and treatment outcomes were similar in both groups. Conclusion. The texting intervention was well accepted and feasible with greater reporting of adherence using text messaging than the diary. Further evaluation of the texting intervention is warranted.

  6. Intrahospital weight and aerobic training in children with cystic fibrosis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Sosa, Elena; Groeneveld, Iris F; Gonzalez-Saiz, Laura; López-Mojares, Luis M; Villa-Asensi, José R; Barrio Gonzalez, María I; Fleck, Steven J; Pérez, Margarita; Lucia, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the effects of an 8-wk intrahospital combined circuit weight and aerobic training program performed by children with cystic fibrosis (of low-moderate severity and stable clinical condition) on the following outcomes: cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak) and muscle strength (five-repetition maximum (5RM) bench press, 5RM leg press, and 5RM seated row) (primary outcomes) and pulmonary function (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s), weight, body composition, functional mobility (Timed Up and Down Stairs and 3-m Timed Up and Go tests), and quality of life (secondary outcomes). We also determined the effects of a detraining period (4 wk) on the aforementioned outcomes. We performed a randomized controlled trial design. Eleven participants in each group (controls: 7 boys, age = 11 ± 3 yr, body mass index = 17.2 ± 0.8 kg · m(-2) (mean ± SEM); intervention: 6 boys, age = 10 ± 2 yr, body mass index = 18.4 ± 1.0 kg · m(-2)) started the study. Adherence to training averaged 95.1% ± 7.4%. We observed a significant group × time interaction effect (P = 0.036) for VO2peak. In the intervention group, VO2peak significantly increased with training by 3.9 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1) (95% confidence interval = 1.8-6.1 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1), P = 0.002), whereas it decreased during the detraining period (-3.4 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1), 95% confidence interval = -5.7 to -1.7 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1), P = 0.001). In contrast, no significant changes were observed during the study period within the control group. Although significant improvements were also observed after training for all 5RM strength tests (P training improvements were not significantly decreased after the detraining period in the intervention group (all P > 0.1 for after training vs detraining). We found no significant training benefits in any of the secondary outcomes. A short-term combined circuit weight and aerobic training program performed in a hospital

  7. DiAlert: a prevention program for overweight first degree relatives of type 2 diabetes patients: results of a pilot study to test feasibility and acceptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heideman Wieke H

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasing due to lifestyle changes, particularly affecting those genetically at risk. We developed DiAlert as a targeted group-based intervention aimed to promote intrinsic motivation and action planning for lifestyle changes and weight loss in first degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The main objective of the pilot of the DiAlert intervention was to assess fidelity, feasibility and acceptability prior to starting the randomized controlled trial. Methods Individuals with a family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus were self-identified and screened for eligibility. DiAlert consists of two group sessions. Feasibility, fidelity, acceptability and self-reported perceptions and behavioral determinants were evaluated in a pre-post study using questionnaires and observations. Determinants of behavior change were analyzed using paired-samples t tests and Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results DiAlert was delivered to two groups of first degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (N = 9 and N = 12. Feasibility and fidelity were confirmed. Overall, the DiAlert group sessions were positively evaluated (8.0 on a scale of 1 to 10 by participants. The intervention did not impact perceived susceptibility or worry about personal diabetes risk. Action planning with regard to changing diet and physical activity increased. Conclusions DiAlert proved feasible and was well-accepted by participants. Positive trends in action planning indicate increased likelihood of actual behavior change following DiAlert. Testing the effectiveness in a randomized controlled trial is imperative. Trial registration Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR: NTR2036

  8. Standardised versus individualised multiherb Chinese herbal medicine for oligomenorrhoea and amenorrhoea in polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomised feasibility and pilot study in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Lily; Flower, Andrew; Prescott, Philip; Wing, Trevor; Moore, Michael; Lewith, George

    2017-02-03

    To explore feasibility of a randomised study using standardised or individualised multiherb Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) for oligomenorrhoea and amenorrhoea in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), to pilot study methods and to obtain clinical data to support sample size calculations. Prospective, pragmatic, randomised feasibility and pilot study with participant and practitioner blinding. 2 private herbal practices in the UK. 40 women diagnosed with PCOS and oligomenorrhoea or amenorrhoea following Rotterdam criteria. 6 months of either standardised CHM or individualised CHM, 16 g daily taken orally as a tea. Our primary objective was to determine whether oligomenorrhoea and amenorrhoea were appropriate as the primary outcome measures for the main study. Estimates of treatment effects were obtained for menstrual rate, body mass index (BMI), weight and hirsutism. Data were collected regarding safety, feasibility and acceptability. Of the 40 participants recruited, 29 (72.5%) completed the study. The most frequently cited symptoms of concern were hirsutism, weight and menstrual irregularity. Statistically significant improvements in menstrual rates were found at 6 months within group for both standardised CHM (mean difference (MD) 0.18±0.06, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.29; p=0.0027) and individualised CHM (MD 0.27±0.06, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.39; p<0.001), though not between group (p=0.26). No improvements were observed for BMI nor for weight in either group. Improvements in hirsutism scores found within group for both groups were not statistically significant between group (p=0.09). Liver and kidney function and adverse events data were largely normal. Participant feedback suggests changing to tablet administration could facilitate adherence. A CHM randomised controlled trial for PCOS is feasible and preliminary data suggest that both individualised and standardised multiherb CHMs have similar safety profiles and clinical effects on promoting menstrual regularity

  9. Utilization and Clinical Feasibility of a Handheld Remote Electrocardiography Recording Device in Cardiac Arrhythmias and Atrial Fibrillation: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ling Chang

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The handheld ECG device shows clinical feasibility with high rate for AF detection with a similar trend toward a higher prevalence with aging from different settings. These data suggested that portable ECG device via remote care system may aid in clinical diagnosis, therapeutic interventions, or patient referral for cardiac arrhythmias.

  10. Mobile, real-time, and point-of-care augmented reality is robust, accurate, and feasible: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenngott, Hannes Götz; Preukschas, Anas Amin; Wagner, Martin; Nickel, Felix; Müller, Michael; Bellemann, Nadine; Stock, Christian; Fangerau, Markus; Radeleff, Boris; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Maier-Hein, Lena; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter

    2018-03-30

    Augmented reality (AR) systems are currently being explored by a broad spectrum of industries, mainly for improving point-of-care access to data and images. Especially in surgery and especially for timely decisions in emergency cases, a fast and comprehensive access to images at the patient bedside is mandatory. Currently, imaging data are accessed at a distance from the patient both in time and space, i.e., at a specific workstation. Mobile technology and 3-dimensional (3D) visualization of radiological imaging data promise to overcome these restrictions by making bedside AR feasible. In this project, AR was realized in a surgical setting by fusing a 3D-representation of structures of interest with live camera images on a tablet computer using marker-based registration. The intent of this study was to focus on a thorough evaluation of AR. Feasibility, robustness, and accuracy were thus evaluated consecutively in a phantom model and a porcine model. Additionally feasibility was evaluated in one male volunteer. In the phantom model (n = 10), AR visualization was feasible in 84% of the visualization space with high accuracy (mean reprojection error ± standard deviation (SD): 2.8 ± 2.7 mm; 95th percentile = 6.7 mm). In a porcine model (n = 5), AR visualization was feasible in 79% with high accuracy (mean reprojection error ± SD: 3.5 ± 3.0 mm; 95th percentile = 9.5 mm). Furthermore, AR was successfully used and proved feasible within a male volunteer. Mobile, real-time, and point-of-care AR for clinical purposes proved feasible, robust, and accurate in the phantom, animal, and single-trial human model shown in this study. Consequently, AR following similar implementation proved robust and accurate enough to be evaluated in clinical trials assessing accuracy, robustness in clinical reality, as well as integration into the clinical workflow. If these further studies prove successful, AR might revolutionize data access at patient

  11. A pilot study of the feasibility of long-term human bone balance during perimenopause using a {sup 41}Ca tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui, S.K. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel) and Department of Therapeutic Radiology-Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, 420 Delaware Street SE, Mayo Mail Code 494, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)]. E-mail: huixx019@umn.edu; Prior, J. [Deparment of Medicine/Endocrinology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., V5Z 1C6 (Canada); Gelbart, Z. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, B.C., V6T2A3 (Canada); Johnson, R.R. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, B.C., V6T2A3 (Canada); Lentle, B.C. [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, British Columbia, V8M 1V4 (Canada); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2007-06-15

    The mechanisms governing calcium fluxes during bone remodeling processes in perimenopausal women are poorly known. Despite higher, albeit erratic, estradiol levels in perimenopause, spine bone loss is greater than during the first five years past the final menstrual flow when estradiol becomes low. Understanding changes during this dynamic transition are important to prevent fragility fractures in midlife and older women. The exploration of long-lived {sup 41}Ca (T {sub 1/2} = 1.04 x 10{sup 5} yrs) tracer measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) leads to the possibility of monitoring bone remodeling balance. With this new technology, we explored a pilot long-term feasibility study of bone health by measuring the {sup 41}Ca trace element in urine for six years from premenopausal to later perimenopausal phases in one midlife woman. We measured bone mineral density in parallel.

  12. Development and Assessment of the Feasibility of a Nurse-Led Care Program for Cancer Patients in a Chemotherapy Day Center: Results of the Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xiaobin; Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Leung, Carenx Wai Yee; Lee, Lai Ha; Wong, Jessica Shuk Yin; Lo, Yim Fan; Ching, Shirley Siu Yin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing number of cancer patients and inadequate communication in clinics are posing challenges to cancer patients receiving outpatient-based chemotherapy and healthcare providers. A nurse-led care program was proposed as one way of dealing with at least some of these challenges. The objectives of the pilot study were to assess the feasibility of the subject recruitment, care, and data collection procedures and to explore the acceptability of this program. A pilot study with a 1-group pretest-posttest design was conducted. Five cancer patients receiving chemotherapy in a chemotherapy day center participated. Each patient had a nurse consultation before chemotherapy and received 2 telephone calls after the first and second cycles of chemotherapy. Four questionnaires were adopted to evaluate the subjects' quality of life, self-efficacy, symptom experiences, and satisfaction with care. Questionnaires were completed before the chemotherapy and after the second cycle. The subjects were also interviewed to understand their comments on the service. The recruitment, care, and data collection procedures were completed smoothly. Slight changes were observed in quality of life and self-efficacy. All 5 subjects were highly satisfied with the care. The nurse-led care program is feasible and acceptable. The effect of the nurse-led care program will be evaluated in a single-center, open, randomized controlled trial. If the encouraging results can be confirmed, it may be an effective approach to improving the quality of ambulatory chemotherapy care. It would also shed light on the development of nurse-led care in other areas.

  13. Usability and feasibility of a mobile health system to provide comprehensive antenatal care in low-income countries: PANDA mHealth pilot study in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benski, Anne Caroline; Stancanelli, Giovanna; Scaringella, Stefano; Herinainasolo, Josea Léa; Jinoro, Jéromine; Vassilakos, Pierre; Petignat, Patrick; Schmidt, Nicole C

    2017-06-01

    Background Madagascar's maternal health mortality ratio in 2013 was 478 deaths per 100,000 live births. Most deaths are related to direct complications during pregnancy and childbirth and could be reduced by providing comprehensive antenatal care (ANC). Objective The objective of the study was to assess the usability and feasibility of a mobile health system (mHealth) to provide high-quality ANC, according to World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations. Methods PANDA (Pregnancy And Newborn Diagnostic Assessment) is an easy-to-use mHealth system that uses affordable communications technology to support diagnosis and health care worker decision-making regarding ANC. From January to March 2015, a cross-sectional pilot study was conducted in Ambanja District, Madagascar, in which ANC using PANDA was provided to 100 pregnant women. The collected data were transmitted to a database in the referral hospital to create individual electronic patient records. Accuracy and completeness of the data were closely controlled. The PANDA software was assessed and the number of abnormal results, treatments performed, and participants requiring referral to health care facilities were monitored. Results The PANDA system facilitated creation of individual electronic patient records that included socio-demographic and medical data for 100 participants. Duration of ANC visits averaged 29.6 min. Health care providers were able to collect all variables (100%) describing personal and medical data. No major technical problems were encountered and no data were lost. During 17 ANC visits (17%), an alert function was generated to highlight abnormal clinical results requiring therapy or referral to an affiliated hospital. Participants' acceptability of the system was very high. Conclusion This pilot study proved the usability and feasibility of the PANDA mHealth system to conduct complete and standardised ANC visits according to WHO guidelines, thus providing a promising solution to

  14. Feasibility of a Humor Training to Promote Humor and Decrease Stress in a Subclinical Sample: A Single-Arm Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nektaria Tagalidou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the feasibility of a humor training for a subclinical sample suffering from increased stress, depressiveness, or anxiety. Based on diagnostic interviews, 35 people were invited to participate in a 7-week humor training. Evaluation measures were filled in prior training, after training, and at a 1-month follow-up including humor related outcomes (coping humor and cheerfulness and mental health-related outcomes (perceived stress, depressiveness, anxiety, and well-being. Outcomes were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVAs. Within-group comparisons of intention-to-treat analysis showed main effects of time with large effect sizes on all outcomes. Post hoc tests showed medium to large effect sizes on all outcomes from pre to post and results remained stable until follow-up. Satisfaction with the training was high, attrition rate low (17.1%, and participants would highly recommend the training. Summarizing the results, the pilot study showed promising effects for people suffering from subclinical symptoms. All outcomes were positively influenced and showed stability over time. Humor trainings could be integrated more into mental health care as an innovative program to reduce stress whilst promoting also positive emotions. However, as this study was a single-arm pilot study, further research (including also randomized controlled trials is still needed to evaluate the effects more profoundly.

  15. An eHealth Application of Self-Reported Sports-Related Injuries and Illnesses in Paralympic Sport: Pilot Feasibility and Usability Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagher, Kristina; Jacobsson, Jenny; Dahlström, Örjan; Timpka, Toomas; Lexell, Jan

    2017-11-29

    Sport participation is associated with a risk of sports-related injuries and illnesses, and Paralympic athletes' additional medical issues can be a challenge to health care providers and medical staff. However, few prospective studies have assessed sports-related injuries and illnesses in Paralympic sport (SRIIPS) over time. Advances in mobile phone technology and networking systems offer novel opportunities to develop innovative eHealth applications for collection of athletes' self-reports. Using eHealth applications for collection of self-reported SRIIPS is an unexplored area, and before initiation of full-scale research of SRIIPS, the feasibility and usability of such an approach needs to be ascertained. The aim of this study was to perform a 4-week pilot study and (1) evaluate the monitoring feasibility and system usability of a novel eHealth application for self-reported SRIIPS and (2) report preliminary data on SRIIPS. An eHealth application for routine collection of data from athletes was developed and adapted to Paralympic athletes. A 4-week pilot study was performed where Paralympic athletes (n=28) were asked to weekly self-report sport exposure, training load, general well-being, pain, sleep, anxiety, and possible SRIIPS. The data collection was followed by a poststudy use assessment survey. Quantitative data related to the system use (eg, completed self-reports, missing responses, and errors) were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The qualitative feasibility and usability data provided by the athletes were condensed and categorized using thematic analysis methods. The weekly response rate was 95%. The athletes were of the opinion that the eHealth application was usable and feasible but stated that it was not fully adapted to Paralympic athletes and their impairments. For example, it was difficult to understand how a new injury or illness should be identified when the impairment was involved. More survey items related to the impairments were

  16. The Relationship between Serum Hemoglobin and Creatinine Levels and Intra-Hospital Mortality and Morbidity in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsoon Fazlinezhad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have shown that Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR and Hemoglobin (Hb concentrations are two predictive values for ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction (MI mortality.. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between GFR and Hb concentrations and intra-hospital mortality and electrocardiographic (ECG and echocardiographic abnormalities in ST-elevation MI patients admitted to a highly equipped hospital in Mashhad. The results will help define some factors to manage these patients more efficiently.. Patients and Methods: This descriptive study aimed to assess the relationship between Hb and GFR concentrations and mortality and morbidity among 294 randomly selected patients with ST-elevation MI. Echocardiography, ECG, and routine laboratory tests, including Hb and creatinine, were performed for all the patients. Then, the data were entered into the SPSS statistical software, version 16 and were analyzed using chi-square, t-test, and ANOVA. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant.. Results: Intra-hospital mortality rate was 10.5%. Besides, the results showed higher levels of serum blood sugar (P < 0.001, higher levels of creatinine (P < 0.001, lower levels of GFR (P < 0.001, lower ejection fraction (P < 0.001, higher grades of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (P = 0.002, and lower mean Hb concentration (P = 0.022 in the dead compared to the alive cases. Besides, the patients with mechanical complications had lower Hb levels (P = 0.008. The results showed no significant relationship between creatinine level and mechanical and electrical complications (P = 0.430 and P = 0.095, respectively. However, ejection fraction was significantly associated with GFR (P = 0.016.. Conclusions: According to the results, low levels of Hb and GFR could predict mortality caused by ST-elevation MI and ECG abnormalities could notify intra-hospital death. Moreover, lower Hb levels were associated with mechanical

  17. Antenatal treatment with corticosteroids for preterm neonates: impact on the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome and intra-hospital mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joice Fabíola Meneguel

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Although the benefits of antenatal corticosteroids have been widely demonstrated in other countries, there are few studies among Brazilian newborn infants. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of antenatal corticosteroids on the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome and intra-hospital mortality among neonates with a gestational age of less than 34 weeks. TYPE OF STUDY: Cross-sectional. SETTING: A tertiary-care hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Neonates exposed to any dose of antenatal corticosteroids for fetal maturation up to 7 days before delivery, and newborns paired by sex, birth weight, gestational age and time of birth that were not exposed to antenatal corticosteroids. The sample obtained consisted of 205 exposed newborns, 205 non-exposed and 39 newborns exposed to antenatal corticosteroids for whom it was not possible to find an unexposed pair. PROCEDURES: Analysis of maternal and newborn records. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: The primary clinical outcomes for the two groups were compared: the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome and intra-hospital mortality; as well as secondary outcomes related to neonatal morbidity. RESULTS: Antenatal corticosteroids reduced the occurrence of respiratory distress syndrome (OR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.21-0.51 and the protective effect persisted when adjusted for weight, gestational age and the presence of asphyxia (adjusted OR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.17-0.43. The protective effect could also be detected through the reduction in the need for and number of doses of exogenous surfactant utilized and the number of days of mechanical ventilation needed for the newborns exposed to antenatal corticosteroids. Their use also reduced the occurrence of intra-hospital deaths (OR: 0.51: 95% CI: 0.38-0.82. However, when adjusted for weight, gestational age, presence of prenatal asphyxia, respiratory distress syndrome, necrotizing enterocolitis and use of mechanical ventilation, the antenatal corticosteroids did not maintain the

  18. Feasibility and effect of aerobic exercise for lowering depressive symptoms among individuals with traumatic brain injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Marika; Harris, Jocelyn E; Thomas, Scott; Keightley, Michelle; Snaiderman, Abe; Colantonio, Angela

    2012-01-01

    : To establish the feasibility and effect of an aerobic exercise intervention on symptoms of depression among individuals with traumatic brain injury. : A pre-post single group. : our community dwelling participants (>11 months postinjury) with residual physical impairment recruited from an outpatient clinic. : 12-week aerobic exercise program. : The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression; aerobic capacity (cycle ergometer, heart rate at reference resistance, perceived exertion); Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and program perception (survey). : Descriptive statistics to depict change in outcome measure scores. Answers from the survey were collated and presented as summary statements. : All participants had fewer symptoms of depression, improved aerobic capacity and higher self esteem after the intervention. High satisfaction with the program was reported with no adverse effects. : The aerobic exercise program was feasible and effective for individuals with traumatic brain injury, leading to improved mood, cardiovascular fitness, and self-esteem. Future research is needed to determine the intensity, frequency, and duration required to reach and maintain improvement.

  19. Feasibility, Safety, and Efficacy of the Combination of -Serine and Computerized Cognitive Retraining in Schizophrenia: An International Collaborative Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    D'Souza, Deepak C; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Perry, Edward; Bhakta, Savita; Singh, Nagendra M; Yadav, Richa; Abi-Saab, Danielle; Pittman, Brian; Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Sharma, Mahendra P; Bell, Morris; Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    The combination of pharmacotherapy and cognitive retraining (CRT) for the cognitive deficits of schizophrenia may be more efficacious than either approach alone, but this has not yet been tested. This study evaluated the feasibility, safety, tolerability, and efficacy of 12 weeks of -serine, combined with CRT in the treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia at two academic sites in parallel, in India and the United States. In a randomized, partial double-blind, placebo-controlled, par...

  20. Feasibility and Acceptability of an Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Intervention: Results from the Healthy Homes, Healthy Families Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dulin Keita, Akilah; Risica, Patricia M.; Drenner, Kelli L.; Adams, Ingrid; Gorham, Gemma; Gans, Kim M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a home-based early childhood obesity prevention intervention designed to empower low-income racially/ethnically diverse parents to modify their children's health behaviors. Methods. We used a prospective design with pre-/posttest evaluation of 50 parent-child pairs (children aged 2 to 5 years) to examine potential changes in dietary, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors among children at baseline and four-month follow-...

  1. Early Childhood Development and Obesity Risk-Factors in a Multi-Ethnic, Low-Income Community: Feasibility of The "Five Hundred under Five" Social Determinants of Health Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearst, Mary O.; Martin, Lauren; Rafdal, Brooke H.; Robinson, Ronel; McConnell, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: First, to describe a community-academic partnership that piloted a parent and home-based programme focused on the intersection of health and education from a social determinants foundation and determine the feasibility and acceptability of such work. Second, to examine trends and co-occurrence of social and environmental context,…

  2. Feasibility of an online well-being intervention for people with spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwer, J H; van Leeuwen, C M C; Bolier, L; Post, M W M

    2016-06-01

    Pre-test and post-test designs with 14 participants. Measurements were taken at baseline (T1), immediately after the intervention (T2) and at 3-month follow-up (T3). Psyfit is an online self-help program designed to enhance well-being in persons with depressed mood. We examined the feasibility of Psyfit in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Community, the Netherlands. Participants chose two of the six Psyfit modules. The researcher maintained telephone contact with the participants. Feasibility was inferred from the completion rate of the modules and feedback from the participants. Outcome measures were the Mental Health Inventory-5, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale and the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale. Overall, 75% of the first module and 39% of the second module were completed. Seven participants were considered as study completers and were included in the evaluation. They evaluated Psyfit as a useful program and helpful for persons with SCI. Several technical problems were reported that mainly concerned browser compatibility. An increase in mental health and nonsignificant change of well-being were found at the end of the intervention period, but these were not maintained at follow-up. Psyfit seems a potentially feasible program. However, adaptation to the SCI population and further study with a controlled design and utilizing a larger sample size are necessary before it can be recommended as part of SCI rehabilitation.

  3. Feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of integrated care for COPD patients: a mixed methods evaluation of a pilot community-based programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, Tania; Bridevaux, Pierre-Olivier; Lörvall, Karin; Parmentier, Rachel; Moix, Jean-Bernard; Beytrison, Vincent; Pernet, Raymond; Rey, Constance; Roberfroid, Pierre-Yves; Chhajed, Prashant N; Dieterle, Thomas; Joos Zellweger, Ladina; Kohler, Malcolm; Maier, Sabrina; Miedinger, David; Thurnheer, Robert; Urwyler, Pascal; Tschopp, Jean-Marie; Zuercher, Emilie; Leuppi, Jörg Daniel; Burnand, Bernard; Peytremann-Bridevaux, Isabelle

    2017-12-12

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of a pilot COPD integrated care programme implemented in Valais, Switzerland. The programme was adapted from the self-management programme Living Well with COPD, and included the following elements: self-management patient-education group sessions, telephone and medical follow-ups, multidisciplinary teams, training of healthcare professionals, and evidence-based COPD care. A process and outcome evaluation of the pilot phase of the programme was conducted by means of qualitative and quantitative methods. Reach (coverage, participation rates), dosage (interventions carried out), fidelity (delivered as intended) and stakeholders' acceptance of the programme were evaluated through data monitoring and conduct of focus groups with patients and healthcare professionals. Effectiveness was assessed with pre-post analyses (before and after the intervention). The primary outcome measures were; (1) generic and disease-specific quality of life (36-Item Short Form Health Survey, Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire); and (2) hospitalisations (all-cause and for acute exacerbations) in the past 12 months. Secondary outcomes included self-efficacy, number of exacerbations and exercise capacity. Finally, controlled pre-post comparisons were also made with patients from the Swiss COPD Cohort for three common outcome measures (dyspnoea [mMRC score], number of exacerbations and smoking status). During the first 2 years of the programme, eight series of group-based education sessions were delivered to 57 patients with COPD in three different locations of the canton of Valais. Coverage objectives were achieved and attendance rate at the education sessions was high (83.6%). Patients' and healthcare professionals' reported a high degree of satisfaction, except for multidisciplinarity and transfer of information. Exploration of the effectiveness of this pilot programme suggested positive pre-post results at 12

  4. Can community midwives prevent antenatal depression? An external pilot study to test the feasibility of a cluster randomized controlled universal prevention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugha, T S; Smith, J; Austin, J; Bankart, J; Patterson, M; Lovett, C; Morgan, Z; Morrell, C J; Slade, P

    2016-01-01

    Repeated epidemiological surveys show no decline in depression although uptake of treatments has grown. Universal depression prevention interventions are effective in schools but untested rigorously in adulthood. Selective prevention programmes have poor uptake. Universal interventions may be more acceptable during routine healthcare contacts for example antenatally. One study within routine postnatal healthcare suggested risk of postnatal depression could be reduced in non-depressed women from 11% to 8% by giving health visitors psychological intervention training. Feasibility and effectiveness in other settings, most notably antenatally, is unknown. We conducted an external pilot study using a cluster trial design consisting of recruitment and enhanced psychological training of randomly selected clusters of community midwives (CMWs), recruitment of pregnant women of all levels of risk of depression, collection of baseline and outcome data prior to childbirth, allowing time for women 'at increased risk' to complete CMW-provided psychological support sessions. Seventy-nine percent of eligible women approached agreed to take part. Two hundred and ninety-eight women in eight clusters participated and 186 termed 'at low risk' for depression, based on an Edinburgh Perinatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score of depression in pregnancy is feasible, acceptable and worth undertaking.

  5. Use of an Anti-Gravity Treadmill for Early Postoperative Rehabilitation After Total Knee Replacement: A Pilot Study to Determine Safety and Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, William D; Pulido, Pamela A; Goldberg, Timothy; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine the safety, feasibility, and effects of anti-gravity gait training on functional outcomes (Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score [KOOS], the Timed Up and Go test [TUG], Numerical Rating Scale [NRS] for pain) with the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill® device for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) rehabilitation. Subjects (N = 30) were randomized to land-based vs anti-gravity gait training over 4 weeks of physical therapy after TKA. Adverse events, complications, and therapist satisfaction were recorded. All patients completed rehabilitation protocols without adverse events. KOOS, TUG, and NRS scores improved in both groups with no significant differences between groups. For the AlterG group, Sports/Recreation and Quality of Life subscales of the KOOS had the most improvement. At the end of physical therapy, TUG and NRS pain scores improved from 14 seconds to 8 seconds and from 2.8 to 1.1, respectively. Subjectively, therapists reported 100% satisfaction with the AlterG. This initial pilot study demonstrated that the AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill device was safe and feasible. While functional outcomes improved over time with use of the anti-gravity gait training, further studies are needed to define the role of this device as an alternative or adjunct to established rehabilitation protocols.

  6. Back to the future – feasibility of recruitment and retention to patient education and telephone follow-up after hip fracture: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langford DP

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dolores P Langford,1,2 Lena Fleig,3–5 Kristin C Brown,3,4 Nancy J Cho,1,2 Maeve Frost,1 Monique Ledoyen,1 Jayne Lehn,1 Kostas Panagiotopoulos,1,6 Nina Sharpe,1 Maureen C Ashe3,4 1Vancouver Coastal Health, 2Department of Physical Therapy, The University of British Columbia (UBC, 3Department of Family Practice, The University of British Columbia (UBC, 4Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 5Freie Universität Berlin, Health Psychology, Berlin, Germany; 6Department of Orthopaedics, The University of British Columbia (UBC, Vancouver, BC, Canada Objectives: Our primary aim of this pilot study was to test feasibility of the planned design, the interventions (education plus telephone coaching, and the outcome measures, and to facilitate a power calculation for a future randomized controlled trial to improve adherence to recovery goals following hip fracture.Design: This is a parallel 1:1 randomized controlled feasibility study.Setting: The study was conducted in a teaching hospital in Vancouver, BC, Canada.Participants: Participants were community-dwelling adults over 60 years of age with a recent hip fracture. They were recruited and assessed in hospital, and then randomized after hospital discharge to the intervention or control group by a web-based randomization service. Treatment allocation was concealed to the investigators, measurement team, and data entry assistants and analysts. Participants and the research physiotherapist were aware of treatment allocation.Intervention: Intervention included usual care for hip fracture plus a 1-hour in-hospital educational session using a patient-centered educational manual and four videos, and up to five postdischarge telephone calls from a physiotherapist to provide recovery coaching. The control group received usual care plus a 1-hour in-hospital educational session using the educational manual and videos.Measurement: Our primary outcome was feasibility, specifically recruitment

  7. Integrative noetic therapies as adjuncts to percutaneous intervention during unstable coronary syndromes: Monitoring and Actualization of Noetic Training (MANTRA) feasibility pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krucoff, M W; Crater, S W; Green, C L; Maas, A C; Seskevich, J E; Lane, J D; Loeffler, K A; Morris, K; Bashore, T M; Koenig, H G

    2001-11-01

    Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for unstable coronary syndromes have substantial emotional and spiritual distress that may promote procedural complications. Noetic (nonpharmacologic) therapies may reduce anxiety, pain and distress, enhance the efficacy of pharmacologic agents, or affect short- and long-term procedural outcomes. The Monitoring and Actualization of Noetic Training (MANTRA) pilot study examined the feasibility of applying 4 noetic therapies-stress relaxation, imagery, touch therapy, and prayer-to patients in the setting of acute coronary interventions. Eligible patients had acute coronary syndromes and invasive angiography or PCI. Patients were randomized across 5 treatment groups: the 4 noetic and standard therapies. Questionnaires completed before PCI reflected patients' religious beliefs and anxiety. Index hospitalization end points included post-PCI ischemia, death, myocardial infarction, heart failure, and urgent revascularization. Mortality was followed up for 6 months after hospitalization. Of eligible patients, 88% gave informed consent. Of 150 patients enrolled, 120 were assigned to noetic therapy; 118 (98%) completed their therapeutic assignments. All clinical end points were available for 100% of patients. Results were not statistically significant for any outcomes comparisons. There was a 25% to 30% absolute reduction in adverse periprocedural outcomes in patients treated with any noetic therapy compared with standard therapy. The lowest absolute complication rates were observed in patients assigned to off-site prayer. All mortality by 6-month follow-up was in the noetic therapies group. In patients with questionnaire scores indicating a high level of spiritual belief, a high level of personal spiritual activity, a low level of community-based religious involvement, or a high level of anxiety, noetic therapies appeared to show greater reduction in absolute in-hospital complication rates compared with standard

  8. Storytelling in the Early Bereavement Period to Reduce Emotional Distress Among Surrogates Involved in a Decision to Limit Life Support in the ICU: A Pilot Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnato, Amber E; Schenker, Yael; Tiver, Greer; Dew, Mary Amanda; Arnold, Robert M; Nunez, Eduardo R; Reynolds, Charles F

    2017-01-01

    Surrogate decision makers involved in decisions to limit life support for an incapacitated patient in the ICU have high rates of adverse emotional health outcomes distinct from normal processes of grief and bereavement. Narrative self-disclosure (storytelling) reduces emotional distress after other traumatic experiences. We sought to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and tolerability of storytelling among bereaved surrogates involved in a decision to limit life support in the ICU. Pilot single-blind trial. Five ICUs across three hospitals within a single health system between June 2013 and November 2014. Bereaved surrogates of ICU patients. Storytelling and control conditions involved printed bereavement materials and follow-up assessments. Storytelling involved a single 1- to 2-hour home or telephone visit by a trained interventionist who elicited the surrogate's story. The primary outcomes were feasibility (rates of enrollment, intervention receipt, 3- and 6-mo follow-up), acceptability (closed and open-ended end-of-study feedback at 6 mo), and tolerability (acute mental health services referral). Of 53 eligible surrogates, 32 (60%) consented to treatment allocation. Surrogates' mean age was 55.5 (SD, 11.8), and they were making decisions for their parent (47%), spouse (28%), sibling (13%), child (3%), or other relation (8%). We allocated 14 to control and 18 to storytelling, 17 of 18 (94%) received storytelling, 14 of 14 (100%) and 13 of 14 (94%) control subjects and 16 of 18 (89%) and 17 of 18 (94%) storytelling subjects completed their 3- and 6-month telephone assessments. At 6 months, nine of 13 control participants (69%) and 16 of 17 storytelling subjects (94%) reported feeling "better" or "much better," and none felt "much worse." One control subject (8%) and one storytelling subject (6%) said that the study was burdensome, and one control subject (8%) wished they had not participated. No subjects required acute mental health services referral. A

  9. Transdiagnostic treatment of bipolar disorder and comorbid anxiety using the Unified Protocol for Emotional Disorders: A pilot feasibility and acceptability trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellard, Kristen K; Bernstein, Emily E; Hearing, Casey; Baek, Ji Hyun; Sylvia, Louisa G; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Barlow, David H; Deckersbach, Thilo

    2017-09-01

    Comorbid anxiety in bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with greater illness severity, reduced treatment response, and greater impairment. Treating anxiety in the context of BD is crucial for improving illness course and outcomes. The current study examined the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary efficacy of the Unified Protocol (UP), a transdiagnostic cognitive behavioral therapy, as an adjunctive treatment to pharmacotherapy for BD and comorbid anxiety disorders. Twenty-nine patients with BD and at least one comorbid anxiety disorder were randomized to pharmacotherapy treatment-as-usual (TAU) or TAU with 18 sessions of the UP (UP+TAU). All patients completed assessments every four weeks to track symptoms, functioning, emotion regulation and temperament. Linear mixed-model regressions were conducted to track symptom changes over time and to examine the relationship between emotion-related variables and treatment response. Satisfaction ratings were equivalent for both treatment groups. Patients in the UP+TAU group evidenced significantly greater reductions over time in anxiety and depression symptoms (Cohen's d's>0.80). Baseline levels of neuroticism, perceived affective control, and emotion regulation ability predicted magnitude of symptom change for the UP+TAU group only. Greater change in perceived control of emotions and emotion regulation skills predicted greater change in anxiety related symptoms. This was a pilot feasibility and acceptability trial; results should be interpreted with caution. Treatment with the UP+TAU was rated high in patient satisfaction, and resulted in significantly greater improvement on indices of anxiety and depression relative to TAU. This suggests that the UP may be a feasible treatment approach for BD with comorbid anxiety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Physical Activity Self-Management and Coaching Compared to Social Interaction in Huntington Disease: Results From the ENGAGE-HD Randomized, Controlled Pilot Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Monica; Quinn, Lori; Drew, Cheney; Kelson, Mark; Trubey, Rob; McEwan, Kirsten; Jones, Carys; Townson, Julia; Dawes, Helen; Tudor-Edwards, Rhiannon; Rosser, Anne; Hood, Kerenza

    2017-06-01

    Self-management and self-efficacy for physical activity is not routinely considered in neurologic rehabilitation. This study assessed feasibility and outcomes of a 14-week physical activity self-management and coaching intervention compared with social contact in Huntington disease (HD) to inform the design of a future full-scale trial. Assessor blind, multisite, randomized pilot feasibility trial. Participants were recruited and assessed at baseline, 16 weeks following randomization, and then again at 26 weeks in HD specialist clinics with intervention delivery by trained coaches in the participants' homes. People with HD were allocated to the ENGAGE-HD physical activity coaching intervention or a social interaction intervention. Eligibility, recruitment, retention, and intervention participation were determined at 16 weeks. Other outcomes of interest included measures of mobility, self-efficacy, physical activity, and disease-specific measures of motor and cognition. Fidelity and costs for both the physical activity and social comparator interventions were established. Forty percent ( n = 46) of eligible patients were enrolled; 22 were randomized to the physical intervention and 24 to social intervention. Retention rates in the physical intervention and social intervention were 77% and 92%, respectively. Minimum participation criteria were achieved by 82% of participants in the physical intervention and 100% in the social intervention. There was no indication of between-group treatment effects on function; however, increases in self-efficacy for exercise and self-reported levels of physical activity in the physical intervention lend support to our predefined intervention logic model. The use of self-report measures may have introduced bias. An HD physical activity self-management and coaching intervention is feasible and worthy of further investigation. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association

  11. The Surgery Fellow's Education Workshop: A Pilot Study to Determine the Feasibility of Training Senior Learners to Teach in the Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambani, Sapan N; Lypson, Monica L; Englesbe, Michael J; Santen, Sally; Kasten, Steven; Mullan, Patricia; Lee, Cheryl T

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, we developed an education workshop to enhance the teaching skills of surgical fellows. We sought to investigate the feasibility of the monthly educational workshop format and its effect on participant teaching skills. Surgical and medical education faculty created a broadly applicable curriculum developed from evidence-based teaching principles, delivered across 8 monthly 90-minute weekday sessions. Workshop feasibility and effect were assessed using evaluations, attendance records, and a variety of self-reported surveys. Each session was associated with a specified education action plan to be completed between sessions. A total of 13 fellows intended to participate. More than 60% attendance was achieved in 7 of 8 sessions. In all, 11 of 13 fellows were engaged (actual attendance or excused absence) across 75% or more of the sessions. Mean participant satisfaction scores ranged from 4.0 to 4.9 on a 5 point Likert scale across 87.5% of sessions. Postworkshop surveys showed increased understanding of the following: (1) knowledge gaps related to education; (2) the role of education for academic surgeons; (3) educational tools to improve teaching performance; and (4) perceived knowledge and attitudes about teaching in the operating room. An action plan was performed in 43% of cases; the most common reason for nonparticipation was lack of time (38%). Our pilot supports the feasibility of an educational workshop series to enhance fellow's educational skills in the area of intraoperative teaching. Participant engagement and satisfaction were high in this self-selected group of initial trainees. Sessions were effective, resulting in a thoughtful self-assessment of teaching skills. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. Feasibility and outcome of dialogical exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder: a pilot study with 25 outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butollo, Willi; König, Julia; Karl, Regina; Henkel, Christine; Rosner, Rita

    2014-01-01

    The research on psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) stems predominantly from a cognitive-behavioral orientation while other approaches are underrepresented. We evaluated dialogical exposure in trauma therapy (DET), a treatment for PTSD combining cognitive-behavioral elements with an interpersonal, gestalt-based framework. In this uncontrolled pilot trial, 25 PTSD patients were treated with DET in an outpatient setting and 21 completed therapy. There was a significant reduction in self-rated PTSD symptoms from pre- to posttreatment. Effect sizes were large in the completer sample and moderate to large in the intent-to-treat sample. General psychopathology also decreased significantly. The dropout rate was rather low at 16%. These results show that further research on DET as a treatment for PTSD is warranted.

  13. Seal integrity and feasibility of CO2 sequestration in the Teapot Dome EOR pilot: geomechanical site characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Laura; Zoback, Mark D.; Friedmann, Julio; Stamp, Vicki

    2008-06-01

    This paper reports a preliminary investigation of CO2 sequestration and seal integrity at Teapot Dome oil field, Wyoming, USA, with the objective of predicting the potential risk of CO2 leakage along reservoir-bounding faults. CO2 injection into reservoirs creates anomalously high pore pressure at the top of the reservoir that could potentially hydraulically fracture the caprock or trigger slip on reservoir-bounding faults. The Tensleep Formation, a Pennsylvanian age eolian sandstone is evaluated as the target horizon for a pilot CO2 EOR-carbon storage experiment, in a three-way closure trap against a bounding fault, termed the S1 fault. A preliminary geomechanical model of the Tensleep Formation has been developed to evaluate the potential for CO2 injection inducing slip on the S1 fault and thus threatening seal integrity. Uncertainties in the stress tensor and fault geometry have been incorporated into the analysis using Monte Carlo simulation. The authors find that even the most pessimistic risk scenario would require ˜10 MPa of excess pressure to cause the S1 fault to reactivate and provide a potential leakage pathway. This would correspond to a CO2 column height of ˜1,500 m, whereas the structural closure of the Tensleep Formation in the pilot injection area does not exceed 100 m. It is therefore apparent that CO2 injection is not likely to compromise the S1 fault stability. Better constraint of the least principal stress is needed to establish a more reliable estimate of the maximum reservoir pressure required to hydrofracture the caprock.

  14. Predictive score for clinical complications during intra-hospital transports of infants treated in a neonatal unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Luiza Pires Vieira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate a predictive score for clinical complications during intra-hospital transport of infants treated in neonatal units. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study nested in a prospective cohort of infants transported within a public university hospital from January 2001 to December 2008. Transports during even (n=301 and odd (n = 394 years were compared to develop and validate a predictive score. The points attributed to each score variable were derived from multiple logistic regression analysis. The predictive performance and the score calibration were analyzed by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve and Hosmer-Lemeshow test, respectively. RESULTS: Infants with a mean gestational age of 35 + 4 weeks and a birth weight of 2457 + 841 g were studied. In the derivation cohort, clinical complications occurred in 74 (24.6% transports. Logistic regression analysis identified five variables associated with these complications and assigned corresponding point values: gestation at birth [34 weeks (2 pts]; pre-transport temperature [37°C(3pts; 36.3-37.0°C (2 pts]; underlying pathological condition [CNS malformation (4 pts; other (2 pts]; transport destination [surgery (5 pts; magnetic resonance or computed tomography imaging (3 pts; other (2 pts]; and pre-transport respiratory support [mechanical ventilation (8 pts; supplemental oxygen (7 pts; no oxygen (2 pts]. For the derivation and validation cohorts, the areas under the ROC curve were 0.770 and 0.712, respectively. Expected and observed frequencies of complications were similar between the two cohorts. CONCLUSION: The predictive score developed and validated in this study presented adequate discriminative power and calibration. This score can help identify infants at risk of clinical complications during intra-hospital transports.

  15. The tailored activity program (TAP) to address behavioral disturbances in frontotemporal dementia: a feasibility and pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Claire M; Clemson, Lindy; Brodaty, Henry; Low, Lee-Fay; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Gitlin, Laura N; Piguet, Olivier; Mioshi, Eneida

    2017-10-15

    To explore the feasibility of implementing the Tailored Activity Program with a cohort of people with frontotemporal dementia and their carers (dyads). The Tailored Activity Program is an occupational therapy based intervention that involves working collaboratively with family carers and prescribes personalized activities for behavioral management in people with dementia. Twenty dyads randomized into the study (Tailored Activity Program: n = 9; Control: n = 11) were assessed at baseline and 4-months. Qualitative analyzes evaluated feasibility and acceptability of the program for the frontotemporal dementia cohort, and quantitative analyzes (linear mixed model analyzes, Spearman's rho correlations) measured the impact of the program on the dyads. The Tailored Activity Program was an acceptable intervention for the frontotemporal dementia dyads. Qualitative analyses identified five themes: "carer perceived benefits", "carer readiness to change", "strategies used by carer to engage person with dementia", "barriers to the Tailored Activity Program uptake/implementation", and "person with dementia engagement". Quantitative outcomes showed an overall reduction of behavioral symptoms (F 18.34  = 8.073, p = 0.011) and maintenance of functional performance in the person with dementia (F 18.03  = 0.375, p = 0.548). This study demonstrates the potential for using an activity-based intervention such as the Tailored Activity Program in frontotemporal dementia. Service providers should recognize that while people with frontotemporal dementia present with challenging issues, tailored therapies may support their function and reduce their behavioral symptoms. Implications for rehabilitation The Tailored Activity Program is an occupational therapy based intervention that involves prescribing personalized activities for behavioral management in dementia. The Tailored Activity Program is an acceptable and feasible intervention approach to address some of the

  16. The feasibility of progressive resistance training in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizza, Lisa; Smith, Caroline A; Swaraj, Soji; Agho, Kingsley; Cheema, Birinder S

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of executing a randomized controlled trial of progressive resistance training (PRT) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Women with PCOS were randomized to an experimental (PRT) group or a no-exercise (usual care) control group. The PRT group was prescribed two supervised and two unsupervised (home-based) training sessions per week for 12 weeks. Feasibility outcomes included recruitment and attrition, adherence, adverse events, and completion of assessments. Secondary outcomes, collected pre and post intervention, included a range of pertinent physiological, functional and psychological measures. Fifteen participants were randomised into the PRT group (n = 8) or control group (n = 7); five women (n = 2 in PRT group and n = 3 in control group) withdrew from the study. The most successful recruitment sources were Facebook (40 %) and online advertisement (27 %), while least successful methods were referrals by clinicians, colleagues and flyers. In the PRT group, attendance to supervised sessions was higher (95 %; standard deviation ±6 %) compared to unsupervised sessions (51 %; standard deviation ±28 %). No adverse events were attributed to PRT. Change in menstrual cycle status was not significantly different between groups over time (p = 0.503). However, the PRT group significantly increased body weight (p = 0.01), BMI (p = 0.04), lean mass (p = 0.01), fat-free mass (p = 0.005) and lower body strength (p = 0.03), while reducing waist circumference (p = 0.03) and HbA1c (p = 0.033) versus the control group. The PRT group also significantly improved across several domains of disease-specific and general health-related quality of life, depression, anxiety and exercise self-efficacy. A randomized controlled trial of PRT in PCOS would be feasible, and this mode of exercise may elicit a therapeutic effect on clinically important outcomes in this cohort. The success of a large

  17. Family Menu-planning Workshop: A Pilot Study on the Feasibility of Adult- and Peer-led Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaus, Cassandra J; Nickols-Richardson, Sharon M

    2017-05-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of a menu-planning workshop led by adults or by adolescents (ie, peers), delivered to parents and their adolescent children. We randomly assigned a convenience sample of 15 parents and their 17 adolescent children to menu-planning workshops taught by either an adult or peer leader. We conducted process evaluation using workshop observations and participant perceptions. Parents and their adolescents completed questionnaires before and immediately after attending and 3- and 6-months after the workshop. Questionnaires measured menu-planning-related knowledge, self-efficacy and program strategy use. We observed adult and peer leaders completing the majority (≥ 80%) of program tasks well. Participants had positive perceptions of the workshop. Menu-planning-related self-efficacy significantly increased for parents and their adolescents from baseline to all follow-up assessment intervals. Adult and peer leaders may feasibly teach a menu-planning workshop to parents and adolescent children. Additional outcomes provide limited but promising indications that menu-planning-related self-efficacy increases after workshop participation and remains elevated when assessed 6-months later, regardless of adult or peer leader mode.

  18. Feasibility and acceptability of ambulatory glucose profile in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Rai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insulin administration and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG are pillars in the management of diabetes in children. Introduction of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM has made it possible to understand the glycemic profiles which are not picked up by SMBG. Recent advent of flash glucose monitoring with inbuilt software to obtain ambulatory glucose profile (AGP has emerged as a novel method to study glycemic patterns in adults with Type I diabetes. However, the use of AGP in children is yet to be explored. Methods: AGP was used in 46 children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Feasibility was measured regarding data and sensor failure. Acceptability was measured using a questionnaire. Results: Forty-six children (22 girls and 24 boys with a mean age of 10.07 years and mean diabetes duration of 3.4 years were included in the study. In this cohort, for 30 (65.21% subjects, the sensor remained in situ for a complete duration of 14 days. Except for minor discomfort, AGP was well accepted by most of the children and their parents. Conclusion: AGP is a feasible option for monitoring glycemic status in children with diabetes with a high rate of acceptance.

  19. Feasibility and acceptability of an early childhood obesity prevention intervention: results from the healthy homes, healthy families pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keita, Akilah Dulin; Risica, Patricia M; Drenner, Kelli L; Adams, Ingrid; Gorham, Gemma; Gans, Kim M

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a home-based early childhood obesity prevention intervention designed to empower low-income racially/ethnically diverse parents to modify their children's health behaviors. We used a prospective design with pre-/posttest evaluation of 50 parent-child pairs (children aged 2 to 5 years) to examine potential changes in dietary, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors among children at baseline and four-month follow-up. 39 (78%) parent-child pairs completed evaluation data at 4-month follow-up. Vegetable intake among children significantly increased at follow-up (0.54 cups at 4 months compared to 0.28 cups at baseline, P = 0.001) and ounces of fruit juice decreased at follow-up (11.9 ounces at 4 months compared to 16.0 ounces at baseline, P = 0.036). Sedentary behaviors also improved. Children significantly decreased time spent watching TV on weekdays (P prevention intervention is feasible, acceptable and demonstrates short-term effects on dietary and sedentary behaviors of low-income racially/ethnically diverse children.

  20. Feasibility and Acceptability of an Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Intervention: Results from the Healthy Homes, Healthy Families Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akilah Dulin Keita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a home-based early childhood obesity prevention intervention designed to empower low-income racially/ethnically diverse parents to modify their children’s health behaviors. Methods. We used a prospective design with pre-/posttest evaluation of 50 parent-child pairs (children aged 2 to 5 years to examine potential changes in dietary, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors among children at baseline and four-month follow-up. Results. 39 (78% parent-child pairs completed evaluation data at 4-month follow-up. Vegetable intake among children significantly increased at follow-up (0.54 cups at 4 months compared to 0.28 cups at baseline, P=0.001 and ounces of fruit juice decreased at follow-up (11.9 ounces at 4 months compared to 16.0 ounces at baseline, P=0.036. Sedentary behaviors also improved. Children significantly decreased time spent watching TV on weekdays (P<0.01 and also reduced weekend TV time. In addition, the number of homes with TV sets in the child’s bedroom also decreased (P<0.0013. Conclusions. The findings indicate that a home-based early childhood obesity prevention intervention is feasible, acceptable and demonstrates short-term effects on dietary and sedentary behaviors of low-income racially/ethnically diverse children.

  1. Feasibility of trauma-focused Guided Imagery and Music with adult refugees diagnosed with PTSD: A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Bolette Daniels; Messel, Catharina; Meyer, Steen Lund

    2018-01-01

    -being and social function demonstrated significant changes with large effect sizes. Evaluation of the single sessions showed that participants found the therapy acceptable and helpful. All participants used music listening for self-care in their homes between sessions. The findings indicate that trauma......© 2017 GAMUT – The Grieg Academy Music Therapy Research CentreTraumatized refugees seeking treatment in special units of psychiatry are in need of treatment options that can help them stabilize and cope with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in their everyday life. Guided Imagery and Music (GIM......) has improved psychological health for clinical populations including trauma survivors with PTSD. Prior to the implementation of a randomized controlled study, a clinical non-controlled study was carried out to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a trauma-focused modification of GIM combined...

  2. Feasibility and Effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Victims of Domestic Violence: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschell, Amy D; Scudder, Ashley B; Schaffner, Kristen F; Slagel, Leslie A

    2017-01-01

    Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an evidence-based treatment for young children (aged 2.5 to 7 years) with externalizing behavior problems. Since its development, PCIT has been applied to a wide array of childhood problems and has a significant evidence base for families with histories of child physical abuse. The current study extended the existing literature by testing the effectiveness and feasibility of PCIT in an urban domestic violence shelter with community-based clinicians delivering the treatment. Seven clinicians implemented PCIT with parent-child dyads which included 21 preschool ( M = 4.57 years; SD = 1.50) children. Families completed assessments at baseline, mid-treatment, and post-treatment. Nine families completed PCIT (43%). Completion of PCIT was associated with improved child behavior, parenting practices, and mental health symptoms. Considerations for treatment delivery and future directions are discussed.

  3. Ambulatory (24 h) blood pressure and arterial stiffness measurement in Marfan syndrome patients: a case control feasibility and pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillebrand, Matthias; Nouri, Ghazaleh; Hametner, Bernhard; Parragh, Stephanie; Köster, Jelena; Mortensen, Kai; Schwarz, Achim; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Wassertheurer, Siegfried

    2016-05-06

    The aim of this work is the investigation of measures of ambulatory brachial and aortic blood pressure and indices of arterial stiffness and aortic wave reflection in Marfan patients. A case-control study was conducted including patients with diagnosed Marfan syndrome following Ghent2 nosology and healthy controls matched for sex, age and daytime brachial systolic blood pressure. For each subject a 24 h ambulatory blood pressure and 24 h pulse wave analysis measurement was performed. All parameters showed a circadian pattern whereby pressure dipping was more pronounced in Marfan patients. During daytime only Marfan patients with aortic root surgery showed increased pulse wave velocity. In contrast, various nighttime measurements, wave reflection determinants and circadian patterns showed a significant difference. The findings of our study provide evidence that ambulatory measurement of arterial stiffness parameters is feasible and that these determinants are significantly different in Marfan syndrome patients compared to controls in particular at nighttime. Further investigation is therefore indicated.

  4. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Pilot Housing Transition Program for Homeless Adults with Mental Illness and Substance Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Sharon A; Raphael-Greenfield, Emily I; Simon, Phyllis M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a housing transition program was feasible and acceptable to homeless clients with mental illness and substance use histories. Ten male residents of a homeless shelter participated in the 3-week housing intervention. The intervention used a DVD format with instructional videos, graphics, and opportunities for hands-on practice of functional skills in a simulated apartment environment. Outcome measures included goal attainment scale scores (GAS), satisfaction surveys, and case manager reports. Six of the 10 participants completed the program and achieved GAS scores at a greater level than expected at baseline (T > 50). Participants reported the intervention to be engaging and enhanced their knowledge of the housing transition process. The intervention appears to have assisted the participants in the attainment of housing skills and warrants further study.

  5. Low-cost virtual reality intervention program for children with developmental coordination disorder: a pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Tal; Weiss, Patrice L; Orian, Danielle; Laufer, Yocheved

    2013-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of using a low-cost, off-the-shelf virtual reality (VR) game to treat young children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and to determine the effect of this intervention on motor function. Nine children, aged 4 to 6 years, referred to physical therapy because of suspected DCD participated in 10 game-based intervention sessions. Outcome measures included Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 (M-ABC-2), the DCD Questionnaire (DCD-Q), the 6-minute walk test, and 10-m walk test. Statistically significant changes were observed in the total standard score (P = .024) and the balance subscore (P = .012) of the M-ABC-2 and in the DCD-Q (P VR environment. VR games seemed to be beneficial in improving the children's motor function.

  6. Promoting Physical Activity in Low-Active Adolescents via Facebook: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial to Test Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcicki, Thomas R; Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana; Hillman, Charles H; Huhman, Marian; McAuley, Edward

    2014-10-30

    The World Wide Web is an effective method for delivering health behavior programs, yet major limitations remain (eg, cost of development, time and resource requirements, limited interactivity). Social media, however, has the potential to deliver highly customizable and socially interactive behavioral interventions with fewer constraints. Thus, the evaluation of social media as a means to influence health behaviors is warranted. The objective of this trial was to examine and demonstrate the feasibility of using an established social networking platform (ie, Facebook) to deliver an 8 week physical activity intervention to a sample of low-active adolescents (N=21; estimated marginal mean age 13.48 years). Participants were randomized to either an experimental (ie, Behavioral) or attentional control (ie, Informational) condition. Both conditions received access to a restricted-access, study-specific Facebook group where the group's administrator made two daily wall posts containing youth-based physical activity information and resources. Primary outcomes included physical activity as assessed by accelerometry and self-report. Interactions and main effects were examined, as well as mean differences in effect sizes. Analyses revealed significant improvements over time on subjectively reported weekly leisure-time physical activity (F1,18=8.426, P=.009, η2 = .319). However, there was no interaction between time and condition (F1,18=0.002, P=.968, η2 = .000). There were no significant time or interaction effects among the objectively measured physical activity variables. Examination of effect sizes revealed moderate-to-large changes in physical activity outcomes. Results provide initial support for the feasibility of delivery of a physical activity intervention to low-active adolescents via social media. Whether by employing behavioral interventions via social media can result in statistically meaningful changes in health-related behaviors and outcomes remains to be

  7. A pilot and feasibility study to assess children's consumption in quick-service restaurants using plate waste methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Juliana F W; Roberts, Susan B; Anzman-Frasca, Stephanie; Gamache, Madeleine M G; Lynskey, Vanessa M; Matthews, Emilia; Mueller, Megan P; Sharma, Shanti; Economos, Christina D

    2017-03-15

    Children regularly consume foods from quick-service restaurants (QSR), but little is known about the foods that children order, the calories and nutrients consumed, the accuracy of stated calorie information, or the ability to assess food orders and consumption in QSRs. This study evaluated the feasibility of plate waste collection in QSRs and examined children's orders and consumption of meals from the standard and children's menus. Additional aims were to examine if the meals ordered met healthier standards for children's menu items and determine the accuracy of the QSR-stated energy content of foods. Fifteen QSRs, two malls, and 116 eligible parents were approached to participate in the study in 2015. Among the families recruited, children's meal orders and consumption were analyzed using plate waste methodology, and a subsample of foods was analyzed using bomb calorimetry in 2015. Two individual QSRs and one mall food court with two QSRs agreed to participate, and n = 50 participants (parents with children between the ages of 5-10 years) were recruited. Children consumed on average 519 calories, 5.7 g saturated fat, 957 mg sodium, 3.7 g fiber, and 22.7 g sugar. Children ordered and consumed significantly fewer calories and less sodium and sugar with meals ordered exclusively from the children's menu compared with the standard menu. Overall there were no significant differences between the measured and stated energy contents of the QSR foods. Conducting plate waste research in QSRs is feasible and there is concordance with stated calorie information. Consuming foods exclusively from the children's menu may help limit overconsumption in QSRs.

  8. A pilot and feasibility study to assess children’s consumption in quick-service restaurants using plate waste methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana F. W. Cohen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children regularly consume foods from quick-service restaurants (QSR, but little is known about the foods that children order, the calories and nutrients consumed, the accuracy of stated calorie information, or the ability to assess food orders and consumption in QSRs. This study evaluated the feasibility of plate waste collection in QSRs and examined children’s orders and consumption of meals from the standard and children’s menus. Additional aims were to examine if the meals ordered met healthier standards for children’s menu items and determine the accuracy of the QSR-stated energy content of foods. Methods Fifteen QSRs, two malls, and 116 eligible parents were approached to participate in the study in 2015. Among the families recruited, children’s meal orders and consumption were analyzed using plate waste methodology, and a subsample of foods was analyzed using bomb calorimetry in 2015. Results Two individual QSRs and one mall food court with two QSRs agreed to participate, and n = 50 participants (parents with children between the ages of 5-10 years were recruited. Children consumed on average 519 calories, 5.7 g saturated fat, 957 mg sodium, 3.7 g fiber, and 22.7 g sugar. Children ordered and consumed significantly fewer calories and less sodium and sugar with meals ordered exclusively from the children’s menu compared with the standard menu. Overall there were no significant differences between the measured and stated energy contents of the QSR foods. Conclusions Conducting plate waste research in QSRs is feasible and there is concordance with stated calorie information. Consuming foods exclusively from the children’s menu may help limit overconsumption in QSRs.

  9. Feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of point-of-care handheld echocardiography in acute ischemic stroke patients - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Peter; Fleischer, Anna; Wiedmann, Silke; Rücker, Viktoria; Mackenrodt, Daniel; Morbach, Caroline; Malzahn, Uwe; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Störk, Stefan; Heuschmann, Peter U

    2017-08-11

    Standard echocardiography (SE) is an essential part of the routine diagnostic work-up after ischemic stroke (IS) and also serves for research purposes. However, access to SE is often limited. We aimed to assess feasibility and accuracy of point-of-care (POC) echocardiography in a stroke unit (SU) setting. IS patients were recruited on the SU of the University Hospital Würzburg, Germany. Two SU team members were trained in POC echocardiography for a three-month period to assess a set of predefined cardiac parameters including left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Diagnostic agreement was assessed by comparing POC with SE executed by an expert sonographer, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) or kappa (κ) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. In the 78 patients receiving both POC and SE agreement for cardiac parameters was good, with ICC varying from 0.82 (95% CI 0.71-0.89) to 0.93 (95% CI 0.87-0.96), and κ from 0.39 (-95% CI 0.14-0.92) to 0.79 (95% CI 0.67-0.91). Detection of systolic dysfunction with POC echocardiography compared to SE was very good, with an area under the curve of 0.99 (0.96-1.00). Interrater agreement for LVEF measured by POC echocardiography was good with κ 0.63 (95% CI 0.40-0.85). POC echocardiography in a SU setting is feasible enabling reliable quantification of LVEF and preliminary assessment of selected cardiac parameters that might be used for research purposes. Its potential clinical utility in triaging stroke patients who should undergo or do not necessarily require SE needs to be investigated in larger prospective diagnostic studies.

  10. Evaluating Acupuncture and Standard carE for pregnant women with Back pain (EASE Back): a feasibility study and pilot randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Nadine E; Bishop, Annette; Bartlam, Bernadette; Ogollah, Reuben; Barlas, Panos; Holden, Melanie; Ismail, Khaled; Jowett, Sue; Kettle, Christine; Kigozi, Jesse; Lewis, Martyn; Lloyd, Alison; Waterfield, Jackie; Young, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Many pregnant women experience low back pain. Acupuncture appears to be a safe, promising intervention but evidence is needed about its clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. To assess the feasibility of a future large randomised controlled trial (RCT) testing the additional benefit of adding acupuncture to standard care (SC) for pregnancy-related back pain. Phase 1: a questionnaire survey described current care for pregnancy-related back pain. Focus groups and interviews with midwives, physiotherapists and pregnant women explored acceptability and feasibility of acupuncture and the proposed RCT. Phase 2: a single-centre pilot RCT. Participants were identified using six methods and randomised to SC, SC plus true acupuncture or SC plus non-penetrating acupuncture. Phase 1: 1093 physiotherapists were surveyed and 15 midwives, 21 physiotherapists and 17 pregnant women participated in five focus groups and 20 individual interviews. Phase 2: 125 women with pregnancy-related back pain participated. SC: a self-management booklet and onward referral for one-to-one physiotherapy (two to four sessions) for those who needed it. SC plus true acupuncture: the self-management booklet and six to eight treatments with a physiotherapist comprising true (penetrating) acupuncture, advice and exercise. SC plus non-penetrating acupuncture: the self-management booklet and six to eight treatments with a physiotherapist comprising non-penetrating acupuncture, advice and exercise. Pilot RCT outcomes included recruitment rates, treatment fidelity, follow-up rate, patient-reported pain and function, quality of life and health-care resource use. Birth and neonatal outcomes were also assessed. Staff overseeing outcome data collection were blind to treatment allocation. Phase 1: 629 (57.5%) physiotherapists responded to the survey, 499 were experienced in treating pregnancy-related back pain and reported 16 advice and 18 treatment options. Typical treatment comprised two to four

  11. Acceptability and preliminary feasibility of an internet/CD-ROM-based education and decision program for early-stage prostate cancer patients: randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Michael A; Mohamed, Nihal E; Butz, Brian P; Bar-Chama, Natan; Stock, Richard; Cesaretti, Jamie; Hassan, Waleed; Samadi, David; Hall, Simon J

    2012-01-13

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer affecting men in the United States. Management options for localized disease exist, yet an evidence-based criterion standard for treatment still has to emerge. Although 5-year survival rates approach 98%, all treatment options carry the possibility for significant side effects, such as erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence. It is therefore recommended that patients be actively involved in the treatment decision process. We have developed an Internet/CD-ROM-based multimedia Prostate Interactive Educational System (PIES) to enhance patients' treatment decision making. PIES virtually mirrors a health center to provide patients with information about prostate cancer and its treatment through an intuitive interface, using videos, animations, graphics, and texts. (1) To examine the acceptability and feasibility of the PIES intervention and to report preliminary outcomes of the program in a pilot trial among patients with a new prostate cancer diagnosis, and (2) to explore the potential impact of tailoring PIES treatment information to participants' information-seeking styles on study outcomes. Participants (n = 72) were patients with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer who had not made a treatment decision. Patients were randomly assigned to 3 experimental conditions: (1) control condition (providing information through standard National Cancer Institute brochures; 26%), and PIES (2) with tailoring (43%) and (3) without tailoring to a patient's information-seeking style (31%). Questionnaires were administrated before (t1) and immediately after the intervention (t2). Measurements include evaluation and acceptability of the PIES intervention, monitoring/blunting information-seeking style, psychological distress, and decision-related variables (eg, decisional confidence, feeling informed about prostate cancer and treatment, and treatment preference). The PIES program was well accepted by patients and did not interfere

  12. Pilot study to investigate the feasibility of the Home Falls and Accidents Screening Tool (HOME FAST) to identify older Malaysian people at risk of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romli, Muhammad Hibatullah; Mackenzie, Lynette; Lovarini, Meryl; Tan, Maw Pin

    2016-08-16

    The relationship between home hazards and falls in older Malaysian people is not yet fully understood. No tools to evaluate the Malaysian home environment currently exist. Therefore, this study aimed to pilot the Home Falls and Accidents Screening Tool (HOME FAST) to identify hazards in Malaysian homes, to evaluate the feasibility of using the HOME FAST in the Malaysian Elders Longitudinal Research (MELoR) study and to gather preliminary data about the experience of falls among a small sample of Malaysian older people. A cross-sectional pilot study was conducted. An urban setting in Kuala Lumpur. 26 older people aged 60 and over were recruited from the control group of a related research project in Malaysia, in addition to older people known to the researchers. The HOME FAST was applied with the baseline survey for the MELoR study via a face-to-face interview and observation of the home by research staff. The majority of the participants were female, of Malay or Chinese ethnicity and living with others in a double-storeyed house. Falls were reported in the previous year by 19% and 80% of falls occurred at home. Gender and fear of falling had the strongest associations with home hazards. Most hazards were detected in the bathroom area. A small number of errors were detected in the HOME FAST ratings by researchers. The HOME FAST is feasible as a research and clinical tool for the Malaysian context and is appropriate for use in the MELoR study. Home hazards were prevalent in the homes of older people and further research with the larger MELoR sample is needed to confirm the validity of using the HOME FAST in Malaysia. Training in the use of the HOME FAST is needed to ensure accurate use by researchers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Treatment of FBSS Low Back Pain with a Novel Percutaneous DRG Wireless Stimulator: Pilot and Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Richard L; Yeung, Anthony; Montes Garcia, Carlos; Tyler Perryman, Laura; Speck, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    Test a miniaturized neurostimulator transforaminally placed at the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and evaluate the device's safety and efficacy in treating failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) low back pain. Pilot, two-phase study. Eleven subjects with chronic intractable neuropathic trunk and/or lower limbs pain were included. The system consisted of an implantable, miniaturized stimulator, provided by Stimwave Technologies (Freedom-4) and an external transmitter. Only one stimulator per subject was implanted unilaterally and transforaminally at L1 to L5 levels. During Phase 1 of the study, the stimulators were not anchored. In Phase 2, the stimulators were anchored. Subjects were treated during 45 days after which the stimulator was removed. Pain reduction, implant duration, and stimulator migration were registered. Overall pain reduction was 59.9%, with only one device placed at one location, covering only a portion of the painful areas in the majority of the subjects. In Phase 1, the non-anchored stimulators migrated a mean of 8.80 mm and in Phase 2 a mean of 1.83 mm. Stimulator migration did not correlate with changes in pain relief. Mean time-to-implant duration was 10 minutes and no adverse events were reported during implant, follow-up period, or after explant. The pain reduction results indicate that the Freedom-4 spinal cord stimulation (SCS) Wireless System is a viable treatment of low back pain through stimulation of the DRG, and better overall pain reduction may be achieved by implanting multiple devices. With short percutaneous implant times and excellent safety profile, this new system may offer health cost savings. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. A Pilot Study of Simple Interventions to Improve Informed Consent in Clinical Research: Feasibility, Approach, and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Nancy; Taylor, Holly; Ali, Joseph; Hallez, Kristina; Chaisson, Lelia

    2014-01-01

    Background Informed consent is intended to ensure that individuals understand the purpose, risks, and benefits of research studies, and then can decide, voluntarily, whether to enroll. However, research suggests that consent procedures do not always lead to adequate participant understanding and may be longer and more complex than necessary. Studies also suggest some consent interventions, including enhanced consent forms and extended discussions with patients, increase understanding, yet methodologic challenges have been raised in studying consent in actual trial settings. This study aimed to examine the feasibility of testing two consent interventions in actual studies and also to measure effectiveness of interventions in improving understanding of trials. Methods Participants enrolling in any of eight ongoing clinical trials (“collaborating studies”) were, for the purposes of this study, sequentially assigned to one of three study arms involving different informed consent procedures (one control and two intervention). Control participants received standard consent form and processes. Participants in the 1st intervention arm received a bulleted fact-sheet providing simple summaries of all study components in addition to the standard consent form. Participants in the 2nd intervention arm received the bulleted fact-sheet and standard consent materials and then also engaged with a member of the collaborating study staff in a feedback Q&A session. Following consent procedures, we administered closed and open ended questions to assess patient understanding and we assessed literacy level. Descriptive statistics, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests were generated to assess correlations; regression analysis determined predictors of patient understanding. Results 144 participants enrolled. Using regression analysis participants receiving the 2nd intervention, which included a standard consent form, bulleted fact sheet and structured question and answer

  15. Intra-Hospital Transport of Patients on Non-Invasive Ventilation: Review, Analysis, and Key Practical Recommendations by the International NIV Committee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annia Schreiber

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intra-hospital transport is often needed for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that cannot be performed at the bedside. However, moving patients from the safe environment of an Intensive Care Unit (ICU can lead to a variety of complications and adverse events, the risk is even higher in ventilated patients. This review is intended as a guide on how to prevent and avoid these adverse events during intra-hospital transport of patients on non-invasive ventilation (NIV. Greater attention should be paid to NIV indications and the selection of the patients to be transported. Detailed planning, preparation, and communication between the ward of origin and destination site, appropriate equipment, skilled staff, and continuous monitoring are the key major determinants of success in transporting critically ill patients on NIV. These points are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  16. Feasibility of Group Schema Therapy for Outpatients with Severe Borderline Personality Disorder in Germany: A Pilot Study with Three Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbinder, Eva; Schuetze, Maren; Kranich, Annika; Sipos, Valerija; Hohagen, Fritz; Shaw, Ida; Farrell, Joan; Arntz, Arnoud; Schweiger, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a severe, challenging to treat mental disorder. Schema therapy (ST) as an individual therapy has been proven to be an effective psychological treatment for BPD. A group format of ST (GST) has been developed and evaluated in a randomized controlled trial in the United States and piloted in The Netherlands. These results suggest that GST speeds up and amplifies treatment effects of ST and might reduce delivery costs. However, feasibility in the German health care system and with BPD patients with high BPD severity and comorbidity, and frequent hospitalization, has not been tested to date. We investigated GST in 10 severely impaired, highly comorbid female patients with BPD, that needed frequent hospital admission. Patients received an outpatient ST-treatment program with weekly group and individual sessions for 1 year. Outcome measures including BPD severity, general psychopathology, psychosocial functioning, quality of life, happiness, schemas, and modes, and days of hospitalization were assessed at the start of treatment and 6, 12, and 36 months later with semi-structured interviews and self-report measures. We observed significant decreases in severity of BPD symptoms, general symptom severity, dysfunctional BPD-specific modes and schemas, and days of hospitalization. Functional modes, quality of live and happiness improved. The results of this feasibility study are promising and encourage further implementation of ST outpatient treatment programs even for patients with severe BPD and high hospitalization risk. However, small sample size and the missing of a control group do not allow the generalizability of these findings. PMID:27933020

  17. Evaluation of the effectiveness and feasibility of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant engineered alternatives: Final report of the Engineered Alternatives Task Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The Engineered Alternatives Task Force (EATF) was established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) WIPP Project Office (WPO) in September 1989 (Hunt, A., 1990), to evaluate the relative effectiveness and feasibility of implementation of selected design enhancements (referred to as ''engineered alternatives'') for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These enhancements consist of modifications of existing waste forms and/or the WIPP facility, and other design variations such as passive marker systems. The purpose of this report is to summarize the methodologies and results of evaluation of the effectiveness of selected engineered alternatives relative to the existing repository design, and to discuss the feasibility of implementing these alternatives with respect to availability of technology, cost, schedule, and regulatory concerns. The EATF has concluded that a number of engineered alternatives could be implemented to improve repository performance if WIPP performance assessment determines that either gas generation or human intrusion presents a problem in demonstrating compliance. Within waste treatment, Level 3 treatments are the most effective in addressing multiple performance parameters, but tend to be the most expensive, the most difficult and time-consuming to implement, and have the greatest regulatory requirements. Level 2 treatments are less expensive, faster, require less extensive permitting, and utilize off- the-shelf technology, but are less effective in addressing multiple performance parameters. Depending upon the performance parameter, Level 1 alternatives such as alternative backfills, alternative waste containers, or modified repository design should be thoroughly evaluated and eliminated before any decision is made to treat the waste. The present uncertainty in the degree to which the baseline WIPP design complies with 40 CFR Part 191 and 40 CFR Part 268 precludes specific recommendations at this time. 130 refs., 21 figs., 37 tabs

  18. Feasibility of group schema therapy for outpatients with severe borderline personality disorder in Germany: A pilot study with three year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Fassbinder

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD is a severe, challenging to treat mental disorder. Schema therapy (ST as an individual therapy has been proven to be an effective psychological treatment for BPD. A group format of ST (GST has been developed and evaluated in a randomized controlled trial in the United States and piloted in The Netherlands. These results suggest that GST speeds up and amplifies treatment effects of ST and might reduce delivery costs. However, feasibility in the German health care system and with BPD patients with high BPD severity and comorbidity, and frequent hospitalization, has not been tested to date. We investigated GST in ten severely impaired, highly comorbid female patients with BPD, that needed frequent hospital admission. Patients received an outpatient ST-treatment program with weekly group and individual sessions for one year. Outcome measures including BPD severity, general psychopathology, psychosocial functioning, quality of life, happiness, schemas and modes, and days of hospitalization were assessed at the start of treatment and six, twelve and 36 months later with semi-structured interviews and self-report measures. We observed significant decreases in severity of BPD symptoms, general symptom severity, dysfunctional BPD-specific modes and schemas, and days of hospitalization. Functional modes, quality of live and happiness improved. The results of this feasibility study are promising and encourage further implementation of ST outpatient treatment programs even for patients with severe BPD and high hospitalization risk. However, small sample size and the missing of a control group do not allow the generalizability of these findings.

  19. A pilot RCT of psychodynamic group art therapy for patients in acute psychotic episodes: feasibility, impact on symptoms and mentalising capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Christiane; Haase, Laura; Seidel, Dorothea; Bayerl, Martin; Gallinat, Jürgen; Herrmann, Uwe; Dannecker, Karin

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of an assessor-blind, randomised controlled trial of psychodynamic art therapy for the treatment of patients with schizophrenia, and to generate preliminary data on the efficacy of this intervention during acute psychotic episodes. Fifty-eight inpatients with DSM-diagnoses of schizophrenia were randomised to either 12 twice-weekly sessions of psychodynamic group art therapy plus treatment as usual or to standard treatment alone. Primary outcome criteria were positive and negative psychotic and depressive symptoms as well as global assessment of functioning. Secondary outcomes were mentalising function, estimated with the Reading the mind in the eyes test and the Levels of emotional awareness scale, self-efficacy, locus of control, quality of life and satisfaction with care. Assessments were made at baseline, at post-treatment and at 12 weeks' follow-up. At 12 weeks, 55% of patients randomised to art therapy, and 66% of patients receiving treatment as usual were examined. In the per-protocol sample, art therapy was associated with a significantly greater mean reduction of positive symptoms and improved psychosocial functioning at post-treatment and follow-up, and with a greater mean reduction of negative symptoms at follow-up compared to standard treatment. The significant reduction of positive symptoms at post-treatment was maintained in an attempted intention-to-treat analysis. There were no group differences regarding depressive symptoms. Of secondary outcome parameters, patients in the art therapy group showed a significant improvement in levels of emotional awareness, and particularly in their ability to reflect about others' emotional mental states. This is one of the first randomised controlled trials on psychodynamic group art therapy for patients with acute psychotic episodes receiving hospital treatment. Results prove the feasibility of trials on art therapy during acute psychotic episodes and justify

  20. An intervention for pulmonary rehabilitators to develop a social identity for patients attending exercise rehabilitation: a feasibility and pilot randomised control trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Andrew R; Matata, Bashir; Pilsworth, Sam; Mcgonigle, Adrian; Wigelsworth, Lyndsey; Jones, Linda; Pott, Nicola; Bettany, Max; Midgley, Adrian W

    2018-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a degenerative condition that can impair health-related quality of life (HRQoL). A number of self-management interventions, employing a variety of behavioural change techniques (BCTs), have been adopted to improve HRQoL for COPD patients. However, a lack of attention has been given to group management interventions with an emphasis on incorporating BCTs into rehabilitators' practice. This study aims to pilot and feasibly explore a social identity group management intervention, delivered by COPD rehabilitation staff to patients attending exercise pulmonary rehabilitation. Doing so will help inform the plausibility of the intervention before conducting a full trial to evaluate its effectiveness to improve HRQoL. This is a two-centre, randomised cross-over controlled trial. Two pulmonary rehabilitation centres based in the UK will be randomly allocated to two treatment arms (standard care and intervention). Outcome measurements relating to HRQoL and social identity will be completed pre- and post-exercise rehabilitation. Focus group interviews will be conducted at the end of exercise rehabilitation to capture participants' contextualised experiences of the intervention. COPD rehabilitators will undertake semi-structured interviews at the end of the trial to garner their holistic perspectives of intervention fidelity and implementation. This is the first study to adopt a social identity approach to develop a rehabilitator-led, group management intervention for COPD patients attending exercise pulmonary rehabilitation. The results of this study will provide evidence for the feasibility and sample size requirements to inform a larger study, which can ascertain the intervention's effectiveness for improving HRQoL for COPD patients. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02288039. Date 31 October 2014.

  1. Nutrition Literacy among Cancer Survivors: Feasibility Results from the Healthy Eating and Living Against Breast Cancer (HEAL-BCa) Study: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Niyati; Jiang, Jieying; Buchan, Marissa; Meyers, Marleen; Gibbs, Heather; Krebs, Paul

    2017-06-17

    Knowledge of nutrition among breast cancer patients is insufficient, despite their motivation to seek valid information about healthy food choices. This study examines the feasibility of nutrition education workshops for cancer survivors, to inform the design of a multi-center intervention. Fifty-nine female English-speaking breast cancer patients, who had completed treatment, were enrolled. Participants were randomized to the intervention or control group. The intervention group attended six nutrition education sessions, and the control group received brochures. Measurements were done at baseline and 3-month follow-up and included the Assessment Instrument for Breast Cancer (NLit-BCa), fruit/vegetable and general health literacy screeners. Height and weight were measured. Changes in nutrition literacy, health literacy, and food intake from baseline to follow-up (within-group change) were calculated for both groups (effect sizes were reported as Cohen's d). Participants were mostly white, with a mean age of 58 years, BMI of 31.6 kg/m 2 , and had college degrees. Follow-up rates were high (89% = control and 77% = intervention group). At baseline, participants scored high for most NLit-BCa assessment components except food portions in both groups. At the 3-month follow-up, effect sizes (d) on the NLit-BCa ranged from -0.5 to 0.16. The study met its recruitment goals within 6 months. Focus groups indicated that (a) attending six sessions was acceptable, (b) patients found social/emotional support, (c) improvements should include information for special diets and booster sessions. This pilot study suggests that the intervention was acceptable and that scaling up of this intervention is feasible and could provide benefit to breast cancer survivors.

  2. A pilot RCT of psychodynamic group art therapy for patients in acute psychotic episodes: feasibility, impact on symptoms and mentalising capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Montag

    Full Text Available This pilot study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of an assessor-blind, randomised controlled trial of psychodynamic art therapy for the treatment of patients with schizophrenia, and to generate preliminary data on the efficacy of this intervention during acute psychotic episodes. Fifty-eight inpatients with DSM-diagnoses of schizophrenia were randomised to either 12 twice-weekly sessions of psychodynamic group art therapy plus treatment as usual or to standard treatment alone. Primary outcome criteria were positive and negative psychotic and depressive symptoms as well as global assessment of functioning. Secondary outcomes were mentalising function, estimated with the Reading the mind in the eyes test and the Levels of emotional awareness scale, self-efficacy, locus of control, quality of life and satisfaction with care. Assessments were made at baseline, at post-treatment and at 12 weeks' follow-up. At 12 weeks, 55% of patients randomised to art therapy, and 66% of patients receiving treatment as usual were examined. In the per-protocol sample, art therapy was associated with a significantly greater mean reduction of positive symptoms and improved psychosocial functioning at post-treatment and follow-up, and with a greater mean reduction of negative symptoms at follow-up compared to standard treatment. The significant reduction of positive symptoms at post-treatment was maintained in an attempted intention-to-treat analysis. There were no group differences regarding depressive symptoms. Of secondary outcome parameters, patients in the art therapy group showed a significant improvement in levels of emotional awareness, and particularly in their ability to reflect about others' emotional mental states. This is one of the first randomised controlled trials on psychodynamic group art therapy for patients with acute psychotic episodes receiving hospital treatment. Results prove the feasibility of trials on art therapy during acute psychotic

  3. Outcomes and feasibility of the short transitional intervention in psychiatry in improving the transition from inpatient treatment to the community: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedüs, Anna; Kozel, Bernd; Fankhauser, Niklaus; Needham, Ian; Behrens, Johann

    2018-04-01

    Discharge from psychiatric inpatient care is frequently described as chaotic, stressful, and emotionally charged. Following discharge, service users are vulnerable to becoming overwhelmed by the challenges involved in readapting to their home environments, which could result in serious problems and lead to readmission. The short transitional intervention in psychiatry (STeP) is a bridging intervention that includes pre- and post-discharge sections. It aims to prepare patients for specific situations in the period immediately following discharge from a psychiatric hospital. We conducted a quasi-experimental pilot study to determine the feasibility of the intervention, and gain insight into the effects of the STeP. Two inpatient wards at a Swiss psychiatric hospital participated in the study, and represented the intervention and control arms. Patient recruitment and baseline assessment were performed 2 weeks prior to discharge. Follow-up data were collected 1 week subsequent to discharge. Questionnaires measured coping, admission and health-care usage, self-efficacy, working alliance, experience of transition, and the number of difficulties experienced following discharge. Fourteen and 15 patients completed the follow-up assessment in the control and intervention groups, respectively. The STeP did not affect primary or secondary outcomes; however, it was shown to be feasible, and patients' feedback highlighted the importance of post-discharge contact sessions. Further research is required to improve understanding of the discharge experience, identify relevant patient outcomes, and assess the effectiveness of the intervention in an adequately-powered randomized, controlled trial. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  4. Effects of Healing Touch and Relaxation Therapy on Adult Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: A Feasibility Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Der-Fa; Hart, Laura K; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Oh, Hyunkyoung; Silverman, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell transplant (SCT), considered the current standard of care for adults with advanced cancers, can lead to substantial deconditioning and diminished well-being. Attending to life quality of SCT recipients is now viewed as essential. The objective of this study was to identify the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of healing touch (HT) and relaxation therapy (RT) with patients undergoing SCT. A randomized prospective design compared 13 SCT patients who received HT daily while hospitalized to 13 similar SCT patients who received daily RT. The clinical outcomes of the 2 groups were also compared with retrospective clinical data of 20 patients who received SCT during the same year. The mean age of participants was 57 years, with 54% receiving autologous and 46% receiving allogeneic transplants. All patients assigned to the HT group completed the protocol. Only 60% of the relaxation group completed the intervention. Both interventions produced improvement in psychosocial measures and a shorter hospital length of stay (LOS) than the historical group. Differential results for LOS were related to the type of transplant received. The LOS differences were not statistically significant but could be clinically significant. Healing touch was a better tolerated modality by this population. Future research is needed to validate the LOS advantage of the HT and RT interventions, explore the differences in effect found with different transplant types, and identify patients who can tolerate RT. The LOS reduction could result in decreased cost. Second, mood and function improvements support quality of life during SCT treatment.

  5. The success rate of narrow body implants used for supporting immediate provisional restorations: a pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Okayasu, Kozue; Fu, Jia-Hui; Hamerink, Howard A; Layher, Mary G; Rudek, Ivan Elimar

    2012-12-01

    Implants were first designed to be used in the reconstruction of edentulous mandibles. However, with the technological advancement, enormous changes were made to improve the implant design and surface characteristics leading to the wide use of implants in the replacement of missing teeth. During the transition from an edentulous span to a fixed prosthesis, narrow body implants (NBIs) have been proposed to enhance patient comfort and function. Therefore, this study was aimed at investigating the survival and success rates of NBIs used for supporting immediately nonfunctional loaded provisional fixed partial denture (PFPD). Either 2.2- or 2.4-mm-diameter dental implants were placed transmucosally into the edentulous ridges of 10 partially edentulous patients. PFPD of self-cured bis-acryl composite material were made using either a vacuform template chairside or a relined prefabricated PFPD. Occlusal adjustments were made to ensure that there was no functional loading on the provisional restorations before they were secured onto the transitional implants. At 1 year, the implant success and survival rates were 38.7% and 93.5%, respectively, with a mean percentage of bone loss of 9.46% (0%-40%) and a mean bone loss of 1.19 mm (range: 0-3.5 mm). With a favorable implant survival rate, the use of NBIs to support provisional restorations seemed to be a feasible treatment option. In addition, there is merit for research on the long-term use of NBIs-supported final prostheses.

  6. Feasibility of establishing an Australian ACL registry: a pilot study by the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJRR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekkas, Christina; Clarnette, Richard; Graves, Stephen E; Rainbird, Sophia; Parker, David; Lorimer, Michelle; Paterson, Roger; Roe, Justin; Morris, Hayden; Feller, Julian A; Annear, Peter; Forster, Ben; Hayes, David

    2017-05-01

    Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common and debilitating injury that impacts significantly on knee function and risks the development of degenerative arthritis. The outcome of ACL surgery is not monitored in Australia. The optimal treatment is unknown. Consequently, the identification of best practice in treating ACL is crucial to the development of improved outcomes. The Australian Knee Society (AKS) asked the Australian Orthopaedic Association (AOA) to consider establishing a national ACL registry. As a first step, a pilot study was undertaken by the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJRR) to test the hypothesis that collecting the required information in the Australian setting was possible. Surgeons completed an operative form which provided comprehensive information on the surgery undertaken. Patients provided pre- and post-operative questionnaires including the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and the Marx Activity Scale (MA Scale). The number of ACL procedures undertaken at each hospital during the recruitment period was compared against State Government Health Department separation data. A total of 802 patients were recruited from October 2011 to January 2013. The overall capture rate for surgeon-derived data was 99%, and the capture rate for the pre-operative patient questionnaire was 97.9%. At 6 months, patient-reported outcomes were obtained from 55% of patients, and 58.5% of patients at 12 months. When checked against State Government Health Department separation data, 31.3% of procedures undertaken at each study hospital were captured in the study. It is possible to collect surgeon-derived and pre-operative patient-reported data, following ACL reconstruction in Australia. The need to gain patient consent was a limiting factor to participation. When patients did consent to participate in the study, we were able to capture nearly 100% of surgical procedures. Patient consent

  7. Lay Health Trainers Supporting Self-Management amongst Those with Low Heath Literacy and Diabetes: Lessons from a Mixed Methods Pilot, Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlam, Bernadette; Rathod, Trishna; Rowlands, Gillian; Protheroe, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a mixed methods process evaluation of a pilot feasibility randomised controlled trial comparing a Lay Health Trainer (LHT) intervention and usual care for those with poorly controlled Type 2 Diabetes Melitus (T2DM). Set in a deprived area in the UK, this research explores patient and health care practitioner (HCP) views on whether a structured interview between a patient and a Lay Health Trainer (LHT), for the purpose of developing a tailored self-management plan for patients, is acceptable and likely to change health behaviours. In doing so, it considers the implications for a future, randomised controlled trial (RCT). Participants were patients, LHTs delivering the intervention, service managers, and practice nurses recruiting patients to the study. Patients were purposively sampled on their responses to a baseline survey, and semistructured interviews were conducted within an exploratory thematic analysis framework. Findings indicate that the intervention is acceptable to patients and HCPs. However, LHTs found it challenging to work with older patients with long-term and/or complex conditions. In order to address this, given an ageing population and concomitant increases in those with such health needs, LHT training should develop skills working with these populations. The design of any future RCT intervention should take account of this.

  8. The Feasibility of Health Trainer Improved Patient Self-Management in Patients with Low Health Literacy and Poorly Controlled Diabetes: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Protheroe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is most prevalent in deprived communities and patients with low health literacy have worse glycaemic control and higher rates of diabetic complications. However, recruitment from this patient population into intervention trials is highly challenging. We conducted a study to explore the feasibility of recruitment and to assess the effect of a lay health trainer intervention, in patients with low health literacy and poorly controlled diabetes from a socioeconomically disadvantaged population, compared with usual care. Methods. A pilot RCT comparing the LHT intervention with usual care. Patients with HbA1c > 7.5 (58 mmol/mol were recruited. Baseline and 7-month outcome data were entered directly onto a laptop to reduce patient burden. Results. 76 patients were recruited; 60.5% had low health literacy and 75% were from the most deprived areas of England. Participants in the LHT arm had significantly improved mental health (p=0.049 and illness perception (p=0.040. The intervention was associated with lower resource use, better patient self-care management, and better QALY profile at 7-month follow-up. Conclusion. This study describes successful recruitment strategies for hard-to-reach populations. Further research is warranted for this cost-effective, relatively low-cost intervention for a population currently suffering a disproportionate burden of diabetes, to demonstrate its sustained impact on treatment effects, health, and health inequalities.

  9. Evaluation of the effectiveness and feasibility of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant engineered alternatives: Final report of the Engineered Alternatives Task Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is an underground repository designed for the geologic disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from the defense activities and programs of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The performance of nuclear waste repositories is governed by US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The study conducted to demonstrate compliance with this regulation is called performance assessment. The EPA standard requires that DOE provide a reasonable assurance, based on performance assessment, that cumulative releases of radioactivity to the accessible environment will not exceed the standard's criteria. Preliminary performance assessment performed by SNL has indicated that the current design of the WIPP repository, together with the waste forms at the DOE storage and generating sites, may not demonstrate compliance with the EPA Standard. In view of this concern, and prompted by recommendations from external review groups, the DOE established the Engineered Alternatives Task Force (EATF) in September, 1989. The objective of the EATF is to identify potential engineering modifications (referred to as engineered alternatives) to the existing WIPP design and/or to the transuranic (TRU) waste forms, an to evaluate their effectiveness and feasibility in facilitating compliance with the EPA Standard. These alternatives would be designed to completely eliminate or reduce any problems which might cause non-compliance with the EPA Standard. 139 refs., 39 figs., 124 tabs

  10. Toward a P300 based Brain-Computer Interface for aphasia rehabilitation after stroke: Presentation of theoretical considerations and a pilot feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja C Kleih

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available People with post-stroke motor aphasia know what they would like to say but cannot express it through motor pathways due to disruption of cortical circuits. We present a theoretical background for our hypothesized connection between attention and aphasia rehabilitation and suggest why in this context, Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI use might be beneficial for patients diagnosed with aphasia. Not only could BCI technology provide a communication tool, it might support neuronal plasticity by activating language circuits and thereby boost aphasia recovery. However, stroke may lead to heterogeneous symptoms that might hinder BCI use which is why the feasibility of this approach needed to be investigated first. In this pilot study, we included five participants diagnosed with post-stroke aphasia. Four participants were initially unable to use the visual P300 speller paradigm. By adjusting the paradigm to their needs, all participants could successfully learn to use the speller for communication with accuracies up to 100%. We describe necessary adjustments to the paradigm and present future steps to further investigate the here presented approach.

  11. Changes in salivary oxytocin after inhalation of clary sage essential oil scent in term-pregnant women: a feasibility pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro, Yuriko; Horiuchi, Shigeko; Takahata, Kaori; Shuo, Takuya; Sawano, Erika; Shinohara, Kazuyuki

    2017-12-08

    This pilot study using a quasi-experimental design was conducted to evaluate the feasibility (i.e., limited efficacy, practicality, and acceptability) of our intervention protocol involving inhalation of the scent of clary sage essential oil by pregnant women and measurement of their preinhalation and postinhalation oxytocin levels. Participants were women of singleton pregnancies between 38 and 40 gestation weeks (N = 11). The experiment group (n = 5) inhaled the scent of clary sage essential oil diluted 50-fold with 10 mL of odorless propylene glycol for 20 min. Regarding limited efficacy, the oxytocin level 15 min postinhalation increased in 3 women and was unmeasurable in 2. The control group (n = 6) inhaled similarly without the 50-fold dilution of clary sage essential oil. Their oxytocin level increased in 2 women, decreased in 2, and was unmeasurable in 2. Uterine contraction was not observed in both groups. Regarding practicality, 3 of the 11 women could not collect sufficient saliva. The cortisol level decreased in both groups postinhalation. The protocol had no negative effects. Regarding acceptability, burden of the protocol was not observed. Trial registration The Clinical Trials Registry of University Hospital Medical Information Network in Japan-UMIN000017830. Registered:  June 8, 2015.

  12. A feasibility study and pilot randomised trial of a tailored prevention program to reduce falls in older people with mild dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Jacqueline; Clemson, Lindy; Brodaty, Henry; Lord, Stephen; Taylor, Morag; Gitlin, Laura; Close, Jacqueline

    2013-09-03

    People with dementia have a disproportionately high rate of falls and fractures and poorer outcomes, yet there is currently no evidence to guide falls prevention in this population. A randomised trial design was used to test feasibility of study components and acceptability of a home hazard reduction and balance and strength exercise fall prevention program. The program was tailored to participant's individual cognitive levels and implemented as a carer-supported intervention. Feasibility of recruitment, retention and implementation of intervention were recorded through observation and documented in field notes. Adherence, carer burden and use of task simplification strategies were also monitored. Outcome measures, collected at 12 weeks included physiological, fear of falling, cognitive and functional measures. Recruitment was achievable but may be more challenging in a multisite trial. Twenty two dyads of persons with mild dementia and their carers were randomised to intervention or usual care control group. Of 38 dyads referred to the study, there was a high rate of willingness to participate, with 6 (16%) declining and 10 (26%) not meeting inclusion criteria. The intervention was well received by participants and carers and adherence to both program components was very good. All participants implemented some home safety recommendations (range 19-80%) with half implementing 50% or more. At the end of 12 weeks, 72% of the intervention group were exercising. Both the rate of falling and the risk of a fall were lower in the intervention group but these findings were not significant (RR= 0.50 (95% CI 0.11-2.19). There were no differences in physiological outcome measures between the control and intervention groups. However results were influenced by the small study size and incomplete data primarily in the intervention group at follow up. The pilot study was feasible and acceptable to people with mild dementia and their carers. The lessons learnt included

  13. Feasibility of parent-mediated behavioural intervention for behavioural problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Nigeria: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Mojeed, Mashudat; Ani, Cornelius; Lagunju, Ike; Omigbodun, Olayinka

    2016-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is a disabling and lifelong neuro-developmental disorder. Challenging behaviours such as aggression and self injury are common maladaptive behaviours in ASD which adversely affect the mental health of both the affected children and their caregivers. Although there is evidence-base for parent-delivered behavioural intervention for children with ASD and challenging behaviours, there is no published research on the feasibility of such an intervention in sub-Saharan Africa. This study assessed the feasibility of parent-mediated behavioural intervention for challenging behaviour in children with ASD in Nigeria. This was a pre-post intervention pilot study involving 20 mothers of children with DSM-5 diagnosis of ASD recruited from a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service out-patient Unit. All the mothers completed five sessions of weekly manualised group-based intervention from March to April, 2015. The intervention included Functional Behavioural Analysis for each child followed by an individualised behaviour management plan. The primary outcome measure was the Aggression and Self Injury Questionnaire, which assessed both Aggression towards a Person and Property (APP) and Self Injurious Behaviour (SIB). The mothers' knowledge of the intervention content was the secondary outcome. All outcome measures were completed at baseline and after the intervention. The mothers' level of satisfaction with the programme was also assessed. Treatment effect was evaluated with Wilcoxon Signed Rank Tests of baseline and post-intervention scores on outcome measures. The children were aged 3-17 years (mean = 10.7 years, SD 4.6 years), while their mothers' ages ranged from 32 to 52 years (mean 42.8 years, SD 6.4 years). The post intervention scores in all four domains of the APP and SIB were significantly reduced compared with pre-intervention scores. The mothers' knowledge of the intervention content significantly increased post

  14. Effects of a "test in-train out" walking program versus supervised standard rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients: a feasibility and pilot randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagoni, Anna M; Cavazza, Stefano; Ferraresi, Giovanni; Grassi, Guido; Felisatti, Michele; Lamberti, Nicola; Basaglia, Nino; Manfredini, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    The loss of normal ambulatory function after stroke, besides causing disability, leads to progressive deconditioning and exposes patients to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and recurrent stroke. Conventional rehabilitation is mainly limited to the subacute period after stroke. Effective, safe and sustainable interventions for patients and healthcare system, including the long-term, should be identified. To verify the feasibility, safety and preliminary efficacy of an original home-based rehabilitation model compared to a standard supervised program in chronic hemiplegic stroke survivors. Pilot, two-arm, parallel group, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Community-dwelling poststroke patient/Hospital. Twelve chronic hemiplegic stroke patients (age=66.5±11.9 years, males, N.=9). Participants were randomly assigned for a 10-week period to a structured home-based exercise program (N.=6) and a standard supervised group-setting program (N.=6). The feasibility outcomes included adherence to interventions, retention rate and safety. Satisfaction was also evaluated by the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. Efficacy was assessed by the 6-minute walk test, Timed Up and Go and Stair Climb tests. The impact on Quality-of-life was estimated using the physical activity domain of the Short Form-36 questionnaire. Operators' time consuming was also calculated. Adherence was 91% in the home-based exercise group and 92% in the standard supervised group. The retention rate was 100%, with no adverse events reported and high satisfaction scores for both interventions. 6-minute walk test and physical activity domain significantly increased in both groups (P=0.03). Timed Up and Go improved in both groups, significantly for the home-based exercise group (P=0.03) while Stair Climb remained stable. Time required to operators to implement the home-based exercise program was 15 hours vs. 30 hours for the standard supervised one. In a sample of hemiplegic chronic stroke patients

  15. Feasibility and acceptability of PrE-operative Physical Activity to improve patient outcomes After major cancer surgery: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial (PEPA Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Daniel; Young, Jane; Beckenkamp, Paula R; Ratcliffe, James; Rubie, Freya; Ansari, Nabila; Pillinger, Neil; Solomon, Michael

    2018-02-17

    There is a need for evidence of the effectiveness of pre-operative exercise for patients undergoing major cancer surgery; however, recruitment to such trials can be challenging. The PrE-operative Physical Activity (PEPA) Trial will establish the feasibility and acceptability of a pre-operative exercise programme aimed to improve patient outcomes after cytoreductive surgery and pelvic exenteration. The secondary aim is to obtain pilot data on the likely difference in key outcomes (post-operative complications, length of hospital stay, post-operative functional capacity and quality of life) to inform the sample size calculation for the substantive randomised clinical trial. Twenty patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery and pelvic exenteration at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney will be recruited and randomly allocated (1:1 ratio) to either 2 to 6 weeks' pre-operative exercise programme (intervention group) or usual care (control group). Those randomised to the intervention group will receive up to six individualised, 1-h physiotherapy sessions (including aerobic and endurance exercises, respiratory muscle exercises, stretching and flexibility exercises), home exercises (instruction and recommendations on how to progress the exercises at home) and encouragement to be more active by using an activity tracker to measure the number of steps walked daily. Patients allocated to the control group will not receive any specific advice about exercise training. Feasibility will be assessed with consent rates to the study, and for the intervention group, retention and adherence rates to the exercise programme. Acceptability of the exercise programme will be assessed with a semi-structured questionnaire. The following measures of the effectiveness of the intervention will be collected at baseline (2 to 6 weeks pre-operative), a week before surgery, during hospital stay and pre hospital discharge: post-operative complication rates (Clavien-Dindo), post

  16. A pilot study of same day sputum smear examination, its feasibility and usefulness in diagnosis of pulmonary TB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneedu, V P; Verma, A K; Sharma, P P; Behera, D

    2011-10-01

    A large number of tuberculosis cases are continuously being reported from India and other developing countries leading to high morbidity and mortality. In spite of many newer tests available for diagnosing a case of tuberculosis, smear microscopy of sputum is still the preferred test under programmatic conditions. The current national and international guidelines recommend two sputum smear examinations in two days for diagnosing cases of tuberculosis, which is time-consuming, tedious, needs multiple visits, leading to high dropout of infectious cases. In the background of existing limitations of smear microscopy, we attempted to complete the diagnosis of tuberculosis on same day by serial collection of the spot sputum specimen and analyze its advantages, feasibility and viability. The study was undertaken by the Department of Microbiology, Lala Ram Sarup Institute of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases during May 2010 to April 2011. Sputum specimens were collected from 330 randomly selected tuberculosis suspects who attended OPD of hospital, patients submitted spot and home collected morning sputum sample in a standard method and spot and additional spot sputum (X- spot) collected one hour after the first spot sample as per the proposed front loading method. All the samples received were stained by acid fast Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) stain and examined on the same day. The sputum sample was pooled and cultured in Lowenstein Jensen (LJ) media in duplicate set of bottles. The results of two different microscopic methods were compared with the gold standard culture test. Out of the total 330 TB suspects, 70.60% were males and 29.39% females. The most common complaint was of cough with sputum (88.18%), chest pain (70.21%), fever (55.15%) and loss of appetite (43.03%). Upon examining the total sputum slides, 18.48 % were positive for acid fast bacilli. The smear positivity was 61/330 (18.48%) by standard methods and in proposed new method 43/330 (13.03%). Sensitivity of the

  17. The feasibility of in vivo quantification of bone-fluorine in humans by delayed neutron activation analysis: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, M; Gräfe, J L; Aslam; Byun, S H; Chettle, D R; Egden, L M; Orchard, G M; Webber, C E; McNeill, F E

    2012-01-01

    Fluorine (F) plays an important role in dental health and bone formation. Many studies have shown that excess fluoride (F − ) can result in dental or skeletal fluorosis, while other studies have indicated that a proper dosage of fluoride may have a protective effect on bone fracture incidence. Fluorine is stored almost completely in the skeleton making bone an ideal site for measurement to assess long-term exposure. This paper outlines a feasibility study of a technique to measure bone-fluorine non-invasively in the human hand using in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) via the 19 F(n,γ) 20 F reaction. Irradiations were performed using the Tandetron accelerator at McMaster University. Eight NaI(Tl) detectors arranged in a 4π geometry were employed for delayed counting of the emitted 1.63 MeV gamma ray. The short 11 s half-life of 20 F presents a difficult and unique practical challenge in terms of patient irradiation and subsequent detection. We have employed two simultaneous timing methods to determine the fluorine sensitivity by eliminating the interference of the 1.64 MeV gamma ray from the 37 Cl(n,γ) 38 Cl reaction. The timing method consisted of three counting periods: an initial 30 s (sum of three 10 s periods) count period for F, followed by a 120 s decay period, and a subsequent 300 s count period to obtain information pertaining to Ca and Cl. The phantom minimum detectable limit (M DL ) determined by this method was 0.96 mg F/g Ca. The M DL was improved by dividing the initial timing period into three equal segments (10 s each) and combining the results using inverse variance weighting. This resulted in a phantom M DL of 0.66 mg F/g Ca. These detection limits are comparable to ex vivo results for various bones in the adult skeleton reported in the literature. Dosimetry was performed for these irradiation conditions. The equivalent dose for each phantom measurement was determined to be 30 mSv. The effective dose was however low, 35 µSv, which is

  18. Feasibility of the "Bring Your Own Device" Model in Clinical Research: Results from a Randomized Controlled Pilot Study of a Mobile Patient Engagement Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Laura; Woodriff, Molly; Crowley, Olga; Lam, Vivian; Sohn, Jeremy; Bradley, Scott

    2016-03-16

    Rising rates of smartphone ownership highlight opportunities for improved mobile application usage in clinical trials. While current methods call for device provisioning, the "bring your own device" (BYOD) model permits participants to use personal phones allowing for improved patient engagement and lowered operational costs. However, more evidence is needed to demonstrate the BYOD model's feasibility in research settings. To assess if CentrosHealth, a mobile application designed to support trial compliance, produces different outcomes in medication adherence and application engagement when distributed through study-provisioned devices compared to the BYOD model. 87 participants were randomly selected to use the mobile application or no intervention for a 28-day pilot study at a 2:1 randomization ratio (2 intervention: 1 control) and asked to consume a twice-daily probiotic supplement. The application users were further randomized into two groups: receiving the application on a personal "BYOD" or study-provided smartphone. In-depth interviews were performed in a randomly-selected subset of the intervention group (five BYOD and five study-provided smartphone users). The BYOD subgroup showed significantly greater engagement than study-provided phone users, as shown by higher application use frequency and duration over the study period. The BYOD subgroup also demonstrated a significant effect of engagement on medication adherence for number of application sessions (unstandardized regression coefficient beta=0.0006, p=0.02) and time spent therein (beta=0.00001, p=0.03). Study-provided phone users showed higher initial adherence rates, but greater decline (5.7%) than BYOD users (0.9%) over the study period. In-depth interviews revealed that participants preferred the BYOD model over using study-provided devices. Results indicate that the BYOD model is feasible in health research settings and improves participant experience, calling for further BYOD model validity

  19. Feasibility of the “Bring Your Own Device” Model in Clinical Research: Results from a Randomized Controlled Pilot Study of a Mobile Patient Engagement Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Laura; Woodriff, Molly; Crowley, Olga; Sohn, Jeremy; Bradley, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Background Rising rates of smartphone ownership highlight opportunities for improved mobile application usage in clinical trials. While current methods call for device provisioning, the "bring your own device” (BYOD) model permits participants to use personal phones allowing for improved patient engagement and lowered operational costs. However, more evidence is needed to demonstrate the BYOD model’s feasibility in research settings. Objective To assess if CentrosHealth, a mobile application designed to support trial compliance, produces different outcomes in medication adherence and application engagement when distributed through study-provisioned devices compared to the BYOD model. Methods 87 participants were randomly selected to use the mobile application or no intervention for a 28-day pilot study at a 2:1 randomization ratio (2 intervention: 1 control) and asked to consume a twice-daily probiotic supplement. The application users were further randomized into two groups: receiving the application on a personal "BYOD” or study-provided smartphone. In-depth interviews were performed in a randomly-selected subset of the intervention group (five BYOD and five study-provided smartphone users). Results The BYOD subgroup showed significantly greater engagement than study-provided phone users, as shown by higher application use frequency and duration over the study period. The BYOD subgroup also demonstrated a significant effect of engagement on medication adherence for number of application sessions (unstandardized regression coefficient beta=0.0006, p=0.02) and time spent therein (beta=0.00001, p=0.03). Study-provided phone users showed higher initial adherence rates, but greater decline (5.7%) than BYOD users (0.9%) over the study period. In-depth interviews revealed that participants preferred the BYOD model over using study-provided devices.  Conclusions Results indicate that the BYOD model is feasible in health research settings and improves participant

  20. Prevention of hypothermia in patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation using the humigard® open surgery humidification system: a prospective randomized pilot and feasibility clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Laurence; Huang, Andrew; Alban, Daniel; Jones, Robert; Story, David; McNicol, Larry; Pearce, Brett

    2017-01-23

    Perioperative thermal disturbances during orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) are common. We hypothesized that in patients undergoing OLT the use of a humidified high flow CO 2 warming system maintains higher intraoperative temperatures when compared to standardized multimodal strategies to maintain thermoregulatory homeostasis. We performed a randomized pilot study in adult patients undergoing primary OLT. Participants were randomized to receive either open wound humidification with a high flow CO 2 warming system in addition to standard care (Humidification group) or to standard care alone (Control group). The primary end point was nasopharyngeal core temperature measured 5 min immediately prior to reperfusion of the donor liver (Stage 3 - 5 min). Secondary endpoints included intraoperative PaCO 2 , minute ventilation and the use of vasoconstrictors. Eleven patients were randomized to each group. Both groups were similar for age, body mass index, MELD, SOFA and APACHE II scores, baseline temperature, and duration of surgery. Immediately prior to reperfusion (Stage 3 - 5 min) the mean (SD) core temperature was higher in the Humidification Group compared to the Control Group: 36.0 °C (0.13) vs. 35.4 °C (0.22), p = 0.028. Repeated measured ANOVA showed that core temperatures over time during the stages of the transplant were higher in the Humidification Group compared to the Control Group (p < 0.0001). There were no significant differences in the ETCO 2 , PaCO 2 , minute ventilation, or inotropic support. The humidified high flow CO 2 warming system was superior to standardized multimodal strategies in maintaining normothermia in patients undergoing OLT. Use of the device was feasible and did not interfere with any aspects of surgery. A larger study is needed to investigate if the improved thermoregulation observed is associated with improved patient outcomes. ACTRN12616001631493 . Retrospectively registered 25 November 2016.

  1. The feasibility and appeal of mobile 'apps' for supporting healthy food purchasing and consumption among socioeconomically disadvantaged women: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Kylie; Mouchacca, Jennifer; Jackson, Michelle

    2014-08-01

    This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility and appeal of using existing hand-held mobile technology (iPod or iPad) 'apps' as tools promoting healthy food planning, shopping and eating behaviours among socioeconomically disadvantaged women. Surveys were administered before and immediately after a 4-week trial of seven currently available iPod or iPad apps, each of which addressed known barriers to healthy eating among socioeconomically disadvantaged women. A convenience sample was recruited from a local community in Melbourne, Australia, comprising 19 women with a low education (fewer than 12 years of formal education) or a low income (a household income of less than $1000 per week, and/or having a pension or benefit as the main source of income). More than half of the sample (n=11, 61%) used most apps at least weekly over the study period. Few found any of the apps complex or difficult to use, and most (n=14) reported that they would use their preferred apps again. Features liked included portability, simplicity, user-friendliness, and novelty/new knowledge provided by certain apps; less appealing features included requirements for time-consuming data entry and inability to access features offline. Selected iPod and iPad apps are useable and appealing to socioeconomically disadvantaged women. Particular features of apps, including simplicity of use and providing seasonal information, appear helpful in assisting women to plan, shop and consume healthy foods. SO WHAT? This study demonstrates a promising approach for reaching and engaging socioeconomically disadvantaged target populations in healthy eating, through the use of mobile apps. Further research establishing the effectiveness of these apps in promoting healthy food planning, shopping and eating behaviours is now warranted.

  2. Meditation experts try Virtual Reality Mindfulness: A pilot study evaluation of the feasibility and acceptability of Virtual Reality to facilitate mindfulness practice in people attending a Mindfulness conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Haro, María V.; López-del-Hoyo, Yolanda; Campos, Daniel; Linehan, Marsha M.; Hoffman, Hunter G.; García-Palacios, Azucena; Modrego-Alarcón, Marta; Borao, Luis; García-Campayo, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Regular mindfulness practice benefits people both mentally and physically, but many populations who could benefit do not practice mindfulness. Virtual Reality (VR) is a new technology that helps capture participants’ attention and gives users the illusion of “being there” in the 3D computer generated environment, facilitating sense of presence. By limiting distractions from the real world, increasing sense of presence and giving people an interesting place to go to practice mindfulness, Virtual Reality may facilitate mindfulness practice. Traditional Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT®) mindfulness skills training was specifically designed for clinical treatment of people who have trouble focusing attention, however severe patients often show difficulties or lack of motivation to practice mindfulness during the training. The present pilot study explored whether a sample of mindfulness experts would find useful and recommend a new VR Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT®) mindfulness skills training technique and whether they would show any benefit. Forty four participants attending a mindfulness conference put on an Oculus Rift DK2 Virtual Reality helmet and floated down a calm 3D computer generated virtual river while listening to digitized DBT® mindfulness skills training instructions. On subjective questionnaires completed by the participants before and after the VR DBT® mindfulness skills training session, participants reported increases/improvements in state of mindfulness, and reductions in negative emotional states. After VR, participants reported significantly less sadness, anger, and anxiety, and reported being significantly more relaxed. Participants reported a moderate to strong illusion of going inside the 3D computer generated world (i.e., moderate to high “presence” in VR) and showed high acceptance of VR as a technique to practice mindfulness. These results show encouraging preliminary evidence of the feasibility and acceptability of

  3. Feasibility of the Participation and Activity Inventory for Children and Youth (PAI-CY) and Young Adults (PAI-YA) with a visual impairment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsman, Ellen Bernadette Maria; van Nispen, Ruth Marie Antoinette; van Rens, Gerardus Hermanus Maria Bartholomeus

    2017-05-11

    Having a visual impairment affects quality of life, daily functioning and participation. To assess rehabilitation needs of visually impaired children and young adults, the Participation and Activity Inventory for Children and Youth (PAI-CY) and Young Adults (PAI-YA) were developed. The PAI-CY comprises four questionnaires for different age categories: 0-2 years, 3-6 years, 7-12 years and 13-17 years. This pilot study assesses the feasibility and acceptability of the PAI-CY and PAI-YA, and the relevance of the content of the questionnaires. In addition to the regular admission procedure, the PAI-CY and PAI-YA were completed by 30 participants (six per questionnaire). For the PAI-CY, parents completed the questionnaire online prior to admission. From age 7 years onwards, children completed the questionnaire face-to-face with a rehabilitation professional during the admission procedure. Young adults completed the PAI-YA online. Subsequently, participants and professionals administered an evaluation form. Overall, 85% of the parents rated all aspects of the PAI-CY neutral to positive, whereas 100% of all children and young adults were neutral to positive on all aspects, except for the duration to complete. The main criticism of professionals was that they were unable to identify actual rehabilitation needs using the questionnaires. Minor adjustments were recommended for the content of questions. Parents, children and young adults were mostly satisfied with the questionnaires, however, professionals suggested some changes. The adaptations made should improve satisfaction with content, clarification of questions, and satisfaction with the questionnaires in compiling a rehabilitation plan. Although face and content validity has been optimized, a larger field study is taking place to further develop and evaluate the questionnaires.

  4. Meditation experts try Virtual Reality Mindfulness: A pilot study evaluation of the feasibility and acceptability of Virtual Reality to facilitate mindfulness practice in people attending a Mindfulness conference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María V Navarro-Haro

    Full Text Available Regular mindfulness practice benefits people both mentally and physically, but many populations who could benefit do not practice mindfulness. Virtual Reality (VR is a new technology that helps capture participants' attention and gives users the illusion of "being there" in the 3D computer generated environment, facilitating sense of presence. By limiting distractions from the real world, increasing sense of presence and giving people an interesting place to go to practice mindfulness, Virtual Reality may facilitate mindfulness practice. Traditional Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT® mindfulness skills training was specifically designed for clinical treatment of people who have trouble focusing attention, however severe patients often show difficulties or lack of motivation to practice mindfulness during the training. The present pilot study explored whether a sample of mindfulness experts would find useful and recommend a new VR Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT® mindfulness skills training technique and whether they would show any benefit. Forty four participants attending a mindfulness conference put on an Oculus Rift DK2 Virtual Reality helmet and floated down a calm 3D computer generated virtual river while listening to digitized DBT® mindfulness skills training instructions. On subjective questionnaires completed by the participants before and after the VR DBT® mindfulness skills training session, participants reported increases/improvements in state of mindfulness, and reductions in negative emotional states. After VR, participants reported significantly less sadness, anger, and anxiety, and reported being significantly more relaxed. Participants reported a moderate to strong illusion of going inside the 3D computer generated world (i.e., moderate to high "presence" in VR and showed high acceptance of VR as a technique to practice mindfulness. These results show encouraging preliminary evidence of the feasibility and acceptability

  5. Meditation experts try Virtual Reality Mindfulness: A pilot study evaluation of the feasibility and acceptability of Virtual Reality to facilitate mindfulness practice in people attending a Mindfulness conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Haro, María V; López-Del-Hoyo, Yolanda; Campos, Daniel; Linehan, Marsha M; Hoffman, Hunter G; García-Palacios, Azucena; Modrego-Alarcón, Marta; Borao, Luis; García-Campayo, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Regular mindfulness practice benefits people both mentally and physically, but many populations who could benefit do not practice mindfulness. Virtual Reality (VR) is a new technology that helps capture participants' attention and gives users the illusion of "being there" in the 3D computer generated environment, facilitating sense of presence. By limiting distractions from the real world, increasing sense of presence and giving people an interesting place to go to practice mindfulness, Virtual Reality may facilitate mindfulness practice. Traditional Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT®) mindfulness skills training was specifically designed for clinical treatment of people who have trouble focusing attention, however severe patients often show difficulties or lack of motivation to practice mindfulness during the training. The present pilot study explored whether a sample of mindfulness experts would find useful and recommend a new VR Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT®) mindfulness skills training technique and whether they would show any benefit. Forty four participants attending a mindfulness conference put on an Oculus Rift DK2 Virtual Reality helmet and floated down a calm 3D computer generated virtual river while listening to digitized DBT® mindfulness skills training instructions. On subjective questionnaires completed by the participants before and after the VR DBT® mindfulness skills training session, participants reported increases/improvements in state of mindfulness, and reductions in negative emotional states. After VR, participants reported significantly less sadness, anger, and anxiety, and reported being significantly more relaxed. Participants reported a moderate to strong illusion of going inside the 3D computer generated world (i.e., moderate to high "presence" in VR) and showed high acceptance of VR as a technique to practice mindfulness. These results show encouraging preliminary evidence of the feasibility and acceptability of using VR to

  6. A Mobile Phone App to Stimulate Daily Physical Activity in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Development, Feasibility, and Pilot Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorrink, Sigrid Nw; Kort, Helianthe Sm; Troosters, Thierry; Lammers, Jan-Willem J

    2016-01-26

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) demonstrate reduced levels of daily physical activity (DPA) compared to healthy controls. This results in a higher risk of hospital admission and shorter survival. Performing regular DPA reduces these risks. To develop an eHealth intervention that will support patients with COPD to improve or maintain their DPA after pulmonary rehabilitation. The design process consisted of literature research and the iterative developing and piloting phases of the Medical Research Council (MRC) model for complex clinical interventions and the involvement of end users. Participants were healthy adults and persons with COPD. The mobile phone interface met all the set requirements. Participants found that the app was stimulating and that reaching their DPA goals was rewarding. The mean (SD) scores on a 7-point scale for usability, ease of use, ease of learning, and contentment were 3.8 (1.8), 5.1 (1.1), 6.0 (1.6), and 4.8 (1.3), respectively. The mean (SD) correlation between the mobile phone and a validated accelerometer was 0.88 (0.12) in the final test. The idea of providing their health care professional with their DPA data caused no privacy issues in the participants. Battery life lasted for an entire day with the final version, and readability and comprehensibility of text and colors were favorable. By employing a user-centered design approach, a mobile phone was found to be an adequate and feasible interface for an eHealth intervention. The mobile phone and app are easy to learn and use by patients with COPD. In the final test, the accuracy of the DPA measurement was good. The final version of the eHealth intervention is presently being tested by our group for efficacy in a randomized controlled trial in COPD patients.

  7. First Human Implantation of a Bioresorbable Polymer Scaffold for Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Clinical Pilot Study for Safety and Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Nicholas; Hlubek, Randall; Danielson, Jill; Neff, Kristin; Vaickus, Lou; Ulich, Thomas R; Ropper, Alexander E

    2016-08-01

    A porous bioresorbable polymer scaffold has previously been tested in preclinical animal models of spinal cord contusion injury to promote appositional healing, spare white matter, decrease posttraumatic cysts, and normalize intraparenchymal tissue pressure. This is the first report of its human implantation in a spinal cord injury patient during a pilot study testing the safety and feasibility of this technique (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02138110). A 25-year-old man had a T11-12 fracture dislocation sustained in a motocross accident that resulted in a T11 American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade A traumatic spinal cord injury. He was treated with acute surgical decompression and spinal fixation with fusion, and enrolled in the spinal scaffold study. A 2 × 10 mm bioresorbable scaffold was placed in the spinal cord parenchyma at T12. The scaffold was implanted directly into the traumatic cavity within the spinal cord through a dorsal root entry zone myelotomy at the caudal extent of the contused area. By 3 months, his neurological examination improved to an L1 AIS grade C incomplete injury. At 6-month postoperative follow-up, there were no procedural complications or apparent safety issues related to the scaffold implantation. Although longer-term follow-up and investigation are required, this case demonstrates that a polymer scaffold can be safely implanted into an acutely contused spinal cord. This is the first human surgical implantation, and future outcomes of other patients in this clinical trial will better elucidate the safety and possible efficacy profile of the scaffold. AIS, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment ScaleSCI, spinal cord injurytSCI, traumatic spinal cord injury.

  8. Are Virtual Rehabilitation Technologies Feasible Models to Scale an Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Program? A Pilot Study Using the Kinect Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubert, Tiffany E; Basnett, Jeanna; Chokshi, Anang; Barrett, Mark; Komatireddy, Ravi

    2015-11-05

    Falls in older adults are a significant public health issue. Interventions have been developed and proven effective to reduce falls in older adults, but these programs typically last several months and can be resource intensive. Virtual rehabilitation technologies may offer a solution to bring these programs to scale. Off-the-shelf and custom exergames have demonstrated to be a feasible adjunct to rehabilitation with older adults. However, it is not known if older adults will be able or willing to use a virtual rehabilitation technology to participate in an evidence-based fall prevention program. To have the greatest impact, virtual rehabilitation technologies need to be acceptable to older adults from different backgrounds and level of fall risk. If these technologies prove to be a feasible option, they offer a new distribution channel to disseminate fall prevention programs. Stand Tall (ST) is a virtual translation of the Otago Exercise Program (OEP), an evidence-based fall prevention program. Stand Tall was developed using the Virtual Exercise Rehabilitation Assistant (VERA) software, which uses a Kinect camera and a laptop to deliver physical therapy exercise programs. Our purpose in this pilot study was to explore if ST could be a feasible platform to deliver the OEP to older adults from a variety of fall risk levels, education backgrounds, and self-described level of computer expertise. Adults age 60 and over were recruited to participate in a one-time usability study. The study included orientation to the program, navigation to exercises, and completion of a series of strength and balance exercises. Quantitative analysis described participants and the user experience. A diverse group of individuals participated in the study. Twenty-one potential participants (14 women, 7 men) met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 69.2 (± 5.8) years, 38% had a high school education, 24% had a graduate degree, and 66% classified as "at risk for falls". Eighteen

  9. Pre-hospital and intra-hospital temporal intervals in patients requiring emergent trauma craniotomy. A 6-year observational study in a level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vloo, Philippe; Nijs, Stefaan; Verelst, Sandra; van Loon, Johannes; Depreitere, Bart

    2018-03-13

    According to level 2 evidence, earlier evacuation of acute subdural or epidural hematomas necessitating surgery is associated with better outcome. Hence, guidelines recommend performing these procedures "immediately". Literature on extent and causes of pre- and intra-hospital intervals in trauma patients requiring emergent craniotomies is almost completely lacking. Studies delineating and refining the interval before thrombolytic agent administration in ischemic stroke have dramatically reduced the "door-to-needle time". A similar exercise for "trauma-to-decompression time" might result in comparable reductions. We aim to map intervals in emergent trauma craniotomies in our Level 1 Trauma Center, screen for associated factors, and propose possible ways to reduce these intervals. We analyzed patients who were primarily referred (1R; n=45) and secondarily referred (after CT imaging in a community hospital; 2R; n=22) to our emergency department (ED), and underwent emergent trauma craniotomies between 2010 and 2016. Median pre-hospital interval (between emergency call (EC) and arrival at the ED) was 42min for 1R patients. Median intra-hospital interval (between initial ED arrival and skin incision (SI)) was 140min and 268min for 1R and 2R patients, respectively. In 1R patients, ED-SI interval was positively correlated with GCS (ρ=.49; Ppre-hospital and intra-hospital measures to improve performance. This is the first report on EC-SI interval in emergent trauma craniotomy, with a median of 174min and >297min for 1R and 2R patients, respectively, in our center. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pain-to-hospital times, cardiovascular risk factors, and early intrahospital mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brković E

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Eliana Brković,1 Katarina Novak,2,3 Livia Puljak3 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, 3Laboratory for Pain Research, University of Split School of Medicine, Split, Croatia Background: The aim of the study was to analyze the most recent trends in myocardial infarction (MI care, the number of patients treated for MI and their outcomes, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and pain-to-hospital times in MI patients. Subjects and methods: For 778 patients treated for acute MI at the Coronary Care Unit (CCU of University Hospital Split, Croatia the following data were acquired: outcome during hospitalization (survived, deceased, cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, previous MI, smoking, and pain-to-CCU time. Results: Among 778 patients treated for acute MI, there were 291 (37% women and 487 (63% men. Forty-five patients (6% died during hospitalization, mostly due to cardiogenic shock. An association was found between early intrahospital mortality and the following risk factors: age >70 years, female sex, previous MI, and smoking. Median pain-to-call time was 2 hours, and median time from the onset of pain to arrival into the CCU was 4 hours. There were 59 (7.6% patients admitted to the CCU within recommended 90 minutes. Diabetic comorbidity was not associated with early death or with longer time from pain to emergency calls. Conclusion: Some of the risk factors associated with adverse outcomes in MI are modifiable. Prehospital delay of 4 hours observed in patients who suffered an MI is too long, and more effort should be devoted to investments in health care and education of the general public regarding chest pain symptoms. Keywords: prehospital delay, ischemic heart disease

  11. Assessment of feasibility and efficacy of Class IV laser therapy for postoperative pain relief in off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Karlekar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laser therapy, for its established analgesic properties with minimal side effects, has been used for the treatment of chronic pain. However, it has not been used for the treatment of acute postoperative pain. This pilot study was designed to assess the feasibility and efficacy of Class IV laser on postoperative pain relief following off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCABG surgery, as a component of multimodal analgesia (MMA technique. Methods: This open observational prospective study comprised of 100 adult patients (84 male, 16 female who underwent OPCABG through sternotomy. For postoperative analgesia, they were subjected to laser therapy subjected to laser therapy in addition to the standard institutional pain management protocol comprising of IV infusion/bolus of tramadol and paracetamol and fentanyl bolus as rescue analgesic. Pain intensity was measured by Verbal Rating Scale (VRS. The laser therapy was scheduled as once a day regime for three consecutive postoperative days (PODs starting on POD 1, 30 min following tracheal extubation. The subsequent laser applications were also scheduled at the same time of the day as on day 1 if VRS was ≥5. 10 W Class IV laser was applied over 150 cm 2 sternal wound area for 150 s. VRS was used to assess pain severity and was recorded for statistical analysis using Friedman Test. Results: The mean (standard deviation [SD] VRS of all the 100 patients just before application of the first dose of laser was 7.31 (0.94 while on MMT; the same fell to 4.0 (1.279 and 3.40 (2.697 at 1 h and 24 h respectively following first dose of laser. The change of VRS over first 24 h among all the 100 patients was statistically significant (P = 0.000. Laser was re-applied in 40 patients whose VRS was ≥5 (mean [SD] - 6.38 [0.868] at 24 th h. After receiving the 2 nd dose of laser the VRS scores fell significantly (P = 0.000 and became 0 at 54 th h. No patients required 3 rd dose of the laser. No patient

  12. Development and pilot feasibility study of a health information technology tool to calculate mortality risk for patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis: the Carotid Risk Assessment Tool (CARAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faerber, Adrienne E; Horvath, Rebecca; Stillman, Carey; O'Connell, Melissa L; Hamilton, Amy L; Newhall, Karina A; Likosky, Donald S; Goodney, Philip P

    2015-03-24

    Patients with no history of stroke but with stenosis of the carotid arteries can reduce the risk of future stroke with surgery or stenting. At present, a physicians' ability to recommend optimal treatments based on an individual's risk profile requires estimating the likelihood that a patient will have a poor peri-operative outcomes and the likelihood that the patient will survive long enough to gain benefit from the procedure. We describe the development of the CArotid Risk Assessment Tool (CARAT) into a 2-year mortality risk calculator within the electronic medical record, integrating the tool into the clinical workflow, training the clinical team to use the tool, and assessing the feasibility and acceptability of the tool in one clinic setting. We modified an existing clinical flowsheet with the local electronic medical record for the CARAT risk model. To understand how CARAT would fit into the existing clinical workflow, we observed the clinic and talked with the clinical staff to develop a process map for the existing clinical workflow. CARAT was completed by the clinic nurse for patients identified on the clinic schedule as having carotid narrowing. We analyzed post-implementation assessment in two ways: quantifying the proportion of eligible patients with whom CARAT was utilized, and surveying surgeons to understand the impact of CARAT on decision-making and clinical workflow. With minimum investment of institutional resources, we were able to produce a workable tool and pilot the tool in our clinic within a 6 month time period. Over 4 months, 287 patients were seen in the clinic with carotid narrowing, and clinic staff completed CARAT for 195 (68%). Per-surgeon completion rates ranged from 29 to 81%. Most patients (191 of 195, 98%) patients had a low 2-year calculated mortality risk. Most surgeons believed the risk assessment aligned with their expectations of patient predicted risk. We successfully integrated CARAT into the existing electronic medical

  13. The feasibility of introducing an adult safeguarding measure for inclusion in the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF): findings from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrie, Caroline; Manthorpe, Jill; Cartwright, Cher; Rayat, Pritpal

    2016-06-30

    There are currently no national measures in England reporting the experiences of people who have been involved with adult safeguarding services following concerns that they may be at risk of abuse or neglect. The Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) aimed to develop a new adult safeguarding outcome measure (survey) for local authorities (LAs) that could be added to the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF). The ASCOF is a national collection of social care outcomes performance indicators collected from the perspective of people receiving partial or total funding from a LA for care services. An outcome measure (a face-to-face interview based survey consisting of 7 questions) was piloted in 40 LAs with 382 adults at risk (or their representative) who had been the subject of a safeguarding investigation. The aim was to investigate the feasibility of the survey in three domains: i) if a statistically representative sample of adults at risk (or their family, friend, carer or advocate) could be recruited; ii) analysis of survey responses and its acceptability to participants iii) feedback from LAs about the survey's administration. Overall the survey results met statistical confidence; however the individual results for adults at risk did not, due to the high proportion of representatives who responded because adults at risk were unable. Responses to the survey were generally positive; 72 % of participants felt that the help received during the safeguarding investigation had made them or the adult at risk (if reporting as a proxy) feel 'quite a bit' or 'a lot safer'. These results are the most robust data collected in England on the perspectives of adults at risk and their representatives on safeguarding services. Participants reported they appreciated being asked for feedback. LAs suggested survey administration improvements. This survey is one way LAs can meet their new legal requirement under the Care Act 2014 to 'seek feedback' from adults at

  14. Feasibility of Ecological Momentary Assessment of Daily Sexting and Substance Use Among Young Adult African American Gay and Bisexual Men: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, Sabrina L; Elmasry, Hoda; Webb Hooper, Monica; Niaura, Raymond S; Hamilton, Alison B; Milburn, Norweeta G

    2017-02-02

    Recent evidence suggests that sexualized text communication ("sexting") is associated with substance use and sexual risk behaviors among young adults, yet little is known about this relationship among young adult African American gay and bisexual men, a population disproportionately impacted by HIV in the United States. Rapid advances in mobile phone technology indicate a clear need for research using mobile health (mHealth) methods such as ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to serve as a viable counterpart to retrospective evaluation methods by using real-time data collection to assess sexting and substance use among this population. The objective of this pilot study was to (1) describe the EMA study design and protocol, (2) characterize the study population, and (3) assess the feasibility of a random prompt text message-based thrice-daily EMA over 14 days, as a means of prospectively studying sexting, marijuana, and alcohol use among a sample of young adult African American gay and bisexual men ages 21 to 25. Participants were recruited through flyers and snowball sampling during spring and summer 2015 at a community-based HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and support organization in Washington, DC. Eligible participants were enrolled in a one-time in-person study visit that consisted of informed written consent to participate in the study, a self-administered survey, a semi-structured interview, and enrollment and training in EMA data collection. Commencing the day after the study visit, a random prompt survey was texted to participants on their personal mobile phones 3 times a day over a 14-day data collection period assessing mood, texts sent, texts received, sexts sent, sexts received, marijuana want, marijuana use, and alcohol use. EMA feasibility was tested with 25 self-identified African American gay (n=16) and bisexual (n=9) men (mean age of 23.48 years, SD 1.5). Each random prompt survey had 8 questions with responses including yes/no and Likert scale

  15. Testing feasibility and reliability of a set of quality indicators to evaluate the organization of palliative care across Europe: a pilot study in 25 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woitha, K.; Hasselaar, J.G.; Beek, K.; Ahmed, N.; Jaspers, B.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Radbruch, L.; Vissers, K.; Engels, Y.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A well-organized palliative care service is a prerequisite for offering good palliative care. Reliable and feasible quality indicators are needed to monitor the quality of their organization. AIM: To test feasibility and reliability of a previously developed set of quality indicators in

  16. Feasibility and efficacy of high-speed gait training with a voluntary driven exoskeleton robot for gait and balance dysfunction in patients with chronic stroke: nonrandomized pilot study with concurrent control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Takahiko; Shimizu, Issei; Hiroi, Yasuhiro; Kawaki, Masahiro; Sato, Daichi; Nagasawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of high-speed gait training with an exoskeleton robot hybrid assistive limb (HAL) in patients with chronic stroke, and to examine the efficacy of eight sessions (8 weeks) of gait training with a HAL compared with conventional physical therapy. Eighteen patients with chronic stroke were included in this study (nine each in the HAL and control groups). The HAL group underwent high-speed gait training with the HAL once a week for 8 weeks (20 min/session). The control group underwent conventional physical therapy for gait disturbance. Outcome measures were walking speed, number of steps, and cadence during a 10 m walking test, a timed up and go test, a functional reach test, and the Berg Balance Scale. Assessments were performed in the absence of the HAL before training and after the fourth and eighth training sessions. All patients in the HAL group completed the high-speed gait training without adverse events. The HAL group improved significantly in walking speed (55.9% increase, Ptraining (Ptraining with a HAL appears to be feasible and effective in improving gait and balance dysfunction despite the limitations of this nonrandomized pilot study.

  17. A Pilot Study Assessing the Feasibility of a Facial Emotion Training Paradigm for School-Age Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo-Ponsaran, Nicole M.; Evans-Smith, Bernadette; Johnson, Jason K.; McKown, Clark

    2014-01-01

    Many children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) demonstrate facial emotion recognition and expression impairments. These impairments may contribute to social disability and may put children with ASDs at risk for developing further mental health problems. In this pilot study, we examined the use of a coach- and computer-assisted facial emotion…

  18. A new pan-European Train-the-Trainer programme for bioinformatics: pilot results on feasibility, utility and sustainability of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Allegra; Attwood, Teresa K; Fernandes, Pedro L; Morgan, Sarah L; Schneider, Maria Victoria; Palagi, Patricia M; Rustici, Gabriella; Tractenberg, Rochelle E

    2017-09-26

    Demand for training life scientists in bioinformatics methods, tools and resources and computational approaches is urgent and growing. To meet this demand, new trainers must be prepared with effective teaching practices for delivering short hands-on training sessions-a specific type of education that is not typically part of professional preparation of life scientists in many countries. A new Train-the-Trainer (TtT) programme was created by adapting existing models, using input from experienced trainers and experts in bioinformatics, and from educational and cognitive sciences. This programme was piloted across Europe from May 2016 to January 2017. Preparation included drafting the training materials, organizing sessions to pilot them and studying this paradigm for its potential to support the development and delivery of future bioinformatics training by participants. Seven pilot TtT sessions were carried out, and this manuscript describes the results of the pilot year. Lessons learned include (i) support is required for logistics, so that new instructors can focus on their teaching; (ii) institutions must provide incentives to include training opportunities for those who want/need to become new or better instructors; (iii) formal evaluation of the TtT materials is now a priority; (iv) a strategy is needed to recruit, train and certify new instructor trainers (faculty); and (v) future evaluations must assess utility. Additionally, defining a flexible but rigorous and reliable process of TtT 'certification' may incentivize participants and will be considered in future. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Feasibility of a randomised trial of a continuing medical education program in shared decision-making on the use of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections in primary care: the DECISION+ pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurier Claudine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The misuse and limited effectiveness of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections (ARIs are well documented, and current approaches targeting physicians or patients to improve appropriate use have had limited effect. Shared decision-making could be a promising strategy to improve appropriate antibiotic use for ARIs, but very little is known about its implementation processes and outcomes in clinical settings. In this matter, pilot studies have played a key role in health science research over the past years in providing information for the planning, justification, and/or refinement of larger studies. The objective of our study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the study design, procedures, and intervention of the DECISION+ program, a continuing medical education program in shared decision-making among family physicians and their patients on the optimal use of antibiotics for treating ARIs in primary care. Methods A pilot clustered randomised trial was conducted. Family medicine groups (FMGs were randomly assigned, to either the DECISION+ program, which included three 3-hour workshops over a four- to six-month period, or a control group that had a delayed exposure to the program. Results Among 21 FMGs contacted, 5 (24% agreed to participate in the pilot study. A total of 39 family physicians (18 in the two experimental and 21 in the three control FMGs and their 544 patients consulting for an ARI were recruited. The proportion of recruited family physicians who participated in all three workshops was 46% (50% for the experimental group and 43% for the control group, and the overall mean level of satisfaction regarding the workshops was 94%. Conclusions This trial, while aiming to demonstrate the feasibility and acceptability of conducting a larger study, has identified important opportunities for improving the design of a definitive trial. This pilot trial is informative for researchers and clinicians

  20. Feasibility and impact of a school-based intervention for families of urban adolescents with asthma: results from a randomized pilot trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruzzese, Jean-Marie; Unikel, Lynne; Gallagher, Richard; Evans, David; Colland, Vivian

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility and short-term outcomes of Asthma: It's a Family Affair!, a school-based intervention for adolescents with asthma and their caregivers. Twenty-four ethnic minority families with a middle school student with asthma were randomized to immediate

  1. Feasibility of whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI for detection of primary tumour, nodal and distant metastases in women with cancer during pregnancy: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Sileny N.; Amant, Frédéric; Michielsen, Katrijn; de Keyzer, Frederik; Fieuws, Steffen; van Calsteren, Kristel; Dresen, Raphaëla C.; Gziri, Mina Mhallem; Vandecaveye, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI (WB-DWI/MRI) for detecting primary tumour, nodal and distant metastases in pregnant women with cancer. Twenty pregnant patients underwent WB-DWI/MRI in additional to conventional imaging. Reproducibility of WB-DWI/MRI between two

  2. Feasibility of a combined aerobic and strength training program and its effects on cognitive and physical function in institutionalized dementia patients. A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossers, Willem J R; Scherder, Erik J A; Boersma, Froukje; Hortobágyi, Tibor; van der Woude, Lucas H V; van Heuvelen, Marieke J G

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We examined the feasibility of a combined aerobic and strength training program in institutionalized dementia patients and studied the effects on cognitive and physical function. Methods: Thirty-three patients with dementia, recruited from one nursing home, participated in this

  3. Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of the Fit4Fun Intervention for Improving Physical Fitness in a Sample of Primary School Children: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eather, Narelle; Morgan, Philip J.; Lubans, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a school-based physical fitness intervention (Fit4Fun) on the physical fitness and physical activity (PA) levels of primary school children. Methods: A group-randomized controlled trial with a 3-month wait-list control group was conducted in…

  4. Feasibility, acceptability and preliminary psychological benefits of mindfulness meditation training in a sample of men diagnosed with prostate cancer on active surveillance: results from a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorson, David; Hankin, Vered; Burns, James; Weiland, Rebecca; Maletich, Carly; Sufrin, Nathaniel; Schuette, Stephanie; Gutierrez, Bruriah; Brendler, Charles

    2017-08-01

    In a pilot randomized controlled trial, examine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an 8-week, mindfulness training program (Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction) in a sample of men on active surveillance on important psychological outcomes including prostate cancer anxiety, uncertainty intolerance and posttraumatic growth. Men were randomized to either mindfulness (n = 24) or an attention control arm (n = 19) and completed self-reported measures of prostate cancer anxiety, uncertainty intolerance, global quality of life, mindfulness and posttraumatic growth at baseline, 8 weeks, 6 months and 12 months. Participants in the mindfulness arm demonstrated significant decreases in prostate cancer anxiety and uncertainty intolerance, and significant increases in mindfulness, global mental health and posttraumatic growth. Participants in the control condition also demonstrated significant increases in mindfulness over time. Longitudinal increases in posttraumatic growth were significantly larger in the mindfulness arm than they were in the control arm. While mindfulness training was found to be generally feasible and acceptable among participants who enrolled in the 8-week intervention as determined by completion rates and open-ended survey responses, the response rate between initial enrollment and the total number of men approached was lower than desired (47%). While larger sample sizes are necessary to examine the efficacy of mindfulness training on important psychological outcomes, in this pilot study posttraumatic growth was shown to significantly increase over time for men in the treatment group. Mindfulness training has the potential to help men cope more effectively with some of the stressors and uncertainties associated with active surveillance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. A heel-strike real-time auditory feedback device to promote motor learning in children who have cerebral palsy: a pilot study to test device accuracy and feasibility to use a music and dance-based learning paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitale, Jaswandi Tushar; Bolte, John H

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a developmental disorder of movement and posture that occurs due to damage to the developing nervous system. As part of therapy, wearable sensors that trigger interactive feedback may provide multi-sensory guidance and motivation. A prototype of a heel-strike real-time feedback system has been developed which records the number of heel strikes during gait and indicates successful heel contact through real-time auditory feedback. The first aim of this feasibility study was to test the prototype accuracy.Since the end user for this device is a child, the device should be esthetically appealing and sufficiently motivating for children to perform repetitive challenging therapeutic movements. The second aim of this study was to collect feedback from the subjects with regard to the device usability and understand if the bell sound used as feedback used was motivating enough for children to continue using the prototype. This would help us in developing the next generation of the device. The prototype was tested with typically developing children and children who have CP. The accuracy in detecting heel strikes was calculated. As part of the study, the subjects were also asked questions to test the device compliance and acceptability of the musical beats with the pediatric population. The device accuracy in identifying heel strikes is 97.44% (95% CI 96.31, 98.88%). The subjects did not show any hesitation to put on the device and the sound feedback motivated them to move. Based on this pilot study, a minimum age limit of 5 years is appropriate and the intervention study should be conducted for no more than 30 min per week. The pilot study showed that a main study can be conducted to test auditory feedback as an intervention to promote motor learning in children who have cerebral palsy. No adverse event or safety issues were reported in the feasibility study.

  6. Feasibility and benefits of group-based exercise in residential aged care adults: a pilot study for the GrACE programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Fien

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to examine the feasibility and benefits of a group resistance training exercise programme for improving muscle function in institutionalised older adults. A feasibility and acceptability study was designed for a residential aged care (RAC facility, based on the Gold Coast, Australia. Thirty-seven adults, mean age 86.8 ± 6.1 years (30 females living in a RAC facility. Participants were allocated into an exercise (n = 20 or control (n = 17 group. The exercise group, the Group Aged Care Exercise (GrACE programme, performed 12 weeks of twice weekly resistance exercises. Feasibility was measured via recruitment rate, measurement (physiological and surveys completion rate, loss-to-follow-up, exercise session adherence, adverse events, and ratings of burden and acceptability. Muscle function was assessed using gait speed, sit-to-stand and handgrip strength assessments. All intervention participants completed pre- and post-assessments, and the exercise intervention, with 85% (n = 17 of the group attending ≥ 18 of the 24 sessions and 15% (n = 3 attending all sessions. Acceptability was 100% with exercise participants, and staff who had been involved with the programme strongly agreed that the participants “Benefited from the programme.” There were no adverse events reported by any participants during the exercise sessions. When compared to the control group, the exercise group experienced significant improvements in gait speed (F(4.078 = 8.265, p = 0.007, sit to stand performance (F(3.24 = 11.033, p = 0.002 and handgrip strength (F(3.697 = 26.359, p < 0.001. Resistance training via the GrACE programme is feasible, safe and significantly improves gait speed, sit-to-stand performance and handgrip strength in RAC adults.

  7. Feasibility and preliminary effects of resistance training and nutritional supplements during versus after radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer: A pilot randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmael, Jon Arne; Bye, Asta; Solheim, Tora Skeidsvoll; Stene, Guro Birgitte; Thorsen, Lene; Kaasa, Stein; Lund, Jo-Åsmund; Oldervoll, Line Merethe

    2017-11-15

    Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) experience involuntary weight loss that has a negative impact on physical function, morbidity, and survival. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the feasibility of an exercise and nutrition intervention during radiotherapy (RT) compared with after RT, and to examine preliminary effects on skeletal muscle mass. Patients with HNC were randomized to an exercise and nutrition intervention during RT (EN-DUR) or after RT (EN-AF). The EN-DUR intervention was conducted at a hospital and the EN-AF intervention took place at a rehabilitation center. The interventions consisted of progressive resistance training (PRT) and oral nutritional supplements (ONS). Feasibility outcomes were tracked weekly and muscle mass was measured by computed tomography scans before and after RT and at 2 months follow-up. Of the 50 eligible patients, 41 (82%) agreed to participate. 90% of patients completed the EN-DUR intervention and the adherence to PRT and ONS was 81% and 57%, respectively. 52% of patients attended the EN-AF intervention and adherence to PRT and ONS was 94% and 76%, respectively. The EN-DUR demonstrated a trend toward mitigating loss of muscle mass during RT and the EN-AF demonstrated a similar trend after RT. No difference in muscle mass was detected between the groups from baseline to week 14. An exercise and nutrition intervention is feasible for patients with HNC during RT, and the intervention is potentially effective in mitigating loss of muscle mass both during and after RT. Future trials should assess the feasibility and effects of extended interventions during and after treatment. Cancer 2017;123:4440-8. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  8. Brief Report: Just-in-Time Visual Supports to Children with Autism via the Apple Watch:® A Pilot Feasibility Study

    OpenAIRE

    O’Brien, Amanda; Abramson, Jennifer; Yu, Christina; Dimery, Katherine; Schlosser, Ralf W.; Shane, Howard C.; Allen, Anna A.; Flynn, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Using augmented input might be an effective means for supplementing spoken language for children with autism who have difficulties following spoken directives. This study aimed to (a) explore whether JIT-delivered scene cues (photos, video clips) via the Apple Watch® enable children with autism to carry out directives they were unable to implement with speech alone, and (b) test the feasibility of the Apple Watch® (with a focus on display size). Results indicated that the hierarchical JIT sup...

  9. The safety and feasibility of an intervention to improve balance dysfunction in ambulant adults with cerebral palsy: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Prue; Murphy, Anna; Opheim, Arve; Pogrebnoy, Dina; Kravtsov, Stella; McGinley, Jennifer

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the safety, feasibility and potential efficacy of balance training in adults with cerebral palsy. Phase 2, assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial. Outpatient rehabilitation facility. A total of 17 ambulatory adults with cerebral palsy. Participants were randomly allocated to an eight-week, once-weekly, small group programme of balance training, or seated attention control activity. Balance training was individually tailored using the Balance Evaluation Systems test. Primary focus was feasibility, addressed by recruitment, retention, adherence, and safety. Efficacy was primarily evaluated with the Ambulatory Self-Confidence Questionnaire and the Balance Evaluation Systems test, at intervention conclusion and Week 24. Secondary outcomes included gait speed, walking distance, falls efficacy, fatigue, quality of life, and global impression of change. Interventions were safe and feasible with no major adverse events. Adherence was high. At eight and 24 weeks, there were negligible between-group differences in Balance Evaluation systems test total. At 24 weeks, there was a small, non-significant between-group difference in favour of the balance group with effect sizes of 0.14 for ambulatory self-confidence, 0.10 for falls efficacy, and 0.12 for fatigue. There were significant between-group differences for self-reported walking confidence and balance change, in favour of the balance group at Weeks 8 and 24 (p cerebral palsy. Small effects from balance training in selected outcomes occurred. Study replication with at least 38 participants per group to confirm efficacy is warranted. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. “Is Your Man Stepping Out?” An online pilot study to evaluate acceptability of a guide-enhanced HIV prevention soap opera video series and feasibility of recruitment by Facebook© advertising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel; Lacroix, Lorraine J.; Nolte, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Love, Sex, and Choices (LSC) is a 12-episode soap opera video series developed to reduce HIV risk among at-risk Black urban women. We added a video guide commentator to offer insights at critical dramatic moments. An online pilot study evaluated acceptability of the Guide Enhanced LSC (GELSC) and feasibility of Facebook© advertising, streaming to smartphones, and retention. Facebook© ads targeted high HIV-prevalence areas. In 30 days, Facebook© ads generated 230 screening interviews; 84 were high risk, 40 watched GELSC, and 39 followed up at 30 days. Recruitment of high-risk participants was 10 per week compared to 7 per week in previous field recruitment. Half the sample was Black; 12% were Latina. Findings suggest GELSC influenced sex scripts and behaviors. It was feasible to recruit young urban women from a large geographic area via Facebook© and to retain the sample. We extended the reach to at-risk women by streaming to mobile devices. PMID:26066692

  11. "Is Your Man Stepping Out?" An Online Pilot Study to Evaluate Acceptability of a Guide-Enhanced HIV Prevention Soap Opera Video Series and Feasibility of Recruitment by Facebook Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel; Lacroix, Lorraine J; Nolte, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Love, Sex, and Choices (LSC) is a 12-episode soap opera video series developed to reduce HIV risk among at-risk Black urban women. We added a video guide commentator to offer insights at critical dramatic moments. An online pilot study evaluated acceptability of the Guide-Enhanced LSC (GELSC) and feasibility of Facebook advertising, streaming to smartphones, and retention. Facebook ads targeted high-HIV-prevalence areas. In 30 days, Facebook ads generated 230 screening interviews: 84 were high risk, 40 watched GELSC, and 39 followed up at 30 days. Recruitment of high-risk participants was 10 per week, compared to seven per week in previous field recruitment. Half the sample was Black; 12% were Latina. Findings suggest GELSC influenced sex scripts and behaviors. It was feasible to recruit young urban women from a large geographic area via Facebook and to retain the sample. We extended the reach to at-risk women by streaming to mobile devices. Copyright © 2015 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ion Prostate Irradiation (IPI) - a pilot study to establish the safety and feasibility of primary hypofractionated irradiation of the prostate with protons and carbon ions in a raster scan technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habl, Gregor; Hatiboglu, Gencay; Edler, Lutz; Uhl, Matthias; Krause, Sonja; Roethke, Matthias; Schlemmer, Heinz P; Hadaschik, Boris; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus

    2014-03-19

    Due to physical characteristics, ions like protons or carbon ions can administer the dose to the target volume more efficiently than photons since the dose can be lowered at the surrounding normal tissue. Radiation biological considerations are based on the assumption that the α/β value for prostate cancer cells is 1.5 Gy, so that a biologically more effective dose could be administered due to hypofractionation without increasing risks of late effects of bladder (α/β = 4.0) and rectum (α/β = 3.9). The IPI study is a prospective randomized phase II study exploring the safety and feasibility of primary hypofractionated irradiation of the prostate with protons and carbon ions in a raster scan technique. The study is designed to enroll 92 patients with localized prostate cancer. Primary aim is the assessment of the safety and feasibility of the study treatment on the basis of incidence grade III and IV NCI-CTC-AE (v. 4.02) toxicity and/or the dropout of the patient from the planned therapy due to any reason. Secondary endpoints are PSA-progression free survival (PSA-PFS), overall survival (OS) and quality-of-life (QoL). This pilot study aims at the evaluation of the safety and feasibility of hypofractionated irradiation of the prostate with protons and carbon ions in prostate cancer patients in an active beam technique. Additionally, the safety results will be compared with Japanese results recently published for carbon ion irradiation. Due to the missing data of protons in this hypofractionated scheme, an in depth evaluation of the toxicity will be created to gain basic data for a following comparison study with carbon ion irradiation. Clinical Trial Identifier: NCT01641185 (clinicaltrials.gov).

  13. Pilot feasibility study of binaural auditory beats for reducing symptoms of inattention in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennel, Susan; Taylor, Ann Gill; Lyon, Debra; Bourguignon, Cheryl

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the potential for the use of binaural auditory beat stimulation to reduce the symptom of inattention in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. This pilot study had a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design. Twenty participants were randomly assigned to listen to either an audio program on compact disk that contained binaural auditory beats or a sham audio program that did not have binaural beats for 20 minutes, three times a week for 3 weeks. The Children's Color Trails Test, the Color Trails Test, the Test of Variables of Attention (TOVA), and the Homework Problem Checklist were used to measure changes in inattention pre- and postintervention. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to analyze pre- and postintervention scores on the Color Trails Tests, Homework Problem Checklist, and the TOVA. The effect of time was significant on the Color Trails Test. However, there were no significant group differences on the Color Trails Test or the TOVA scores postintervention. Parents reported that the study participants had fewer homework problems postintervention. The results from this study indicate that binaural auditory beat stimulation did not significantly reduce the symptom of inattention in the experimental group. However, parents and adolescents stated that homework problems due to inattention improved during the 3-week study. Parents and participants stated that the modality was easy to use and helpful. Therefore, this modality should be studied over a longer time frame in a larger sample to further its effectiveness to reduce the symptom of inattention in those diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Feasibility and safety of augmented-reality glass for computed tomography-assisted percutaneous revascularization of coronary chronic total occlusion: A single center prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opolski, Maksymilian P; Debski, Artur; Borucki, Bartosz A; Staruch, Adam D; Kepka, Cezary; Rokicki, Jakub K; Sieradzki, Bartosz; Witkowski, Adam

    2017-11-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of chronic total occlusion (CTO) may be facilitated by projection of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) datasets in the catheterization laboratory. There is no data on the feasibility and safety outcomes of CTA-assisted CTO PCI using a wearable augmented-reality glass. A total of 15 patients scheduled for elective antegrade CTO intervention were prospectively enrolled and underwent preprocedural coronary CTA. Three-dimensional and curved multiplanar CT reconstructions were transmitted to a head-mounted hands-free computer worn by interventional cardiologists during CTO PCI to provide additional information on CTO tortuosity and calcification. The results of CTO PCI using a wearable computer were compared with a time-matched prospective angiographic registry of 59 patients undergoing antegrade CTO PCI without a wearable computer. Operators' satisfaction was assessed by a 5-point Likert scale. Mean age was 64 ± 8 years and the mean J-CTO score was 2.1 ± 0.9 in the CTA-assisted group. The voice-activated co-registration and review of CTA images in a wearable computer during CTO PCI were feasible and highly rated by PCI operators (4.7/5 points). There were no major adverse cardiovascular events. Compared with standard CTO PCI, CTA-assisted recanalization of CTO using a wearable computer showed more frequent selection of the first-choice stiff wire (0% vs 40%, p augmented-reality glass is feasible and safe, and might reduce the resources required for the interventional treatment of CTO. Copyright © 2017 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ReCAP: Feasibility and Effectiveness of a Pilot Program to Facilitate Quality Improvement Learning in Oncology: Experience of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Quality Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Arif H; Quinn, Doris; Gilligan, Timothy D; Davis, Barbara Corning; Dalby, Carole K; Bretsch, Jennifer; McNiff, Kristen K; Jacobson, Joseph O; Kamal, Arif H; Quinn, Doris; Gilligan, Timothy D; Corning Davis, Barbara; Dalby, Carole K; Bretsch, Jennifer; McNiff, Kristen K; Jacobson, Joseph O

    2016-02-01

    Studies have demonstrated that structured training programs can improve health professionals' skills in performing clinical care or research. We sought to develop and test a novel quality training program (QTP) tailored to oncology clinicians. The American Society of Clinical Oncology QTP consisted of three in-person learning sessions and four phases: prework, planning, implementation, and sustain and spread. We measured two primary outcomes: program feasibility and effectiveness. Feasibility was evaluated by recording participation. Effectiveness was measured using the Kirkpatrick model, which evaluates four outcomes: reaction, learning, behavior, and results. We collected qualitative feedback through a focus group of participants and mixed quantitative–qualitative results from a 6-month follow-up evaluation survey. Results are presented using descriptive statistics. We received feedback from of 80% of participants who took part in 92% of in-person program days. QTP deliverables were completed by 100% of teams; none withdrew from the program. Regarding reaction, 100% of respondents expressed interest in actively contributing to future QTP courses. For learning, most teams continued to use the core methodology tools (eg, project charter, aims statements) after the program. Regarding behavior, when asked about intention to serve as a local quality improvement leader, a majority said they “definitely will” serve as: team leader on a specific project (75%), project champion or sponsor (75%), or teacher or trainer for others (64%). In evaluating outcomes, 50% reported applying learned methodology to new projects at their local institution. We demonstrate one of the first feasible and effective training programs to facilitate quality improvement learning for oncology clinicians. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. Feasibility, safety and preliminary evidence of the effectiveness of a home-based exercise programme for older people with Alzheimer's disease: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttanon, Plaiwan; Hill, Keith D; Said, Catherine M; Williams, Susan B; Byrne, Karin N; LoGiudice, Dina; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Dodd, Karen J

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and safety of a home-based exercise programme for people with Alzheimer's disease, and to provide preliminary evidence of programme effectiveness in improving balance and mobility and reducing falls risk. A randomized controlled trial. Community. Forty people with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (mean age 81.9, SD 5.72; 62.5% female). Participants were randomized to a six-month home-based individually tailored balance, strengthening and walking exercise programme (physiotherapist) or a six-month home-based education programme (control) (occupational therapist). Both programmes provided six home-visits and five follow-up phone calls. Balance, mobility, falls and falls risk were measured at baseline and programme completion. Intention-to-treat analysis using a generalized linear model with group allocation as a predictor variable was performed to evaluate programme effectiveness. Feasibility and adverse events were systematically recorded at each contact. Fifty-eight per cent of the exercise group finished the programme, completing an average of 83% of prescribed sessions, with no adverse events reported. Functional Reach improved significantly (P = 0.002) in the exercise group (mean (SD), 2.28 (4.36)) compared to the control group (-2.99 (4.87)). Significant improvement was also observed for the Falls Risk for Older People - Community score (P = 0.008) and trends for improvement on several other balance, mobility, falls and falls risk measures for the exercise group compared to the control group. The exercise programme was feasible and safe and may help improve balance and mobility performance and reduce falls risk in people with Alzheimer's disease.

  17. A pilot study to assess feasibility of value based pricing in Cyprus through pharmacoeconomic modelling and assessment of its operational framework: sorafenib for second line renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Panagiotis; Talias, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The continuing increase of pharmaceutical expenditure calls for new approaches to pricing and reimbursement of pharmaceuticals. Value based pricing of pharmaceuticals is emerging as a useful tool and possess theoretical attributes to help health system cope with rising pharmaceutical expenditure. To assess the feasibility of introducing a value-based pricing scheme of pharmaceuticals in Cyprus and explore the integrative framework. A probabilistic Markov chain Monte Carlo model was created to simulate progression of advanced renal cell cancer for comparison of sorafenib to standard best supportive care. Literature review was performed and efficacy data were transferred from a published landmark trial, while official pricelists and clinical guidelines from Cyprus Ministry of Health were utilised for cost calculation. Based on proposed willingness to pay threshold the maximum price of sorafenib for the indication of second line renal cell cancer was assessed. Sorafenib value based price was found to be significantly lower compared to its current reference price. Feasibility of Value Based Pricing is documented and pharmacoeconomic modelling can lead to robust results. Integration of value and affordability in the price are its main advantages which have to be weighed against lack of documentation for several theoretical parameters that influence outcome. Smaller countries such as Cyprus may experience adversities in establishing and sustaining essential structures for this scheme.

  18. Feasibility and patient acceptability of a novel artificial intelligence-based screening model for diabetic retinopathy at endocrinology outpatient services: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, Stuart; Lee, Pei Ying; Scheetz, Jane; Li, Zhixi; Kotowicz, Mark A; MacIsaac, Richard J; He, Mingguang

    2018-03-12

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and patient acceptability of a novel artificial intelligence (AI)-based diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening model within endocrinology outpatient settings. Adults with diabetes were recruited from two urban endocrinology outpatient clinics and single-field, non-mydriatic fundus photographs were taken and graded for referable DR ( ≥ pre-proliferative DR). Each participant underwent; (1) automated screening model; where a deep learning algorithm (DLA) provided real-time reporting of results; and (2) manual model where retinal images were transferred to a retinal grading centre and manual grading outcomes were distributed to the patient within 2 weeks of assessment. Participants completed a questionnaire on the day of examination and 1-month following assessment to determine overall satisfaction and the preferred model of care. In total, 96 participants were screened for DR and the mean assessment time for automated screening was 6.9 minutes. Ninety-six percent of participants reported that they were either satisfied or very satisfied with the automated screening model and 78% reported that they preferred the automated model over manual. The sensitivity and specificity of the DLA for correct referral was 92.3% and 93.7%, respectively. AI-based DR screening in endocrinology outpatient settings appears to be feasible and well accepted by patients.

  19. Pilot trial of a tele-rehab intervention to improve outcomes after stroke in Ghana: A feasibility and user satisfaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfo, Fred S; Adusei, Nathaniel; Ampofo, Michael; Kpeme, Frank K; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2018-04-15

    Tele-rehabilitation after stroke holds promise for under-resourced settings, especially sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), with its immense stroke burden and severely limited physical therapy services. To preliminarily assess the feasibility and outcomes of mobile technology-assisted physical therapy exercises for stroke survivors in Ghana. We conducted a prospective, single arm, pre-post study involving 20 stroke survivors recruited from a tertiary medical center, who received a Smartphone with the 9zest Stroke App® to deliver individualized, goal-targeted 5-days-a-week exercise program that was remotely supervised by a tele-therapist for 12 weeks. Outcome measures included changes in stroke levity scale scores (SLS), Modified Rankin score (MRS), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MOCA), and feasibility indicators. Among study participants, mean ± SD age was 54.6 ± 10.2 years, 11 (55%) were men, average time from stroke onset was 6 months. No participants dropped out. Compared with baseline status, mean ± SD scores on SLS improved from 7.5 ± 3.1 to 11.8 ± 2.2 at month 1 (p < 0.0001) and 12.2 ± 2.4 at month 3 (p < 0.0001), MOCA scores improved from 18.2 ± 4.3 to 20.4 ± 4.7 at month 1 (p = 0.14), and 22.2 ± 7.6 at month 3 (p = 0.047). Mean ± SD weekly sessions performed by participants per month was 5.7 ± 5.8 and duration of sessions was 25.5 ± 16.2 min. Erratic internet connectivity negatively affected full compliance with the intervention, although satisfaction ratings by study participants were excellent. It is feasible to administer an m-health delivered physical therapy intervention in SSA, with high user satisfaction. Randomized trials to assess the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of this intervention are warranted. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Brief Report: Just-in-Time Visual Supports to Children with Autism via the Apple Watch:® A Pilot Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Amanda; Schlosser, Ralf W; Shane, Howard C; Abramson, Jennifer; Allen, Anna A; Flynn, Suzanne; Yu, Christina; Dimery, Katherine

    2016-12-01

    Using augmented input might be an effective means for supplementing spoken language for children with autism who have difficulties following spoken directives. This study aimed to (a) explore whether JIT-delivered scene cues (photos, video clips) via the Apple Watch ® enable children with autism to carry out directives they were unable to implement with speech alone, and (b) test the feasibility of the Apple Watch ® (with a focus on display size). Results indicated that the hierarchical JIT supports enabled five children with autism to carry out the majority of directives. Hence, the relatively small display size of the Apple Watch does not seem to hinder children with autism to glean critical information from visual supports.

  1. Turning waste medicines to cost savings: A pilot study on the feasibility of medication recycling as a solution to drug wastage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Ming Ren; Chew, Lita

    2017-01-01

    Unused medicines represent a major source of wastage in healthcare systems around the world. Previous studies have suggested the potential cost savings from recycling the waste medicines. However, issues of product safety and integrity often deter healthcare institutions from recycling donated medications. To evaluate the feasibility of medication recycling and to assess the actual cost savings from recycling waste medicines and whether reusability of waste medicines differed among various drug classes and donor sources. Donated medications from hospitals, private medical clinics and patients were collected and assessed using a medication recycling protocol in a hospice care setting from November 2013 through January 2014. Costs were calculated using a reference pricing list from a public hospital. A total of 244 donations, amounting to 20,759 dosage units, were collected during the study period. Most donations (90.8%) were reusable, providing a total of S$5266 in cost savings. Less than 2 h daily was spent by a single pharmacy technician on the sorting and distributing processes. Medications donated by health facilities were thrice more likely to be reusable than those by patients (odds ratio = 3.614, 95% confidence interval = 3.127, 4.176). Medications belonging to Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical class G (0.0%), H (8.2%) and L (30.0%) were the least reusable. Most donated medications were reusable. The current protocol can be further streamlined to focus on the more reusable donor sources and drug classes and validated in other settings. Overall, we opine that it is feasible to practise medication recycling on a larger scale to reduce medication wastage.

  2. Feasibility and effects of home-based smartphone-delivered automated feedback training for gait in people with Parkinson's disease: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginis, Pieter; Nieuwboer, Alice; Dorfman, Moran; Ferrari, Alberto; Gazit, Eran; Canning, Colleen G; Rocchi, Laura; Chiari, Lorenzo; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Mirelman, Anat

    2016-01-01

    Inertial measurement units combined with a smartphone application (CuPiD-system) were developed to provide people with Parkinson's disease (PD) real-time feedback on gait performance. This study investigated the CuPiD-system's feasibility and effectiveness compared with conventional gait training when applied in the home environment. Forty persons with PD undertook gait training for 30 min, three times per week for six weeks. Participants were randomly assigned to i) CuPiD, in which a smartphone application offered positive and corrective feedback on gait, or ii) an active control, in which personalized gait advice was provided. Gait, balance, endurance and quality of life were assessed before and after training and at four weeks follow-up using standardized tests. Both groups improved significantly on the primary outcomes (single and dual task gait speed) at post-test and follow-up. The CuPiD group improved significantly more on balance (MiniBESTest) at post-test (from 24.8 to 26.1, SD ∼ 5) and maintained quality of life (SF-36 physical health) at follow-up whereas the control group deteriorated (from 50.4 to 48.3, SD ∼ 16). No other statistically significant differences were found between the two groups. The CuPiD system was well-tolerated and participants found the tool user-friendly. CuPiD was feasible, well-accepted and seemed to be an effective approach to promote gait training, as participants improved equally to controls. This benefit may be ascribed to the real-time feedback, stimulating corrective actions and promoting self-efficacy to achieve optimal performance. Further optimization of the system and adequately-powered studies are warranted to corroborate these findings and determine cost-effectiveness.

  3. A systematic decision-making process on the need for updating clinical practice guidelines proved to be feasible in a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Monika; Jaschinski, Thomas; Eikermann, Michaela; Mathes, Tim; Bühn, Stefanie; Koppert, Wolfgang; Leffler, Andreas; Neugebauer, Edmund; Pieper, Dawid

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to test and evaluate a new decision-making process on the need for updating within the update of a German clinical practice guideline (CPG). The pilot study comprised (1) limited searches in Pubmed to identify new potentially relevant evidence, (2) an online survey among the members of the CPG group to assess the need for update, and (3) a consensus conference for determination and prioritization of guideline sections with a high need for update. Subsequently, we conducted a second online survey to evaluate the procedure. The searches resulted in 902 abstracts that were graded as new potentially relevant evidence. Twenty five of 39 members of the CPG group (64%) participated in the online survey. Seventy six percent of those took part in the second online survey. The evaluation study found on average a grade of support of the procedure regarding the determination of the need for update of 3.65 (standard deviation: 0.76) on a likert scale with 1 = "no support" to 5 = "very strong support." The conducted procedure presents a systematic approach for assessing whether and to what extent a CPG requires updating and enables setting priorities for which particular guideline section to update within a CPG. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pilot study assessing the feasibility of applying bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in very early stage Parkinson's disease: study design and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, David; Tolleson, Christopher; Davis, Thomas L; Gill, Chandler E; Molinari, Anna L; Bliton, Mark J; Tramontana, Michael G; Salomon, Ronald M; Kao, Chris; Wang, Lily; Hedera, Peter; Phibbs, Fenna T; Neimat, Joseph S; Konrad, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation provides significant symptomatic benefit for people with advanced Parkinson's disease whose symptoms are no longer adequately controlled with medication. Preliminary evidence suggests that subthalamic nucleus stimulation may also be efficacious in early Parkinson's disease, and results of animal studies suggest that it may spare dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. We report the methodology and design of a novel Phase I clinical trial testing the safety and tolerability of deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease and discuss previous failed attempts at neuroprotection. We recently conducted a prospective, randomized, parallel-group, single-blind pilot clinical trial of deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease. Subjects were randomized to receive either optimal drug therapy or deep brain stimulation plus optimal drug therapy. Follow-up visits occurred every six months for a period of two years and included week-long therapy washouts. Thirty subjects with Hoehn & Yahr Stage II idiopathic Parkinson's disease were enrolled over a period of 32 months. Twenty-nine subjects completed all follow-up visits; one patient in the optimal drug therapy group withdrew from the study after baseline. Baseline characteristics for all thirty patients were not significantly different. This study demonstrates that it is possible to recruit and retain subjects in a clinical trial testing deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease. The results of this trial will be used to support the design of a Phase III, multicenter trial investigating the efficacy of deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease.

  5. Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Technology for Oral Patient-Controlled Analgesia, the PCoA® Acute Device, for Hospitalized Patients with Postoperative Pain, in Pilot Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Wirz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute postoperative pain delays recovery and increases morbidity and mortality. Traditional administration of postoperative analgesics by nurses is often inefficient. The present study evaluated the safety, efficacy, and usability of a novel, patient-controlled analgesic dispenser, the PCoA Acute. Methods. A controlled pilot study was conducted at three medical centers. Patients scheduled for elective surgery were enrolled into two groups, both taking oral analgesics: a control group (n=43, opioids dispensed by nurses, and a test group (n=27, opioids dispensed via the PCoA Acute. Pill intake data were recorded. Pain ratings at rest and during movement were surveyed. Results. No severe adverse events were recorded. Average pill intake time was reduced from 8 : 58 minutes in the control group to 1 : 17 minutes in the test group (P value < 0.05. The test group took 67% more pills than the control group, indicating enhanced compliance. Pain scores were significantly lower for patients in the test group (P value < 0.05. Over 90% of PCoA Acute users were satisfied with its use. Conclusions. The study confirmed that PCoA Acute is safe and effective. It is well accepted by patients and medical staff. Its use can optimize pain medication administration.

  6. Using the Inflammacheck Device to Measure the Level of Exhaled Breath Condensate Hydrogen Peroxide in Patients With Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (The EXHALE Pilot Study): Protocol for a Cross-Sectional Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Daniel M; Fogg, Carole; Brown, Thomas P; Jones, Thomas L; Lanning, Eleanor; Bassett, Paul; Chauhan, Anoop J

    2018-01-30

    Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are common conditions that affect over 5 million people in the United Kingdom. These groups of patients suffer significantly from breathlessness and recurrent exacerbations that can be difficult to diagnose and go untreated. A common feature of COPD and asthma is airway inflammation that increases before and during exacerbations. Current methods of assessing airway inflammation can be invasive, difficult to perform, and are often inaccurate. In contrast, measurement of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) is performed during normal tidal breathing and is known to reflect the level of global inflammation in the airways. There is a need for novel tools to diagnose asthma and COPD earlier and to detect increased airway inflammation that precedes an exacerbation. The aim of this study was to explore the use of a new handheld device (called Inflammacheck) in measuring H 2 O 2 levels in EBC. We will study whether it can measure EBC H 2 O 2 levels consistently and whether it can be used to differentiate asthma and COPD from healthy controls. We will perform a cross-sectional, feasibility, pilot study of EBC H 2 O 2 levels, as measured by Inflammacheck, and other markers of disease severity and symptom control in patients with asthma and COPD and volunteers with no history of lung disease. Participants will be asked to provide an exhaled breath sample for measurement of their EBC H 2 O 2 using Inflammacheck. The result will be correlated with disease stage, spirometry, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), and symptom control scores. This study's recruitment is ongoing; it is anticipated that the results will be available in 2018. The EXhaled Hydrogen peroxide As a marker of Lung diseasE (EXHALE) pilot study will provide an evaluation of a new method of measuring EBC H 2 O 2 . It will assess the device's consistency and ability to distinguish airway inflammation in asthma and COPD compared

  7. Designing an iPad App to Monitor and Improve Classroom Behavior for Children with ADHD: iSelfControl Feasibility and Pilot Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerson, Natasha; Ziv, Hadar; Collins, Penelope; Arastoo, Sara; Warschauer, Mark; Crinella, Francis; Lakes, Kimberley

    2016-01-01

    Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) receive approximately 80% of instruction in the general education classroom, where individualized behavioral management strategies may be difficult for teachers to consistently deliver. Mobile device apps provide promising platforms to manage behavior. This pilot study evaluated the utility of a web-based application (iSelfControl) designed to support classroom behavior management. iSelfControl prompted students every ‘Center’ (30-minutes) to self-evaluate using a universal token-economy classroom management system focused on compliance, productivity, and positive relationships. Simultaneously, the teacher evaluated each student on a separate iPad. Using Multi Level Modeling, we examined 13 days of data gathered from implementation with 5th grade students (N = 12) at a school for children with ADHD and related executive function difficulties. First, an unconditional growth model evaluated the overall amount of change in aggregated scores over time as well as the degree of systematic variation in scores within and across teacher-student dyads. Second, separate intercepts and slopes were estimated for teacher and student to estimate degree of congruency between trajectories. Finally, differences between teacher and student scores were tested at each time-point in separate models to examine unique ‘Center’ effects. 51% of the total variance in scores was attributed to differences between dyads. Trajectories of student and teacher scores remained relatively stable across seven time-points each day and did not statistically differ from each other. On any given day, students tended to evaluate their behaviors more positively (entered higher scores for themselves) compared to corresponding teacher scores. In summary, iSelfControl provides a platform for self and teacher evaluation that is an important adjunct to conventional classroom management strategies. The application captured teacher

  8. Feasibility and impact of Creciendo Sanos, a clinic-based pilot intervention to prevent obesity among preschool children in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Andrade, Gloria Oliva; Cespedes, Elizabeth M; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Romero-Quechol, Guillermina; González-Unzaga, Marco Aurelio; Benítez-Trejo, María Amalia; Flores-Huerta, Samuel; Horan, Chrissy; Haines, Jess; Taveras, Elsie M; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Gillman, Matthew W

    2014-03-20

    Mexico has the highest adult overweight and obesity prevalence in the Americas; 23.8% of children obese. Creciendo Sanos was a pilot intervention to prevent obesity among preschoolers in Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) clinics. We randomized 4 IMSS primary care clinics to either 6 weekly educational sessions promoting healthful nutrition and physical activity or usual care. We recruited 306 parent-child pairs: 168 intervention, 138 usual care. Children were 2-5 years old with WHO body mass index (BMI) z-score 0-3. We measured children's height and weight and parents reported children's diet and physical activity at baseline and 3 and 6-month follow-up. We analyzed behavioral and BMI outcomes with generalized mixed models incorporating multiple imputation for missing values. 93 (55%) intervention and 96 (70%) usual care families completed 3 and 6-month follow-up. At 3 months, intervention v. usual care children increased vegetables by 6.3 servings/week (95% CI, 1.8, 10.8). In stratified analyses, intervention participants with high program adherence (5-6 sessions) decreased snacks and screen time and increased vegetables v. usual care. No further effects on behavioral outcomes or BMI were observed. Transportation time and expenses were barriers to adherence. 90% of parents who completed the post-intervention survey were satisfied with the program. Although satisfaction was high among participants, barriers to participation and retention included transportation cost and time. In intention to treat analyses, we found intervention effects on vegetable intake, but not other behaviors or BMI. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01539070.Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica del IMSS: 2009-785-120.

  9. Is two days of intermittent energy restriction per week a feasible weight loss approach in obese males? A randomised pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Marguerite; Le Fevre, Lauren; Haywood, Cilla; Proietto, Joseph

    2018-02-01

    The 5:2 diet (two non-consecutive days of 2460 KJ (600 calories) and 5 days of ad libitum eating per week) is becoming increasingly popular. This pilot study aimed to determine whether the 5:2 diet can achieve ≥5% weight loss and greater improvements in weight and biochemical markers than a standard energy-restricted diet (SERD) in obese male war veterans. A total of 24 participants were randomised to consume either the 5:2 diet or a SERD (2050 KJ (500 calorie) reduction per day) for 6 months. Weight, waist circumference (WC), fasting blood glucose, blood lipids, blood pressure and dietary intake were measured at baseline, 3 and 6 months by a blinded investigator. After 6 months, participants in both groups significantly reduced body weight (P = weight loss was 5.3 ± 3.0 kg (5.5 ± 3.2%) for the 5:2 group and 5.5 ± 4.3 kg (5.4 ± 4.2%) for the SERD group. Mean WC reduction for the 5:2 group was 8.0 ± 4.5 and 6.4 ± 5.8 cm for the SERD group. There was no significant difference in the amount of weight loss or WC reduction between diet groups. There was no significant change in diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose or blood lipids in either dietary group. Results suggest that the 5:2 diet is a successful but not superior weight loss approach in male war veterans when compared to a SERD. Future research is needed to determine the long-term effectiveness of the 5:2 diet and its effectiveness in other population groups. © 2017 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  10. A pilot study to assess the feasibility and impact of a brief motivational intervention on problem drug and alcohol use in adult mental health inpatient units: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Hermine L; Birchwood, Max; Griffith, Emma; Freemantle, Nick; McCrone, Paul; Stefanidou, Chrysi A; Walsh, Kathryn; Clarke, Latoya; Rana, Arsal; Copello, Alex

    2014-08-01

    Substance misuse in those with severe mental health problems is common and associated with poor engagement in treatment and treatment outcomes. Up to 44% of those admitted into psychiatric inpatient facilities have coexisting substance-misuse problems. However, this is not routinely addressed as part of their treatment plan. A mental health admission may present a window of opportunity for inpatients to reevaluate the impact of their substance use. This study will aim to evaluate the effectiveness of a targeted brief motivational intervention in improving engagement in treatment and to assess how feasible and acceptable this intervention is to inpatients and staff as a routine intervention. This randomized controlled trial will use concealed randomization; blind, independent assessment of outcome at 3 months; characterization of refusers and dropouts; and be analyzed according to the intention-to-treat principle. After baseline assessments, eligible participants will be randomized either to the Brief Integrated Motivational Intervention plus Treatment As Usual, or Treatment as Usual alone. Eligible participants will be those who are new admissions; >18 years; ICD-10 diagnosis of -schizophrenia or related disorder, bipolar affective disorder, recurrent depressive disorder, and DSM-IV diagnosis of substance abuse or dependence over the last 3 months. The primary outcome is engagement in treatment for substance misuse, and secondary outcomes include readiness to change substance misuse together with a cost-effectiveness analysis. Qualitative interviews with staff and participants will assess the acceptability of the intervention. This pilot randomized trial will provide the first robust evidence base for inpatient care of people with severe mental health problems and co-morbid substance misuse and provide the groundwork for confirmatory trials to evaluate a potentially feasible, cost-effective, and easy-to-implement treatment option that may be readily integrated into

  11. Feasibility of studying brain morphology in major depressive disorder with structural magnetic resonance imaging and clinical data from the electronic medical record: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, Wouter S.; Perlis, Roy H.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Zeng-Treitler, Qing; Gainer, Vivian S.; Murphy, Shawn N.; Churchill, Susanne E.; Kohane, Isaac S.; Shenton, Martha E.; Iosifescu, Dan V.

    2012-01-01

    For certain research questions related to long-term outcomes or to rare disorders, designing prospective studies is impractical or prohibitively expensive. Such studies could instead utilize clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data (MRI) collected as part of routine clinical care, stored in the electronic medical record (EMR). Using major depressive disorder (MDD) as a disease model, we examined the feasibility of studying brain morphology and associations with remission using clinical and MRI data exclusively drawn from the EMR. Advanced automated tools were used to select MDD patients and controls from the EMR who had brain MRI data, but no diagnosed brain pathology. MDD patients were further assessed for remission status by review of clinical charts. Twenty MDD patients (eight full-remitters, six partial-remitters, and six non-remitters), and fifteen healthy control subjects met all study criteria for advanced morphometric analyses. Compared to controls, MDD patients had significantly smaller right rostral-anterior cingulate volume, and level of non-remission was associated with smaller left hippocampus and left rostral-middle frontal gyrus volume. The use of EMR data for psychiatric research may provide a timely and cost-effective approach with the potential to generate large study samples reflective of the real population with the illness studied. PMID:23149041

  12. Exploring Acceptability and Feasibility of Evidence-Based Practice in Child Welfare Settings: A Pilot Study with Attachment-Based Family Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Santens

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Flemish Child Welfare System (CWS is in great need of a shared empirically informed clinical strategy for working with depressed adolescents and their families. Many evidence-based practices (EBP exist, but little is known as to whether they can be successfully imported in the CWS. Therefore, the current study explores the implementation of a particular EBP, Attachment-Based Family Therapy (ABFT, in home-based services of the Flemish CWS in Belgium. Specifically, the study focused on (1 the acceptability of ABFT by counselors and whether negative attitudes about EBP can be changed ('n' = 73 counselors, and (2 the feasibility of implementing ABFT ('n' = 43 adolescents, 11–17 years old, 72% female by exploring initial effectiveness. The results suggest that (1 initial negative attitudes of counselors towards ABFT were significantly more positive after attending training and discussions about ABFT, and that (2 ABFT could be used by counselors to successfully reduce adolescent depressive symptoms. Future research should include a control group to draw stronger causal conclusions. Strengths and limitations of the study’s design and implications for further dissemination are discussed.

  13. RECON Pilot Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, Henriette D.

    One of the specific recommendations in the Retrospective Conversion (RECON) feasibility report (ED 032 895) was that a pilot project be established to test various conversion techniques, ideally covering the highest priority material (English-language monograph records from 1960-68). A two-year pilot project was initiated in August 1969. This…

  14. Lessons learned developing a diagnostic tool for HIV-associated dementia feasible to implement in resource-limited settings: pilot testing in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Kwasa

    Full Text Available To conduct a preliminary evaluation of the utility and reliability of a diagnostic tool for HIV-associated dementia (HAD for use by primary health care workers (HCW which would be feasible to implement in resource-limited settings.In resource-limited settings, HAD is an indication for anti-retroviral therapy regardless of CD4 T-cell count. Anti-retroviral therapy, the treatment for HAD, is now increasingly available in resource-limited settings. Nonetheless, HAD remains under-diagnosed likely because of limited clinical expertise and availability of diagnostic tests. Thus, a simple diagnostic tool which is practical to implement in resource-limited settings is an urgent need.A convenience sample of 30 HIV-infected outpatients was enrolled in Western Kenya. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of a diagnostic tool for HAD as administered by a primary HCW. This was compared to an expert clinical assessment which included examination by a physician, neuropsychological testing, and in selected cases, brain imaging. Agreement between HCW and an expert examiner on certain tool components was measured using Kappa statistic.The sample was 57% male, mean age was 38.6 years, mean CD4 T-cell count was 323 cells/µL, and 54% had less than a secondary school education. Six (20% of the subjects were diagnosed with HAD by expert clinical assessment. The diagnostic tool was 63% sensitive and 67% specific for HAD. Agreement between HCW and expert examiners was poor for many individual items of the diagnostic tool (K = .03-.65. This diagnostic tool had moderate sensitivity and specificity for HAD. However, reliability was poor, suggesting that substantial training and formal evaluations of training adequacy will be critical to enable HCW to reliably administer a brief diagnostic tool for HAD.

  15. Feasibility and effects of a combined adjuvant high-intensity interval/strength training in breast cancer patients: a single-center pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Sebastian Viktor Waldemar; Laszlo, Roman; Otto, Stephanie; Prokopchuk, Dmytro; Schumann, Uwe; Ebner, Florian; Huober, Jens; Steinacker, Jürgen Michael

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate feasibility of an exercise intervention consisting of high-intensity interval endurance and strength training in breast cancer patients. Twenty-six women with nonmetastatic breast cancer were consecutively assigned to the exercise intervention- (n= 15, mean age 51.9 ± 9.8 years) and the control group (n = 11, mean age 56.9 ± 7.0 years). Cardiopulmonary exercise testing that included lactate sampling, one-repetition maximum tests and a HADS-D questionnaire were used to monitor patients both before and after a supervised six weeks period of either combined high-intensity interval endurance and strength training (intervention group, twice a week) or leisure training (control group). Contrarily to the control group, endurance (mean change of VO 2 , peak 12.0 ± 13.0%) and strength performance (mean change of cumulative load 25.9 ± 11.2%) and quality of life increased in the intervention group. No training-related adverse events were observed. Our guided exercise intervention could be used effectively for initiation and improvement of performance capacity and quality of life in breast cancer patients in a relatively short time. This might be especially attractive during medical treatment. Long-term effects have to be evaluated in randomized controlled studies also with a longer follow-up. Implications for Rehabilitation High-intensity interval training allows improvement of aerobic capacity within a comparable short time. Standard leisure training in breast cancer patients is rather suitable for the maintenance of performance capacity and quality of life. Guided high-intensity interval training combined with strength training can be used effectively for the improvement of endurance and strength capacity and also quality of life. After exclusion of contraindications, guided adjuvant high-intensity interval training combined with strength training can be safely used in breast cancer patients.

  16. Feasibility, acceptability, and characteristics associated with adherence and completion of a culturally relevant internet-enhanced physical activity pilot intervention for overweight and obese young adult African American women enrolled in college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Rodney P; Dutton, Gareth R; Cherrington, Andrea; Fontaine, Kevin; Baskin, Monica; Casazza, Krista; Lorch, Danielle; Allison, Jeroan J; Durant, Nefertiti H

    2015-06-02

    African American women are one of the least active demographic groups in the US, with only 36% meeting the national physical activity recommendations in comparison to 46% of White women. Physical activity begins to decline in African American women in adolescence and continues to decline into young adulthood. Yet, few interventions have been developed to promote physical activity in African American women during this critical period of life. The purpose of this article was to evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of a culturally-relevant Internet-enhanced physical activity pilot intervention for overweight/obese African American college females and to examine psychosocial and behavioral characteristics associated with intervention adherence and completion. A 6-month single group pre-posttest design was used. Participants (n = 27) accessed a culturally-relevant Social Cognitive Theory-based physical activity promotion website while engaging in a minimum of four moderate-intensity physical activity sessions each week. Acceptability and feasibility of the intervention was assessed by participant retention and a consumer satisfaction survey completed by participants. Fifty-six percent of participants (n = 15) completed the intervention. Study completers were more physically active at baseline (P = 0.05) and had greater social support for exercise from family members (P = 0.04). Sixty percent of study completers (n = 9) reported the website as "enjoyable" or "very enjoyable" to use and 60% (n = 9) reported increased motivation from participation in the physical activity program. Moreover, 87% (n = 13) reported they would recommend the website to a friend. Results provide some preliminary support for the acceptability and feasibility of an Internet-enhanced physical activity program for overweight/obese African American women, while highlighting important limitations of the approach. Successful promotion of physical activity in college aged African

  17. An mHealth App for Supporting Quitters to Manage Cigarette Cravings With Short Bouts of Physical Activity: A Randomized Pilot Feasibility and Acceptability Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassandra, Mary; Lintunen, Taru; Hagger, Martin S; Heikkinen, Risto; Vanhala, Mauno; Kettunen, Tarja

    2017-05-26

    While gains in reducing smoking rates in Finland have been made, prevalence rates are still substantial. Relapse rates among smokers engaged in quit-smoking programs are high. Physical activity has been proposed as one means to help smokers manage cravings. Software and apps on mobile phone and handheld devices offer an opportunity to communicate messages on how to use physical activity to manage cravings as part of quit-smoking programs. We aimed to test the feasibility, acceptability, usability, and preliminary efficacy of an mHealth mobile phone app, Physical activity over Smoking (PhoS), to assist smokers in quitting smoking in a randomized controlled trial. The app was designed to prompt smokers to engage in physical activities to manage their smoking cravings. Regular smokers (n=44) attended a group-based behavioral counselling program aimed at promoting physical activity as an additional aid to quit. After quit day, participants were randomly allocated to an intervention (n=25) or to a comparison (n=19) group. Participants in the intervention group were provided with the PhoS app and training on how to use it to assist with relapse prevention. Participants in the comparison condition were provided with generalized relapse prevention training. Some participants reported that the PhoS app was useful in assisting them to successfully manage their cigarette cravings, although compliance across the sample was modest and participants reported low levels of usability. Participants receiving the PhoS app did not report greater abstinence than those who did not receive the app. However, participants receiving the app were more likely to report greater abstinence if they did not use pharmacological support, while those who did not receive the app reported greater abstinence when using pharmacological support. Participants receiving the app reported greater levels of physical activity than those who did not. Results revealed that the app resulted in better retention

  18. An mHealth App for Supporting Quitters to Manage Cigarette Cravings With Short Bouts of Physical Activity: A Randomized Pilot Feasibility and Acceptability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintunen, Taru; Heikkinen, Risto; Vanhala, Mauno; Kettunen, Tarja

    2017-01-01

    Background While gains in reducing smoking rates in Finland have been made, prevalence rates are still substantial. Relapse rates among smokers engaged in quit-smoking programs are high. Physical activity has been proposed as one means to help smokers manage cravings. Software and apps on mobile phone and handheld devices offer an opportunity to communicate messages on how to use physical activity to manage cravings as part of quit-smoking programs. Objective We aimed to test the feasibility, acceptability, usability, and preliminary efficacy of an mHealth mobile phone app, Physical activity over Smoking (PhoS), to assist smokers in quitting smoking in a randomized controlled trial. The app was designed to prompt smokers to engage in physical activities to manage their smoking cravings. Methods Regular smokers (n=44) attended a group-based behavioral counselling program aimed at promoting physical activity as an additional aid to quit. After quit day, participants were randomly allocated to an intervention (n=25) or to a comparison (n=19) group. Participants in the intervention group were provided with the PhoS app and training on how to use it to assist with relapse prevention. Participants in the comparison condition were provided with generalized relapse prevention training. Results Some participants reported that the PhoS app was useful in assisting them to successfully manage their cigarette cravings, although compliance across the sample was modest and participants reported low levels of usability. Participants receiving the PhoS app did not report greater abstinence than those who did not receive the app. However, participants receiving the app were more likely to report greater abstinence if they did not use pharmacological support, while those who did not receive the app reported greater abstinence when using pharmacological support. Participants receiving the app reported greater levels of physical activity than those who did not. Results revealed that

  19. Feasibility and Effects of a Brief Compassion-Focused Imagery Intervention in Psychotic Patients with Paranoid Ideation: A Randomized Experimental Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascone, Leonie; Sundag, Johanna; Schlier, Björn; Lincoln, Tania M

    2017-03-01

    Paranoia is characterized by a lack of perceived social safeness and associated negative affect. Low self-esteem, negative self-concepts and negative emotions have been shown to contribute to paranoid symptom formation. Thus, interventions focusing on affiliation and positive affect might be particularly helpful for patients with paranoia. The present study experimentally tested the effect of a one-session, brief compassion-focused imagery derived from Compassion-Focused Therapy (Gilbert, ) versus a control imagery condition in a repeated measures randomized design. A negative affective state was induced via in-sensu exposure to a recent distressful social situation in order to provide a minimum level of threat-related arousal to be down-regulated by the interventions thereafter. The sample consisted of psychotic patients with paranoid ideation (N = 51) who were randomly assigned to one of the experimental conditions. Effects on postulated causal mechanisms, i.e., self-relating (self-reassurance, self-compassion, self-criticism), and affect (self-reported affective states, skin conductance levels) as well as on state paranoia, were tested. Subjective benefit and appraisals of the intervention were explored. There were no specific intervention effects on negative self-relating, negative affect and skin-conductance or on paranoia. However, compassion-focused imagery had significant effects on self-reassurance and happiness. Explorative analyses revealed that the majority of the participants appraised the intervention in a positive manner, indicating good acceptance. The intervention showed an effect on some of the postulated mechanisms but not on others, which might have been because of its brevity. Further investigation of interventions targeting affiliation for people with paranoid experiences appears worthwhile. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Affiliative imagery work is feasible and appraised positively in psychotic patients. Brief compassion

  20. Feasibility and Efficacy of a Parent-Focused, Text Message-Delivered Intervention to Reduce Sedentary Behavior in 2- to 4-Year-Old Children (Mini Movers): Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Katherine L; Salmon, Jo; Hinkley, Trina; Hnatiuk, Jill A; Hesketh, Kylie D

    2018-02-09

    Despite public health guidelines to limit sedentary behavior, many young children spend large amounts of time sedentary (eg, screen and sitting time) during waking hours. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility and efficacy of a parent-focused, predominantly text message-delivered intervention to support parents to reduce the amount of time their children spend in sedentary behavior. Mini Movers was a pilot randomized controlled trial delivered to parents of 2- to 4-year-old children in Melbourne, Australia. Participants were recruited through playgroups, social media, and snowball sampling. Eligibility criteria were having an ambulatory child (2-4 years), English literacy, and smartphone ownership. Participants were randomized to intervention or wait-list control on a 1:1 ratio after baseline data collection. The 6-week intervention was predominantly delivered via text messages, using a Web-based bulk text message platform managed by the interventionist. Intervention strategies focused on increasing parental knowledge, building self-efficacy, setting goals, and providing reinforcement, and were underpinned by the Coventry, Aberdeen & London-Refined taxonomy of behavior change techniques and social cognitive theory. The primary outcome was intervention feasibility, measured by recruitment, retention, intervention delivery, and fidelity; process evaluation questionnaires; and qualitative interviews with a subsample of participants. Secondary outcomes were children's screen and restraint time (parent report), sitting time (parent report, activPAL), and potential mediators (parent report). Linear regression models were used to determine intervention effects on secondary outcomes, controlling for the child's sex and age and clustering by playgroup; effect sizes (Cohen's d) were calculated. A total of 57 participants (30 intervention; 27 wait-list control) were recruited, and retention was high (93%). Process evaluation results showed that the

  1. A Pilot Study for the Feasibility of F-18 FLT-PET in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer: Comparison with F-18 FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jai Hyuen; Kim, Euy Nyong; Hong, Il Ki

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of 3'-[F-18]fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine positron emission tomography(FLT-PET) for the detection of locally advanced breast cancer and to compare the degree of FLT and 2'-deoxy-2'-[F-18]fluoro-d-glucose(FDG) uptake in primary tumor, lymph nodes and other normal organs. The study subjects consisted of 22 female patients (mean age; 42±6 years) with biopsy-confirmed infiltrating ductal carcinoma between Aug 2005 and Nov 2006. We performed conventional imaging workup, FDG-PET and FLT PET/CT. Average tumor size measured by MRI was 7.2±3.4 cm. With visual analysis, Tumor and Lymph node uptakes of FLT and FDG were determined by calculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) and tumor to background (TB) ratio. We compared FLT tumor uptake with FDG tumor uptake. We also investigated the correlation between FLT tumor uptake and FDG tumor uptake and the concordant rate with lymph node uptakes of FLT and FDG. FLT and FDG uptakes of bone marrow and liver were measured to compare the biodistribution of each other. All tumor lesions were visually detected in both FLT-PET and FDG-PET. There was no significant correlation between maximal tumor size by MRI and SUVmax of FLT-PET or FDG-PET (p>0.05). SUVmax and SUV75 (average SUV within volume of interest using 75% isocontour) of FLT-PET were significantly lower than those of FDG-PET in primary tumor (SUVmax; 6.3±5.2 vs 8.3±4.9, p=0.02 / SUV75; 5.3±4.3 vs 6.9 4.2, p=0.02). There is significant moderate correlation between uptake of FLT and FDG in primary tumor (SUVmax; rho=0.450, p=0.04 / SUV75; rho=0.472, p=0.03). But, TB ratio of FLT-PET was higher than that of FDG-PET(11.7±7.7 vs 6.3±3.8, p=0.001). The concordant rate between FLT and FDG uptake of lymph node was reasonably good (33/34). The FLT SUVs of liver and bone marrow were 4.2±1.2 and 8.3±4.9. The FDG SUVs of liver and bone marrow were 1.8±0.4 and 1.6±0.4. The uptakes of FLT were lower than those of FDG, but all

  2. Moxifloxacin versus Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone in the management of odontogenic maxillofacial infectious processes: A preliminary, intrahospital, controlled clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Arámbula, Hansel; Hidalgo-Hurtado, Antonio; Rodríguez-Flores, Rosaura; González-Amaro, Ana-María; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the days of hospitalization length between patients treated with Moxifloxacin with that of patients treated with a Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone combination and additionally, to isolate and identify the oral pathogens involved in orofacial odontogenic infections. Material and Methods A pilot-controlled-clinical-trial was carried out on hospitalized patients with cervicofacial odontogenic abscesses or cellulitis, who were randomly asigned to two study groups: 1) patients who received Moxifloxacin, and 2) patients receiving Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone combination. Infiltrate samples were collected through transdermic or transmucosal punction and later cultured on a media specific for aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Mean hospitalization duration in days until hospital discharge and susceptibility assessment in rates were established. Results Mean hospitalization time in days of patients treated with Moxifloxacin was 7.0 ± 1.6 days, while in the Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone group, this was 8.4 ± 1.8 days, although significant difference could not be demonstrated (p=0.074). A total of 43 strains were isolated, all of these Gram-positive. These strains appeared to be highly sensitive to Moxifloxacin (97.5%) and Ceftriaxone (92.5%). Conclusions Moxifloxacin and Ceftriaxone appear to be potential convenient and rational alternatives to traditional antibiotics, for treating severe odontogenic infections, in conjunction with surgical extraoral incision, debridement, and drainage. Key words:Orofacial odontogenic infections, antimicrobial susceptibility, antimicrobial resistance. PMID:26644841

  3. Soft Factors, Smooth Transport? The role of safety climate and team processes in reducing adverse events during intrahospital transport in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzke, Markus; Schiffinger, Michael; Zellhofer, Dominik; Steyrer, Johannes

    2017-11-15

    Intrahospital patient transports (IHTs) in intensive care involve an appreciable risk of adverse events (AEs). Research on determinants of AE occurrence during IHT has hitherto focused on patient, transport, and intensive care unit (ICU) characteristics. By contrast, the role of "soft" factors, although arguably relevant for IHTs and a topic of interest in general health care settings, has not yet been explored. The study aims at examining the effect of safety climate and team processes on the occurrence of AE during IHT and whether team processes mediate the effect of safety climate. Data stem from a noninterventional, observational multicenter study in 33 ICUs (from 12 European countries), with 858 transports overall recorded during 28 days. AEs include medication errors, dislodgments, equipment failures, and delays. Safety climate scales were taken from the "Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations" (short version), team processes scales from the "Leiden Operating Theatre and Intensive Care Safety" questionnaire. Patient condition was assessed with NEMS (Nine Equivalents of Nursing Manpower Use Score). All other variables could be directly observed. Hypothesis testing and assessment of effects rely on bivariate correlations and binomial logistic multilevel models (with ICU as random effect). Both safety climate and team processes are comparatively important determinants of AE occurrence, also when controlling for transport-, staff-, and ICU-related variables. Team processes partially mediate the effect of safety climate. Patient condition and transport duration are consistently related with AE occurrence, too. Unlike most patient, transport, and ICU characteristics, safety climate and team processes are basically amenable to managerial interventions. Coupled with their considerable effect on AE occurrence, this makes pertinent endeavors a potentially promising approach for improving patient safety during IHT. Although literature suggests that safety

  4. Pre-post, mixed-methods feasibility study of the WorkingWell mobile support tool for individuals with serious mental illness in the USA: a pilot study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Joanne; Wright, Spenser M; Carlisle, Alyssa M

    2018-02-06

    Successful competitive employment has been found to be related to enhanced self-esteem, higher quality of life and reduced mental health service use for individuals living with serious mental illnesses (SMIs) including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. The effectiveness of the individual placement and support model has been demonstrated in multiple randomised controlled trials in many countries. The management of stress, depression and anxiety in the workplace may be effectively enhanced through digital mental health interventions. The WorkingWell mobile support tool ('app') is specifically designed to meet the need for illness management support for individuals with SMI in the workplace, as an adjunct to professional treatment. The WorkingWell app, grounded in evidence-based supported employment, is informed by user experience design. It will be tested in a pre-post design, mixed-methods pilot study to explore issues of feasibility, acceptability and usefulness, and to provide preliminary data on the impact of use. Putative mediators of improved job tenure and psychological well-being, including postintervention changes in social support, self-efficacy and work-related motivation, will be investigated. Forty individuals at least 18 years of age, meeting the eligibility requirements for supported employment services (ie, diagnosed with a mental illness meeting the criteria for severity, duration and treatment), working a minimum of 10 hours per week at study enrolment, and speaking, reading and writing in English will be recruited for the pilot study. Research staff will recruit individuals at community-based mental health agencies; provide orientation to the study, the study smartphones and the WorkingWell app; conduct research interviews including standardised measures as well as semistructured items; and provide technical assistance in telephone calls and inperson meetings. A sample of 10 agency staff will be recruited to obtain further

  5. Study protocol: The development of a pilot study employing a randomised controlled design to investigate the feasibility and effects of a peer support program following discharge from a specialist first-episode psychosis treatment centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francey Shona

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young people with first-episode psychosis (FEP are at risk of a range of negative outcomes. Specialist FEP services have been developed to provide comprehensive, multi-disciplinary treatment. However, these services are often available for a restricted period and the services that young people may be transferred to are less comprehensive. This represents a risk of drop out from treatment services in a group already considered to be at risk of disengagement. Peer support groups have been shown to improve social relationships among people with psychosis however individual peer support programs have not been tested on young people with first-episode psychosis; nor have they been tested at the point of discharge from services. Methods/design The study is an 18-month randomised controlled trial being conducted at Orygen Youth Health Research Centre in Melbourne, Australia. The aim of the study is to test the feasibility and effects of a 6-month peer support intervention delivered to young people with FEP over the period of discharge. Participants are young people aged 15-24 who are being discharged from a specialist first-episode psychosis treatment centre. There is a 6-month recruitment period. The intervention comprises two hours of contact per fortnight during which peer support workers can assist participants to engage with their new services, or other social and community activities. Participants will be assessed at baseline and post intervention (6 months. Discussion This paper describes the development of a randomised-controlled trial which aims to pilot a peer support program among young people who are being discharged from a specialist FEP treatment centre. If effective, the intervention could lead to benefits not only for participants over the discharge period, but for peer support workers as well. Trial registration The study was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry; number: ACTRN

  6. A randomized pilot study of a comprehensive postoperative exercise program compared with usual care following primary total hip arthroplasty in subjects less than 65 years of age: feasibility, selection of outcome measures and timing of assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaupre, Lauren A; Masson, Edward C O; Luckhurst, Barbara J; Arafah, Orfan; O'Connor, Gregory J

    2014-06-02

    Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) is being used more commonly in younger higher demand patients. The purpose of this randomized pilot study was to explore a) feasibility of comprehensive postoperative rehabilitation compared to usual care following primary THA in subjects program (Intervention) or usual postoperative care (Control). Subjects were assessed preoperatively, six-weeks postoperatively (Pre-intervention) and four and 12 months postoperatively (Post-intervention). Self-report measures were the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and Rand 36-Item Health Survey (RAND-36). Performance-based measures included lower extremity strength, walking speed and endurance, and gait laboratory assessment. Ten Control and 11 Intervention subjects with an average age of 53.4 (SD9.3) years were randomized. All Intervention subjects completed the program without adverse effects. Although no statistically significantly results were reported, four months postoperatively, Intervention subjects had clinically important differences (CID) in strength compared with Control subjects. Walking endurance, WOMAC and RAND scores improved significantly with no CID noted between groups. Ten (48%) subjects reported a ceiling effect on the WOMAC (9 (43%) subjects on Pain; 1 (5%) subject on Function). No group CID were noted in gait measures. Our recommendations would be that performance-based strength measures should be considered for the primary outcome in this younger cohort. Because of the ceiling effects with WOMAC Pain, a different pain measure is indicated. Other more challenging functional performance-based tests should be considered such as a more prolonged endurance test. There is merit in one-year follow-up as strength improved after four months in both groups.

  7. Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, P.; Kalas, P.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility study itself examines the technical, economic and financial implications of a nuclear power station in depth so as to make sure that nuclear power is the right course to take. This means that it is quite an expensive operation and it is to avoid wasting this money that a pre-feasibility study is carried out. This preliminary study should eliminate cases where the electrical system cannot absorb the capacity of a nuclear station of commercial size, where other sources of power such as hydro-electricity, gas or cheap coal would make nuclear obviously uneconomic or where no suitable sites exist. If this first rather simple survey shows that nuclear power is a credible solution to a utilities need for electricity or heat production plant, then the next stage is a full feasibility study. (orig./TK) [de

  8. Evaluation of natural language processing from emergency department computerized medical records for intra-hospital syndromic surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagliaroli Véronique

    2011-07-01

    most frequent cause of lack of processing was non-recognition of the term by UrgIndex (9.7%. Overall precision was 79.1% (95% CI: 77.3-80.8. It varied from 81.4% for respiratory syndromes to 77.0% for cutaneous syndromes. Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of and interest in developing an automated method for extracting and encoding medical concepts from ED narrative reports, the first step required for the detection of potentially infectious patients at epidemic risk.

  9. Overcoming language barriers with foreign-language speaking patients: a survey to investigate intra-hospital variation in attitudes and practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilpert Sarah

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of available interpreter services by hospital clincial staff is often suboptimal, despite evidence that trained interpreters contribute to quality of care and patient safety. Examination of intra-hospital variations in attitudes and practices regarding interpreter use can contribute to identifying factors that facilitate good practice. The purpose of this study was to describe attitudes, practices and preferences regarding communication with limited French proficiency (LFP patients, examine how these vary across professions and departments within the hospital, and identify factors associated with good practices. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to random samples of 700 doctors, 700 nurses and 93 social workers at the Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland. Results Seventy percent of respondents encounter LFP patients at least once a month, but this varied by department. 66% of respondents said they preferred working with ad hoc interpreters (patient's family and bilingual staff, mainly because these were easier to access. During the 6 months preceding the study, ad hoc interpreters were used at least once by 71% of respondents, and professional interpreters were used at least once by 51%. Overall, only nine percent of respondents had received any training in how and why to work with a trained interpreter. Only 23.2% of respondents said the clinical service in which they currently worked encouraged them to use professional interpreters. Respondents working in services where use of professional interpreters was encouraged were more likely to be of the opinion that the hospital should systematically provide a professional interpreter to LFP patients (40.3% as compared with those working in a department that discouraged use of professional interpreters (15.5% and they used professional interpreters more often during the previous 6 months. Conclusion Attitudes and practices regarding communication with

  10. Overcoming language barriers with foreign-language speaking patients: a survey to investigate intra-hospital variation in attitudes and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudelson, Patricia; Vilpert, Sarah

    2009-10-15

    Use of available interpreter services by hospital clinical staff is often suboptimal, despite evidence that trained interpreters contribute to quality of care and patient safety. Examination of intra-hospital variations in attitudes and practices regarding interpreter use can contribute to identifying factors that facilitate good practice. The purpose of this study was to describe attitudes, practices and preferences regarding communication with limited French proficiency (LFP) patients, examine how these vary across professions and departments within the hospital, and identify factors associated with good practices. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to random samples of 700 doctors, 700 nurses and 93 social workers at the Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland. Seventy percent of respondents encounter LFP patients at least once a month, but this varied by department. 66% of respondents said they preferred working with ad hoc interpreters (patient's family and bilingual staff), mainly because these were easier to access. During the 6 months preceding the study, ad hoc interpreters were used at least once by 71% of respondents, and professional interpreters were used at least once by 51%. Overall, only nine percent of respondents had received any training in how and why to work with a trained interpreter. Only 23.2% of respondents said the clinical service in which they currently worked encouraged them to use professional interpreters. Respondents working in services where use of professional interpreters was encouraged were more likely to be of the opinion that the hospital should systematically provide a professional interpreter to LFP patients (40.3%) as compared with those working in a department that discouraged use of professional interpreters (15.5%) and they used professional interpreters more often during the previous 6 months. Attitudes and practices regarding communication with LFP patients vary across professions and hospital departments. In

  11. Feasibility and pilot study of the effects of microfinance on mortality and nutrition in children under five amongst the very poor in India: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Shalini; Szatkowski, Lisa; Sinha, Ranjeet; Yaron, Gil; Fogarty, Andrew; Allen, Stephen; Choudhary, Sunil; Smyth, Alan R

    2014-07-23

    The United Nations Millennium Development Goals include targets for the health of children under five years old. Poor health is linked to poverty and microfinance initiatives are economic interventions that may improve health by breaking the cycle of poverty. However, there is a lack of reliable evidence to support this. In addition, microfinance schemes may have adverse effects on health, for example due to increased indebtedness. Rojiroti UK and the Centre for Promoting Sustainable Livelihood run an innovative microfinance scheme that provides microcredit via women's self-help groups (SHGs). This pilot study, conducted in rural Bihar (India), will establish whether it is feasible to collect anthropometric and mortality data on children under five years old and to conduct a limited cluster randomized trial of the Rojiroti intervention. We have designed a cluster randomized trial in which participating tolas (small communities within villages) will be randomized to either receive early (SHGs and microfinance at baseline) or late intervention (SHGs and microfinance after 18 months). Using predesigned questionnaires, demographic, and mortality data for the last year and information about participating mothers and their children will be collected and the weight, height, and mid upper arm circumference (MUAC) of children will be measured at baseline and at 18 months. The late intervention group will establish SHGs and microfinance support at this point and data collection will be repeated at 36 months.The primary outcome measure will be the mean weight for height z-score of children under five years old in the early and late intervention tolas at 18 months. Secondary outcome measures will be the mortality rate, mean weight for age, height for age, prevalence of underweight, stunting, and wasting among children under five years of age. Despite economic progress, marked inequalities in child health persist in India and Bihar is one of the worst affected states. There

  12. Transporte intra-hospitalar de pacientes sob ventilação invasiva: repercussões cardiorrespiratórias e eventos adversos Intrahospital transport of patients on invasive ventilation: cardiorespiratory repercussions and adverse events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Tami Suzuki Zuchelo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a ocorrência de alterações cardiorrespiratórias e identificar eventos adversos durante o transporte intra-hospitalar de pacientes sob ventilação invasiva. MÉTODOS: Estudo observacional prospectivo não-randomizado, conduzido em dois hospitais terciários, entre abril de 2005 e dezembro de 2006. Foram incluídos pacientes sob ventilação invasiva que necessitaram de transporte intra-hospitalar durante o período do estudo. Os critérios de exclusão foram: estar sob suspeita de morte encefálica; ter sido submetido a períodos de ventilação mecânica e de nebulização em tubo T; e ter sido transportado para o centro cirúrgico. Antes e após o transporte, os seguintes parâmetros foram avaliados: gasometria arterial, sinais vitais, uso de medicamentos através de uma bomba de infusão contínua, parâmetros do ventilador mecânico, duração do transporte, distância percorrida e número de profissionais envolvidos. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos 48 pacientes, num total de 58 transportes. Observou-se alteração cardiorrespiratória importante em 39 transportes, totalizando 86 episódios, assim como 16 eventos adversos relacionados à falha de equipamento e falha da equipe, dentre eles problemas com baterias e falhas de comunicação. CONCLUSÕES: Durante o transporte intra-hospitalar de pacientes submetidos à ventilação invasiva, alterações cardiorrespiratórias foram frequentes (67,2%, e eventos adversos ocorreram em 75,7% dos transportes realizados.OBJECTIVE: To determine the occurrence of cardiorespiratory alterations and to identify adverse events during the intrahospital transport of patients on invasive ventilation. METHODS: A prospective observational non-randomized study was conducted at two tertiary hospitals between April of 2005 and December of 2006. We included patients on invasive ventilation who required intrahospital transport during the study period. Exclusion criteria were as follows: being

  13. Shape-Up and Eat Right Families Pilot Program: Feasibility of a Weight Management Shared Medical Appointment Model in African-Americans With Obesity at an Urban Academic Medical Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitanjali Srivastava

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesDisparities in obesity care exist among African-American children and adults. We sought to test the feasibility of a pilot program, a 1-year family-based intervention for African-American families with obesity [shape up and eat right (SUPER], adopting the shared medical appointment model (SMA at an urban safety net hospital.OutcomesPrimary outcomes: (1 family attendance rate and (2 program satisfaction. Secondary outcomes: change in body mass index (BMI, eating behaviors, and sedentary activity.MethodsAdult parents (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 ≥18 years and their child(ren (BMI ≥ 85th percentile ages 6–12 years from adult or pediatric weight management clinics were recruited. One group visit per month (n = 12 consisting of a nutrition and exercise component was led by a nurse practitioner and registered dietitian. Height and weight were recorded during each visit. Participants were queried on program satisfaction, food logs and exercise journals, Food Stamp Program’s Food Behavior, and the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program food checklists.ResultsThirteen participants from lower socioeconomic zip codes consented [n = 5 mothers mean age 33 years, BMI of 47.4 kg/m2 (31.4–73.6 kg/m2; n = 8 children; mean age 9 years, BMI of 97.6th percentile (94–99th percentile; 60% enrolled in state Medicaid]. Average individual attendance was 23.4% (14–43%; n = 13; monthly session attendance rates declined from 100 to 40% by program completion; two families completed the program in entirety. Program was rated (n = 5 adults very satisfactory (40% and extremely satisfactory (60%. Pre-intervention, families rated their eating habits as fair and reported consuming sugar-sweetened beverages or sports drinks, more so than watching more than 1 h of television (p < 0.002 or video game/computer activity (p < 0.006 and consuming carbonated sodas (p < 0.004. Post-intervention, reducing salt

  14. Feasibility and acceptability of workers' health surveillance for fire fighters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plat, Marie-Christine J.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the feasibility and acceptability of a new workers' health surveillance (WHS) for fire fighters in a Dutch pilot-implementation project. In three fire departments, between November 2007 and February 2009, feasibility was tested with respect to i) worker intent

  15. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    be difficult to plan and conduct. It is sometimes assumed that pilot implementations are less complicated and risky than ordinary implementations. Pilot implementations are, however, neither prototyping nor small-scale versions of full-scale implementations; they are fundamentally different and have their own...

  16. The CUPCIG (CAM-Use in Primary Care in Germany) Study:Part I-Pain. Study Protocol of a Pilot-trial to Assess Feasibility, Acceptability and Perceived Effectiveness of CAM in Pain Disorders in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schencking, Martin; Sönnichsen, Andreas; Bassüner, Susanne; Redaelli, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    There is limited valid data available on CAM procedures for chronic joint and neuropathic pain in primary care in Germany. Indiviual CAM qualifications of the general practitioners (GPs) and the potential of cost reduction through CAM treatment are almost unknown. The aim of this pilot trial preceding the main study is to examine the survey mode, to estimate the response rate by GPs with or without an additional qualification for CAM, and to identify the status quo in therapeutic approaches for chronic pain disorders in primary care. This is a cross-sectional study with an ex post facto design among German GPs consisting of 2 parts: In a first step, a pilot trial precedes the main study targeting 200 GPs with and 200 GPs without additional qualification in CAM in a selected region. The results of the CUPCIG study comprise the distribution of pain types treated in primary care practices, the GPs' attitude toward complementary pain therapy, pharmacological or CAM treatment, the estimate of cost reduction through CAM treatment of pain, the application of diverse CAM procedures, and biographical data. The CUPCIG study serves to compile pain therapy approaches in primary care in Germany with respect to the individual CAM expertise of the GPs. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  17. Pilot Implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Maria Ie

    This PhD dissertation engages in the study of pilot (system) implementation. In the field of information systems, pilot implementations are commissioned as a way to learn from real use of a pilot system with real data, by real users during an information systems development (ISD) project and before...... the final system is implemented. Among others, their use is argued to investigate the fit between the technical design and the organisational use. But what is a pilot implementation really? In this dissertation, I set out to address this conceptual question. I initially investigate this question....... The analysis is conducted by means of a theoretical framework that centres on the concept infrastructure. With infrastructure I understand the relation between organised practice and the information systems supporting this practice. Thus, infrastructure is not a thing but a relational and situated concept...

  18. A tutorial on pilot studies: the what, why and how

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaila Afisi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pilot studies for phase III trials - which are comparative randomized trials designed to provide preliminary evidence on the clinical efficacy of a drug or intervention - are routinely performed in many clinical areas. Also commonly know as "feasibility" or "vanguard" studies, they are designed to assess the safety of treatment or interventions; to assess recruitment potential; to assess the feasibility of international collaboration or coordination for multicentre trials; to increase clinical experience with the study medication or intervention for the phase III trials. They are the best way to assess feasibility of a large, expensive full-scale study, and in fact are an almost essential pre-requisite. Conducting a pilot prior to the main study can enhance the likelihood of success of the main study and potentially help to avoid doomed main studies. The objective of this paper is to provide a detailed examination of the key aspects of pilot studies for phase III trials including: 1 the general reasons for conducting a pilot study; 2 the relationships between pilot studies, proof-of-concept studies, and adaptive designs; 3 the challenges of and misconceptions about pilot studies; 4 the criteria for evaluating the success of a pilot study; 5 frequently asked questions about pilot studies; 7 some ethical aspects related to pilot studies; and 8 some suggestions on how to report the results of pilot investigations using the CONSORT format.

  19. Johrei Family Healing: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Canter, P. H.; Brown, L. B.; Greaves, C.; Ernst, E.

    2006-01-01

    Johrei is a form of spiritual healing comprising “energy channelling” and light massage given either by a trained healer or, after some basic training, by anyone. This pilot trial aimed to identify any potential benefits of family-based Johrei practice in childhood eczema and for general health and to establish the feasibility of a subsequent randomised controlled trial. Volunteer families of 3-5 individuals, including at least one child with eczema were recruited to an uncontrolled pilot t...

  20. Feasibility and safety of exercise stress testing using an anti-gravity treadmill with Tc-99m tetrofosmin single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging: A pilot non-randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Patrick; Kayse, Regina; Rudick, Steven; Robbins, Nathan; Scheler, Jennifer; Harris, David; O'Donnell, Robert; Dwivedi, Alok K; Gerson, Myron C

    2017-08-31

    Exercise is the AHA/ACC guideline-recommended stress modality for myocardial perfusion imaging, but many patients are unable to exercise to target heart rate on a conventional treadmill. We examined the feasibility and safety of stress imaging using an anti-gravity treadmill in patients with perceived poor exercise capacity. 49 patients were recruited for stress testing by anti-gravity treadmill (n = 29) or to a regadenoson control group (n = 20). Seventeen anti-gravity test patients (59%) reached target heart rate obviating the need for a pharmacologic stress agent. Adverse effects of the anti-gravity treadmill were limited to minor muscle aches in 5 subjects. Stress myocardial perfusion image quality judged by 3 blinded readers on a 5-point scale was comparable for the anti-gravity treadmill (4.30 ± SD 0.87) vs pharmacologic stress (4.28 ± SD 0.66). Stress testing using an anti-gravity treadmill is feasible and may help some patients safely achieve target heart rate.

  1. Pilot project in rural western Madhya Pradesh, India, to assess the feasibility of using LED and solar-powered lanterns to remove kerosene lamps and related hazards from homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamania, S; Chouhan, R; Awasthi, A; Bendell, R; Marsden, N; Gibson, J; Whitaker, I S; Potokar, T S

    2015-05-01

    Globally, 300,000 deaths are estimated to occur annually and the incidence is far greater as a large majority of burns are small and go unreported. Ninety-five percent of the global burden of burns is found in low- and middle-income countries; however, there is relatively little in the literature regarding effective primary prevention in these areas. Flame is the most common cause of burn in Madhya Pradesh, the central state of India. The most common demographic among the burn unit inpatient of Choithram hospital Indore, is young women from 21 to 40 years of age, whose burns are primarily caused by kerosene lamps. A non electrical source of illumination is essential for every household in rural areas due to the infrequent and poor power supply. At the baseline, 23 kerosene lamp burns were reported by villagers in the past 5 years among the study population of this pilot project. A pilot project to investigate the strategies for reducing the incidence of domestic burns in rural villages around the city of Indore was performed, by replacing kerosene lamps with safer and more sustainable alternatives, including solar-powered and light-emitting diode (LED) lamps. A total of 1042 households were randomly chosen from 18 villages within the Malwa region of Madhya Pradesh (population of 28,825) to receive the alternative light source (670 LED and 372 solar lamps). We investigated the efficacy of this strategy of reducing the incidence of burns, measured the social acceptance by villagers, and quantified the cost implications and availability of LED lamps in rural communities with a high incidence of burns. Replacing kerosene lamps with LED and solar alternatives was deemed socially acceptable by 99.34% of the participants and reduced the cost of lighting for impoverished rural villagers by 85% over 1 year. We successfully demonstrated a significant decrease in the use of kerosene lamps (pkerosene lamps as an effective primary prevention strategy for reducing burns in rural

  2. A case-control, mono-center, open-label, pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of therapeutic touch in preventing radiation dermatitis in women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younus, Jawaid; Lock, Michael; Vujovic, Olga; Yu, Edward; Malec, Jitka; D'Souza, David; Stitt, Larry

    2015-08-01

    Therapeutic touch (TT) is a non-invasive commonly used complementary therapy. TT is based on the use of hand movements and detection of energy field congestion to correct imbalances. Improvement in subjective symptoms in a variety of clinical trials has been seen with TT. The effect of TT during radiotherapy for breast cancer is unknown. Women undergoing adjuvant radiation for Stage I/II breast cancer post conservative surgery were recruited for this cohort study. TT treatments were administered three times per week following radiation therapy. Feasibility was defined as an a priori threshold of 15 of 17 patients completing all TT treatments. The preventive effectiveness of TT was evaluated by documenting the 'time to develop' and the 'worst grade of radiation' dermatitis. Toxicity was assessed using NCIC CTC V3 dermatitis scale. Cosmetic rating was performed using the EORTC Breast Cosmetic Rating. The quality of life, mood and energy, and fatigue were assessed by EORTC QLQ C30, POMS, and BFI, respectively. The parameters were assessed at baseline, and serially during treatment. A total of 49 patients entered the study (17 in the TT Cohort and 32 in the Control Cohort). Median age in TT arm was 63 years and in control arm was 59 years. TT was considered feasible as all 17 patients screened completed TT treatment. There were no side effects observed with the TT treatments. In the TT Cohort, the worst grade of radiation dermatitis was grade II in nine patients (53%). Median time to develop the worst grade was 22 days. In the Control Cohort, the worst grade of radiation dermatitis was grade III in 1 patient. However, the most common toxicity grade was II in 15 patients (47%). Three patients did not develop any dermatitis. Median time to develop the worst grade in the control group was 31 days. There was no difference between cohorts for the overall EORTC cosmetic score and there was no significant difference in before and after study levels in quality of life, mood

  3. A pilot controlled trial to determine the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of a PAPA-based online intervention to address practical and perceptual barriers to medication adherence in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Chapman

    2015-11-01

    The intervention was effective in addressing perceptual barriers to adherence, as well as having a positive impact on IBD-related illness perceptions: increasing treatment control beliefs, and reducing concerns and emotional response. Fewer episodes of non-adherence were reported in the Intervention Group compared to the Control Group. Satisfaction with information about IBD medication improved following the intervention. However, the number of reported practical barriers was similar between the Intervention and Control groups, suggesting that other support might need to be incorporated into the intervention. Limitations of this study include potential bias due to drop-out, potential lack of generalisability to patient populations not recruited online and a reliance on self-report rather than objective outcome measures. However, this controlled trial suggests that the IBD-Helper intervention may be an effective, feasible and acceptable method of addressing perceptual barriers to adherence.

  4. Resveratrol exerts no effect on inflammatory response and delayed onset muscle soreness after a marathon in male athletes.: A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laupheimer, M W; Perry, M; Benton, S; Malliaras, P; Maffulli, N

    2014-09-01

    We investigated whether the inflammatory response and delayed onset of muscle soreness after a marathon are altered by resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic flavonoid antioxidant. Double blind placebo-controlled randomised pilot study. London Marathon. Marathon race participants. 7 healthy male athletes were randomised to receive Resveratrol (600 mg Resveratrol daily for 7 days immediately before the marathon) or a placebo. Blood samples taken 48 hours before and 18-32 hours after the marathon were analysed for white blood cell count (WBC) and C-reactive protein (CRP). A VAS score was taken at the same times as the blood samples to assess delayed onset muscle soreness. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of changes occurring between pre- and post- tests for WBC, CRP or VAS. There were no differences in immune response or delayed onset muscle soreness between resveratrol and placebo after a marathon. Further investigations are needed with longer treatment time and higher doses, analysing additional parameters such interleukins for a possible effect of resveratrol on the inflammatory response due to extensive exercise. To avoid a type II error, 17 subjects in each group would be required.

  5. Effect of locally tailored labour management guidelines on intrahospital stillbirths and birth asphyxia at the referral hospital of Zanzibar: a quasi-experimental pre-post study (The PartoMa study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaløe, N; Housseine, N; Meguid, T; Nielsen, B B; Jensen, Akg; Khamis, R S; Mohamed, A G; Ali, M M; Said, S M; van Roosmalen, J; Bygbjerg, I C

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate effect of locally tailored labour management guidelines (PartoMa guidelines) on intrahospital stillbirths and birth asphyxia. Quasi-experimental pre-post study investigating the causal pathway through changes in clinical practice. Tanzanian low-resource referral hospital, Mnazi Mmoja Hospital. Facility deliveries during baseline (1 October 2014 until 31 January 2015) and the 9th to 12th intervention month (1 October 2014 until 31 January 2015). Birth outcome was extracted from all cases of labouring women during baseline (n = 3690) and intervention months (n = 3087). Background characteristics and quality of care were assessed in quasi-randomly selected subgroups (n = 283 and n = 264, respectively). Stillbirths and neonates with 5-minute Apgar score ≤5. Stillbirth rate fell from 59 to 39 per 1000 total births (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.53-0.82), and subanalyses suggest that this was primarily due to reduction in intrahospital stillbirths. Apgar scores between 1 and 5 fell from 52 to 28 per 1000 live births (RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.41-0.69). Median time from last fetal heart assessment till delivery (or fetal death diagnosis) fell from 120 minutes (IQR 60-240) to 74 minutes (IQR 30-130) (Mann-Whitney test for difference, P human resources and substandard care remain major challenges, PartoMa guidelines were associated with improvements in care, leading to reductions in stillbirths and birth asphyxia. Findings furthermore emphasise the central role of improved fetal surveillance and restricted intrapartum oxytocin use in safety at birth. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: #PartoMa guidelines aided in reducing stillbirths and birth asphyxia at a Tanzanian low-resource hospital PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY: PartoMa guidelines help birth attendants in Tanzania to save lives Every year, 3 million babies die on the day of birth. The vast majority of these deaths occur in the poorest countries. If their mothers had received better care during birth, most babies would have survived. At Mnazi

  6. Pilot Greenhouse

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This pilot greenhouse was built in collaboration with the "Association des Maraichers" of Geneva in the frame of the study for making use of the heat rejected as warm water by CERN accelerators and experiments. Among other improvements, more automated and precise regulation systems for heating and ventilation were developed. See also 8305598X.

  7. Using clinical and robotic assessment tools to examine the feasibility of pairing tDCS with upper extremity physical therapy in patients with stroke and TBI: a consideration-of-concept pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Addie; Fritz, Stacy L; Liuzzo, Derek M; Newman-Norlund, Roger; Herter, Troy M

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may provide a safe, non-invasive technique for modulating neural excitability during neurorehabilitation. 1) Assess feasibility and potential effectiveness of tDCS as an adjunct to standard upper extremity (UE) physical therapy (PT) for motor impairments resulting from neurological insult. 2) Determine sustainability of improvements over a six month period. Five participants with chronic neurologic insult (stroke or traumatic brain injury > 6 months prior) completed 24 sessions (40 minutes, three times/week) of UE-PT combined with bihemispheric tDCS delivered at 1.5 mA over the motor cortex during the first 15 minutes of each PT session. Outcomes were assessed using clinical (UE Fugl-Meyer, Purdue Pegboard, Box and Block, Stroke Impact Scale) and robotic (unimanual and bimanual motor control) measures. Change in scores and associated effects sizes from Pre-test to Post-test and a six month Follow-up were calculated for each participant and group as a whole. Scores on UE Fugl-Meyer, Box and Block, Purdue Pegboard, Stroke Impact Scale, and robotic measures improved from Pre- to Post-test. Improvements on UE Fugl-Meyer, Box and Block, and robotic measures were largely sustained at six months. Combining bihemispheric tDCS with UE-PT in individuals with neurological insult warrants further investigation.

  8. Transporte intra-hospitalar de pacientes internados em UTI Neonatal: fatores de risco para intercorrências Intra-hospital transport of neonatal intensive care patients: risk factors for complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Luiza P. Vieira

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar os fatores associados à hipotermia e ao aumento da necessidade de oxigênio e/ou suporte ventilatório durante o transporte intra-hospitalar de pacientes internados em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva neonatal. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo de todos os pacientes internados na unidade neonatal que necessitaram de transporte intra-hospitalar de janeiro de 1997 a dezembro de 2000, entre segundas-feiras e sextas-feiras, das 8h às 17h. Fatores associados à hipotermia e ao aumento da necessidade de oxigênio e/ou de suporte ventilatório durante e até duas horas após o transporte foram estudados por meio de regressão logística. RESULTADOS: Foram realizados 502 transportes no período. Os pacientes tinham em média 2.000g, 35 semanas de idade gestacional ao nascer e 22 dias de vida. As principais indicações do transporte foram: cirurgia e realização de exames de imagem. A hipotermia ocorreu em 17% dos transportes e o aumento da necessidade de oxigênio e/ou de suporte ventilatório em 7%. Fatores associados à hipotermia foram: duração do transporte >3h (OR=2,1; IC95%=1,2-3,6, presença de malformações neurológicas (OR=1,7; IC95%=1,1-2,5, transporte realizado em 1997 (OR=1,7; IC95%=1,1-2,6 e peso no transporte >3.500g (OR=0,3; IC95%=0,16-0,68. Fatores de risco para o aumento da necessidade de oxigênio e/ou de suporte ventilatório foram: idade gestacional ao nascimento em semanas (OR=0,9; IC95%=0,8-0,9, idade em dias no transporte (OR=1,0; IC95%=1,0-1,1 e presença de malformações gastrintestinais e geniturinárias (OR=3,1; IC95%=1,6-6,2. CONCLUSÕES: As intercorrências relativas ao transporte intra-hospitalar são freqüentes nos neonatos em UTI e estão associadas às condições dos pacientes e dos transportes.OBJECTIVE: Evaluate factors associated with hypothermia and increased need of oxygen and/or ventilatory support during intra-hospital transport of neonatal intensive care patients. METHODS: Prospective study of

  9. Safety, feasibility and efficacy of a rapid ART initiation in pregnancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Safety, feasibility and efficacy of a rapid ART initiation in pregnancy pilot programme in Cape Town, South Africa. S Black, R Zulliger, L Myer, R Marcus, S Jeneker, R Taliep, D Pienaar, R Wood, L-G Bekker ...

  10. Feasibility and acceptability to patients of a longitudinal system for evaluating cancer-related symptoms and quality of life: pilot study of an e/Tablet data-collection system in academic oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Amy P; Herndon, James E; Wheeler, Jane L; Day, Jeannette M; Hood, Linda; Patwardhan, Meenal; Shaw, Heather; Lyerly, Herbert Kim

    2009-06-01

    Programmed, notebook-style, personal computers ("e/Tablets") can collect symptom and quality-of-life (QOL) data at the point of care. Patients use an e/Tablet in the clinic waiting area to complete electronic surveys. Information then travels wirelessly to a server, which generates a real-time report for use during the clinical visit. The objective of this study was to determine whether academic oncology patients find e/Tablets logistically acceptable and a satisfactory means of communicating symptoms to providers during repeated clinic visits. Sixty-six metastatic breast cancer patients at Duke Breast Cancer Clinic participated. E/Tablets were customized to electronically administer a satisfaction/acceptability survey, several validated questionnaires, and the Patient Care Monitor (PCM) review of symptoms survey. At each of the four visits within six months, participants completed the patient satisfaction/acceptability survey, which furnished data for the current analysis. Participant demographics were: mean age of 54 years, 77% Caucasian, and 47% with less than a college education. Participants reported that e/Tablets were easy to read (94%), easy to navigate (99%), and had a comfortable weight (90%); they found it easy to respond to questions using the e/Tablet (98%). Seventy-five percent initially indicated satisfaction with PCM for reporting symptoms; this proportion increased over time. By the last visit, 88% of participants indicated that they would recommend the PCM to other patients; 74% felt that the e/Tablet helped them remember symptoms to report to their clinician. E/Tablets offered a feasible and acceptable method for collecting longitudinal patient-reported symptom and QOL data within an academic, tertiary care, breast cancer clinic.

  11. Safety and Feasibility of Intravesical Instillation of Botulinum Toxin-A in Hydrogel-based Slow-release Delivery System in Patients With Interstitial Cystitis-Bladder Pain Syndrome: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Yishai H; Zisman, Amnon; Jeshurun-Gutshtat, Michal; Gerassi, Tami; Hakim, Gil; Vinshtok, Yuri; Stav, Kobi

    2018-01-04

    To assess the feasibility and the safety of a mixture instillation of TC-3 gel, a novel reverse-thermal gelation hydrogel, and botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A) for the treatment of interstitial cystitis-bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS). TC-3 gel-BTX-A mix is instilled into the bladder as liquid, solidifies because of body heat, and gradually dissolves to release BTX-A for several hours. A single intravesical instillation of 200 U BTX-A premixed with 40 mL TC-3 gel was delivered to the bladder. Adverse events and preliminary efficacy outcome measures were assessed: bladder diary, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index (ICSI) and Interstitial Cystitis Problem Index (ICPI) at baseline and at 2, 6, and 12 weeks. A total of 15 severely symptomatic patients with IC/BPS (ICSI and ICPI score ranges 12-19 and 12-16, respectively; median VAS = 7) were enrolled (male and female = 4 and 11, ages 24-76). In terms of safety, no increase in VAS score was noted at instillation. All adverse events were transient and mild, the most common being temporary mild constipation (n = 4, 26%). The mean VAS at baseline vs week 12 was 6.6 ± 2.7 vs 5.3 ± 2.8 (P = .044). The mean ICSI and ICPI scores were reduced at week 12 compared with baseline (15.4 ± 2.4 vs 12.9 ± 4.3, P = .004, and 14.8 ± 1.4 vs 11.9 ± 4.0, P = .004, respectively). The mean number of voids per night at baseline decreased for 6 weeks (3.3 ± 2.1 vs 1.8 ± 0.9, P = .046) and then returned to baseline level at week 12. Intravesical instillation of a TC-3 gel-BTX-A mixture is safe and tolerable. Preliminary results suggest temporary efficacy lasting for a few weeks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Study of the Feasibility of FDG-PET/CT to Systematically Detect and Quantify Differential Metabolic Effects of Chronic Tobacco Use in Organs of the Whole Body-A Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torigian, Drew A; Green-McKenzie, Judith; Liu, Xianling; Shofer, Frances S; Werner, Thomas; Smith, Catherine E; Strasser, Andrew A; Moghbel, Mateen C; Parekh, Ami H; Choi, Grace; Goncalves, Marcus D; Spaccarelli, Natalie; Gholami, Saied; Kumar, Prithvi S; Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K; Mesaros, Clementina; Alavi, Abass

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to systematically detect and quantify differential effects of chronic tobacco use in organs of the whole body. Twenty healthy male subjects (10 nonsmokers and 10 chronic heavy smokers) were enrolled. Subjects underwent whole-body FDG-PET/CT, diagnostic unenhanced chest CT, mini-mental state examination, urine testing for oxidative stress, and serum testing. The organs of interest (thyroid, skin, skeletal muscle, aorta, heart, lung, adipose tissue, liver, spleen, brain, lumbar spinal bone marrow, and testis) were analyzed on FDG-PET/CT images to determine their metabolic activities using standardized uptake value (SUV) or metabolic volumetric product (MVP). Measurements were compared between subject groups using two-sample t tests or Wilcoxon rank-sum tests as determined by tests for normality. Correlational analyses were also performed. FDG-PET/CT revealed significantly decreased metabolic activity of lumbar spinal bone marrow (MVPmean: 29.8 ± 9.7 cc vs 40.8 ± 11.6 cc, P = 0.03) and liver (SUVmean: 1.8 ± 0.2 vs 2.0 ± 0.2, P = 0.049) and increased metabolic activity of visceral adipose tissue (SUVmean: 0.35 ± 0.10 vs 0.26 ± 0.06, P = 0.02) in chronic smokers compared to nonsmokers. Normalized visceral adipose tissue volume was also significantly decreased (P = 0.04) in chronic smokers. There were no statistically significant differences in the metabolic activity of other assessed organs. Subclinical organ effects of chronic tobacco use are detectable and quantifiable on FDG-PET/CT. FDG-PET/CT may, therefore, play a major role in the study of systemic toxic effects of tobacco use in organs of the whole body for clinical or research purposes. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Plan for the civil reprocessing pilot plant of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.Y.; Chen, M.

    1987-01-01

    Based on the R and D work, experience on plant operation and site situation, the necessity and feasibility of building a pilot plant for civil reprocessing in China are discussed. The capacity of 100 kg HM/day (LWR) and 3 kg HM/day (MTR) has been proposed. The plant consists of cold testing facility and hot pilot facility. It is expected to complete the pilot plant in 1990's. This paper also describes the purpose, scale, process and equipment of the pilot plant

  14. Feasibility Study of the Social Enterprise Intervention with Homeless Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kristin M.; Xie, Bin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To reduce mental health symptoms and high-risk behaviors and increase social support and service utilization among street-living youth, the authors conducted a pilot study to assess the feasibility of the social enterprise intervention (SEI) at a homeless youth agency. Method: Convenience sampling was used to recruit 16 street-living…

  15. Intermittent Renewable Management Pilot Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiliccote, Sila [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Homan, Gregory [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Anderson, Robert [Olivine, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States); Hernandez, John [Pacific Gas & Electric Company, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The Intermittent Renewable Management Pilot - Phase 2 (IRM2) was designed to study the feasibility of demand-side resources to participate into the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) wholesale market as proxy demand resources (PDR). The pilot study focused on understanding the issues related with direct participation of third-parties and customers including customer acceptance; market transformation challenges (wholesale market, technology); technical and operational feasibility; and value to the rate payers, DR resource owners and the utility on providing an enabling mechanism for DR resources into the wholesale markets. The customer had the option of committing to either three contiguous hour blocks for 24 days or six contiguous hours for 12 days a month with day-ahead notification that aligned with the CAISO integrated forward market. As a result of their being available, the customer was paid $10/ kilowatt (kW)-month for capacity in addition to CAISO energy settlements. The participants were limited to no more than a 2 megawatt (MW) capacity with a six-month commitment. Four participants successfully engaged in the pilot. In this report, we provide the description of the pilot, participant performance results, costs and value to participants as well as outline some of the issues encountered through the pilot. Results show that participants chose to participate with storage and the value of CAISO settlements were significantly lower than the capacity payments provided by the utility as incentive payments. In addition, this pilot revealed issues both on the participant side and system operations side. These issues are summarized in the report.The Intermittent Renewable Management Pilot - Phase 2 (IRM2) was designed to study the feasibility of demand-side resources to participate into the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) wholesale market as proxy demand resources (PDR). The pilot study focused on understanding the issues related with

  16. 14-plex Feasibility Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotongan, Victoria Hazel [Native Village of Unalakleet

    2013-06-21

    The Native Village of Unalakleet project was a feasibility study for a retrofit of a “tribally owned” three story, 14 apartment complex located in Unalakleet, Alaska. The program objective and overall goal was to create a plan for retrofitting to include current appraised value and comparable costs of new construction to determine genuine feasibility as low-income multi-family housing for tribal members.

  17. Feasibility of a responsive business scorecard - a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woerd, K.F.; van den Brink, T.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    Several authors have pointed at opportunities to develop the well-established Business Balanced Scorecard into a Scorecard that enables companies to integrate sustainability into their strategy. Recent case studies and research experiences show that social and environmental targets are more widely

  18. Mindfulness for adolescent chronic pain: a pilot feasibility study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Chronic pain is common in paediatric populations and many patients do not respond to the currently available evidence-based treatments. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) have a growing evidence-base in adults, but evidence is limited in youth with chronic pain. Methods: We conducted an open-label ...

  19. Feasible mathematics II

    CERN Document Server

    Remmel, Jeffrey

    1995-01-01

    Perspicuity is part of proof. If the process by means of which I get a result were not surveyable, I might indeed make a note that this number is what comes out - but what fact is this supposed to confirm for me? I don't know 'what is supposed to come out' . . . . 1 -L. Wittgenstein A feasible computation uses small resources on an abstract computa­ tion device, such as a 'lUring machine or boolean circuit. Feasible math­ ematics concerns the study of feasible computations, using combinatorics and logic, as well as the study of feasibly presented mathematical structures such as groups, algebras, and so on. This volume contains contributions to feasible mathematics in three areas: computational complexity theory, proof theory and algebra, with substantial overlap between different fields. In computational complexity theory, the polynomial time hierarchy is characterized without the introduction of runtime bounds by the closure of certain initial functions under safe composition, predicative recursion on nota...

  20. The ENIQ pilot study: current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaitre, P.; Eriksen, B.; Crutzen, S. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre, Petten (Netherlands); Hansch, M. [Preussische Elektrizitaets-AG (Preussenelektra), Hannover (Germany); Whittle, J. [AEA Technology, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    1998-11-01

    A pilot study is currently being carried out by ENIQ (European Network for Inspection Qualification) in order to explore the issues involved in inspection qualification applied along the general principles of the European methodology. The components selected for the pilot study are austenitic pipe to pipe and pipe to elbows welds typical of those in BWR recirculation loops. A range of defect parameters has been defined. A suitable inspection procedure designed to find the designated defects will be applied to geometrically representative test pieces. The procedure/equipment will be qualified through open trials and technical justification. The personnel qualification will be done in a blind way. Once all features of the inspection system will have been qualified an in-service inspection will be simulated in order to test the feasibility of the qualification approach followed. In this paper the current status of this pilot study is discussed. (orig.)

  1. No Child Left Inside Week: Pilot Program

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Jamie C.

    2013-01-01

    This program evaluation assessed the feasibility and effectiveness of a free No Child Left Inside (NCLI) week-long outdoor program to coincide with the Utah state-designated No Child Left Inside Week. The pilot program was implemented at the community level in Cache Valley, Utah, in 2012. Families attended eleven activities throughout the week that included hands-on experience and participation. A community BioBlitz was also planned as a conclusion to the week. Survey results demonstrate incr...

  2. Pilot Boarding Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pilot boarding areas are locations at sea where pilots familiar with local waters board incoming vessels to navigate their passage to a destination port. Pilotage is...

  3. [Evaluation of the feasibility of a program of adapted physical activity in day hospital of digestive oncology: From the point of view of patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespel, Céline; Brami, Cloé; de Boissieu, Paul; Mazza, Camille; Chauvet, Kevin; Lemoine, Amélie; Gavlak, Benoit; Léandri, Chloé; Brasseur, Mathilde; Bertin, Eric; Bouché, Olivier

    2018-02-06

    Adapted physical activity (APA) is recognized as an effective supportive care for asthenia and quality of life in oncology. Before an APA program was organized, the feasibility of such a program was evaluated among the patients. Descriptive, prospective, semi-qualitative, single-center study over a 3-month period in patients treated with ambulatory chemotherapy for digestive cancer. A self-questionnaire was offered to all patients to evaluate their practice and knowledge about APA. In ten patients, fatigue, anxiety and depression were assessed, before and after 9 weeks of hospital-based APA. The scores were compared by matched Student test. Of the 123 patients treated, 80 questionnaires (65%) were exploitable. Before the diagnosis of cancer, 40 patients (50%) were physically active, 20% after (n=16). The reasons for not practicing were: lack of interest/not the idea (42%), lack of time (34%), do not believe in profit (9%), too expensive (8%). Fifty-three patients (66%) were interested in the program. In 10 patients, the APA program significantly reduced the depression score (P=0.024) and a non-significant improvement in anxiety and fatigue. This study shows that patients treated with chemotherapy are unaware of the usefulness of APA and that medical information can improve adherence to such a program. The establishment of an intra-hospital APA program proved to be possible and relevant. Copyright © 2018 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Nutrition education program for food bank clients: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many low income families depend on foods from food banks. The objective of the study was to determine program content and examine feasibility of a pilot nutrition education program for food bank clients. Formative research was conducted with staff at a local food bank and its pantries and adult clie...

  5. Feasibility study of the commercial production of densified biomass fuel at Klamath Falls, Oregon. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-08-01

    The project began with assessments of local biomass resources which could serve as feedstock for a DBF plant, and the potential customer markets for DBF. Based on these analyses, a pilot densification plant was designed and installed for purposes of trial operations and evaluation. In addition, exploration for geothermal resources was conducted in order to confirm a suitable feedstock dehydration heat source. The results of this exploration, and of the pilot plant's trial operations, were then used to determine requirements for a commercial-scale DBF plant, and the feasibility of upgrading the pilot plant for commercial-scale operations.

  6. Technical Analysis Feasibility Study on Smart Microgrid System in Sekolah Tinggi Teknik PLN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyanto, Heri

    2018-02-01

    Nowadays application of new and renewable energy as main resource of power plant has greatly increased. High penetration of renewable energy into the grid will influence the quality and reliability of the electricity system, due to the intermittent characteristic of new and renewable energy resources. Smart grid or microgrid technology has the ability to deal with this intermittent characteristic especially if these renewable energy resources integrated to grid in large scale, so it can improve the reliability and efficiency of the grid. We plan to implement smart microgrid system at Sekolah Tinggi Teknik PLN as a pilot project. Before the pilot project start, the feasibility study must be conducted. In this feasibility study, the renewable energy resources and load characteristic at the site will be measured. Then the technical aspect of this feasibility study will be analyzed. This paper explains that analysis of ths feasibility study.

  7. Feasibility studies and technological innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, Frede Kloster; Lund, Henrik; Sukkumnoed, Decharut

    2004-01-01

    The chapter offers a tool to conduct feasibility studies and focuses on how to make feasibility studies in a situation with environmental concerns, in which technological innovation and institutional chnages are among the objectives.......The chapter offers a tool to conduct feasibility studies and focuses on how to make feasibility studies in a situation with environmental concerns, in which technological innovation and institutional chnages are among the objectives....

  8. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations

  9. Preoperative therapeutic programme for elderly patients scheduled for elective abdominal oncological surgery: A randomized controlled pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dronkers, J.J.; Lamberts, H.; Reutelingsperger, I.M.M.D.; Naber, R.H.; Dronkers-Landman, C.M.; Veldman, A.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Investigation of the feasibility and preliminary effect of a short-term intensive preoperative exercise programme for elderly patients scheduled for elective abdominal oncological surgery. Design: Single-blind randomized controlled pilot study. Setting: Ordinary hospital in the

  10. Explosive Formulation Pilot Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Pilot Plant for Explosive Formulation supports the development of new explosives that are comprised of several components. This system is particularly beneficial...

  11. Road authority pilot and feasibility study. Evaluation to Realise a common Approach to Self-explaining European Roads ERASER, Deliverable No. 3 and 4, Report No. WP03-03 and WP04-04. Project initiated by “ERA-NET ROAD – Coordination and Implementation of Road Research in Europe”.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, L. Pumberger, A. Lawton, B. Charman, S. & Wijnen, W.

    2012-01-01

    This deliverable describes a draft version of a tool that has been developed within ERASER Work Package 3 (Road authorities pilot) to help European road authorities make decisions to improve the safety and ‘self-explainingness’ of their roads. For this tool, the concept of self-explaining roads

  12. Evaluating the Feasibility of RESCUE: An Adjunctive HAI-Based Intervention for Veterans with PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Amount: $709,517 Study/Product Aim(s) • To develop and pilot test feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of RESCUE, an adjunct scalable human animal ...Continued animal shelter collaboration. 5. Completed case series, conducted qualitative interviews, and finalized study protocol. 6. Initiated...treatment. Recovery through Engagement with Shelter Canines, Understanding, and Exposure (RESCUE), is an adjunctive, Human Animal Interaction (HAI

  13. Fatores associados à hipotermia durante o transporte intra-hospitalar em pacientes internados em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal Pequeño para la edad gestacional: repercusión en las habilidades motoras finas Factors associated with hypothermia during intra-hospital transport in patients assisted in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Luiza P. Vieira

    2011-03-01

    transporte fueron estudiados por regresión logística. RESULTADOS: De los 1197 transportes realizados en el periodo de estudio, 1191 (99,5% atendieron a los criterios de inclusión. Las enfermedades de base de los 640 niños estudiados (edad gestacional: 35,0±3,8sem; peso al nacer: 2341±888g fueron: malformaciones únicas o múltiples (71%, infecciones (7,7%, hemorragia peri/intraventricular (5,5%, angustia respiratoria (4,0% y otros (11,8%. Los pacientes fueron transportados para realización de cirugías (22,6%, resonancia magnética (10,6%, tomografía (20,9%, exámenes contrastados (18,2% y otros procedimientos (27,7%. La hipotermia ocurrió en 182 (15,3% transportes y se asoció al (OR; IC95%: peso al transporte OBJECTIVE: To determine frequency and factors associated with hypothermia during intra-hospital transports of patients assisted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. METHODS: Cross-sectional study nested in a prospective cohort of infants submitted to intra-hospital transports performed by a trained team from January 1997 to December 2008 at a NICU of a public university hospital. Transports of patients aged more than one year and/or with weight higher than 10kg were excluded. Factors associated with hypothermia during intra-hospital transports were studied by logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Among the 1,197 transports performed during the studied period, 1,191 (99.5% met the inclusion criteria. The 640 transported infants had mean gestational age of 35.0±3.8 weeks and birth weight of 2341±888g. They presented the following underline diseases: single or multiple malformations (71.0%, infections (7.7%, peri/intraventricular hemorrhage (5.5%, respiratory distress (4.0% and others (11.1%. Patients were transported for surgical procedures (22.6%, magnetic resonance (10.6%, tomography imaging (20.9%, contrasted exams (18.2%, and others (27.7%. Hypothermia occurred in 182 (15.3% transports and was associated with (OR; 95%CI: weight at transport <1000g (3

  14. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be

  15. The feasibility of domestic CO2 emissions trading in Poland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauff, J.

    2000-01-01

    In early 2000, neither a comprehensive upstream system nor an all-encompassing downstream approach to CO2 emissions permit trading seems feasible in Poland. However, a pilot emissions trading system in the power and Combined Heat and Power (CHP) sector isthought to be a realistic option in the ne...... needed for Poland. It should include a close look at the implications of EU climateprotection policies and the effects of the liberalization of international electricity markets on domestic policy options....... to gather relevant experiences for the possible future introduction of a comprehensive system and for the emerging international emissionstrading system.To determine whether a pilot system is desirable, however, an extensive and comparative analysis of different climate protection policy options is still...

  16. Feasibility studies for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hladky, E.

    2000-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with planning of decommission of the NPPs A1, V1 and V2 Bohunice and Mochovce. It was concluded that: Used model for decommissioning parameters assessment has been suitable for elaboration of initial decommissioning plans (feasibility studies); Basic assessment of main decommissioning parameters and basic comparison of various decommissioning options have been possible; Improvement of the model and corresponding software is desirable and works on software improvement began one year ago; V1-NPP initial decommissioning plan should be actualized, because initial decommissioning plan does not correspond by its content and structure to requirements of Act No. 130/98 and Nuclear Regulatory Authority Degree No. 246/99; Strategy of radioactive wastes treatment and conditioning together with technical provisions at Jaslovske Bohunice site was changed in comparison with the assumptions in 1991-92; Considered V1 NPP decommissioning options are necessary to be re-evaluated in accordance with latest development of knowledge and approaches to NPP decommissioning in the world; Specific unit costs are substantially and differentially changed in comparison with the assumptions in 1991-92; Necessity to take into account technical changes resulted from V1 NPP reconstruction. (author)

  17. GINGER: A feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Virgilio, Angela D. V.; Belfi, Jacopo; Ni, Wei-Tou; Beverini, Nicolo; Carelli, Giorgio; Maccioni, Enrico; Porzio, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    GINGER (Gyroscopes IN General Relativity) is a proposal for an Earth-based experiment to measure the Lense-Thirring (LT) and de Sitter effects. GINGER is based on ring lasers, which are the most sensitive inertial sensors to measure the rotation rate of the Earth. We show that two ring lasers, one at maximum signal and the other horizontal, would be the simplest configuration able to retrieve the GR effects. Here, we discuss this configuration in detail showing that it would have the capability to test LT effect at 1%, provided the accuracy of the scale factor of the instrument at the level of 1 part in 1012 is reached. In principle, one single ring laser could do the test, but the combination of the two ring lasers gives the necessary redundancy and the possibility to verify that the systematics of the lasers are sufficiently small. The discussion can be generalised to seismology and geodesy and it is possible to say that signals 10-12 orders of magnitude below the Earth rotation rate can be studied; the proposed array can be seen as the basic element of multi-axial systems, and the generalisation to three dimensions is feasible adding one or two devices and monitoring the relative angles between different ring lasers. This simple array can be used to measure with very high precision the amplitude of angular rotation rate (the length of the day, LOD), its short term variations, and the angle between the angular rotation vector and the horizontal ring laser. Finally this experiment could be useful to probe gravity at fundamental level giving indications on violations of Einstein Equivalence Principle and Lorenz Invariance and possible chiral effects in the gravitational field.

  18. Pilot Weather Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aviation weather reports relayed from pilots to FAA air traffic controllers or National Weather Service personnel. Elements include sky cover, turbulence, wind...

  19. CERN pilot greenhouse

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This pilot installation was situated near Bld. BA6 opposite to the main entrance of the Meyrin site, with respect to Route de Meyrin. See Weekly Bulletin 3/83, and also photo 8305594X, 8505898X, 8302200.

  20. Methods and processes for development of a CONSORT extension for reporting pilot randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabane, Lehana; Hopewell, Sally; Lancaster, Gillian A; Bond, Christine M; Coleman, Claire L; Campbell, Michael J; Eldridge, Sandra M

    2016-01-01

    Feasibility and pilot studies are essential components of planning or preparing for a larger randomized controlled trial (RCT). They are intended to provide useful information about the feasibility of the main RCT-with the goal of reducing uncertainty and thereby increasing the chance of successfully conducting the main RCT. However, research has shown that there are serious inadequacies in the reporting of pilot and feasibility studies. Reasons for this include a lack of explicit publication policies for pilot and feasibility studies in many journals, unclear definitions of what constitutes a pilot or feasibility RCT/study, and a lack of clarity in the objectives and methodological focus. All these suggest that there is an urgent need for new guidelines for reporting pilot and feasibility studies. The aim of this paper is to describe the methods and processes in our development of an extension to the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) Statement for reporting pilot and feasibility RCTs, that are executed in preparation for a future, more definitive RCT. There were five overlapping parts to the project: (i) the project launch -which involved establishing a working group and conducting a review of the literature; (ii) stakeholder engagement -which entailed consultation with the CONSORT group, journal editors and publishers, the clinical trials community, and funders; (iii) a Delphi process -used to assess the agreement of experts on initial definitions and to generate a reporting checklist for pilot RCTs, based on the 2010 CONSORT statement extension applicable to reporting pilot studies; (iv) a consensus meeting -to discuss, add, remove, or modify checklist items, with input from experts in the field; and (v) write-up and implementation- which included a guideline document which gives an explanation and elaboration (E&E) and which will provide advice for each item, together with examples of good reporting practice. This final part also included a

  1. The DanCavas Pilot Study of Multifaceted Screening for Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease in Men and Women Aged 65-74 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, T V; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Rasmussen, L M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: This pilot study of a large population based randomised screening trial investigated feasibility, acceptability, and relevance (prevalence of clinical and subclinical cardiovascular disease [CVD] and proportion receiving insufficient prevention) of a multifaceted screening f...

  2. Morbidity follow-up feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.

    1988-02-01

    The report reviews the available sources of data within Canada for undertaking morbidity follow-up studies to both supplement and complement studies using Canadian mortality data. Such studies would permit earlier detection and more sensitive measures of differences in risk for exposures to radiation and allow timely measures to be taken to minimize any occupational and environmental health risk to radiation workers. The technical feasibility of using these sources was reviewed using the criteria of adequate personal identifying information, automation of data records, file size and the accuracy of the morbidity diagnosis information. At the present time certain of the provincial cancer registry files meet these criteria best. A work plan was prepared suggesting a morbidity pilot study to clarify the role of occupational factors in the incidence of cancer among radiation workers using the Alberta Cancer Registry file and the National Dose Registry (NDR) file of radiation workers. For the longer term a full cohort study using the National Cancer Incidence Reporting System (NCIRS) and the NDR workers as the study population would provide information on all radiation workers on a national basis. A work plan was prepared and some initial format conversion of historical data was undertaken to begin developing the NCIRS into a data base suitable for long-term health studies

  3. Methylphenidate protocol: feasibility in a pediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTraglia, J

    1991-12-01

    This report examines the feasibility of double blind individual trials of methylphenidate versus placebo in a general pediatric practice to assess benefit of this medication in the treatment of attention deficit disorder. Children presenting with the diagnosis of attention deficit disorder were enrolled in a three-week protocol. The first week was a baseline week during which teachers and parents completed the Connors rating scales. During the second and third weeks of each trial, placebo or methylphenidate was given for a week each in an unknown order to parents, teachers or the investigator. Respective Connors rating scales were also completed for each of these weeks. At the end of the third week, the three parent questionnaires and the three teacher questionnaires were returned to the investigator for scoring and disclosure about findings. During a pilot period, 53% of the trials were improperly completed. Reasons for this were addressed and with simple measures the rate of successful completion was raised to 83%. During the study phase, 43% of the children were found to be hyperactive but they did not benefit from medication. In six trials there was disagreement between teachers and parents. The completed trials and many of the incompleted trials were helpful in the assessment of the children with attention deficit disorder and their response to medication. It is felt that this approach is suitable for a private general pediatric practice.

  4. The Society of European Robotic Gynaecological Surgery (SERGS) Pilot Curriculum for robot assisted gynecological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, Peter; Kimmig, Rainer; Lecuru, Fabrice; Persson, Jan; Ponce, Jordi; Degueldre, Michel; Verheijen, René

    2018-02-01

    To set forth experiences in the context of the SERGS Pilot Curriculum-the first standardized educational program for robotic use in gynecological surgery-in terms of feasibility, effectiveness and potential for certification. The Society of European Robotic Gynecological Surgery (SERGS) outlined a Pilot Curriculum for standardized education in robot-assisted laparoscopic gynecological surgery. Its feasibility and acceptance were checked in the form of a fellowship pilot program conducted at four European Centers of Excellence for robot-assisted surgery. Results and conclusions derived from this pilot program are presented. The SERGS Pilot Curriculum defines criteria for a standardized training and assessment of performance, boosts the learning curve of the candidate and increases contentment at work. Regarding face validity, it proves valuable as finally all candidates could perform the outlined procedure safely and efficiently without supervision. Due to the immense increase of robotic procedures in gynecology standardized training curricula are indispensable. This seems highly necessary to ensure patients' safety and surgical outcome. The SERGS Pilot Curriculum sets standards for a stepwise theoretical and practical training in gynecological robotic procedures. It seems feasible as instrument for accreditation as gynecologic robotic surgeon. Though as a general applicable guideline for systematic training in robot-assisted surgery, a definite curriculum should have a more definite timeline and implementation of a structured assessment of performance.

  5. Flathead Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belvin Pete: Ed McCarthy; Krista Gordon; Chris Bergen; Rhett Good

    2006-10-03

    The study shall assess the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on lands selected and owned by the Salish and Kootenai Tribes and shall examine the potential for the development of solar and biomass resources located on Tribal Lands.

  6. Base compaction specification feasibility analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this research is to establish the technical engineering and cost : analysis concepts that will enable WisDOT management to objectively evaluate the : feasibility of switching construction specification philosophies for aggregate base...

  7. User Participation in Pilot Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torkilsheyggi, Arnvør Martinsdóttir á; Hertzum, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Pilot implementations provide users with real-work experiences of how a system will affect their daily work before the design of the system is finalized. On the basis of a pilot implementation of a system for coordinating the transport of patients by hospital porters, we investigate pilot...... the use of the pilot system because the porters and nurses learned about their needs throughout the pilot implementation, not just during use. Finally, we discuss how the scope and duration of a pilot implementation influence the conditions for participation....

  8. DIRAC universal pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagni, F.; McNab, A.; Luzzi, C.; Krzemien, W.; Consortium, DIRAC

    2017-10-01

    In the last few years, new types of computing models, such as IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service) and IAAC (Infrastructure as a Client), gained popularity. New resources may come as part of pledged resources, while others are in the form of opportunistic ones. Most but not all of these new infrastructures are based on virtualization techniques. In addition, some of them, present opportunities for multi-processor computing slots to the users. Virtual Organizations are therefore facing heterogeneity of the available resources and the use of an Interware software like DIRAC to provide the transparent, uniform interface has become essential. The transparent access to the underlying resources is realized by implementing the pilot model. DIRAC’s newest generation of generic pilots (the so-called Pilots 2.0) are the “pilots for all the skies”, and have been successfully released in production more than a year ago. They use a plugin mechanism that makes them easily adaptable. Pilots 2.0 have been used for fetching and running jobs on every type of resource, being it a Worker Node (WN) behind a CREAM/ARC/HTCondor/DIRAC Computing element, a Virtual Machine running on IaaC infrastructures like Vac or BOINC, on IaaS cloud resources managed by Vcycle, the LHCb High Level Trigger farm nodes, and any type of opportunistic computing resource. Make a machine a “Pilot Machine”, and all diversities between them will disappear. This contribution describes how pilots are made suitable for different resources, and the recent steps taken towards a fully unified framework, including monitoring. Also, the cases of multi-processor computing slots either on real or virtual machines, with the whole node or a partition of it, is discussed.

  9. NSTAR Smart Grid Pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabari, Anil [NSTAR Electric, Manchester, NH (United States); Fadipe, Oloruntomi [NSTAR Electric, Manchester, NH (United States)

    2014-03-31

    NSTAR Electric & Gas Corporation (“the Company”, or “NSTAR”) developed and implemented a Smart Grid pilot program beginning in 2010 to demonstrate the viability of leveraging existing automated meter reading (“AMR”) deployments to provide much of the Smart Grid functionality of advanced metering infrastructure (“AMI”), but without the large capital investment that AMI rollouts typically entail. In particular, a central objective of the Smart Energy Pilot was to enable residential dynamic pricing (time-of-use “TOU” and critical peak rates and rebates) and two-way direct load control (“DLC”) by continually capturing AMR meter data transmissions and communicating through customer-sited broadband connections in conjunction with a standardsbased home area network (“HAN”). The pilot was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (“DOE”) through the Smart Grid Demonstration program. NSTAR was very pleased to not only receive the funding support from DOE, but the guidance and support of the DOE throughout the pilot. NSTAR is also pleased to report to the DOE that it was able to execute and deliver a successful pilot on time and on budget. NSTAR looks for future opportunities to work with the DOE and others in future smart grid projects.

  10. A feasibility study incorporating a pilot randomised controlled trial of oral feeding plus pre-treatment gastrostomy tube versus oral feeding plus as-needed nasogastric tube feeding in patients undergoing chemoradiation for head and neck cancer (TUBE trial): study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleri, Vinidh; Wood, Joshua; Patterson, Joanne; Stocken, Deborah D; Cole, Mike; Vale, Luke; Franks, Jeremy; Guerrero-Urbano, Teresa; Donnelly, Rachael; Barclay, Stewart; Rapley, Tim; Rousseau, Nikki

    2016-01-01

    There are 7000 new cases of head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC) treated by the NHS each year. Stage III and IV HNSCC can be treated non-surgically by radio therapy (RT) or chemoradiation therapy (CRT). CRT can affect eating and drinking through a range of side effects with 90 % of patients undergoing this treatment requiring nutritional support via gastrostomy (G) or nasogastric (NG) tube feeding. Long-term dysphagia following CRT is a primary concern for patients. The effect of enteral feeding routes on swallowing function is not well understood, and the two feeding methods have, to date, not been compared to assess which leads to a better patient outcome. The purpose of this study is to explore the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing these two options with particular emphasis on patient willingness to be randomised and clinician willingness to approach eligible patients. This is a mixed methods multicentre study to establish the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial comparing oral feeding plus pre-treatment gastrostomy versus oral feeding plus as required nasogastric tube feeding in patients with HNSCC. A total of 60 participants will be randomised to the two arms of the study (1:1 ratio). The primary outcome of feasibility is a composite of recruitment (willingness to randomise and be randomised) and retention. A qualitative process evaluation investigating patient, family and friends and staff experiences of trial participation will also be conducted alongside an economic modelling exercise to synthesise available evidence and provide estimates of cost-effectiveness and value of information. Participants will be assessed at baseline (pre-randomisation), during CRT weekly, 3 months and 6 months. Clinicians are in equipoise over the enteral feeding options for patients being treated with CRT. Swallowing outcomes have been identified as a top priority for patients following treatment and this trial would inform

  11. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  12. Pilot project as enabler?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neisig, Margit; Glimø, Helle; Holm, Catrine Granzow

    This article deals with a systemic perspective on transition. The field of study addressed is a pilot project as enabler of transition in a highly complex polycentric context. From a Luhmannian systemic approach, a framework is created to understand and address barriers of change occurred using...... pilot projects as enabler of transition. Aspects of how to create trust and deal with distrust during a transition are addressed. The transition in focus is the concept of New Public Management and how it is applied in the management of the Employment Service in Denmark. The transition regards...

  13. Single-Pilot Workload Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jason; Williams, Kevin; Hackworth, Carla; Burian, Barbara; Pruchnicki, Shawn; Christopher, Bonny; Drechsler, Gena; Silverman, Evan; Runnels, Barry; Mead, Andy

    2013-01-01

    Integrated glass cockpit systems place a heavy cognitive load on pilots (Burian Dismukes, 2007). Researchers from the NASA Ames Flight Cognition Lab and the FAA Flight Deck Human Factors Lab examined task and workload management by single pilots. This poster describes pilot performance regarding programming a reroute while at cruise and meeting a waypoint crossing restriction on the initial descent.

  14. The feasibility of ecological taxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulus, A.T.G.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of ecological taxation in general and for the Netherlands in specific was analyzed within the context of one of the NRP research projects. The analysis shows that the feasibility of ecological taxes is generally determined by the tax design, the taxing authority by which these taxes are imposed and by the constitutional, institutional and fiscal structures into which they are embedded. In order to be feasible, the analysis shows that ecologically relevant taxes have to be imposed by a taxing authority which is clearly related to relevant ecological circumstances. Since normal taxing authorities tend to be political units which most of the times do not fit this description, institutional and constitutional changes are necessary to introduce and impose (additional) feasible types of ecological taxes in practice. Within the context of the Netherlands, the analysis shows that the currently changing intergovernmental and financial relationships in this country provide important starting points for municipalities, water authorities and provinces to introduce feasible types of such taxes. 225 refs

  15. Investigation of piloting aids for manual control of hypersonic maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, David L.; Phillips, Michael R.; Person, Lee H., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of piloting aids designed to provide precise maneuver control for an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle is described. Stringent constraints and nonintuitive high-speed flight effects associated with maneuvering in the hypersonic regime raise the question of whether manual control of such a vehicle should even be considered. The objectives of this research were to determine the extent of manual control that is desirable for a vehicle maneuvering in this regime and to identify the form of aids that must be supplied to the pilot to make such control feasible. A piloted real-time motion-based simulation of a hypersonic vehicle concept was used for this study, and the investigation focused on a single representative cruise turn maneuver. Piloting aids, which consisted of an auto throttle, throttle director, autopilot, flight director, and two head-up display configurations, were developed and evaluated. Two longitudinal control response types consisting of a rate-command/attitude-hold system and a load factor-rate/load-factor-hold system were also compared. The complete set of piloting aids, which consisted of the autothrottle, throttle director, and flight director, improved the average Cooper-Harper flying qualities ratings from 8 to 2.6, even though identical inner-loop stability and control augmentation was provided in all cases. The flight director was determined to be the most critical of these aids, and the cruise turn maneuver was unachievable to adequate performance specifications in the absence of this flight director.

  16. An Individualized Representational Intervention to Improve Symptom Management (IRIS) in Older Breast Cancer Survivors: Three Pilot Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich, Susan M.; Brown, Roger L.; Egan, Judith J.; Perez, Oscar A.; Phelan, Cynthia H.; Yeom, Hyune; Ward, Sandra E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To test the feasibility and acceptability of an individualized representational intervention to improve symptom management (IRIS) in older breast cancer survivors and test the short-term effects of an IRIS on symptom distress. Design Two small randomized clinical trials and one pre-experimental study. Setting Oncology clinic and community. Sample 41 women with breast cancer (aged 65 years and older) in pilot study 1, 20 in pilot study 2, and 21 in pilot study 3. Methods In pilot study 1, women were randomized to the IRIS or usual care control. In pilot study 2, women were randomized to the IRIS or delayed IRIS (wait list) control. In pilot study 3, all women received the IRIS by telephone. Measures were collected at baseline, postintervention, and follow-up (up to four months). Main Research Variables Feasibility, acceptability, symptom distress, symptom management behaviors, symptom management barriers, and quality of life. Findings Across three pilot studies, 76% of eligible women participated, 95% completed the study, 88% reported the study was helpful, and 91% were satisfied with the study. Some measures of symptom distress decreased significantly after the IRIS, but quality of life was stable. Women in the IRIS group changed their symptom management behaviors more than controls. Conclusions Preliminary evidence supports the need for and feasibility of an IRIS. Implications for Nursing Nurses may help older breast cancer survivors manage their numerous chronic symptoms more effectively by assessing women’s beliefs about their symptoms and their current symptom management strategies. PMID:19403441

  17. Cogeneration: Key feasibility analysis parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coslovi, S.; Zulian, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper first reviews the essential requirements, in terms of scope, objectives and methods, of technical/economic feasibility analyses applied to cogeneration systems proposed for industrial plants in Italy. Attention is given to the influence on overall feasibility of the following factors: electric power and fuel costs, equipment coefficients of performance, operating schedules, maintenance costs, Italian Government taxes and financial and legal incentives. Through an examination of several feasibility studies that were done on cogeneration proposals relative to different industrial sectors, a sensitivity analysis is performed on the effects of varying the weights of different cost benefit analysis parameters. With the use of statistical analyses, standard deviations are then determined for key analysis parameters, and guidelines are suggested for analysis simplifications

  18. Pilot Critical Incident Reports as a Means to Identify Human Factors of Remotely Piloted Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Alan; Cardoza, Colleen; Null, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    It has been estimated that aviation accidents are typically preceded by numerous minor incidents arising from the same causal factors that ultimately produced the accident. Accident databases provide in-depth information on a relatively small number of occurrences, however incident databases have the potential to provide insights into the human factors of Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) operations based on a larger volume of less-detailed reports. Currently, there is a lack of incident data dealing with the human factors of unmanned aircraft systems. An exploratory study is being conducted to examine the feasibility of collecting voluntary critical incident reports from RPAS pilots. Twenty-three experienced RPAS pilots volunteered to participate in focus groups in which they described critical incidents from their own experience. Participants were asked to recall (1) incidents that revealed a system flaw, or (2) highlighted a case where the human operator contributed to system resilience or mission success. Participants were asked to only report incidents that could be included in a public document. During each focus group session, a note taker produced a de-identified written record of the incident narratives. At the end of the session, participants reviewed each written incident report, and made edits and corrections as necessary. The incidents were later analyzed to identify contributing factors, with a focus on design issues that either hindered or assisted the pilot during the events. A total of 90 incidents were reported. Human factor issues included the impact of reduced sensory cues, traffic separation in the absence of an out-the-window view, control latencies, vigilance during monotonous and ultra-long endurance flights, control station design considerations, transfer of control between control stations, the management of lost link procedures, and decision-making during emergencies. Pilots participated willingly and enthusiastically in the study

  19. Feasibility and impact of placing water coolers on sales of sugar-sweetened beverages in Dutch secondary school canteens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, Tommy L S; van Hal, Wendy C W; Blokdijk, Lobke; Seidell, Jaap C; Renders, Carry M; Bemelmans, Wanda J E

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of placing water coolers on sugar-sweetened beverage sales at secondary schools (age 12-18 years) in the city of Zwolle, the Netherlands. METHODS: Six schools, hosting 5,866 pupils, were divided in three

  20. Assessing the gaming experience of an applied game for rehabilitation of the arm and hand function : A feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kottink, Anke I.R.; Prange-Lasonder, Gerdienke B.; Rietman, Johan S.; Buurke, Jaap H.; Ibánez, Jaíme; González-Vargas, José; Azorín, José María; Akay, Metin; Pons, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    The present pilot study assessed the feasibility, in terms of gaming experience, of using a first prototype of a self-developed mixed-reality system for rehabilitation of the arm and hand function. Results showed that the hybrid game approach is well accepted by Cerebral Palsy children and adults

  1. Safety and Feasibility of Using the Second-Generation Pillcam Colon Capsule to Assess Active Colonic Crohn's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Haens, Geert; Löwenberg, Mark; Samaan, Mark A.; Franchimont, Denis; Ponsioen, Cyriel; van den Brink, Gijs R.; Fockens, Paul; Bossuyt, Peter; Amininejad, Leila; Rajamannar, Gopalan; Lensink, Elsemieke M.; van Gossum, Andre M.

    2015-01-01

    The second-generation Pillcam Colon Capsule Endoscope (PCCE-2; Given Imaging Ltd, Yoqneam, Israel) is an ingestible capsule for visualization of the colon. We performed a multicenter pilot study to assess its safety and feasibility in evaluating the severity of Crohn's disease (CD). In a prospective

  2. Normanskill Hydroelectric Facility Feasibility Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besha, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of installing a hydroelectric generating facility at an existing dam of the Normanskill Reservoir in NY. Evaluation of the hydrologic, technical, economic, legal, instrumental and environmental factors led to the conclusion that the project is feasible and advantageous. The proposed project has a present worth net cost of $3,099,800. The benefit cost ratio is 2.36. It is estimated that the proposed hydroelectric generating facility at the French's Mills site, City of Watervliet Reservoir will replace approximately 6,000 barrels of foreign oil per year. (LCL)

  3. Lower Sioux Wind Feasibility & Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minkel, Darin

    2012-04-01

    This report describes the process and findings of a Wind Energy Feasibility Study (Study) conducted by the Lower Sioux Indian Community (Community). The Community is evaluating the development of a wind energy project located on tribal land. The project scope was to analyze the critical issues in determining advantages and disadvantages of wind development within the Community. This analysis addresses both of the Community's wind energy development objectives: the single turbine project and the Commerical-scale multiple turbine project. The main tasks of the feasibility study are: land use and contraint analysis; wind resource evaluation; utility interconnection analysis; and project structure and economics.

  4. Priming a Pilot Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Magnus; Ie Pedersen, Maria

    Abstract. We report on the initial findings of an action research study about effects specifications. It is a part of larger IS pilot implementation project conducted in the Danish healthcare sector. Through interviews and a workshop we have identified and specified the main effects that comprise...

  5. Feasibility of self-directed learning in clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolsgaard, M G; Arendrup, H; Pedersen, P; Ringsted, C

    2013-08-01

    Self-directed learning has been well described in preclinical settings. However, studies report conflicting results when self-directed initiatives are implemented in clinical clerkships. To explore the feasibility of self-directed learning stimulated by clinical encounter-cards (CECs) in clinical clerkships. Two focus groups of year-four and year-five students were interviewed about the usefulness of CECs to their learning in clerkships. The CECs were then introduced in two cohorts of 248 year-four and 250 year-five medical students and evaluated on a nine-point scale with regard to usefulness and feasibility. The pilot groups reported that the CECs had positive effects in terms of engaging in diagnostic reasoning, reflection on management plans, and professional identity formation. However, the two large cohorts of students rated the usefulness of the CECs on learning in clerkship low (year-four: mean 2.92, SD 1.54; year-five: mean 2.28, SD 1.06) along with preceptor support (year-four: mean 2.68, SD 1.62; year-five: mean 2.59, SD 1.78, p = 0.34). Self-directed CECs can have a positive effect on participation and clinical reasoning but are highly dependent on the context of use. Self-directed learning initiatives that aim to increase participation in communities of practice may not be feasible without major faculty development initiatives.

  6. Feasibility and acceptability of workers' health surveillance for fire fighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plat, Marie-Christine J; Frings-Dresen, Monique Hw; Sluiter, Judith K

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to test the feasibility and acceptability of a new workers' health surveillance (WHS) for fire fighters in a Dutch pilot-implementation project. In three fire departments, between November 2007 and February 2009, feasibility was tested with respect to i) worker intent to change health and behavior; ii) the quality of instructions for testing teams; iii) the planned procedure in the field; and iv) future WHS organisation. Acceptability involved i) satisfaction with WHS and ii) verification of the job-specificity of the content of two physical tests of WHS. Fire fighters were surveyed after completing WHS, three testing teams were interviewed, and the content of the two tests was studied by experts. nearly all of the 275 fire fighters intended to improve their health when recommended by the occupational physician. The testing teams found the instructions to be clear, and they were mostly positive about the organisation of WHS. Acceptability: the fire fighters rated WHS at eight points (out of a maximum of ten). The experts also reached a consensus about the optimal job-specific content of the future functional physical tests. Overall, it is feasible and acceptable to implement WHS in a definitive form in the Dutch fire-fighting sector.

  7. General discussion of feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calori, F.

    1976-01-01

    Fundamentals, objectives and parameters of feasibility studies in the field of nuclear power project planning are discussed in a general way. Technical and economic problems to be considered are pointed out. In special cases, IAEA offers its aid and support. (UA) [de

  8. Pilot demonstrations of arsenic removal technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal Malcolm D.

    2004-09-01

    The Arsenic Water Technology Partnership (AWTP) program is a multi-year program funded by a congressional appropriation through the Department of Energy to develop and test innovative technologies that have the potential to reduce the costs of arsenic removal from drinking water. The AWTP members include Sandia National Laboratories, the American Water Works Association (Awwa) Research Foundation and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development). The program is designed to move technologies from bench-scale tests to field demonstrations. The Awwa Research Foundation is managing bench-scale research programs; Sandia National Laboratories is conducting the pilot demonstration program and WERC will evaluate the economic feasibility of the technologies investigated and conduct technology transfer activities. The objective of the Sandia Arsenic Treatment Technology Demonstration project (SATTD) is the field demonstration testing of both commercial and innovative technologies. The scope for this work includes: (1) Identification of sites for pilot demonstrations; (2) Accelerated identification of candidate technologies through Vendor Forums, proof-of-principle laboratory and local pilot-scale studies, collaboration with the Awwa Research Foundation bench-scale research program and consultation with relevant advisory panels; and (3) Pilot testing multiple technologies at several sites throughout the country, gathering information on: (a) Performance, as measured by arsenic removal; (b) Costs, including capital and Operation and Maintenance (O&M) costs; (c) O&M requirements, including personnel requirements, and level of operator training; and (d) Waste residuals generation. The New Mexico Environment Department has identified over 90 public water systems that currently exceed the 10 {micro}g/L MCL for arsenic. The Sandia Arsenic Treatment Technology Demonstration project is currently operating pilots at three sites in New Mexico. The cities of

  9. Percutaneous Nerve Stimulation in Chronic Neuropathic Pain Patients due to Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopsky, D.J.; Ettema, F.W.L.; van der Leeden, M.; Dekker, J.; Stolwijk-Swuste, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The long-term prognosis for neuropathic pain resolution following spinal cord injury (SCI) is often poor. In many SCI patients, neuropathic pain continues or even worsens over time. Thus, new treatment approaches are needed. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility and

  10. Hemodialysis Infection Prevention Protocols Ontario—Shower Technique (HIPPO-ST: A Pilot Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Daisy Kosa

    2017-03-01

    Discussion: This HIPPO-ST pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of the larger HIPPO-ST study, especially given the high levels of education success with the HIPPO-ST arm and the low levels of contamination in the control arm.

  11. Aquatic Physical Therapy for Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Susan; McIntyre, Auburn; Plummer, Leanne

    2010-01-01

    Aquatic therapy is an intervention for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) that has not been investigated formally. This was a pilot randomized controlled trial to investigate the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an aquatic therapy program to improve motor skills of children with DCD. Thirteen children (mean age 7…

  12. Civic Engagement for Older Adults With Functional Limitations: Piloting an Intervention for Adult Day Health Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabelko-Schoeny, Holly; Anderson, Keith A.; Spinks, Katie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Past research has demonstrated the importance of civic engagement for older adults, yet previous studies have not focused specifically on the potential benefits of civic engagement for older adults with functional limitations. This pilot study explored the feasibility and effectiveness of an intervention designed to promote civic…

  13. Pilot clinical trial of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) versus placebo for Sjögren's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillemer, Stanley R.; Brennan, Michael T.; Sankar, Vidya; Leakan, Rose Anne; Smith, Janine A.; Grisius, Margaret; Ligier, Sophie; Radfar, Lida; Kok, Marc R.; Kingman, Albert; Fox, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    To screen for potential efficacy and assess feasibility and safety of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) as a treatment for Sjögren's syndrome (SS). A 24-week randomized, double-blinded, pilot trial of oral DHEA (200 mg/day) versus placebo was conducted. The primary comparison was to a hypothesized 20%

  14. Open-Trial Pilot of "Mind Reading" and in Vivo Rehearsal for Children with HFASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomeer, Marcus L.; Rodgers, Jonathan D.; Lopata, Christopher; McDonald, Christin A.; Volker, Martin A.; Toomey, Jennifer A.; Smith, Rachael A.; Gullo, Gaetano

    2011-01-01

    In this pilot study, the authors evaluated a manualized administration of the "Mind Reading" (MR) program with in vivo rehearsal to determine the effects on emotion recognition and autism features of eleven 7- to 12-year-old children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders (HFASD), and to determine the overall feasibility of the…

  15. Endovascular Hypothermia in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Pilot Study of Selective Intra-Arterial Cold Saline Infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Jian; Liu, Liqiang; Zhang, Hongqi; Geng, Xiaokun; Jiao, Liqun; Li, Guilin; Coutinho, Jonathan M.; Ding, Yuchuan; Liebeskind, David S.; Ji, Xunming

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a pilot feasibility and safety study of selective brain cooling with intra-arterial infusion of cold saline combined with endovascular reperfusion for acute ischemic stroke. Patients with large-vessel occlusion within 8 hours after symptom onset were enrolled. All patients received

  16. An Attachment Parenting Intervention to Prevent Adolescents' Problem Behaviors: A Pilot Study in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotta, Fabrizia; Ortega, Enrique; Stattin, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Background: In spite of the proven effectiveness of parenting based programs to prevent adolescent risk behaviors, such programs are rarely implemented in Mediterranean countries. Objective: This pilot study was aimed at assessing the feasibility and the effects of a parenting based universal prevention program (Connect) in Italy. Methods: Our…

  17. A novel, online social cognitive training program for young adults with schizophrenia: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mor Nahum

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: This study provides an initial proof of concept for online social cognition training in schizophrenia. This form of training demonstrated feasibility and resulted in within-subject gains in social functioning and motivation. This pilot study represents a first step towards validating this training approach; randomized controlled trials, now underway, are designed to confirm and extend these findings.

  18. An Internet-Based Telerehabilitation System for the Assessment of Motor Speech Disorders: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne J.; Theodoros, Deborah G.; Russell, Trevor G.; Cahill, Louise M.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Clark, Kathy M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This pilot study explored the feasibility and effectiveness of an Internet-based telerehabilitation application for the assessment of motor speech disorders in adults with acquired neurological impairment. Method: Using a counterbalanced, repeated measures research design, 2 speech-language pathologists assessed 19 speakers with…

  19. Teaching Computer Programming to Medical Doctors, Nurses and Hospital Staff : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kubben, Pieter; Looije, Pepijn; Scherpbier, Albert; van Merode, Frits

    2017-01-01

    There is plenty of opportunity where the medical world can benefit from caregivers who can translate point-of-care challenges into digital solutions using coding skills. The objective of this pilot study is to evaluate the feasibility of teaching computer programming to hospital staff with no or

  20. Organic Rankine cycle unit for waste heat recovery on ships (PilotORC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haglind, Fredrik; Montagud, Maria E. Mondejar; Andreasen, Jesper Graa

    The project PilotORC was aimed at evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of the use of organic Rankine cycle (ORC) units to recover low-temperature waste heat sources (i.e. exhaust gases, scavenge air, engine cooling system, and lubricant oil system) on container vessels. The project...

  1. The feasibility of domestic CO2 emissions trading in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missfeldt, F.; Hauff, J.

    2000-09-01

    In early 2000, neither a comprehensive upstream system nor an all-encompassing downstream approach to CO 2 emissions permit trading seems feasible in Poland. However, a pilot emissions trading system in the power and Combined Heat and Power (CHP) sector is thought to be a realistic option in the near future. A comprehensive upstream approach would require permits for the carbon contained in fossil fuels produced or imported in Poland. It is ruled out due to the perceived difficulties of the inclusion of the coal sector in such a system. While inclusion of the gas sector, and especially of the oil sector, seems possible within a relatively short time, relying on an upstream approach without the coal sector is not advisable. Once the restructuring of the coal sector as well as the privatization of the gas and oil sector is advanced, an upstream approach might become an option again. A comprehensive downstream approach would regulate CO 2 emissions at their source, that is mostly at point of combustion of fossil fuels. A system which includes industry, households and transport can be assumed to be infeasible. Instead, a 'core program' was examined, which would focus on power and heat generation as well as energy intensive industries. Such an approach was found feasible in principle. Currently, however, only the largest emitters could be easily integrated in a reliable system. Drawing the line between those included and those excluded from such a partial system requires careful analysis. Including all enterprises in the relevant sectors would require significant improvements in monitoring and reporting reliability. A pilot emissions permit trading system could be introduced in the professional power and heat sector. Here, awareness concerning the instrument was found to be high and the system could be based on monitoring requirements already required by law. Gradual inclusion of more relevant sectors and eventual combination with an upstream component to include oil

  2. Human biomonitoring pilot study DEMOCOPHES in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwedler, Gerda; Seiwert, Margarete; Fiddicke, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Human biomonitoring (HBM) is an effective tool to assess human exposure to environmental pollutants, but comparable HBM data in Europe are lacking. In order to expedite harmonization of HBM studies on a European scale, the twin projects COPHES (Consortium to Perform Human Biomonitoring...... on a European Scale) and DEMOCOPHES (Demonstration of a study to Coordinate and Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale) were formed, comprising 35 partners from 27 European countries. In COPHES a research scheme and guidelines were developed to exemplarily measure in a pilot study mercury in hair......, cadmium, cotinine and several phthalate metabolites in urine of 6–11 year old children and their mothers in an urban and a rural region. Seventeen European countries simultaneously conducted this cross-sectional DEMOCOPHES feasibility study. The German study population was taken in the city of Bochum...

  3. The national conversion pilot project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Der Puy, M.; Francis, G.; Konczal, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy is now faced with the prospect of terminating traditional defense production missions at several Department of Energy sites. Because of this, there is a critical need to develop a DOE process to convert former defense production facilities to private use so that underutilized workers and facilities may be used to minimize the impact on the United States economy. The purpose of the National Conversation Pilot Project (NCPP) at Rocky Flats near Denver, Colorado is to explore and demonstrate the feasibility of economic conversion of DOE facilities, in a manner consistent with ongoing site waste management and cleanup activities, and non-prejudicial to future land use planning decisions. The NCPP is divided into three stages: The first stage, now under way, is one of detailed planning for cleanup and building maintenance activities. The second stage involves building cleanup necessary to support the proposed industrial activities, maintenance of equipment and building infrastructure necessary to assure protection of human health and the environment, declassification work, and some small scale research and development activities. Stage III would involve DOE metals recycling. Specific approval from the DOE is required prior to each project stage. To ensure stakeholder involvement, a steering committee will advise the DOE on the desirability to proceed with the project from stage to stage. A key question in the conversion process is whether a competitive economic and regulatory environment can be created on a DOE facility, allowing an onsite conversion business to effectively compete with offsite businesses. If successful, the Rocky Flats project could become the model for economic conversion at other DOE facilities

  4. Johrei Family Healing: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. H. Canter

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Johrei is a form of spiritual healing comprising “energy channelling” and light massage given either by a trained healer or, after some basic training, by anyone. This pilot trial aimed to identify any potential benefits of family-based Johrei practice in childhood eczema and for general health and to establish the feasibility of a subsequent randomised controlled trial. Volunteer families of 3-5 individuals, including at least one child with eczema were recruited to an uncontrolled pilot trial lasting 12 months. Parents were trained in Johrei healing and then practised at home with their family. Participants kept diaries and provided questionnaire data at baseline, 3,6 and 12 months. Eczema symptoms were scored at the same intervals. Scepticism about Johrei is presently an obstacle to recruitment and retention of a representative sample in a clinical trial, and to its potential use in general practice. The frequency and quality of practise at home by families may be insufficient to bring about the putative health benefits. Initial improvements in eczema symptoms and diary recorded illness, could not be separated from seasonal factors and other potential confounders. There were no improvements on other outcomes measuring general health and psychological wellbeing of family members.

  5. Johrei family healing: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canter, P H; Brown, L B; Greaves, C; Ernst, E

    2006-12-01

    Johrei is a form of spiritual healing comprising "energy channelling" and light massage given either by a trained healer or, after some basic training, by anyone. This pilot trial aimed to identify any potential benefits of family-based Johrei practice in childhood eczema and for general health and to establish the feasibility of a subsequent randomised controlled trial. Volunteer families of 3-5 individuals, including at least one child with eczema were recruited to an uncontrolled pilot trial lasting 12 months. Parents were trained in Johrei healing and then practised at home with their family. Participants kept diaries and provided questionnaire data at baseline, 3,6 and 12 months. Eczema symptoms were scored at the same intervals. Scepticism about Johrei is presently an obstacle to recruitment and retention of a representative sample in a clinical trial, and to its potential use in general practice. The frequency and quality of practise at home by families may be insufficient to bring about the putative health benefits. Initial improvements in eczema symptoms and diary recorded illness, could not be separated from seasonal factors and other potential confounders. There were no improvements on other outcomes measuring general health and psychological wellbeing of family members.

  6. The ESA Space Weather Applications Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, A.; Hilgers, A.; Daly, E.

    Following the completion in 2001 of two parallel studies to consider the feasibility of a European Space Weather Programme ESA embarked upon a space weather pilot study with the goal of prototyping European space weather services and assessing the overall market for such within Europe This pilot project centred on a number of targeted service development activities supported by a common infrastructure and making use of only existing space weather assets Each service activity included clear participation from at least one identified service user who was requested to provide initial requirements and regular feedback during the operational phase of the service These service activities are now reaching the end of their 2-year development and testing phase and are now accessible each with an element of the service in the public domain see http www esa-spaceweathet net swenet An additional crucial element of the study was the inclusion of a comprehensive and independent analysis of the benefits both economic and strategic of embarking on a programme which would include the deployment of an infrastructure with space-based elements The results of this study will be reported together with their implication for future coordinated European activities in this field

  7. Pilot project as enabler?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neisig, Margit; Glimø, Helle; Holm, Catrine Granzow

    pilot projects as enabler of transition. Aspects of how to create trust and deal with distrust during a transition are addressed. The transition in focus is the concept of New Public Management and how it is applied in the management of the Employment Service in Denmark. The transition regards......This article deals with a systemic perspective on transition. The field of study addressed is a pilot project as enabler of transition in a highly complex polycentric context. From a Luhmannian systemic approach, a framework is created to understand and address barriers of change occurred using...... the systemic change from a very control based and detailed regulated version of New Public Management towards a system allowing more flexibility and decentralized decision making empowering municipalities as well as employees own decision making...

  8. Pilots 2.0: DIRAC pilots for all the skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagni, F.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; McNab, A.; Luzzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the last few years, new types of computing infrastructures, such as IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service) and IAAC (Infrastructure as a Client), gained popularity. New resources may come as part of pledged resources, while others are opportunistic. Most of these new infrastructures are based on virtualization techniques. Meanwhile, some concepts, such as distributed queues, lost appeal, while still supporting a vast amount of resources. Virtual Organizations are therefore facing heterogeneity of the available resources and the use of an Interware software like DIRAC to hide the diversity of underlying resources has become essential. The DIRAC WMS is based on the concept of pilot jobs that was introduced back in 2004. A pilot is what creates the possibility to run jobs on a worker node. Within DIRAC, we developed a new generation of pilot jobs, that we dubbed Pilots 2.0. Pilots 2.0 are not tied to a specific infrastructure; rather they are generic, fully configurable and extendible pilots. A Pilot 2.0 can be sent, as a script to be run, or it can be fetched from a remote location. A pilot 2.0 can run on every computing resource, e.g.: on CREAM Computing elements, on DIRAC Computing elements, on Virtual Machines as part of the contextualization script, or IAAC resources, provided that these machines are properly configured, hiding all the details of the Worker Nodes (WNs) infrastructure. Pilots 2.0 can be generated server and client side. Pilots 2.0 are the “pilots to fly in all the skies”, aiming at easy use of computing power, in whatever form it is presented. Another aim is the unification and simplification of the monitoring infrastructure for all kinds of computing resources, by using pilots as a network of distributed sensors coordinated by a central resource monitoring system. Pilots 2.0 have been developed using the command pattern. VOs using DIRAC can tune pilots 2.0 as they need, and extend or replace each and every pilot command in an easy way. In this

  9. Agricultural Pilot's Audiological Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foltz, Lucas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The agricultural airplane pilot are daily exposed to intense noises, being susceptible to the noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL and its auditory and extra auditory effects. Objective: To analyze the audiological profile of this population, verifying the work's influence on its hearing. Method: It was realized a retrospective, individual, observational, and cross-sectional study through the data obtained by means of a questionnaire and audiometric thresholds of 41 agricultural pilots. To the statistical analysis were utilized the chi-square, Spearman, and Wilcoxon tests with significance level of 5%. Results: It was verified that 95,1% of the pilots use PPE ( personal protective equipment during flight and 58,5% have contact with pesticides. More than half of individuals referred to feel auditory and extra auditory symptoms, being the buzz the more frequent (29,1%. It has the occurrence of 29,3% of NIHL suggestive hearing loss and 68,3% of normality, taking this presence of unilateral notch in 24,4% and bilateral notch in 31,7%. It was found correlation statistically significant in the associations between time of service and the average of the acute frequencies in the right ear (p=0038, and in the left ear (p=0,010. It has a statistical tendency in the association between audiometric configuration and contact with pesticides (p=0,088. Conclusion: The hearing loss prevalence in this study was showed high. More than half of the sample has normal audiometric thresholds with notch configuration. Such data lead to the conclusion that the agricultural pilots, even with PPE use, they still suffer with the damages caused by noise, needing best proposals of hearing loss prevention.

  10. Feasibility Study on HYSOL CSP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Henrik; Baldini, Mattia; Skytte, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    integrated HYSOL concept, therefore, becomes a fully dispatchable (offering firm power) and fully renewable energy source (RES) based power supply alternative, offering CO2-free electricity in regions with sufficient solar resources. The economic feasibility of HYSOL configurations is addressed in this paper...... salt can be stored and the stored heat can thus increase the load factor and the usability for a CSP plant, e.g. to cover evening peak demand. In the HYSOL concept (HYbrid SOLar) such configuration is extended further to include a gas turbine fuelled by upgraded biogas or natural gas. The optimised....... The CO2 free HYSOL alternative is discussed relative to conventional reference firm power generation technologies. In particular the HYSOL performance relative to new power plants based on natural gas (NG) such as open cycle or combined cycle gas turbines (OCGT or CCGT) are in focus. The feasibility...

  11. Biological Feasibility of Measles Eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strebel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in reducing global measles mortality has renewed interest in measles eradication. Three biological criteria are deemed important for disease eradication: (1) humans are the sole pathogen reservoir; (2) accurate diagnostic tests exist; and (3) an effective, practical intervention is available at reasonable cost. Interruption of transmission in large geographical areas for prolonged periods further supports the feasibility of eradication. Measles is thought by many experts to meet these criteria: no nonhuman reservoir is known to exist, accurate diagnostic tests are available, and attenuated measles vaccines are effective and immunogenic. Measles has been eliminated in large geographical areas, including the Americas. Measles eradication is biologically feasible. The challenges for measles eradication will be logistical, political, and financial. PMID:21666201

  12. Pilot of the BOOST-A™: An online transition planning program for adolescents with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Megan; Murray, Nina; Ciccarelli, Marina; Falkmer, Torbjörn; Falkmer, Marita

    2017-12-01

    Many adolescents with autism face difficulties with the transition from high school into post-school activities. The Better OutcOmes & Successful Transitions for Autism (BOOST-A™) is an online transition planning program which supports adolescents on the autism spectrum to prepare for leaving school. This study describes the development of the BOOST-A™ and aimed to determine the feasibility and viability of the program. Two pilot studies were conducted. In Pilot A, the BOOST-A™ was trialled by six adolescents on the autism spectrum, their parents, and the professionals who worked with them, to determine its feasibility. In Pilot B, 88 allied health professionals (occupational therapists, speech pathologists, and psychologists) reviewed the BOOST-A™ to determine its viability. Participants rated the BOOST-A™ as a feasible tool for transition planning. The majority of allied health professionals agreed that it was a viable program. Based on participant feedback, the BOOST-A™ was modified to improve usability and feasibility. The BOOST-A™ is a viable and feasible program that has the potential to assist adolescents with autism in preparing for transitioning out of high school. Future research will determine the effectiveness of the BOOST-A™ with adolescents across Australia. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  13. Feasibility of Biomass Biodrying for Gasification Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidian, Arash

    and the pilot-scale continuous system was designed in 2010 to demonstrate the feasibility of mixed sludge biodrying for efficient combustion in biomass boilers. Mixed sludge was biodried in the reactor to 45% moisture level, which was the suitable level for boiler application. Techno-economic analysis also revealed the potential economic benefits for pulp and paper mills. However, considerable uncertainties existed in terms of feasibility of the biodrying technology for other types of biomass that are usually used in the gasification process, mainly because of low nutrient level of typical lignocellulosic biomass used as feedstock. Furthermore, the technology had not been shown to be economically viable in conjunction with gasification process at pulp and paper mills. In this work the feasibility of low-nutrient biomass biodrying was tested by experiments and techno-economic model was developed to identify the performance of biodrying process for commercial-scale application. In the economic analysis, a comprehensive approach for biodrying cost assessment was introduced that is based on the well-known approach widely used in the process industry and few sources of benefits were identified.

  14. Feasibility of Wind Energy Parks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, Jose

    2000-01-01

    The paper discuss the feasibility of wind energy parks including aspects of supply and demand of energy, costs of generation and risks of investment associated. The paper introduce to the situation of wind energy in the word and specifically in Spain, describes the legal framework in promotion of renewables in Spain, the analysis of revenues and the risk of this business in the european market

  15. NTRE extended life feasibility assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results of a feasibility analysis of a long life, reusable nuclear thermal rocket engine are presented in text and graph form. Two engine/reactor concepts are addressed: the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) design and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) concept. Engine design, integration, reliability, and safety are addressed by various members of the NTRE team from Aerojet Propulsion Division, Energopool (Russia), and Babcock & Wilcox.

  16. Feasibility assessment, Lowell Hydroelectric Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    The results are presented of a feasibility analysis for hydroelectric generating facilities on the Merrimack River at Lowell, Massachusetts. The projected facility would utilize the existing Pawtucket Dam and a portion of the existing Northern Canal. The project was examined for economic, engineering, and environmental viability, and the results are favorable. The owners intend to proceed to the next step of negotiating a firm power purchase agreement.

  17. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  18. Feasibility of dietary assessment methods, other tools and procedures for a pan-European food consumption survey among infants, toddlers and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ocké, Marga; Brants, Henny; Dofkova, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    more challenging by the interviewers. Conclusions Both dietary assessment methods with related tools and administration protocols were evaluated as feasible. The administration protocol with two 1-day food diaries with completion interviews offers more advantages for the future pan-European survey......Purpose To test the feasibility of tools and procedures for a pan-European food consumption survey among children 0-10 years and to recommend one of two tested dietary assessment methods. Methods Two pilot studies including 378 children were conducted in Belgium and the Czech Republic in the Pilot...

  19. Intergenerational mentoring at Men's Sheds: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J; Cordier, Reinie; Ciccarelli, Marina; MacCallum, Judith; Milbourn, Benjamin; Vaz, Sharmila; Joosten, Annette; Buchanan, Angus; McAuliffe, Tomomi; Stancliffe, Roger J

    2018-01-01

    This study reports on the feasibility of an intergenerational mentoring programme for youth with intellectual disability (ID) aimed at developing skills and building networks. Youth with ID were paired with older male mentors who were trained to support the mentees participate in activities and social interactions during weekly sessions. We interviewed the mentees and mentors, and assessed them on a range of outcomes using standardized measures. Interviews highlighted that the programme presented a great "opportunity" for the mentees and mentors. The participants described facilitators and challenges to the acquisition of practical skills by mentees and the development of relationships between mentors and mentees, including communication, transportation and mentor training. The youth with ID had difficulty completing the self-report measures. Mentoring programmes are viable to support youth with ID during the transition to adulthood; however, refinement is required in the rollout out of a pilot intervention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Evaluating midwifery units (EMU): lessons from the pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Amy R; Tracy, Sally K; Foureur, Maralyn; Tracy, Mark

    2013-08-01

    this paper describes the pilot study that was undertaken to test the feasibility of the recruitment plan designed to recruit women who booked to give birth in two freestanding midwifery units in NSW, Australia. The pilot preceded the full prospective cohort study, Evaluating Midwifery Units (EMU), which aimed to examine the antenatal, birth and postnatal outcomes of women planning to give birth in freestanding midwifery units compared to those booked to give birth in tertiary level maternity units in Australia and New Zealand. a prospective cohort study with two mutually-exclusive cohorts. two freestanding midwifery units in NSW and their corresponding tertiary referral hospitals. a total of 146 women with few identified risk factors recruited between 13 September 2009 and 31 March 2010 whose planned place of birth was either a freestanding midwifery unit or tertiary maternity unit. the pilot study identified the feasibility of relying on the booking midwife to recruit eligible women from several antenatal booking clinics to the study. Low rates of eligible women were invited resulting in a lower than expected consent rate. In addition, although mostly only low-risk women were invited to participate, some women requiring medical consultation at the time of booking were inadvertently recruited into the study. The results of this pilot study led us to revise the study protocol to find ways of including the outcomes of all women without identified risk factors who booked at either the freestanding midwifery units or the tertiary referral hospital in that area. This paper describes the revisions that were made to the study plan. five lessons were learned from the pilot study. We found that recruitment protocols employed for the cohort study were too complicated and required simplification to maximise the potential of the study. The study protocol needed to be changed for the main study to ensure a larger sample size and to ensure the risk profile of each cohort was as

  1. NHS pilots in primary care--an insight into the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihra, Tajinder; D'Cruz, Len

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at the background to the current changes in primary care dentistry being piloted in England. It looks at the structure of the different elements being piloted, such as the oral health assessment, interim care appointments and care pathways. It also examines advanced care pathways and how complex care will be provided when clinically feasible and beneficial to the patient. The authors have worked in a type 1 pilot practice since September 2010. The NHS contract currently being piloted in England delivers care through care pathways and clinical risk assessments with prevention as an important building block for the delivery of services. There are new measures planned for measuring quality outcomes in primary care. This has implications for how services are delivered, who delivers them and how dentists will be remunerated in the future.

  2. Targeted prevention of lifestyle related diseases in the primary care sector – results from the TOF pilot project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun Larsen, Lars; Thilsing, Trine

    This abstract reports on the results of a non-randomized pilot study carried out to test the acceptability, feasibility and short-term effects of a healthcare intervention in primary care. The intervention is designed to systematically identify persons at risk of developing lifestyle-related dise......This abstract reports on the results of a non-randomized pilot study carried out to test the acceptability, feasibility and short-term effects of a healthcare intervention in primary care. The intervention is designed to systematically identify persons at risk of developing lifestyle...

  3. The feasibility and validity of care mapping in the clinical neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, Katie; Leigh, Andrew; Sheldrick, Russell; Surr, Claire; Hare, Dougal Julian

    2015-01-01

    Dementia Care Mapping (DCM) is an observational tool and process that is widely used in dementia care in measuring and improving person-centred care (PCC). DCM was previously piloted on a neurorehabilitation ward, where it was found to be feasible and acceptable in this setting. Following this, a new modified tool and accompanying manual were developed: Care Mapping - Neurorehabilitation (DCM-NR). The current study aimed to assess the feasibility and validity of DCM-NR by piloting its use in a range of clinical neuroscience settings. A mixed-methods design was used employing both quantitative and qualitative techniques. The new DCM-NR was found to be feasible for use both in terms of the suitability of its coding system and the implementation process. DCM-NR was shown to have a moderate level of concurrent validity with participants' self-report of PCC. Participants' subjective reports on their experiences of care provided validation for the areas of psychological need observed in DCM-NR. The results of this study indicate that DCM-NR is feasible and valid for use in a range of clinical neuroscience settings. Further longitudinal research is required to evaluate the impact of DCM-NR on PCC practices over time.

  4. Analysis of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Samples: Integrated Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, Phillip F [ORNL

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Samples: Integrated Summary Report. Summaries of conclusions, analytical processes, and analytical results. Analysis of samples taken from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico in support of the WIPP Technical Assessment Team (TAT) activities to determine to the extent feasible the mechanisms and chemical reactions that may have resulted in the breach of at least one waste drum and release of waste material in WIPP Panel 7 Room 7 on February 14, 2014. This report integrates and summarizes the results contained in three separate reports, described below, and draws conclusions based on those results. Chemical and Radiochemical Analyses of WIPP Samples R-15 C5 SWB and R16 C-4 Lip; PNNL-24003, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, December 2014 Analysis of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Underground and MgO Samples by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); SRNL-STI-2014-00617; Savannah River National Laboratory, December 2014 Report for WIPP UG Sample #3, R15C5 (9/3/14); LLNL-TR-667015; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, January 2015 This report is also contained in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Technical Assessment Team Report; SRNL-RP-2015-01198; Savannah River National Laboratory, March 17, 2015, as Appendix C: Analysis Integrated Summary Report.

  5. Subseabed Radioactive Waste Disposal Feasibility Program: ocean engineering challenges for the 80's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbert, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Subseabed Disposal Program is to assess the feasibility of disposing of high-level radioactive wastes or spent fuel in suitable geologic formations beneath the deep ocean floor. The program is entering a phase which will address engineering feasibility. While the current phase of the program to determine the scientific and environmental feasibility of the concept is not yet complete, activities to assess the engineering aspects are being initiated in parallel to facilitate the development of the concept on a time scale commensurate with other related programs both in the United States and abroad. It is anticipated that engineering aspects will become the central focus of the program during the early 80's and will continue so through the establishment of a pilot-plant level activity which could occur by the mid-90's

  6. Clinical feasibility trial of a motion detection system for fall prevention in hospitalized older adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Marisa; Harrison, Barbara; Rawashdeh, Osamah; Hammond, Robert; Avery, Yvonne; Rawashdeh, Muawea; Sa'deh, Waseem; Maddens, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of a wireless 5-sensor, motion detection system (5S-MDS) with hospitalized older adults. Interventions to prevent hospital-based falls in older adults are important to reduce morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. Wearable motion sensors, which track and wirelessly transmit body movements, may identify human movement patterns that immediately precede falls, thus allowing early prevention. Descriptive feasibility study in which 5 hospitalized older adults were recruited to wear the 5S-MDS for 4 hours. Measurement included assessment of participant acceptance, skin integrity, and sensor accuracy. All 5 participants (mean age, 90.2 years) agreed that sensors were acceptable and skin integrity was maintained. The sensor data accurately reflected the patient movements. The 5S-MDS was feasible for 4 hours' use with hospitalized older adults. It has potential as an early warning system for falls. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Feasibility of a peer-led, school-based asthma education programme for adolescents in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sheyab, N A; Gallagher, R; Roydhouse, J K; Crisp, J; Shah, S

    2012-05-01

    The Adolescent Asthma Action programme (Triple A) has been used successfully to promote asthma knowledge, awareness and quality of life in adolescents with asthma in Australia. We describe the feasibility and acceptability of an adaptation of this English-language, peer-led, asthma education programme in a girls' high school in Northern Jordan. The pilot was conducted by bilingual health workers. Feasibility, acceptability and adaptability were measured through participation rates, open-ended questionnaires completed by peer leaders, a focus group for junior students and reflective journal notes. The programme was well-received by staff and students, with high levels of participation. The peer-led approach was viewed positively. Students reported that they enjoyed the interactive learning activities and the opportunity to practise English. The students reported increased asthma knowledge and awareness, with students with asthma reporting receiving more support from peers. A peer-led asthma education programme is feasible and acceptable in the Jordanian school context.

  8. Feasibility of a home-delivered Internet obesity prevention program for fourth-grade students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Scott; Lambert, Laurel; McDonough, Suzanne; Green, Kenneth; Loftin, Mark

    2009-08-01

    This pilot study examined the feasibility of an interactive obesity prevention program delivered to a class of fourth-grade students utilizing daily e-mail messages sent to the students' home computers. The study involved a single intact class of 22 students, 17 (77%) of whom submitted parental permission documentation and received e-mail messages each school day over the course of one month. Concerns regarding Internet safety and children's use of e-mail were addressed fairly easily. Cost/benefit issues for the school did not seem prohibitive. Providing e-mail access to students without a home computer was accomplished by loaning them personal digital assistant (PDA) devices. In larger interventions, loaning PDAs is probably not feasible economically, although cell phones may be an acceptable alternative. It was concluded that this type of interactive obesity prevention program is feasible from most perspectives. Data from a larger scale effectiveness study is still needed.

  9. DPC loading feasibility study report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dafoe, R.E.; Lopez, D.A.; Williams, K.L.

    1997-11-01

    Disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated under a ``Settlement Agreement`` between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. This study investigates the feasibility of using the Dry Transfer Cell facility to package waste into Dual Purpose Canisters for interim storage at the adjacent Dry Storage System comprised of an interim storage pad with NUHOMS{reg_sign} storage modules. The wastes would then be road-ready for eventual disposal in a permanent repository. The operating period for these activities is expected to be from 2015 to 2035.

  10. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  11. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  12. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  13. Motivational Engineering for Pilot Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Frederick I.; And Others

    The study was an investigation of student pilot motivation for, and toward, the Air Training Command's undergraduate pilot training (UPT) program. The motivation hygiene approach was used to identify the motivational factors operating in the UPT program systematically. This approach has been used extensively in industry and with success in a…

  14. Prediction of pilot induced oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin PANĂ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in the design of flight-control systems for aircraft under pilotedcontrol is the determination of handling qualities and pilot-induced oscillations (PIO tendencieswhen significant nonlinearities exist in the vehicle description. The paper presents a method to detectpossible pilot-induced oscillations of Category II (with rate and position limiting, a phenomenonusually due to a misadaptation between the pilot and the aircraft response during some tasks in whichtight closed loop control of the aircraft is required from the pilot. For the analysis of Pilot in the LoopOscillations an approach, based on robust stability analysis of a system subject to uncertainparameters, is proposed. In this analysis the nonlinear elements are substituted by linear uncertainparameters. This approach assumes that PIO are characterized by a limit cycle behavior.

  15. Hualapai Wind Project Feasibility Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Kevin [Hualapai Tribe; Randall, Mark [Daystar Consulting; Isham, Tom [Power Engineers; Horna, Marion J [MJH Power Consulting LLC; Koronkiewicz, T [SWCA Environmental, Inc.; Simon, Rich [V-Bar, LLC; Matthew, Rojas [Squire Sanders Dempsey; MacCourt, Doug C. [Ater Wynne, LLP; Burpo, Rob [First American Financial Advisors, Inc.

    2012-12-20

    The Hualapai Department of Planning and Economic Development, with funding assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy, Tribal Energy Program, with the aid of six consultants has completed the four key prerequisites as follows: 1. Identify the site area for development and its suitability for construction. 2. Determine the wind resource potential for the identified site area. 3. Determine the electrical transmission and interconnection feasibility to get the electrical power produced to the marketplace. 4. Complete an initial permitting and environmental assessment to determine the feasibility for getting the project permitted. Those studies indicated a suitable wind resource and favorable conditions for permitting and construction. The permitting and environmental study did not reveal any fatal flaws. A review of the best power sale opportunities indicate southern California has the highest potential for obtaining a PPA that may make the project viable. Based on these results, the recommendation is for the Hualapai Tribal Nation to move forward with attracting a qualified wind developer to work with the Tribe to move the project into the second phase - determining the reality factors for developing a wind project. a qualified developer will bid to a utility or negotiate a PPA to make the project viable for financing.

  16. PV solar system feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashhab, Moh’d Sami S.; Kaylani, Hazem; Abdallah, Abdallah

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► This research studies the feasibility of PV solar systems. ► The aim is to develop the theory and application of a hybrid system. ► Relevant research topics are reviewed and some of them are discussed in details. ► A prototype of the PV solar system is designed and built. - Abstract: This research studies the feasibility of PV solar systems and aims at developing the theory and application of a hybrid system that utilizes PV solar system and another supporting source of energy to provide affordable heating and air conditioning. Relevant research topics are reviewed and some of them are discussed in details. Solar heating and air conditioning research and technology exist in many developed countries. To date, the used solar energy has been proved to be inefficient. Solar energy is an abundant source of energy in Jordan and the Middle East; with increasing prices of oil this source is becoming more attractive alternative. A good candidate for the other system is absorption. The overall system is designed such that it utilizes solar energy as a main source. When the solar energy becomes insufficient, electricity or diesel source kicks in. A prototype of the PV solar system that operates an air conditioning unit is built and proper measurements are collected through a data logging system. The measured data are plotted and discussed, and conclusions regarding the system performance are extracted.

  17. A negative bioventing feasibility test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Greene, D.W.; Herbes, S.E.; Walzel, A.D.

    1994-01-01

    A bioventing feasibility test was conducted at a hydrocarbon fuel spill site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The soils at this site are generally of low air permeability and are representative of the clayey soils encountered at several Department of Energy sites and throughout the southeastern United States. The tests included an in situ air permeability test and in situ respiration tests at three well where highest soil contamination was measured. The in situ respiration tests showed that there was the potential for significant biodegradation in the soil with adequate oxygenation. The in situ permeability tests indicated that the majority of flow was trough fractures, rather than through the bulk soils. A helium tracer test verified that injected gas flowed directly to the surface through a small number of fractures, with no flow reaching the monitoring wells. These results indicate that oxygen transport to the bulk soils would be severely limited by diffusion, such that bioventing was deemed not feasible for this site. In light of these results, the importance of testing for fracture flow in soils of lower permeability is stressed -- whether the technology is bioventing or conventional soil venting

  18. Wireless Roadside Inspection Phase II Tennessee Commercial Mobile Radio Services Pilot Test Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Siekmann, Adam [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program is researching the feasibility and value of electronically assessing truck and bus driver and vehicle safety at least 25 times more often than is possible using only roadside physical inspections. The WRI program is evaluating the potential benefits to both the motor carrier industry and to government. These potential benefits include reduction in accidents, fatalities and injuries on our highways and keeping safe and legal drivers and vehicles moving on the highways. WRI Pilot tests were conducted to prototype, test and demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of electronically collecting safety data message sets from in-service commercial vehicles and performing wireless roadside inspections using three different communication methods. This report summarizes the design, conduct and results of the Tennessee CMRS WRI Pilot Test. The purpose of this Pilot test was to demonstrate the implementation of commercial mobile radio services to electronically request and collect safety data message sets from a limited number of commercial vehicles operating in Tennessee. The results of this test have been used in conjunction with the results of the complimentary pilot tests to support an overall assessment of the feasibility and benefits of WRI in enhancing motor carrier safety (reduction in accidents) due to increased compliance (change in motor carrier and driver behavior) caused by conducting frequent safety inspections electronically, at highway speeds, without delay or need to divert into a weigh station

  19. Feasibility study for the European Reliability Data System (ERDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancini, G.

    1980-01-01

    In the framework of the Reactor Safety Programme of the Commission of the European Communities, the JRC - Ispra Establishment has performed a feasibility study for an integrated European Reliability Data System, the aim of which is the collection and organization of information related to the operation of LWRs with regard to component and systems behaviour, abnormal occurrences, outages, etc. Component Event Data Bank (CEGB), Abnormal Occurrences Reporting System, Generic Reliability Parameter Data Bank, Operating Unit Status Reports and the main activities carried out during the last two years are described. The most important achievements are briefly reported, such as: Reference Classification for Systems, Components and Failure Events, Informatic Structure of the Pilot Experiment of the CEDB, Information Retrieval System for Abnormal Occurrences Reports, Data Bank on Component Reliability Parameters, System on the Exchange of Operation Experience of LWRs, Statistical Data Treatment. Finally, the general conclusions of the feasibility study are summarized: the possibility and the usefulness for the creation of an integrated European Reliability Data System are outlined. (author)

  20. Regional disposal, a feasible solution for Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, Maria

    2004-01-01

    Almost every country that exploits or builds nuclear power plants is engaged in its own research or international cooperation programs aiming at identification of optimal solutions of closing the fuel cycle and finding feasible technologies for final disposal of spent fuel and high-level wastes resulting from reprocessing. The general trend that manifests in these countries is to manage on their own territories the final disposal while considering the possibility of regional arrangements for common disposal. But this latter alternative has not been definitively analyzed and decided upon. Hence, European Union and IAEA look for solutions of long term (of the order of hundreds years) for the final disposal, particularly within regional facilities. Multinational repositories where disposal of high-level wastes or spent fuel should appear as a paid specialized servicing, where the operation technical conditions would be well established, as secure from nuclear safety and physical point of view, under the provisions of safeguards agreements, are still under consideration. No matter of the option which will be chosen, closing the nuclear cycle and ensuring a final disposal facility for radioactive wastes are compulsory tasks and issues with many aspects in common (establishing a site hosted by stable deep geological formations, protection by engineered barriers to prevent dispersion of radioactive products into the environment, long term analyses, etc). In this circumstances, having in mind that no other variant appears to be achievable before 2020-2050, intermediate term storage appears as compulsory a solution in developing the fuel cycle both world wide and in Romania, As early as in the first half of 2003 at Cernavoda, the Intermediate Storage for Spent Fuel (DICA) was commissioned. This is a facility founded for the first time in Romania aiming at closing the fuel cycle. The paper presents the current issues and the results obtained so far within the frame of

  1. Live Piloting and Prototyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Rizzo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents current trends in service design research concerning large scale projects aimed at generating changes at a local scale. The strategy adopted to achieve this, is to co-design solutions including future users in the development process, prototyping and testing system of products and services before their actual implementation. On the basis of experience achieved in the European Project Life 2.0, this paper discusses which methods and competencies are applied in the development of these projects, eliciting the lessons learnt especially from the piloting phase in which the participatory design (PD approach plays a major role. In the first part, the topic is introduced jointly with the theoretical background where the user center design and participatory design methods are presented; then the Life 2.0 project development is described; finally the experience is discussed from a service design perspective, eliciting guidelines for piloting and prototyping services in a real context of use. The paper concludes reflecting on the designers’ role and competencies needed in this process.

  2. Pilots 2.0: DIRAC pilots for all the skies

    CERN Document Server

    Stagni, F; McNab, A; Luzzi, C

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, new types of computing infrastructures, such as IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service) and IAAC (Infrastructure as a Client), gained popularity. New resources may come as part of pledged resources, while others are opportunistic. Most of these new infrastructures are based on virtualization techniques. Meanwhile, some concepts, such as distributed queues, lost appeal, while still supporting a vast amount of resources. Virtual Organizations are therefore facing heterogeneity of the available resources and the use of an Interware software like DIRAC to hide the diversity of underlying resources has become essential. The DIRAC WMS is based on the concept of pilot jobs that was introduced back in 2004. A pilot is what creates the possibility to run jobs on a worker node. Within DIRAC, we developed a new generation of pilot jobs, that we dubbed Pilots 2.0. Pilots 2.0 are not tied to a specific infrastructure; rather they are generic, fully configurable and extendible pilots. A Pilot 2.0 can be s...

  3. Pilot trial on separation conditions for diaper recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Shin; Cho, Hee-Sun

    2017-09-01

    By utilizing laboratory-scale tests, the optimal separation conditions for diaper recycling were identified, and then, these conditions were validated by a pilot trial. In this research, we determined the mass balances derived during various processing steps and identified the most feasible procedures to use for separating each material in the output flow. The results showed that drum screening was not able to remove all the fiber and super absorbent particles (SAP) in the plastic-rich fraction and that cellulose enzyme treatment can be a good solution. To achieve better separation of fibers and SAP, slot screening followed by a cleaner is a potential option. A feasible diaper recycling process was recommended based on these results. This process involves screening and enzymatic treatment for the plastic fraction, and screening, cleaning, and thickening for the fiber fraction. Treatment procedures were also proposed for the SAP fraction and rejected materials. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Pilot Testing of the NURSE Stress Management Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Colleen; Barrere, Cynthia; Robertson, Sue; Zahourek, Rothlyn; Diaz, Desiree; Lachapelle, Leeanne

    2016-12-01

    Student nurses experience significant stress during their education, which may contribute to illness and alterations in health, poor academic performance, and program attrition. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and potential efficacy of an innovative stress management program in two baccalaureate nursing programs in Connecticut, named NURSE (Nurture nurse, Use resources, foster Resilience, Stress and Environment management), that assists nursing students to develop stress management plans. An explanatory sequential mixed-methods design was used to evaluate the effects of the intervention with 40 junior nursing students. Results from this study provide evidence that the NURSE intervention is highly feasible, and support further testing to examine the effect of the intervention in improving stress management in nursing students. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. [Drowning - An update on prehospital and intrahospital treatment strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunden, Mike Sebastian; Tank, Sascha; Kerner, Thoralf

    2015-07-01

    500000 people die from unintentional drowning each year worldwide. Drowning accidents occur to humans of every age, while fatal drowning is the leading cause of death among boys 5 to 14 years of age. In Germany, however, most drowning victims are elderly people. Considering the multitude of accident settings, ranging from bathing accidents in lakes to shipwrecks at sea, professional first responders need to adapt to various scenarios. This article summarizes the pathophysiology of drowning, particular features of prehospital life support and current knowledge on the further therapy of victims of near fatal drowning accidents. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  6. [Preclinical and intrahospital management of mass casualties and terrorist incidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, A; Bieler, D; Friemert, B; Kollig, E; Flohe, S

    2017-10-01

    Due to the recent terrorist attacks in Paris, Brussels, Ansbach, Munich, Berlin and more recently Manchester and London, terrorism is realized as a present threat to our society and social life, as well as a challenge for the health care system. Without fueling anxiety, there is a need for sensitization to this subject and to familiarize all concerned with the special kind of terrorist attack-related injuries, the operational priorities and tactics and the individual basic principles of preclinical and hospital care. There is a need to adapt the known established medical structure for a conventional mass casualty situation to the special requirements that are raised by this new kind of terrorist threat to our social life. It is the aim of this article, from a surgical point of view, to depict the tactics and challenges of preclinical care of the special kind of terrorist attack-related injuries from the site of the incident, via the advanced medical post or casualty collecting point, to the triage point at the hospital. The special needs of medical care and organizational aspects of the primary treatment in the hospital are highlighted and possible decisional options and different approaches are discussed.

  7. DISSS/ET modernization feasibility of adapting existing software and hardware technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, R.S.

    1993-09-30

    The Fission Energy and Systems Safety Program (FESSP) at LLNL was funded by the DOE Office of Safeguards and Security to develop an integrated system, hereafter referred to as the Security Clearance Electronic Processing, Transfer, Evaluation, and Recordkeeping (SCEPTER) System, for the electronic collection and transfer of personnel security data between clearance offices at contractor sites and DOE field offices and the Office of Personnel Management(OPM). This system will use existing software and hardware technologies where feasible. The project will consist of three phases. The first phase will investigate user needs, determine the feasibility of using existing technologies, and define project requirements. The second phase will be a pilot project to develop the computer systems and procedures required to automate the security clearance work flow within DOE and between DOE and OPM. Once the pilot system is implemented and tested, the decision to extend the system throughout DOE can be made. This third phase, the extension to a full production system, will require the investment of considerable funds in equipment and in the development of both a computer system and management infrastructure to support its successful operation. This investment will be undertaken only after the pilot system is operational and evaluated.

  8. Factors derived from the intrahospitable laboratories that cause stress in infirmary students Factores derivados de los laboratorios intrahospitalarios que provocan estrés en los estudiantes de enfermería Fatores derivados dos laboratórios intra-hospitalares que provocam estresse nos estudantes de enfermagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Basso Musso

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative, correlation cross-sectional study with descriptive analysis, whose objective was to assess the factors derived from the intra-hospitable laboratories that affect the stress appearance in Infirmary students. The sample consisted of 129 students, which voluntarily acceded to answer questionnaires Evaluative Scale de Hamilton for the Anxiety, validated in 2003, and Questionnaire KEZKAK, both adapted by the investigating group. The obtained data was processed through Microsoft Excel program, appearing: the 100% of the students presented Stress. From the manifestations of Stress, the tensional anxiety and insomnia appear with the biggest percentages. From the Stress producing Factors, in Student's competitions: "having errors on its work and harming the patient", and in the Educational "receiving contradictory orders" are the ones that present greater frequency of intensity, being the Educational factor the preponderant in the appearance of stress. One concludes that is necessary to adapt the educational positions of a guardian in the clinical practices given greater emphasis to the support that will have to be lend to student, with the purpose of diminishing stress an favoring the learning.Estudio transversal, cuantitativo, correlacional con análisis descriptivo, cuyo objetivo fue conocer los factores derivados de los laboratorios intrahospitalarios que inciden en la aparición de estrés en 129 estudiantes de Enfermería, que contestaron los cuestionarios Escala Hamilton y KEZKAK. Los datos fueron procesados con el programa Microsoft Excel, según los resultados: el 100% presenta Estrés. Ansiedad, tensión e insomnio, aparecen con mayor porcentaje. Los Factores Competencias del alumno: "cometer errores en su trabajo y perjudicar al paciente", y en Docente: "recibir ordenes contradictorias" son los que presentan mayor frecuencia, siendo el Docente el predominante en la aparición de estrés. Se concluye que es necesario adecuar las

  9. The pilot European Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative of the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisoni, G.B.; Henneman, W.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In North America, the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has established a platform to track the brain changes of Alzheimer's disease. A pilot study has been carried out in Europe to test the feasibility of the adoption of the ADNI platform (pilot E-ADNI). METHODS: Seven...... academic sites of the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium (EADC) enrolled 19 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 22 with AD, and 18 older healthy persons by using the ADNI clinical and neuropsychological battery. ADNI compliant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, cerebrospinal fluid...

  10. 33 CFR 385.12 - Pilot projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pilot projects. 385.12 Section... Processes § 385.12 Pilot projects. (a) The Plan includes pilot projects to address uncertainties associated... management, and wastewater reuse. The purpose of the pilot projects is to develop information necessary to...

  11. IPNS upgrade: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    Many of Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL's) scientific staff members were very active in R ampersand D work related to accelerator-based spoliation sources in the 1970s and early 1980s. In 1984, the Seitz/Eastman Panel of the National Academy of Sciences reviewed U.S. materials science research facilities. One of the recommendations of this panel was that the United States build a reactor-based steady-state source, the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Subsequently, R ampersand D activities related to the design of an accelerator-based source assumed a lower priority. The resumption of pulsed-source studies in this country started simultaneously with design activities in Europe aimed at the European Spallation Source (ESS). The European Community funded a workshop in September 1991 to define the parameters of the ESS. Participants in this workshop included both accelerator builders and neutron source users. A consortium of European countries has proposed to build a 5-MW pulsed source, and a feasibility study is currently under way. Soon after the birth of the ESS, a small group at ANL set about bringing themselves up to date on pulsed-source information since 1984 and studied the feasibility of upgrading ANL's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) to 1 MW by means of a rapidly cycling synchrotron that could be housed, along with its support facilities, in existing buildings. In early 1993, the Kohn panel recommended that (1) design and construction of the ANS should be completed according to the proposed project schedule and (2) development of competitive proposals for cost-effective design and construction of a 1-MW pulsed spallation source should be authorized immediately

  12. IPNS upgrade: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Many of Argonne National Laboratory`s (ANL`s) scientific staff members were very active in R&D work related to accelerator-based spoliation sources in the 1970s and early 1980s. In 1984, the Seitz/Eastman Panel of the National Academy of Sciences reviewed U.S. materials science research facilities. One of the recommendations of this panel was that the United States build a reactor-based steady-state source, the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Subsequently, R&D activities related to the design of an accelerator-based source assumed a lower priority. The resumption of pulsed-source studies in this country started simultaneously with design activities in Europe aimed at the European Spallation Source (ESS). The European Community funded a workshop in September 1991 to define the parameters of the ESS. Participants in this workshop included both accelerator builders and neutron source users. A consortium of European countries has proposed to build a 5-MW pulsed source, and a feasibility study is currently under way. Soon after the birth of the ESS, a small group at ANL set about bringing themselves up to date on pulsed-source information since 1984 and studied the feasibility of upgrading ANL`s Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) to 1 MW by means of a rapidly cycling synchrotron that could be housed, along with its support facilities, in existing buildings. In early 1993, the Kohn panel recommended that (1) design and construction of the ANS should be completed according to the proposed project schedule and (2) development of competitive proposals for cost-effective design and construction of a 1-MW pulsed spallation source should be authorized immediately.

  13. World Ships - Architectures & Feasibility Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, A. M.; Pak, M.; Putz, D.; Buhler, C.; Reiss, P.

    A world ship is a concept for manned interstellar flight. It is a huge, self-contained and self-sustained interstellar vehicle. It travels at a fraction of a per cent of the speed of light and needs several centuries to reach its target star system. The well- known world ship concept by Alan Bond and Anthony Martin was intended to show its principal feasibility. However, several important issues haven't been addressed so far: the relationship between crew size and robustness of knowledge transfer, reliability, and alternative mission architectures. This paper addresses these gaps. Furthermore, it gives an update on target star system choice, and develops possible mission architectures. The derived conclusions are: a large population size leads to robust knowledge transfer and cultural adaptation. These processes can be improved by new technologies. World ship reliability depends on the availability of an automatic repair system, as in the case of the Daedalus probe. Star systems with habitable planets are probably farther away than systems with enough resources to construct space colonies. Therefore, missions to habitable planets have longer trip times and have a higher risk of mission failure. On the other hand, the risk of constructing colonies is higher than to establish an initial settlement on a habitable planet. Mission architectures with precursor probes have the potential to significantly reduce trip and colonization risk without being significantly more costly than architectures without. In summary world ships remain an interesting concept, although they require a space colony-based civilization within our own solar system before becoming feasible.

  14. Pilot Model Using Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Akio; Matsubara, Genyo; Nakamura, Takeshi

    The motion of an aircraft controlled by a pilot is decided depending on the characteristics of a man-machine system. Although analysis and investigation are usually performed using a mathematical model of the aircraft including the control system, a method for making a mathematical model of the pilot, which is necessary for the analysis and study of man-machine systems, has not been established. Although a method for constructing a mathematical model of a pilot using a transfer function 1) has been reported, it is thought that a more accurate and more flexible pilot model may be obtained by applying a neural network (NN). Therefore, various studies have examined a pilot model to which a NN has been applied. As a result, it has been clarified that the application of a NN to a pilot model provides better performance compared to the case of applying a transfer function. Moreover, it has also been clarified that a single versatile pilot model, which can deal with various conditions, can be obtained by applying a NN and studying the control results under various conditions.

  15. Liverpool Telecare Pilot: case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Barnes

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Telecare services use information and communications technology (ICT to support the provision of care to people in their own homes. This paper describes a pilot telecare service employed by Liverpool (UK City Council to support a sample of their frail and elderly social services users. The pilot has been running for over two years and has been deployed for 21 individuals in Liverpool. In this paper we present the pilot system and provide real example cases which help to illustrate the benefits of such a system.

  16. NAESA Augmentation Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, John J.

    1998-01-01

    This project was one project within the Native American Earth and Space Academy (NAESA). NAESA is a national initiative comprised of several organizations that support programs which focus on 1) enhancing the technological, scientific and pedagogical skills of K-14 teachers who instruct Native Americans, 2) enhancing the understanding and applications of science, technology, and engineering of college-bound Native Americans and teaching them general college "survival skills" (e.g., test taking, time management, study habits), 3) enhancing the scientific and pedagogical skills of the faculty of tribally-controllcd colleges and community colleges with large Native American enrollments, and 4) strengthening the critical relationships between students, their parents, tribal elders, and their communities. This Augmentation Pilot Project focused on the areas of community-school alliances and intemet technology use in teaching and learning and daily living addressing five major objectives.

  17. Menstrual cups and sanitary pads to reduce school attrition, and sexually transmitted and reproductive tract infections: a cluster randomised controlled feasibility study in rural Western Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips-Howard, Penelope A.; Nyothach, Elizabeth; ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Omoto, Jackton; Wang, Duolao; Zeh, Clement; Onyango, Clayton; Mason, Linda; Alexander, Kelly T.; Odhiambo, Frank O.; Eleveld, Alie; Mohammed, Aisha; van Eijk, Anna M.; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Vulule, John; Faragher, Brian; Laserson, Kayla F.

    2016-01-01

    Conduct a feasibility study on the effect of menstrual hygiene on schoolgirls' school and health (reproductive/sexual) outcomes. 3-arm single-site open cluster randomised controlled pilot study. 30 primary schools in rural western Kenya, within a Health and Demographic Surveillance System. Primary

  18. Building Resiliency in a Palliative Care Team: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Darshan H; Perez, Giselle K; Traeger, Lara; Park, Elyse R; Goldman, Roberta E; Haime, Vivian; Chittenden, Eva H; Denninger, John W; Jackson, Vicki A

    2016-03-01

    Palliative care clinicians (PCCs) are vulnerable to burnout as a result of chronic stress related to working with seriously ill patients. Burnout can lead to absenteeism, ineffective communication, medical errors, and job turnover. Interventions that promote better coping with stress are needed in this population. This pilot study tested the feasibility of the Relaxation Response Resiliency Program for Palliative Care Clinicians, a program targeted to decrease stress and increase resiliency, in a multidisciplinary cohort of PCCs (N = 16) at a major academic medical center. A physician delivered the intervention over two months in five sessions (12 hours total). Data were collected the week before the program start and two months after completion. The main outcome was feasibility of the program. Changes in perceived stress, positive and negative affect, perspective taking, optimism, satisfaction with life, and self-efficacy were examined using nonparametric statistical tests. Effect size was quantified using Cohen's d. The intervention was feasible; all participants attended at least four of the five sessions, and there was no attrition. After the intervention, participants showed reductions in perceived stress and improvements in perspective taking. Our findings suggest that a novel team-based resiliency intervention based on elicitation of the relaxation response was feasible and may help promote resiliency and protect against the negative consequences of stress for PCCs. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The value of site-based observations complematary to naturalistic driving observations : a pilot study on the right turn manoeuvre.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nes, N. van Christoph, M.W.T. Hoedemaeker, M. & Horst, A.R.A. van der

    2013-01-01

    Naturalistic driving studies are increasingly applied in different shapes and sizes. The European project PROLOGUE has investigated the value and feasibility of a large-scale naturalistic driving study in Europe. Within PROLOGUE several pilot studies have been conducted in different countries. The

  20. Small City Transit : Ann Arbor, Michigan : Pilot Dial-A-Ride Project in a Sector of the City

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-03-01

    Ann Arbor, Michigan, is an illustration of a pilot dial-a-ride project implemented to test the feasibility of a coordinated dial-a-ride/fixed route service. This case study is one of thirteen examples of a transit service in a samll community. The ba...

  1. "Let's Talk about Drugs": Pilot Study of a Community-Level Drug Prevention Intervention Based on Motivational Interviewing Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbery, Natasha; McCambridge, Jim; Strang, John

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility of a community-level drug prevention intervention based upon the principles of motivational interviewing within a further education college was investigated in a pilot study. Design/methodology/approach: The implementation over the course of a single term of "Let's Talk about Drugs" was studied with both action…

  2. Sensory Adapted Dental Environments to Enhance Oral Care for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermak, Sharon A.; Stein Duker, Leah I.; Williams, Marian E.; Dawson, Michael E.; Lane, Christianne J.; Polido, José C.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot and feasibility study examined the impact of a sensory adapted dental environment (SADE) to reduce distress, sensory discomfort, and perception of pain during oral prophylaxis for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants were 44 children ages 6-12 (n = 22 typical, n = 22 ASD). In an experimental crossover design, each…

  3. A pilot study on early home-based intervention through an intelligent baby gym (CareToy) in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sgandurra, Giuseppina; Bartalena, Laura; Cecchi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CareToy is an intelligent system, inspired by baby gyms, aimed to provide an intensive, individualized, home-based and family-centred early intervention (EI) program. AIMS: A pilot study was carried out to explore the feasibility of CareToy intervention in preterm infants, aged 3-9 mo...

  4. Ultra Low-Dose Naloxone and Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Elderly Patients Undergoing Joint Replacement Surgery: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngozi N Imasogie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A pilot study was conducted to assess whether both the rationale and feasibility exist for future randomized clinical trials to evaluate the combined use of naloxone infusion and tramadol/acetaminophen as opioid-sparing drugs in elderly patients undergoing lower extremity joint replacement surgery.

  5. Incorporating health literacy in education for socially disadvantaged adults: an Australian feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscat, Danielle M; Smith, Sian; Dhillon, Haryana M; Morony, Suzanne; Davis, Esther L; Luxford, Karen; Shepherd, Heather L; Hayen, Andrew; Comings, John; Nutbeam, Don; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2016-06-04

    Adult education institutions have been identified as potential settings to improve health literacy and address the health inequalities that stem from limited health literacy. However, few health literacy interventions have been tested in this setting. Feasibility study for an RCT of the UK Skilled for Health Program adapted for implementation in Australian adult education settings. Implementation at two sites with mixed methods evaluation to examine feasibility, test for change in participants' health literacy and pilot test health literacy measures. Twenty-two socially disadvantaged adults with low literacy participated in the program and received 80-90 hours of health literacy instruction. The program received institutional support from Australia's largest provider of vocational education and training and was feasible to implement (100 % participation; >90 % completion; high teacher satisfaction). Quantitative results showed improvements in participants' health literacy skills and confidence, with no change on a generic measure of health literacy. Qualitative analysis identified positive student and teacher engagement with course content and self-reported improvements in health knowledge, attitudes, and communication with healthcare professionals. Positive feasibility results support a larger RCT of the health literacy program. However, there is a need to identify better, multi-dimensional measures of health literacy in order to be able to quantify change in a larger trial. This feasibility study represents the first step in providing the high quality evidence needed to understand the way in which health literacy can be improved and health inequalities reduced through Australian adult education programs.

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Douglas James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-27

    The mission of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is to demonstrate the safe, environmentally sound, cost effective, permanent disposal of Transuranic (TRU) waste left from production of nuclear weapons.

  7. US Daily Pilot Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pilot Balloon observational forms for the United States. Taken by Weather Bureau and U.S. Army observers. Period of record 1918-1960. Records scanned from the NCDC...

  8. Vertebral pain in helicopter pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffret, R.; Delahaye, R. P.; Metges, P. J.; VICENS

    1980-01-01

    Pathological forms of spinal pain engendered by piloting helicopters were clinically studied. Lumbalgia and pathology of the dorsal and cervical spine are discussed along with their clinical and radiological signs and origins.

  9. US Monthly Pilot Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly winds aloft summary forms summarizing Pilot Balloon observational data for the United States. Generally labeled as Form 1114, and then transitioning to Form...

  10. An informatics structure for the component event data bank of the ERDS feasibility project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capobianchi, S.; Borella, A.

    1980-01-01

    The development of the ERDS involves complex problems in organisation and data processing and it has therefore been decided to proceed by means of pilot experiments in order to test in practice the proposed solutions. The first experiment is concerned with the development of a computerised model for collecting, handling and retrieving raw data events through an experimental Component Event Data Bank (CEDB). With CEDB this refers to organised information related to events such as failures, repairs, maintenance actions etc., concerning major LWR components of which the technical specification, operational requirements and environmental conditions are specified in detail. This pilot experiment is indeed the most challenging in the framework of the ERDS feasibility project. It is foreseen that the raw data will be supplied by national European data banks using forms and codes proper to each of them. The conversion and standardisation of these data into homogeneous 'European' codes and classifications is for the most part automatically performed. (author)

  11. Feasibility assessment of a risk-based approach to technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atefi, B.; Gallagher, D.W.

    1991-05-01

    The first phase of the assessment concentrates on (1) identification of selected risk-based approaches for improving current technical specifications, (2) appraisal of characteristics of each approach, including advantages and disadvantages, and (3) recommendation of one or more approaches that might result in improving current technical specification requirements. The second phase of the work concentrates on assessment of the feasibility of implementation of a pilot program to study detailed characteristics of the preferred approach. The real time risk-based approach was identified as the preferred approach to technical specifications for controlling plant operational risk. There do not appear to be any technical or institutional obstacles to prevent initiation of a pilot program to assess the characteristics and effectiveness of such an approach. 2 tabs

  12. PC11 PILOT Reference Manual,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    file management , text editing and other features of the EXEC were used to prepare PILOT programs. These features of the EXEC are described in the...on the EXEC and ECL commands. Section 2.1.2 describes ECL commands pertinent to PCIIT PILOT. 2.1.1 Executive Control Language Fundamantals 2.1.1.1...some microcomputers compatible with it. The file management , text editing and other features of the IBM Disk Operating System (DOS) were used to

  13. Mobile App-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia: Feasibility and Initial Efficacy Among Veterans With Cannabis Use Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Babson, Kimberly A; Ramo, Danielle E; Baldini, Lisa; Vandrey, Ryan; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O

    2015-01-01

    Background Cannabis is the most frequently used illicit substance in the United States resulting in high rates of cannabis use disorders. Current treatments for cannabis use are often met with high rates of lapse/relapse, tied to (1) behavioral health factors that impact cannabis use such as poor sleep, and (2) access, stigma, supply, and cost of receiving a substance use intervention. Objective This pilot study examined the feasibility, usability, and changes in cannabis use and sleep diffic...

  14. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  15. MRS transfer facility feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jowdy, A.K.; Smith, R.I.

    1990-12-01

    Under contract to the US Department of Energy, Parsons was requested to evaluate the feasibility of building a simple hot cell (waste handling) transfer facility at the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) site to facilitate acceptance of spent fuel into the Federal Waste Management System starting in early 1998. The Transfer Facility was intended to provide a receiving and transfer to storage capability at a relatively low throughput rate (approximately 500 MTU/yr) and to provide the recovery capability needed on the site in the event of a transport or storage cask seal failure during a period of about two years while the larger Spent Fuel Handling Building (SFHB) was being completed. Although the original study basis postulated an incremental addition to the larger, previously considered MRS configurations, study results show that the Transfer Facility may be capable of receiving and storing spent fuel at annual rates of 3000 MTU/yr or more, making a larger fuel handling structure unnecessary. In addition, the study analyses showed that the Transfer Facility could be constructed and put into service in 15--17 months and would cost less than the previous configurations. 2 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Active Job Monitoring in Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Eileen; Fischer, Max; Giffels, Manuel; Jung, Christopher; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments in high energy physics (HEP) including multi-core jobs and multi-core pilots require data centres to gain a deep understanding of the system to monitor, design, and upgrade computing clusters. Networking is a critical component. Especially the increased usage of data federations, for example in diskless computing centres or as a fallback solution, relies on WAN connectivity and availability. The specific demands of different experiments and communities, but also the need for identification of misbehaving batch jobs, requires an active monitoring. Existing monitoring tools are not capable of measuring fine-grained information at batch job level. This complicates network-aware scheduling and optimisations. In addition, pilots add another layer of abstraction. They behave like batch systems themselves by managing and executing payloads of jobs internally. The number of real jobs being executed is unknown, as the original batch system has no access to internal information about the scheduling process inside the pilots. Therefore, the comparability of jobs and pilots for predicting run-time behaviour or network performance cannot be ensured. Hence, identifying the actual payload is important. At the GridKa Tier 1 centre a specific tool is in use that allows the monitoring of network traffic information at batch job level. This contribution presents the current monitoring approach and discusses recent efforts and importance to identify pilots and their substructures inside the batch system. It will also show how to determine monitoring data of specific jobs from identified pilots. Finally, the approach is evaluated.

  17. Feasibility trial of a Spanish-language multimedia educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Kristen J; McIntyre, Jessica; Gonzalez, Luis E; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Fisher, Kate J; Jacobsen, Paul B; Meade, Cathy; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2013-10-01

    may not generalize to other Hispanic populations. In the pilot project, we demonstrated the feasibility of delivering multimedia information to patients in medical oncology clinics. Because delivery in a clinical setting was found to be feasible, a larger study should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the multimedia intervention with respect to promoting accrual of Hispanic patients to clinical trials.

  18. A card game for the treatment of delusional ideas: A naturalistic pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benzakin Laetitia

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "Michael's game" is a card game which aims at familiarizing healthcare professionals and patients with cognitive behavioral therapy of psychotic symptoms. This naturalistic study tests the feasibility and the impact of the intervention in various naturalistic settings. Method Fifty five patients were recruited in seven centers. They were assessed in pre and post-test with the Peters Delusion Inventory – 21 items (PDI-21. Results Forty five patients completed the intervention significantly reducing their conviction and preoccupation scores on the PDI-21. Conclusion This pilot study supports the feasibility and effectiveness of "Michael's game" in naturalistic setting. Additional studies could validate the game in a controlled fashion.

  19. Cardiac Auscultation Using Smartphones: Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Si-Hyuck; Joe, Byunggill; Yoon, Yeonyee; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Shin, Insik; Suh, Jung-Won

    2018-02-28

    Cardiac auscultation is a cost-effective, noninvasive screening tool that can provide information about cardiovascular hemodynamics and disease. However, with advances in imaging and laboratory tests, the importance of cardiac auscultation is less appreciated in clinical practice. The widespread use of smartphones provides opportunities for nonmedical expert users to perform self-examination before hospital visits. The objective of our study was to assess the feasibility of cardiac auscultation using smartphones with no add-on devices for use at the prehospital stage. We performed a pilot study of patients with normal and pathologic heart sounds. Heart sounds were recorded on the skin of the chest wall using 3 smartphones: the Samsung Galaxy S5 and Galaxy S6, and the LG G3. Recorded heart sounds were processed and classified by a diagnostic algorithm using convolutional neural networks. We assessed diagnostic accuracy, as well as sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values. A total of 46 participants underwent heart sound recording. After audio file processing, 30 of 46 (65%) heart sounds were proven interpretable. Atrial fibrillation and diastolic murmur were significantly associated with failure to acquire interpretable heart sounds. The diagnostic algorithm classified the heart sounds into the correct category with high accuracy: Galaxy S5, 90% (95% CI 73%-98%); Galaxy S6, 87% (95% CI 69%-96%); and LG G3, 90% (95% CI 73%-98%). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were also acceptable for the 3 devices. Cardiac auscultation using smartphones was feasible. Discrimination using convolutional neural networks yielded high diagnostic accuracy. However, using the built-in microphones alone, the acquisition of reproducible and interpretable heart sounds was still a major challenge. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03273803; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03273803 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6x6g1fHIu).

  20. Exploring guideline adaptation strategy for Turkey: Is "ADAPTE" feasible or does it need adaptation as well?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan Baser, Duygu; Kahveci, Rabia; Baydar Artantas, Aylin; Yasar, İlknur; Aksoy, Hilal; Koc, Esra Meltem; Kasim, İsmail; Kunnamo, Ilkka; Özkara, Adem

    2018-02-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines are mostly developed by 3 methods; namely, de novo, adoption, and adaptation. Nonpublished studies and authors experience shows that most guidelines in Turkey are either by adoption or by adaptation. There is no available local tool for adaptation, so the process is not standardized and most of the time not explicitly defined. The objective of this study is to search for international guideline adaptation tools and test their feasibility in Turkish context, to serve a final goal of developing a unique local strategic tool for guideline adaptation. The methodological design of this study includes selection of an international tool for Clinical Practice Guideline adaptation, piloting this tool with selected Turkish guidelines, identifying the feasibility of this tool and exploring the needs for adaptation of the tool, drawing recommendations for adaptation of the strategies, and validation of the process by local experts. The study from planning phase to finalizing the guidance, including pilot studies and panel but excluding translation of ADAPTE, lasted 18 months. Nine researchers were involved in the adaptation process and 15 more experts were involved in the validation panel. Following the suggestions of the research team on modifications and validation through the expert panel; 2 steps of the ADAPTE toolkit were rejected, 2 steps were accepted by modification, 7 steps were accepted by additional recommendations. In addition, 2 tools were suggested to be added to the toolkit. This is the first study on adaptation of guidelines in Turkey. Pilot adaptation of 2 guidelines with ADAPTE revealed that ADAPTE is a useful and feasible tool in Turkish setting, but might require certain changes in recommendations and revision of tools. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Orchestrating differential data access for translational research: a pilot implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandizi, Marco; Melnichuk, Olga; Bild, Raffael; Kohlmayer, Florian; Rodriguez-Castro, Benedicto; Spengler, Helmut; Kuhn, Klaus A; Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Ohmann, Christian; Mustonen, Timo; Linden, Mikael; Nyrönen, Tommi; Lappalainen, Ilkka; Brazma, Alvis; Sarkans, Ugis

    2017-03-23

    Translational researchers need robust IT solutions to access a range of data types, varying from public data sets to pseudonymised patient information with restricted access, provided on a case by case basis. The reason for this complication is that managing access policies to sensitive human data must consider issues of data confidentiality, identifiability, extent of consent, and data usage agreements. All these ethical, social and legal aspects must be incorporated into a differential management of restricted access to sensitive data. In this paper we present a pilot system that uses several common open source software components in a novel combination to coordinate access to heterogeneous biomedical data repositories containing open data (open access) as well as sensitive data (restricted access) in the domain of biobanking and biosample research. Our approach is based on a digital identity federation and software to manage resource access entitlements. Open source software components were assembled and configured in such a way that they allow for different ways of restricted access according to the protection needs of the data. We have tested the resulting pilot infrastructure and assessed its performance, feasibility and reproducibility. Common open source software components are sufficient to allow for the creation of a secure system for differential access to sensitive data. The implementation of this system is exemplary for researchers facing similar requirements for restricted access data. Here we report experience and lessons learnt of our pilot implementation, which may be useful for similar use cases. Furthermore, we discuss possible extensions for more complex scenarios.

  2. Transient ischaemic attack and stroke risk: pilot of a primary care electronic decision support tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranta A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs indicate high risk for stroke and rapid management reduces stroke burden. Rapid specialist access to initiate timely management is often challenging to achieve. AIM: To assess the feasibility of implementing a TIA/Stroke electronic decision support (EDS tool intended to aid general practitioners (GPs in the timely management of TIAs. METHODS: An eight-week pilot provided access to the TIA/Stroke EDS to selected GPs in the MidCentral district, with subsequent patient record review and a post-pilot user satisfaction survey. RESULTS: Eleven patients from eight practices were entered into the tool and when EDS-rendered advice was followed, diagnosis was accurate and management was in accordance with New Zealand TIA guidelines. No adverse outcomes resulted and user feedback was positive. DISCUSSION: Results indicate that wider implementation of the TIA/Stroke EDS tool is feasible.

  3. 7 CFR 1781.18 - Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT (RCD) LOANS AND WATERSHED (WS) LOANS AND ADVANCES § 1781.18 Feasibility. (a) Before WS loan, WS advance, or RCD loan is approved, a determination of feasibility will be... Conservationist before a WS loan, WS advance, or RCD loan is approved. (b) A written assessment of the project's...

  4. Sault Tribe Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Osterhout; Global Energy Concepts

    2005-07-31

    The Sault Tribe conducted a feasibility study on tribal lands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to determine the technical and economic feasibility of both small and large-scale wind power development on tribal lands. The study included a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and regulatory analyzes and assessments.

  5. Pharmacogenetics of Ketamine-Induced Emergence Phenomena: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroke, Edwin N; Crawford, Sybil L; Dungan, Jennifer R

    Up to 55% of patients who are administered ketamine experience an emergence phenomena (EP) that closely mimics schizophrenia and increases their risk of injury; however, to date, no studies have investigated genetic association of ketamine-induced EP in healthy patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the feasibility and sample sizes required to explore the relationship between CYP2B6*6 and GRIN2B single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ketamine-induced EP. This cross-sectional, pharmacogenetic candidate, gene pilot study recruited 75 patients having minor elective outpatient surgeries. EP was measured with the Clinician Administered Dissociative State Scale. Genetic association of CYP2B6*6 and GRIN2B (rs1019385 and rs1806191) single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ketamine-induced EP occurrence and severity were tested using logistic and linear regression. Forty-seven patients (63%) received ketamine and were genotyped, and 40% of them experienced EP. Occurrence and severity of EP were not associated with CYP2B6*6 or GRIN2B (p > .10). Exploratory analysis of nongenotype models containing age, ketamine dose, duration of anesthesia, and time from ketamine administration to assessment for EP significantly predicted EP occurrence (p = .001) and severity (p = .007). This pilot study demonstrates feasibility for implementing a pharmacogenetic study in a clinical setting, and we estimate that between 380 and 570 cases will be needed to adequately power future genetic association studies. Younger age, higher dose, and longer duration of anesthesia significantly predicted EP occurrence and severity among our pilot sample. Although the small sample size limited our ability to demonstrate significant genotype differences, we generated effect sizes, sample size estimates, and nongenetic covariates information in order to support future pharmacogenetic study design for evaluating this adverse event.

  6. A workplace farmstand pilot programme in Omaha, Nebraska, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertmann, Farryl M W; Fricke, Hollyanne E; Carpenter, Leah R; Schober, Daniel J; Smith, Teresa M; Pinard, Courtney A; Yaroch, Amy L

    2015-09-01

    To explore the feasibility of a workplace farmstand programme through the utilization of an online ordering system to build awareness for local food systems, encourage community participation, and increase local fruit and vegetable availability. A 4-week pilot to explore feasibility of workplace farmstand programmes through a variety of outcome measures, including survey, mode of sale, weekly sales totals and intercept interviews. A large private company in Sarpy County, Omaha, Nebraska, USA. Employees of the company hosting the farmstand programme. Pre-programme, a majority of employees indicated that quality (95·4 %), variety (94·6 %) and cost of fruits and vegetables (86·4 %) were driving factors in their fruit and vegetable selection when shopping. The availability of locally or regionally produced fruits and vegetables was highly important (78·1 %). Participants varied in their definition of local food, with nearly half (49·2 %) reporting within 80·5 km (50 miles), followed by 160·9 km (100 miles; 29·5 %) and 321·9 km (200 miles; 12·1 %). Weekly farmstand purchases (both walk-ups and online orders) ranged from twenty-eight to thirty-nine employees, with weekly sales ranging from $US 257·95 to 436·90 for the producer. The mode of purchase changed throughout the pilot, with higher use of online ordering in the beginning and higher use of