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Sample records for intrahepatic portosystemic stent

  1. Recanalization of an Occluded Intrahepatic Portosystemic Covered Stent via the Percutaneous Transhepatic Approach

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    Chan, Chih Yang; Liang, Po Chin [National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei (China)

    2010-08-15

    A 41-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis had recurrent portal hypertension and bleeding from esophageal varices due to complete occlusion of a previously inserted transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent. Because recanalization of the stent by the transjugular approach was unsuccessful, ultrasound-guided entry to the splenic vein and portal vein was used. After catheter-directed intrathrombus thrombolysis, successful opening of the stent was achieved and a stent was placed. We herein report a rare case in which thrombolysis and recanalization of a TIPS stent were performed via a percutaneous transhepatic approach

  2. Treatment of Portosystemic Shunt Myelopathy with a Stent Graft Deployed through a Transjugular Intrahepatic Route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Deepak; Arora, Ankur; Deka, Pranjal; Mukund, Amar; Bhatnagar, Shorav; Jindal, Deepti; Kumar, Niteen; Pamecha, Viniyendra

    2013-01-01

    A case of surgically created splenorenal shunt complicated with shunt myelopathy was successfully managed by placement of a stent graft within the splenic vein to close the portosystemic shunt and alleviate myelopathy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of shunt myelopathy in a patient with noncirrhotic portal fibrosis without cirrhosis treated by a novel technique wherein a transjugular intrahepatic route was adopted to deploy the stent graft

  3. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

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    Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Joon Koo; Chung, Jin Wook; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicidne, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-05-15

    As a new interventional procedure for the control of variceal bleeding, a portosystemic shunt can be established with the installment of metallic stent through the transjugular approach. In order to evaluate the clinical usefulness of the procedure, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedure were performed in 5 patients with variceal bleeding due to liver cirrhosis. The metallic stents were mainly a self expandable Wallstent (Schneider, Switzerland), An 8 to 10 mm shunt was formed by the insertion of the stent and balloon dilatation after puncture of the proximal portal vein from the right or middle hepatic vein. The patency of the shunt was proven by portography after the procedure. The portal pressure measured in 3 patients before and after the procedure improved with decrease from 31 mmHg to 25 mmHg. The procedure failed in 1 patient due to pre-existing portal vein thrombosis. During the follow-up period from 1 month to 4 months, shunts were patent in all 4 patients. However, hepatic encephalopathy occurred in one patient one week following the procedure. Though the follow-up period was not long enough for full evaluation, we found the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was a safe and effective procedure for the control of variceal bleeding by lowering the portal pressure. For the appropriate application for this procedure, the optimal size of the shunt and optical degree of the resultant decompression are yet to be determined in the future.

  4. Congenital Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts

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    Lee, Woong Hee; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shick; Shin, Hyeong Cheol [Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Intrahepatic portosystemic shunts are an anomalous connection between the portal vein and hepatic vein/IVC, which may be either congenital or acquired secondary to liver cirrhosis or portal hypertension. Cases of congenital intrahepatic shunts are usually encountered in children and may spontaneously resolve. We report 5 cases of congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunts in neonates and an adult

  5. Usefulness of a balloon-expandable, covered stent for the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

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    Rössle M

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE covered, self-expandable nitinol stents in 2001 considerably improved the patency, response rates and survival of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS. Side effects of portosystemic shunting such as hepatic encephalopathy (HE and worsening of hepatic function, however, remained a problem. To reduce HE, underdilatation of nitinol stents has been practiced for many years. However, as shown recently, underdilatation was a flop since, due to their intrinsic memory, nitinol stents always expanded to reach their nominal diameter of 8 or 10 mm. To overcome this problem and to be able to perform permanent shunts with a smaller diameter of < 8 mm, we studied the usefulness of a balloon-expandable, covered, metallic stent which allowed adjustment to any diameter between 5 and 12 mm. Methods: 30 patients with cirrhosis and symptomatic portal hypertension were included. The mean Child-Pugh score was 8 ± 2.17 patients had refractory ascites, 9 patients variceal bleeding and four patients other indications for the TIPS. Results: The TIPS was successfully implanted in all patients within 69.6 ± 21.8 min. The shunt reduced the portosystemic pressure gradient by 57.5 ± 14.2% with a mean stent diameter of 7.4 ± 1.0 mm (5 -10.3 mm. During a mean follow-up of 330 ± 249 days, shunt revision was necessary in 5 patients (17%, four of them had insufficient response and received stent dilatation and one patient had stent misplacement requiring a parallel shunt. Three patients (10% developed HE. Conclusions: The covered, balloon-expandable stent could be placed accurately and allowed creation of adapted shunts with smaller diameters as usual. This resulted in a comparatively low rate of HE.

  6. Risk factors for stent graft thrombosis after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Younes; Kerrigan, Timothy; Li, Lei; Prosser, Dominik; Brar, Anantnoor; Righetti, Johnathan; Schenning, Ryan C; Kaufman, John A; Farsad, Khashayar

    2017-12-01

    To identify risk factors of stent graft thrombosis after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation. Patients who underwent TIPS creation between June 2003 and January 2016 and with follow-up assessing stent graft patency were included (n=174). Baseline comorbidities, liver function, procedural details and follow-up liver function tests were analyzed in association with hazards of thrombosis on follow-up. Competing risk cox regression models were used considering liver transplant after TIPS creation as the competing risk variable. One-, 2- and 5-year primary patency rates were 94.1%, 91.7% and 78.2%, respectively. Patient age [sub-hazard ratio (sHR): 1.13; P=0.001], body mass index (BMI) value for trend=0.017). Older age, lower BMI and higher post-TIPS portosystemic gradients were associated with higher hazards of shunt thrombosis after TIPS creation using stent grafts. Higher rates of shunt thrombosis were seen in patients for whom TIPS creation was clinically unsuccessful. The association between TIPS thrombosis and higher post-TIPS portosystemic gradients may indicate impaired flow through the shunt, a finding which may be technical or anatomic in nature and should be assessed before procedure completion.

  7. Reversal of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)-Induced Hepatic Encephalopathy Using a Strictured Self-Expanding Covered Stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, Mitchell W.; Soltes, George D.; Lin, Peter H.; Bush, Ruth L.; Lumsden, Alan B.

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a known complication following percutaneous transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement. We describe herein a simple and effective strategy of TIPS revision by creating an intraluminal stricture within a self-expanding covered stent, which is deployed in the portosystemic shunt to reduce the TIPS blood flow. This technique was successful in reversing a TIPS-induced hepatic encephalopathy in our patient

  8. Evaluation of fluency stent-grafts in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jianbo; Li Yanhao; Chen Yong; He Xiaofeng; Zeng Qingle; Mei Quelin; Lu Wei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of Fluency stent-graft (Bard Corp) in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Methods: The clinical data of 21 consecutive patients treated by TIPS using Fluency stent-grafts were retrospectively reviewed. All of them were recurrent variceal bleeding secondary to portal vein hypertension, 1 was bleeding secondary to primary hepatic carcinoma with port vein thrombus, and 1 was Budd-Chiari syndrome. They were followed-up after (10.1±4.6) months (2.0 to 24.0 months). Stent-grafts patancy, portal vein pressure and liver function were recorded and compared. Results: Twenty-five stent-grafts were successfully implanted in 21 patients, 23 stent grafts were 8 mm 2 were 10 mm in diameter. The covered length of the stents varied from 6 to 8 cm. The bleeding was stopped and the portal vein pressure decreased significantly from (25.4±3.5) mm Hg to (15.4±2.8) mm Hg (t= 12.495, P 0.05). Conclusion: The Fluency stent-grafts could increase the patency of the TIPS, but its efficacy on the long-term effect and hepatic encephalopathy need further investigation. (authors)

  9. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent-shunt procedure for refractory ascites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Wenke; Shan Hong; Zhu Kangshun; Jiang Zaibo; Li Zhengran; Huang Mingsheng; Guan Shouhai; Shen Xinying

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical efficacy of TIPS in the treatment of patients with refractory ascites and investigate the clinical factors associated with TIPS. Methods: 21 consecutive patients with refractory ascites, 16 men and 5 women with mean age of 45 years (range 22-69 years) were followed up for an average of 337 days (range 50-1323 days). Ascites/abdomen circumference, serum parameters, stents function, time of followed up and survival rate were analyzed. Results: The ascites was significantly reduced as compared with basal values (P<0.05). 81% and 91% patients had no or mild ascites during 3 to 6 months and 9 to 12 after TIPS respectively. According to responses to treatment within 3 months, using Logistic regression predicated the control of ascites with relation to Child class C for severe prognosis (P<0.05). There were significant change in serum sodium, serum creatinine as compared with baseline at follow-up (P<0.05). Their mortality were 14% during follow-up for 3 months, 20% in 6 and the survival rate was 72% at 1 year. According to COX regression analysis showed that age, Child class C, serum albumin, hepatic encephalopathy, serum total bilirubin were related to severe prognosis; but only hepatic encephalopathy and Child class C had an effect on survival rate. Conclusion: TIPS is an effective method for refractory ascite caused by hepatitis cirrhosis, and also effective for patients with functional renal failure but retaining of liver compensation

  10. Experimental comparison study of the tissue characteristics in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and vascular stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qin; An Yanli; Deng Gang; Fang Wen; Zhu Guangyu; Niu Huanzhang; Yu Hui; Li Guozhao; Teng Gaojun; Wang Zhen; Wei Xiaoying

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the tissue characteristics within vascular stent and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt(TIPS) on swine and to provide more information for the understanding and prevention of vascular stent and TIPS restenosis. Methods: Animal models for TIPS were built in 6 swine and vascular stents were implanted in iliac veins simultaneously. 14-28 days after the operation, the 6 swine were killed to remove the TIPS and vascular stent and the pathological examinations were performed on the tissues within the shunt and stent. The similarities and differences of the tissues within the shunt and stent were analyzed with Krttskal Wallis test. Results: Restenosis of TIPS occurred in 4 models and complete occlusion were seen in 2, while all vascular stents were patent and coated with a thin layer of intimal tissue. Electron microscopic results showed that the tissues in restenotic TIPS were loose and with more extra matrix and fibers, and less smooth muscle, fibroblastic and myofibroblastic cells with different and irregular shape and rich secretory granules. The tissues in patent TIPS contained more extra fibers, smooth muscle and fibroblastic cells with normal organelle. The intimal tissues in vascular stent contained more fibers and fibroblasts cells, less smooth muscle cells. On immunohistochemical staining, the tissues in restenotic and patent TIPS as well as the intimal tissues in vascular stent had strong positive expression for anti-SMC- actin-α, the expression were gradually weakened for PCNA, the intimal tissues in vascular stent had a strong positive expression for vimentin, while the expression of the tissues in restenotic and patent TIPS were weakened gradually. For myoglobulin, the tissues in restenotic TIPS had weakly positive expression, the expression in patent TIPS and vascular stent were almost negative. Western blot results for TGF-β showed that the absorbance ratios of the intima tissues in vascular stent, normal vascular

  11. A comparison of clinical efficacy between covered stent-grafts and bare stents in transjuglar in-trahepatic portosystemic shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yongbin; Zhang Xitong; Zhang Wei; Xia Yonghui; Liang Songnian; Xu Ke

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical efficacy between covered stent and uncovered stent in transjuglar in-trahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Methods: Thirty patients with liver cirrhosis (portal hypertension), who received TIPS, were retrospectively studied. All patients were divided into two groups covered-stent group (n=20) and uncovered-stent group (n=10). For each patient, portal pressure was measured before and after operation, and the patency of shunt was evaluated by color Doppler ultrasound after operation. The mortality, recurrent bleeding rate and incidence of hepatic encephalopathy were analyzed by Fisher exact probability test. Results: The TIPS treatment was successful in all patients, the portal pressure in the covered-stent group reduced from (3.78 ± 0.50)kPa to (2.13 ± 0.44) kPa and that of the uncovered-stent group reduced from (3.67 ± 0.48)kPA TO (2.13 ± 0.35)kPa. Twenty-six cases were postoperatively followed-up (17 cases in covered-stent group, 9 cases in uncovered-stent group). the follow-up period varied from 7 days to 62 months (median follow-up period was 23 months). Thirteen patients died of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and hepatic failure. The difference of mortality between covered-stent group (8/17) and uncovered-stent group (5/17) and the uncovered-stent group (3/9) was not different too (P>0.05). The incidence of hepatic encephalopathy in the covered-stent group (4/17) was not different from that of the uncovered-stent group (2/9) (P>0.05). The patency rates of 6 months and 12 months reached 100% in the covered-stent group, which were higher than those in the uncovered-stent group 77.8% (7/9) and 55.6%(5/9) (P<0.05). Conclusions: The patency rate of shunt at 12 months after TIPS was higher in the covered-stent group than the uncovered-stent group, while the mortality, recurrent bleeding rate and incidence of hepatic encephalopathy were not significantly different between the two groups. (authors)

  12. Experimental study of an endothelial progenitor cell coated stent in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Hongjian; Teng Gaojun; Cao Aihong; Chen Jun; Deng Gang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of a self-expandable metal stent coated with autologous endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) for prevention of restenosis in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in a swine model. Methods: EPCs were coated on the metal stents using fibrin gel before TIPS procedure. TIPS was performed in 15 young adult pigs, using an autologous EPC-seeded stent (treatment group, n=9) or a conventional bare metal stent (control group, n=6). All pigs were sacrificed at 2 weeks after TIPS procedure. Portography was performed immediately before the euthanasia. Gross and microscopic pathological exams and immunohistochemical exams of the TIPS track specimens were performed. Fisher test and t test were used to analyse the data. Results: TIPS was performed successfully in all the 15 swine. On day 14 of follow-up, direct portography and necropsy demonstrated that 5 shunts remained patent, 2 shunts stenosed, and the remaining 2 shunts occluded in the treatment group (n=9); while 5 shunts were occluded and one shunt was stenotic in the control group (n=6). The patency rate was 56% vs 0 (P=0.03) between the two groups. Histological analyses showed a greater pseudo-intimal hyperplasia in the TIPS track of the control group than that of the treatment group (pseudointimal thickness at hepatic vein, hepatic parenchyma and portal vein site was (1.2±0.4), (1.3±0.5), (1.5±0.4) mm vs (1.0±0.6), (0.9±0.5), (1.0±0.4) mm respectively (P<0.05). Conclusion: The EPC-coated metal stent is feasibly constructed in vitro and improves the patency in TIPS in a porcine model. (authors)

  13. [Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting with covered stents in children: a preliminary study of safety and patency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurera, L J; Espejo, J J; Canis, M; Bueno, A; Vicente, J; Gilbert, J J

    2014-01-01

    To retrospectively analyze the safety and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting (TIPS) using covered stents in children. We present 6 children (mean age, 10.6 years; mean weight, 33.5kg) who underwent TIPS with 8mm diameter Viatorr(®) covered stents for acute (n=4) or recurrent (n=2) upper digestive bleeding that could not be controlled by endoscopic measures. Five of the children had cirrhosis and the other had portal vein thrombosis with cavernous transformation. We analyzed the relapse of upper digestive bleeding, the complications that appeared, and the patency of the TIPS shunt on sequential Doppler ultrasonography or until transplantation. A single stent was implanted in a single session in each child; none of the children died. The mean transhepatic gradient decreased from 16mmHg (range: 12-21mmHg) before the procedure to 9mmHg (range: 1-15mmHg) after TIPS. One patient developed mild encephalopathy, and the girl who had portal vein thrombosis with cavernous transformation developed an acute occlusion of the TIPS that resolved after the implantation of a coaxial stent. Three children received transplants (7, 9, and 10 months after the procedure, respectively), and the patency of the TIPS was confirmed at transplantation. In the three remaining children, patency was confirmed with Doppler ultrasonography 1, 3, and 5 months after implantation. None of the children had new episodes of upper digestive bleeding during follow-up after implantation (mean: 8.1 months). Our results indicate that TIPS with 8mm diameter Viatorr(®) covered stents can be safe and efficacious for the treatment of upper digestive bleeding due to gastroesophageal varices in cirrhotic children; our findings need to be corroborated in larger series. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Technical and clinical outcome of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt: Bare metal stents (BMS) versus viatorr stent-grafts (VSG)

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    Sommer, Christof M., E-mail: cmsommer@gmx.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gockner, Theresa L.; Stampfl, Ulrike; Bellemann, Nadine [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Sauer, Peter; Ganten, Tom [Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Weitz, Juergen [Department of General, Abdominal and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans U.; Radeleff, Boris A. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► Twelve month mean number of TIPS revisions per patient was significantly lower in VSG. ► First TIPS revision was performed significantly later in the VSG. ► There was no significant difference of hepatic encephalopathy in both study groups. -- Abstract: Purpose: To compare retrospectively angiographical and clinical results in patients undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent-shunt (TIPS) using BMS or VSG. Materials and methods: From February 2001 to January 2010, 245 patients underwent TIPS. From those, 174 patients matched the inclusion criteria with elective procedures and institutional follow-up. Group (I) consisted of 116 patients (mean age, 57.0 ± 11.1 years) with BMS. Group (II) consisted of 58 patients with VSG (mean age, 53.5 ± 16.1 years). Angiographic and clinical controls were scheduled at 3, 6 and 12 months, followed by clinical controls every 6 months. Primary study goals included hemodynamic success, shunt patency as well as time to and number of revisions. Secondary study goals included clinical success. Results: Hemodynamic success was 92.2% in I and 91.4% in II (n.s.). Primary patency was significantly higher in II compared to I (53.8% after 440.4 ± 474.5 days versus 45.8% after 340.1 ± 413.8 days; p < 0.05). The first TIPS revision was performed significantly later in II compared to I (288.3 ± 334.7 days versus 180.1 ± 307.0 days; p < 0.05). In the first angiographic control, a portosystemic pressure gradient ≥15 mmHg was present in 73.9% in I and in 39.4% in II (p < 0.05). Clinical success was 73.7–86.2% after 466.3 ± 670.1 days in I and 85.7–90.5% after 617.5 ± 642.7 days in II (n.s.). Hepatic encephalopathy was 37.5% in I and 36.5% in II (n.s.). Conclusion: VSG increased primary shunt patency as well as decreased time to and number of TIPS revisions. There was a trend of higher clinical success in VSG without increased hepatic encephalopathy.

  15. Technical and clinical outcome of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt: Bare metal stents (BMS) versus viatorr stent-grafts (VSG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, Christof M.; Gockner, Theresa L.; Stampfl, Ulrike; Bellemann, Nadine; Sauer, Peter; Ganten, Tom; Weitz, Juergen; Kauczor, Hans U.; Radeleff, Boris A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Twelve month mean number of TIPS revisions per patient was significantly lower in VSG. ► First TIPS revision was performed significantly later in the VSG. ► There was no significant difference of hepatic encephalopathy in both study groups. -- Abstract: Purpose: To compare retrospectively angiographical and clinical results in patients undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent-shunt (TIPS) using BMS or VSG. Materials and methods: From February 2001 to January 2010, 245 patients underwent TIPS. From those, 174 patients matched the inclusion criteria with elective procedures and institutional follow-up. Group (I) consisted of 116 patients (mean age, 57.0 ± 11.1 years) with BMS. Group (II) consisted of 58 patients with VSG (mean age, 53.5 ± 16.1 years). Angiographic and clinical controls were scheduled at 3, 6 and 12 months, followed by clinical controls every 6 months. Primary study goals included hemodynamic success, shunt patency as well as time to and number of revisions. Secondary study goals included clinical success. Results: Hemodynamic success was 92.2% in I and 91.4% in II (n.s.). Primary patency was significantly higher in II compared to I (53.8% after 440.4 ± 474.5 days versus 45.8% after 340.1 ± 413.8 days; p < 0.05). The first TIPS revision was performed significantly later in II compared to I (288.3 ± 334.7 days versus 180.1 ± 307.0 days; p < 0.05). In the first angiographic control, a portosystemic pressure gradient ≥15 mmHg was present in 73.9% in I and in 39.4% in II (p < 0.05). Clinical success was 73.7–86.2% after 466.3 ± 670.1 days in I and 85.7–90.5% after 617.5 ± 642.7 days in II (n.s.). Hepatic encephalopathy was 37.5% in I and 36.5% in II (n.s.). Conclusion: VSG increased primary shunt patency as well as decreased time to and number of TIPS revisions. There was a trend of higher clinical success in VSG without increased hepatic encephalopathy

  16. Long Term Follow-up of a Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt: A Comparison of Covered and Uncovered Stents

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    Joo, Seung Moon; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Hyo Cheol; Jae, Hwan Jun; Chung, Jin Wook [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-01-15

    To evaluate the long term patency of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) and to compare the patency rate of covered and uncovered stents in TIPS. The study population included 78 patients with portal hypertension that underwent TIPS between January 1999 and July 2007 at our institution using uncovered stents in 53 patients and covered stents in 25 patients. The primary and secondary patency rates of TIPS were estimated to compare the uncovered and covered stent groups. The primary and secondary patency rates of the TIPS patients were found to be 83.9% and 93.9% at the 6 month follow-up and 73.5% and 88.5% at the12 month follow-up for uncovered and covered stents, respectively. A breakdown patency rates for the 12 month follow-up revealed that the primary patency rates were 76.6% and 66.3% for uncovered and covered stents, respectively; whereas, the secondary patency rates were 94.3% and 73.8% for the uncovered and covered stents, respectively. A comparative analysis did not provide evidence to suggest that a difference exists between the patency rates of the uncovered and covered stent groups (p>0.05). No significant difference was found between the patency rates of the uncovered and covered stent groups. A follow-up to this study would be a more thorough randomized evaluation of the different types of covered stents to compare long-term patency rates.

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)? What are some common uses of the procedure? How should I prepare? What does the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I ...

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Porto-Systemic Stent-Shunt for Therapy of Bleeding Esophageal Varices Due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in Primary Myelofibrosis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Phillip, Veit;Berger, Hermann;Straub, Melanie;Saugel, Bernd;Treiber, Matthias;Einwächter, Henrik;Schmid, Roland M.;Huber, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary myelofibrosis belongs to the group of myeloproliferative syndromes. Extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver can lead to portal hypertension. Patient and Methods: We report a case of a patient with life-threatening, endoscopically not treatable bleeding from esophageal varices due to extramedullary hematopoiesis of the liver that was successfully treated with placement of a transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic stent-shunt (TIPS). Results: Therapy of variceal bleeding ...

  2. Influence of covered stent versus bare stent on long-term efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Lu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the long-term postoperative efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE-covered stent or bare stent, and to provide a basis of evidence-based medicine for the selection of stent in TIPS. Methods CBM, Wanfang Data, CNKI, VIP, MEDLINE, and PubMed were searched for controlled trials on TIPS in the treatment of cirrhotic portal hypertension published form 1989 to 2015; the studies which met the inclusion criteria were selected, and quality assessment was performed for these articles. RevMan 5.3 software was used to analyze the incidence rates of stent dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy and 1-year survival rate after TIPS, and funnel plots were used to analyze publication bias. Results A total of 11 studies were included, consisting of 698 patients in PTFE-covered stent group and 1283 patients in bare stent group. The results of the meta-analysis showed that the PTFE-covered stent group showed a significantly lower incidence rate of stent dysfunction than the bare stent group (14.8% vs 47.0%, OR=0.18, 95% CI: 0.13-0.24, P<0.001. There was no significant difference in the incidence rate of hepatic encephalopathy between the two groups (23.5% vs 25.7%, OR=0.88, 95% CI: 0.66-1.17, P=0.37. The PTFE-covered stent group had a significantly higher 1-year survival rate than the bare stent group (76.9% vs 62.7%, OR=2.10, 95% CI: 1.54-2.85, P<0.001. The funnel plots which were plotted based on the incidence rates of stent dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy and 1-year survival rate lacked symmetry, which suggested that a certain degree of publication bias might exist. Conclusion Compared with the bare stent, the PTFE-covered stent can improve stent dysfunction and 1-year survival rate after TIPS, while there is no significant change in the incidence rate of hepatic encephalopathy. Therefore, the PTFE-covered stent has certain advantages over the bare stent in TIPS. In

  3. Hemodynamic changes in liver measured by multi-imaging methods before and after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent-shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yonghui; Chen Wei; Li Jiaping; Zhuang Wenquan; Li Ziping; Yang Jianyong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate hemodynamic changes in liver treated by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent-shunt (TIPSS) with hepatic computed tomography (CT) perfusion, Doppler ultrasound and portal vein pressure measurement, as well as the correlation among these methods. Methods: Hepatic CT perfusion was performed in 9 cirrhotic patients one week before TIPSS and 72 hours after TIPSS. Intraoperative portal vein pressure was measured before and after portosystemic shunt establish. The follow- up hepatic CT perfusion were carried out in 3 cases at 3 months and 6 months postoperatively. The hemodynamic surveillance by Doppler ultrasound were performed in 48 hours and 3 months after TIPSS for 9 cases, and in 6 months after TIPSS for 6 cases. Two cases underwent venography and portal vein pressure measurement in 6 months after TIPSS treatment. Results: The mean of portal vein perfusion (PVP), total hepatic blood flow (THBF), hepatic perfusion index (HPI) and portal vein free pressure (PVFP) before TIPSS were (0.92 ± 0.18) ml·min·ml -1 , (1.28±0.17) ml·min -1 ·ml -1 , (28 ± 8)%, and (23.92±0.86) mmHg, respectively. In 72 hours after TIPSS, the mean of PVP, THBF, HPI and PVFP were (0.21 ± 0.15) ml·min -1 ·ml -1 , (0.74 ± 0.18) ml·min -1 ·ml -1 , (74±13)%, and (12.62±1.54) mm Hg, respectively. After treatment, the mean of PVP was (0.49±0.05) ml·min -1 ·ml -1 at 3 months and (0.57±0.03) ml·min -1 ·ml -1 at 6 months, respectively. There was negative correlation between PVP and PVFP before TIPSS (r= 0.678, P 0.05). Moreover, a significant correlation was found between the degree of portal vein pressure decrease and portal vein perfusion decrease (r=0.867, P 3 /s was not less than that of main portal vein (9.83±5.72) cm 3 /s until six months after treatment. Conclusion: The portal vein pressure obviously decreased after TIPSS, and meanwhile, most blood flow of portal vein passed through portosystemic stent shunt without liver parenchyma perfusion

  4. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt ( ...

  5. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Flow Reduction with Adjustable Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Balloon-Expandable Stents Using the “Sheath Control” Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, Robert C., E-mail: Robert.c.blue@gmail.com; Lo, Grace C.; Kim, Edward; Patel, Rahul S.; Scott Nowakowski, F.; Lookstein, Robert A.; Fischman, Aaron M. [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Interventional Radiology Section, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-06-15

    PurposeA complication of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) placement is refractory portosystemic encephalopathy (PSE) often requiring TIPS reduction. We report the results of a “sheath control technique” utilizing constraining sheaths during deployment of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered balloon-expandable stents, minimizing stent migration, and providing additional procedural control.MethodsTIPS reduction was performed in 10 consecutive patients for PSE using Atrium iCast covered stents (Atrium Maquet Getinge Group, Germany). Within the indwelling TIPS stent, a 9 mm × 59 mm iCast stent was deployed with 2 cm exposed from the sheath’s distal end and the majority of the stent within the sheath to create the distal hourglass shape. During balloon retraction, the stent was buttressed by the sheath. The proximal portion of the stent was angioplastied to complete the hourglass configuration, and the central portion of the stent was dilated to 5 mm. Demographics, pre- and post-procedure laboratory values, and outcomes were recorded.ResultsTen patients underwent TIPS reduction with 100 % technical success. There was no stent migration during stent deployment. All patients experienced initial improvement of encephalopathy. One patient ultimately required complete TIPS occlusion for refractory PSE, and another developed TIPS occlusion 36 days post-procedure. There was no significant trend toward change in patients’ MELD scores immediately post-procedure or at 30 days (p = 0.46, p = 0.47, respectively).ConclusionTIPS reduction using Atrium iCast PTFE balloon-expandable stents using the “sheath control technique” is safe and effective, and minimizes the risk of stent migration.

  6. Combined-stent covered technique and single covered stent technique for transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt: a prospective randomized controlled study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Changming; Li Xuan; Fu Jun; Lu Xianjun; Luan Jingyuan; Li Tianrun; Zhao Jun; Dong Guoxiang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the technique of combined stents with that of single stent-graft for the construction of transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt (TIPS) and to discuss their clinical outcomes. Methods: During the period from April 2011 to Dec. 2012, a total of 30 patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to portal hypertension were admitted to the hospital. TIPS procedure was carried out in all the 30 patients. The patients were randomly allocated into either combined-stent group (n=17) or stent-graft group (control group, n=13) on the basis of a computer-generated randomization sequence. The PSC quality control, the patency rate of portal vein branches and the shunts, the incidence of encephalopathy and the survival rate of the two groups were documented and analyzed. Results: Technical success rate was 100%. After the treatment, in both groups the PSG became significantly lower than the PSG determined before the treatment (P<0.000). According to quality control chart, the of combined stents was superior to stent-graft technique in effectively controlling PSG. Five days after TIPS, the ammonia level in the combined- stent group was significantly decreased (P=0.029), while in the control group the ammonia level showed no significant changes (P=0.065). One patient died shortly after TIPS. The median follow- up time was 181 days. During the follow-up period death occurred in 3 cases in each group. The difference in the survival rate between the two groups was no significant (P=0.906). Of the three patients who developed encephalopathy, two were in the combined-stent group and one was in the control group. After medication the symptoms of encephalopathy were relieved. The patency rate of the shunts was 100% and the re-bleeding rate was 0% for both groups. The patency rate of portal vein branches was significantly higher in the combined-stent group than that in the control group (P=0.039). Conclusion: For the construction of TIPS, the technique of

  7. Efficacy of a dexamethasone-eluting nitinol stent on the inhibition of pseudointimal hyperplasia in a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: an experimental study in a swine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Tae Seok [Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Joo Hyeogn; Park, Young Koo [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho Young [University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Joon [Hallym University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yuk, Sun Hong [Hannam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    We wanted to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of using a dexamethasone (DM)-eluting nitinol stent to inhibit the pseudointimal hyperplasia following stent placement in the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt tract (TIPS) of a swine. Fifteen stents were constructed using 0.15 mm-thick nitinol wire; they were 60 mm in length and 10 mm in diameter. The metallic stents were then classified into three types; type 1 and 2 was coated with the mixture of 12% and 20%, respectively, of DM solution and polyurethane (PU), while type 3 was a bare stent that was used for control study. In fifteen swine, each type of stent was implanted in the TIPS tract of 5 swine, and each animal was sacrificed 2 weeks after TIPS creation. The proliferation of the pseudointima was evaluated both on follow-up portogram and pathologic examination. One TIPS case, using the type 1 stent, and two TIPS cases, using the type 2 stent, maintained their luminal patency while the others were all occluded. On the histopathologic analysis, the mean of the maximum pseudointimal hyperplasia was expressed as the percentage of the stent radius that was patent, and these values were 51.2%, 50% and 76% for the type 1, 2, and 3 stents, respectively. The DM-eluting stent showed a tendency to reduce the development of pseudointimal hyperplasia in the TIPS tract of a swine model with induced-portal hypertension.

  8. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPSS) with use of Roesch-Uchida transjugular liver access set; Evaluation by CT and its clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Motoichiro; Okawada, Taketoshi; Kato, Ryoichi; Mochizuki, Takao; Ohkawa, Yoshihisa; Kaneko, Masao [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan); Ke, Xu; Hanguo, Zhang; Fangxian, He

    1992-12-01

    Appropriateness of the Roesch-Uchida transjugular liver access set designed for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPSS) procedure was confirmed, especially about the catheter angle and effective length of the 20 G puncture needle, by CT analysis on three dimensional vascular anatomy of the liver. Clinically, TIPSS using the set was successfully made for two patients, connecting superior right hepatic vein with right portal vein in one patient and middle hepatic vein with left portal vein in another patient with hypoplastic right portal vein. Prior to TIPSS procedure, verification of vascular anatomy on CT images is the key to success of TIPSS in safe. (author).

  9. Embolization of nonvariceal portosystemic collaterals in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, Jose Ignacio; Arias, Mercedes; Longo, Jesus Maria; Alejandre, Pedro Luis; Betes, Maria Teresa; Elizalde, Arlette Maria

    1997-01-01

    Percutaneous embolization of large portosystemic collaterals was performed in three patients following placement of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in order to improve hepatopetal portal flow. Improved hepatic portal perfusion was achieved in these cases, thereby theoretically reducing the risk of chronic hepatic encephalopathy

  10. Transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic stent-shunt for therapy of bleeding esophageal varices due to extramedullary hematopoiesis in primary myelofibrosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillip, Veit; Berger, Hermann; Straub, Melanie; Saugel, Bernd; Treiber, Matthias; Einwächter, Henrik; Schmid, Roland M; Huber, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis belongs to the group of myeloproliferative syndromes. Extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver can lead to portal hypertension. We report a case of a patient with life-threatening, endoscopically not treatable bleeding from esophageal varices due to extramedullary hematopoiesis of the liver that was successfully treated with placement of a transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic stent-shunt (TIPS). Therapy of variceal bleeding by TIPS insertion was successful. During a 29-month follow-up, no hepatic failure, hepatic encephalopathy, or further variceal bleeding episode occurred. TIPS placement is a well-established procedure for the treatment of complications due to portal hypertension mainly due to liver cirrhosis. This report illustrates that TIPS placement can also be a promising treatment option in patients with primary myelofibrosis and portal hypertension due to extramedullary hematopoiesis. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts in Patients with Cirrhosis with Refractory Ascites: Comparison of Clinical Outcomes by Using 8- and 10-mm PTFE-covered Stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Tuzzolino, Fabio; Petridis, Ioannis; D'Amico, Mario; Luca, Angelo

    2017-07-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy and complications of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation performed by using a 10-mm or an 8-mm-diameter polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stent in a consecutive series of patients with cirrhosis with refractory ascites (RA). Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this retrospective study and informed consent was waived. One hundred seventy-one patients with RA (mean age, 58.7 years ± 10.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 57.2 years, 60.3 years) had undergone TIPS placement by using 10-mm (60 patients) or 8-mm (111 patients) covered stent between January 2004 and December 2012. Median follow-up time was 16.8 months (range, 3.4-84.8 months). Hemodynamic changes, incidence of hepatic encephalopathy, and long-term (>3 months) need for paracentesis after TIPS placement were evaluated and calculated by using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by using the log-rank test. Results Pre-TIPS demographics and clinical characteristics of the two groups were comparable. The portosystemic gradient before TIPS was 17.0 mm Hg ± 4.2 (95% CI: 15.9 mm Hg, 18.1 mm Hg) in the 10-mm group versus 16.1 mm Hg ± 3.7 (95% CI: 15.4 mm Hg, 16.8 mm Hg) in the 8-mm group (P = .164). After TIPS, the portosystemic gradient was 6.5 mm Hg ± 3.4 (95% CI: 5.7 mm Hg, 7.4 mm Hg) in the 10-mm group versus 7.5 mm Hg ± 2.6 (95% CI: 6.9 mm Hg, 7.9 mm Hg) in the 8-mm group (P = .039). The long-term need for paracentesis was greater in the 8-mm group (64 of 111 patients [58%] vs 18 of 60 patients [31%], P = .003). Overall, hepatic encephalopathy was similar in both groups (45 of 111 patients [41%] vs 26 of 60 patients [44%], P = .728). Conclusion A10-mm PTFE-covered stent leads to better control of RA secondary to portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis, compared with an 8-mm stent, without increasing the incidence of hepatic encephalopathy. © RSNA, 2017.

  12. Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography in the Evaluation of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Performed with Expanded-Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Stent-Graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanelli, Fabrizio; Bezzi, Mario; Bruni, Antonio; Corona, Mario; Boatta, Emanuele; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Passariello, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We assessed, in a prospective study, the efficacy of multidetector spiral computed tomography (MDCT) in the evaluation of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) patency in patients treated with the Viatorr (Gore, Flagstaff, AZ) expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE)-covered stent-graft. Eighty patients who underwent TIPS procedure using the Viatorr self-expanding e-PTFE stent-graft were evaluated at follow-up of 1, 3, 6, and 12 months with clinical and laboratory tests as well as ultrasound–color Doppler (USCD) imaging. In case of varices, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was also performed. In addition, the shunt was evaluated using MDCT at 6 and 12 months. In all cases of abnormal findings and discrepancy between MDCT and USCD, invasive control venography was performed. MDCT images were acquired before and after injection of intravenous contrast media on the axial plane and after three-dimensional reconstruction using different algorithms. MDCT was successfully performed in all patients. No artefacts correlated to the Viatorr stent-graft were observed. A missing correlation between UCSD and MDCT was noticed in 20 of 80 (25%) patients. Invasive control venography confirmed shunt patency in 16 (80%) cases and shunt malfunction in 4 (20%) cases. According to these data, MDCT sensitivity was 95.2%; specificity was 96.6%; and positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were 90.9 and 98.2%, respectively. USCD sensitivity was 90%; specificity was 75%; and PPV and NPV were 54.5 and 95.7%, respectively. A high correlation (K value = 0.85) between MDCT and invasive control venography was observed. On the basis of these results, MDCT shows superior sensitivity and specificity compared with USCD in those patients in whom TIPS was performed with the Viatorr stent-graft. MDCT can be considered a valid tool in the follow-up of these patients.

  13. Early and long-term clinical and radiological follow-up results of expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleux, Geert; Heye, Sam; Thijs, Maria; Wilms, Guy; Nevens, Frederik; Verslype, Chris; Wilmer, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the therapeutic efficacy and immediate and long-term safety of expanded-tetrafluoroethylene covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts in patients with portal hypertension-related complications. A cohort of 56 patients suffering from severe portal hypertension-related complications underwent implantation of an expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-graft. All patients suffered from severe liver cirrhosis graded Child-Pugh A (n=8; 16%), B (n=13; 21%) or C (n=35; 63%). In 44 patients, the stent-graft was placed during the initial TIPS procedure (de novo TIPS); in the other 12 patients, the stent-graft was placed to repermeabilize the previously placed bare stent (TIPS revision). Follow-up was performed with clinical assessment, duplex ultrasound and, if abnormal or inconclusive, with invasive venography and pressure measurements. Per- en immediate post-procedural complications occurred in four patients (4/56, 7%). None of them was lethal. During follow-up, stent occlusion appeared in one patient and stenosis in two; no recurrence of bleeding was noted in all patients treated for variceal bleeding (n=28), and 24 of the 28 patients (86%) suffering from refractory ascites and/or hepatic hydrothorax were free of regular paracenteses and/or drainage of pleural effusion after shunt creation. The 30-day and global mortality for the total study population (n=56) was, respectively, 7% (n=4) and 28.5% (n=16). In the patient subgroup with variceal bleeding (n=28), 30-day mortality was 3.5% (n=1) and global mortality 14.2% (n=4). In the ascites and/or hydrothorax subgroup (n=28), 8.1% (n=3) mortality at 30 days was found and global mortality was 32.4% (n=12). In 10 patients of the 56 studied patients (18%), isolated hepatic encephalopathy occurred, which was lethal in 4 (Child C) patients (7%). Three of these four patients died within the 1st month after TIPS placement. A very high primary patency rate

  14. Early and long-term clinical and radiological follow-up results of expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maleux, Geert; Heye, Sam; Thijs, Maria; Wilms, Guy [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Nevens, Frederik; Verslype, Chris [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Hepatology, Leuven (Belgium); Wilmer, Alexander [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Medical Intensive Care Unit, Leuven (Belgium)

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the therapeutic efficacy and immediate and long-term safety of expanded-tetrafluoroethylene covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts in patients with portal hypertension-related complications. A cohort of 56 patients suffering from severe portal hypertension-related complications underwent implantation of an expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-graft. All patients suffered from severe liver cirrhosis graded Child-Pugh A (n=8; 16%), B (n=13; 21%) or C (n=35; 63%). In 44 patients, the stent-graft was placed during the initial TIPS procedure (de novo TIPS); in the other 12 patients, the stent-graft was placed to repermeabilize the previously placed bare stent (TIPS revision). Follow-up was performed with clinical assessment, duplex ultrasound and, if abnormal or inconclusive, with invasive venography and pressure measurements. Per- en immediate post-procedural complications occurred in four patients (4/56, 7%). None of them was lethal. During follow-up, stent occlusion appeared in one patient and stenosis in two; no recurrence of bleeding was noted in all patients treated for variceal bleeding (n=28), and 24 of the 28 patients (86%) suffering from refractory ascites and/or hepatic hydrothorax were free of regular paracenteses and/or drainage of pleural effusion after shunt creation. The 30-day and global mortality for the total study population (n=56) was, respectively, 7% (n=4) and 28.5% (n=16). In the patient subgroup with variceal bleeding (n=28), 30-day mortality was 3.5% (n=1) and global mortality 14.2% (n=4). In the ascites and/or hydrothorax subgroup (n=28), 8.1% (n=3) mortality at 30 days was found and global mortality was 32.4% (n=12). In 10 patients of the 56 studied patients (18%), isolated hepatic encephalopathy occurred, which was lethal in 4 (Child C) patients (7%). Three of these four patients died within the 1st month after TIPS placement. A very high primary patency rate

  15. Comparison of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt with covered stent and ballon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration in managing isolated gastric varices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Kwon; Lee, Kristen A.; Sauk, Steven; Korenblat, Kevin [Washington University St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Although a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is commonly placed to manage isolated gastric varices, balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) has also been used. We compare the long-term outcomes from these procedures based on our institutional experience. We conducted a retrospective review of patients with isolated gastric varices who underwent either TIPS with a covered stent or BRTO between January 2000 and July 2013. We identified 52 consecutive patients, 27 who had received TIPS with a covered stent and 25 who had received BRTO. We compared procedural complications, re-bleeding rates, and clinical outcomes between the two groups. There were no significant differences in procedural complications between patients who underwent TIPS (7%) and those who underwent BRTO (12%) (p = 0.57). There were also no statistically significant differences in re-bleeding rates from gastric varices between the two groups (TIPS, 7% [2/27]; BRTO, 8% [2/25]; p = 0.94) or in developing new ascites following either procedure (TIPS, 4%; BRTO, 4%; p = 0.96); significantly more patients who underwent TIPS developed hepatic encephalopathy (22%) than did those who underwent BRTO (0%, p = 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference in mean survival between the two groups (TIPS, 30 months; BRTO, 24 months; p = 0.16); median survival for the patients who received TIPS was 16.6 months, and for those who underwent BRTO, it was 26.6 months. BRTO is an effective method of treating isolated gastric varices with similar outcomes and complication rates to those of TIPS with a covered stent but with a lower rate of hepatic encephalopathy.

  16. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, A.R.; Stanley, A.J.; Vijayananthan, A.; Moss, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    The creation of an intrahepatic portosystemic shunt via a transjugular approach (TIPS) is an interventional radiological procedure used to treat the complications of portal hypertension. TIPS insertion is principally indicated to prevent or arrest variceal bleeding when medical or endoscopic treatments fail, and in the management refractory ascites. This review discusses the development and execution of the technique, with focus on its clinical efficacy. Patient selection, imaging surveillance, revision techniques, and complications are also discussed.

  17. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, A.R. [Department of Radiology, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Melbourne (Australia)], E-mail: andrewowen@doctors.org.uk; Stanley, A.J. [Department of Gastroenterology, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Vijayananthan, A. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Moss, J.G. [Department of Radiology, Gartnavel General Hospital, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    The creation of an intrahepatic portosystemic shunt via a transjugular approach (TIPS) is an interventional radiological procedure used to treat the complications of portal hypertension. TIPS insertion is principally indicated to prevent or arrest variceal bleeding when medical or endoscopic treatments fail, and in the management refractory ascites. This review discusses the development and execution of the technique, with focus on its clinical efficacy. Patient selection, imaging surveillance, revision techniques, and complications are also discussed.

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... to the hepatic vein in the liver. A small metal device called a stent is placed to ... is kept open by the placement of a small, tubular metal device commonly called a stent . During ...

  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... the liver. A small metal device called a stent is placed to keep the connection open and ... a small, tubular metal device commonly called a stent . During a TIPS procedure, interventional radiologists use image ...

  1. Is sonographic surveillance of polytetrafluoroethylene-covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) necessary? A single centre experience comparing both types of stents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, J.-J.; Chen, C. [Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Section of Hepatobiliary Disease, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Geller, B. [Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Firpi, R.; Machicao, V.I. [Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Section of Hepatobiliary Disease, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Caridi, J.G. [Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Nelson, D.R. [Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Section of Hepatobiliary Disease, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Morelli, G. [Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Section of Hepatobiliary Disease, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)], E-mail: morelgj@medicine.ufl.edu

    2008-10-15

    Aim: To investigate whether sonographic (US) surveillance of polytetrafluoroethylene covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) is necessary. Materials and methods: We identified 128 patients who underwent TIPS for complications of portal hypertension between January 2001 and December 2005 at a large tertiary centre. Procedural data were retrospectively analysed. US surveillance of the TIPS was performed at baseline with scheduled follow-up or whenever shunt dysfunction was suspected. Clinical and radiology reports were compared to assess US surveillance of the TIPS. Results: Four hundred and twenty-six US studies were performed, with a median of three per patient (range 1-5). The median follow-up period was 378 days (range 1-1749 days). Twenty-three patients (18%) had baseline US studies performed only whereas 105 (82%) also had follow-up studies. Forty-one (32%) of 128 patients [32 (78%) Wallstent, nine (22%) Viatorr] had Doppler ultrasound abnormalities noted. Venography was performed in all 41 patients. Abnormal venography and elevated hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) was seen in 34 (82.9%) of the 41 patients [29 (85.3%) Wallstent, five (14.7%) Viatorr]. Among the 34 patients, 17 (50%) [13 (76.5%) Wallstent, four (23.5%) Viatorr] had venographic abnormalities noted at the hepatic venous end accompanied by increased HVPG. All four of the Viatorr patients had minor narrowing at the hepatic venous end and HVPG measurements that ranged 3-4 mm Hg above 12 mm Hg. Conclusion: Considering the improved patency of covered stents in TIPS, US surveillance may be superfluous after the baseline study.

  2. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... to determine the severity of the condition. To help plan for the placement of the TIPS stent, ... Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not ...

  3. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... a stent is placed to keep the connection open and allow it to bring blood draining from ... veins within the liver. The shunt is kept open by the placement of a small, tubular metal ...

  4. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... needle (a special long needle extending from the neck into the liver). A stent is then placed ... the procedure include: fever muscle stiffness in the neck bruising on the neck at the point of ...

  5. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect than open surgical bypass on future liver transplantation ... Encephalopathy can be treated with certain medications, a special diet or, by revising the stent, but sometimes ...

  6. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... the portal system using a TIPS needle (a special long needle extending from the neck into the ... Encephalopathy can be treated with certain medications, a special diet or, by revising the stent, but sometimes ...

  7. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... smaller than a "pencil lead", or approximately 1/8 inch in diameter. The stent used in this ...

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... blood draining from the bowel back to the heart while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce ... blood away from the liver back to the heart). A stent is then placed in this tunnel ...

  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... portal vein to the hepatic vein in the liver. A small metal device called a stent is ... bowel back to the heart while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the ...

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. A ... A stent placed inside this pathway keeps it open and allows some of the blood that would ...

  11. Clinical results of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Auh Whan; Sim, Jae In; Ryeom, Hun Kyu; Kim, Yong Joo [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    To evaluate the clinical results of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt(TIPS) for the control of variceal bleeding. TIPS creation was attempted in 23 patients with endoscopically confirmed variceal bleeding. Most patients had multiple episodes of bleeding in the past and have been treated with multiple endoscopic sclerotherapies. Pre-and post-procedural hepatic and portal vein pressures were measured. After creation of TIPS patients were followed up at regular intervals. TIPS has been successfully accomplished in 22 of 23 patients using Wallstent(n = 21) and Strecker stent(n = 1). Immediate bleeding control was achieved in all patients with shunt creation. No procedure-related complication was noted. Portal vein pressure was reduced from 30.7 {+-} 5.8 mmHg to 20.8 {+-} 4.7 mmHg. The mean pressure gradient of portosystemic shunt dropped from 22.8 {+-} 6.0 prior to TIPS to 12.2 {+-} 4.1 immediately after. During the follow-up period (6-556 days, mean; 10 months), seven patients died; progressive hepatic failure (n 4), variceal rebleeding (n = 2), and respiratory failure(n = 1). Hepatic encephalopathy after TIPS was noted in 7 patients(31.8%). Variceal rebleeding occurred in 3 patients(13.6%). The remaining 15 patients have survived an average of 11 months. This results suggest that TIPS is a safe and effective method for lowering portal pressure and controlling variceal bleeding. Furthermore if these initial results are encouraged by further long-term observation, TIPS could replace endoscopic and risky surgical intervention.

  12. An unusual case of intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vena cava (IVC) (most common). Intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunts are rare vascular anomalies that may be detected in asymptomatic patients, given the recent advances in radiological imaging techniques. Accurate shunt evaluation and classification can be performed with ultrasound and multi-detector computed.

  13. Prevention and treatment of complications after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XUE Hui

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS in the treatment of cirrhotic portal hypertension has been widely accepted both at home and abroad. This article focuses on the fatal complications of TIPS (including intraperitoneal bleeding and acute pulmonary embolism, shunt failure, and recurrent portosystemic hepatic encephalopathy, and elaborates on the reasons for such conditions and related preventive measures, in order to improve the accuracy and safety of intraoperative puncture, reduce common complications such as shunt failure and hepatic encephalopathy, and improve the clinical effect of TIPS in the treatment of cirrhotic portal hypertension.

  14. Pancreaticoportal Fistula and Disseminated Fat Necrosis After Revision of a Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Seth J.; Saad, Nael; Korenblat, Kevin; Darcy, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year old man with alcohol related cirrhosis and portal hypertension was referred for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) to treat his refractory ascites. Ten years later, two sequential TIPS revisions were performed for shunt stenosis and recurrent ascites. After these revisions, he returned with increased serum pancreatic enzyme levels and disseminated superficial fat necrosis; an iatrogenic pancreaticoportal vein fistula caused by disruption of the pancreatic duct was suspected. The bare area of the TIPS was subsequently lined with a covered stent-graft, and serum enzyme levels returned to baseline. In the interval follow-up period, the patient has clinically improved.

  15. Hepatic Veins and Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis in a Child Treated by Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Santos, Aline Cristine Barbosa; Tannuri, Uenis; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old boy with portal hypertension, due to Budd-Chiari syndrome, and retrohepatic inferior vena cava thrombosis, submitted to a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) by connecting the suprahepatic segment of the inferior vena cava directly to the portal vein. After 3 months, the withdrawal of anticoagulants promoted the thrombosis of the TIPS. At TIPS revision, thrombosis of the TIPS and the main portal vein and clots at the splenic and the superior mesenteric veins were found. Successful angiography treatment was performed by thrombolysis and balloon angioplasty of a severe stenosis at the distal edge of the stent.

  16. Pancreaticoportal Fistula and Disseminated Fat Necrosis After Revision of a Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Seth J., E-mail: kleins@mir.wustl.edu; Saad, Nael [Washington University School of Medicine, Interventional Radiology Section, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States); Korenblat, Kevin [Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine (United States); Darcy, Michael D. [Washington University School of Medicine, Interventional Radiology Section, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States)

    2013-04-15

    A 59-year old man with alcohol related cirrhosis and portal hypertension was referred for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) to treat his refractory ascites. Ten years later, two sequential TIPS revisions were performed for shunt stenosis and recurrent ascites. After these revisions, he returned with increased serum pancreatic enzyme levels and disseminated superficial fat necrosis; an iatrogenic pancreaticoportal vein fistula caused by disruption of the pancreatic duct was suspected. The bare area of the TIPS was subsequently lined with a covered stent-graft, and serum enzyme levels returned to baseline. In the interval follow-up period, the patient has clinically improved.

  17. The role of MR angiography before transjugular placement of a portosystemic stent shunt (TIPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.F.; Siewert, B.; Kim, D.; Edelman, R.R.; Stokes, K.R.; Finn, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The authors employed magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to guide catheter placement for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPS) procedures in 14 of 24 patients, and compared the results to the 10 patients who did not have prior panning based on MRA. Two-dimensional time-of-flight venography was performed during breath holding, and projection venograms were formatted in sagittal, coronal and axial planes. MRA defined venous anatomy sufficiently well to shorten the procedure and helped to minimize invasiveness. With MRA guidance, intrahepatic needle punctures were significantly fewer (without MRA guidance: mean 12.1; with MRA guidance: mean 3.5, p [de

  18. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stentshunt (TIPSS): A new nonoperative, transjugular percutaneous procedure. [Radiological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, G M; Noeldge, G; Siegerstetter, V; Franke, M; Wenz, W; Palmaz, J C; Roessle, M

    1989-08-01

    In a 49-year-old male patient suffering from severe symptoms of end-stage portal hypertension and Child's stage C metabolic status, an intrahepatic stent-assisted portosystemic shunt was established for the first time exclusively by means of interventional radiology. Via transjugular access, a modified Brockenbrough needle was used to puncture the right branch of the portal vein via the right liver vein. As a target, a Dormia-basket was used that had previously been exposed in the right main portal branch. After successful puncture and balloon dilation of the artificial tract, two Palmaz stents were implanted to keep the tract permanently open. The portosystemic pressure gradient dropped from 38 to 18 mm Hg. The clinical status of the patient improved substantially during the following days. However, the patient died on day 11 after the procedure because of sudden onset of acute respiratory distress arising from acute nosocomial fungus and cytomegalovirus infection worsened by his primary immunoincompetence. Autopsy demonstrated a totally patent shunt without superficial thrombus. Microscopically, a thin endothelial layer on the inner shunt surface was found to be present. (orig.).

  19. Tratamento da síndrome de Budd-Chiari por meio da colocação de tips e de "stent" venoso supra-hepático Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS and suprahepatic venous stenting in the management of Budd-Chiari syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurandi A. Bettio

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Descrever o uso do "shunt" intra-hepático portossistêmico (TIPS e do "stent" venoso supra-hepático no manejo da síndrome de Budd-Chiari, enfocando suas indicações, aspectos técnicos e benefícios do procedimento. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: De janeiro de 1999 a março de 2002, nove casos de síndrome de Budd-Chiari foram encaminhados ao Serviço de Hemodinâmica do Hospital São Lucas, Porto Alegre, RS. A obstrução venosa supra-hepática foi constatada em todos os casos por meio de ultra-sonografia com Doppler em cores. A criação de TIPS foi realizada entre o sistema venoso supra-hepático ou a veia cava inferior e a veia porta, posicionando-se a endoprótese entre as duas abordagens. Doppler em cores pós-procedimento foi efetuado em todos os pacientes em períodos seriados. RESULTADOS: Três casos foram tratados inicialmente com inserção de "stent" venoso por apresentarem estenose preponderante em veias supra-hepáticas. Em dois desses casos ocorreu trombose do "stent", sendo necessária colocação de TIPS. Os demais seis casos foram tratados primariamente com TIPS. Dos oito "shunts" criados, trombose da endoprótese foi constatada em três casos, resolvidas com limpeza dos trombos e dilatação com balão em um caso e inserção de novas próteses nos demais. Embolização com molas de colaterais venosas ectasiadas foi efetuada em um paciente. CONCLUSÕES: A colocação de TIPS constitui-se numa estratégia terapêutica segura e efetiva na síndrome de Budd-Chiari, promovendo uma significativa melhora clínica e hemodinâmica dos pacientes, evitando procedimentos mais invasivos e podendo, em casos sem cirrose estabelecida, servir de tratamento definitivo da hipertensão portal.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS and suprahepatic venous stenting in the management of Budd-Chiari syndrome, emphasizing the indications, technical aspects and the advantages of the procedure

  20. Transcaval transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: preliminary clinical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun; Won, Jong Yoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Joon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Kyu; Yoon, Woong [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    To determine the feasibility of transcaval transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation in patients with unusual anatomy between the hepatic veins and portal bifurcation, and inaccessible or inadequate hepatic veins. Transcaval TIPS, performed in six patients, was indicated by active variceal bleeding (n=2), recurrent variceal bleeding (n=2), intractable ascites (n=1), and as a bridge to liver transplantation (n=1). The main reasons for transcaval rather than classic TIPS were the presence of an unusually acute angle between the hepatic veins and the level of the portal bifurcation (n=3), hepatic venous occlusion (n=2), and inadequate small hepatic veins (n=1). Technical and functional success was achieved in all patients. The entry site into liver parenchyma from the inferior vena cava was within 2 cm of the atriocaval junction. Procedure-related complications included the death of one patient due to hemoperitoneum despite the absence of contrast media spillage at tractography, and another suffered reversible hepatic encephalopathy. In patients with unusual anatomy between the hepatic veins and portal bifurcation, and inaccessible or inadequate hepatic veins, transcaval TIPS creation is feasible.

  1. Transcaval transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: preliminary clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun; Won, Jong Yoon; Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Jae Kyu; Yoon, Woong

    2003-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of transcaval transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation in patients with unusual anatomy between the hepatic veins and portal bifurcation, and inaccessible or inadequate hepatic veins. Transcaval TIPS, performed in six patients, was indicated by active variceal bleeding (n=2), recurrent variceal bleeding (n=2), intractable ascites (n=1), and as a bridge to liver transplantation (n=1). The main reasons for transcaval rather than classic TIPS were the presence of an unusually acute angle between the hepatic veins and the level of the portal bifurcation (n=3), hepatic venous occlusion (n=2), and inadequate small hepatic veins (n=1). Technical and functional success was achieved in all patients. The entry site into liver parenchyma from the inferior vena cava was within 2 cm of the atriocaval junction. Procedure-related complications included the death of one patient due to hemoperitoneum despite the absence of contrast media spillage at tractography, and another suffered reversible hepatic encephalopathy. In patients with unusual anatomy between the hepatic veins and portal bifurcation, and inaccessible or inadequate hepatic veins, transcaval TIPS creation is feasible

  2. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Dysfunction: Concordance of Clinical Findings, Doppler Ultrasound Examination, and Shunt Venography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Joshua M; Gaba, Ron Charles

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the concordance between clinical symptoms, Doppler ultrasound (US), and shunt venography for the detection of stent-graft transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) dysfunction. Forty-one patients (M:F 30:11, median age 55 years) who underwent contemporaneous clinical exam, Doppler US, and TIPS venography between 2003 and 2014 were retrospectively studied. Clinical symptoms (recurrent ascites or variceal bleeding) were dichotomously classified as present/absent, and US and TIPS venograms were categorized in a binary fashion as normal/abnormal. US abnormalities included high/low (>190 or 50 cm/s), absent flow, and return of antegrade intra-hepatic portal flow. Venographic abnormalities included shunt stenosis/occlusion and/or pressure gradient elevation. Clinical and imaging concordance rates were calculated. Fifty-two corresponding US examinations and venograms were assessed. The median time between studies was 3 days. Forty of 52 (77%) patients were symptomatic, 33/52 (64%) US examinations were abnormal, and 20/52 (38%) TIPS venograms were abnormal. Concordance between clinical symptoms and TIPS venography was 48% (25/52), while the agreement between US and shunt venography was 65% (34/52). Clinical symptoms and the US concurred in 60% (31/52) of the patients. The sensitivity of clinical symptoms and US for the detection of venographically abnormal shunts was 80% (16/20) and 85% (17/20), respectively. Both clinical symptoms and the US had low specificity (25%, 8/32 and 50%, 16/32) for venographically abnormal shunts. Clinical findings and the US had low concordance rates with TIPS venography, with acceptable sensitivity but poor specificity. These findings suggest the need for improved noninvasive imaging methods for stent-graft TIPS surveillance.

  3. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Dysfunction: Concordance of Clinical Findings, Doppler Ultrasound Examination, and Shunt Venography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M Owen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the concordance between clinical symptoms, Doppler ultrasound (US, and shunt venography for the detection of stent-graft transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS dysfunction. Materials and Methods: Forty-one patients (M:F 30:11, median age 55 years who underwent contemporaneous clinical exam, Doppler US, and TIPS venography between 2003 and 2014 were retrospectively studied. Clinical symptoms (recurrent ascites or variceal bleeding were dichotomously classified as present/absent, and US and TIPS venograms were categorized in a binary fashion as normal/abnormal. US abnormalities included high/low (>190 or 50 cm/s, absent flow, and return of antegrade intra-hepatic portal flow. Venographic abnormalities included shunt stenosis/occlusion and/or pressure gradient elevation. Clinical and imaging concordance rates were calculated. Results: Fifty-two corresponding US examinations and venograms were assessed. The median time between studies was 3 days. Forty of 52 (77% patients were symptomatic, 33/52 (64% US examinations were abnormal, and 20/52 (38% TIPS venograms were abnormal. Concordance between clinical symptoms and TIPS venography was 48% (25/52, while the agreement between US and shunt venography was 65% (34/52. Clinical symptoms and the US concurred in 60% (31/52 of the patients. The sensitivity of clinical symptoms and US for the detection of venographically abnormal shunts was 80% (16/20 and 85% (17/20, respectively. Both clinical symptoms and the US had low specificity (25%, 8/32 and 50%, 16/32 for venographically abnormal shunts. Conclusion: Clinical findings and the US had low concordance rates with TIPS venography, with acceptable sensitivity but poor specificity. These findings suggest the need for improved noninvasive imaging methods for stent-graft TIPS surveillance.

  4. Congenital hepatic arteriovenous fistula with intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and aortic stenosis in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, K.; Koide, Y.; Wada, Y.; Nakaniwa, S.; Yamane, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Examination of a 2-month-old male golden retriever presented to the hospital revealed malnutrition, ascites, cardiac murmur and hyperammonemia. Identification of subaortic stenosis and hepatic arteriovenous fistula was made through ultrasonography and angiocardiography. In addition, intrasurgical mesenteric portography showed an intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. The dog did not show portal hypertension and secondary multiple extrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Surgical correction was attempted after medical treatment. The hepatic artery branch which was connected to the hepatic arteriovenous fistula was separated, and completely ligated using silk ligature. However, the separation of the intrahepatic shunt blood vessel was unsuccessful and the dog died 15 hr postoperatively

  5. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts in Children with Biliary Atresia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppert, Peter E.; Goffette, Pierre; Astfalk, Wolfgang; Sokal, Emil M.; Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Schott, Ullrich; Duda, Stephan H.; Schweizer, Paul; Claussen, Claus D.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We retrospectively evaluated the technical and long-term clinical results of transjugularintrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) in children with portal hypertension and biliary atresia (BA). Methods: Nine children with BA and recurrent bleeding from esophagogastric and/or intestinal varices were treated by TIPS at the age of 34-156 months and followed-up in two centers. Different types of stents were used. Results: Shunt insertion succeeded in all patients, but in two a second procedure was necessary. Seven procedures lasted more than 3 hr, mainly due to difficult portal vein puncture.Variceal bleeding ceased in all patients; however, 16 reinterventions were performed in eight patients for clinical reasons (n =11) and sonographically suspected restenosis (n =5). Four patients underwent successful liver transplantation 4-51 months after TIPS and five are in good clinical conditions 64-75 months after TIPS. Conclusions: TIPS in children with BA is technically difficult, mainly due to periportal fibrosis and small portal veins. Frequency of reinterventions seems to be higher compared with adults

  6. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS): Current Status and Future Possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, Jose Ignacio; Quiroga, Jorge; Herrero, Jose Ignacio; Benito, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Since the insertion of the first TIPS in 1989 much has been learned about this therapeutic procedure. It has an established role for the treatment of some complications of portal hypertension: prevention of recurrent variceal bleeding and rescue of patients with acute uncontrollable variceal bleeding. In addition TIPS is useful for Budd-Chiari syndrome, refractory ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, although its specific role in these indications remains to be definitively established. However, the decrease in sinusoidal blood flow induced by TIPS can lead to the patient developing hepatic encephalopathy and liver failure in some cases. Therefore, TIPS should be used with caution in patients with very poor liver function. From a technical point of view, successful placement of TIPS is achieved in more than 98% of cases by experienced groups. At present, evaluation of TIPS dysfunction based on morphology probably leads to an overdiagnosis of this complication since most of these cases are not associated with clinical manifestations (recurrent bleeding or refractory ascites). The major disadvantage of TIPS remains its poor long-term patency requiring a mandatory surveillance program. The indicator for shunt function/malfunction should be the portosystemic pressure gradient, which is best assessed by intravascular measurements. Shunt obstructions may be prevented or reduced by the use of stent-grafts in the future

  7. Preoperative MR angiography evaluation of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Li; Yang Dakuan; Yuan Shuguang; Yan Dong; Wang Jiaping; Li Yingchun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the application of MR angiography (MRA) in deciding the puncture points of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Methods: Preoperative MRA was performed in 59 patients with portal hypertension (study group) in order to search for the causes of portal hypertension, to observe the patterns and route of the hepatic and portal veins and to measure the vascular diameter at the scheduled puncture site. MRA was also performed in 50 healthy subjects, which was served as the control group. The results were compared between two groups. Results: The diseases in the study group included simple cirrhosis (n=49), cirrhosis accompanied with hepatocellular carcinoma (n=4), pure portal vein thrombosis (n=3), splenic vein stenosis (n=1) and Budd-Chiari syndrome (n=2). In study group the type I, II and III of the hepatic vein classification were seen in 14, 39 and 12 cases respectively,while in control group in 12, 34 and 14 cases respectively. In study group, the right, middle and left hepatic vein which had the diameter larger enough for puncturing existed in 52, 40 and 28 cases respectively, while in control group in 46, 34 and 23 cases respectively. The safe point for puncture via the right and the left branch of the portal vein was located beyond the distance of (16.2 ± 3.1) mm and (14.2 ± 3.8) mm respectively. Conclusion: MRA is a valuable non-invasive examination, which is of great value in determining the causes of portal hypertension and in planning the puncturing sites before performing TIPS. (authors)

  8. The Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in the Treatment of Portal Hypertension: Current Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Pomier-Layrargues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS represents a major advance in the treatment of complications of portal hypertension. Technical improvements and increased experience over the past 24 years led to improved clinical results and a better definition of the indications for TIPS. Randomized clinical trials indicate that the TIPS procedure is not a first-line therapy for variceal bleeding, but can be used when medical treatment fails, both in the acute situation or to prevent variceal rebleeding. The role of TIPS to treat refractory ascites is probably more justified to improve the quality of life rather than to improve survival, except for patients with preserved liver function. It can be helpful for hepatic hydrothorax and can reverse hepatorenal syndrome in selected cases. It is a good treatment for Budd Chiari syndrome uncontrollable by medical treatment. Careful selection of patients is mandatory before TIPS, and clinical followup is essential to detect and treat complications that may result from TIPS stenosis (which can be prevented by using covered stents and chronic encephalopathy (which may in severe cases justify reduction or occlusion of the shunt. A multidisciplinary approach, including the resources for liver transplantation, is always required to treat these patients.

  9. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for the treatment of Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Guohong; He Chuangye; Yin Zhanxin; Meng Xiangjie; Wang Jianhong; Zhang Hongbo; Zhou Xinming; Wu Kaichun; Ding Jie; Fan Daiming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) for Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). Methods: 14 patients with clinical findings of progressive liver function abnormality and severe complication of portal hypertension (upper gastrointestinal bleeding and refractory ascites)were diagnosed as BCS. Based on imaging manifestations, these patients were classified as follows: obstruction of inferior vena cava (1 case); obstruction of hepatic veins (5 cases); combined obstruction (obstruction of hepatic veins and inferior vena cava)(8 cases). During the procedure, different puncture points were selected for fulfilling the real condition; including 7 cases from hepatic vein to portal vein; 4 cases from inferior vena cava to hepatic vein, 4 cases from the right hepatic vein to portal vein. After the operation, the follow-up evaluation of blood flow in the shunt was performed. Results: All of these patients were successfully performed with TIPS, with average pressure of portal vein decreasing from (4.9 ± 1.4) KPa to(3.2 ± 1.5) KPa. After 5 to 64 mouths follow-up, the recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding occurred in two patients due to stent stenosis and were well controlled through balloon angioplasty. Conclusions: TIPS is an effective treatment for BCS with progressive liver dysfunction or severe portal hypertension with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and refractory ascites. In addition, it also contributes to the treatment of the recurrent or severe portal hypertension after the inferior vena cava or hepatic vein angioplasty. (authors)

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt: Histologic and Immunohistochemical Study of Autopsy Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terayama, Noboru; Matsui, Osamu; Kadoya, Masumi; Yoshikawa, Jun; Gabata, Toshifumi; Miyayama, Shiro; Takashima, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Nakanishi, Isao; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the histologic findings associated with stenosed and occluded transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) tracts. Methods: Four TIPS tracts within three autopsy livers were histologically studied for vascular components by routine staining and immunohistochemical staining. TIPS had been performed for bleeding from esophageal varices in patients with cirrhosis of the liver. Results: Two TIPS, examined on days 4 and 53, showed occlusion by fibrin thrombus. In the former, no endothelial cells were detected, but coagulative necrosis of hepatocytes was found in the surrounding liver. In the latter, bile pigments were seen on the luminal surface. In the two other TIPS without tract occlusion, examined on days 49 and 293, a layer of endothelial cells, proliferation of smooth muscle cells, and deposition of an extracellular matrix such as collagen were confirmed. In the tract examined on day 293, there was protrusion of hepatocytes into the lumen through the stent wires. Conclusion: Short- and midterm TIPS occlusions were caused by thrombus forming after necrosis of hepatocytes and bile leakage, respectively. Long-term TIPS stenosis was associated with a combination of pseudointimal hyperplasia and ingrowth of hepatocytes

  11. Radiation Exposure in Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Creation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miraglia, Roberto, E-mail: rmiraglia@ismett.edu; Maruzzelli, Luigi, E-mail: lmaruzzelli@ismett.edu; Cortis, Kelvin, E-mail: kelvincortis@ismett.edu [Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Radiology Service, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Services (Italy); D’Amico, Mario, E-mail: mdamico@ismett.edu [University of Palermo, Department of Radiology (Italy); Floridia, Gaetano, E-mail: gfloridia@ismett.edu; Gallo, Giuseppe, E-mail: ggallo@ismett.edu; Tafaro, Corrado, E-mail: ctafaro@ismett.edu; Luca, Angelo, E-mail: aluca@ismett.edu [Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Radiology Service, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Services (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    PurposeTransjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation is considered as being one of the most complex procedures in abdominal interventional radiology. Our aim was twofold: quantification of TIPS-related patient radiation exposure in our center and identification of factors leading to reduced radiation exposure.Materials and methodsThree hundred and forty seven consecutive patients underwent TIPS in our center between 2007 and 2014. Three main procedure categories were identified: Group I (n = 88)—fluoroscopic-guided portal vein targeting, procedure done in an image intensifier-based angiographic system (IIDS); Group II (n = 48)—ultrasound-guided portal vein puncture, procedure done in an IIDS; and Group III (n = 211)—ultrasound-guided portal vein puncture, procedure done in a flat panel detector-based system (FPDS). Radiation exposure (dose-area product [DAP], in Gy cm{sup 2} and fluoroscopy time [FT] in minutes) was retrospectively analyzed.ResultsDAP was significantly higher in Group I (mean ± SD 360 ± 298; median 287; 75th percentile 389 Gy cm{sup 2}) as compared to Group II (217 ± 130; 178; 276 Gy cm{sup 2}; p = 0.002) and Group III (129 ± 117; 70; 150 Gy cm{sup 2}p < 0.001). The difference in DAP between Groups II and III was also significant (p < 0.001). Group I had significantly longer FT (25.78 ± 13.52 min) as compared to Group II (20.45 ± 10.87 min; p = 0.02) and Group III (19.76 ± 13.34; p < 0.001). FT was not significantly different between Groups II and III (p = 0.73).ConclusionsReal-time ultrasound-guided targeting of the portal venous system during TIPS creation results in a significantly lower radiation exposure and reduced FT. Further reduction in radiation exposure can be achieved through the use of modern angiographic units with FPDS.

  12. Usefulness of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in the Management of Bleeding Ectopic Varices in Cirrhotic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, V.; Joly, L.; Perreault, P.; Bouchard, L.; Lafortune, M.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in the control of bleeding from ectopic varices. Methods. From 1995 to 2004, 24 cirrhotic patients, bleeding from ectopic varices, mean age 54.5 years (range 15-76 years), were treated by TIPS. The etiology of cirrhosis was alcoholic in 13 patients and nonalcoholic in 11 patients. The location of the varices was duodenal (n = 5), stomal (n = 8), ileocolic (n = 6), anorectal (n = 3), umbilical (n = 1), and peritoneal (n 1). Results. TIPS controlled the bleeding in all patients and induced a decrease in the portacaval gradient from 19.7 ± 5.4 to 6.4 ± 3.1 mmHg. Postoperative complications included self-limited intra-abdominal bleeding (n = 2), self-limited hemobilia (n = 1), acute thrombosis of the shunt (n = 1), and bile leak treated by a covered stent (n = 1). Median follow-up was 592 days (range 28-2482 days). Rebleeding occurred in 6 patients. In 2 cases rebleeding was observed despite a post-TIPS portacaval gradient lower than 12 mmHg and was controlled by variceal embolization; 1 patient underwent surgical portacaval shunt and never rebled; in 3 patients rebleeding was related to TIPS stenosis and treated with shunt dilatation with addition of a new stent. The cumulative rate of rebleeding was 23% and 31% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 80% and 76%, respectively. Conclusion. The present series demonstrates that bleeding from ectopic varices, a challenging clinical problem, can be managed safely by TIPS placement with low rebleeding and good survival rates

  13. Effects of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) on blood volume distribution in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Troels M; Bendtsen, Flemming; Henriksen, Jens H

    2017-01-01

    increased (+22%, prestores central hypovolaemia......BACKGROUND: Cirrhosis is accompanied by portal hypertension with splanchnic and systemic arterial vasodilation, and central hypovolaemia. A transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) alleviates portal hypertension, but also causes major haemodynamic changes. AIMS: To investigate effects...... catheterization. Central and arterial blood volume (CBV) and cardiac output (CO) were determined with indicator dilution technique. RESULTS: After TIPS, the thoracic blood volume increased (+10.4% of total blood volume (TBV), p

  14. Combined transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and other interventions for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Bin; Zhao, Meng-Fei; Yue, Zhen-Dong; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Wang, Lei; Fan, Zhen-Hua; He, Fu-Liang; Dai, Shan; Yao, Jian-Nan; Liu, Fu-Quan

    2015-11-21

    To evaluate combination transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) and other interventions for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and portal hypertension. Two hundred and sixty-one patients with HCC and portal hypertension underwent TIPS combined with other interventional treatments (transarterial chemoembolization/transarterial embolization, radiofrequency ablation, hepatic arterio-portal fistulas embolization, and splenic artery embolization) from January 1997 to January 2010 at Beijing Shijitan Hospital. Two hundred and nine patients (121 male and 88 female, aged 25-69 years, mean 48.3 ± 12.5 years) with complete clinical data were recruited. We evaluated the safety of the procedure (procedure-related death and serious complications), change of portal vein pressure before and after TIPS, symptom relief [e.g., ascites, hydrothorax, esophageal gastric-fundus variceal bleeding (EGVB)], cumulative rates of survival, and distributary channel restenosis. The characteristics of the patients surviving ≥ 5 and portal hypertension symptoms were ameliorated. During the 5 year follow-up, the total recurrence rate of resistant ascites or hydrothorax was 7.2% (15/209); 36.8% (77/209) for EGVB; and 39.2% (82/209) for hepatic encephalopathy. The cumulative rates of distributary channel restenosis at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years were 17.2% (36/209), 29.7% (62/209), 36.8% (77/209), 45.5% (95/209) and 58.4% (122/209), respectively. No procedure-related deaths and serious complications (e.g., abdominal bleeding, hepatic failure, and distant metastasis) occurred. Moreover, Child-Pugh score, portal vein tumor thrombosis, lesion diameter, hepatic arterio-portal fistulas, HCC diagnosed before or after TIPS, stent type, hepatic encephalopathy, and type of other interventional treatments were related to 5 year survival after comparing patient characteristics. TIPS combined with other interventional treatments seems to be safe and efficacious in patients with HCC and portal

  15. Intrahepatic Portosystemic Venous Shunt: Successful Embolization Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Ju; Shin, Byung Seok; Lee, In Ho; Ohm, Joon Young; Lee, Byung Seok; Ahn, Moon Sang [Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho Jun [Dept. of Radiology, Konyang University Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    A 67-year-old woman presented with memory impairment and behavioral changes. Brain MRI indicated hepatic encephalopathy. Abdominal CT scans revealed an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt that consisted of two shunt tracts to the aneurysmal sac that communicated directly with the right hepatic vein. The large tract was successfully occluded by embolization using the newly available AMPLATZERTM Vascular Plug II and the small tract was occluded by using coils. The patient's symptoms disappeared after shunt closure and she remained free of recurrence at the 3-month follow-up evaluation.

  16. Cardiac and renal effects of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Troels M; Bendtsen, Flemming; Møller, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Refractory ascites and recurrent variceal bleeding are among the serious complications of portal hypertension and cirrhosis for which a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) can be used. Cirrhotic patients have varying degrees of haemodynamic derangement, mainly characterized...... to improve in patients with the hepatorenal syndrome. The clinical and haemodynamic effects of TIPS have been studied intensively and will be reviewed in the present paper. Considerable knowledge on the effects of TIPS on the pathophysiology of cirrhosis has been gained, but studies on the central...

  17. RE: Endovascular Treatment of Congenital Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts with Amplatzer Plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierre, Sergio; Alonso, Jose; Lipsich, Jose

    2012-01-01

    In our paper entitled 'Endovascular treatment of congenital portal vein fistulas with the Amplatzer occlusion device' published in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology in 2004, we already reported the use of the AVP in the treatment of an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt. This situation does not undervalue the quality of the reported case, but for didactic purposes, we believe it is important to state that the work of Dr. Lee confirms, as was previously reported, that these devices are useful and safe for these rare situations.

  18. RE: Endovascular Treatment of Congenital Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts with Amplatzer Plugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierre, Sergio; Alonso, Jose; Lipsich, Jose [Hospital Nacional de Pediatria ' JP Garrahan' , Combate de los Pozos, Buenos (Argentina)

    2012-01-15

    In our paper entitled 'Endovascular treatment of congenital portal vein fistulas with the Amplatzer occlusion device' published in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology in 2004, we already reported the use of the AVP in the treatment of an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt. This situation does not undervalue the quality of the reported case, but for didactic purposes, we believe it is important to state that the work of Dr. Lee confirms, as was previously reported, that these devices are useful and safe for these rare situations.

  19. Transjugular portal vein recanalization with creation of intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (PVR-TIPS) in patients with chronic non-cirrhotic, non-malignant portal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Christoph; Riecken, Bettina; Schmidt, Arthur; De Gottardi, Andrea; Meier, Benjamin; Bosch, Jaime; Caca, Karel

    2018-03-01

    To determine safety and efficacy of transjugular portal vein recanalization with creation of intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (PVR-TIPS) in patients with chronic non-cirrhotic, non-malignant portal vein thrombosis (PVT). This retrospective study includes 17 consecutive patients with chronic non-cirrhotic PVT (cavernous transformation n = 15). PVR-TIPS was indicated because of variceal bleeding (n = 13), refractory ascites (n = 2), portal biliopathy with recurrent cholangitis (n = 1), or abdominal pain (n = 1). Treatment consisted of a combination of transjugular balloon angioplasty, mechanical thrombectomy, and-depending on extent of residual thrombosis-transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and additional stenting of the portal venous system. Recanalization was successful in 76.5 % of patients despite cavernous transformation in 88.2 %. Both 1- and 2-year secondary PV and TIPS patency rates were 69.5 %. Procedure-related bleeding complications occurred in 2 patients (intraperitoneal bleeding due to capsule perforation, n = 1; liver hematoma, n = 1) and resolved spontaneously. However, 1 patient died due to subsequent nosocomial pneumonia. During follow-up, 3 patients with TIPS occlusion and PVT recurrence experienced portal hypertensive complications. PVR-TIPS is safe and effective in selected patients with chronic non-cirrhotic PVT. Due to technical complexity and possible complications, it should be performed only in specialized centers with high experience in TIPS procedures. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Long-term outcome following trans-jugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Jinguo; Zhang Shutian; Feng Zitan; Zhou Guifen; Pan Xinyuan; Liang Zhihui

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the 6-year outcome following trans-jugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPSS) for variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension. Methods: 65 patients, 51 males, 14 females, aged 35-72 years old with averaged 4.5 years, have been undergone TIPSS because of portal hypertension due to cirrhosis or Budd-Chiari syndrome. The portal pressures were measured before and after TIPSS. Follow-up study was done by color Doppler sonography or Barium esophageal radiography for 3 months to 6 years (averaged 18 months). Repeated interventional treatments were done in cases of restenosis of the shunts. Results: There were 0, 2, 10, 5, 0 cases of recurrent bleeding after 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, 2 year and 3-6 year following TIPSS respectively. Stenosis occurred in shunt paths due to thrombosis or smooth muscle cell proliferation or neo-intimal hyperplasia were relieved after thrombolytic therapy and repeated balloon angioplasty or stent plant among most of them. 2 were failed due to serious stenosis. 7 cases died, 2 of massive bleeding, 1 of the other cause and 4 of hepatic cancer. The other patients are getting well. Conclusions: Although there were very high rates of restenosis (34%), but most of them could be treated again with interventional therapy, and in kept patency effectively. TIPSS is a still practical valuable management for massive gastric bleeding

  1. Endovascular Management of Refractory Hepatic Encephalopathy Complication of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS): Comprehensive Review and Clinical Practice Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Keith; Carrion, Andres F.; Salsamendi, Jason; Doshi, Mehul; Baker, Reginald; Kably, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) has evolved as an effective intervention for treatment of complications of portal hypertension. The use of polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stents have improved the patency of the shunts and diminished the incidence of TIPS dysfunction. However, TIPS-related refractory hepatic encephalopathy (rHE) poses a significant challenge. Approximately 3–7 % of patients with TIPS develop rHE. Refractory hepatic encephalopathy is defined as a recurrent or persistent encephalopathy despite appropriate medical treatment. Hepatic encephalopathy can be an extremely debilitating complication that profoundly affects quality of life. The approach to management of patients with rHE is complex and typically requires collaboration between different specialties. Liver transplantation is the ultimate treatment for rHE; however, the ongoing shortage of organ donation markedly limits this treatment option. Alternative therapies such as shunt occlusion or reduction can control symptoms and serve as a ‘bridge’ therapy to liver transplantation. Therefore, interventional radiologists play a key role in the management of these patients by offering a variety of endovascular techniques. The purpose of this review is to highlight some of these endovascular techniques and to develop a therapeutic algorithm that can be applied in clinical practice for the management of rHE

  2. Endovascular Management of Refractory Hepatic Encephalopathy Complication of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS): Comprehensive Review and Clinical Practice Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Keith, E-mail: keithjppereira@gmail.com [Jackson Memorial Hospital/University of Miami Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States); Carrion, Andres F., E-mail: andres.carrionmonsa@jhsmiami.org [Jackson Memorial Hospital/University of Miami Hospital, Department of Hepatology (United States); Salsamendi, Jason, E-mail: JSalsamendi@med.miami.edu; Doshi, Mehul, E-mail: MDoshi@med.miami.edu; Baker, Reginald, E-mail: RBaker@med.miami.edu; Kably, Issam, E-mail: ikably@med.miami.edu [Jackson Memorial Hospital/University of Miami Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) has evolved as an effective intervention for treatment of complications of portal hypertension. The use of polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stents have improved the patency of the shunts and diminished the incidence of TIPS dysfunction. However, TIPS-related refractory hepatic encephalopathy (rHE) poses a significant challenge. Approximately 3–7 % of patients with TIPS develop rHE. Refractory hepatic encephalopathy is defined as a recurrent or persistent encephalopathy despite appropriate medical treatment. Hepatic encephalopathy can be an extremely debilitating complication that profoundly affects quality of life. The approach to management of patients with rHE is complex and typically requires collaboration between different specialties. Liver transplantation is the ultimate treatment for rHE; however, the ongoing shortage of organ donation markedly limits this treatment option. Alternative therapies such as shunt occlusion or reduction can control symptoms and serve as a ‘bridge’ therapy to liver transplantation. Therefore, interventional radiologists play a key role in the management of these patients by offering a variety of endovascular techniques. The purpose of this review is to highlight some of these endovascular techniques and to develop a therapeutic algorithm that can be applied in clinical practice for the management of rHE.

  3. Hepatic Encephalopathy Secondary to Intrahepatic Portosystemic Venous Shunt: Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Embolization with n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Microcoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Takuji; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Iida, Shigeharu; Kato, Takeharu; Tanaka, Osamu; Matsushima, Shigenori; Ito, Hirotoshi; Okuyama, Chio; Ushijima, Yo; Shiga, Kensuke; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2002-01-01

    We report a 70-year-old woman with hepatic encephalopathy due to an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt that was successfully occluded by percutaneous transcatheter embolization with n-butyl cyanoacrylate and microcoils

  4. Management of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)-associated Refractory Hepatic Encephalopathy by Shunt Reduction Using the Parallel Technique: Outcomes of a Retrospective Case Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cookson, Daniel T.; Zaman, Zubayr; Gordon-Smith, James; Ireland, Hamish M.; Hayes, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the reproducibility and technical and clinical success of the parallel technique of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) reduction in the management of refractory hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Materials and Methods: A 10-mm-diameter self-expanding stent graft and a 5–6-mm-diameter balloon-expandable stent were placed in parallel inside the existing TIPS in 8 patients via a dual unilateral transjugular approach. Changes in portosystemic pressure gradient and HE grade were used as primary end points. Results: TIPS reduction was technically successful in all patients. Mean ± standard deviation portosystemic pressure gradient before and after shunt reduction was 4.9 ± 3.6 mmHg (range, 0–12 mmHg) and 10.5 ± 3.9 mmHg (range, 6–18 mmHg). Duration of follow-up was 137 ± 117.8 days (range, 18–326 days). Clinical improvement of HE occurred in 5 patients (62.5%) with resolution of HE in 4 patients (50%). Single episodes of recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurred in 3 patients (37.5%). These were self-limiting in 2 cases and successfully managed in 1 case by correction of coagulopathy and blood transfusion. Two of these patients (25%) died, one each of renal failure and hepatorenal failure. Conclusion: The parallel technique of TIPS reduction is reproducible and has a high technical success rate. A dual unilateral transjugular approach is advantageous when performing this procedure. The parallel technique allows repeat bidirectional TIPS adjustment and may be of significant clinical benefit in the management of refractory HE.

  5. Hepatic Encephalopathy due to Congenital Multiple Intrahepatic Portosystemic Venous Shunts Successfully Treated by Percutaneous Transhepatic Obliteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Takenaga

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy due to intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunts (IPSVS in a non-cirrhotic condition is rare. Here we report a rare case of a patient with congenital multiple IPSVS successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic obliteration. The patient was a 67-year-old woman who presented to our hospital with progressive episodes of consciousness disorder and vomiting. Laboratory tests revealed hyperammonemia (192.0 μg/dL, and computed tomography revealed multiple IPSVS in both lobes. There was no evidence of underlying liver disease or hepatic trauma. Transcatheter embolization for IPSVS was performed because conservative therapy was not sufficiently effective. After endovascular shunt closure, hepatic encephalopathy improved. The serum ammonia level normalized during the 5-year follow-up period. Thus, transcatheter embolization may be an effective therapy for patients with symptomatic and refractory IPSVS. Careful follow-up is necessary for portal hypertension-related complications after transcatheter embolization for IPSVS.

  6. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt by direct transcaval approach: indications and anatomic foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Jianguo; Sun Xiaoli; Huang He; Xu Xiaoming; Pu Longsong; Lv Chunyan; Sun Peng; Yang Shuhui; Liu Shuying

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate into the indications and related anatomic foundation of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation by direct transcaval approach in patients with portal hypertension cirrhosis suffering unusual anatomy between the hepatic veins and portal bifurcation; and to evaluate the security, feasibility and clinical significance. Methods: Direct transcaval approach TIPS were performed in 65 patients including active variceal bleeding (n=52), intractable ascites (n=12), and as a bridge to liver transplantation (n=1). Results: Technical and functional success were achieved in all patients. The success rate was 100% without related complications including the technique and primary patency rate is obvious higher than classical TIPS. Conclusion: In patients with unusual anatomy between the hepatic veins and portal bifurcation, and inaccessible or inadequate hepatic veins, transcaval TIPS creation is secure and feasible. The results suggest that the direct transcaval approach offering favorable primary patency because the shunt has a straight line in construction

  7. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in a patient with cavernomatous portal vein occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamata, Hiroshi; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Kanazawa, Hidenori; Takahashi, Shuji; Tajima, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Hiromitsu

    2000-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis secondary to primary sclerosing cholangitis was referred to us for the treatment of recurrent bleeding from esophageal varices that had been refractory to endoscopic sclerotherapy. Her portal vein was occluded, associated with cavernous transformation. A transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was performed after a preprocedural three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography evaluation to determine feasibility. The portal vein system was recanalized and portal blood flow increased markedly after TIPS. Esophageal varices disappeared 3 weeks after TIPS. Re-bleeding and hepatic encephalopathy were absent for 3 years after the procedure. We conclude that with adequate preprocedural evaluation, TIPS can be performed safely even in patients with portal vein occlusion associated with cavernous transformation.

  8. Minilaparotomy-Assisted Transmesenteric-Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt: Comparison with Conventional Transjugular Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalaeian, Hamed, E-mail: hjalaeia@umn.edu; Talaie, Reza; D’Souza, Donna; Taleb, Shayandokht [University of Minnesota, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Noorbaloochi, Siamak [University of Minnesota, School of Medicine (United States); Flanagan, Siobhan; Hunter, David; Golzarian, Jafar [University of Minnesota, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-10-15

    PurposeThis study was performed to compare the intrahepatic shunt function outcome and procedural complications of minilaparotomy-assisted transmesenteric (MAT)-transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement with the conventional transjugular method.MethodsThis is a retrospective review of all patients who had a MAT or conventional TIPS procedure over a 6-year period at our institute. The primary patency rate, fluoroscopy time, technical success, major procedure-related complications, and mortality data were compared between two treatment groups.ResultsWe included 49 patients with MAT-TIPS, and 63 with conventional TIPS, with an average follow-up of 21.43 months. The primary patency rates at 6 and 12 months were 82.9 and 66.7 % in the conventional TIPS group, and 81.0 and 76.5 % in the MAT-TIPS group (p = 1.000, and 0.529), respectively. There was no significant difference in technical success rate, post-procedure portosystemic pressure gradient, fluoroscopy time, and peri-procedural mortality rate between treatment groups. Major procedural-related complications were seen more frequently among MAT-TIPS patients (p = 0.012). In the MAT-TIPS group, 5 (10.2 %) patients developed post-procedure minilaparotomy, wound-related complications, and 5 (10.2 %) developed bacterial peritonitis; whereas, none of patients with conventional TIPS had either of these complications (p = 0.014).ConclusionWhile both MAT-TIPS and conventional TIPS had similar shunt primary patency rate and technical success rate, the MAT approach was associated with a significantly higher rate of minilaparotomy-related wound complications or infectious complications. These complications maybe prevented by a change in post-procedure monitoring and therapy.

  9. Shear Wave Elastography of the Spleen for Monitoring Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Function: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Zheng, Xiao; Zheng, Yuan-Yi; Zuo, Guo-Qing; Ran, Hai-Tao; Auh, Yong Ho; Waldron, Levi; Chan, Tiffany; Wang, Zhi-Gang

    2016-05-01

    To assess the feasibility of splenic shear wave elastography in monitoring transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) function. We measured splenic shear wave velocity (SWV), main portal vein velocity (PVV), and splenic vein velocity (SVV) in 33 patients 1 day before and 3 days to 12 months after TIPS placement. We also measured PVV, SVV, and SWV in 10 of 33 patients with TIPS dysfunction 1 day before and 3 to 6 days after TIPS revision. Analyses included differences in portosystemic pressure gradient (PPG), PVV, SVV, and mean SWV before and after TIPS procedures; comparison of median SWV before and after TIPS procedures; differences in PVV, SVV, and SWV before and at different times up to 12 months after TIPS placement; accuracy of PVV, SVV, and SWV in determining TIPS dysfunction; and correlation between PPG and SWV. During 12 months of follow-up, 23 of 33 patients had functioning TIPS, and 10 had TIPS dysfunction. The median SWV was significantly different before and after primary TIPS placement (3.60 versus 3.05 m/s; P = .005), as well as before and after revision (3.73 versus 3.06 m/s; P = .003). The PPG, PVV, and SVV were also significantly different before and after TIPS placement and revision (P function and determining TIPS dysfunction. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  10. Basic anatomic study of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt by direct transcaval approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xia; Xu Ke

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the indications and related anatomic foundation of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) through direct transcaval approach, and to evaluate the safety, feasibility and clinical significance. Methods: Sixty four patients diagnosed as hepatocirrhosis clinically were involved, including the function of liver Child B (n=40), Child C (n=24). After 2 phrase of hepatic CT enhancement scanning and postprocessing through multiple planner reconstruction (MPR) and curve planner reconstruction (CPR), the data were conjugated statistically by ANOVA. Results: The length of the intrahepatic segment of the inferior cava in Child B is longer than that in Child C (P<0.05). Referring the points of hepatic vein entrance to vena cava as A1, 2 cm away from right hepatic vein as A2, the crotch of portal vein as B1, 2 cm away from right portal vein as B2. The length of A1B1 is shorter than that of A2B1(P<0.05). The angle between A1B2 and right portal vein is smaller than that of A2B2 and right portal vein (P<0.05). Conclusion: Transcaval TIPS creation is safe and feasible, providing the direct transcaval approach as a favorable fluent patency way and less influence on hemodynamics in comparison with traditional TIPS. (authors)

  11. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: results and prognostic factors in patients with post-necrotic liver cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Chung, Jin Wook; Han, Joon Koo; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Joo [Kyungbook National University College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt(TIPS) in the management of gastroesophageal variceal bleeding and predictive factors for long-term survival in patients with post-necrotic liver cirrhosis. A total of 49 patients with post-necrotic liver cirrhosis underwent TIPS over a recent three-year period. Forty-five had a history of hepatitis B viral infection, and four, of hepatitis C viral infection. In all patients, the indication for the procedure was variceal bleeding. Child-Pugh class was A in seven patients, B in 16 and C in 26 patients at the time of the last bleeding. The effectiveness of portal decompression and bleeding control was evaluated. Long-term survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and predictive factors were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. The procedure was technically successful in all cases. The portosystemic pressure gradient decreased significantly from 21.4 {+-} 6.4 mmHg to 12.0 {+-} 5.1 mmHg(N=45). Active variceal bleeding was controlled in 34 of the 37 emergency patients. The total length of follow-up was from one day to three and a half years(mean : 383 {+-} 357 days). Rebleeding developed in 17 patients (35%). Hepatic encephalopathy, either newly developed or aggravated, occurred in 16 (32.7%). The thirty-day mortality rate was 20.4%, and the one-year survival rate was 63.8%. The significant predictive factors for poor prognosis were Child-Pugh class C and post-TIPS hepatic encephalopathy. TIPS is effective in portal decompression in the patients with variceal bleeding due to post-necrotic liver cirrhosis. The Child-Pugh classification and hepatic encephalopathy after TIPS are considered to be significant predictive factors for long-term survival.

  12. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: results and prognostic factors in patients with post-necrotic liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Chung, Jin Wook; Han, Joon Koo; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Yong Joo

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt(TIPS) in the management of gastroesophageal variceal bleeding and predictive factors for long-term survival in patients with post-necrotic liver cirrhosis. A total of 49 patients with post-necrotic liver cirrhosis underwent TIPS over a recent three-year period. Forty-five had a history of hepatitis B viral infection, and four, of hepatitis C viral infection. In all patients, the indication for the procedure was variceal bleeding. Child-Pugh class was A in seven patients, B in 16 and C in 26 patients at the time of the last bleeding. The effectiveness of portal decompression and bleeding control was evaluated. Long-term survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and predictive factors were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. The procedure was technically successful in all cases. The portosystemic pressure gradient decreased significantly from 21.4 ± 6.4 mmHg to 12.0 ± 5.1 mmHg(N=45). Active variceal bleeding was controlled in 34 of the 37 emergency patients. The total length of follow-up was from one day to three and a half years(mean : 383 ± 357 days). Rebleeding developed in 17 patients (35%). Hepatic encephalopathy, either newly developed or aggravated, occurred in 16 (32.7%). The thirty-day mortality rate was 20.4%, and the one-year survival rate was 63.8%. The significant predictive factors for poor prognosis were Child-Pugh class C and post-TIPS hepatic encephalopathy. TIPS is effective in portal decompression in the patients with variceal bleeding due to post-necrotic liver cirrhosis. The Child-Pugh classification and hepatic encephalopathy after TIPS are considered to be significant predictive factors for long-term survival

  13. Combination therapy using PSE and TIO ameliorates hepatic encephalopathy due to intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt in idiopathic portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Seiichiro; Ito, Hiroyuki; Takashimizu, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Hasebe, Terumitsu; Watanabe, Norihito

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman treated for anemia and ascites exhibited hepatic encephalopathy. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) showed communication between the portal vein and the middle hepatic vein, indicating an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt (PSS). Since hepatic encephalopathy of the patient was resistant to medical treatment, interventional radiology was performed for the treatment of shunt obliteration. Hepatic venography showed anastomosis between the hepatic vein branches, supporting the diagnosis of idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH). To minimize the increase in portal vein pressure after shunt obliteration, partial splenic artery embolization (PSE) was first performed to reduce portal vein blood flow. Transileocolic venous obliteration (TIO) was then performed, and intrahepatic PSS was successfully obliterated using coils with n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA). In the present case, hepatic encephalopathy due to intrahepatic PSS in the patient with IPH was successfully treated by combination therapy using PSE and TIO

  14. Comparison of Technical and Clinical Outcome of Transjugular Portosystemic Shunt Placement Between a Bare Metal Stent and a PTFE-Stentgraft Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauermann, J; Potthoff, A; Mc Cavert, M; Marquardt, S; Vaske, B; Rosenthal, H; von Hahn, T; Wacker, F; Meyer, B C; Rodt, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    To analyse technical and clinical success of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in patients with portal hypertension and compare a stent and a stentgraft with regard to clinical and technical outcome and associated costs. 170 patients (56 ± 12 years, 32.9% females) treated with TIPS due to portal hypertension were reviewed. 80 patients received a stent (group 1) and 83 a stentgraft (group 2), and seven interventions were unsuccessful. Technical data, periprocedural imaging, follow-up ultrasound and clinical data were analysed with focus on technical success, patency, clinical outcome and group differences. Cost analysis was performed. Portal hypertension was mainly caused by ethyltoxic liver cirrhosis with ascites as dominant symptom (80%). Technical success was 93.5% with mean portosystemic gradient decrease from 16.1 ± 4.8 to 5.1 ± 2.1 mmHg. No significant differences in technical success and portosystemic gradient decrease between the groups were observed. Kaplan-Meier analysis yielded significant differences in primary patency after 14 days, 6 months and 2 years in favour of the stentgraft. Both groups showed good clinical results without significant difference in 1-year survival and hepatic encephalopathy rate. Costs to establish TIPS and to manage 2-year follow-up with constant patency and clinical success were 8876 € (group 1) and 9394 € (group 2). TIPS is a safe and effective procedure to manage portal hypertension. Stent and stentgraft enabled good technical and clinical results with a low complication rate. Primary patency rates are clearly in favour of the stentgraft, whereas the stent was more cost effective with similar clinical results in both groups.

  15. Comparison of Technical and Clinical Outcome of Transjugular Portosystemic Shunt Placement Between a Bare Metal Stent and a PTFE-Stentgraft Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauermann, J., E-mail: jostlauermann@gmail.com [Hannover Medical School, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Potthoff, A. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology (Germany); Mc Cavert, M. [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Ireland); Marquardt, S. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Vaske, B. [Hannover Medical School, Institute of Biometry (Germany); Rosenthal, H. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Hahn, T. von [Hannover Medical School, Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology (Germany); Wacker, F.; Meyer, B. C.; Rodt, Thomas, E-mail: rodt.thomas@mh-hannover.de [Hannover Medical School, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    PurposeTo analyse technical and clinical success of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in patients with portal hypertension and compare a stent and a stentgraft with regard to clinical and technical outcome and associated costs.Materials and Methods170 patients (56 ± 12 years, 32.9 % females) treated with TIPS due to portal hypertension were reviewed. 80 patients received a stent (group 1) and 83 a stentgraft (group 2), and seven interventions were unsuccessful. Technical data, periprocedural imaging, follow-up ultrasound and clinical data were analysed with focus on technical success, patency, clinical outcome and group differences. Cost analysis was performed.ResultsPortal hypertension was mainly caused by ethyltoxic liver cirrhosis with ascites as dominant symptom (80 %). Technical success was 93.5 % with mean portosystemic gradient decrease from 16.1 ± 4.8 to 5.1 ± 2.1 mmHg. No significant differences in technical success and portosystemic gradient decrease between the groups were observed. Kaplan–Meier analysis yielded significant differences in primary patency after 14 days, 6 months and 2 years in favour of the stentgraft. Both groups showed good clinical results without significant difference in 1-year survival and hepatic encephalopathy rate. Costs to establish TIPS and to manage 2-year follow-up with constant patency and clinical success were 8876 € (group 1) and 9394 € (group 2).ConclusionTIPS is a safe and effective procedure to manage portal hypertension. Stent and stentgraft enabled good technical and clinical results with a low complication rate. Primary patency rates are clearly in favour of the stentgraft, whereas the stent was more cost effective with similar clinical results in both groups.

  16. Pictorial essay: trans-jugular intra-hepatic porto-systemic shunt (TIPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Anuradha, T.N.; Rastogi, H.; Pandey, U.C.

    2001-01-01

    TIPS is an interventional radiologic method of creating a portosystemic shunt by percutaneous means. It is a relatively new weapon in the armamentarium of the management of portal hypertension with variceal bleeding or intractable ascites. Using needles, angioplasty balloon catheters and expandable metallic stents, a shunt is established directly inside the liver parenchyma connecting a large hepatic vein with a main portal vein branch. Depending on the diameter of the expandable stent used, the created TIPS diverts various amounts of portal blood into the systemic circulation and results in significant portal decompression, cessation of hemorrhage from esophageal varices and resolution of ascites. TIPS is not only an effective and safe alternative to shunt surgery but is life saving in cases of variceal hemorrhage. The use of TIPS seems to be a valid alternative to surgery and has several advantages over either esophageal transection or surgical shunts. TIPS avoids a general anesthetic, laparotomy, and disruption of the hepatic venous system that may adversely affect subsequent hepatic transplantation. TIPS has been performed on patients without interfering with successful transplantation

  17. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for severe jaundice in patients with acute Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fu-Liang; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Fan, Zhen-Hua; Zhao, Meng-Fei; Dai, Shan; Yue, Zhen-Dong; Liu, Fu-Quan

    2015-02-28

    To evaluate the feasibility of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) for severe jaundice secondary to acute Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). From February 2009 to March 2013, 37 patients with severe jaundice secondary to acute BCS were treated. Sixteen patients without hepatic venule, hepatic veins (HV) obstruction underwent percutaneous angioplasty of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and/or HVs. Twenty-one patients with HV occlusion underwent TIPS. Serum bilirubin, liver function, demographic data and operative data of the two groups of patients were analyzed. Twenty-one patients underwent TIPS and the technical success rate was 100%, with no technical complications. Sixteen patients underwent recanalization of the IVC and/or HVs and the technical success rate was 100%. The mean procedure time for TIPS was 84.0±12.11 min and angioplasty was 44.11±5.12 min (Pjaundice in either group. Severe jaundice is not a contraindication for TIPS in patients with acute BCS and TIPS is appropriate for severe jaundice due to BCS.

  18. Mid-term effect of direct intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for the treatment of portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Jianjun; Yan Zhiping; Wang Jianhua; Liu Qingxin; Qu Xudong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze the mid-term clinical results of direct intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (DIPS) in treating patients with portal hypertension. Methods: DIPS were created in 23 patients with portal hypertension. Both preoperative and postoperative portal systemic pressure gradient (PPG), liver function and clinical symptoms were recorded and compared. Shunt patency was checked by color Doppler ultrasonography and the data were statistically analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. Results DIPS creation was successfully accomplished in all 23 patients. No serious complications occurred after DIPS except for hemorrhagic ascites (n = 1) and mild hepatic encephalopathy (n = 3). Mean PPG significantly decreased from preoperative (32.6 ± 5.3) mmHg with a range of (23 - 43) mmHg to postoperative (10.1 ± 2.7) mmHg with a range of (5-14) mmHg (P < 0.001). After the procedure, the albumin level also markedly decreased while the bilirubin level distinctly increased. Obvious improvement of the clinical symptoms was observed. The cumulated primary patency rate of the shunt one and two years after treatment was 77.4% and 50.2% respectively. Conclusion: The mid-term clinical results indicate that DIPS is an effective and safe procedure for treating patients with portal hypertension. (authors)

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement During Pregnancy: A Case Series of Five Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingraham, Christopher R.; Padia, Siddharth A.; Johnson, Guy E.; Easterling, Thomas R.; Liou, Iris W.; Kanal, Kalpana M.; Valji, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Background and AimsComplications of portal hypertension, such as variceal hemorrhage and ascites, are associated with significant increases in both mortality and complications during pregnancy. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a well-established procedure for treating portal hypertension, but the safety of TIPS during pregnancy is largely unknown. In this series, we review five patients who underwent TIPS placement while pregnant and describe their clinical outcomes.MethodsFive pregnant patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension underwent elective TIPS for complications of portal hypertension (four for secondary prevention of variceal bleeding and one for refractory ascites). Outcomes measured were recurrent bleeding episodes or need for further paracenteses during pregnancy, estimated radiation dose to the fetus and gestational age at delivery. All patients were followed after delivery to evaluate technical and clinical success of the procedure.ResultsAll five patients survived pregnancy and went on to deliver successfully. When TIPS was performed for secondary prevention of variceal bleeding (n = 4), no patients demonstrated variceal bleeding after TIPS placement. When TIPS was performed for refractory ascites (n = 1), no further paracenteses were required. All patients delivered successfully, albeit prematurely. Average radiation dose estimated to the fetus was 16.3 mGy.ConclusionsThis series suggests that TIPS can be performed in selective pregnant patients with portal hypertension, with little added risk to the mother or fetus

  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement in Patients with Cirrhosis and Concomitant Portal Vein Thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Thuong G. Van; Hodge, Justin; Funaki, Brian; Lorenz, Jonathan; Rosenblum, Jordan; Straus, Christopher; Leef, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the safety and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation in patients with liver cirrhosis complicated by thrombosed portal vein. Methods. This study reviewed 15 cases of TIPS creation in 15 cirrhotic patients with portal vein thrombosis at our institution over an 8-year period. There were 2 women and 13 men with a mean age of 53 years. Indications were refractory ascites, variceal hemorrhage, and refractory pleural effusion. Clinical follow-up was performed in all patients. Results. The technical success rate was 75% (3/4) in patients with chronic portal vein thrombosis associated with cavernomatous transformation and 91% (10/11) in patients with acute thrombosis or partial thrombosis, giving an overall success rate of 87%. Complications included postprocedural encephalopathy and localized hematoma at the access site. In patients with successful shunt placement, the total follow-up time was 223 months. The 30-day mortality rate was 13%. Two patients underwent liver transplantation at 35 days and 7 months, respectively, after TIPS insertion. One patient had an occluded shunt at 4 months with an unsuccessful revision. The remaining patients had functioning shunts at follow-up. Conclusion. TIPS creation in thrombosed portal vein is possible and might be a treatment option in certain patients

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement During Pregnancy: A Case Series of Five Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingraham, Christopher R., E-mail: cringra@uw.edu; Padia, Siddharth A., E-mail: spadia@uw.edu; Johnson, Guy E., E-mail: gej@uw.edu [University of Washington, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States); Easterling, Thomas R., E-mail: easter@uw.edu [University of Washington, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (United States); Liou, Iris W., E-mail: irisl@medicine.washington.edu [University of Washington, Department of Medicine (United States); Kanal, Kalpana M., E-mail: kkanal@uw.edu [University of Washington, Physics Section, Department of Radiology (United States); Valji, Karim, E-mail: kvalji@uw.edu [University of Washington, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Background and AimsComplications of portal hypertension, such as variceal hemorrhage and ascites, are associated with significant increases in both mortality and complications during pregnancy. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a well-established procedure for treating portal hypertension, but the safety of TIPS during pregnancy is largely unknown. In this series, we review five patients who underwent TIPS placement while pregnant and describe their clinical outcomes.MethodsFive pregnant patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension underwent elective TIPS for complications of portal hypertension (four for secondary prevention of variceal bleeding and one for refractory ascites). Outcomes measured were recurrent bleeding episodes or need for further paracenteses during pregnancy, estimated radiation dose to the fetus and gestational age at delivery. All patients were followed after delivery to evaluate technical and clinical success of the procedure.ResultsAll five patients survived pregnancy and went on to deliver successfully. When TIPS was performed for secondary prevention of variceal bleeding (n = 4), no patients demonstrated variceal bleeding after TIPS placement. When TIPS was performed for refractory ascites (n = 1), no further paracenteses were required. All patients delivered successfully, albeit prematurely. Average radiation dose estimated to the fetus was 16.3 mGy.ConclusionsThis series suggests that TIPS can be performed in selective pregnant patients with portal hypertension, with little added risk to the mother or fetus.

  2. Adopting wedge hepatic venography with CO2 during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Linpeng; Chen Songtao; Shi Xiulan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To renovate angiography in identifying portal vein anatomy during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedures, saving the time of TIPS procedures, decreasing the risk of the complications of the post-procedure. Methods: The difference between the Wedge hepatic venography with Carbon Dioxide in 6 cases and Inferior Mesenteric artery angiography in 7 cases during TIPS procedures were compared in the identification of portal vein anatomy. The quality of images, their effects on the procedures, the complications and the recovery post-procedure were evaluated. Results: Using CO 2 , the portal veins were opacified in all 6 cases. TIPS procedures succeeded in all cases except 1 case because of poor coagulation function. Using Inferior Mesenteric artery angiography, the portal veins were opacified in all 7 cases. TIPS procedure succeeded in all cases except 1 case because of chronic portal occlusion. Puncture-site hematoma occurred in 1 case after TIPS procedure. Conclusion: Wedge hepatic venography with Carbon Dioxide is superior, safer and more convenient than Inferior Mesenteric Artery angiography in identifying portal vein anatomy during TIPS. (authors)

  3. Association between portal vein pressure drop gradient after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and clinical prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Zhengguo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the association between portal vein pressure drop gradient in patients with cirrhotic portal hypertension treated by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS and clinical prognosis, as well as the ideal range of portal vein pressure drop. MethodsA total of 58 patients who underwent TIPS in Xinqiao Hospital of Third Military Medical University from November 2013 to December 2015 were enrolled. All the patients underwent TIPS and embolization of the gastric coronary vein and the short gastric veins, and the change intervals of portal vein pressure gradient were monitored. The follow-up time ranged from 3 days to 2 years, and the association of portal vein pressure drop gradient with postoperative liver function, splenic function, rebleeding rate, hepatic encephalopathy, and portal hypertensive gastrointestinal diseases was analyzed. The paired t-test was used for comparison of parameters before and after treatment. ResultsThe patients had a significant reduction in liver function on day 3 after surgery. At 2 month after surgery, the levels of TBil was rised and had significant changes[(49.81±27.82μmol/L vs (31.64±17.67 μmol/L,t=5.372,P<0.001]. At 6 months after surgery, red blood cell count and platelet count had no significant changes,but,white blood cell count was reduced[(3.79±1.37)×109/L vs (4.57±2.24×109/L,t=2.835,P=0.006]. There was a 23% reduction in portal vein pressure after surgery (from 30.62±3.56 mmHg before surgery to 21.21±2.90 mmHg after surgery, t=23.318,P<0.001. All the patients had varying degrees of relief of gastrointestinal symptoms associated with portal vein hypertension, such as abdominal distension, poor appetite, and diarrhea. Of all patients, none experienced in-stent restenosis or occlusion and 13 experienced hepatic encephalopathy after surgery, which tended to occur at the time when postoperative portal vein pressure was reduced to 14.7-25.7 mmHg, i

  4. A case of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation with portal hypertension: treatment with transjuguIar intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Hoon; Kim, Young Whan; Kim, Yong Joo [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-01

    Arteriovenous malformation of the pancreas is a rare disease, and it is manifested by gastrointestinal bleeding and/or portal hypertension. Surgery is definitely the treatment of choice at the early stage of the disease, and a transcatheter embolization is an alternative treatment for the control of bleeding and if the lesion is surgically inaccessible. We describe a 62-year-old man who had refractory ascites and esophageal variceal bleeding caused by a pancreatic arteriovenous malformation associated with portal hypertension; this was successfully treated by a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt.

  5. A case of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation with portal hypertension: treatment with transjuguIar intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Hoon; Kim, Young Whan; Kim, Yong Joo

    2004-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation of the pancreas is a rare disease, and it is manifested by gastrointestinal bleeding and/or portal hypertension. Surgery is definitely the treatment of choice at the early stage of the disease, and a transcatheter embolization is an alternative treatment for the control of bleeding and if the lesion is surgically inaccessible. We describe a 62-year-old man who had refractory ascites and esophageal variceal bleeding caused by a pancreatic arteriovenous malformation associated with portal hypertension; this was successfully treated by a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

  6. Pathological Predictors of Shunt Stenosis and Hepatic Encephalopathy after Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuliang He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS is an artificial channel from the portal vein to the hepatic vein or vena cava for controlling portal vein hypertension. The major drawbacks of TIPS are shunt stenosis and hepatic encephalopathy (HE; previous studies showed that post-TIPS shunt stenosis and HE might be correlated with the pathological features of the liver tissues. Therefore, we analyzed the pathological predictors for clinical outcome, to determine the risk factors for shunt stenosis and HE after TIPS. Methods. We recruited 361 patients who suffered from portal hypertension symptoms and were treated with TIPS from January 2009 to December 2012. Results. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of shunt stenosis was increased with more severe inflammation in the liver tissue (OR, 2.864; 95% CI: 1.466–5.592; P=0.002, HE comorbidity (OR, 6.266; 95% CI, 3.141–12.501; P<0.001, or higher MELD score (95% CI, 1.298–1.731; P<0.001. Higher risk of HE was associated with shunt stenosis comorbidity (OR, 6.266; 95% CI, 3.141–12.501; P<0.001, higher stage of the liver fibrosis (OR, 2.431; 95% CI, 1.355–4.359; P=0.003, and higher MELD score (95% CI, 1.711–2.406; P<0.001. Conclusion. The pathological features can predict individual susceptibility to shunt stenosis and HE.

  7. Outcomes of Locoregional Tumor Therapy for Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padia, Siddharth A., E-mail: spadia@uw.edu; Chewning, Rush H., E-mail: rchewnin@uw.edu; Kogut, Matthew J., E-mail: kogutm@uw.edu; Ingraham, Christopher R., E-mail: cringa@uw.edu; Johnson, Guy E., E-mail: gej@uw.edu [University of Washington Medical Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Bhattacharya, Renuka, E-mail: renuka@uw.edu [University of Washington Medical Center, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine (United States); Kwan, Sharon W., E-mail: shakwan@uw.edu; Monsky, Wayne L., E-mail: wmonsky@uw.edu; Vaidya, Sandeep, E-mail: svaidya@uw.edu [University of Washington Medical Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Hippe, Daniel S., E-mail: dhippe@uw.edu [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Valji, Karim, E-mail: kvalji@uw.edu [University of Washington Medical Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeLocoregional therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be challenging in patients with a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). This study compares safety and imaging response of ablation, chemoembolization, radioembolization, and supportive care in patients with both TIPS and HCC.MethodsThis retrospective study included 48 patients who had both a TIPS and a diagnosis of HCC. Twenty-nine of 48 (60 %) underwent treatment for HCC, and 19/48 (40 %) received best supportive care (i.e., symptomatic management only). While etiology of cirrhosis and indication for TIPS were similar between the two groups, treated patients had better baseline liver function (34 vs. 67 % Child-Pugh class C). Tumor characteristics were similar between the two groups. A total of 39 ablations, 17 chemoembolizations, and 10 yttrium-90 radioembolizations were performed on 29 patients.ResultsAblation procedures resulted in low rates of hepatotoxicity and clinical toxicity. Post-embolization/ablation syndrome occurred more frequently in patients undergoing chemoembolization than ablation (47 vs. 15 %). Significant hepatic dysfunction occurred more frequently in the chemoembolization group than the ablation group. Follow-up imaging response showed objective response in 100 % of ablation procedures, 67 % of radioembolization procedures, and 50 % of chemoembolization procedures (p = 0.001). When censored for OLT, patients undergoing treatment survived longer than patients receiving supportive care (2273 v. 439 days, p = 0.001).ConclusionsAblation appears to be safe and efficacious for HCC in patients with TIPS. Catheter-based approaches are associated with potential increased toxicity in this patient population. Chemoembolization appears to be associated with increased toxicity compared to radioembolization.

  8. Inpatient Cost Assessment of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in the USA from 2001 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuei, Andrew; Lee, Edward Wolfgang; Saab, Sammy; Busuttil, Ronald W; Durazo, Francisco; Han, Steven-Huy; ElKabany, Mohamed; McWilliams, Justin P; Kee, Stephen T

    2016-10-01

    Despite widespread use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) for treatment of portal hypertension, a paucity of nationwide data exists on predictors of the economic impact related to TIPS. Using the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2001 to 2012, we aimed to evaluate factors contributing to hospital cost of patients admitted to US hospitals for TIPS. Using the NIS, we identified a discharge-weighted national estimate of 61,004 TIPS procedures from 2001 to 2012. Through independent sample analysis, we determined profile factors related to increases in hospital costs. Of all TIPS cases, the mean charge adjusted for inflation to the year 2012 is $125,044 ± $160,115. The mean hospital cost adjusted for inflation is $44,901 ± $54,565. Comparing pre- and post-2005, mean charges and cost have increased considerably ($98,154 vs. $142,652, p < 0.001 and $41,656 vs. $46,453, p < 0.001, respectively). Patients transferred from a different hospital, weekend admissions, Asian/Pacific Islander patients, and hospitals in the Northeastern and Western region had higher cost. Number of diagnoses and number of procedures show positive correlations with hospital cost, with number of procedures exhibiting stronger relationships (Pearson 0.613). Comorbidity measures with highest increases in cost were pulmonary circulation disorders ($32,157 increase, p < 0.001). The cost of the TIPS procedure is gradually rising for hospitals. Alongside recent healthcare reform through the Affordable Care Act, measures to reduce the economic burden of TIPS are of increasing importance. Data from this study are intended to aid physicians and hospitals in identifying improvements that could reduce hospital costs.

  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Insertion for the Management of Portal Hypertension in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Lauren; McKiernan, Patrick; Sharif, Khalid; McGuirk, Simon

    2018-04-17

    To describe our 20-year experience with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPSS) procedures for children with resistant portal hypertension (PHTN). Retrospective review of all children that had a TIPSS performed at Birmingham Children's Hospital from 1 January 1995 - 1 January 2015. 40 children underwent 42 attempted TIPSS for resistant PHTN with recurrent variceal bleeding (n = 35), refractory ascites (n = 4), and hypersplenism (n = 1). Median age at operation was 12 years (range, 7 months - 17 years). Thirty-four procedures were elective and 8 were emergency cases.TIPSS was established in 33 cases (79%). Median portal venous pressure reduction was 10mmHg. Variceal bleeding ceased in 27 (96%) and ascites improved in all. Clinical improvement following TIPSS enabled 7 children to be bridged to transplantation and 7 others to become suitable for transplantation. The 1-year and 5-year survival with TIPSS was 57% and 35%, respectively. Child-Pugh score C was an independent risk factor for adverse outcome (LR = 8.0; 95% CI 2.7 - 23.5; P = 0.001).There were 6 major complications: hepatic artery thrombosis and infarction (n = 1), hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm (n = 1), bile leak (n = 1), and hepatic encephalopathy (n = 3). Encephalopathy was resistant to medical treatment in 2 cases, necessitating staged closure in one.Ten patients (30%) required intervention to maintain TIPSS patency. The 1-year and 5-year freedom from reintervention was 71% and 55%, respectively. A TIPSS is highly successful in controlling symptoms in children with resistant PHTN and facilitating liver transplantation. However, it is technically demanding and not without risk. Patients must be appropriately selected and counselled.

  10. Radiation dose reduction during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt implantation using a new imaging technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spink, C., E-mail: c.spink@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Avanesov, M. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Schmidt, T. [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); Grass, M. [Philips Research, Hamburg (Germany); Schoen, G. [Department of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Adam, G.; Bannas, P.; Koops, A. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The new imaging technology halved the radiation exposure. • DSA image quality observed was not decreased after technology upgrade. • Radiation time and contrast consumption not significantly increased using the new technology. - Abstract: Objective: To compare patient radiation dose in patients undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) implantation before and after an imaging-processing technology upgrade. Methods: In our retrospective single-center-study, cumulative air kerma (AK), cumulative dose area product (DAP), total fluoroscopy time and contrast agent were collected from an age- and BMI-matched collective of 108 patients undergoing TIPS implantation. 54 procedures were performed before and 54 after the technology upgrade. Mean values were calculated and compared using two-tailed t-tests. Two blinded, independent readers assessed DSA image quality using a four-rank likert scale and the Wilcoxcon test. Results: The new technology demonstrated a significant reduction of 57% of mean DAP (402.8 vs. 173.3 Gycm{sup 2}, p < 0.001) and a significant reduction of 58% of mean AK (1.7 vs. 0.7 Gy, p < 0.001) compared to the precursor technology. Time of fluoroscopy (26.4 vs. 27.8 min, p = 0.45) and amount of contrast agent (109.4 vs. 114.9 ml, p = 0.62) did not differ significantly between the two groups. The DSA image quality of the new technology was not inferior (2.66 vs. 2.77, p = 0.56). Conclusions: In our study the new imaging technology halved radiation dose in patients undergoing TIPS maintaining sufficient image quality without a significant increase in radiation time or contrast consumption.

  11. Transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt in the elderly: Palliation for complications of portal hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Mubin I; Karsan, Hetal; Ferral, Hector; Shaikh, Azim; Waheed, Uzma; Akhter, Talal; Gabbard, Alan; Morar, Kamal; Tyrrell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To present a dedicated series of transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunts (TIPS) in the elderly since data is sparse on this population group. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of patients at least 65 years of age who underwent TIPS at our institutions between 1997 and 2010. Twenty-five patients were referred for TIPS. We deemed that 2 patients were not considered appropriate candidates due to their markedly advanced liver disease. Of the 23 patients suitable for TIPS, the indications for TIPS placement was portal hypertension complicated by refractory ascites alone (n = 9), hepatic hydrothorax alone (n = 2), refractory ascites and hydrothorax (n = 1), gastrointestinal bleeding alone (n = 8), gastrointestinal bleeding and ascites (n = 3). RESULTS: Of these 23 attempted TIPS procedure patients, 21 patients had technically successful TIPS procedures. A total of 29 out of 32 TIPS procedures including revisions were successful in 21 patients with a mean age of 72.1 years (range 65-82 years). Three of the procedures were unsuccessful attempts at TIPS and 8 procedures were successful revisions of our existing TIPS. Sixteen of 21 patients who underwent successful TIPS (excluding 5 patients lost to follow-up) were followed for a mean of 14.7 mo. Ascites and/or hydrothorax was controlled following technically successful procedures in 12 of 13 patients. Bleeding was controlled following technically successful procedures in 10 out of 11 patients. CONCLUSION: We have demonstrated that TIPS is an effective procedure to control refractory complications of portal hypertension in elderly patients. PMID:22400084

  12. Sarcopenia Is Risk Factor for Development of Hepatic Encephalopathy After Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardelli, Silvia; Lattanzi, Barbara; Torrisi, Sabrina; Greco, Francesca; Farcomeni, Alessio; Gioia, Stefania; Merli, Manuela; Riggio, Oliviero

    2017-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is an important complication in patients with cirrhosis who received transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS). We investigated whether a decrease in muscle mass was associated independently with the occurrence of HE after TIPS. We performed a prospective study of 46 consecutive patients with cirrhosis (mean age, 58.6 ± 9.1 y; mean model for end-stage liver disease score, 11.3 ± 3.3; mean Child-Pugh score, 7.6 ± 1.5) who received TIPS from January 2013 through December 2014 at a tertiary center in Rome, Italy. All patients underwent computed tomography analysis at the level of the third lumbar vertebrae to determine the skeletal muscle index; sarcopenia was defined by sex-specific cut-off values. We estimated the incidence of the first episode of HE after TIPS, taking into account the competing risk nature of the data (death or liver transplantation). Twenty-six patients (57%) were found to have sarcopenia. Twenty-one patients (46%) developed overt HE in the 7 ± 9 months after TIPS placement; all of these patients were sarcopenic, according to the skeletal muscle index. Of the 25 patients without HE after TIPS, only 5 had sarcopenia. In multivariate analysis, model for end-stage liver disease score (subdistribution hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.34; P = .043) and sarcopenia (subdistribution hazard ratio, 31.3; 95% confidence interval, 4.5-218.07; P Sarcopenia should be considered in selecting patients for TIPS therapy. Nutritional status should be evaluated in patients with sarcopenia before TIPS placement, which might reduce the incidence of HE. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jonathan K.; Al-Tariq, Quazi Z.; Zaw, Taryar M.; Raman, Steven S.; Lu, David S.K.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo assess radiofrequency (RF) ablation efficacy, as well as the patency of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPSs), in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Materials and MethodsRetrospective database review of patients with pre-existing TIPS undergoing RF ablation of HCC was conducted over a 159-month period ending in November 2013. TIPS patency pre- and post-RF ablation was assessed by ultrasound, angiography, and/or contrast-enhanced CT or MRI. Patient demographics and immediate post-RF ablation outcomes and complications were also reviewed.Results19 patients with 21 lesions undergoing 25 RF ablation sessions were included. Child-Pugh class A, B, and C scores were seen in 1, 13, and 5 patients, respectively. Eleven patients (58 %) ultimately underwent liver transplantation. Immediate technical success was seen in all ablation sessions without residual tumor enhancement (100 %). No patients (0 %) suffered liver failure within 1 month of ablation. Pre-ablation TIPS patency was demonstrated in 22/25 sessions (88 %). Of 22 cases with patent TIPS prior to ablation, post-ablation patency was demonstrated in 22/22 (100 %) at immediate post-ablation imaging and in 21/22 (95 %) at last follow-up (1 patient was incidentally noted to have occlusion 31 months later). No immediate complications were observed.ConclusionAblation efficacy was similar to the cited literature values for patients without TIPS. Furthermore, TIPS patency was preserved in the majority of cases. Patients with both portal hypertension and HCC are not uncommonly encountered, and a pre-existing TIPS does not appear to be a definite contraindication for RF ablation

  14. Three-dimensional Image Fusion Guidance for Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacher, Vania; Petit, Arthur; Derbel, Haytham; Novelli, Luigi; Vitellius, Manuel; Ridouani, Fourat; Luciani, Alain; Rahmouni, Alain; Duvoux, Christophe; Salloum, Chady; Chiaradia, Mélanie; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2017-11-01

    To assess the safety, feasibility and effectiveness of image fusion guidance with pre-procedural portal phase computed tomography with intraprocedural fluoroscopy for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement. All consecutive cirrhotic patients presenting at our interventional unit for TIPS creation from January 2015 to January 2016 were prospectively enrolled. Procedures were performed under general anesthesia in an interventional suite equipped with flat panel detector, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and image fusion technique. All TIPSs were placed under image fusion guidance. After hepatic vein catheterization, an unenhanced CBCT acquisition was performed and co-registered with the pre-procedural portal phase CT images. A virtual path between hepatic vein and portal branch was made using the virtual needle path trajectory software. Subsequently, the 3D virtual path was overlaid on 2D fluoroscopy for guidance during portal branch cannulation. Safety, feasibility, effectiveness and per-procedural data were evaluated. Sixteen patients (12 males; median age 56 years) were included. Procedures were technically feasible in 15 of the 16 patients (94%). One procedure was aborted due to hepatic vein catheterization failure related to severe liver distortion. No periprocedural complications occurred within 48 h of the procedure. The median dose-area product was 91 Gy cm 2 , fluoroscopy time 15 min, procedure time 40 min and contrast media consumption 65 mL. Clinical benefit of the TIPS placement was observed in nine patients (56%). This study suggests that 3D image fusion guidance for TIPS is feasible, safe and effective. By identifying virtual needle path, CBCT enables real-time multiplanar guidance and may facilitate TIPS placement.

  15. Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jonathan K., E-mail: jonathan.park09@gmail.com [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology (United States); Al-Tariq, Quazi Z., E-mail: qat200@gmail.com [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States); Zaw, Taryar M., E-mail: taryar.zaw@gmail.com; Raman, Steven S., E-mail: sraman@mednet.ucla.edu; Lu, David S.K., E-mail: dlu@mednet.ucla.edu [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo assess radiofrequency (RF) ablation efficacy, as well as the patency of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPSs), in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Materials and MethodsRetrospective database review of patients with pre-existing TIPS undergoing RF ablation of HCC was conducted over a 159-month period ending in November 2013. TIPS patency pre- and post-RF ablation was assessed by ultrasound, angiography, and/or contrast-enhanced CT or MRI. Patient demographics and immediate post-RF ablation outcomes and complications were also reviewed.Results19 patients with 21 lesions undergoing 25 RF ablation sessions were included. Child-Pugh class A, B, and C scores were seen in 1, 13, and 5 patients, respectively. Eleven patients (58 %) ultimately underwent liver transplantation. Immediate technical success was seen in all ablation sessions without residual tumor enhancement (100 %). No patients (0 %) suffered liver failure within 1 month of ablation. Pre-ablation TIPS patency was demonstrated in 22/25 sessions (88 %). Of 22 cases with patent TIPS prior to ablation, post-ablation patency was demonstrated in 22/22 (100 %) at immediate post-ablation imaging and in 21/22 (95 %) at last follow-up (1 patient was incidentally noted to have occlusion 31 months later). No immediate complications were observed.ConclusionAblation efficacy was similar to the cited literature values for patients without TIPS. Furthermore, TIPS patency was preserved in the majority of cases. Patients with both portal hypertension and HCC are not uncommonly encountered, and a pre-existing TIPS does not appear to be a definite contraindication for RF ablation.

  16. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt before Abdominal Surgery in Cirrhotic Patients: A Retrospective, Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Vinet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery in cirrhotic patients is associated with high morbidity and mortality related to portal hypertension and liver insufficiency. Therefore, preoperative portal decompression is a logical approach to facilitate abdominal surgery and hopefully to improve postoperative survival. The present study evaluated the clinical outcomes of 18 patients (mean age 58 years with cirrhosis (seven alcoholics and 11 nonalcoholics who underwent transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS placement before antrectomy (n=5, colectomy (n=10, small-bowel resection (n=1, pancreatectomy (n=1 and nephrectomy (n=1. TIPS was performed a mean (± SD of 72±21 days before surgery and induced a marked mean decrease in portohepatic gradient from 21.4±3.9 mmHg to 8.4±3.4 mmHg. Cirrhotic patients (n=17 who underwent elective abdominal surgery without preoperative TIPS placement were used as the control group. Both groups were matched for age, etiology of cirrhosis, indications for surgery, type of surgery and coagulation parameters. The mean Pugh score was significantly higher in the TIPS group (7.7 versus 6.2. No significant differences were observed for operative blood loss, postoperative complications, duration of hospitalization and one-month (83% versus 88% or one-year (54% versus 63% cumulative survival rate. Analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model showed that neither TIPS placement nor preoperative Pugh score were independent predictors for survival. The present study suggests that preoperative TIPS placement does not improve postoperative evolution after abdominal surgery in cirrhotic patients with good or moderately impaired liver function.

  17. Three-Dimensional Path Planning Software-Assisted Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt: A Technical Modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsauo, Jiaywei, E-mail: 80732059@qq.com; Luo, Xuefeng, E-mail: luobo-913@126.com [West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Institute of Interventional Radiology (China); Ye, Linchao, E-mail: linchao.ye@siemens.com [Siemens Ltd, Healthcare Sector (China); Li, Xiao, E-mail: simonlixiao@gmail.com [West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Institute of Interventional Radiology (China)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to report our results with a modified technique of three-dimensional (3D) path planning software assisted transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS).Methods3D path planning software was recently developed to facilitate TIPS creation by using two carbon dioxide portograms acquired at least 20° apart to generate a 3D path for overlay needle guidance. However, one shortcoming is that puncturing along the overlay would be technically impossible if the angle of the liver access set and the angle of the 3D path are not the same. To solve this problem, a prototype 3D path planning software was fitted with a utility to calculate the angle of the 3D path. Using this, we modified the angle of the liver access set accordingly during the procedure in ten patients.ResultsFailure for technical reasons occurred in three patients (unsuccessful wedged hepatic venography in two cases, software technical failure in one case). The procedure was successful in the remaining seven patients, and only one needle pass was required to obtain portal vein access in each case. The course of puncture was comparable to the 3D path in all patients. No procedure-related complication occurred following the procedures.ConclusionsAdjusting the angle of the liver access set to match the angle of the 3D path determined by the software appears to be a favorable modification to the technique of 3D path planning software assisted TIPS.

  18. Portal hypertensive enteropathy diagnosed by capsule endoscopy and demonstration of the ileal changes after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carella Alessandra

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Recent data suggest that mucosal abnormalities can occur even in the duodenum, jejunum, and distal ileum of cirrhosis patients. We present a case of portal hypertensive enteropathy in a cirrhosis patient shown by capsule endoscopy and the effect of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt on the ileal pictures. Case presentation An 83-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our hospital for anemia and a positive fecal occult blood test. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed small varices without bleeding signs and hypertensive gastropathy. Colonoscopy was negative. To rule out any other cause of bleeding, capsule endoscopy was performed; capsule endoscopy revealed severe hyperemia of the jejunum-ileal mucosa with active bleeding. Because of the persistence of anemia and the frequent blood transfusions, not responding to β-blocker drugs or octreotide infusion, a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was performed. Anemia improved quickly after the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and no further blood transfusion was necessary in the follow-up. The patient developed portal encephalopathy two months later and was readmitted to our department. We repeated the capsule endoscopy that showed a significant improvement of the gastric and ileal mucosa without any signs of bleeding. Conclusion Hypertensive enteropathy is a rare condition, but it seems more common with the introduction of capsule endoscopy in clinical practice. This case shows that the jejunum can be a source of bleeding in cirrhosis patients, and this is the first demonstration of its resolution after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement.

  19. Liver perfusion scintigraphy prior to and after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) in patients with portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willkomm, P.; Schomburg, A.; Reichmann, K.; Bangard, M.; Overbeck, B.; Biersack, H.J.; Brensing, K.A.; Sauerbruch, T.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: This investigation was performed to compare the hemodynamic results of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, a new interventional treatment for portal hypertension, with those observed after the established surgical shunt interventions. Methods: We examined 22 patients with portal hypertension due to liver cirrhosis before and after elective TIPS by liver perfusion scintigraphy. The relative portal perfusion was determined before and after the shunt procedure. Additionally, we measured the portal pressure gradient (PPG: Portal-central venous pressure, mmHg). Results: Prior to TIPS, the relative portal perfusion was significantly reduced to 22±9.1%. After the intervention we calculated values of 23.1±10.7% in the TIPS-group (p=0.67; not significant). In spite of unchanged portal perfusion, the portal pressure was significantly (p [de

  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt for Treatment of Cirrhosis-related Chylothorax and Chylous Ascites: Single-institution Retrospective Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikolski, Steven G., E-mail: skikolski@ucsd.edu; Aryafar, Hamed, E-mail: haryafar@ucsd.edu; Rose, Steven C., E-mail: scrose@ucsd.edu [University of California San Diego Health Sciences, Department of Radiology (United States); Roberts, Anne C., E-mail: acroberts@ucsd.edu [University of California San Diego Health Sciences, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States); Kinney, Thomas B., E-mail: tbkinney@ucsd.edu [University of California San Diego Health Sciences, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo investigate the efficacy and safety of the use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation to treat cirrhosis-related chylous collections (chylothorax and chylous ascites).MethodsWe retrospectively reviewed data from four patients treated for refractory cirrhosis-related chylous collections with TIPS at our institution over an 8 year period.ResultsOne patient had chylothorax, and three patients had concomitant chylothorax and chylous ascites. There were no major complications, and the only procedure-related complications occurred in two patients who had mild, treatable hepatic encephalopathy. All patients had improvement as defined by decreased need for thoracentesis or paracentesis, with postprocedure follow-up ranging from 19 to 491 days.ConclusionTIPS is a safe procedure that is effective in the treatment of cirrhosis-related chylous collections.

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt, Mechanical Aspiration Thrombectomy, and Direct Thrombolysis in the Treatment of Acute Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G.; Bovio, Giulio; Dahamane, M'Hamed; Centanaro, Monica

    2007-01-01

    A patient was admitted because of severe abdominal pain, anorexia, and intestinal bleeding. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography demonstrated acute portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (PSMVT). The patient was treated percutaneously with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS), mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis, and 1 week after the procedure, complete patency of the portal and superior mesenteric veins was demonstrated. TIPS, mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis together are promising endovascular techniques for the treatment of symptomatic acute PSMVT

  2. Long-Term Follow-Up After Successful Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement in a Pediatric Patient with Budd-Chiari Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Szejnfeld, Denis; Moreira, Airton Mota; Gibelli, Nelson; Gregorio, Miguel Angel De; Tannuri, Uenis; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2008-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation is the standard of care in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS), and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) has become an important adjunct procedure while the patient is waiting for a liver. No long-term follow up of TIPS in BCS patients has been published in children. We report successful 10-year follow-up of a child with BCS and iatrogenic TIPS dysfunction caused by oral contraceptive use.

  3. Role of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in the management of severe complications of portal hypertension in idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissonnette, Julien; Garcia-Pagán, Juan Carlos; Albillos, Agustín; Turon, Fanny; Ferreira, Carlos; Tellez, Luis; Nault, Jean-Charles; Carbonell, Nicolas; Cervoni, Jean-Paul; Abdel Rehim, Mohamed; Sibert, Annie; Bouchard, Louis; Perreault, Pierre; Trebicka, Jonel; Trottier-Tellier, Félix; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Valla, Dominique-Charles; Plessier, Aurélie

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by portal hypertension in the absence of cirrhosis. The efficacy and safety of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in this population are unknown. The charts of patients with idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension undergoing TIPS in seven centers between 2000 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Forty-one patients were included. Indications for TIPS were recurrent variceal bleeding (n = 25) and refractory ascites (n = 16). Patients were categorized according to the presence (n = 27) or absence (n = 14) of significant extrahepatic comorbidities. Associated conditions were hematologic, prothrombotic, neoplastic, immune, and exposure to toxins. During follow-up (mean 27 ± 29 months), variceal rebleeding occurred in 7/25 (28%), including three with early thrombosis of the stent. Post-TIPS overt hepatic encephalopathy was present in 14 patients (34%). Eleven patients died, five due the liver disease or complications of the procedure and six because of the associated comorbidities. The procedure was complicated by hemoperitoneum in four patients (10%), which was fatal in one case. Serum creatinine (P = 0.005), ascites as indication for TIPS (P = 0.04), and the presence of significant comorbidities (P = 0.01) at the time of the procedure were associated with death. Mortality was higher in patients with significant comorbidities and creatinine ≥100 μmol/L (P portal hypertension who have normal kidney function or do not have severe extrahepatic conditions, TIPS is an excellent option to treat severe complications of portal hypertension. (Hepatology 2016;64:224-231). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  4. Congenital intrahepatic arterioportal and portosystemic venous fistulae with jejunal arteriovenous malformation depicted on multislice spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Eun Jin; Goo, Hyun Woo; Yoon, Chong Hyun; Kim, Seong-Chul

    2004-01-01

    We report a symptomatic infant with very rare congenital arterioportal and portosystemic venous fistulae in the liver. Multislice CT after partial transcatheter embolisation revealed not only the complicated vascular architecture of the lesion, but also an incidental jejunal arteriovenous malformation which explained the patient's melena. The patient underwent ligation of the hepatic artery and resection of the jejunal arteriovenous malformation. Postoperative multislice CT clearly demonstrated the success of the treatment. (orig.)

  5. Trans-jugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt placement for refractory ascites: a 'real-world' UK health economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Matthew J; Guha, Neil; Stedman, Brian; Hacking, Nigel; Wright, Mark

    2013-07-01

    To assess the benefit of trans-jugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt (TIPS) placement for refractory ascites. A retrospective observational study of all patients undergoing TIPS for refractory ascites in our hospital between 2003 and 2012. Secondary care. Cirrhotic patients with refractory ascites. We examined direct real-world (National Health Service) health related costs in the year before and after the TIPS procedure took place. Data were collected relating to the need for reintervention and hepatic encephalopathy. Data were available for 24 patients who underwent TIPS for refractory ascites (86% of eligible patients). TIPS was technically successful in all cases. Mean number of bed days in the year prior to TIPS was 30.3 and 14.3 in the year following (p=0.005). No patient had ascites at the end of the year after the TIPS with less requirement for paracentesis over the course of the year (p<0.001). Mean reduction in cost was £2759 per patient. TIPS was especially cost-effective in patients requiring between 6 and 12 drains per year with a mean saving of £9204 per patient. TIPS is both a clinically effective and economically advantageous therapeutic option for selected patients with refractory ascites.

  6. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in patients with active variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension and portal vein thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyun Woong; Ryeom, Hun Kyu; Lee, Sang Kwon; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Young Sun; Suh, Kyung Jin; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Yong Joo

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in patients with active variceal bleeding due to liver cirrhosis and pre-existing portal vein thrombosis. Of a total of 123 patients who underwent TIPS, 14 patients with intractable variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension and portal vein thrombosis were included in this study. Noncavernomatous portal vein occlusion was seen in eight patients, and complete portal vein occlusion with cavernomatous trans-formation in six. For all patients, the methods used for TIPS placement were the same as those used in patients with patents portal veins. In seven of eight patients with noncavernomatous occlusion, right hepatic vein-right portal vein shunting was performed; in one with knoncavernomatous occlusion, a shunt was created between the right hepatic and left portal vein. In five of six patients with cavernomatous occlusion, the right hepatic and main portal vein were connected via a collateral vein. The procedures were technically successful in all except one patient. Immediate hemostatis was achieved after all technically successful procedures, and no significant complications were encountered. Minor complications were noted in six patients (three biliary tree punctures, one transperitoneal puncture, one splenic vein perforation, one hepatic subcapsular hematoma). TIPS is a technically feasible and hemodynamically effective procedure, even in patients with active variceal bleeding due to cirrhosis and complete portal vein occlusion

  7. Bleeding ectopic duodenal varix: use of a new microvascular plug (MVP) device along with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Richa; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Bee, Erik; Karagozian, Raffi

    2017-08-16

    Ectopic varices (ECV) occur along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract outside the common variceal sites and represent 2%-5% of all GI variceal bleeds with mortality rates up to 40%. Management is challenging because of inaccessibility and increased risk of rebleeding. We report what is to our knowledge the first clinical use of a new microvascular plug (MVP) with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPSS) for a bleeding duodenal varix (DV). A 68-year-old man presented with melena. Endoscopy demonstrated a grade II varix in the second part of the duodenum with red wale sign. TIPSS was performed and portogram revealed a single DV. Poststent placement venogram revealed a persistent varix and hence a 5-7 mm MVP was deployed. Subsequent imaging showed cessation of blood through the DV. The patient had no further bleeding. TIPSS with embolisation is an effective treatment for ECV. This MVP offers advantages due to its size and compatibility and can be redeployed in case of suboptimal placement. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Three-dimensional C-arm CT-guided transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement: Feasibility, technical success and procedural time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Groezinger, Gerd; Maurer, Michael; Grosse, Ulrich; Horger, Marius; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Syha, Roland [University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Lauer, Ulrich M. [University of Tuebingen, Internal Medicine I, Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious disease, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Establishment of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) constitutes a standard procedure in patients suffering from portal hypertension. The most difficult step in TIPS placement is blind puncture of the portal vein. This study aimed to evaluate three-dimensional mapping of portal vein branches and targeted puncture of the portal vein. Twelve consecutive patients suffering from refractory ascites by liver cirrhosis were included in this retrospective study to evaluate feasibility, technical success and procedural time of C-arm CT-targeted puncture of the portal vein. As a control, 22 patients receiving TIPS placement with fluoroscopy-guided blind puncture were included to compare procedural time. Technical success could be obtained in 100 % of the study group (targeted puncture) and in 95.5 % of the control group (blind puncture). Appropriate, three-dimensional C-arm CT-guided mapping of the portal vein branches could be achieved in all patients. The median number of punctures in the C-arm CT-guided study group was 2 ± 1.3 punctures. Procedural time was significantly lower in the study group (14.8 ± 8.2 min) compared to the control group (32.6 ± 22.7 min) (p = 0.02). C-arm CT-guided portal vein mapping is technically feasible and a promising tool for TIPS placement resulting in a significant reduction of procedural time. (orig.)

  9. Predictors of Shunt Dysfunction and Overall Survival in Patients with Variceal Bleeding Treated with Transjugular Portosystemic Shunt Creation Using the Fluency Stent Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yue-Meng; Li, Yu-Hua; Xu, Ying; Wu, Hua-Mei; Li, Ying-Chun; Wu, Xi-Nan; Yang, Jin-Hui

    2018-01-16

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is an established method for portal hypertension. This study was to investigate the long-term safety, technical success, and patency of TIPS, and to determine the risk factors and clinical impacts of shunt dysfunction. A total of 154 consecutive patients undergoing embolotherapy of gastric coronary vein and/or short gastric vein and TIPS creation were prospectively studied. Follow-up data included technical success, patency and revision of TIPS, and overall survival of patients. During the study, the primary and secondary technical success rates were 98.7% and 100%, respectively. Sixty-three patients developed shunt dysfunction, 30 with shunt stenosis and 33 with shunt occlusion. The cumulative 60-month primary, primary assisted, and secondary patency rates were 19.6%, 43.0%, and 93.4%, respectively. The cumulative 60-month overall survival rates were similar between the TIPS dysfunction group and the TIPS non-dysfunction group (68.6% vs. 58.6%, P = .096). Baseline portal vein thrombosis (P value of 8.5 had 77.8% sensitivity and 64.8% specificity. The long-term safety, technical success, and patency of TIPS were good; baseline portal vein thrombosis, use of bare stents, and PPG were significantly associated with shunt dysfunction; shunt dysfunction has little impact on patients' long-term survival because of high secondary patency rates. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration for gastric variceal bleeding: its feasibility compared with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Ho; Yoon, Chang Jin; Park, Jae Hyung; Chung, Jin Wook; Kwon, Jong Won [Seoul Natioonal University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Guk Myung [Cheju National University College of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    To assess the feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) in active gastric variceal bleeding, and to compare the findings with those of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Twenty-one patients with active gastric variceal bleeding due to liver cirrhosis were referred for radiological intervention. In 15 patients, contrast-enhanced CT scans demonstrated gastrorenal shunt, and the remaining six (Group 1) underwent TIPS. Seven of the 15 with gastrorenal shunt (Group 2) were also treated with TIPS, and the other eight (Group 3) underwent BRTO. All patients were followed up for 6 to 21 (mean, 14.4) months. For statistical inter-group comparison of immediate hemostasis, rebleeding and encephalopathy, Fisher's exact test was used. Changes in the Child-Pugh score before and after each procedure in each group were statistically analyzed by means of Wilcoxon's signed rank test. One patient in Group 1 died of sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and persistent bleeding three days after TIPS, while the remaining 20 survived the procedure with immediate hemostasis. Hepatic encephalopathy developed in four patients (one in Group 1, three in Group 2, and none in Group 3); one, in Group 2, died while in an hepatic coma 19 months after TIPS. Rebleeding occurred in one patient, also in Group 2. Except for transient fever in two Group-3 patients, no procedure-related complication occurred. In terms of immediate hemostasis, rebleeding and encephalopathy, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups (p > 0.05). In Group 3, the Child-Pugh score showed a significant decrease after the procedure (p = 0.02). BRTO can effectively control active gastric variceal bleeding, and because of immediate hemostasis, the absence of rebleeding, and improved liver function, is a good alternative to TIPS in patients in whom such bleeding, accompanied by gastrorenal shunt, occurs.

  11. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration for gastric variceal bleeding: its feasibility compared with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Ho; Yoon, Chang Jin; Park, Jae Hyung; Chung, Jin Wook; Kwon, Jong Won; Choi, Guk Myung

    2003-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) in active gastric variceal bleeding, and to compare the findings with those of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Twenty-one patients with active gastric variceal bleeding due to liver cirrhosis were referred for radiological intervention. In 15 patients, contrast-enhanced CT scans demonstrated gastrorenal shunt, and the remaining six (Group 1) underwent TIPS. Seven of the 15 with gastrorenal shunt (Group 2) were also treated with TIPS, and the other eight (Group 3) underwent BRTO. All patients were followed up for 6 to 21 (mean, 14.4) months. For statistical inter-group comparison of immediate hemostasis, rebleeding and encephalopathy, Fisher's exact test was used. Changes in the Child-Pugh score before and after each procedure in each group were statistically analyzed by means of Wilcoxon's signed rank test. One patient in Group 1 died of sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and persistent bleeding three days after TIPS, while the remaining 20 survived the procedure with immediate hemostasis. Hepatic encephalopathy developed in four patients (one in Group 1, three in Group 2, and none in Group 3); one, in Group 2, died while in an hepatic coma 19 months after TIPS. Rebleeding occurred in one patient, also in Group 2. Except for transient fever in two Group-3 patients, no procedure-related complication occurred. In terms of immediate hemostasis, rebleeding and encephalopathy, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups (p > 0.05). In Group 3, the Child-Pugh score showed a significant decrease after the procedure (p = 0.02). BRTO can effectively control active gastric variceal bleeding, and because of immediate hemostasis, the absence of rebleeding, and improved liver function, is a good alternative to TIPS in patients in whom such bleeding, accompanied by gastrorenal shunt, occurs

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt for Portal Hypertension in Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Bin; Li, Kai; Dong, Xiaoqun; Liu, Fu-Quan

    2017-09-01

    In patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), limited therapeutic options are available for portal hypertension resulted from portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). We aimed to determine safety and efficacy of TIPS for treatment of symptomatic portal hypertension in HCC with PVTT. We evaluated clinical characteristics of 95 patients with HCC and PVTT out of 992 patients who underwent TIPS. The primary endpoints included success rate, procedural mortality, serious complications, decrease in portosystemic pressure gradient, and symptom relief. The secondary endpoints included recurrence of portal hypertension, overall survival, adverse events related to treatments for HCC, and quality of life measured by Karnofsky Performance Status Scale (KPS). Success rate of TIPS was 95.8% (91/95), with procedural mortality of 1.1%. Serious complications related to TIPS procedure occurred in 2.1% (2/95) of patients. The symptoms of portal hypertension were well relieved. Variceal bleeding was successfully controlled and terminated in 100% of patients, with a recurrence rate of 39.2% in 12 months. Refractory ascites/hydrothorax was controlled partially or completely in 92.9% of patients during 1 month after TIPS, with a recurrence rate of 17.9% in 12 months. Survival rate at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months was 75.8, 52.7, 26.4, and 3.3%, respectively. No unexpected adverse event related to treatments for HCC was observed. The KPS score was 49 ± 4.5 and 63 ± 4.7 before and 1 month after TIPS, respectively (p portal hypertension in HCC with PVTT.

  13. Clinical analysis of long-term outcomes of re-intervention of transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fuquan; Yue Zhendong; Zhao Hongwei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety,effectiveness and clinical factors of re-intervention of transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt (TIPS). Methods: A retrospective study of safety and long-term outcomes of TIPS was made in 771 patients from August 1994 to August 2010. The 625 patients had follow-up data.The patients who received TIPS once, twice, and more than twice were divided into group 1, group 2 and group 3, respectively. Clinical symptoms, survival rate and restenosis rate of each group were analyzed. Clinical influencing factors of re-intervention effect were discussed. Results: The success rate of first intervention was 98.2% (757/771), the death rate was 0.7% (5/757) and severe complication rate was 2.5% (19/757). The success rate of re-intervention was 98.7% (457/463), no death and severe complications occurred. The restenosis rate in group 3 decreased significantly than group 1 (χ 2 =7.908, P<0.05) in the first year of TIPS. The restenosis rates in group 2 and group 3 were lower than group 1 from 2 to 5 years of TIPS (χ2 values were 27.046, 25.724, 37.002 and 19.046, respectively, P<0.05). The survival rate in group 3 was higher than group 1 (χ 2 =9.114, P<0.05)and group 2 was higher than group 1 (χ 2 =4.929, P<0.05) in the first year of TIPS, while there was no statistical difference between group 2 and group 3 (χ 2 =2.678, P>0.05). The patients in group 2 and group 3 also had higher survival rates than group 1 from 2 to 5 years of TIPS (χ 2 value were 41.314, 26.920, 13.692 and 6.713, respectively, P<0.05). 19.4% (79/406) of patients who received re-intervention had symptom recurrence and shunt stenosis or occlusion. 11.6% (47/406) of patients had symptom recurrence with portal hypertension signs, 62.8% (255/406) had shunt stenosis or occlusion with portal hypertension signs. Conclusions: Restenosis or occlusion of TIPS, symptom recurrence and portal hypertension signs were important factors for re-intervention. Re-intervention of TIPS was

  14. TIPS - anastomose portossistêmica intra-hepática transjugular. Revisão TIPS - transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson CARREIRO

    2001-01-01

    -expansiva.At the present time several therapeutic options are used for the treatment of bleeding esophageal varices in patients with portal hypertension. We will review the main medical publications on transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS, a procedure seldom used among us. TIPS works as a portocaval side-to-side shunt and decreases the risk of esophageal bleeding through lowering of the portal system pressure and a decrease of the portal hepatic pressure gradient. TIPS consists in the percutaneous insertion, through the internal jugular vein, of a metallic stent under fluoroscopic control in the hepatic parenchyma creating a true porta caval communication. There are several studies demonstrating the efficacy of TIPS, although only a few of them are randomized and control-matched to allow us to conclude that this procedure is safe, efficient and with a good cost benefit ratio. In this review, we search for the analysis of the TIPS utilization, its techniques, its major indications and complications. TIPS has been used in cases of gastroesophageal bleeding that has failed with pharmacologic or endoscopic treatment in patients Child-Pugh B and C. It can be used also as a bridge for liver transplantation. Others indications for TIPS are uncontrolled ascites, hepatic renal syndrome, and hepatic hydrotorax. The main early complications of TIPS using are related to the insertion site and hepatic encephalopathy and the stent occlusion is the chief late complication.

  15. Radiologic follow-up of the transjugular intrahepatic stent-shunt (TIPSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmann, H.J.; Noeldge, G.; Leutloff, U.; Radeleff, B.; Richter, G.M.

    2001-01-01

    The transjugular intrahepatic stent-shunt (TIPSS) is a well accepted minimal invasive therapy for complications of portal hypertension: recurrent variceal bleeding, refractory ascites and liver failure due to the Budd-Chiari syndrome. The high frequency of shunt stenoses and occlusions makes regular follow up examinations essential. Despite modern non invasive imaging methods direct portography still is the gold standard for shunt surveillance in TIPSS. Ultrasound is helpful to detect shunt dysfunction, but nevertheless its failure rate is considerable despite the use of contrast enhancers such as Levovist because of anatomic and physical limitations, particularly when TIPSS-tracts deep in the liver are present. Reintervention rates approach 90-100% after 24 months, with 100% in child's A patients with comparatively good liver function. However, a strict shunt surveillance program with early portography and reintervention when necessary guarantees high clinical success rates associated with very low rebleeding rates below 10%. Overall the secondary success rate is 80%. Secondary failures are mainly caused by lack of patient compliance during follow-up. In a subgroup of patients no shunt maturation is observed, requiring multiple shunt revisions. In cases of recurrent shunt occlusions an association with bile leaks is presumed. In selected cases patients with chronically recurrent shunt stenosis or occlusions may benefit from placement of TIPSS stent grafts. (orig.) [de

  16. Increase in hepatic arterial blood flow after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation and its potential predictive value of postprocedural encephalopathy and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, N H; Sasadeusz, K J; Seshadri, R; Chalasani, N; Shah, H; Johnson, M S; Namyslowski, J; Moresco, K P; Trerotola, S O

    2001-11-01

    To determine (i) whether there is a significant increase in hepatic artery blood flow (HABF) after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation and (ii) whether the extent of incremental increase in HABF is predictive of clinical outcome after TIPS creation. Prospective, nonrandomized, nonblinded duplex Doppler ultrasound (US) examinations were performed on 24 consecutive patients (19 men; Child Class A/B/C: 4/12/8, respectively) with a mean age of 52.8 years who were referred for TIPS creation for variceal bleeding. Peak hepatic artery velocity and vessel dimensions were used to calculate the hepatic arterial blood flow (HABF) before and after TIPS creation. Patients were clinically followed in the gastrohepatology clinic and TIPS US surveillance was performed at 1 and 3 months to assess shunt function. The extent of incremental increase in HABF was analyzed as a predictor of post-TIPS encephalopathy and/or death. The technical success rate of TIPS creation was 100%. The shunt diameters were either 10 mm (n = 11) or 12 mm (n = 13). TIPS resulted in a significant reduction in the portosystemic gradient from 24.3 mm Hg +/- 5.7 to 9.3 mm Hg +/- 2.9 (P creation, from 60.8 cm/sec +/- 26.7 to 121 cm/sec +/- 51.5 (P creation, new or worsened encephalopathy developed in five patients at 30 days and in an additional three at 90 days. They were all successfully managed medically. Three patients (12.5%) died within 30 days of the TIPS procedure. The extent of incremental increase in HABF after TIPS was variable and did not correlate with the development of 30-day and 90-day encephalopathy (P =.41 and P =.83, respectively) or 30-day mortality (P =.2). HABF increases significantly after TIPS but is not predictive of clinical outcome. The significance of the incremental increase is yet to be determined.

  17. Custom-made covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in an infant with trisomy 22 and biliary atresia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlapoutaki, Chrysanthi Emmanouil; Franchi-Abella, Stephanie; Pariente, Daniele; Habes, Dalila

    2009-01-01

    We report an 8-month-old girl with portal hypertension secondary to biliary atresia. The decision to treat with TIPS was made at the age of 8 months due to recurrent variceal bleeding. The procedure was carried out with a 6-mm bare stent due to her small size. Radiological follow-up with Doppler US showed gradual stenosis and finally occlusion of the stent 80 days after implantation. Revision was performed with placement of an additional 6-mm expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) stent-graft that had remained patent for 9 months, proving that in small children with a portal vein diameter less than 8 mm, the combination of a bare stent and stent-graft can provide excellent results. (orig.)

  18. Custom-made covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in an infant with trisomy 22 and biliary atresia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chlapoutaki, Chrysanthi Emmanouil; Franchi-Abella, Stephanie; Pariente, Daniele [Bicetre Hospital University Paris XI, Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Habes, Dalila [Bicetre Hospital University Paris XI, Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris, Pediatric Hepatology and National Reference Center for Biliary Atresia, Paris (France)

    2009-07-15

    We report an 8-month-old girl with portal hypertension secondary to biliary atresia. The decision to treat with TIPS was made at the age of 8 months due to recurrent variceal bleeding. The procedure was carried out with a 6-mm bare stent due to her small size. Radiological follow-up with Doppler US showed gradual stenosis and finally occlusion of the stent 80 days after implantation. Revision was performed with placement of an additional 6-mm expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) stent-graft that had remained patent for 9 months, proving that in small children with a portal vein diameter less than 8 mm, the combination of a bare stent and stent-graft can provide excellent results. (orig.)

  19. Trans-jugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt placement for refractory ascites: a ‘real-world’ UK health economic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Matthew J; Guha, Neil; Stedman, Brian; Hacking, Nigel; Wright, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the benefit of trans-jugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt (TIPS) placement for refractory ascites. Design A retrospective observational study of all patients undergoing TIPS for refractory ascites in our hospital between 2003 and 2012. Setting Secondary care. Patients Cirrhotic patients with refractory ascites. Main outcome measures We examined direct real-world (National Health Service) health related costs in the year before and after the TIPS procedure took place. Data were collected relating to the need for reintervention and hepatic encephalopathy. Results Data were available for 24 patients who underwent TIPS for refractory ascites (86% of eligible patients). TIPS was technically successful in all cases. Mean number of bed days in the year prior to TIPS was 30.3 and 14.3 in the year following (p=0.005). No patient had ascites at the end of the year after the TIPS with less requirement for paracentesis over the course of the year (p<0.001). Mean reduction in cost was £2759 per patient. TIPS was especially cost-effective in patients requiring between 6 and 12 drains per year with a mean saving of £9204 per patient. Conclusions TIPS is both a clinically effective and economically advantageous therapeutic option for selected patients with refractory ascites. PMID:28839725

  20. An Approach to Endovascular and Percutaneous Management of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) Dysfunction: A Pictorial Essay and Clinical Practice Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Keith, E-mail: keithjppereira@gmail.com; Baker, Reginald, E-mail: rbaker@med.miami.edu; Salsamendi, Jason; Doshi, Mehul; Kably, Issam; Bhatia, Shivank [Jackson Memorial Hospital/University of Miami Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) have evolved as an effective and durable nonsurgical option in the treatment of portal hypertension (PH). It has been shown to improve survival in decompensated cirrhosis and may also serve as a bridge to liver transplantation. In spite of the technical improvements in the procedure, problems occur with the shunt which jeopardizes effective treatment of the PH. Appropriate management is vital to ensure the longevity of the conduit. Shunt revision techniques include endovascular revision techniques and new shunt creation or, in the appropriate patients, alternative/rescue therapies. The ability of interventional radiologists to restore adequate TIPS function has enormous implications for quality of life with palliation, morbidity/mortality related to variceal bleeding and survival if transplant candidates can live long enough to receive a new liver. As such, it is imperative that these treatment strategies are understood and employed when these patients are encountered. In this review, the restoration of appropriate shunt function using various techniques will be discussed as they apply to a variety of clinical scenarios, based on literature. In addition, illustrative case examples highlighting our experience at an academic tertiary medical center will be included. It is the intent to have this document serve as a concise and informative reference to be used by those who may encounter patients with suboptimal functioning TIPS.

  1. An Approach to Endovascular and Percutaneous Management of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) Dysfunction: A Pictorial Essay and Clinical Practice Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Keith; Baker, Reginald; Salsamendi, Jason; Doshi, Mehul; Kably, Issam; Bhatia, Shivank

    2016-01-01

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) have evolved as an effective and durable nonsurgical option in the treatment of portal hypertension (PH). It has been shown to improve survival in decompensated cirrhosis and may also serve as a bridge to liver transplantation. In spite of the technical improvements in the procedure, problems occur with the shunt which jeopardizes effective treatment of the PH. Appropriate management is vital to ensure the longevity of the conduit. Shunt revision techniques include endovascular revision techniques and new shunt creation or, in the appropriate patients, alternative/rescue therapies. The ability of interventional radiologists to restore adequate TIPS function has enormous implications for quality of life with palliation, morbidity/mortality related to variceal bleeding and survival if transplant candidates can live long enough to receive a new liver. As such, it is imperative that these treatment strategies are understood and employed when these patients are encountered. In this review, the restoration of appropriate shunt function using various techniques will be discussed as they apply to a variety of clinical scenarios, based on literature. In addition, illustrative case examples highlighting our experience at an academic tertiary medical center will be included. It is the intent to have this document serve as a concise and informative reference to be used by those who may encounter patients with suboptimal functioning TIPS.

  2. An Approach to Endovascular and Percutaneous Management of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) Dysfunction: A Pictorial Essay and Clinical Practice Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Keith; Baker, Reginald; Salsamendi, Jason; Doshi, Mehul; Kably, Issam; Bhatia, Shivank

    2016-05-01

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) have evolved as an effective and durable nonsurgical option in the treatment of portal hypertension (PH). It has been shown to improve survival in decompensated cirrhosis and may also serve as a bridge to liver transplantation. In spite of the technical improvements in the procedure, problems occur with the shunt which jeopardizes effective treatment of the PH. Appropriate management is vital to ensure the longevity of the conduit. Shunt revision techniques include endovascular revision techniques and new shunt creation or, in the appropriate patients, alternative/rescue therapies. The ability of interventional radiologists to restore adequate TIPS function has enormous implications for quality of life with palliation, morbidity/mortality related to variceal bleeding and survival if transplant candidates can live long enough to receive a new liver. As such, it is imperative that these treatment strategies are understood and employed when these patients are encountered. In this review, the restoration of appropriate shunt function using various techniques will be discussed as they apply to a variety of clinical scenarios, based on literature. In addition, illustrative case examples highlighting our experience at an academic tertiary medical center will be included. It is the intent to have this document serve as a concise and informative reference to be used by those who may encounter patients with suboptimal functioning TIPS.

  3. Prediction of Mortality after Emergent Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement: Use of APACHE II, Child-Pugh and MELD Scores in Asian Patients with Refractory Variceal Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, Wen Sheng; Wu, Reng Hong; Lin, Ching Yih; Chen, Jyh Jou; Sheu, Ming Juen; Koay, Lok Beng; Lee, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if existing methods of grading liver function that have been developed in non-Asian patients with cirrhosis can be used to predict mortality in Asian patients treated for refractory variceal hemorrhage by the use of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure. Data for 107 consecutive patients who underwent an emergency TIPS procedure were retrospectively analyzed. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II), Child-Pugh and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores were calculated. Survival analyses were performed to evaluate the ability of the various models to predict 30-day, 60-day and 360-day mortality. The ability of stratified APACHE II, Child-Pugh, and MELD scores to predict survival was assessed by the use of Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test. No patient died during the TIPS procedure, but 82 patients died during the follow-up period. Thirty patients died within 30 days after the TIPS procedure; 37 patients died within 60 days and 53 patients died within 360 days. Univariate analysis indicated that hepatorenal syndrome, use of inotropic agents and mechanical ventilation were associated with elevated 30-day mortality (p 11 or an MELD score > 20 predicted increased risk of death at 30, 60 and 360 days (p 11 or an MELD score > 20 are predictive of mortality in Asian patients with refractory variceal hemorrhage treated with the TIPS procedure. An APACHE II score is not predictive of early mortality in this patient population

  4. Stent Recanalization of Chronic Portal Vein Occlusion in a Child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cwikiel, Wojciech; Solvig, Jan; Schroder, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy with a 21/2 year history of portal hypertension and repeated bleedings from esophageal varices, was referred for treatment. The 3.5-cm-long occlusion of the portal vein was passed and the channel created was stabilized with a balloon-expandable stent; a portosystemic stent-shunt was also created. The portosystemic shunt closed spontaneously within 1 month, while the recanalized segment of the portal vein remained open. The pressure gradient between the intrahepatic and extrahepatic portal vein branches dropped from 17 mmHg to 0 mmHg. The pressure in the portal vein dropped from 30 mmHg to 17 mmHg and the bleedings stopped. The next dilation of the stent was performed 12 months later due to an increased pressure gradient; the gastroesophageal varices disappeared completely. Further dilation of the stent was planned after 2, 4, and 6 years

  5. MELD Score as a Predictor of Early Death in Patients Undergoing Elective Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, Aaron; Ferral, Hector; Vasan, Rajiv; Postoak, Darren W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To Evaluate the MELD score as a predictor of 30-day mortality in patients undergoing elective TIPS procedures. Methods. This was a retrospective, IRB-approved study. The medical records of all patients who underwent a TIPS procedure between May 1, 1999 and June 1, 2003 in a single institution were reviewed. Patients who underwent elective TIPS were selected. Elective TIPS was performed in 119 patients with a mean age of 55.1 (± 9.6) years. The MELD and Child-Pugh scores before TIPS, etiology of cirrhosis, portosystemic gradients before and after TIPS, procedure time, and procedural complications were obtained from the medical records. The MELD and Child-Pugh scores before TIPS were compared between the survivor group (SG) and the early death (EDG) group. The early death rate was calculated for MELD score subgroups (1-10, 11-17, 18-24, and >24). Data were analyzed using the Fisher exact test, chi-square test and independent-sample t-test. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results. Technical success rate was 100%. The early death rate was 10.9% (13/119). The mean MELD scores before TIPS were 19.4 (± 5.9) (EDG) and 14 (± 4.2) (SG) (p = 0.025). The early death rate was highest in the pre-TIPS MELD > 24 subgroup. The Child-Pugh scores were 9.0 (± 1.6) (SG) and 9.8 ± 1.06 (EDG) (p 0.08). The mean portosystemic gradients before TIPS were 20.5 (± 7.7) mmHg (EDG) and 22.7 (± 7.3) (SG) (p > 1) and the mean portosystemic gradients after TIPS were 6.5 (± 3.5) (EDG) and 6.9 (± 2.4) (SG) (p > 1). The mean procedural times were 95.6 (± 8.4) min (EDG) and 89.2 (± 7.5) min (SG) (p > 1). No early death was attributed to a fatal complication during TIPS. Conclusion. The MELD score is useful in identifying patients at a higher risk of early death after an elective TIPS. On the basis of our results, we do not endorse elective TIPS in patients with MELD scores > 24

  6. Prediction of Mortality after Emergent Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement: Use of APACHE II, Child-Pugh and MELD Scores in Asian Patients with Refractory Variceal Hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzeng, Wen Sheng; Wu, Reng Hong; Lin, Ching Yih; Chen, Jyh Jou; Sheu, Ming Juen; Koay, Lok Beng; Lee, Chuan [Chi-Mei Foundation Medical Center, Tainan (China)

    2009-10-15

    This study was designed to determine if existing methods of grading liver function that have been developed in non-Asian patients with cirrhosis can be used to predict mortality in Asian patients treated for refractory variceal hemorrhage by the use of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure. Data for 107 consecutive patients who underwent an emergency TIPS procedure were retrospectively analyzed. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II), Child-Pugh and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores were calculated. Survival analyses were performed to evaluate the ability of the various models to predict 30-day, 60-day and 360-day mortality. The ability of stratified APACHE II, Child-Pugh, and MELD scores to predict survival was assessed by the use of Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test. No patient died during the TIPS procedure, but 82 patients died during the follow-up period. Thirty patients died within 30 days after the TIPS procedure; 37 patients died within 60 days and 53 patients died within 360 days. Univariate analysis indicated that hepatorenal syndrome, use of inotropic agents and mechanical ventilation were associated with elevated 30-day mortality (p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that a Child-Pugh score > 11 or an MELD score > 20 predicted increased risk of death at 30, 60 and 360 days (p < 0.05). APACHE II scores could only predict mortality at 360 days (p < 0.05). A Child-Pugh score > 11 or an MELD score > 20 are predictive of mortality in Asian patients with refractory variceal hemorrhage treated with the TIPS procedure. An APACHE II score is not predictive of early mortality in this patient population.

  7. Changes in cerebral blood flow after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt can help predict the development of hepatic encephalopathy: An arterial spin labeling MR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Gang [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); College of Civil Aviation, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); Zhang, Long Jiang [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); Wang, Ze [Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3900 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Qi, Rong Feng; Shi, Donghong [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); Wang, Li [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); College of Civil Aviation, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); Fan, Xinxin [Research Institute of General Surgery, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); Lu, Guang Ming, E-mail: kevinzhanglongjiang@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Background and purpose: Cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) are still unclear. Our aim is to assess the TIPS-induced CBF changes and their potential clinical significance using the arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: Nine cirrhotic patients underwent ASL 1–8 days before and 4–7 days after TIPS. CBF was calculated at each voxel and mean CBF values were computed in the whole brain, gray matter and white matter. Changes of CBFs before and after TIPS were compared by paired t-test. Results: Voxel-wise results showed CBF diffusely increased in patients after TIPS, but no region with significant decrease in CBF was found, nor was any significant mean CBF difference detected in the whole brain, gray matter and white matter. Six patients out of nine showed a global CBF increase of 9–39%; one patient presented a global CBF decrease of 6%; another two showed a global CBF decrease of 16% and 31% respectively. Follow-up studies showed that the two patients with greatly decreased global CBF suffered from multiple episodes of overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) after TIPS and one died of OHE. Conclusions: CBF derived from noninvasive ASL MRI could be used as a useful biomarker to predict the development of OHE through consecutively tracking CBF changes in patients with inserted TIPS. Increased CBFs in many cortical regions could be common effects of the TIPS procedure, while decreased global CBF following TIPS might indicate the development of OHE.

  8. Parâmetros dopplervelocimétricos na avaliação da perviedade da anastomose portossistêmica intra-hepática transjugular (TIPS Dopplerflowmetric patterns for evaluation of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt patency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Sergio Zafred Marcelino

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A anastomose portossistêmica intra-hepática transjugular (TIPS é um procedimento intervencionista minimamente invasivo realizado pela introdução de prótese metálica auto-expansível no parênquima hepático, via transjugular. Tem por objetivo tratar as complicações da hipertensão portal, principalmente a hemorragia digestiva alta e a ascite refratária. A estenose é complicação freqüente, embora o procedimento seja eficaz e com baixo índice de insucesso. O diagnóstico precoce da estenose é de fundamental importância, pois interfere no tipo de tratamento a ser realizado e o reaparecimento dos sintomas pode ser grave. O ultra-som Doppler é então utilizado para o seguimento dos pacientes portadores do TIPS, e vários parâmetros são descritos na literatura para o diagnóstico de estenose, como: as velocidades mínima e máxima no interior da prótese, a velocidade na veia porta, o gradiente de velocidade entre dois pontos da prótese, e outros. Infelizmente não há consenso sobre qual parâmetro ou conjunto de parâmetros é mais eficaz no diagnóstico, porque os protocolos de avaliação variam de instituição para instituição. Os autores realizaram uma revisão dos parâmetros de estenose descritos na literatura e de outros aspectos de fundamental importância na compreensão do procedimento, como as indicações, as contra-indicações e a fisiopatologia da estenose.Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS is a minimally invasive interventional procedure that consists of placement of an auto expandable metallic stent in the hepatic parenchyma via transjugular. It is used to treat the complications of portal hypertension, particularly digestive bleeding of gullet varices and refractory ascites. Although TIPS is an efficient procedure with low rate of failure some complications such as stenosis are frequent. Early diagnosis of stenosis is mandatory since it interferes with the type of treatment and the

  9. The transjugular portosystemic stent shunt (TIPSS) as an intervention in clinical complication of portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalhammer, A.; Jacobi, V.; Schwarz, W.; Balzer, J.; Abolmaali, N.; Vogl, T.J.

    2001-01-01

    Most frequent complications in patients with liver cirrhosis are due to portal hypertension. Beside ascites circumvent vessles formate with vasodilatation. Due to counterregulation a secondary hyperaldosteronism develops with release of vasocontrictive agents. If conservative and endoscopic methods fail, indication for building a portosystemic shunt is given. The TIPSS procedure is less invasive than the surgical method of Warren-Shunt, so the radiological intervention has replaced surgery. Reducing the portal pressure by the shunt, the clinical complications change for the better. Still problems are defined as hepatic encephalopathy and right ventricular heart failure. Regular follow up investigations have to be performed to detect complications in the shunt. Using regular clinical and radiological check up TIPSS is of clinical benefit with good long term results. (orig.) [de

  10. A Flexible Stent with Small Intestinal Submucosa Covering for Direct Intrahepatic Portocaval Shunt: Experimental Pilot Study in Swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niyyati, Mahtab; Petersen, Bryan D.; Pavcnik, Dusan; Uchida, Barry T.; Timmermans, Hans A.; Hiraki, Takao; Wu Renghong; Brountzos, Elias; Keller, Frederick S.; Roesch, Josef

    2005-01-01

    The suitability of the flexible sandwich Zilver stent-graft (SZSG) with a biologically active tissue layer (small intestinal submucosa) for creation of the intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided direct intrahepatic portocaval shunt (DIPS) was explored in six young swine in a search for a flexible system to replace the rigid polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) stent originally used by this group with limited success. The portal vein was punctured from the inferior vena cava through the caudate lobe of the liver using IVUS guidance. After balloon dilation of the puncture tract, DIPS was successfully created in all animals with use of an SZSG 9 mm in diameter and 6 cm or 8 cm long. Only one DIPS remained well patent at 14 days when the animal had to be killed because of encephalopathy. DIPS in the other five animals were found to be either severely stenosed (3 animals) or occluded (2 animals) at 4 weeks due to accelerated formation of neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) in the liver parenchymal portion of the shunt and superimposed thrombosis. The lack of high pressure in the portal system contributed to early endograft closure. The flexible stent and the covering fail badly. The reason for this could be due to either component. More work is required to find a reliable flexible system with long-term patency. Exploration of the IVUS-guided direct extrahepatic portocaval shunt is suggested

  11. Brain regional homogeneity changes following transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in cirrhotic patients support cerebral adaptability theory—A resting-state functional MRI study

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    Ni, Ling; Qi, Rongfeng [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhang, Long Jiang, E-mail: kevinzhlj@163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhong, Jianhui [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Zheng, Gang [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Wu, Xingjiang; Fan, Xinxin [Department of General Surgery, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Lu, Guang Ming, E-mail: cjr.luguangming@vip.163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The exact neuro-pathophysiological effect of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) on brain function remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the longitudinal brain activity changes in cirrhotic patients with TIPS insertion using resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) with regional homogeneity (ReHo) method. Methods: Fifteen cirrhotic patients without overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) planned for TIPS procedure and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Eleven of the 15 patients underwent repeated fMRI examinations at median 7-day following TIPS, 8 patients in median 3-month, and 7 patients in median 1-year follow-up duration, respectively. Regional homogeneity was calculated by the Kendall's coefficient of concordance (KCC) and compared between patients before TIPS and healthy controls with two-sample t test as well as pre-and post-TIPS patients with paired t test. Correlations between the pre- and post-TIPS changes of ReHo and the changes of venous blood ammonia level and number connection test type A (NCT-A)/digit symbol test (DST) scores were calculated by crossing subjects. Results: Compared with healthy controls, 15 cirrhotic patients before TIPS procedure showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes and increased ReHo in the bilateral caudate. Compared with the pre-TIPS patients, 11 post-TIPS patients in the median 7-day follow-up examinations demonstrated decreased ReHo in the medial frontal gyrus (MFG), superior parietal gyrus (SPG), middle/superior temporal gyrus (M/STG), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), caudate, and increased ReHo in the insula. Eight post-TIPS patients in the median 3-month follow-up examinations showed widespread decreased ReHo in the bilateral frontal and parietal lobes, ACC, caudate, and increased ReHo in the insula and precuneus/cuneus. In the median 1-year follow-up studies, seven post-TIPS patients displayed

  12. Brain regional homogeneity changes following transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in cirrhotic patients support cerebral adaptability theory—A resting-state functional MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, Ling; Qi, Rongfeng; Zhang, Long Jiang; Zhong, Jianhui; Zheng, Gang; Wu, Xingjiang; Fan, Xinxin; Lu, Guang Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The exact neuro-pathophysiological effect of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) on brain function remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the longitudinal brain activity changes in cirrhotic patients with TIPS insertion using resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) with regional homogeneity (ReHo) method. Methods: Fifteen cirrhotic patients without overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) planned for TIPS procedure and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Eleven of the 15 patients underwent repeated fMRI examinations at median 7-day following TIPS, 8 patients in median 3-month, and 7 patients in median 1-year follow-up duration, respectively. Regional homogeneity was calculated by the Kendall's coefficient of concordance (KCC) and compared between patients before TIPS and healthy controls with two-sample t test as well as pre-and post-TIPS patients with paired t test. Correlations between the pre- and post-TIPS changes of ReHo and the changes of venous blood ammonia level and number connection test type A (NCT-A)/digit symbol test (DST) scores were calculated by crossing subjects. Results: Compared with healthy controls, 15 cirrhotic patients before TIPS procedure showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes and increased ReHo in the bilateral caudate. Compared with the pre-TIPS patients, 11 post-TIPS patients in the median 7-day follow-up examinations demonstrated decreased ReHo in the medial frontal gyrus (MFG), superior parietal gyrus (SPG), middle/superior temporal gyrus (M/STG), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), caudate, and increased ReHo in the insula. Eight post-TIPS patients in the median 3-month follow-up examinations showed widespread decreased ReHo in the bilateral frontal and parietal lobes, ACC, caudate, and increased ReHo in the insula and precuneus/cuneus. In the median 1-year follow-up studies, seven post-TIPS patients displayed

  13. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that is used to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached to the scanner ...

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... bleeding resistant to traditional medical treatments. The greatest difference in performing TIPS in children is their tremendous ...

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    Full Text Available ... seen in adults, often as a result of chronic liver problems leading to cirrhosis (scarring of the ... is a concern, particularly in patients with poor kidney function. Any procedure ... with more advanced liver disease are at greater risk for worsening liver failure ...

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    Full Text Available ... from the liver into the veins of the spleen, stomach, lower esophagus, and intestines, causing enlarged vessels, ... hepatic artery, which may result in severe liver injury or bleeding that could require a transfusion or ...

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    Full Text Available ... cord. Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then listens for the returning echoes from ...

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    Full Text Available ... avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the stomach and esophagus in patients with ... stomach, lower esophagus, and intestines, causing enlarged vessels, bleeding and the accumulation of fluid in the chest ...

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    Full Text Available ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a physician with ... not responsible for the content contained on the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact ...

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    Full Text Available ... or bypass, without the risks that accompany open surgery. TIPS is a minimally invasive procedure that typically has a shorter recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect ...

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    Full Text Available ... any allergies, especially to local anesthetic medications, general anesthesia or to contrast materials containing iodine (sometimes referred ... this procedure while the patient is under general anesthesia, while some prefer conscious sedation for their patient. ...

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    Full Text Available ... an interventional radiology suite or occasionally in the operating room. Some interventional radiologists prefer performing this procedure ... thin, hollow plastic tube into the vessel. Using real time x-ray guidance, your doctor will then guide ...

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    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... causing enlarged vessels, bleeding and the accumulation of fluid in the chest or abdomen. This condition is ... cause severe bleeding. severe ascites (the accumulation of fluid in the abdomen) and/or hydrothorax (in the ...

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    Full Text Available ... to take in the morning. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You will be asked to wear a gown. Plan to stay overnight at the hospital for one or more ...

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    Full Text Available ... and patient consultation. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

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    Full Text Available ... in the chest or abdomen. This condition is most commonly seen in adults, often as a result ... minimally invasive procedures such as a TIPS are most often performed by a specially trained interventional radiologist ...

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    Full Text Available ... open. Patients who typically need a TIPS have portal hypertension , meaning they have increased pressure in the portal ... problems leading to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are ...

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    Full Text Available ... complex and lengthy procedures requiring extended fluoroscopy use) death (rare) top of page What are the limitations ... filtered out by the liver. The TIPS may cause too much of these substances to bypass the ...

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ... a video display screen that looks like a computer or television monitor. The image is created based ...

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    Full Text Available ... anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or blood thinners several days prior to your procedure and instructed to not eat or drink anything after midnight the night before. Your doctor will tell you which medication ...

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... physician will numb an area just above your right collarbone with a local anesthetic . A very small ...

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    Full Text Available ... Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to radiation. ... into a vein in your hand or arm so that sedative medication can be given intravenously. Moderate ...

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... should always inform their physician and x-ray technologist if there is any possibility that they are ... and pulse during the procedure. A nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) line into a ...

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    Full Text Available ... based on the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that ... area of your body where the catheter is to be inserted will be sterilized and covered ... an area just above your right collarbone with a local anesthetic . ...

  3. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... hollow plastic tube into the vessel. Using real time x-ray guidance, your doctor will then guide the catheter toward the liver and into one of the hepatic veins. Pressures are measured in the hepatic vein and right heart to confirm ...

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    Full Text Available ... The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image is immediately visible ... the hepatic vein to identify the portal venous system. Access is then gained from the hepatic vein ...

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    Full Text Available ... then placed in this tunnel to keep the pathway open. Patients who typically need a TIPS have ... and stomach. A TIPS procedure involves creating a pathway through the liver that connects the portal vein ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... time x-ray guidance, your doctor will then guide the catheter toward the liver and into one of the hepatic veins. Pressures are measured in the hepatic vein and right heart to confirm the diagnosis of portal hypertension, and also to determine the severity of the ...

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    Full Text Available ... body tissue through which the sound travels. A small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to travel from the transducer to the examined area within the body and then back again. Ultrasound ...

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    Full Text Available ... and/or hydrothorax (in the chest). Budd-Chiari syndrome , a blockage in one or more veins that ... intentionally to solve the problem. Although extremely rare, children may also require a TIPS procedure. TIPS in ...

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    Full Text Available ... advised to stop taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or blood thinners several days prior to ... you to stop taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or blood thinners for a specified period ...

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    Full Text Available ... Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical questions ... your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. ...

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    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, allergies and medications you’re taking. You ... with ascites or variceal bleeding resistant to traditional medical treatments. The greatest difference in performing TIPS in ...

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    Full Text Available ... catheter inside a blood vessel carries certain risks. These risks include damage to the blood vessel, bruising ... and infection. However precaution is taken to mitigate these risks. Other possible complications of the procedure include: ...

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    Full Text Available ... and devices that monitor your heart beat and blood pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? ... flow in the liver and reduces abnormally high blood pressure in the veins of the stomach, esophagus, bowel ...

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    Full Text Available ... single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into ... patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), as well as the type of body ...

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    Full Text Available ... one or two x-ray tubes and a television-like monitor that is located in the examining ... display screen that looks like a computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the ...

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    Full Text Available ... can be done electively and patients may go home the next day. However, the amount of bleeding that can occur can sometimes be life threatening and those patients are monitored in intensive care beforehand and during recovery. You should be able ...

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... filtered out by the liver. The TIPS may cause too much of these substances to bypass the ...

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    Full Text Available ... thin, hollow plastic tube into the vessel. Using real time x-ray guidance, your doctor will then guide ... invasive procedure that typically has a shorter recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect ...

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    Full Text Available ... or blood thinners for a specified period of time before your procedure. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray technologist if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so ...

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    Full Text Available ... taking. You may be advised to stop taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or blood thinners ... Your physician may advise you to stop taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or blood thinners ...

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    Full Text Available ... This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic region. Discuss the fees associated with your prescribed procedure with your doctor, ...

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    Full Text Available ... they have increased pressure in the portal vein system. This pressure buildup can cause blood to flow ... the hepatic vein to identify the portal venous system. Access is then gained from the hepatic vein ...

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    Full Text Available ... the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

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    Full Text Available ... seen in adults, often as a result of chronic liver problems leading to cirrhosis (scarring of the ... or congestive heart failure radiation injury to the skin is a rare complication (it ... with more advanced liver disease are at greater risk for worsening liver failure ...

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    Full Text Available ... physician will numb an area just above your right collarbone with a local anesthetic . A very small ... Pressures are measured in the hepatic vein and right heart to confirm the diagnosis of portal hypertension, ...

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ...

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    Full Text Available ... The video is produced by the x-ray machine and a detector that is suspended over a ... the procedure includes an intravenous line (IV), ultrasound machine and devices that monitor your heart beat and ...

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    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then listens for the returning echoes ... for encephalopathy , which is an alteration of normal brain function ... toxic substances in the bloodstream are ordinarily filtered out by the liver. ...

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    Full Text Available ... radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

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    Full Text Available ... the contrast material used for venograms . Also, kidney failure (temporary or permanent) due to contrast material use ... or urgent intervention heart arrhythmias or congestive heart failure radiation injury to the skin is a rare ...

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... on the complexity of the condition and vascular anatomy. top of page What will I experience during ...

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    Full Text Available ... so as not to expose the fetus to radiation. If an x-ray is necessary, precautions will be taken to ... denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Venography Images ...

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    Full Text Available ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ... limitations of TIPS? Patients with more advanced liver disease are at greater risk for worsening liver failure ...

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    Full Text Available ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ... of their liver disease may not be a good candidate for the procedure. Encephalopathy can be treated ...

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    Full Text Available ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ... Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not ...

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    Full Text Available ... is completed. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A TIPS is designed to produce the same ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ...

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    Full Text Available ... hepatic vein to identify the portal venous system. Access is then gained from the hepatic vein into ... TIPS procedure to make sure that it remains open and functions properly. top of page Who interprets ...

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    Full Text Available ... condition is most commonly seen in adults, often as a result of chronic liver problems leading to ... to contrast materials containing iodine (sometimes referred to as "dye" or "x-ray dye"). Your physician may ...

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    Full Text Available ... pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. You will likely be instructed ...

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... any possibility that they are pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not ...

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    Full Text Available ... while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the stomach and esophagus in patients ... site. Using ultrasound, the doctor will identify your internal jugular vein , which is situated above your collarbone, ...

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    Full Text Available ... an interventional radiology suite or occasionally in the operating room. Some interventional radiologists prefer performing this procedure ... the hepatic vein to identify the portal venous system. Access is then gained from the hepatic vein ...

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    Full Text Available ... and medical diseases. This can result in significant challenges in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional ... Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical questions ...

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    Full Text Available ... as to whether the procedure was a technical success when it is completed. top of page What ... the contrast material used for venograms . Also, kidney failure (temporary or permanent) due to contrast material use ...

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), ...

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    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank ... View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

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    Full Text Available ... vein (the vein that carries blood from the digestive organs to the liver) to one of the ... vein (the vein that carries blood from the digestive organs to the liver) to a hepatic vein ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... the liver, so a patient who already has encephalopathy because of their liver disease may not be a good candidate for the procedure. Encephalopathy can be treated with certain medications, a special ...

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    Full Text Available ... placed to keep the connection open and allow it to bring blood draining from the bowel back ... on the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from ...

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    Full Text Available ... the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This ... here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging ...

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... or blood thinners for a specified period of time before your procedure. Women should always inform their ... based on the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return ...

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... observed. This procedure is usually completed in an hour or two but may take up to several ...

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... the esophagus and stomach. A TIPS procedure involves creating a pathway through the liver that connects the ... diseases. This can result in significant challenges in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and ...

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    Full Text Available ... be connected to monitors that track your heart rate, blood pressure and pulse during the procedure. A ... after the procedure? Devices to monitor your heart rate and blood pressure will be attached to your ...

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... in the portal vein system. This pressure buildup can cause blood to flow backward from the liver ... to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are much ...

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    Full Text Available ... for ultrasound. A catheter is a long, thin plastic tube that is considerably smaller than a "pencil ... and guide a catheter, a long, thin, hollow plastic tube into the vessel. Using real time x- ...

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    Full Text Available ... complex and lengthy procedures requiring extended fluoroscopy use) death (rare) top of page What are the limitations ... and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media ...

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    Full Text Available ... the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are much less likely to require a TIPS. ... intentionally to solve the problem. Although extremely rare, children may also require a TIPS procedure. TIPS in ...

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    Full Text Available ... during the procedure. A nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) line into a vein in ... physicians with expertise in several radiologic areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org ...

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    Full Text Available ... composition of body tissue through which the sound travels. A small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to travel from the transducer to the examined area within ...

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    Full Text Available ... fabric lining abdominal bleeding that might require a transfusion laceration of the hepatic artery, which may result ... liver injury or bleeding that could require a transfusion or urgent intervention heart arrhythmias or congestive heart ...

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    Full Text Available ... connected to monitors that track your heart rate, blood pressure and pulse during the procedure. A nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) line into a vein in your hand or arm so that sedative medication can be given intravenously. ...

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    Full Text Available ... in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ...

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    Full Text Available ... your symptoms. They are also at risk for encephalopathy , which is an alteration of normal brain function ... the liver, so a patient who already has encephalopathy because of their liver disease may not be ...

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    Full Text Available ... general anesthesia is that the patient will not feel anything. You will be positioned on your back. ... will be attached to your body. You will feel a slight pin prick when the needle is ...

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... of bleeding that can occur can sometimes be life threatening and those patients are monitored in intensive ...

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index ...

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    Full Text Available ... some prefer conscious sedation for their patient. The advantage of general anesthesia is that the patient will ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ...

  15. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... is a tract created within the liver using x-ray guidance to connect two veins within the liver. ... containing iodine (sometimes referred to as "dye" or "x-ray dye"). Your physician may advise you to stop ...

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    Full Text Available ... the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and ...

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... is numbed using local anesthetic. You may feel pressure when the catheter is inserted into the vein or artery. If you receive a general anesthetic, you will be unconscious for the entire procedure, and you will be monitored by an anesthesiologist . If the procedure is done with ...

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... TIPS. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A TIPS is used to ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect than open surgical bypass on ...

  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... Other possible complications of the procedure include: fever muscle stiffness in the neck bruising on the neck ... lining abdominal bleeding that might require a transfusion laceration of the hepatic artery, which may result in ...

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... on the complexity of the condition and vascular anatomy. top of page What will I experience during ... to the contrast material used for venograms . Also, kidney failure (temporary or permanent) due to contrast material ...

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose ...

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    Full Text Available ... the liver to bypass the liver entirely, reducing high blood pressure in the portal vein and the associated risk of bleeding from ... pressures are measured to confirm reduction in portal hypertension. Additional portal venograms are also performed to confirm satisfactory blood ...

  4. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to stop taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or blood thinners several days prior to your ... stomach, esophagus, or intestines into the liver. portal gastropathy , an engorgement of the veins in the wall ...

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    Full Text Available ... to stop taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or blood thinners several days prior to your ... stomach, esophagus, or intestines into the liver. portal gastropathy , an engorgement of the veins in the wall ...

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    Full Text Available ... no: Thank you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × ... Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... who typically need a TIPS have portal hypertension , meaning they have increased pressure in the portal vein ... the local anesthetic is injected. Most of the sensation is at the skin incision site, which is ...

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... flow in the liver and reduces abnormally high blood pressure in the veins of the stomach, esophagus, bowel and liver, reducing ... liver to bypass the liver entirely, reducing high blood pressure in the portal vein and the associated risk of bleeding from enlarged ...

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... minimize radiation exposure to the baby. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x- ...

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    Full Text Available ... tube that is considerably smaller than a "pencil lead", or approximately 1/8 inch in diameter. The ... an alteration of normal brain function that can lead to confusion. This is because toxic substances in ...

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    Full Text Available ... permanent) due to contrast material use is a concern, particularly in patients with poor kidney function. Any ... at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... physician will numb an area just above your right collarbone with a local anesthetic . A very small ...

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    Full Text Available ... reviewed on February 08, 2017 Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking ... of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying ...

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    Full Text Available ... to the contrast material used for venograms . Also, kidney failure (temporary or permanent) due to contrast material ... is a concern, particularly in patients with poor kidney function. Any procedure that involves placement of a ...

  16. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... to take in the morning. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You will be ... can be done electively and patients may go home the next day. However, the amount of bleeding ...

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... guide the catheter toward the liver and into one of the hepatic veins. Pressures are measured in the hepatic vein and right heart to confirm the diagnosis of portal hypertension, ...

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    Full Text Available ... Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic ... Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate ...

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A TIPS is designed to produce the ... skin that does not have to be stitched. Risks Any procedure where the skin is penetrated carries ...

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    Full Text Available ... to make sure that it remains open and functions properly. top of page Who interprets the results ... a concern, particularly in patients with poor kidney function. Any procedure that involves placement of a catheter ...

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... may be advised to stop taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or blood thinners several days prior ... may advise you to stop taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or blood thinners for a specified ...

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    Full Text Available ... bleeding from any of the veins that normally drain the stomach, esophagus, or intestines into the liver. ... a radiographic table, one or two x-ray tubes and a television-like monitor that is located ...

  4. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... blood flow in the liver and reduces abnormally high blood pressure in the veins of the stomach, esophagus, bowel ... the liver to bypass the liver entirely, reducing high blood pressure in the portal vein and the associated risk ...

  5. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... Patients who typically need a TIPS have portal hypertension , meaning they have increased pressure in the portal ... leading to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are ...

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... above your collarbone, and guide a catheter, a long, thin, hollow plastic tube into the vessel. Using ...

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    Full Text Available ... This can result in significant challenges in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This page ...

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    Full Text Available ... display screen that looks like a computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the amplitude (loudness), ... imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose ...

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    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

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    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that ... suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Please help ...

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    Full Text Available ... pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, allergies and medications you’re taking. You may be ... including herbal supplements, and if you have any allergies, especially to local anesthetic medications, general anesthesia or ...

  13. Congenital portosystemic shunts with and without gastrointestinal bleeding - case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Ying; Chen, Jun; Chen, Qi; Ji, Min; Pa, Mier; Qiao, Zhongwei [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Hui [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Shan [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Surgery, Shanghai (China)

    2015-12-15

    The clinical presentation of congenital portosystemic shunt is variable and gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommon presentation. To describe the imaging features of congenital portosystemic shunt as it presented in 11 children with (n = 6) and without gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 5). We performed a retrospective study on a clinical and imaging dataset of 11 children diagnosed with congenital portosystemic shunt. A total of 11 children with congenital portosystemic shunt were included in this study, 7 with extrahepatic portosystemic shunts and 4 with intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Six patients with gastrointestinal bleeding had an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and the imaging results showed that the shunts originated from the splenomesenteric junction (n = 5) or splenic vein (n = 1) and connected to the internal iliac vein. Among the five cases of congenital portosystemic shunt without gastrointestinal bleeding, one case was an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt and the other four were intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Most congenital portosystemic shunt patients with gastrointestinal bleeding had a shunt that drained portal blood into the iliac vein via an inferior mesenteric vein. This type of shunt was uncommon, but the concomitant rate of gastrointestinal bleeding with this type of shunt was high. (orig.)

  14. Genetic and Functional Analysis of Congenital Portosystemic Shunts in Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bossche, L.

    2017-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis was to gain further insight into the pathogenesis of congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS), elucidate mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of CPSS, and explore predictors of recovery after surgical ligation of the shunt. For intrahepatic portosystemic shunts

  15. Direct intrahepatic portocaval shunt creation via the inter-strut space of the inferior vena cava stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsauo, J.; Yu, Y.; Luo, X.; Wang, Z.; Liu, L.; Li, X.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The feasibility of DIPS creation through an IVC stent was investigated. • DIPS creation through the IVC stent was successful in all four patients. • DIPS creation through the IVC stent is feasible

  16. 肝内门腔分流术支架与血管支架组织成分的对比研究%Experimental comparison study of the tissue characteristics in transjugular intrahepalic portosystemic shunt and vascular stent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢勤; 魏晓莹; 滕皋军; 安艳丽; 邓钢; 方文; 朱光宇; 牛焕章; 余辉; 李国昭; 王甄

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the tissue characteristics within vascular stent and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt(TIPS)on swine and to provide more information for the understanding and prevention of vascular stent and TIPS restenosis.Methods Animal models for TIPS were built in 6 swine and vascular stents were implanted in iliac veins simultaneouly.14-28 days after the operation.the 6 swine were killed to remove the TIPS and vascular stent and the pathological examinations were performed on the tissues within the shunt and stent.The similarities and difierences of the tissues within the shunt and stent were analvzed with Kruskal Wallis test. Results Restenosis of TIPS occurred in 4 models and complete occlusion were seen in 2,while all vascular stents were patent and coated with a thin layer of intimal tissueElectron micmscopic results showed that the tissues in restenotic TIPS were loose and with more extra matrix and fibers.and less smooth muscle,fibroblastic and myofibroblastic cells with different and irregular shape and rich secretory granules.The tissues in patent,TIPS contained more extra fibers,smooth muscle and fibmblastic cells with normal organdie.The intimal tissues in vascular stent contained more fibers and fibroblasts cells.less smooth muscle cells.On immunohistoehemical staining,the tissues in restenotlc and Datent TIPS as well as the intimal tissues in vascular stent had strong positive expression for anti-SMCactin-α.the expression were gradually weakened for PCNA,the intimal tissues in vascular stent had a strong positive expression for vimentin,while the expression of the tissues in restenotic and patent TIPS were weakened gradually.For myoglobulin,the tissues in restenotic TIPS had weakly positive expression,the expression in patent TIPS and vascular stent were almost negative. Western blot results for TGF-β showed that the absorbance ratios of the intima tissues in vascular stent,normal vascular tissues,normal liver tissues

  17. Congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Conor P.; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Babyn, Paul S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, M5G 1X8, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-09-01

    A congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (CEPS) is uncommon. A type 1 CEPS exists where there is absence of intrahepatic portal venous supply and a type 2 CEPS where this supply is preserved. The diagnosis of congenital portosystemic shunt is important because it may cause hepatic encephalopathy. To describe the clinical and imaging features of three children with CEPS and to review the cases in the published literature. The diagnostic imaging and medical records for three children with CEPS were retrieved and evaluated. An extensive literature search was performed. Including our cases, there are 61 reported cases of CEPS, 39 type 1 and 22 type 2. Type 1 occurs predominantly in females, while type 2 shows no significant sexual preponderance. The age at diagnosis ranges from 31 weeks of intrauterine life to 76 years. Both types of CEPS have a number of associations, the most common being nodular lesions of the liver (n=25), cardiac anomalies (n=19), portosystemic encephalopathy (n=10), polysplenia (n=9), biliary atresia (n=7), skeletal anomalies (n=5), and renal tract anomalies (n=4). MRI is recommended as an important means of diagnosing and classifying cases of CEPS and examining the associated cardiovascular and hepatic abnormalities. Screening for CEPS in patients born with polysplenia is suggested. (orig.)

  18. Congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Conor P.; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Babyn, Paul S.

    2003-01-01

    A congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (CEPS) is uncommon. A type 1 CEPS exists where there is absence of intrahepatic portal venous supply and a type 2 CEPS where this supply is preserved. The diagnosis of congenital portosystemic shunt is important because it may cause hepatic encephalopathy. To describe the clinical and imaging features of three children with CEPS and to review the cases in the published literature. The diagnostic imaging and medical records for three children with CEPS were retrieved and evaluated. An extensive literature search was performed. Including our cases, there are 61 reported cases of CEPS, 39 type 1 and 22 type 2. Type 1 occurs predominantly in females, while type 2 shows no significant sexual preponderance. The age at diagnosis ranges from 31 weeks of intrauterine life to 76 years. Both types of CEPS have a number of associations, the most common being nodular lesions of the liver (n=25), cardiac anomalies (n=19), portosystemic encephalopathy (n=10), polysplenia (n=9), biliary atresia (n=7), skeletal anomalies (n=5), and renal tract anomalies (n=4). MRI is recommended as an important means of diagnosing and classifying cases of CEPS and examining the associated cardiovascular and hepatic abnormalities. Screening for CEPS in patients born with polysplenia is suggested. (orig.)

  19. Improved Patency of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt: The Efficacy of Cilostazol for the Prevention of Pseudointimal Hyperplasia in Swine TIPS Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Woo; Cha, In Ho; Kim, Chul Hwan; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Park, Jeong Hee; Hong, Suk Joo; Lee, In Sik

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the efficacy of oral administration of cilostazol to inhibit pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia in swine TIPS models. Methods. Successful TIPS creation was carried out in 11 of 12 healthy young pigs (20-25 kg). In the treatment group (n = 6), both cilostazol and aspirin were administered daily, from the first day of TIPS creation. The control group (n = 5) was administered only aspirin. The animals were followed-up for 2 weeks and then killed. The specimen (including portal vein, hepatic parenchymal tract, hepatic vein, and inferior vena cava) and stents were carefully bisected in a longitudinal fashion. The control group was compared with the treatment group by means of a gross and histologic evaluation of the degree of pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia in the shunt. Results. At the gross evaluation, the control group showed considerably more pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia than the treatment group. Using microscopic evaluation, there was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) in the mean maximum pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia thickness between the control group (2.97 ± 0.33 mm) and treatment group (0.73 ± 0.27 mm). Conclusion. Oral administration of cilostazol may have been effective in reducing pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia in swine TIPS models

  20. Endovascular treatment of intrahepatic inferior vena cava obstruction from malignant hepatocellular tumor thrombus utilizing Luminexx self-expanding nitinol stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stambo, Glenn W.; Leto, John; George, Christopher; Van Epps, Kelly; Woeste, Troy; Berlet, Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) obstruction is a well-described clinical entity. Most IVC obstructions from malignant neoplasms are a direct result of tumor compression [Oviedo J, Cerda S. Vascular invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma. Arch Pathol Lab Med 2001;125: 454-5; Furui S, Sawada S, et al. Gianturco stent placement in malignant caval obstruction: analysis of factors for predicting the outcome. Radiology 1995;195:147-52; Fletcher WS, Lakin PC, et al. Results of treatment of inferior vena cava syndrome with expandable metallic stents. Arch Surg 1998;133:935-8]. The symptoms of IVC obstruction include progressive ascites, scrotal edema and lower body edema. These constellations of symptoms are described as IVC syndrome and are devastating to a patient with end-stage cancer. We describe a palliative therapy utilizing Luminexx nitinol self-expanding stents to treat intracaval hepatoma thrombus obstructing the IVC. The procedure is rapidly performed, technically reliable, and has essentially no morbidity or mortality. This procedure can be performed in the interventional radiology suite with excellent results resolving the IVC syndrome soon after placement of the stents. We believe endovascular stenting as an excellent palliative therapy for patients with IVC syndrome and should be the treatment of choice for caval obstructions due to intraluminal tumor thrombus

  1. Endovascular treatment of intrahepatic inferior vena cava obstruction from malignant hepatocellular tumor thrombus utilizing Luminexx self-expanding nitinol stents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stambo, Glenn W. [Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, 4516 North Armenia Avenue, Tampa, FL 33603 (United States)], E-mail: xraydoc2@yahoo.com; Leto, John [Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, 3001 W. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Tampa, FL 33607 (United States); George, Christopher [Department of Hematology and Oncology, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, 4301 W. Habana Avenue, Suite 1, Tampa, FL 33607 (United States); Van Epps, Kelly; Woeste, Troy; Berlet, Mathew [Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, 4516 North Armenia Avenue, Tampa, FL 33603 (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) obstruction is a well-described clinical entity. Most IVC obstructions from malignant neoplasms are a direct result of tumor compression [Oviedo J, Cerda S. Vascular invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma. Arch Pathol Lab Med 2001;125: 454-5; Furui S, Sawada S, et al. Gianturco stent placement in malignant caval obstruction: analysis of factors for predicting the outcome. Radiology 1995;195:147-52; Fletcher WS, Lakin PC, et al. Results of treatment of inferior vena cava syndrome with expandable metallic stents. Arch Surg 1998;133:935-8]. The symptoms of IVC obstruction include progressive ascites, scrotal edema and lower body edema. These constellations of symptoms are described as IVC syndrome and are devastating to a patient with end-stage cancer. We describe a palliative therapy utilizing Luminexx nitinol self-expanding stents to treat intracaval hepatoma thrombus obstructing the IVC. The procedure is rapidly performed, technically reliable, and has essentially no morbidity or mortality. This procedure can be performed in the interventional radiology suite with excellent results resolving the IVC syndrome soon after placement of the stents. We believe endovascular stenting as an excellent palliative therapy for patients with IVC syndrome and should be the treatment of choice for caval obstructions due to intraluminal tumor thrombus.

  2. Stent

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Stent URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002303.htm Stent To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A stent is a tiny tube placed into a hollow structure in your ...

  3. Role of Self-Expandable Metal Stents in Acute Variceal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad Maufa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute variceal bleeding continues to be associated with significant mortality. Current standard of care combines hemodynamic stabilization, antibiotic prophylaxis, pharmacological agents, and endoscopic treatment. Rescue therapies using balloon tamponade or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt are implemented when first-line therapy fails. Rescue therapies have many limitations and are contraindicated in some cases. Placement of fully covered self-expandable metallic stent is a promising therapeutic technique that can be used to control bleeding in cases of refractory esophageal bleeding as an alternative to balloon tamponade. These stents can be left in place for as long as two weeks, allowing for improvement in liver function and institution of a more definitive treatment.

  4. Experimental TIPS with spiral Z-stents in swine with and without induced portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Saxon, Richard R.; Nishimine, Kiyoshi; Nishida, Norifumi; Uchida, Barry T.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the suitability of spiral Z-stents for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) and the influence of portal hypertension on shunt patency in young swine. Methods. TIPS were established using spiral Z-stents in 14 domestic swine. In 7 animals, the portal venous pressure was normal; in the other 7, acute portal hypertension was induced by embolization of portal vein branches. Follow-up portal venography and histologic evaluations were done from 1 hr to 12 weeks after TIPS. Results. Follow-up transhepatic portal venograms showed progressive narrowing of the shunt, most priminent in the midportion of the tract. Ingrowth of liver parenchyma between the stent wires found after 3 weeks led to progressive shunt narrowing and shunt occlusion by 12 weeks. A pseudointima grew rapidly inside the stent, peaked in thickness around 4 weeks, and decreased later. Acutely created portal hypertension rapidly returned to normal and there was no difference in TIPS patency between the two groups of animals. Conclusion. Although the spiral Z-stent can be used as a device for creation of TIPS in patients with cirrhotic livers, it is associated with extensive liver ingrowth in swine that leads to rapid shunt occlusion. Portal hypertension was only transient in this model

  5. A rare intrahepatic portacaval tubular shunt in a patient with spastic paraparesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardic, S.; Deniz, E.; Ardic, F.A. [Ankara State Hospital, Ankara, (Turkey). Department of Radiology; Arbatli, M. [Bayindir Tip Hospital, Ankara, (Turkey). Department of Radiology; Aysun, A. [Ankara Oncology Center, Ankara, (Turkey). Department of Radiology

    1997-05-01

    Being a non-invasive and less costly method of imaging, colour Doppler with spectral analysis has an ever-increasing role in the diagnosis and follow-up of portosystemic collaterals in chronic liver disease. A case is presented a case with characteristic cranial MR and CT findings of portosystemic encephalopathy and an intrahepatic portacaval shunt demonstrated with colour Doppler and abdominal MR imaging. 17 refs.

  6. A rare intrahepatic portacaval tubular shunt in a patient with spastic paraparesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardic, S.; Deniz, E.; Ardic, F.A.; Arbatli, M.; Aysun, A.

    1997-01-01

    Being a non-invasive and less costly method of imaging, colour Doppler with spectral analysis has an ever-increasing role in the diagnosis and follow-up of portosystemic collaterals in chronic liver disease. A case is presented a case with characteristic cranial MR and CT findings of portosystemic encephalopathy and an intrahepatic portacaval shunt demonstrated with colour Doppler and abdominal MR imaging

  7. The transjugular portosystemic stent shunt (TIPSS) as an intervention in clinical complication of portal hypertension; Der transjugulaere portosystemische Stentshunt (TIPSS) als Intervention bei klinischen Komplikationen der portalen Hypertonie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalhammer, A.; Jacobi, V.; Schwarz, W.; Balzer, J.; Abolmaali, N.; Vogl, T.J. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Zentrum der Radiologie

    2001-10-01

    Most frequent complications in patients with liver cirrhosis are due to portal hypertension. Beside ascites circumvent vessles formate with vasodilatation. Due to counterregulation a secondary hyperaldosteronism develops with release of vasocontrictive agents. If conservative and endoscopic methods fail, indication for building a portosystemic shunt is given. The TIPSS procedure is less invasive than the surgical method of Warren-Shunt, so the radiological intervention has replaced surgery. Reducing the portal pressure by the shunt, the clinical complications change for the better. Still problems are defined as hepatic encephalopathy and right ventricular heart failure. Regular follow up investigations have to be performed to detect complications in the shunt. Using regular clinical and radiological check up TIPSS is of clinical benefit with good long term results. (orig.) [German] Die haeufigsten Komplikationen bei Patienten mit einer Leberzirrhose lassen sich auf das Vorliegen einer portalen Hypertension zurueckfuehren. Neben einer Aszitesbildung kommt es zur Vasodilatation mit Ausbildung portaler Umgehungskreislaeufe, gegenregulatorisch zu einem sekundaeren Hyperaldosteronismus und Ausschuettung vasokonstriktiver Substanzen. Sind mittels konservativer und endoskopischer Methoden die Komplikationen nicht mehr zu beherrschen, ist die Indikation zur Shuntanlage gegeben. Wegen der geringeren Invasivitaet einer TIPSS-Anlage gegenueber der operativen Methode eines Warren-Shunts hat sich die interventionell radiologische Methodik in den letzten Jahren immer mehr durchgesetzt. Durch den mittels Shuntanlage reduzierten Pfortaderdruck kommt es zu einer deutlichen klinischen Besserung der unterschiedlichen Komplikationen. Als klinisch problematische Symptome bei der Shuntanlage sind die hepatische Enzephalopathie und eine Zunahme der Rechtsherzbelastung zu werten. Um Komplikationen im Bereich des Shunts frueh zu erkennen, muss dieser engmaschig kontrolliert werden. Unter

  8. Aberrant hepatic lipid storage and metabolism in canine portosystemic shunts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Van den Bossche

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a poorly understood multifactorial pandemic disorder. One of the hallmarks of NAFLD, hepatic steatosis, is a common feature in canine congenital portosystemic shunts. The aim of this study was to gain detailed insight into the pathogenesis of steatosis in this large animal model. Hepatic lipid accumulation, gene-expression analysis and HPLC-MS of neutral lipids and phospholipids in extrahepatic (EHPSS and intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (IHPSS was compared to healthy control dogs. Liver organoids of diseased dogs and healthy control dogs were incubated with palmitic- and oleic-acid, and lipid accumulation was quantified using LD540. In histological slides of shunt livers, a 12-fold increase of lipid content was detected compared to the control dogs (EHPSS P<0.01; IHPSS P = 0.042. Involvement of lipid-related genes to steatosis in portosystemic shunting was corroborated using gene-expression profiling. Lipid analysis demonstrated different triglyceride composition and a shift towards short chain and omega-3 fatty acids in shunt versus healthy dogs, with no difference in lipid species composition between shunt types. All organoids showed a similar increase in triacylglycerols after free fatty acids enrichment. This study demonstrates that steatosis is probably secondary to canine portosystemic shunts. Unravelling the pathogenesis of this hepatic steatosis might contribute to a better understanding of steatosis in NAFLD.

  9. Aberrant hepatic lipid storage and metabolism in canine portosystemic shunts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bossche, Lindsay; Schoonenberg, Vivien A C; Burgener, Iwan A; Penning, Louis C; Schrall, Ingrid M; Kruitwagen, Hedwig S; van Wolferen, Monique E; Grinwis, Guy C M; Kummeling, Anne; Rothuizen, Jan; van Velzen, Jeroen F; Stathonikos, Nikolas; Molenaar, Martijn R; Helms, Bernd J; Brouwers, Jos F H M; Spee, Bart; van Steenbeek, Frank G

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a poorly understood multifactorial pandemic disorder. One of the hallmarks of NAFLD, hepatic steatosis, is a common feature in canine congenital portosystemic shunts. The aim of this study was to gain detailed insight into the pathogenesis of steatosis in this large animal model. Hepatic lipid accumulation, gene-expression analysis and HPLC-MS of neutral lipids and phospholipids in extrahepatic (EHPSS) and intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (IHPSS) was compared to healthy control dogs. Liver organoids of diseased dogs and healthy control dogs were incubated with palmitic- and oleic-acid, and lipid accumulation was quantified using LD540. In histological slides of shunt livers, a 12-fold increase of lipid content was detected compared to the control dogs (EHPSS Plipid-related genes to steatosis in portosystemic shunting was corroborated using gene-expression profiling. Lipid analysis demonstrated different triglyceride composition and a shift towards short chain and omega-3 fatty acids in shunt versus healthy dogs, with no difference in lipid species composition between shunt types. All organoids showed a similar increase in triacylglycerols after free fatty acids enrichment. This study demonstrates that steatosis is probably secondary to canine portosystemic shunts. Unravelling the pathogenesis of this hepatic steatosis might contribute to a better understanding of steatosis in NAFLD.

  10. Intrahepatic ovulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur L. Wozniak, HBSc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic ovaries are a rare finding in the literature, with fewer than 50 published cases to date. This phenomenon has been found in the omentum, bladder, mesentery, and uterus; attached to the colon; inside the left labia majora; and in the kidney. Various etiologies have been proposed, including postsurgical or postinflammatory transplantation, malignant origins, and abnormal embryologic development. We report the ultrasonographic, computed tomographic (CT, and magnetic resonance (MR imaging of, what is to the best of our knowledge, the first case of an intrahepatic ectopic ovary.

  11. TIPS stent migration into the heart with 6-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehervari, Imre; Szonyi, Laszlo; Fazakas, Janos; Gerlei, Zsuzsa; Lazar, Istvan

    2011-01-01

    The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is widely used for the treatment of portal hypertension in adults, but no studies have defined the best approach to treat portal hypertension in pediatric patients. Pediatric use of TIPS is rare even in large centers of adult practice. The migration of stents has also been reported as a complication in adults. There is no standard way to treat this type of complication, and it is not always clear whether immediate removal or watchful waiting is safer for the patient. We report the case of an 11-year-old patient who underwent urgent TIPS implantation due to variceal bleeding, after unsuccessful sclerotherapy. During the procedure, due to the deep impact of the stent, a second, telescopic, stent was inserted. The portal pressure decreased, no further bleeding occurred, and the patient was listed for transplantation. Three weeks later a routine chest X-ray discovered the migration of the second stent into the right ventricle. No interventional radiological removal or open heart surgery was available for the transplant waiting list patient. The patient underwent uneventful combined liver-kidney transplantation. During the 6-year follow-up period the child had no signs of hemodynamic instability, and his somatic and mental development were appropriate. To our knowledge this case is the first publication on a heart-impacted TIPS stent in a child. The watchful waiting was justified by uneventful combined liver-kidney transplantation and long-term follow-up. This case also underlines the need for best practice guidelines in pediatric portal hypertension.

  12. Are TIPS Stent-Grafts a Contraindication for Future Liver Transplantation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleux, Geert; Pirenne, Jacques; Vaninbroukx, Johan; Aerts, Raymond; Nevens, Frederik

    2004-01-01

    Our purpose was to assess the feasibility of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in patients priorly having undergone transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) with an expanded tetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE)-covered endoprosthesis. In 48 patients an e- PTFE-covered endoprosthesis was inserted to treat severe complications of portal hypertension. In 36 patients the endoprosthesis was inserted during TIPS creation (de novo TIPS); in the other 12 patients the endoprosthesis was placed to repermeabilize the previously created, but occluded bare stent (revision TIPS). Eight of them (5 de novo and 3 revision cases) later underwent an OLT. The hospital records of these patients were reviewed from initial admission, through TIPS, the pre-OLT period, and OLT to current postoperative status. Five de novo and 3 revision cases underwent OLT 4-279 days (mean delay: 80.8 days) after TIPS procedure. All OLT's were performed under veno-venous bypass surgery. De visu surgical inspection confirmed correct positioning of the fully patent stent graft, starting in the portal vein and ending at the junction of the hepatic vein to the inferior caval vein. No surgical difficulty was observed during proximal or distal clamping or during resection of the diseased liver. Correctly positioned e-PTFE-covered nitinol endoprostheses do not interfere with a later OLT and may not be considered as a contraindication in patients who need a TIPS as a bridge to OLT

  13. Intrahepatic porto-hepatic venous shunts in Rendu-Osler-Weber disease: imaging demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Shunro; Mori, Hiromu; Yamada, Yasunari; Hayashida, Tomoko; Hori, Yuzo; Kiyosue, Hiro

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the imaging features of the intrahepatic portohepatic venous (PHV) shunt, which is a potential cause of portosystemic encephalopathy in Rendu-Osler-Weber disease. Six patients with Rendu-Osler-Weber disease (two men, four women; age range 42-73 years) were retrospectively studied. There were two from one family and three from another family. Of these patients, one was diagnosed with definitive portosystemic encephalopathy because of a psychiatric disorder. We retrospectively reviewed the radiological examinations, including abdominal angiography (n=6), three-phase dynamic helical computed tomography (CT; n=3), and conventional enhanced CT (n=1). In one patient, CT during angiography and CT angioportography were also performed. Evaluation was placed on the imaging features of intrahepatic PHV shunts. On angiography, intrahepatic PHV shunts showing multiple and small shunts <5 mm in diameter in an apparent network were detected in all patents. In two patients, a large shunt with a size of either 7 or 10 mm was associated. These intrahepatic PHV shunts were predominantly distributed in the peripheral parenchyma. Intrahepatic PHV shunts would be characterized by small and multiple shunts in an apparent network on the periphery with or without a large shunt. (orig.)

  14. Anatomy of the Portal Vein Bifurcation: Implication for Transjugular Intrahepatic Portal Systemic Shunts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, Philip Chong-hei; Ng, Wai Fu; Lam, Christine Suk-yee; Tsui, Polly Po; Faruqi, Asma

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The relationship of the portalvein bifurcation to the liver capsule in Asians, which is an important landmark for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, has not previously been described. Methods: The anatomy of the portal vein bifurcation was studied in 70 adult Chinese cadavers; it was characterized as intrahepatic or extrahepatic. The length of the exposed portion of the right and left portal veins was measured when the bifurcation was extrahepatic. Results: The portal vein bifurcation was intrahepatic in 37 cadavers (53%) and extrahepatic in 33 cadavers (47%). The mean length of the right and left extrahepatic portal veins was 0.96 cm and 0.85 cm respectively.Both were less than or equal to 2 cm in 94% of the cadavers with extrahepatic bifurcation. There was no correlation between the presence of cirrhosis and the location of the portal vein bifurcation(p 1.0). There was no statistically significant difference in liver mass in cadavers with either extrahepatic or intrahepatic bifurcation (p =0.40). Conclusions: These findings suggest that fortransjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement, a portal vein puncture 2 cm from the bifurcation will be safe in most cases

  15. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Andrea Farias de Melo; Mota Junior, Americo, E-mail: andreafariasm@gmail.com [Instituto de Medicina Integral Professor Fernando Figueira de Pernambuco (IMIP), Recife, PE (Brazil); Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete [Universidade de Fortaleza (UNIFOR), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-07-15

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common - increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations. (author)

  16. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Andrea Farias de Melo; Mota Junior, Americo; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common - increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations. (author)

  17. Congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt associated with heterotaxy and polysplenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Feinstein, Jeffrey A. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford (United States); Cohen, Ronald A.; Patel, Hitendra [Children' s Hospital and Research Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oakland, CA (United States); Feingold, Brian; Kreutzer, Jacqueline [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Chan, Fandics P. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Cardiovascular Imaging Section, Department of Radiology, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Heterotaxy with polysplenia is associated with many cardiovascular anomalies including the occasional occurrence of congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts (CEPS). Missing this anomaly can lead to inappropriate and ineffective therapy. To emphasize the importance and associated anatomy of CEPS in conjunction with heterotaxy with polysplenia. Review of three young children who presented with cyanosis and pulmonary hypertension without a cardiac etiology. They were known (1) or discovered (2) to have heterotaxy with polysplenia. There was absence of the intrahepatic inferior vena cava (IVC) with azygos or hemiazygos continuation in all three cases. In spite of normal liver function, they were discovered to have large portosystemic shunts, splenorenal in location, along with diffuse peripheral pulmonary arterial dilatation suggestive of CEPS (Abernethy malformation) with hepatopulmonary or, more accurately, portopulmonary syndrome. All CEPS were ipsilateral to the spleens. Patency of the portal veins in these cases allowed for percutaneous shunt closure with resolution of cyanosis. CEPS is associated with heterotaxy with polysplenia and can be symptomatic because of pulmonary arteriovenous (AV) shunting. Portal and hepatic vein patency are critical for determining feasibility of CEPS closure. (orig.)

  18. Restoration of Liver Function and Portosystemic Pressure Gradient after TIPSS and Late TIPSS Occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maedler, U.; Hansmann, J.; Duex, M.; Noeldge, G.; Sauer, P.; Richter, G.M.

    2002-01-01

    TIPSS (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) may be indicated to control bleeding from esophageal and gastric varicose veins, to reduce ascites, and to treat patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome and veno-occlusive disease. Numerous measures to improve the safety and methodology of the procedure have helped to increase the technical and clinical success. Follow-up of TIPSS patients has revealed shunt stenosis to occur more often in patients with preserved liver function (Child A, Child B). In addition, the extent of liver cirrhosis is the main factor that determines prognosis in the long term. Little is known about the effects of TIPSS with respect to portosystemic hemodynamics. This report deals with a cirrhotic patient who stopped drinking 7 months prior to admission. He received TIPSS to control ascites and recurrent esophageal bleeding. Two years later remarkable hypertrophy of the left liver lobe and shunt occlusion was observed. The portosystemic pressure gradient dropped from 24 mmHg before TIPSS to 11 mmHg and remained stable after shunt occlusion. The Child's B cirrhosis prior to TIPSS turned into Child's A cirrhosis and remained stable during the follow-up period of 32 months. This indicates that liver function of TIPSS patients may recover due to hypertrophy of the remaining non-cirrhotic liver tissue. In addition the hepatic hemodynamics may return to normal. In conclusion, TIPSS cannot cure cirrhosis but its progress may be halted if the cause can be removed. This may result in a normal portosystemic gradient, leading consequently to shunt occlusion

  19. Intrahepatic cholestasis in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Ž.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal liver function tests occur in 3-5% of pregnancies, with many potential causes, including coincidental liver disease (most commonly viral hepatitis or gallstones and underlying chronic liver disease. Pruritus in pregnancy is common, affecting 23% of pregnancies, of which a small proportion will have obstetric cholestasis. Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP is a cholestatic disorder characterized by pruritus with onset in the second or third trimester of pregnancy, elevated serum aminotransferases and bile acid levels, and spontaneous relief of signs and symptoms within two to three weeks after delivery. ICP is observed in 0.4-1% of pregnancies in most areas of Central and Western Europe and North America. Genetic and hormonal factors, but also environmental factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of ICP. Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy increases the risk of preterm delivery (19­60%, meconium staining of amniotic fluid (27%, fetal bradycardia (14%, fetal distress (22-41%, and fetal loss (0.4-4.1%, particularly when associated with fasting serum bile acid levels >40 μmol/L. Important ICP-induced changes in serum profiles of amidated bile acids were observed, involving both a marked increase in cholic acid concentration and a shift towards a higher proportion of taurine-conjugated species. Ursodeoxycholic acid (10-20 mg/kg/d is today regarded as the first line treatment for intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Delivery has been recommended in the 37-38th week when lung maturity has been established.

  20. Canine intrahepatic vasculature: is a functional anatomic model relevant to the dog?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jon L; Mannion, Paddy; Ladlow, Jane F

    2015-01-01

    To clarify canine intrahepatic portal and hepatic venous system anatomy using corrosion casting and advanced imaging and to devise a novel functional anatomic model of the canine liver to investigate whether this could help guide the planning and surgical procedure of partial hepatic lobectomy and interventional radiological procedures. Prospective experimental study. Adult Greyhound cadavers (n = 8). Portal and hepatic vein corrosion casts of healthy livers were assessed using computed tomography (CT). The hepatic lobes have a consistent hilar hepatic and portal vein supply with some variation in the number of intrahepatic branches. For all specimens, 3 surgically resectable areas were identified in the left lateral lobe and 2 surgically resectable areas were identified in the right medial lobe as defined by a functional anatomic model. CT of detailed acrylic casts allowed complex intrahepatic vascular relationships to be investigated and compared with previous studies. Improving understanding of the intrahepatic vascular supply facilitates interpretation of advanced images in clinical patients, the planning and performance of surgical procedures, and may facilitate interventional vascular procedures, such as intravenous embolization of portosystemic shunts. Functional division of the canine liver similar to human models is possible. The left lateral and right medial lobes can be consistently divided into surgically resectable functional areas and partial lobectomies can be performed following a functional model; further study in clinically affected animals would be required to investigate the relevance of this functional model in the dog. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  1. Treatment of Occluded Distal Splenorenal Shunts with Endovascular Stents: A Report of Two Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Medina, Antonio; Peiro, Javier; Gonzalez de Garay, Miguel; Antonana, Miguel A.; Sustacha, Jon; Grande, Domingo

    2001-01-01

    Surgical treatment of an occluded or stenotic portosystemic shunt is difficult and carries a high risk of mortality. We report two cases of early thrombosis of distal splenorenal shunt (DSRS) successfully treated by transcatheter recanalization and stent placement. At 18-month follow-up, the patients remained asymptomatic and control venograms showed continued patency of the shunt with no evidence of stenosis or collaterals

  2. Ultrasonographic findings of intrahepatic hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jang Ho; Lim, Hyo Keum; Ham, Eun Jae; Choo, In Wook; Bae, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Jong Sup

    1989-01-01

    Sequential ultrasonography was performed in 22 cases of intrahepatic hematomas diagnosed by operation, laboratory data, and clinical manifestation. We analyzed the shape, location, size of hematoma, and change in size and echogenicity by age of hematoma. The results were as follows: 1. The most common shape of intrahepatic hematoma was round. 2. The most common site of intrahepatic hematoma was the posterior segment of the right lobe of the liver. 3. Size of hematoma was decreased from 3rd day, and most hematomas were nearly or completely absorbed from 2nd week to 4th week. 4. Echogenecities of intrahepatic hematoma in immediate ultrasonography after injury showed mainly echogenic or mixed form, and then the echogenecities were decreased and nearly or completely not seen from 2nd week to 4th week

  3. Gastric Varices Bleed at Lower Portosystemic Pressure Gradients than Esophageal Varices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Joseph D; Mendoza-Elias, Nasya; Lipnik, Andrew J; Lokken, R Peter; Bui, James T; Ray, Charles E; Gaba, Ron C

    2018-05-01

    To quantify and compare portosystemic pressure gradients (PSGs) between bleeding esophageal varices (EV) and gastric varices (GV). In a single-center, retrospective study, 149 patients with variceal bleeding (90 men, 59 women, mean age 52 y) with EV (n = 69; 46%) or GV (n = 80; 54%) were selected from 320 consecutive patients who underwent successful transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation from 1998 to 2016. GV were subcategorized using the Sarin classification as gastroesophageal varices (GEV) (n = 57) or isolated gastric varices (IGV) (n = 23). PSG before TIPS was measured from the main portal vein to the right atrium. PSGs were compared across EV, GEV, and IGV groups using 1-way analysis of variance. Overall mean baseline PSG was 21 mm Hg ± 6. PSG was significantly higher in patients with EV versus GV (23 mm Hg vs 19 mm Hg; P IGV (16 mm Hg); this difference was statistically significant (P IGV 17 mm Hg; P IGV bled versus 9% (5/57) of GEV and 3% (2/69) of EVs (P = .169). Mean final PSG after TIPS was 8 mm Hg (IGV 6 mm Hg vs EV and GEV 8 mm Hg; P = .005). GV bleed at lower PSGs than EV. EV, GEV, and IGV bleeding is associated with successively lower PSGs. These findings highlight distinct physiology, anatomy, and behavior of GV compared with EV. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Stent insertion in patients with malignant biliary obstruction: problems of the Hanaro stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jae Hyun; Seong, Chang Kyu; Shin, Tae Beom; Kim, Yong Joo [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Gyoo Sik [School of Medicine, Kosin National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byeung Ho [School of Medicine, Donga National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    To investigate the problems of the Hanaro stent (Solco Intermed, Seoul, Korea) when used in the palliative treatment of patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction. Between January 2000 and May 2001, the treatment of 46 patients with malignant biliary obstruction involved percutaneous placement of the Hanaro stent. Five patients encountered problems during removal of the stent's introduction system. The causes of obstruction were pancreatic carcinoma (n=2), cholangiocarcinoma (n=2), and gastric carcinoma with biliary invasion (n=1). In one patient, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and stent insertion were performed as a one-step procedure, while the others underwent conventional percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage for at least two days prior to stent insertion. A self-expandable Hanaro stent, 8-10 mm in deameter and 50-100 mm in lengh, and made from a strand of nitinol wire, was used in all cases. Among the five patients who encountered problems, breakage of the olive tip occourred in three, upward displacement of the stent in two, and improper expansion of the distal portion of the stent, unrelated with the obstruction site, in one. The broken olive tip was pushed to the duodenum in two cases and to the peripheral intrahepatic duct in one. Where the stent migrated during withdrawal of its introduction system, an additional stent was inserted. In one case, the migrated stent was positioned near the liver capsule and the drainage catheter could not be removed. Although the number of patients in this study was limited, some difficulties were encountered in withdrawing the stent's introduction system. To prevent the occurrence of this unusual complication, the stent should be appropriately expansile, and shape in the olive tip should be considered.

  5. Haematology and coagulation profiles in cats with congenital portosystemic shunts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzounos, Caitlin E; Tivers, Michael S; Adamantos, Sophie E; English, Kate; Rees, Alan L; Lipscomb, Vicky J

    2017-12-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were, first, to report the haematological parameters and coagulation times for cats with a congenital portosystemic shunt (CPSS) and the influence of surgical shunt attenuation on these parameters; and, second, to identify any association between prolongation in coagulation profiles and incidence of perioperative haemorrhage. Methods This was a retrospective clinical study using client-owned cats with a CPSS. Signalment, shunt type (extra- or intrahepatic), degree of shunt attenuation (complete or partial), haematological parameters, prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) test results, and occurrence of any perioperative clinical bleeding complications were recorded for cats undergoing surgical treatment of a CPSS at the Royal Veterinary College, UK, between 1994 and 2011. Results Forty-two cats were included. Thirty-six (85.7%) had an extrahepatic CPSS and six (14.3%) had an intrahepatic CPSS. Preoperatively, mean cell volume (MCV) and mean cell haemoglobin (MCH) were below the reference interval (RI) in 32 (76.2%) and 31 (73.8%) cats, respectively. Red blood cell count and mean cell haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were above the RI in 10 (23.8%) and eight (19.1%) cats, respectively. Postoperatively, there were significant increases in haematocrit ( P = 0.044), MCV ( P = 0.008) and MCH ( P = 0.002). Despite the significant increase in MCV postoperatively, the median MCV postoperatively was below the RI, indicating persistence of microcytosis. Preoperatively, PT was above the upper RI in 14 cats (87.5%), and aPTT was above the upper RI in 11 cats (68.8%). No cat demonstrated a perioperative clinical bleeding complication. Conclusions and relevance Cats with a CPSS are likely to present with a microcytosis, but rarely present with anaemia, leukocytosis or thrombocytopenia. Surgical attenuation of the CPSS results in a significant increase in the HCT and MCV. Coagulation profiles in cats with a

  6. Expandable stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, J C; Carrasco, H

    1996-05-01

    Expandable metallic stents are effective in selected patients with malignant or benign airway stenoses. When used for malignant lesions, the primary purpose of the stent is to improve the quality of life; stents are usually chosen for palliation of symptoms in recognition of the low likelihood of success for other therapy. For patients with benign stenoses, the stents provide a permanent source of structural support to alleviate the narrowed segment. The advantages of the expandable metallic stents are as follows: (1) they can be inserted through an endotracheal tube or under local anesthesia with relative simplicity under fluoroscopic guidance; (2) they do not impair the drainage of sputum because ciliary movement is not interrupted; (3) over a period of a few weeks, the meshwork is gradually covered with mucosa as the stent becomes incorporated into the airway wall; (4) ventilation usually is not impaired if the metallic mesh stent covers another nonstenosed bronchus, because the interstices of the stent are nonobstructive; and (5) they are dynamic and continue to expand over time, particularly if concurrent treatment achieves an effect on the lesion that caused stenosis. Disadvantages of the expandable stent include (1) they often are only temporarily effective for tracheobronchial stenosis due to intraluminal tumor or granulation tissue, both of which can grow between the wires; (2) they are considered permanent stents because removal is difficult; and (3) they can be poorly positioned during placement or can become displaced by progressive migration after placement, and they cannot be repositioned. A relative contraindication to insertion is an inflammatory process or infection that can predispose to granulation formation, particularly at the points of maximal contact pressure of the stent to the airway mucosa. In the presence of inflammation, it may be better to use a silicone prosthesis until the inflammatory process subsides and fibrosis occurs. Granulation

  7. Computed tomography of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimura, Ryoichi; Takashima, Tsutomu; Matsui, Osamu; Tsuji, Masahiko; Hirose, Shoichiro.

    1983-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is an uncommon tumor as primary hepatic neoplasm. Five cases of cholangiocarcinoma, mass forming peripheral type, are reported about its CT findings. They were manifested as a poorly marginated low density mass with a irregular stellate area. In one case, a cut section of the gross specimen following surgery showed a central callagenous scar and vessels within the necrotic tumor. (author)

  8. Familial cholestasis: progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woerd, Wendy L.; van Mil, Saskia W. C.; Stapelbroek, Janneke M.; Klomp, Leo W. J.; van de Graaf, Stan F. J.; Houwen, Roderick H. J.

    2010-01-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) type 1, 2 and 3 are due to mutations in ATP8B1, ABCB11 and ABCB4, respectively. Each of these genes encodes a hepatocanalicular transporter, which is essential for the proper formation of bile. Mutations in ABCB4 can result in progressive

  9. Airway stents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Colleen

    2018-01-01

    Stents and tubes to maintain the patency of the airways are commonly used for malignant obstruction and are occasionally employed in benign disease. Malignant airway obstruction usually results from direct involvement of bronchogenic carcinoma, or by extension of carcinomas occurring in the esophagus or the thyroid. External compression from lymph nodes or metastatic disease from other organs can also cause central airway obstruction. Most malignant airway lesions are surgically inoperable due to advanced disease stage and require multimodality palliation, including stent placement. As with any other medical device, stents have significantly evolved over the last 50 years and deserve an in-depth understanding of their true capabilities and complications. Not every silicone stent is created equal and the same holds for metallic stents. Herein, we present an overview of the topic as well as some of the more practical and controversial issues surrounding airway stents. We also try to dispel the myths surrounding stent removal and their supposed use only in central airways. At the end, we come to the long-held conclusion that stents should not be used as first line treatment of choice, but after ruling out the possibility of curative surgical resection or repair. PMID:29707506

  10. Splenophrenic portosystemic shunt in dogs with and without portal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The possible existence of the same pattern of porto-caval connection in dogs having a single congenital portosystemic shunt (CPSS) and in dogs having multiple acquired portosystemic shunt (MAPSS) secondary to portal hypertension (PH) was evaluated. Retrospective evaluation of all CT examinations of patients having ...

  11. Intrahepatic splenosis: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekkafali, Zekai; Karsli, Fevzi A.; Silit, Emir; Basekim, Cinar C.; Mutlu, Hakan; Kizilkaya, Esref; Narin, Yavuz

    2002-01-01

    Splenosis is heterotopic autotransplantation and seeding of splenic tissue. In the literature, only a few cases of splenosis involving the liver and the radiologic characteristics of these lesions have been reported. We report a case of intrahepatic splenosis diagnosed by ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphic features. To our knowledge, our patient is the first case diagnosed only by radiologic and radionuclide examination without any intervention. (orig.)

  12. Minimally invasive treatment of intrahepatic cholangiolithiasis after stricture of hepaticojejunal anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varabei, Aliaksandr; Arlouski, Yury; Lagodich, Natalli; Arehay, Vitaly

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the study was to improve the results of treatment of patients with intrahepatic cholangiolithiasis for hepaticojejunostomy stricture with use of miniinvasive methods. In our centre during the period from 2002 till 2016 were treated in 58 patients with hepaticojejunostomy strictures. Thirteen patients from their was coexistant intrahepatic cholangiolithiasis. Forty-six (79.3%) patients was performed rehepaticojejunostomy. Twelve patients was performed a minimally invasive intervention such as laser recanalisation using double balloon enteroscopy (7 patients) and lithoextraction with double balloon enteroscopy (1), transhepatic cholangioscopy (2 patients) with laser lithotripsy (1), balloon dilatation of the stricture rehepaticojejunostomosis (4), lithoextraction (4), including with double balloon enteroscopy ("randevoux" procedure) (1), stenting (2). We observed several complication such as cholangitis (5); recurrent cholangiolithiasis (1); restricture of rehepaticojejunostomosis (2). Miniinvasive endoscopic techniques treatment and endobiliary correction of rehepaticojejunostomosis strictures and cholangiolithiasis have shown good results.

  13. Intrahepatic splenosis mimicking hepatic neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Neves Saad Teles

    Full Text Available Introduction: Splenosis is defined as the heterotopic autoimplantation of splenic tissue following trauma to or surgery on the spleen. Clinical case: We present a case of an asymptomatic 73-year-old male in whom hypervascular lesions were detected during routine exams. The patient reported a history of carotid artery surgery and cholecystectomy; he had a laparotomy incision from childhood but was unaware of the reason for it. The patient exhibited slightly elevated carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA levels. Histopathology revealed intrahepatic heterotopic splenic parenchyma, with no evidence of neoplasia in either of the two lesions, the diameters of which were 1.5 cm and 3.6 cm. Patient received outpatient follow-up care for 24 months and experienced no complications. Discussion: Our clinical, laboratory, and imaging exams failed to reveal the etiology of the lesion. Because the masses were hypervascular lesions, a percutaneous liver biopsy was not feasible. Conclusion: Through this report, we emphasize the importance of considering intrahepatic splenosis as a remote possibility in patients with hepatic nodules who have a history of splenectomy. Keywords: Splenosis, Neoplasia, Liver, Splenectomy

  14. Intrahepatic cholestasis with parental alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, B M; Hollenbeck, J I; Donnelly, W H; Talbert, J L

    1976-02-01

    From July 1971 to March 1975, elevan infants receiving total or partial parenteral alimentation at the University of Florida showed histologic evidence of intrahepatic cholestasis. The clinical records of these patients have been examined. These infants were critically ill and had protracted hospital courses with only two survivors. Liver biopsies demonstrated marked cholestasis with some fibrosis and thickening of the limiting membrane of the hepatocyte. In those patients in whom serial liver biopsies were obtained, hepatic histology returned toward normal, paralleling improvement in liver function studies, as intravenous alimentation was discontinued. Careful monitoring of the liver function tests is essential to detect this progressive abnormality as early as possible and discontinue intravenous alimentation. Follow-up as long as two and a half years in the two surviving patients has demonstrated no chronic dysfunction.

  15. Molecular profiling of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Douglas V N P; Zhang, Shanshan; Chen, Xin

    2017-01-01

    . Areas covered: The present review article outlines the main studies and resulting discoveries on the molecular profiling of iCCA, with a special emphasis on the different techniques used for this purpose, the diagnostic and prognostic markers identified, as well as the genes and pathways that could......INTRODUCTION: Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA) is the second most frequent primary tumor of the liver and a highly lethal disease. Therapeutic options for advanced iCCA are limited and ineffective due to the largely incomplete understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this deadly tumor...... be potentially targeted with innovative therapies. Expert commentary: Molecular profiling has led to the identification of distinct iCCA subtypes, characterized by peculiar genetic alterations and transcriptomic features. Targeted therapies against some of the identified genes are ongoing and hold great promise...

  16. Symptomatic stent cast.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keohane, John

    2012-02-03

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  17. Portosystemic pressure reduction achieved with TIPPS and impact of portosystemic collaterals for the prediction of the portosystemic-pressure gradient in cirrhotic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grözinger, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.groezinger@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Tübingen (Germany); Wiesinger, Benjamin; Schmehl, Jörg; Kramer, Ulrich [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Tübingen (Germany); Mehra, Tarun [Department of Dermatology, University of Tübingen (Germany); Grosse, Ulrich; König, Claudius [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Tübingen (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The portosystemic pressure gradient is an important factor defining prognosis in hepatic disease. However, noninvasive prediction of the gradient and the possible reduction by establishment of a TIPSS is challenging. A cohort of patients receiving TIPSS was evaluated with regard to imaging features of collaterals in cross-sectional imaging and the achievable reduction of the pressure gradient by establishment of a TIPSS. Methods: In this study 70 consecutive patients with cirrhotic liver disease were retrospectively evaluated. Patients received either CT or MR imaging before invasive pressure measurement during TIPSS procedure. Images were evaluated with regard to esophageal and fundus varices, splenorenal collaterals, short gastric vein and paraumbilical vein. Results were correlated with Child stage, portosystemic pressure gradient and post-TIPSS reduction of the pressure gradient. Results: In 55 of the 70 patients TIPSS reduced the pressure gradient to less than 12 mmHg. The pre-interventional pressure and the pressure reduction were not significantly different between Child stages. Imaging features of varices and portosystemic collaterals did not show significant differences. The only parameter with a significant predictive value for the reduction of the pressure gradient was the pre-TIPSS pressure gradient (r = 0.8, p < 0.001). Conclusions: TIPSS allows a reliable reduction of the pressure gradient even at high pre-interventional pressure levels and a high collateral presence. In patients receiving TIPSS the presence and the characteristics of the collateral vessels seem to be too variable to draw reliable conclusions concerning the portosystemic pressure gradient.

  18. Portosystemic pressure reduction achieved with TIPPS and impact of portosystemic collaterals for the prediction of the portosystemic-pressure gradient in cirrhotic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grözinger, Gerd; Wiesinger, Benjamin; Schmehl, Jörg; Kramer, Ulrich; Mehra, Tarun; Grosse, Ulrich; König, Claudius

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The portosystemic pressure gradient is an important factor defining prognosis in hepatic disease. However, noninvasive prediction of the gradient and the possible reduction by establishment of a TIPSS is challenging. A cohort of patients receiving TIPSS was evaluated with regard to imaging features of collaterals in cross-sectional imaging and the achievable reduction of the pressure gradient by establishment of a TIPSS. Methods: In this study 70 consecutive patients with cirrhotic liver disease were retrospectively evaluated. Patients received either CT or MR imaging before invasive pressure measurement during TIPSS procedure. Images were evaluated with regard to esophageal and fundus varices, splenorenal collaterals, short gastric vein and paraumbilical vein. Results were correlated with Child stage, portosystemic pressure gradient and post-TIPSS reduction of the pressure gradient. Results: In 55 of the 70 patients TIPSS reduced the pressure gradient to less than 12 mmHg. The pre-interventional pressure and the pressure reduction were not significantly different between Child stages. Imaging features of varices and portosystemic collaterals did not show significant differences. The only parameter with a significant predictive value for the reduction of the pressure gradient was the pre-TIPSS pressure gradient (r = 0.8, p < 0.001). Conclusions: TIPSS allows a reliable reduction of the pressure gradient even at high pre-interventional pressure levels and a high collateral presence. In patients receiving TIPSS the presence and the characteristics of the collateral vessels seem to be too variable to draw reliable conclusions concerning the portosystemic pressure gradient

  19. Endoscopic removal of malfunctioning biliary self-expandable metallic stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familiari, Pietro; Bulajic, Milutin; Mutignani, Massimiliano; Lee, Linda S; Spera, Gianluca; Spada, Cristiano; Tringali, Andrea; Costamagna, Guido

    2005-12-01

    Endoscopic removal of malfunctioning self-expandable metallic biliary stents (SEMS) is difficult and not well described. The aim of this study is to review the indications, the techniques, and the results of SEMS removal in a cohort of patients with malfunctioning stents. All patients who underwent an attempt at endoscopic removal of biliary SEMS over a 5-year period were retrospectively identified. The main indications for SEMS removal were the following: distal migration of the stent or impaction to the duodenum, impaction into the bile-duct wall, tissue ingrowth, and inappropriate length of the stent causing occlusion of intrahepatic ducts. SEMS were removed by using foreign-body forceps or polypectomy snares. Endoscopic removal of 39 SEMS (13 uncovered and 26 covered) was attempted in 29 patients (17 men; mean age, 66 years). SEMS extraction was attempted after a mean of 7.5 months (8.75 months standard deviation) post-SEMS insertion. Removal was successful in 20 patients (68.9%) and in 29 SEMS (74.3%). Covered SEMS were effectively removed more frequently than uncovered ones: 24 of 26 (92.3%) and 5 of 13 (38.4%), respectively (p < 0.05). No major complications were recorded. Multivariate analysis showed that the time interval between insertion and removal, SEMS length, stent-mesh design (zigzag vs. interlaced), and indication for removal were not predictive of success at stent removal. Endoscopic removal of biliary SEMS is feasible and safe in more than 70% of cases. Because only 38% of uncovered SEMS were removable, the presence of a stent covering is the only factor predictive of successful stent extraction. The presence of diffuse and severe ingrowth was the main feature limiting SEMS removal.

  20. Staged Transcatheter Treatment of Portal Hypoplasia and Congenital Portosystemic Shunts in Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan; Dagan, Tamir; Atar, Eli; Schwartz, Michael; Kachko, Ludmila; Superina, Riccardo; Amir, Gabriel; Shapiro, Rivka; Birk, Einat

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) with portal venous hypoplasia cause hyperammonemia. Acute shunt closure results in portal hypertension. A transcatheter method of staged shunt reduction to afford growth of portal vessels followed by shunt closure is reported. Methods: Pressure measurements and angiography in the CPSS or superior mesenteric artery (SMA) during temporary occlusion of the shunt were performed. If vessels were diminutive and the pressure was above 18 mmHg, a staged approach was performed, which included implantation of a tailored reducing stent to reduce shunt diameter by ∼50 %. Recatheterization was performed approximately 3 months later. If the portal pressure was below 18 mmHg and vessels had developed, the shunt was closed with a device. Results: Six patients (5 boys, 1 girl) with a median age of 3.3 (range 0.5–13) years had CPSS portal venous hypoplasia and hyperammonemia. Five patients underwent staged closure. One patient tolerated acute closure. One patient required surgical shunt banding because a reducing stent could not be positioned. At median follow-up of 3.8 (range 2.2–8.4) years, a total of 21 procedures (20 transcatheter, 1 surgical) were performed. In all patients, the shunt was closed with a significant reduction in portal pressure (27.7 ± 11.3 to 10.8 ± 1.8 mmHg; p = 0.016), significant growth of the portal vessels (0.8 ± 0.5 to 4.0 ± 2.4 mm; p = 0.037), and normalization of ammonia levels (202.1 ± 53.6 to 65.7 ± 9.6 μmol/L; p = 0.002) with no complications. Conclusion: Staged CPSS closure is effective in causing portal vessel growth and treating hyperammonemia

  1. Staged Transcatheter Treatment of Portal Hypoplasia and Congenital Portosystemic Shunts in Children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan, E-mail: elchananb@bezeqint.net; Dagan, Tamir [Schneider Children' s Medical Center Israel, Section of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel); Atar, Eli; Schwartz, Michael [Schneider Children' s Medical Center Israel, Section of Radiology (Israel); Kachko, Ludmila [Schneider Children' s Medical Center Israel, Section of Anesthesiology (Israel); Superina, Riccardo; Amir, Gabriel [Schneider Children' s Medical Center Israel, Section of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel); Shapiro, Rivka [Schneider Children' s Medical Center Israel, Section of Gastroenterology (Israel); Birk, Einat [Schneider Children' s Medical Center Israel, Section of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) with portal venous hypoplasia cause hyperammonemia. Acute shunt closure results in portal hypertension. A transcatheter method of staged shunt reduction to afford growth of portal vessels followed by shunt closure is reported. Methods: Pressure measurements and angiography in the CPSS or superior mesenteric artery (SMA) during temporary occlusion of the shunt were performed. If vessels were diminutive and the pressure was above 18 mmHg, a staged approach was performed, which included implantation of a tailored reducing stent to reduce shunt diameter by {approx}50 %. Recatheterization was performed approximately 3 months later. If the portal pressure was below 18 mmHg and vessels had developed, the shunt was closed with a device. Results: Six patients (5 boys, 1 girl) with a median age of 3.3 (range 0.5-13) years had CPSS portal venous hypoplasia and hyperammonemia. Five patients underwent staged closure. One patient tolerated acute closure. One patient required surgical shunt banding because a reducing stent could not be positioned. At median follow-up of 3.8 (range 2.2-8.4) years, a total of 21 procedures (20 transcatheter, 1 surgical) were performed. In all patients, the shunt was closed with a significant reduction in portal pressure (27.7 {+-} 11.3 to 10.8 {+-} 1.8 mmHg; p = 0.016), significant growth of the portal vessels (0.8 {+-} 0.5 to 4.0 {+-} 2.4 mm; p = 0.037), and normalization of ammonia levels (202.1 {+-} 53.6 to 65.7 {+-} 9.6 {mu}mol/L; p = 0.002) with no complications. Conclusion: Staged CPSS closure is effective in causing portal vessel growth and treating hyperammonemia.

  2. Aberrant hepatic lipid storage and metabolism in canine portosystemic shunts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Bossche, Lindsay; Schoonenberg, Vivien A.C.; Burgener, Iwan A.; Penning, Louis C.; Schrall, Ingrid M.; Kruitwagen, Hedwig S.; Van Wolferen, Monique E.; Grinwis, Guy C.M.; Kummeling, Anne; Rothuizen, Jan; Van Velzen, Jeroen F.; Stathonikos, Nikolas; Molenaar, Martijn R.; Helms, Bernd J.; Brouwers, Jos F.H.M.; Spee, Bart; Van Steenbeek, Frank G.

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a poorly understood multifactorial pandemic disorder. One of the hallmarks of NAFLD, hepatic steatosis, is a common feature in canine congenital portosystemic shunts. The aim of this study was to gain detailed insight into the pathogenesis of steatosis in

  3. Intrahepatic biliary tract adenocarcinoma. Review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encalada, Edmundo; Engracia, Ruth; Calle, Carlos; Rivera, Tania; Marengo, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    A seven years old patient, with a biliary tract tumoration, diagnosed by computerized tomography and eco, which had practice an exploratory laparotomy, finding an intrahepatic tumor at the left hepatic tract level, with a pathological diagnosis of papillary adenocarcinoma moderately differentiated the biliary tract. The surgery is the main treatment, auxiliary treatments with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. (The author)

  4. Use of transsplenic injection of agitated saline and heparinized blood for the ultrasonographic diagnosis of macroscopic portosystemic shunts in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ochoa, Pablo; Llabrés-Díaz, Francisco; Ruiz, Sergio; Corda, Andrea; Prieto, Saul; Sosa, Ivan; Gregori, Tommaso; Gascón, Manuel; Couto, Guillermo C

    2011-01-01

    We describe the use of ultrasonography-guided percutaneous splenic injection of agitated saline and heparinized blood for the diagnosis of portosystemic shunts (PSS) in 34 dogs. Agitated saline mixed with 1 ml of heparinized autologous blood was injected into the spleen of 34 sedated dogs under sonographic guidance. The transducer was then sequentially repositioned to visualize the portal vein, the caudal vena cava, and the right atrium through different acoustic windows. It was possible to differentiate between intrahepatic and extrahepatic shunts depending on the entry point of the microbubbles into the caudal vena cava. Portoazygos shunts and portocaval shunts could be differentiated based on the presence of microbubbles in the caudal vena cava and/or the right atrium. In one dog, collateral circulation due to portal hypertension was identified. In dogs with a single extrahepatic shunt, the microbubbles helped identify the shunting vessel. The technique was also used postoperatively to assess the efficacy of shunt closure. All abnormal vessels were confirmed by exploratory laparotomy or with ultrasonographic identification of the shunting vessel. Ultrasound-guided transsplenic injection of agitated saline with heparinized blood should be considered as a valuable technique for the diagnosis of PSS; it is easy to perform, safe, and the results are easily reproducible.

  5. Carotid Angioplasty and Stenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting Overview Carotid angioplasty (kuh-ROT-id AN-jee-o-plas-tee) and stenting ... to better see and examine the blood vessels. Food and medications You'll receive instructions on what ...

  6. Computed tomographic findings of intrahepatic peripheral cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Seong Ku; Suh, Soo Jhi; Kim, Ho Joon; Chun, Byung Hee

    1986-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is synonymous with bile duct carcinoma, and can originate in a small intrahepatic bile duct (peripheral type), a major intrahepatic duct including the hepatic hills, an extrahepatic duct, or near the papilla of Vater (central type). In a sense bile duct carcinoma of the peripheral type is cholangiocarcinoma of the liver; it has the same gross configuration as hepatocellular carcinoma, resulting in difficulty to differentiate on the CT. The authors studied CT findings of 14 cases of pathologically proven peripheral type cholangiocarcinoma of the liver during the last 4 years. The results were as follows: 1. Of 14 cases, 8 were female and 6 were male, and the age ranged from 5th to 7th decades. 2. Preoperative clinical diagnosis were as follows: hepatoma 8 cases, abscess 5 cases and metastasis 1 case in order of frequency. 3. Diagnosis were confirmed by hepatic lobectomy in 7 cases, wedge resection in 5 cases and needle biopsy in 2 case. 4. Laboratory findings were not specific, but there were only 2 cases with elevated alpha-fetoprotein level. 5. Associated diseases were gallstones in 1 case, intrahepatic duct stones in 1 case, extrahepatic duct stones in 2 cases, acute or chronic cholecystitis in 5 cases and CS in 3 cases. 6. Angiographic and scintigraphic findings were helpful in differential diagnosis from hepatoma but ultrasonography was non-specific. 7. The number of tumor were solitary in 12 cases and multiple in 2 cases. Among solitary cases, the site of involvement of the liver were right lobe in 8 cases and left lobe in 4 cases. 8. Common CT features of the intrahepatic peripheral cholangiocinoma of the liver were irregular, inhomogeneous, occasionally peripherally enhancing, low density liver mass, frequently accompanied by diffuse or segmental dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct. If there were normal alpha fetoprotein level, positive skin and/or stool examination for CS and diffuse or segmental dilatation of the intrahepatic duct

  7. Role of Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stent for Treatment of Benign Biliary Strictures and Bile Leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pausawasadi, Nonthalee [Department of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Soontornmanokul, Tanassanee; Rerknimitr, Rungsun [Department of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2012-02-15

    Endoscopic therapy by balloon dilation and placement of multiple large-bore plastic stents is the treatment of choice for benign biliary stricture. This approach is effective but it typically requires multiple endoscopic sessions given the short duration of stent patency. The endoscopic approach for treatment of bile leak involves the placement of a stent with or without biliary sphincterotomy. The self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has traditionally been used for palliation of malignant biliary strictures given the long duration of stent patency owing to their larger stent diameter. Recently, SEMS has been used in a variety of benign biliary strictures and leaks, especially with the design of the covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS), which permits endoscopic-mediated stent removal. The use of CSEMS in benign biliary stricture could potentially result in a decrease in endoscopic sessions and it is technically easier when compared to placement of multiple plastic stents. However, complications such as cholecystitis due to blockage of cystic duct, stent migration, infection and pancreatitis have been reported. The potential subsegmental occlusion of contralateral intrahepatic ducts also limits the use of CSEMS in hilar stricture. Certain techniques and improvement of stent design may overcome these challenges in the future. Thus, CSEMS may be appropriate in only highly selected conditions, such as refractory benign biliary stricture, despite multiple plastic stent placement or difficult to treat bile duct stricture from chronic pancreatitis, and should not be used routinely. This review focuses on the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stent for benign biliary strictures and bile leaks.

  8. Role of Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stent for Treatment of Benign Biliary Strictures and Bile Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pausawasadi, Nonthalee; Soontornmanokul, Tanassanee; Rerknimitr, Rungsun

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy by balloon dilation and placement of multiple large-bore plastic stents is the treatment of choice for benign biliary stricture. This approach is effective but it typically requires multiple endoscopic sessions given the short duration of stent patency. The endoscopic approach for treatment of bile leak involves the placement of a stent with or without biliary sphincterotomy. The self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has traditionally been used for palliation of malignant biliary strictures given the long duration of stent patency owing to their larger stent diameter. Recently, SEMS has been used in a variety of benign biliary strictures and leaks, especially with the design of the covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS), which permits endoscopic-mediated stent removal. The use of CSEMS in benign biliary stricture could potentially result in a decrease in endoscopic sessions and it is technically easier when compared to placement of multiple plastic stents. However, complications such as cholecystitis due to blockage of cystic duct, stent migration, infection and pancreatitis have been reported. The potential subsegmental occlusion of contralateral intrahepatic ducts also limits the use of CSEMS in hilar stricture. Certain techniques and improvement of stent design may overcome these challenges in the future. Thus, CSEMS may be appropriate in only highly selected conditions, such as refractory benign biliary stricture, despite multiple plastic stent placement or difficult to treat bile duct stricture from chronic pancreatitis, and should not be used routinely. This review focuses on the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stent for benign biliary strictures and bile leaks.

  9. Role of Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stent for Treatment of Benign Biliary Strictures and Bile Leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausawasadi, Nonthalee; Soontornmanokul, Tanassanee

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy by balloon dilation and placement of multiple large-bore plastic stents is the treatment of choice for benign biliary stricture. This approach is effective but it typically requires multiple endoscopic sessions given the short duration of stent patency. The endoscopic approach for treatment of bile leak involves the placement of a stent with or without biliary sphincterotomy. The self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has traditionally been used for palliation of malignant biliary strictures given the long duration of stent patency owing to their larger stent diameter. Recently, SEMS has been used in a variety of benign biliary strictures and leaks, especially with the design of the covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS), which permits endoscopic-mediated stent removal. The use of CSEMS in benign biliary stricture could potentially result in a decrease in endoscopic sessions and it is technically easier when compared to placement of multiple plastic stents. However, complications such as cholecystitis due to blockage of cystic duct, stent migration, infection and pancreatitis have been reported. The potential subsegmental occlusion of contralateral intrahepatic ducts also limits the use of CSEMS in hilar stricture. Certain techniques and improvement of stent design may overcome these challenges in the future. Thus, CSEMS may be appropriate in only highly selected conditions, such as refractory benign biliary stricture, despite multiple plastic stent placement or difficult to treat bile duct stricture from chronic pancreatitis, and should not be used routinely. This review focuses on the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stent for benign biliary strictures and bile leaks. PMID:22563290

  10. Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy of Primary Intrahepatic Stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung Hwan; Lee, Sung Koo; Min, Young Il; Lee, Mun Gyu; Sung, Kyu Bo; Cho, Kyung Sik; Lee, Sung Gyu; Min, Pyung Chul

    1992-01-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithothripsy (ESWL) was performed in intrahepatic stone patients (n = 18) by Dornier MPL 9,000 with ultrasound guidance. The patients had T-tube (n = 9) or percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainge tube (n = 9). Average treatment session was four and shock-wave numbers were in the range of 3,064 to 12,000 (average 6,288 shocks). Intrahepatic stones were removed completely in 16 patients over a 3 month period by ESWL and combined stone extraction maneuver such as cholangioscopic or interventional radiologic method. Extracorporeal shockwave lithothripsy was very helpful in facilitating extraction of stones in unfavorable locations or located above the severe stricture. In summary, extracorporeal Shockwave lithotripsy, followed by percutaneous stone extraction, will provide an improvement in the success rate and duration of treatment required for complete removal of primary hepatolithiasis. PMID:1477027

  11. Management of advanced hilar biliary malignancy with X-shaped stenting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Gyu Hyuk; You, Jin Jong; Ahn, In Oak; Na, Jae Boem; Chung, Sugn Hoon

    2000-01-01

    To report X-shaped stent insertion and its result in the patients with advanced hilar malignancy. X-shaped stents were inserted in six patients with advanced hilar malignancy involving segmental branches of both intrahepatic bile ducts (IHD). The causes were cholangiocarcinomas in five patients and recurrent GB cancer in one. The procedure includes three steps: 1) the insertion of two wires through three IHDs in an X configuration, using a stone basket; 2) balloon dilatation of lesions, and 3) the insertion of two stents in an as X configuration. Stents were inserted after balloon dilatation in five patients, and without balloon dilatation in one. Changes in serum bilirubin levels and procedure-related problems were reviewed. In all patients, serum bilirubin levels gradually decreased, but in two, they increased again. One of these two died of sepsis after 1 month. There was bile leakage through the puncture and bile was extracted from malignant ascites. In the other patient, occlusion of the left stent tip occurred, and additional left PTBD was performed 3 months later. Hemobilia developed in all five patients with balloon dilatation, these all experienced pain during dilatation, but afterwards this disappeared. One stent without pre-balloon dilation showed incomplete self-expansion at the crossing part and supplementary balloon dilatations were performed. In patients with advanced hilar malignancy,X-shaped stent insertion is a new palliation. Problems such as hemobilia, pain, and intraperitoneal bile leakage may, however, occur. (author)

  12. Bile Duct Anastomosis Supplied With Biodegradable Stent in Liver Transplantation: The Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janousek, L; Maly, S; Oliverius, M; Kocik, M; Kucera, M; Fronek, J

    2016-12-01

    The most common biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation are bile leaks, anastomotic and intrahepatic strictures, stones, and ampullary dysfunction. These complications can occur in up to 10% to 30% of liver transplant recipients. Leaks occur early in the posttransplant period; the stricture formation typically graduates over time. Ten patients underwent transplantation in our preliminary study: 5 were randomized to the group with stent placement and 5 to the control group. We investigated the role of an absorbable biliary stent with the goal of proving patency of duct-to-duct biliary anastomosis. The stents are made of machine-knitted polydioxanone monofilaments. Our initial results show that duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction using an absorbable internal stent had good patency in all 5 patients. There were no signs of biliary leakage accompanying the anastomoses in any of the cases, and there was no stone formation observed after liver transplantation. The biliary stent was completely absorbed, with no adverse effects. Based on our initial experience and data, we concluded that biodegradable stents can be successfully and safely used in clinical practice. Further large prospective randomized studies are needed to estimate the efficacy of the bioabsorbable stents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Computed tomography of hepatocellular carcinoma. Dilatation of intrahepatic bile duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soomi; Nakamura, Hitonobu; Tanaka, Ken; Hori, Shinichi; Tokunaga, Kou [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1983-10-01

    Based on a series of CT of the liver in 125 patients with hepatoma and 45 patients with metastatic hepatic tumors, the mode of dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct was examined. In patients with hepatoma, partia dilatations of intrahepatic bile duct were more commonly seen than general dilatations. On the other hand, there was no case of partial dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct in patients with metastatic hepatic tumors. It could be concluded that partial dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct is an useful CT finding to make a diagnosis of hepatoma, particularly to differentiate hepatoma from metastatic hepatic tumor.

  14. Intrahepatic chemoembolization in unresectable pediatric liver malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcement, C.M.; Towbin, R.B.; Meza, M.P.; Kaye, R.D.; Carr, B.I.; Gerber, D.A.; Mazariegos, G.V.; Reyes, J.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effectiveness of a new miltidisciplinary approach using neoadjuvant intrahepatic chemoembolization (IHCE) and liver transplant (OLTx) in patients with unresectable hepatic tumors who have failed systemic chemotherapy. Materials and methods. From November 1989 to April 1998, 14 children (2-15 years old) were treated with 50 courses of intra-arterial chemotherapy. Baseline and post-treatment contrast-enhanced CT and alpha-fetoprotein levels were performed. Seven had hepatoblastoma, and 7 had hepatocellular carcinoma (1 fibrolamellar variant). All patients had subselective hepatic angiography and infusion of cisplatin and/or adriamycin (36 courses were followed by gelfoam embolization). The procedure was repeated every 3-4 weeks based on hepatic function and patency of the hepatic artery. Results. Six of 14 children received orthotopic liver transplants (31 courses of IHC). Pretransplant, 3 of 6 showed a significant decrease in alpha-fetoprotein, while only 1 demonstrated a significant further reduction in tumor size. Three of 6 patients are disease free at this time. Three of 6 patients died of metastatic tumor 6, 38, and 58 months, respectively post-transplant. One of 14 is currently undergoing treatment, has demonstrated a positive response, and is awaiting OLTx. Three of 14 withdrew from the program and died. Four of 14 patients developed an increase in tumor size, developed metastatic disease, and were not transplant candidates. Two hepatic arteries thrombosed, and one child had a small sealed-off gastric ulcer as complications of intrahepatic chemoembolization. Conclusion. The results of intrahepatic chemoembolization are promising and suggest that some children who do not respond to systemic therapy can be eventually cured by a combination of intrahepatic chemoembolization orthotopic liver transplant. Alpha-fetoprotein and cross-sectional imaging appear to be complementary in evaluating tumor response. IHCE does not appear to convert

  15. Intrahepatic chemoembolization in unresectable pediatric liver malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcement, C.M.; Towbin, R.B.; Meza, M.P.; Kaye, R.D.; Carr, B.I. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Gerber, D.A.; Mazariegos, G.V.; Reyes, J. [Department of Transplant Surgery, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2000-11-01

    Objective. To determine the effectiveness of a new miltidisciplinary approach using neoadjuvant intrahepatic chemoembolization (IHCE) and liver transplant (OLTx) in patients with unresectable hepatic tumors who have failed systemic chemotherapy. Materials and methods. From November 1989 to April 1998, 14 children (2-15 years old) were treated with 50 courses of intra-arterial chemotherapy. Baseline and post-treatment contrast-enhanced CT and alpha-fetoprotein levels were performed. Seven had hepatoblastoma, and 7 had hepatocellular carcinoma (1 fibrolamellar variant). All patients had subselective hepatic angiography and infusion of cisplatin and/or adriamycin (36 courses were followed by gelfoam embolization). The procedure was repeated every 3-4 weeks based on hepatic function and patency of the hepatic artery. Results. Six of 14 children received orthotopic liver transplants (31 courses of IHC). Pretransplant, 3 of 6 showed a significant decrease in alpha-fetoprotein, while only 1 demonstrated a significant further reduction in tumor size. Three of 6 patients are disease free at this time. Three of 6 patients died of metastatic tumor 6, 38, and 58 months, respectively post-transplant. One of 14 is currently undergoing treatment, has demonstrated a positive response, and is awaiting OLTx. Three of 14 withdrew from the program and died. Four of 14 patients developed an increase in tumor size, developed metastatic disease, and were not transplant candidates. Two hepatic arteries thrombosed, and one child had a small sealed-off gastric ulcer as complications of intrahepatic chemoembolization. Conclusion. The results of intrahepatic chemoembolization are promising and suggest that some children who do not respond to systemic therapy can be eventually cured by a combination of intrahepatic chemoembolization orthotopic liver transplant. Alpha-fetoprotein and cross-sectional imaging appear to be complementary in evaluating tumor response. IHCE does not appear to convert

  16. Timing Affects Measurement of Portal Pressure Gradient After Placement of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts in Patients With Portal Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Junior, Gilberto; Turon, Fanny; Baiges, Anna; Cerda, Eira; García-Criado, Ángeles; Blasi, Annabel; Torres, Ferran; Hernandez-Gea, Virginia; Bosch, Jaume; Garcia-Pagan, Juan Carlos

    2017-05-01

    A reduction in portal pressure gradient (PPG) to portal hypertension who received placement of TIPS from January 2008 through October 2015; patients were followed until March 2016. We compared PPG values measured at different time points and under different conditions: immediately after placement of TIPS (immediate PPG); at least 24 hours after placement to TIPS into hemodynamically stable patients, without sedation (early PPG); and again 1 month after TIPS placement (late PPG). The immediate PPG differed significantly from the early PPG, regardless of whether the TIPS was placed using general anesthesia (8.5 ± 3.5 mm Hg vs 10 ± 3.5 mm Hg; P = .015) or deep sedation (12 ± 4 mm Hg vs 10.5 ± 4 mm Hg; P <.001). In considering the 12 mm Hg threshold, concordance between immediate PPG and early PPG values was poor. However, there was no significant difference between mean early PPG and late PPG values (8.5 ± 2.5 mm Hg vs 8 ± 3 mm Hg), or between proportions of patients with early PPG vs late PPG values <12 mm Hg threshold. Maintenance of a PPG value <12 mm Hg during the follow-up period was associated with a lower risk of recurrent or de novo variceal bleeding or ascites (hazard ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.04 0.27; P < .001). In a retrospective study of patients with PPG values measured at different time points after TIPS placement, we found measurements of PPG in awake, hemodynamically stable patients at least 24 hours after TIPS to be the best maintained values. Our findings support the concept that PPG value <12 mm Hg after TIPS placement is associated with reduced risk of bleeding and ascites. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. No difference in portal and hepatic venous bacterial DNA in patients with cirrhosis undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt insertion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Christian; Karlsen, Stine; Grønbaek, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial translocation (BT) with immune activation may lead to hemodynamical alterations and poor outcomes in patients with cirrhosis.......Bacterial translocation (BT) with immune activation may lead to hemodynamical alterations and poor outcomes in patients with cirrhosis....

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) in the Treatment of Venous Symptomatic Chronic Portal Thrombosis in Non-cirrhotic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, Jose I.; Elorz, Mariana; Vivas, Isabel; Martinez-Cuesta, Antonio; Bastarrika, Gorka; Benito, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To present a series of cases of non-cirrhotic patients with symptomatic massive portal thrombosis treated by percutaneous techniques. All patients underwent a TIPS procedure in order to maintain the patency of the portal vein by facilitating the outflow. Methods: A total of six patients were treated for thrombosis of the main portal vein (6/6); the main right and left branches (3/6) and the splenic vein (5/6) and superior mesenteric vein (6/6). Two patients had a pancreatic malignancy; one patient with an orthotopic liver transplant had been surgically treated for a pancreatic carcinoma. Two patients had idiopathic thrombocytosis, and in the remaining patient no cause for the portal thrombosis was identified. During the initial procedure in each patient one or more approaches were tried: transhepatic (5/6), transileocolic (1/6), trans-splenic (1/6) or transjugular (1/6). In all cases the procedure was completed with a TIPS with either ultrasound guidance (3/6), 'gun-shot' technique (2/6) or fluoroscopic guidance (1/6).Results: No complications were observed during the procedures. One patient had a repeat episode of variceal bleeding at 30 months, one patient remained asymptomatic and was lost to follow-up at 24 months, two patients were successfully treated surgically (cephalic duodenopancreatectomy) and are alive at 4 and 36 months. One patient remains asymptomatic (without new episodes of abdominal pain) at 16 months of follow-up. One patient died because of tumor progression at 10 months. Conclusion: Percutaneous techniques for portal recanalization are an interesting alternative even in non-acute thrombosis. Once flow has been restored in the portal vein TIPS may be necessary to obtain an adequate outflow, hence facilitating and maintaining the portal flow

  19. Hepatic Rupture Induced by Spontaneous Intrahepatic Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-bao Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of hepatic rupture is usually secondary to trauma, and hepatic rupture induced by spontaneous intrahepatic hematoma is clinically rare. We describe here a 61-year-old female patient who was transferred to our hospital with hepatic rupture induced by spontaneous intrahepatic hematoma. The patient had no history of trauma and had a history of systemic lupus erythematosus for five years, taking a daily dose of 5 mg prednisone for treatment. The patients experienced durative blunt acute right upper abdominal pain one day after satiation, which aggravated in two hours, accompanied by dizziness and sweating. Preoperative diagnosis was rupture of the liver mass. Laparotomy revealed 2500 mL fluid consisting of a mixture of blood and clot in the peritoneal cavity. A 3.5 cm × 2.5 cm rupture was discovered on the hepatic caudate lobe near the vena cava with active arterial bleeding, and a 5  × 6 cm hematoma was reached on the right posterior lobe of the liver. Abdominal computed tomography (CT and laparotomy revealed spontaneous rupture of intrahepatic hematoma with hemorrhagic shock. The patient was successfully managed by suturing the rupture of the hepatic caudate lobe and clearing part of the hematoma. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after two weeks of hospitalization.

  20. Multidetector CT portal venography in evaluation of portosystemic collateral vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, A.; Jain, M.

    2008-01-01

    This essay shows the usefulness of multidetector CT angiography for evaluation of the splenoportal venous system, which is essential in the management of patients with portal hypertension and its complications, such as portal vein thrombosis. By providing scanning with reconstruction of thin axial source images and reformatting into thicker multiplanar reformats, multidetector CT can help to determine the extent and location of portosystemic collateral vessels in patients with portal hypertension and is probably the optimal imaging technique in this setting.

  1. Successful Reversal of Chronic Incapacitating Post-TIPS Encephalopathy by Balloon Occlusion of the Stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphna Fenyves

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS placement is a new technique allowing decompression of the portal system without the need for abdominal surgery or general anesthetic. This promising procedure appears safe, and is being evaluated in the context of life threatening uncontrollable variceal hemorrhage as well as ascites refractory to medical treatment. Following TIPS, portal flow diversion is associated with hepatic encephalopathy in up to 25% of patients. This is most often mild and treatable but may become uncontrollable, incapacitating and even life threatening in up to 3 to 5% of cases. The authors present two patients in whom such life threatening encephalopathy and stupor was reversed by transjugular balloon occlusion of the TIPS.

  2. Frequency of helicobacter pylori antibodies in porto-systemic encephalopathy,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethar, G.H.; Ahmed, R.; Afsar, S.; Zuberi, B.F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the frequency of Helicobacter pylori antibodies in patients presenting with porto-systemic encephalopathy due to liver disease. Patients and Methods: During the study period, seventy-six patients of porto-systemic encephalopathy due to liver diseases was selected. These subjects were evaluated for hepatic encephalopathy grade, modified Child-Pugh classification and were managed according to the standard practices. These patients were evaluated for Helicobacter (H. pylori) antibody status by ELlSA (Abbott Laboratories) method. Results: Out of 76 patients studied and tested for H. pylori antibodies, 48(63.2%) were males and 28(36.8%) were females with age ranging between 17 and 85 years. Out of 76 patients who presented with porto-systemic encephalopathy, 59(77.6%) had a positive H. pylori antibody test. Thirty-five of these were males and 24 were females. A significant number of patients who presented with higher grade of encephalopathy were H. pylori antibody positive (p<0.001). Conclusion: In this study, frequency of H. pylori antibodies was significantly high in patients of porto-systematic encephalopathy. (author)

  3. Circumferential Stent Fracture: Novel Detection and Treatment with the Use of StentBoost

    OpenAIRE

    Ramegowda, Raghu T.; Chikkaswamy, Srinivas B.; Bharatha, Ashalatha; Radhakrishna, Jayashree; Krishnanaik, Geetha B.; Nanjappa, Manjunath C.; Panneerselvam, Arunkumar

    2012-01-01

    Circumferential stent fracture is extremely uncommon, and in rare cases, it can cause stent thrombosis. Recognizing stent fracture can be difficult on conventional fluoroscopy because of poor stent radiopacity. We found that StentBoost image acquisition yields improved visibility of stent struts, enabling the identification of stent fracture and the precise positioning of new stents over previously stented segments.

  4. Modified nasolacrimal duct stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Min; Jin Mei; Chen Huanjun; Li Yi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Traditional nasolacrimal duct stenting possesses some shortcoming including difficulty of pulling ball head guide wire from the nasal cavity with turbinate hypertrophy and nasal septal deviation. The new method of nose-oral tube track establishment can overcome the forementioned and increase the successful rate. Methods: 5 F catheter and arterial sheath were modified to be nasolacrimal duct stent delivery device respectively. Antegrade dacryocystography was taken firstly to display the obstructed site and followed by the modified protocol of inserting the guide wire through nasolacrimal duct and nasal cavity, and establishing the stent delivery track for retrograde stent placement. Results: 5 epiphora patients with failure implantation by traditional method were all succeeded through the modified stenting (100%). During 6-mouth follow-up, no serious complications and reocclusion occurred. Conclusion: The establishment of eye-nose-mouth-nose of external nasal guide wire track can improve the successful rate of nasolacrimal duct stenting. (authors)

  5. Auxetic coronary stent endoprosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Faisal; Ali, Murtaza Najabat; Ansari, Umar

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular heart disease is one of the leading health issues in the present era and requires considerable health care resources to prevent it. The present study was focused on the development of a new coronary stent based on novel auxetic geometry which enables the stent to exhibit...... a negative Poisson's ratio. Commercially available coronary stents have isotropic properties, whereas the vascular system of the body shows anisotropic characteristics. This results in a mismatch between anisotropic-isotropic properties of the stent and arterial wall, and this in turn is not favorable...... for mechanical adhesion of the commercially available coronary stents with the arterial wall. It is believed that an auxetic coronary stent with inherent anisotropic mechanical properties and negative Poisson's ratio will have good mechanical adhesion with the arterial wall. METHODS: The auxetic design...

  6. Differential diagnosis of benign intrahepatic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, R.; Herter, M.; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg

    1983-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of benign intrahepatic tumours can be very difficult despite numerous non-invasive diagnostic approaches, as is evident from two case reports presented here. The problem appears particularly intricate if two or more masses or space-occupying growths are present at the same time, the diagnostic aspects being different. In the first case, echinococcus alveolaris occurred simultaneously with a cavernous haemangioma and a focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH). In the second case, FNH as a pendulating tumour was combined with a second focus in the superior part of the liver. These two examples are used as basis for discussing various diagnostic approaches, such as sonography, computed tomography and scintiscanning. (orig.) [de

  7. Differential diagnosis of benign intrahepatic tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, R.; Herter, M.

    1983-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of benign intrahepatic tumours can be very difficult despite numerous non-invasive diagnostic approaches, as is evident from two case reports presented here. The problem appears particularly intricate if two or more masses or space-occupying growths are present at the same time, the diagnostic aspects being different. In the first case, echinococcus alveolaris occurred simultaneously with a cavernous haemangioma and a focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH). In the second case, FNH as a pendulating tumour was combined with a second focus in the superior part of the liver. These two examples are used as basis for discussing various diagnostic approaches, such as sonography, computed tomography and scintiscanning.

  8. Idiopathic Non-Cirrhotic Intrahepatic Portal Hypertension (NCIPH)—Newer Insights into Pathogenesis and Emerging Newer Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ashish; Elias, Joshua E.; Eapen, Chundamannil E.; Ramakrishna, Banumathi; Elias, Elwyn

    2014-01-01

    Chronic microangiopathy of portal venules results in idiopathic non-cirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension (NCIPH). Recent data suggest a role for vasoactive factors of portal venous origin in the pathogenesis of this ‘pure’ vasculopathy of the liver. Enteropathies (often silent), are an important ‘driver’ of this disease. NCIPH is under-recognized and often mis-labeled as cryptogenic cirrhosis. Liver biopsy is needed to prove the diagnosis of NCIPH. In these patients, with advancing disease and increased porto-systemic shunting, the portal venous vasoactive factors bypass the liver filter and contribute to the development of pulmonary vascular endothelial disorders—porto-pulmonary hypertension and hepato-pulmonary syndrome as well as mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis. Prognosis in NCIPH patients is determined by presence, recognition and management of associated disorders. With better understanding of the pathogenesis of NCIPH, newer treatment options are being explored. Imbalance in ADAMTS 13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13): vWF (von-Willebrand factor) ratio is documented in NCIPH patients and may have a pathogenic role. Therapeutic interventions to correct this imbalance may prove to be important in the management of NCIPH. PMID:25755567

  9. Multidisciplinary management of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: Current approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guro, Hanisah; Kim, Jin Won; Choi, YoungRok; Cho, Jai Young; Yoon, Yoo-Seok; Han, Ho-Seong

    2017-06-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a common primary hepatic tumor. However, its outcomes are usually worse than those of hepatocellular carcinoma owing to its non-specific presentation and detection at an advanced stage. The most widely used serum marker, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, is non-specific. Furthermore, imaging studies rarely identify any pathognomonic features. Surgery is the only treatment option that offers a chance of long-term survival. However, the resectability rate is low owing to the high frequencies of intrahepatic metastases, peritoneal carcinomatosis, or extrahepatic metastases. Surgical treatment should be tailored according to the macroscopic classification of ICC (e.g. mass-forming, periductal infiltrating, and intraductal growth types) because it reflects the tumor's dissemination pattern. Although lymph node metastasis is a negative prognostic factor, the importance and extent of lymph node dissection is still controversial. To improve patient survival, liver transplantation is considered in some patients with unresectable ICC, especially in those with an insufficient remnant liver volume. Minimally invasive procedures, including laparoscopic and robotic liver resection, have been tested and achieved comparable outcomes to conventional surgery in preliminary studies. No randomized trials have confirmed the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in ICC, and several trials have evaluated molecular-targeted agents as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. Multidisciplinary approaches are necessary to improve the outcomes of ICC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Current research on progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DENG Baocheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC refers to a heterogeneous group of autosomal-recessive disorders. The estimated incidence varies between 1/50,000 and 1/100,000 births. Three types of PFIC have been identified and related to mutations in hepatocellular transport system genes involved in bile formation. PFIC-1, PFIC-2, and PFIC-3 are due to mutations in ATP8B1, ABCB11, and ABCB4 genes involved in bile secretion, respectively. Serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase is normal in patients with PFIC-1 and PFIC-2, while it is raised in patients with PFIC3. The main clinical manifestation of PFIC is severe intrahepatic cholestasis. PFIC usually appears in infancy or childhood and rapidly progresses to end-stage liver disease before adulthood. Diagnosis of this disease is based on clinical manifestations, liver function tests, liver ultrasonography, liver histology, and genetic testing. Ursodeoxycholic acid therapy is the initial treatment in all PFIC patients to prevent liver damage. In some PFIC1 and PFIC2 patients, biliary diversion may also relieve pruritus and slow disease progression. However, most PFIC patients are ultimately candidates for liver transplantation.

  11. StentBoost Visualization for the Evaluation of Coronary Stent Expansion During Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Cura, Fernando; Albertal, Mariano; Candiello, Alfonsina; Nau, Gerardo; Bonvini, Victor; Tricherri, Hernan; Padilla, Lucio T.; Belardi, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Inadequate stent implantation is associated with stent thrombosis and restenosis. StentBoost can enhance stent visualization and evaluate stent expansion. Currently, there are limited comparison studies between StentBoost and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). We aimed to test the correlation and agreement between IVUS and StentBoost measurements. Methods From December 2010 to December 2011, 38 patients (54 stents) were analyzed using IVUS and StentBoost. Minimal stent diameter and...

  12. Rescue EUS-guided intrahepatic biliary drainage for malignant hilar biliary stricture after failed transpapillary re-intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaga, Kosuke; Takenaka, Mamoru; Kitano, Masayuki; Chiba, Yasutaka; Imai, Hajime; Yamao, Kentaro; Kamata, Ken; Miyata, Takeshi; Omoto, Shunsuke; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Nishida, Naoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2017-11-01

    Treatment of unresectable malignant hilar biliary stricture (UMHBS) is challenging, especially after failure of repeated transpapillary endoscopic stenting. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided intrahepatic biliary drainage (EUS-IBD) is a recent technique for intrahepatic biliary decompression, but indications for its use for complex hilar strictures have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of EUS-IBD for UMHBS after failed transpapillary re-intervention. Retrospective analysis of all consecutive patients with UMHBS of Bismuth II grade or higher who, between December 2008 and May 2016, underwent EUS-IBD after failed repeated transpapillary interventions. The technical success, clinical success, and complication rates were evaluated. Factors associated with clinical ineffectiveness of EUS-IBD were explored. A total of 30 patients (19 women, median age 66 years [range 52-87]) underwent EUS-IBD for UMHBS during the study period. Hilar biliary stricture morphology was classified as Bismuth II, III, or IV in 5, 13, and 12 patients, respectively. The median number of preceding endoscopic interventions was 4 (range 2-14). EUS-IBD was required because the following procedures failed: duodenal scope insertion (n = 4), accessing the papilla after duodenal stent insertion (n = 5), or achieving desired intrahepatic biliary drainage (n = 21). Technical success with EUS-IBD was achieved in 29 of 30 patients (96.7%) and clinical success was attained in 22 of these 29 (75.9%). Mild peritonitis occurred in three of 30 (10%) and was managed conservatively. Stent dysfunction occurred in 23.3% (7/30). There was no procedure-related mortality. On multivariable analysis, Bismuth IV stricture predicted clinical ineffectiveness (odds ratio = 12.7, 95% CI 1.18-135.4, P = 0.035). EUS-IBD may be a feasible and effective rescue alternative with few major complications after failed transpapillary endoscopic re-intervention in patients

  13. Intrahepatic ascariasis – Common parasite at an uncommon site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udit Chauhan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections of the biliary tree are common infections of the biliary system which frequently lead to life-threatening sepsis. Parasitic infections of the biliary tree like ascariasis are not uncommon. Most adult worms reside into the extrahepatic biliary system. Intrahepatic existence is not commonly described. Urgent recognition of the intrahepatic existence of this common parasite is of paramount importance in order to start timely treatment of this lifethreatening infection. Authors described a case of intrahepatic ascariasis in a young male who was diagnosed radiologically and thereafter managed with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and antibiotics.

  14. Computed tomography of localized dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, T.; Itai, Y.; Tasaka, A.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients showed localized dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts on computed tomography, usually unaccompanied by jaundice. Congenital dilatation was diagnosed when associated with a choledochal cyst, while cholangiographic contrast material was helpful in differentiating such dilatation from a simple cyst by showing its communication with the biliary tract when no choledochal cyst was present. Obstructive dilatation was associated with intrahepatic calculi in 4 cases, hepatoma in 9, cholangioma in 5, metastatic tumor in 5, and polycystic disease in 2. Cholangioma and intrahepatic calculi had a greater tendency to accompany such localized dilatation; in 2 cases, the dilatation was the only clue to the underlying disorder

  15. Predictors of early stent occlusion among plastic biliary stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashab, Mouen A; Kim, Katherine; Hutfless, Susan; Lennon, Anne Marie; Kalloo, Anthony N; Singh, Vikesh K

    2012-09-01

    A major disadvantage of plastic biliary stents is their short patency rates. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of early stent occlusion among patients receiving conventional plastic biliary stents. Early stent occlusion was defined as worsening cholestatic liver test results of a severity sufficiently significant to warrant ERCP with stent exchange prior to the planned stent exchange, or as symptoms of cholangitis. The association of cumulative stent diameter, demographics, stricture location, procedure indication, Charlson comorbidity index, history of prior early stent occlusion, presence of gallbladder, and performance of sphincteromy with the occurrence of early stent occlusion was studied using logistic regression and multivariate analysis. Our patient cohort comprised 343 patients (mean age 59.3 years) who underwent 561 ERCP procedures with the placement of one or more plastic biliary stents (mean number of stents per procedure 1.2, mean total diameter of stents per procedure 12 Fr). Early stent occlusion occurred in 73 (13 %) procedures. Female gender was protective against early stent occlusion (adjusted OR 0.54, 95 % CI 0.32-0.90, p = 0.02), while hilar stricture location was independently associated with a significantly increased risk of early stent occlusion (adjusted OR 3.41, 95 % CI 1.68-6.90, p = 0.0007). Early occlusion of conventional biliary stents occurred in 13 % of cases. While female gender decreased the risk of early stent occlusion, hilar stricture location was a significant predictor of early stent occlusion. Our results suggest that physicians should consider early elective stent exchange in patients with hilar strictures.

  16. Portosystemic shunts for extrahepatic portal hypertension in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocornal, J; Cruz, F

    1981-07-01

    Twenty-three children with prehepatic portal hypertension and hemorrhage due to ruptured esophagogastric varices had portosystemic shunts. Their ages ranged from two years and seven months to 15 years. Eleven were less than eight years of age. Twenty patients had portal vein cavernomatosis and three patients had double portal veins. In 21 patients, a mesocaval type of shunt was done. A splenorenal shunt was performed in two. There was no surgical mortality. Two shunts occluded, both in rather young infants--two years and seven months and three years of age. In all the others, there was no further bleeding, and the shunts remained patent, as shown by abdominal angiograms. Neuropsychiatric disorders, probably due to hepatic encephalopathy, occurred in only one patient. On the basis of this favorable experience, we believe that an elective portosystemic shunt should, in general, be performed upon children with prehepatic portal hypertension after one major variceal hemorrhage. We favor a mesocaval type of shunt in these children because of the larger diameter of the vessels involved in the anastomosis and because it preserves the spleen, maintaining defense against subsequent infection.

  17. Histologic examination of hepatic biopsy samples as a prognostic indicator in dogs undergoing surgical correction of congenital portosystemic shunts: 64 cases (1997-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jacquelyn S; Monnet, Eric; Powers, Barbara E; Twedt, David C

    2008-05-15

    To determine whether results of histologic examination of hepatic biopsy samples could be used as an indicator of survival time in dogs that underwent surgical correction of a congenital portosystemic shunt (PSS). Retrospective case series. 64 dogs that underwent exploratory laparotomy for an extrahepatic (n = 39) or intrahepatic (25) congenital PSS. All H&E-stained histologic slides of hepatic biopsy samples obtained at the time of surgery were reviewed by a single individual, and severity of histologic abnormalities (ie, arteriolar hyperplasia, biliary hyperplasia, fibrosis, cell swelling, lipidosis, lymphoplasmacytic cholangiohepatitis, suppurative cholangiohepatitis, lipid granulomas, and dilated sinusoids) was graded. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to determine whether each histologic feature was associated with survival time. Median follow-up time was 35.7 months, and median survival time was 50.6 months. Thirty-eight dogs were alive at the time of final follow-up; 15 had died of causes associated with the PSS, including 4 that died immediately after surgery; 3 had died of unrelated causes; and 8 were lost to follow-up. None of the histologic features examined were significantly associated with survival time. Findings suggested that results of histologic examination of hepatic biopsy samples obtained at the time of surgery cannot be used to predict long-term outcome in dogs undergoing surgical correction of a PSS.

  18. Abnormal Gas Diffusing Capacity and Portosystemic Shunt in Patients With Chronic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Moon-Seung; Lee, Min-Ho; Park, Yoo-Sin; Kim, Shin-Hee; Kwak, Min-Jung; Kang, Ju-Seop

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary dysfunctions including the hepatopulmonary syndrome and portosystemic shunt are important complications of hepatic cirrhosis. To investigate the severity and nature of abnormal gas diffusing capacity and its correlation to portosystemic shunt in patients with chronic liver disease. Methods Forty-four patients with chronic liver disease (15 chronic active hepatitis (CAH), 16 Child-Pugh class A, and 13 Child-Pugh class B) without other diseases history were enrolled in the ...

  19. Spectral Imaging for Intracranial Stents and Stent Lumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chi-Lun; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Chen, Chi-Jen; Hsu, Hui-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Application of computed tomography for monitoring intracranial stents is limited because of stent-related artifacts. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of gemstone spectral imaging on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. In vitro, we scanned Enterprise stent phantom and a stent-cheese complex using the gemstone spectral imaging protocol. Follow-up gemstone spectral images of 15 consecutive patients with placement of Enterprise from January 2013 to September 2014 were also retrospectively reviewed. We used 70-keV, 140-keV, iodine (water), iodine (calcium), and iodine (hydroxyapatite) images to evaluate their effect on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. Two regions of interest were individually placed in stent lumen and adjacent brain tissue. Contrast-to-noise ratio was measured to determine image quality. The maximal diameter of stent markers was also measured to evaluate stent-related artifact. Two radiologists independently graded the visibility of the lumen at the maker location by using a 4-point scale. The mean of grading score, contrast/noise ratio and maximal diameter of stent markers were compared among all modes. All results were analyzed by SPSS version 20. In vitro, iodine (water) images decreased metallic artifact of stent makers to the greatest degree. The most areas of cheese were observed on iodine (water) images. In vivo, iodine (water) images had the smallest average diameter of stent markers (0.33 ± 0.17mm; P stent lumen (160.03 ±37.79; P stent-related artifacts of Enterprise and enhance contrast of in-stent lumen. Spectral imaging may be considered a noninvasive modality for following-up patients with in-stent stenosis.

  20. Percutaneous Ureteral stent insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Wook; Choi, Woo Suk; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-10-15

    Percutaneous ureteral stent insertion is a treatment of permanent or temporary urinary diversion to maintain continuity and function of the obstructed and injured ureter. We performed 31 cases of percutaneous double pig tall ureteral stent insertion in 21 patients, included 13 patients with malignant ureteral obstruction and eight patients with injured ureter as well as benign inflammatory stricture. Satisfactory resulted was obtained in all patients but one, who need percutaneous nephrostomy on week later for urinary diversion. No significant complication was encountered. The authors concluded that percutaneous ureteral stent insertion, an interventional procedure alternative to urologic retrograde method, is an effective method for urinary diversion.

  1. Pneumoperitoneum after Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography due to Rupture of Intrahepatic Bile Ducts and Glisson’s Capsule in Hepatic Metastasis: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubair Khan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP has been proven to be a safe and effective method for diagnosis and treatment of biliary and pancreatic disorders. Major complications of ERCP include pancreatitis, hemorrhage, cholangitis, and duodenal perforation. We report a third case in literature of pneumoperitoneum after ERCP due to rupture of intrahepatic bile ducts and Glisson’s capsule in a peripheral hepatic lesion. Case Report: A 50-year-old male with a history of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and who had a partially covered metallic stent placed in the biliary tree 1 year ago presented to the oncology clinic with fatigue, abdominal pain, and hypotension. He was planned for ERCP for possible cholangitis secondary to obstructed previously placed biliary stent. However, the duodenoscope could not be advanced to the level of the major papilla because of narrowed pylorus and severely strictured duodenal sweep. Forward-view gastroscope was then passed with careful manipulation to the severely narrowed second part of the duodenum where the previously placed metallic stent was visualized. Balloon sweeping of stenting was done. Cholangiography did not show any leak. Following the procedure, the patient underwent CT scan of the abdomen that showed pneumoperitoneum which was communicating with pneumobilia through a loculated air collection in necrotic hepatic metastasis perforating Glisson’s capsule. The patient was managed conservatively. Conclusion: In our case, pneumoperitoneum resulted from rupture of intrahepatic bile ducts and Glisson’s capsule in hepatic metastasis. This case emphasizes the need for close clinical and radiological observation of patients with hepatic masses (primary or metastatic subjected to ERCP.

  2. Clinical grading of Intrahepatic Cholestasis Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Pradhan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP is the pregnancy induced liver disorder causing intense itching of palm, sole or even whole body especially in the evening at late second and third trimester. This disease categorized into mild and severe ICP according to raised level of LFT including serum level of Bile acid and Cholic acid. ICP has less morbidity to mother but significant risk for fetus in uterus. The predisposing element to cause intense pruritus is because of high amount of bile acid in maternal serum. Toxic bile acids affect fetal cardiomyocytes that retained in fetus body causing sudden intrauterine fetal death. ICP is commonly found in winter months and mostly itching of body occurs in the evening after sunset. Fetus in uterus is unsafe if mother’s bile acid exceeds normal value. ICP is successfully treated with Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, S-adenosyl methionine (SAME, Dexamethasone and vitamin K. Keywords: itching; bile acid; obstetric cholestasis; Ursodeoxycholic cholic acid.

  3. Solitary intrahepatic bile-duct cyst presenting with Jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Mi; Chun, Ki Sung; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Bahk, Yong Whee; Kim, Jun Gi

    1989-01-01

    Caroli's disease is an uncommon condition, and characterized by congenital segmental saccular dilatation of intrahepatic bile ducts. A case of Caroli's disease, manifested by only a large communicating cystic dilatation of left intrahepatic bile duct and causing extrinsic pressure over the extrahepatic bile duct, is presented. The patient was 43-year-old housewife, hospitalized because of abdominal distension and severe jaundice. To relieve jaundice and alleviate surgical intervention, percutaneous drainage of the bile-duct cyst preceded surgery

  4. Intravascular ultrasound assessed incomplete stent apposition and stent fracture in stent thrombosis after bare metal versus drug-eluting stent treatment the Nordic Intravascular Ultrasound Study (NIVUS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosonen, Petteri; Vikman, Saila; Jensen, Lisette Okkels

    2012-01-01

    This prospective multicenter registry used intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in patients with definite stent thrombosis (ST) to compare rates of incomplete stent apposition (ISA), stent fracture and stent expansion in patients treated with drug-eluting (DES) versus bare metal (BMS) stents. ST...... is a rare, but potential life threatening event after coronary stent implantation. The etiology seems to be multifactorial....

  5. Percutaneous placement of ureteral stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hyup; Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Joon Koo; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    Antegrade placement of ureteral stents has successfully achieved in 41 of 46 ureters. When it was difficult to advance ureteral stents through the lesion, it was facilitated by retrograde guide-wire snare technique through urethra. Complications associated with the procedure were non-function of ureteral stent by occlusion, upward migration,and spontaneous fracture of ureteral stent. These complications were managed by percutaneous nephrostomy and removal of ureteral stents by guide-wire snare technique and insertion of a new ureteral stent. While blood cell in urine was markedly increased in about 50% of patients following the procedure.

  6. Drug-eluting stents to prevent stent thrombosis and restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eui; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Although first-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have significantly reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis, they have also increased the long-term risk of stent thrombosis. This safety concern directly triggered the development of new generation DES, with innovations in stent platforms, polymers, and anti-proliferative drugs. Stent platform materials have evolved from stainless steel to cobalt or platinum-chromium alloys with an improved strut design. Drug-carrying polymers have become biocompatible or biodegradable and even polymer-free DES were introduced. New limus-family drugs (such as everolimus, zotarolimus or biolimus) were adopted to enhance stent performances. As a result, these new DES demonstrated superior vascular healing responses on intracoronary imaging studies and lower stent thrombotic events in actual patients. Recently, fully-bioresorbable stents (scaffolds) have been introduced, and expanding their applications. In this article, the important concepts and clinical results of new generation DES and bioresorbable scaffolds are described.

  7. Drug eluting stents and modern stent technologies for in-stent restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Martin

    2017-08-01

    The implantation of metallic stents has become a standard procedure to improve the outcome after angioplasty of peripheral vessels. However, the occurrence of in-stent restenosis is hampering the long-term efficacy of these procedures and is associated with re-occurrence of symptoms. The optimal treatment modality for in-stent-restenosis in the peripheral vasculature is not well examined. This review discusses the existing evidence for the treatment of in-stent restenosis with drug eluting stents and modern stent technologies.

  8. The risk and prognostic impact of definite stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis after coronary stent implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thayssen, Per; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Lassen, Jens Flensted

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Data are limited on the prognostic impact of stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis in patients treated with coronary stents. We examined the prognostic impact of stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis in patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods and results......: All patients who underwent stent implantation from 2002 to 2005 were identified in the Western Denmark Heart Registry. The hazard ratio (HR) for death associated with stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis was estimated with a Cox regression analysis with stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis...... as time-dependent variables. A total of 12,277 patients were treated with stent implantation. Stent thrombosis was observed in 111 (0.9%) patients and in-stent restenosis in 503 (4.1%) patients within 12 months after the index PCI. Occurrence of stent thrombosis was associated with an increased risk...

  9. Perioperative and long-term outcome of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma involving the hepatic hilus after curative-intent resection: comparison with peripheral intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-Feng; Bagante, Fabio; Chen, Qinyu; Beal, Eliza W; Lv, Yi; Weiss, Matthew; Popescu, Irinel; Marques, Hugo P; Aldrighetti, Luca; Maithel, Shishir K; Pulitano, Carlo; Bauer, Todd W; Shen, Feng; Poultsides, George A; Soubrane, Olivier; Martel, Guillaume; Koerkamp, B Groot; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Itaru, Endo; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2018-05-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with hepatic hilus involvement has been either classified as intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma or hilar cholangiocarcinoma. The present study aimed to investigate the clinicopathologic characteristics and short- and long-term outcomes after curative resection for hilar type intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma in comparison with peripheral intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hilar cholangiocarcinoma. A total of 912 patients with mass-forming peripheral intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, 101 patients with hilar type intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, and 159 patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma undergoing curative resection from 2000 to 2015 were included from two multi-institutional databases. Clinicopathologic characteristics and short- and long-term outcomes were compared among the 3 groups. Patients with hilar type intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma had more aggressive tumor characteristics (eg, higher frequency of vascular invasion and lymph nodes metastasis) and experienced more extensive resections in comparison with either peripheral intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma or hilar cholangiocarcinoma patients. The odds of lymphadenectomy and R0 resection rate among patients with hilar type intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma were comparable with hilar cholangiocarcinoma patients, but higher than peripheral intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patients (lymphadenectomy incidence, 85.1% vs 42.5%, P hilar type intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma experienced a higher rate of technical-related complications compared with peripheral intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patients. Of note, hilar type intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma was associated with worse disease-specific survival and recurrence-free survival after curative resection versus peripheral intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (median disease-specific survival, 26.0 vs 54.0 months, P hilar cholangiocarcinoma (median disease-specific survival, 26.0 vs 49.0 months, P = .003; median recurrence-free survival

  10. Future developments in biliary stenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hair, Clark D; Sejpal, Divyesh V

    2013-01-01

    Biliary stenting has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years. Advancements in stent design have led to prolonged patency and improved efficacy. However, biliary stenting is still affected by occlusion, migration, anatomical difficulties, and the need for repeat procedures. Multiple novel plastic biliary stent designs have recently been introduced with the primary goals of reduced migration and improved ease of placement. Self-expandable bioabsorbable stents are currently being investigated in animal models. Although not US Food and Drug Administration approved for benign disease, fully covered self-expandable metal stents are increasingly being used in a variety of benign biliary conditions. In malignant disease, developments are being made to improve ease of placement and stent patency for both hilar and distal biliary strictures. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments and future directions of biliary stenting. PMID:23837001

  11. Colectomy for porto-systemic encephalopathy: is it still topical?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rym Ennaifer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common long term complication of porto-systemic shunt. We report herein the case of a 59-year-old man with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis treated successfully 9 years earlier with distal splenorenal shunt for uncontrolled variceal bleeding. In the last year, he developed a severe and persistent hepatic encephalopathy secondary to the shunt, which was resistant to medical therapy. As liver transplantation was not available and obliteration of the shunt was hazardous, we performed subtotal colectomy in order to reduce ammonia production. This therapeutic option proved successful, as the grade of encephalopathy decreased and the patient improved. Our experience indicates that colonic exclusion should be considered as an option in the management of HE refractory to medical treatment in highly selected patients when liver transplantation is not available or even as a bridge given the long waiting time on lists.

  12. Assessment of surgical portosystemic shunts and associated complications: The diagnostic and therapeutic role of radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taslakian, Bedros, E-mail: btaslakian@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); Faraj, Walid, E-mail: wf07@aub.edu.lb [Department of General Surgery, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); Khalife, Mohammad, E-mail: mk12@aub.edu.lb [Department of General Surgery, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad, E-mail: mk00@aub.edu.lb [Department of Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); El-Merhi, Fadi, E-mail: fe19@aub.edu.lb [Department of Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); Saade, Charbel, E-mail: cs39@aub.edu.lb [Department of Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); Hallal, Ali, E-mail: ah05@aub.edu.lb [Department of General Surgery, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); Haydar, Ali, E-mail: ah24@aub.edu.lb [Department of Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Portal hypertension is the pathological increase in portal venous pressure. • Surgical portosystemic shunting is an accepted methods to decrease portal venous pressure. • Surgical portosystemic shunts are divided into selective and nonselective. • Shunt thrombosis is a serious complication, resulting in shunt dysfunction. • Imaging is essential in the assessment of the shunt function and anatomy. - Abstract: Surgical portosystemic shunting, the formation of a vascular connection between the portal and systemic venous circulation, has been used as a treatment to reduce portal venous pressure. Although the use of portosystemic shunt surgery in the management of portal hypertension has declined during the past decade in favour of alternative therapies, and subsequently surgeons and radiologists became less familiar with the procedure, it remains a well-established treatment. Knowledge of different types of surgical portosystemic shunts, their pathophysiology and complications will help radiologists improve communication with surgeons and enhance their understanding of the diagnostic and therapeutic role of radiology in the assessment and management of these shunts. Optimal assessment of the shunt is essential to determine its patency and allow timely intervention. Both non-invasive and invasive imaging modalities complement each other in the evaluation of surgical portosystemic shunts. Interventional radiology plays an important role in the management of complications, such as shunt thrombosis and stenosis. This article describes the various types of surgical portosystemic shunts, explains the anatomy and pathophysiology of these shunts, illustrates the pearls and pitfalls of different imaging modalities in the assessment of these shunts and demonstrates the role of radiologists in the interventional management of complications.

  13. Assessment of surgical portosystemic shunts and associated complications: The diagnostic and therapeutic role of radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taslakian, Bedros; Faraj, Walid; Khalife, Mohammad; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad; El-Merhi, Fadi; Saade, Charbel; Hallal, Ali; Haydar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Portal hypertension is the pathological increase in portal venous pressure. • Surgical portosystemic shunting is an accepted methods to decrease portal venous pressure. • Surgical portosystemic shunts are divided into selective and nonselective. • Shunt thrombosis is a serious complication, resulting in shunt dysfunction. • Imaging is essential in the assessment of the shunt function and anatomy. - Abstract: Surgical portosystemic shunting, the formation of a vascular connection between the portal and systemic venous circulation, has been used as a treatment to reduce portal venous pressure. Although the use of portosystemic shunt surgery in the management of portal hypertension has declined during the past decade in favour of alternative therapies, and subsequently surgeons and radiologists became less familiar with the procedure, it remains a well-established treatment. Knowledge of different types of surgical portosystemic shunts, their pathophysiology and complications will help radiologists improve communication with surgeons and enhance their understanding of the diagnostic and therapeutic role of radiology in the assessment and management of these shunts. Optimal assessment of the shunt is essential to determine its patency and allow timely intervention. Both non-invasive and invasive imaging modalities complement each other in the evaluation of surgical portosystemic shunts. Interventional radiology plays an important role in the management of complications, such as shunt thrombosis and stenosis. This article describes the various types of surgical portosystemic shunts, explains the anatomy and pathophysiology of these shunts, illustrates the pearls and pitfalls of different imaging modalities in the assessment of these shunts and demonstrates the role of radiologists in the interventional management of complications

  14. Daily targeting of intrahepatic tumors for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, James M.; Brock, Kristy K.; Litzenberg, Dale W.; McShan, Daniel L.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Haken, Randall Ten; McGinn, Cornelius J.; Lam, Kwok L.; Dawson, Laura A.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: A system has been developed for daily targeting of intrahepatic tumors using a combination of ventilatory immobilization, in-room diagnostic imaging, and on-line setup adjustment. By reducing geometric position uncertainty, as well as organ movement, this system permits reduction of margins and thus potentially higher treatment doses. This paper reports our initial experience treating 8 patients with focal liver tumors using this system. Methods and Materials: The system includes diagnostic X-ray tubes mounted on the wall and ceiling of a treatment room, an active matrix flat panel imager, in-room control for image acquisition and setup adjustment, and a ventilatory immobilization system via active breathing control (ABC). Eight patients participated in the study, two using an early prototype ABC unit, and the remaining six with a commercial ABC system and improved setup measurement tools. Treatment margins were reduced, and dose consequently increased because of increased confidence in target position under this protocol. After daily setup via skin marks, orthogonal radiographs were acquired at suspended ventilation. The images were aligned to the CT model using the diaphragm for inferior-superior (IS) alignment, and the skeleton for left-right (LR) and anterior-posterior (AP) alignment. Adjustments were made for positioning errors greater than a threshold (3 or 5 mm). After treatment, retrospective analysis determined the final setup accuracy, as well as the error in initial setup measurement performed before setup adjustment. Results: Two hundred sixty-two treatment fractions were delivered on eight patients, with 171 treatments requiring repositioning. Typical treatment times were 25-30 min. Patients were able to tolerate ABC throughout the course of treatment. Breath holds up to 35 s long were used for treatment. The use of on-line imaging and setup adjustment reduced setup errors (σ) from 4.0 mm (LR), 6.7 mm (IS), and 3.8 mm (AP) to 2.1 mm (LR

  15. Renal PTA stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsetis, D.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is a common condition that may lead to hypertension, progressive renal dysfunction and cardiovascular morbidity. Catheter-based therapy for symptomatic, haemodynamically significant, RAS has become the preferred method of revascularization. Balloon angioplasty has been the traditional treatment of choice for fibromuscular dysplasia, however stents are increasingly used for the treatment of atheromatous lesions; in many cases-such as in ostial lesions-, direct stenting is strongly indicated. Despite the increased use of endovascular therapy for renal artery stenosis, there is still controversy regarding the optimal management and the net benefit of this treatment. Several randomized trials of balloon angioplasty or stenting for renal artery stenosis compared with medical therapy alone have been conducted, however these could not show definite advantage of endovascular therapy. Problems encountered with those trials include enrollment of small number of patients, frequent crossover from medical to interventional therapy compromising the intention-to-treat results, or selection of patients that are not expected to show clear benefit. The Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) is the most important of these trials; however, it,s study design was faulty and therefore did not provide conclusive evidence to answer the question of whether angioplasty and stenting or medical therapy is the best treatment for haemodynamically significant RAS. All expectations are now focused on the Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial which was designed to answer the same question, and its methodologies took into consideration the weaknesses of the ASTRAL trial. Regarding stent device itself, it seems that the optimal design is probably a stainless steel, laser cut, open-cells stent mounted on a rapid exchange delivery balloon catheter compatible with 0.014-in and 0.018-in guidewire. As a future

  16. Future developments in biliary stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hair CD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Clark D Hair,1 Divyesh V Sejpal21Department of Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY, USAAbstract: Biliary stenting has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years. Advancements in stent design have led to prolonged patency and improved efficacy. However, biliary stenting is still affected by occlusion, migration, anatomical difficulties, and the need for repeat procedures. Multiple novel plastic biliary stent designs have recently been introduced with the primary goals of reduced migration and improved ease of placement. Self-expandable bioabsorbable stents are currently being investigated in animal models. Although not US Food and Drug Administration approved for benign disease, fully covered self-expandable metal stents are increasingly being used in a variety of benign biliary conditions. In malignant disease, developments are being made to improve ease of placement and stent patency for both hilar and distal biliary strictures. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments and future directions of biliary stenting.Keywords: plastic stents, self-expandable metal stents, drug eluting stents, bioabsorbable stents, malignant biliary strictures, benign biliary strictures

  17. Heterogeneous Intravascular Ultrasound Findings of Stent Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Morofuji, Toru; Inaba, Shinji; Aisu, Hiroe; Takahashi, Kayo; Saito, Makoto; Higashi, Haruhiko; Yoshii, Toyofumi; Sumimoto, Takumi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The underlying mechanisms of stent thrombosis are not completely understood. Methods We experienced 12 definite stent thrombosis cases (1 early, 1 late, and 10 very late) at our hospital from July 2011 to April 2016 and evaluated the possible causes of stent thrombosis by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Results Five different potential morphological causes of stent thrombosis (neoatherosclerosis, stent malapposition, stent fracture, edge dissection, and stent underexpansion) were d...

  18. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma : gross appearance and corresponding pathologic and radiologic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Kim, Chang Guhn; Lee, Moon Gyu; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Auh, Yong Ho; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1999-01-01

    To assess the clinical and pathologic features of each type of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, which is divided into three types according to gross appearance, and to determine the efficacy of CT in detecting this tumor. The pathologic and CT features of 53 surgically proven cases of intrahepatic cholangio-carcinoma were reviewed. On the basis of their gross appearance, the tumors were divided into three types, as follows : mass forming (n=33), periductal infiltrating (n=6), and intraductal growth type (n=14). CT scans were analyzed for sensitivity of detection and correlation between a tumors appearance and its histopathology. The most common histopathologic feature of mass forming and periductal infiltrating type was tubular adenocarcinoma, while in the intraductal growth type, papillary adenocarcinoma (100%) was common. With regard to pattern of tumor spread, intrahepatic and lymph node metastasis were more common in the mass forming and periductal infiltrating type than in the intraductal growth type. CT findings including intrahepatic mass, ductal wall thickening or intraductal mass associated with segmental dilatation of intrahepataic bile ducts, corresponded with these morphologic types. This classification according to gross appearance is of considerable value when interpreting the pathologic features of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. CT seems to be a useful modality for the detection of tumors and may be consistent with their gross morphologic findings

  19. Evaluation of computed tomography on diagnosis of portosystemic collaterals in portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohe, Takashi; Kuronuma, Yukio; Fujiwara, Hiromichi; Ibuki, Yoshikazu; Maehara, Misao; Sugaya, Hitoshi; Harada, Takashi; Iwasaki, Naoya; Hyodo, Haruo

    1987-01-01

    We analyzed the diagnostic capability of CT to demonstrate the eight types of portosystemic collaterals in patient with portal hypertension. A total of 62 patients with portal hypertension underwent both CT and conventional angiography. All of these eight types of collaterals, such as esophageal varices, paraesophageal varices, coronary and short gastric pathway, dilated vein in splenic hilus, splenorenal and splenoretroperitoneal pathway, paraumbilical pathway and small veins on liver surface, caput medusa, azygos system, were demonstrated on CT better than angiography, except coronary and short gastric pathyway. And we also made comparative study of CT with per-rectal portal scintigraphy in 9 patients who underwent both studies. In 7 of these 9 patients, portosystemic collaterals were recognized on scintigram less than CT. In conclusion, CT provides much qualified images than conventional angiography or per-rectal portal scintigraphy in evaluating portosystemic collaterals. (author)

  20. Evaluation of computed tomography on diagnosis of portosystemic collaterals in portal hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohe, T; Kuronuma, Y; Fujiwara, H; Ibuki, Y; Maehara, M; Sugaya, H; Harada, T; Iwasaki, N; Hyodo, H

    1987-04-01

    We analyzed the diagnostic capability of CT to demonstrate the eight types of portosystemic collaterals in patient with portal hypertension. A total of 62 patients with portal hypertension underwent both CT and conventional angiography. All of these eight types of collaterals, such as esophageal varices, paraesophageal varices, coronary and short gastric pathway, dilated vein in splenic hilus, splenorenal and splenoretroperitoneal pathway, paraumbilical pathway and small veins on liver surface, caput medusa, azygos system, were demonstrated on CT better than angiography, except coronary and short gastric pathyway. And we also made comparative study of CT with per-rectal portal scintigraphy in 9 patients who underwent both studies. In 7 of these 9 patients, portosystemic collaterals were recognized on scintigram less than CT. In conclusion, CT provides much qualified images than conventional angiography or per-rectal portal scintigraphy in evaluating portosystemic collaterals.

  1. 'Stent in a stent'--an alternative technique for removing partially covered stents following sleeve gastrectomy complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilikostas, Georgios; Sanmugalingam, Nimalan; Khan, Omar; Reddy, Marcus; Groves, Chris; Wan, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Endoscopic stenting is a relatively new technique for the treatment of post sleeve gastrectomy complications. Partially covered stents are used in this method to minimise the risk of migration but they are associated with difficulties with removal. Patients requiring emergency stenting following sleeve gastrectomy underwent insertion of a partially covered metallic stent. One month later, if the stent was not easily removable, a fully covered overlapping stent was inserted and the patient was readmitted 2 weeks later for removal of both stents. Four patients required stenting following sleeve gastrectomy leaks, and one patient required stenting for a stricture. In these cases, a 'stent in a stent' technique was used for removal. This technique allows the safe removal of partially covered stents inserted following sleeve gastrectomy complications.

  2. Single-stage intraoperative transhepatic biliary stenting in patients with unresectable hepatobiliary pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yoshimi; Kubota, Keiichi; Kita, Junji; Katoh, Masato; Shimoda, Mitsugi; Sawada, Tokihiko; Iso, Yukihiro

    2013-02-01

    The current study was conducted to evaluate the safety and utility of intraoperative transhepatic biliary stenting (ITBS) in patients with unresectable malignant biliary obstruction (UMBO) diagnosed intraoperatively. In this study, 50 patients who underwent ITBS for UMBO between April 2001 and May 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. For 26 patients who underwent preoperative percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD), the expandable metallic stent (EMS) was inserted intraoperatively by the PTBD route in a single stage. For 24 patients, the intrahepatic bile ducts were intentionally dilated by injection of saline via the endoscopic nasobiliary drainage or the percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage route, and the puncture was performed under intraoperative ultrasound guidance followed by guidewire and catheter insertion. Thereafter, the EMS was placed in the same manner. The initial postoperative complications and long-term results of ITBS were evaluated. In all cases, ITBS was technically successful. Stenting alone was performed in 22 patients and stenting combined with other procedures in 28 patients. Hospital mortality occurred for three patients (6 %), and complication-related mortality occurred in two cases (4 %). There were nine cases (18 %) of postoperative complications. The median survival time was 179 days, and the EMS patency time was 137 days. During the follow-up period, EMS occlusion occurred in 23 cases (46 %). Best supportive care was a significant independent risk factor for early mortality within 100 days after ITBS (p = 0.020, odds ratio, 9.398). Single-stage ITBS is feasible for palliation of UMBO and seems to have a low complication rate.

  3. Interventional Management of Delayed and Massive Hemobilia due to Arterial Erosion by Metallic Biliary Stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hee Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Tae Beom [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Kimhae Jung Ang Hospital, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae Cheol [Dept. of Radiology, Ulsan Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jae Ik [Dept. of Radiology, Ajou University Hospital, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Won [Dept. of Radiology, Busan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness of interventional management for delayed and massive hemobilia secondary to arterial erosion self expandable metallic stent (SES) in with biliary duct malignancy. Over 8-year period, eight patients who suffered from delayed massive hemobilia after SES placement for malignant biliary obstruction as palliative procedure, were included. The mean period between SES placement and presence of massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage was 66.5 days (15-152 days), pancreatic cancer (n = 2), Klatskin tumor (n = 2), common bile duct cancer (n = 2), intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (n = 1), and gastric cancer with ductal invasion (n = 1). Angiographic findings were pseudoaneurysm (n = 6), contrast extravasation (n = 1) and arterial spasm at segment (n = 1). Six patients underwent embolization of injured vessels using microcoils and N-butyl cyanoacrylate. Two patients underwent stent graft placement at right hepatic artery to prevent ischemic hepatic damage because of the presence of portal vein occlusion. Massive hemobilia was successfully controlled by the embolization of arteries (n = 6) and stent graft placement (n = 2) without related complications. The delayed massive hemobilia to arterial erosion metallic biliary stent is rare this complication be successfully treated by interventional management.

  4. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002953.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery To use the sharing features ... to remove plaque buildup ( endarterectomy ) Carotid angioplasty with stent placement Description Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is ...

  5. The Effect of Stent Cell Geometry on Carotid Stenting Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alparslan, Burcu, E-mail: burcu.alparslan@gmail.com [Yozgat State Hospital, Radiology Clinic (Turkey); Nas, Omer Fatih, E-mail: omerfatihnas@gmail.com [Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Eritmen, Ulku Turpcu, E-mail: drulkutur@hotmail.com.tr [Special Eregli Anatolia Hospital, Radiology Clinic (Turkey); Duran, Selcen, E-mail: selcenduran16@hotmail.com [Yerkoy State Hospital, Neurology Clinic (Turkey); Ozkaya, Guven, E-mail: ozkaya@uludag.edu.tr [Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics (Turkey); Hakyemez, Bahattin, E-mail: bhakyemez@uludag.edu.tr [Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey)

    2016-04-15

    PurposeThe aim of this study was to investigate the effect of stent cell geometry on midterm results of carotid artery stenting (CAS).Materials and MethodOne hundred fifty-five patients underwent CAS between February 2010 and December 2012. Ninety-one open- and 84 closed-cell stents were used in this non-randomized, retrospective study. Periprocedural complications were defined as the ones happened during the procedure or within 30 days afterwards. Starting from the 6th month after the procedure, in-stent restenosis was detected with multidetector computed tomography angiography and classified into four groups from focal restenosis to occlusion.ResultsEleven complications were encountered in the periprocedural period (four on the open- and seven on the closed-cell group). Total complication rate was 6.3 % (11/175). No significant difference was detected in terms of periprocedural complications between two groups (p = 0.643). There was statistically significant difference between stent design groups in regard to radiological findings (p = 0.002). Sixteen of open-cell stents and three of closed-cell stents had focal restenosis. One closed-cell stent had diffuse proliferative restenosis and one open-cell stent had total occlusion.ConclusionIn-stent restenosis was more common in open-cell stent group, which have larger free cell area than closed-cell stents. Although our radiologic findings promote us to use closed-cell design if ‘possible’, no difference was detected in terms of clinical outcomes.

  6. Self-expandable metalic endotracheal stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Young Soo; Cho, Dae Soon; Cho, Kyung Ja; Lee, Young Soo; Lee, Mi Jae

    1993-01-01

    Six bare stents and six covered stents were inserted in the trachea of 12 dogs under general anesthesia. After 1-10 weeks of observation, the dogs were killed, and the trachea and lung were examined grossly and histologically. Pneumonia and stent migration were observed more frequently at covered stent group. Inflammatory change of the trachea was more severe at covered stent group. In conclusion, we believe that it is inadequate to insert silicone covered stent in the tracheobronchial tree. (Author)

  7. Self-expandable metalic endotracheal stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Young Soo; Cho, Dae Soon; Cho, Kyung Ja; Lee, Young Soo; Lee, Mi Jae [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-01-01

    Six bare stents and six covered stents were inserted in the trachea of 12 dogs under general anesthesia. After 1-10 weeks of observation, the dogs were killed, and the trachea and lung were examined grossly and histologically. Pneumonia and stent migration were observed more frequently at covered stent group. Inflammatory change of the trachea was more severe at covered stent group. In conclusion, we believe that it is inadequate to insert silicone covered stent in the tracheobronchial tree. (Author).

  8. Genomic Perturbations Reveal Distinct Regulatory Networks in Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nepal, Chirag; O'Rourke, Colm J; Oliveira, Douglas Vnp

    2018-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA) remains a highly heterogeneous malignancy that has eluded effective patient stratification to date. The extent to which such heterogeneity can be influenced by individual driver mutations remains to be evaluated. Here, we analyzed genomic (whole-exome sequen...

  9. Delayed complications after flow-diverter stenting: reactive in-stent stenosis and creeping stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John Moshe; Moscovici, Samuel; Leker, Ronen R; Itshayek, Eyal

    2014-07-01

    We assessed the frequency and severity of changes in stent configuration and location after the treatment of intracranial aneurysms, and patterns of in-stent stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed data for consecutive aneurysm patients managed with endovascular implantation of flow-diverter stents (Silk Flow Diverter [Balt Extrusion, Montmorency, France] and Pipeline Embolization Device [ev3/Coviden, Minneapolis, MN, USA]) from October 2011 to July 2012. Routine 2, 6, 9-12, and 16-20 month follow-up angiograms were compared, with a focus on changes in stent configuration and location from immediately after deployment to angiographic follow-up, and the incidence and development of in-stent stenosis. Thirty-four patients with 42 aneurysms met inclusion criteria. The Silk device was implanted in 16 patients (47%, single device in 15), the Pipeline device in 18 (53%, single device in 16). On first follow-up angiography, in-stent stenosis was observed in 38% of Silk devices and 39% of Pipeline devices. In-stent stenosis was asymptomatic in 12 of 13 patients. One woman presented with transient ischemic attacks and required stent angioplasty due to end tapering and mild, diffuse in-stent stenosis. Configuration and location changes, including stent creeping and end tapering were seen in 2/16 patients (13%) with Silk devices, and 0/18 patients with Pipeline devices. We describe stent creeping and end tapering as unusual findings with the potential for delayed clinical complications. In-stent stenosis, with a unique behavior, is a frequent angiographic finding observed after flow-diverter stent implant. The stenosis is usually asymptomatic; however, close clinical and angiographic monitoring is mandatory for individualized management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Angioplasty and stent - heart - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug-eluting stents - discharge; PCI - discharge; Percutaneous coronary intervention - discharge; Balloon angioplasty - discharge; Coronary angioplasty - discharge; Coronary artery angioplasty - discharge; Cardiac ...

  11. Indications for stenting during thrombolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, N; Broholm, R; Just, Sven Richardt Lundgren

    2013-01-01

    of a stent in this position is the treatment of choice facilitating the venous flow into an unobstructed outflow tract either from the femoral vein or the deep femoral vein or both. The stent, made of stainless steel or nitinol, has to be self-expandable and flexible with radial force to overcome...... the challenges in this low-pressure system. The characteristics of the anatomy with external compression and often a curved vein segment with diameter difference make stent placement necessary. Ballooning alone has no place in this area. The proportion of inserted stents varies in the published materials...

  12. The stenting strategy of drug-eluting stents for coronary artery disease in patients on dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fujita

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reports regarding the relationship between the length and diameter of implanted drug-eluting stents and clinical and angiographic outcomes in dialysis patients are limited. Aim: We investigated the efficiency of drug-eluting stents for coronary artery disease in patients on dialysis from the viewpoint of stent sizing. Methods: Sirolimus-eluting stents were implanted in 88 lesions and bare metal stents were implanted in 43 lesions. We compared stenting strategy, major adverse cardiac events, and angiographic results between sirolimus-eluting stent and bare metal stent groups. Results: Stent diameter was smaller and stent length was longer in the sirolimus-eluting stent group than in the bare metal stent group in our routine practices. There was no significant between-group difference in late diameter loss. Rates of angiographic restenosis and target lesion revascularization were significantly higher in the sirolimus-eluting stent group than in the bare metal stent group. Although stent length was significantly longer and stent diameter was smaller in the sirolimus-eluting stent group, sirolimus-eluting stents did not improve the subsequent clinical and angiographic results compared with bare metal stents in dialysis patients. Conclusion: In dialysis patients, a longer length and/or smaller diameter sirolimus-eluting stent implantation was associated with high rates of restenosis and target lesion revascularization compared with bare metal stents.

  13. Dedicated bifurcation stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Ananthakrishna Pillai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bifurcation percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI is still a difficult call for the interventionist despite advancements in the instrumentation, technical skill and the imaging modalities. With major cardiac events relate to the side-branch (SB compromise, the concept and practice of dedicated bifurcation stents seems exciting. Several designs of such dedicated stents are currently undergoing trials. This novel concept and pristine technology offers new hope notwithstanding the fact that we need to go a long way in widespread acceptance and practice of these gadgets. Some of these designs even though looks enterprising, the mere complex delivering technique and the demanding knowledge of the exact coronary anatomy makes their routine use challenging.

  14. Surgical attenuation of congenital portosystemic shunts in dogs. Techniques, complications and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kummeling, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304828793

    2009-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis was to identify factors associated with outcome after surgical attenuation of congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) in dogs and to clarify underlying mechanisms of postoperative recovery in this disease. Two surgical techniques used for CPSS attenuation, ligation and

  15. The structural study of prefabrication stress stent and the hemodynamics in percutaneous transhepatic portacaval shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Jianguo; Sun Xiaoli; Zhou Yijun; Huang He; Zhou Hua; Lv Chunyan; Yang Shuhui

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To present a preliminary latest procedure for portal hypertension and evaluate the technical feasibility and efficacy of portacaval shunt creation through the percutaneous transhepatic approach in order to make a hemodynamic comparison with that of the classic TIPS. Methods: Thirty-eight patients with portal hypertension (36 men; mean age 57 years, range 32-73) were referred for PTPS procedure because of bleeding varices (n=36), intractable ascites (n=1), and hepatopulmonary syndrome (n=1). The severity of liver disease was classified as Child-Pugh B in 27 and C in 11. The PTPS was created by a percutaneous transhepatic puncture into right portal vein and then through left portal vein to the hepatic segment of IVC followed by a prefabrication stress stent-graft placement at the very site. Results: Technical and functional success of 100% was achieved in all patients, without related complications. The postprocedural portal vein-IVC gradients mean 13 cmH 2 O was achieved with the follow-up period mean 493 days. No recurrence of variceal bleeding and controlled refractory ascites were achieved, and still more with primary patency rate of the involved vascular structure up to 94.8% at 365 days, much better than classic TIPS. Conclusions: Portacaval shunt creation using the prefabrication stress stent via percutaneous transhepatic technique is safe and feasible. the compact coincidence was obtained between the stent and the involved vessel with restoration of intrahepatic portal venous hemodynamics together with partial lowering of portal venous pressure and guaranteeing intrahepatic perfusion through right portal vein. It is also obviously to have postoperative prevention of shunt restenoses and lowering postoperative incidence of hepato-encephalopathy. (authors)

  16. Evaluation of portosystemic collaterals by MDCT-MPR imaging for management of hemorrhagic esophageal varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Hideaki; Aikata, Hiroshi; Takaki, Shintaro; Azakami, Takahiro; Katamura, Yoshio; Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Hiramatsu, Akira; Waki, Koji; Imamura, Michio; Kawakami, Yoshiiku; Takahashi, Shoichi; Toyota, Naoyuki; Ito, Katsuhide; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlation between changes in portosystemic collaterals, evaluated by multidetector-row computed tomography imaging using multiplanar reconstruction (MDCT-MPR), and prognosis in patients with hemorrhagic esophageal varices (EV) after endoscopic treatment. Methods: Forty-nine patients with primary hemostasis for variceal bleeding received radical endoscopic treatment: endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) or endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Patients were classified according to the rate of reduction in feeding vessel diameter on MDCT-MPR images, into the narrowing (n = 24) and no-change (n = 25) groups. We evaluated changes in portosystemic collaterals by MDCT-MPR before and after treatment, and determined rebleeding and survival rates. Results: The left gastric and paraesophageal (PEV) veins were recognized as portosystemic collaterals in 100 and 80%, respectively, of patients with EV on MDCT-MPR images. The rebleeding rates at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years after endoscopic treatment were 10, 15, 23, and 23%, respectively, for the narrowing group, and 17, 24, 35, and 67%, respectively, for the no-change group (P = 0.068). Among no-change group, the rebleeding rate in patients with large PEV was significantly lower than that with small PEV (P = 0.027). The rebleeding rate in patients with small PEV of the no-change group was significantly higher than that in the narrowing group (P = 0.018). There was no significant difference in rebleeding rates between the no-change group with a large PEV and narrowing group (P = 0.435). Conclusion: Changes in portosystemic collaterals evaluated by MDCT-MPR imaging correlate with rebleeding rate. Evaluation of portosystemic collaterals in this manner would provide useful information for the management of hemorrhagic EV.

  17. Immunohistochemical analysis of restenotic tissue after transjugular portosystemic shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qin; An Yanli; Deng Gang; Fang Wen; Zhu Guangyu; Li Guozhao; Wei Xiaoying; Liu Yuanyuan; Teng Gaojun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of several restenotic tissue elements after transjugular portosystemic shunt, and to provide more informations for the mechanism of TIPS restenosis. Methods: TIPS was performed in 6 swine to set up TIPS animal models. 14-21 days after operation, the models were sacrificed to obtain the TIPS tissues for pathological examinations, including electric microscope, HE staining, and immunohistochemical staining of anti-SMC-actin-α, PCNA, Vementin, myoglobulin, eNOS and iNOS. Then , the results were comparatively analyzed between TIPS obstructed shunt tissues and non-obstructed shunt tissues. Results: Restenosis was occurred with different degrees in 4 swine of the 6 TIPS models. Electric microscopic results showed that the restenosis tissues were composed of over proliferated collagen, SMCs and fibroblasts. Anti-SMC-actin-α and PCNA were strongly positive expression in restenotic tissues, and also positive in patent tissues. Vimentin expressed strongly in unstenotic tissues, on the contrary, it expressed obviously weaker in restenotic tissues. Myoglobulin expressed more strongly in restenotic tissues and weakened in unstenotic tissues. eNOS expressed positive in normal liver tissues, and expressed weaker near TIPS restenotic tissues. iNOS showed stronger expression in restenotic tissues and could hardly expressed in normal liver tissues. Conclusions: Restenotic rate may be 67% in TIPS swine models. Restenotic tissues may be mainly composed of proliferated SMCs positively expressed anti-SMC-actin-α with strong ability of movement. eNOS may be expressed in normal liver tissues and instead iNOS be expressed in strongly injured liver tissues. (authors)

  18. Intravascular stent graft with polyurethane and metallic stent: experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Young Soo; Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Boo Kyung Han; Park, Jae Hyung; Lee, Hak Jong; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Jong Won; Ha, Jongwon

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of a new model of the stent graft, and of tissue response related to placement of the stent graft. The stent graft was constructed from polyurethane (Pellethane) graft and Hanaro stent(12mm in diameter, 45mm in length, 10 bends). A stent grafts was inserted into the lower thoracic aorta in each of six adult mongrel dogs(body weight, 12-16kg). At one, two, four, and six months, follow-up studies of angiography and spiral CT angiography were preformed to evaluate wascular patency, vascular stenosis, and thrombus formation. Two dogs were sacrificed at 1month, 2months, and 6months after insertion of the stent graft and macroscopic, light microscopic, and scanning electron microscopic examinations of the aortic segment including the stent graft were performed to evaluate intimal hyperplasia, endothelial growth to the graft, and thrombus formation. During follow-up at one, two, four, and six months, angiography or spiral CT angiography showed 20-100% luminal stenosis or occlusion of the lower thoracic aorta by the thrombus and perigraft leaks in three dogs(50%), and collateral vessels caused by occlusion of the aorta in two (33.3%). On gross examination, there were thrombi of 1-5mm thickness at the graft portions in all dogs, and this thickness gradually increased. The mean thickness of intimal hyperplasia at the stent portion gradually increased from 120μm to 227μm and the mean thickness of intimal hyperplasia at the graft portion from 93μm to 914μm. This thickness was greater at the graft portion than at the stent portion. Scanning electron microscopy showed elliptical endothelial lining on the neointimal surfaces at each end of the graft. Thrombi caused stenosis or occlusion of the stent graft. In order for such a graft to be ideal, further study is needed

  19. Stent fabric fatigue of grafts supported by Z-stents versus ringed stents: an in vitro buckling test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Wang, Lu; Guidoin, Robert; Nutley, Mark; Song, Ge; Zhang, Ze; Du, Jia; Douville, Yvan

    2014-03-01

    Stent-grafts externally fitted with a Z-shaped stents were compared to devices fitted with ringed stents in an in vitro oscillating fatigue machine at 200 cycles per minute and a pressure of 360 mmHg for scheduled durations of up to 1 week. The devices fitted with Z-stents showed a considerably lower endurance limit to buckling compared to the controls. The contact between the apexes of adjacent Z-stents resulted in significant damage to the textile scaffolds and polyester fibers due to the sharp angle of the Z-stents. The ringed stents did not cause any fraying in the textile scaffolds.

  20. Percutaneous biliary drainage and stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totev, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) is an X-ray or US guided procedure that involves the injection of a contrast material directly into the bile ducts inside the liver to produce pictures of them. If a blockage or narrowing is found, additional procedures may be performed: 1. insertion of a catheter to drain excess bile out of the body or both - internal and external; 2. plastic endoprothesis placement; 3. self-expandable metal stents placement to help open bile ducts or to bypass an obstruction and allow fluids to drain. Current percutaneous biliary interventions include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and biliary drainage to manage benign and malignant obstructions. Internal biliary stents are either plastic or metallic, and various types of each kind are available. Internal biliary stents have several advantages. An external tube can be uncomfortable and have a psychological disadvantage. An internal stent prevents the problems related to external catheters, for example, pericatheter leakage of bile and the need for daily flushing. The disadvantages include having to perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or new PTC procedures to obtain access in case of stent obstruction. Better patency rates are reported with metallic than with plastic stents in cases of malignant obstruction, though no effect on survival is noted. Plastic internal stents are the cheapest but reportedly prone to migration. Metallic stents are generally not used in the treatment of benign disease because studies have shown poor long-term patency rates. Limited applications may include the treatment of patients who are poor surgical candidates or of those in whom surgical treatment fails. Most postoperative strictures are treated surgically, though endoscopic and (less commonly) percutaneous placement of nonmetallic stents has increasingly been used in the past few years. Now there are some reports about use of biodegradable biliary

  1. Endotracheal expandable metallic stent placement in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, S; Tanabe, Y; Fujiwara, Y; Koyama, T; Tanigawa, N; Kobayashi, M; Katsube, Y; Nakamura, H [Tottori Univ. School of Medicine, Yonago (Japan). Dept. of Radiology Research Inst. for Microbial Diseases, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    1991-01-01

    Various types of Gianturco zig-zag wire stent were implanted into the tracheas of 4 dogs to define the suitable characteristics of the endotracheal wire stent in these animals. These stents were constructed of 0.45, and 0.33 mm stainless steel wire. The diameter of the fully expanded stents was 3 cm and their lengths were 2, 3, and 4 cm. The 2 cm stent constructed of 0.33 mm wire showed minimum pathologic changes of the trachea of the dog compared to the other stents, and at the same time had a complete covering of ciliated columnar epithelium over the stent surface. (orig.).

  2. Efficacy of intrahepatic absolute alcohol in unrespectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, J.I.; Hameed, K.; Khan, I.U.; Shah, S.

    2001-01-01

    To determine efficacy of intrahepatic absolute alcohol injection in researchable hepatocellular carcinoma. A randomized, controlled, experimental and interventional clinical trial. Gastroenterology Department, PGMI, Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar during the period from June, 1998 to June, 2000. Thirty patients were treated by percutaneous, intrahepatic absolute alcohol injection sin repeated sessions, 33 patients were not given or treated with alcohol to serve as control. Both the groups were comparable for age, sex and other baseline characteristics. Absolute alcohol therapy significantly improved quality of life of patients, reduced the tumor size and mortality as well as showed significantly better results regarding survival (P< 0.05) than the patients of control group. We conclude that absolute alcohol is a beneficial and safe palliative treatment measure in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). (author)

  3. Developmental intrahepatic shunts of childhood: radiological features and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paley, M.R.; Farrant, P.; Kane, P.; Karani, J.B.; Heaton, N.D.; Howard, E.R.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of radiological techniques in the diagnosis and management of developmental intrahepatic shunts. Hepatic vascular fistulae are recognised sequelae of liver trauma and intrahepatic tumours. However, there are rare developmental malformations which may present in childhood or later life and which may carry life-threatening complications. Retrospective analysis of clinical and radiological data was carried out in 24 patients. Anomalies evaluated were: (a) direct communication between hepatic artery and hepatic veins; (b) congenital hepatoportal arteriovenous malformations; and (c) congenital portocaval anastomosis with persistent flow through the ductus venosus. Although rare, the prompt recognition of these vascular anomalies allows early surgical or radiological intervention and reversal of the haemodynamic complications. (orig.)

  4. Developmental intrahepatic shunts of childhood: radiological features and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paley, M.R.; Farrant, P.; Kane, P.; Karani, J.B. [Department of Radiology, King`s College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Heaton, N.D.; Howard, E.R. [Department of Paediatric Hepatobiliary Surgery, King`s College Hospital Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of radiological techniques in the diagnosis and management of developmental intrahepatic shunts. Hepatic vascular fistulae are recognised sequelae of liver trauma and intrahepatic tumours. However, there are rare developmental malformations which may present in childhood or later life and which may carry life-threatening complications. Retrospective analysis of clinical and radiological data was carried out in 24 patients. Anomalies evaluated were: (a) direct communication between hepatic artery and hepatic veins; (b) congenital hepatoportal arteriovenous malformations; and (c) congenital portocaval anastomosis with persistent flow through the ductus venosus. Although rare, the prompt recognition of these vascular anomalies allows early surgical or radiological intervention and reversal of the haemodynamic complications. (orig.) With 7 figs., 4 tabs., 22 refs.

  5. Prevalence of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis among patients with resectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Srinevas K; Hyder, Omar; Marsh, J Wallis; Sotiropoulos, Georgios C; Paul, Andreas; Alexandrescu, Sorin; Marques, Hugo; Pulitano, Carlo; Barroso, Eduardo; Aldrighetti, Luca; Geller, David A; Sempoux, Christine; Herlea, Vlad; Popescu, Irinel; Anders, Robert; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Gigot, Jean-Francois; Mentha, Giles; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this report was to determine the prevalence of underlying nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in resectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Demographics, comorbidities, clinicopathologic characteristics, surgical treatments, and outcomes from patients who underwent resection of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma at one of eight hepatobiliary centers between 1991 and 2011 were reviewed. Of 181 patients who underwent resection for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, 31 (17.1 %) had underlying nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis were more likely obese (median body mass index, 30.0 vs. 26.0 kg/m(2), p < 0.001) and had higher rates of diabetes mellitus (38.7 vs. 22.0 %, p = 0.05) and the metabolic syndrome (22.6 vs. 10.0 %, p = 0.05) compared with those without nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Presence and severity of hepatic steatosis, lobular inflammation, and hepatocyte ballooning were more common among nonalcoholic steatohepatitis patients (all p < 0.001). Macrovascular (35.5 vs. 11.3 %, p = 0.01) and any vascular (48.4 vs. 26.7 %, p = 0.02) tumor invasion were more common among patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. There were no differences in recurrence-free (median, 17.0 versus 19.4 months, p = 0.42) or overall (median, 31.5 versus 36.3 months, p = 0.97) survival after surgical resection between patients with and without nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis affects up to 20 % of patients with resectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

  6. Measurement of intrahepatic pressure during radiofrequency ablation in porcine liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Chiaki; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Baba, Yoko; Kaneko, Keiko; Yakabi, Koji

    2010-04-01

    To identify the most effective procedures to avoid increased intrahepatic pressure during radiofrequency ablation, we evaluated different ablation methods. Laparotomy was performed in 19 pigs. Intrahepatic pressure was monitored using an invasive blood pressure monitor. Radiofrequency ablation was performed as follows: single-step standard ablation; single-step at 30 W; single-step at 70 W; 4-step at 30 W; 8-step at 30 W; 8-step at 70 W; and cooled-tip. The array was fully deployed in single-step methods. In the multi-step methods, the array was gradually deployed in four or eight steps. With the cooled-tip, ablation was performed by increasing output by 10 W/min, starting at 40 W. Intrahepatic pressure was as follows: single-step standard ablation, 154.5 +/- 30.9 mmHg; single-step at 30 W, 34.2 +/- 20.0 mmHg; single-step at 70 W, 46.7 +/- 24.3 mmHg; 4-step at 30 W, 42.3 +/- 17.9 mmHg; 8-step at 30 W, 24.1 +/- 18.2 mmHg; 8-step at 70 W, 47.5 +/- 31.5 mmHg; and cooled-tip, 114.5 +/- 16.6 mmHg. The radiofrequency ablation-induced area was spherical with single-step standard ablation, 4-step at 30 W, and 8-step at 30 W. Conversely, the ablated area was irregular with single-step at 30 W, single-step at 70 W, and 8-step at 70 W. The ablation time was significantly shorter for the multi-step method than for the single-step method. Increased intrahepatic pressure could be controlled using multi-step methods. From the shapes of the ablation area, 30-W 8-step expansions appear to be most suitable for radiofrequency ablation.

  7. Preliminary Report of Carotid Artery Stenting Using a Tapered Stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Woo; Kim, Dong Hyun; Hong, Seung; Jeong; Kim, Young Suk; Byun, Joo Nam; Oh, Jae Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seong Hwan [Dept. of Neurology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    To analyze the results of carotid artery stenting using a tapered stent and to evaluate the effectiveness of the tapered stent compared to previously reported studies using non-tapered stents. From October 2008 to August 2010, elective carotid artery stenting using a tapered stent was attempted in 39 lesions from 36 consecutive patients. Post-procedural complications were evaluated by neurologic symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging. Restenosis or occlusion was evaluated by carotid Doppler ultrasound and computerized tomography with angiography. Newly developed neurologic symptoms were evaluated clinically. The self-expandable tapered stent was placed across the carotid artery stenosis. A total stroke was noted in 3 patients, while a major stroke was noted in 1 patient. On diffusion weighted imaging, new lesions were observed in 15 patients, but 13 patients were clinically silent. Follow-up imaging studies were performed in the 13 clinically silent lesions, and no evidence of restenosis or occlusion was found any of the 13 lesions. During clinical follow-up in 34 lesions from 31 patients, there were newly developed neurological symptoms in only 1 patient.

  8. Radial force measurement of endovascular stents: Influence of stent design and diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Matsubara, Yutaka; Aoyagi, Yukihiko; Matsuda, Daisuke; Okadome, Jun; Morisaki, Koichi; Inoue, Kentarou; Tanaka, Shinichi; Ohkusa, Tomoko; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-04-01

    Angioplasty and endovascular stent placement is used in case to rescue the coverage of main branches to supply blood to brain from aortic arch in thoracic endovascular aortic repair. This study assessed mechanical properties, especially differences in radial force, of different endovascular and thoracic stents. We analyzed the radial force of three stent models (Epic, E-Luminexx and SMART) stents using radial force-tester method in single or overlapping conditions. We also analyzed radial force in three thoracic stents using Mylar film testing method: conformable Gore-TAG, Relay, and Valiant Thoracic Stent Graft. Overlapping SMART stents had greater radial force than overlapping Epic or Luminexx stents (P stents was greater than that of all three endovascular stents (P stents, site of deployment, and layer characteristics. In clinical settings, an understanding of the mechanical characteristics, including radial force, is important in choosing a stent for each patient. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Abnormalities of intrahepatic bile ducts in extrahepatic biliary atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raweily, E A; Gibson, A A; Burt, A D

    1990-12-01

    The infantile cholangiopathies are a group of conditions associated with neonatal jaundice, which include extrahepatic biliary atresia, paucity of intra-hepatic bile ducts and disorders associated with persistence of fetal biliary structures, the so-called ductal plate malformations. Although previously regarded as distinct entities, it has recently been suggested that they may represent parts of a disease spectrum in which the principal process is one of bile duct destruction, the morphological manifestations in individual cases being influenced by the stage of intra-uterine development at which such injury occurs and by the site within the biliary system at which there is maximum damage. To further examine this concept, we have studied liver biopsy specimens from 37 neonates with extrahepatic biliary atresia, with particular reference to abnormalities of the intrahepatic bile ducts. Paucity of intrahepatic ducts, defined as a bile duct: portal tract ratio of less than 0.9, was identified in six cases (16.2%). In eight cases (21.6%) we found concentric tubular ductal structures similar to those observed in ductal plate malformations. In one case, both abnormalities could be demonstrated. Our findings support the concept that there is overlap between the various types of infantile cholangiopathy.

  10. Sonography-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of intrahepatic primary cholangiocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Mingan [Department of Interventional Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing, 100853 (China); Liang Ping, E-mail: Liangping301@hotmail.com [Department of Interventional Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing, 100853 (China); Yu Xiaoling; Cheng Zhigang; Han Zhiyu; Liu Fangyi; Yu Jie [Department of Interventional Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing, 100853 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of sonography-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of intrahepatic primary cholangiocarcinoma. Materials and methods: From May 2006 to March 2010, 15 patients (11 men, 4 women; mean age, 57.4 years) with 24 histologically proven intrahepatic primary cholangiocarcinoma lesions (mean tumor size, 3.2 {+-} 1.9 cm; range, 1.3-9.9 cm) were treated with microwave ablation. Results: Thirty-eight sessions were performed for 24 nodules in 15 patients. The follow-up period was 4-31 months (mean, 12.8 {+-} 8.0 months). The ablation success rate, the technique effectiveness rate, and the local tumor progression rate were 91.7% (22/24), 87.5% (21/24), and 25% (6/24) respectively according to the results of follow-up. The cumulative overall 6, 12, 24 month survival rates were 78.8%, 60.0%, and 60.0%, respectively. Major complication occurred including liver abscess in two patients (13.3%) and needle seeding in one patient (6.7%). Both complications were cured satisfied with antibiotic treatment combined to catheter drainage for abscess and resection for needle seeding. The minor complications and side effects were experienced by most patients which subsided with supportive treatment. Conclusion: Microwave ablation can be used as a safe and effective technique to treat intrahepatic primary cholangiocarcinoma.

  11. Angiographic CT: in vitro comparison of different carotid artery stents-does stent orientation matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettau, Michael; Bendszus, Martin; Hähnel, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the in vitro visualization of different carotid artery stents on angiographic CT (ACT). Of particular interest was the influence of stent orientation to the angiography system by measurement of artificial lumen narrowing (ALN) caused by the stent material within the stented vessel segment to determine whether ACT can be used to detect restenosis within the stent. ACT appearances of 17 carotid artery stents of different designs and sizes (4.0 to 11.0 mm) were investigated in vitro. Stents were placed in different orientations to the angiography system. Standard algorithm image reconstruction and stent-optimized algorithm image reconstruction was performed. For each stent, ALN was calculated. With standard algorithm image reconstruction, ALN ranged from 19.0 to 43.6 %. With stent-optimized algorithm image reconstruction, ALN was significantly lower and ranged from 8.2 to 18.7 %. Stent struts could be visualized in all stents. Differences in ALN between the different stent orientations to the angiography system were not significant. ACT evaluation of vessel patency after stent placement is possible but is impaired by ALN. Stent orientation of the stents to the angiography system did not significantly influence ALN. Stent-optimized algorithm image reconstruction decreases ALN but further research is required to define the visibility of in-stent stenosis depending on image reconstruction.

  12. Endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor-receptor levels in portal and hepatic vein of patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis receiving elective transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebicka, Jonel; Krag, Aleksander; Gansweid, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    In cirrhosis portal hypertension can promote bacterial translocation and increase serum endotoxin levels. Vice versa, endotoxin aggravates portal hypertension by induction of systemic and splanchnic vasodilation, and by triggering hepatic inflammatory response via tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα......). However, the hepatic elimination of endotoxin in cirrhotic patients with severe portal hypertension, in the absence of acute complications, has not been investigated so far....

  13. The clinical results of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration in treatment of gastric varices compared with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Chang Won; Jeon, Ung Bae; Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Jo, Mong; Heo, Jeong

    2007-01-01

    To compare the clinical results of BRTO in the gastric varices with those of TIPS. From January 2004 to March 2006, eight patients who had been followed up for more than 1 month after BRTO were enrolled in this study. This study compared the clinical efficacy of BRTO with than of TIPS in 13 patients who had undergone TIPS from January 2000 to March 2006. The change in laboratory parameters before and after each procedure and the incidence of rebleeding, encephalopathy, asictes and varices were analyzed after each procedure. In the BRTO group, the level of albumin increased, and the levels of ammonia and the Child-Pugh score decreased. The TIPS group showed no improvement in the liver function. In the BRTO group, the gastric varices were eradicated in 7 patients. Gastric variceal rebleeding and encephalopathy did not occur. However, the esophageal varices worsened in 6 patients. In the TIPS group, rebleeding (n = 4), encephalopathy (n = 7) and a worsening of the gastric (n = 5) or esophageal varices (n = 2) occurred. BRTO improves the metabolic activity of the liver and has a lower incidence of encephalopathy. Hence, BRTO is a good alternative to TIPS in the gastric varices accompanied by a gastrorenal shunt although a treatment for a worsening of the esophageal varices may be needed after BRTO

  14. The clinical results of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration in treatment of gastric varices compared with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Chang Won; Jeon, Ung Bae; Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Jo, Mong; Heo, Jeong [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    To compare the clinical results of BRTO in the gastric varices with those of TIPS. From January 2004 to March 2006, eight patients who had been followed up for more than 1 month after BRTO were enrolled in this study. This study compared the clinical efficacy of BRTO with than of TIPS in 13 patients who had undergone TIPS from January 2000 to March 2006. The change in laboratory parameters before and after each procedure and the incidence of rebleeding, encephalopathy, asictes and varices were analyzed after each procedure. In the BRTO group, the level of albumin increased, and the levels of ammonia and the Child-Pugh score decreased. The TIPS group showed no improvement in the liver function. In the BRTO group, the gastric varices were eradicated in 7 patients. Gastric variceal rebleeding and encephalopathy did not occur. However, the esophageal varices worsened in 6 patients. In the TIPS group, rebleeding (n = 4), encephalopathy (n = 7) and a worsening of the gastric (n = 5) or esophageal varices (n = 2) occurred. BRTO improves the metabolic activity of the liver and has a lower incidence of encephalopathy. Hence, BRTO is a good alternative to TIPS in the gastric varices accompanied by a gastrorenal shunt although a treatment for a worsening of the esophageal varices may be needed after BRTO.

  15. Interval biliary stent placement via percutaneous ultrasound guided cholecystostomy: another approach to palliative treatment in malignant biliary tract obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, James; Mortimer, Alex; Kelly, Michael; Loveday, Eric

    2010-12-01

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a minimally invasive procedure for providing gallbladder decompression, often in critically ill patients. It can be used in malignant biliary obstruction following failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography when the intrahepatic ducts are not dilated or when stent insertion is not possible via the bile ducts. In properly selected patients, percutaneous cholecystostomy in obstructive jaundice is a simple, safe, and rapid option for biliary decompression, thus avoiding the morbidity and mortality involved with percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting. Subsequent use of a percutaneous cholecystostomy for definitive biliary stent placement is an attractive concept and leaves patients with no external drain. To the best of our knowledge, it has only been described on three previous occasions in the published literature, on each occasion forced by surgical or technical considerations. Traditionally, anatomic/technical considerations and the risk of bile leak have precluded such an approach, but improvements in catheter design and manufacture may now make it more feasible. We report a case of successful interval metal stent placement via percutaneous cholecystostomy which was preplanned and achieved excellent palliation for the patient. The pros and cons of the procedure and approach are discussed.

  16. Interval Biliary Stent Placement Via Percutaneous Ultrasound Guided Cholecystostomy: Another Approach to Palliative Treatment in Malignant Biliary Tract Obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, James; Mortimer, Alex; Kelly, Michael; Loveday, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a minimally invasive procedure for providing gallbladder decompression, often in critically ill patients. It can be used in malignant biliary obstruction following failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography when the intrahepatic ducts are not dilated or when stent insertion is not possible via the bile ducts. In properly selected patients, percutaneous cholecystostomy in obstructive jaundice is a simple, safe, and rapid option for biliary decompression, thus avoiding the morbidity and mortality involved with percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting. Subsequent use of a percutaneous cholecystostomy for definitive biliary stent placement is an attractive concept and leaves patients with no external drain. To the best of our knowledge, it has only been described on three previous occasions in the published literature, on each occasion forced by surgical or technical considerations. Traditionally, anatomic/technical considerations and the risk of bile leak have precluded such an approach, but improvements in catheter design and manufacture may now make it more feasible. We report a case of successful interval metal stent placement via percutaneous cholecystostomy which was preplanned and achieved excellent palliation for the patient. The pros and cons of the procedure and approach are discussed.

  17. [Coronary stents: 30 years of medical progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvain, Johanne; Cayla, Guillaume; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Fargeot, Catherine; Montalescot, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    The history of interventional cardiology has been marked by several technologic revolutions since the late 1970s. The first key step was the use of inflatable balloon angioplasty as an alternative to CABG surgery for coronary revascularization, followed by intracoronary delivery of bare metal stent (BMS) and drug eluting stents (DES) to drastically reduce intracoronary restenosis observed with BMS. Improved stents platforms and polymers (absorbable or biocompatible) led to a dramatic reduction in the rate of late stent thrombosis. Self-expanding stents are now available to improve stent a position especially in acute myocardial infarction. The emergence of new fully bioabsorbable stents that can be combined with antiproliferative drugs is the ongoing revolution. A new generation of stents is continuously improving and likely to become the ideal stent for coronary revascularization in the near future. © 2014 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  18. Portal hypertension: a review of portosystemic collateral pathways and endovascular interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, A.K.; Andring, B.; Patel, A.; Trimmer, C.; Kalva, S.P.

    2015-01-01

    The portal vein is formed at the confluence of the splenic and superior mesenteric vein behind the head of the pancreas. Normal blood pressure within the portal system varies between 5 and 10 mmHg. Portal hypertension is defined when the gradient between the portal and systemic venous blood pressure exceeds 5 mmHg. The most common cause of portal hypertension is cirrhosis. In cirrhosis, portal hypertension develops due to extensive fibrosis within the liver parenchyma causing increased vascular resistance. In addition, the inability of the liver to metabolise certain vasodilators leads to hyperdynamic splanchnic circulation resulting in increased portal blood flow. Decompression of the portal pressure is achieved by formation of portosystemic collaterals. In this review, we will discuss the pathophysiology, anatomy, and imaging findings of spontaneous portosystemic collaterals and clinical manifestations of portal hypertension with emphasis on the role of interventional radiology in the management of complications related to portal hypertension

  19. Porto-systemic collaterals in cirrhosis of the liver. Selective percutaneous transhepatic catheterization of the portal venous system in portal hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoevels, J; Lunderquist, A; Tylen, U; Simert, G [Lund Univ. (Sweden)

    1979-01-01

    In 93 patients with cirrhosis of the liver and portal venous hypertension the main tributaries of the portal vein were examined by percutaneous transhepatic catheterization. The appearance and degree of porto-systemic collaterals were analysed. Esophageal varices were demonstrated in 82 patients. No correlation was found between the portal venous pressure and the extent of porto-systemic communications.

  20. Reversibility of hyperintense globus pallidus on T 1-weighted MRI following surgery for a portosystemic shunt in an 8-year-old girl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Shinji; Sera, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Mituhiro; Ohshiro, Hajime; Uchino, Shinichiro; Seguchi, Sasa; Endo, Fumio

    1999-01-01

    An 8-year-old Japanese girl with a portosystemic shunt had shown hyperammonaemia since she was 3 years of age. MRI of her brain showed bilateral hyperintense globus pallidus. A portosystemic shunt was evident on US and angiography. She underwent surgical banding of the shunt, after which the lesion and clinical symptoms disappeared. (orig.)

  1. Stenting of major airway constriction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaomei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlated issues in the stenting treatment of major airway constriction. Methods: Nineteen cases of major airway stenting procedure were studied retrospectively. The clinical choice of stents of different advantages or deficiencies were discussed. The importance of intravenous anesthesia supporting, life-parameters monitoring during the procedures and the prevention of complications were analysed. Results: Under intravenous and local anesthesia, 19 Wallstents had been successively placed and relieved 19 cases of major airway constrictions due to malignant or benign diseases (15 of tumors, 3 of tuberculosis, 1 of tracheomalacia). Intravenous anesthesia and life-parameters monitoring had made the procedures more safe and precise. Conclusions: Major airway stenting is an reliable method for relieving tracheobronchial stenosis; and intravenous anesthesia supporting and life-parameters monitoring guarantee the satisfactions of procedures

  2. Portosystemic shunting in portal hypertension: evaluation with portal scintigraphy with transrectally administered I-123 IMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwagi, T.; Azuma, M.; Ikawa, T.; Takehara, T.; Matsuda, H.; Yoshioka, H.; Mitsutani, N.; Koizumi, T.; Kimura, K.

    1988-01-01

    Portosystemic shunting was evaluated with rectal administration of iodine-123 iodoamphetamine (IMP) in seven patients without liver disease and 53 patients with liver cirrhosis. IMP (2-3 mCi [74-111 MBq]) was administered to the rectum through a catheter. Images of the chest and abdomen were obtained for up to 60 minutes with a scintillation camera interfaced with a computer. In all patients, images of the liver and/or lungs were observed within 5-10 minutes and became clear with time. In patients without liver disease, only liver images could be obtained, whereas the lung was visualized with or without the liver in all patients with liver cirrhosis. The portosystemic shunt index was calculated by dividing counts of lungs by counts of liver and lung. These values were significantly higher in liver cirrhosis, especially in the decompensated stage. Transrectal portal scintigraphy with IMP appears to be a useful method for noninvasive and quantitative evaluation of portosystemic shunting in portal hypertension

  3. Evaluation of hepatic steatosis in dogs with congenital portosystemic shunts using Oil-Red-O staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, GB; Luff, J; Daniel, L; Van den Bergh, R.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this prospective study were to quantify steatosis in dogs with congenital portosystemic shunts using a fat-specific stain, to compare the amount of steatosis in different lobes of the liver, and to evaluate intra- and inter-Observer variability in lipid point counting. Computer-assisted point counting of lipid droplets was undertaken following Oil-Red-O staining in 21 dogs with congenital portosystemic shunts and 9 control dogs. Dogs with congenital portosystemic shunts had significantly more small lipid droplets ( 9 μ) and lipogranulomas per tissue point (p = 0.023 and 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, computer-assisted counting of lipid droplets following Oil Red O staining of liver biopsy samples allows objective measurement and detection of significant differences between dogs with CPS and normal dogs. This method will allow future evaluation of the relationship between different presentations of CPS (anatomy, age, breed) and lipidosis, as well as the impact of hepatic lipidosis on outcomes following surgical shunt attenuation. PMID:23528942

  4. Usefulness of color and pulsed Doppler's in the evaluation of surgical portosystemic shunts in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrocal, T.; Prieto, C.; Cortes, P.; Rodriguez, R.; Pastor, I.

    2003-01-01

    Portosystemic shunts are performed to relieve symptomatic portal hypertension symptomatic or removal pressure in hepatic vascularisation in patients with Budd-Chiari's syndrome. Most surgical portosystemic shunts can be suitably studied by means of ultrasound scan complemented by color and pulsed Dopplers, proved one understands the hemodynamics of the surgical procedures involved. This article demonstrates the usefulness and limitations of the ultrasound scan Duplex Doppler in the evaluation of portosystemic shunts performed on pediatric patients. Pulsed Doppler provides information regarding the nature and direction of blood flow. Color doppler is capable of directly revealing the shunt and, in most cases, permits the anastomosis to be located. The types of shunts that appear include proximal and distal spleno-renal, portocaval and mesocaval. Types of vascular connections are illustrated,s well as expected post-surgical blood flow direction in affected vessels. The ultrasound scanning technique is discussed, as well as the criteria for determining vascular permeability. Also highlighted are the advantages, limitations and diagnostic difficulties associated with the different forms of Doppler. (Author) 17 refs

  5. Stent migration after right ventricular outflow tract stenting in the severe cyanotic Tetralogy of Fallot case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamaki Hayashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report our experience with a stent migration after right ventricle outflow tract stenting and converted to patent ductus arteriosus stenting in Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF with severe infundibular stenosis. Finally, the patient achieved to TOF repair, and the migrated stent was removed without any complication.

  6. Scintigraphic appearance and selective arteriographic aspects in intrahepatic cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valleteau de Moulliac, M [Hopital Saint-Michel, 75 - Paris (France); de Tovar, G; Mornet, P; Moinard, J F [Centre Medico-Chirurgical Foch, 92 - Suresnes (France)

    1978-01-21

    Based on one case history, it is reviewed that prolonged cases of obstructive jaundice can take on deceiving appearances, and all the more so when they fall within the framework of a 'biological gap'. Extensive distension of the extra and intrahepatic bile ducts are at the basis of images with multiple, radiating hilar gaps on scintigraphy, and of 'chicken nests' and 'Swiss cheese' at hepatographic times in selective hepatic arteriography. These rather uncommon images should lead to a diagnosis of a surgical cholestatic liver.

  7. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Il Kwon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs] have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations.

  8. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000235.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge To use the sharing ... the hospital. You may have also had a stent (a tiny wire mesh tube) placed in the ...

  9. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000234.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge To use the sharing ... peripheral artery). You may have also had a stent placed. To perform the procedure: Your doctor inserted ...

  10. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007393.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries To use the sharing features ... inside the arteries and block blood flow. A stent is a small, metal mesh tube that keeps ...

  11. Management of stent dislodgment in coarctoplasty of aorta with three overlapping self-expandable nitinol stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi, Payam; Haji-Zeinali, Ali-Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    We describe a case of native coarctation of aorta managed with three self-expandable nitinol stents. After balloon pre-dilation, the first and second stents were dislodged. The coarcted area was successfully treated with the third stent overlapped with the previous stents. During follow up (30 months), the patient was free of complications. It seems that implantation of multiple overlapping self-expandable stents in aortic coarctation patients, if needed, is safe and possible.

  12. Prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways in patients with portal hypertension: demonstration by gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldana, Rogerio Pedreschi; Bezerra, Alexandre Araujo Sergio; Cecin, Alexnadre Oliveira; Souza, Luis Ronan Marques Ferreira de; Goldman, Susan Menasce; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Szejnfeld, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    To demonstrate the usefulness of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in the evaluation of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. We reviewed the images from 40 patients with portal hypertension studied with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and selected illustrative cases of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. The scans were performed using high field equipment (1.5 Tesla) and a 3 D volume technique. Image were obtained after intravenous injection of paramagnetic contrast media using a power injector. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated with precision the porto-systemic collateral pathways, particularly when investigating extensive territories or large vessels. The cases presented show the potential of this method in the investigation of patients with portal hypertension. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is a useful method for the evaluation of patients with portal hypertension and prominent collateral pathways. (author)

  13. Anatomic relationship of intrahepatic bile ducts to portal veins revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bret, P.M.; Stempel, J.; Atri, M.; Lough, J.O.; Illescas, F.F.

    1987-01-01

    It is well accepted that intrahepatic bile ducts lie in front of corresponding portal vein branches. Since the authors' clinical experience with US was different, they studied 18 normal necropsy cadaver livers. The common bile duct, main portal vein, and hepatic artery were cannulated and injected respectively with air, dilute contrast medium, and mineral oil. The livers were then examined in anatomic position with CT. In the left lobe of the liver, the bile ducts were anterior to the portal vein in seven cases, posterior in seven cases, and were tortuous both anterior and posterior in three cases. In the right lobe, the bile ducts were anterior in nine cases, posterior in five cases, tortuous in one case, and not seen in two cases. In the porta hepatis, the bile ducts were anterior in eight cases, posterior in one case, tortuous in five cases, and not seen in three cases. Histologic specimens confirmed the anterior and posterior location of the bile ducts relative to the portal veins. In conclusion, intrahepatic bile ducts can be either anterior or posterior to the corresponding portal vein branches

  14. A study on CT features of intrahepatic bile duct abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Pengqiu; Li Peng; He Zhiyan; Chen Weixia; Liu Yan

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate CT features of intrahepatic bile duct abscess (IBDA) and its pathologic basis. Methods: The CT imaging data of 31 consecutive cases of intrahepatic bile duct abscess proved by surgery or clinical treatments from October 1989 to February 1999 were retrospectively studied. The causes included acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis and retrograde infection due to different etiologies. For all the cases, the CT manifestations of liver abscess, bile duct abnormalities, and their relationship were observed respectively. Results: Manifestations of liver abscess were revealed in all cases (31/31, 100%). The CT manifestations of bile duct abnormalities included signs of etiologies caused bile duct obstruction and other signs including cholangiectasis (29/31, 93.5%), the dilated bile ducts communicated with (5/31, 16.1%) or abut on (8/31, 25.8%) the abscesses, and gas collection in bile ducts (10/31, 32.2%). The signs showing the relationship between liver abscess and bile duct abnormalities were that the abscesses complied with the obstructive site and the dilated bile ducts (15/31, 48.4%), and the liver abscesses located in different (7/31, 22.6%) or same (4/31, 12.9%) liver lobes or segments with gas collection in the dilated bile ducts. Conclusion: The CT manifestations of IBDA included signs of liver abscess, abnormalities of bile ducts, and signs showing their relationship. CT scanning was helpful in making comprehensive and accurate diagnosis of IBDA

  15. Plastic biliary stents for malignant biliary diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibregtse, Inge; Fockens, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Plastic biliary endoprostheses have not changed much since their introduction more than 3 decades ago. Although their use has been challenged by the introduction of metal stents, plastic stents still remain commonly used. Much work has been done to improve the problem of stent obstruction but

  16. Therapies targeting inflammation after stent implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Since the introduction of coronary vessel scaffold by metallic stent, percutaneous coronary intervention has become widely performed all over the world. Although drug-eluting stent technology has further decrease the incidence of in-stent restenosis, there still remaining issues related to stent implantation. Vessel inflammation is one of the causes that may be related to stent restenosis as well as stent thrombosis. Therefore, systemic therapies targeting inflammation emerged as adjunctive pharmacological intervention to improve outcome. Statins, corticosteroids, antiplatelets, and immunosuppresive or anti-cancer drugs are reported to favorably impact outcome after bare-metal stent implantation. In type 2 diabetic patients, pioglitazone may be the most promising drug that can lower neointimal proliferation and, as a result, lower incidence of restenosis and target lesion revascularization. On the other hand, several new stent platforms that might decrease inflammatory response after drug-eluting stent implantation have been introduced. Because durable polymer used in the first generation drug-eluting stents are recognized to be responsible for unfavorable vessel response, biocompatible or bioabsorbable polymer has been introduce and already used clinically. Furthermore, polymer-free drug-eluting stent and bioresorbable scaffold are under investigation. Although vessel inflammation may be reduced by using these new drug-eluting stents or scaffold, long-term impact needs to be investigated further.

  17. Incidence and predictors of coronary stent thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Bollati, Mario; Clementi, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Stent thrombosis remains among the most feared complications of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting. However, data on its incidence and predictors are sparse and conflicting. We thus aimed to perform a collaborative systematic review on incidence and predictors of stent...

  18. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral stent...

  19. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or to...

  20. Metallic ureteral stents in malignant ureteral obstruction: clinical factors predicting stent failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Po-Ming; Hsu, Jui-Shan; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Lee, Yuan-Ju; Huang, Kuo-How; Yu, Hong-Jheng; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Liang, Po-Chin

    2014-06-01

    To provide clinical outcomes of the Resonance metallic ureteral stent in patients with malignant ureteral obstruction, as well as clinical factors predicting stent failure. Cancer patients who have received Resonance stents from July 2009 to March 2012 for ureteral obstruction were included for chart review. Stent failure was detected by clinical symptoms, image studies, and renal function tests. Survival analysis for stent duration was used to estimate patency rate and factors predicting stent failure. A total of 117 stents were inserted successfully into 94 ureteral units in 79 patients. There were no major complications. These stents underwent survival analysis and proportional hazard regression. The median duration for the stents was 5.77 months. In multivariate analysis, age (P=0.043), preoperative serum creatinine level (P=0.0174), and cancer type (P=0.0494) were significant factors associated with stent failure. Cancer treatment before and after stent insertion had no effect on stent duration. Resonance stents are effective and safe in relieving malignant ureteral obstructions. Old age and high serum creatinine level are predictors for stent failure. Stents in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancers have longer functional duration.

  1. Coronary and peripheral stenting in aorto-ostial protruding stents: The balloon assisted access to protruding stent technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Tarek A; Sanchez, Carlos E; Bailey, Steven R

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of aorto-ostial in-stent restenosis lesions represents a challenge for interventional cardiologists. Excessive protrusion of the stent into the aorta may lead to multiple technical problems, such as difficult catheter reengagement of the vessel ostium or inability to re-wire through the stent lumen in repeat interventions. We describe a balloon assisted access to protruding stent technique in cases where conventional coaxial engagement of an aorto-ostial protruding stent with the guide catheter or passage of the guide wire through the true lumen is not feasible. This technique is applicable both in coronary and peripheral arteries. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Experimental absorbable stent permits airway remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Liu, Yun-Hen; Peng, Yi-Jie; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2011-02-01

    Despite metallic and silicone stents being effective in treating various airway lesions, many concerns still remain. A bioresorbable stent that scaffolds the airway lumen and dissolves after the remodeling process is completed has advantages over metallic and silicone stents. We designed and fabricated a new mesh-type bioresorbable stent with a backbone of polycaprolactone (PCL), and evaluated its safety and biocompatibility in a rabbit trachea model. The PCL stent was fabricated by a laboratory-made microinjection molding machine. In vitro mechanical strength of the PCL stents was tested and compared to that of commercial silicone stents. The bioresorbable stents were surgically implanted into the cervical trachea of New Zealand white rabbits (n=6). Animals received bronchoscopic examination at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. Histological examination was completed to evaluate the biocompatibility of the stents. No animals died during the period of study. Distal stent migration was noted in 1 rabbit. In-stent secretion accumulation was found in 2 rabbits. Histological examination showed intact ciliated epithelium and marked leukocyte infiltration in the submucosa of the stented area at 10 and 28 weeks. Stent degradation was minimal, and the mechanical strength was well preserved at the end of 33 weeks. These preliminary findings showed good safety and biocompatibility of the new PCL stent when used in the airway remodeling. PCL could be a promising bioresorbable material for stent design if prolonged degradation time is required. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Three-dimensional reconstructions of intrahepatic bile duct tubulogenesis in human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestentoft, Peter S; Jelnes, Peter; Hopkinson, Branden M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During liver development, intrahepatic bile ducts are thought to arise by a unique asymmetric mode of cholangiocyte tubulogenesis characterized by a series of remodeling stages. Moreover, in liver diseases, cells lining the Canals of Hering can proliferate and generate new hepatic...... in normal liver and in the extensive ductular reactions originating from intrahepatic bile ducts and branching into the parenchyma of the acetaminophen intoxicated liver. In the developing human liver, three-dimensional reconstructions using multiple marker proteins confirmed that the human intrahepatic...

  4. Microvascular stent anastomosis using N-fibroin stents: feasibility, ischemia time, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Ralf; Vorwig, Oliver; Wöltje, Michael; Gaudin, Robert; Luebke, Andreas M; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Rheinnecker, Michael; Heiland, Max; Grupp, Katharina; Gröbe, Alexander; Hanken, Henning

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate a novel microvascular anastomosis technique using N-fibroin stents. Cylinder stents of 1 mm diameter and 5 mm length were fabricated using N-fibroin from silkworms. In 22 rats, aortas were dissected, and the stent was inserted into the two ends of the aorta and fixed using methylmethacrylate. Stent anastomosis was successful in 21 (96%) rats. The mean ischemia time was 7.4 minutes, significantly shorter than the 15.9 minutes in the control group with conventional sutures (P stent anastomosis cases, and marked host rejection was evident at the stent anastomosis sites. Around the stents, thrombi were frequent (52%). Our study demonstrated the basic feasibility of stent anastomosis using N-fibroin stents and reduced ischemia time. However, thrombus formation, frequent and severe abdominal infections, and heavy host rejection remain critical issues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Endoscopic stent suture fixation for prevention of esophageal stent migration during prolonged dilatation for achalasia treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, E; Asari, R; Paireder, M; Lenglinger, J; Schoppmann, S F

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to compare endoscopic stent suture fixation with endoscopic clip attachment or the use of partially covered stents (PCS) regarding their capability to prevent stent migration during prolonged dilatation in achalasia. Large-diameter self-expanding metal stents (30 mm × 80 mm) were placed across the gastroesophageal junction in 11 patients with achalasia. Stent removal was scheduled after 4 to 7 days. To prevent stent dislocation, endoscopic clip attachment, endoscopic stent suture fixation, or PCS were used. The Eckardt score was evaluated before and 6 months after prolonged dilatation. After endoscopic stent suture fixation, no (0/4) sutured stent migrated. When endoscopic clips were used, 80% (4/5) clipped stents migrated (p = 0.02). Of two PCS (n = 2), one migrated and one became embedded leading to difficult stent removal. Technical adverse events were not seen in endoscopic stent suture fixation but were significantly correlated with the use of clips or PCS (r = 0.828, p = 0.02). Overall, 72% of patients were in remission regarding their achalasia symptoms 6 months after prolonged dilatation. Endoscopic suture fixation of esophageal stents but not clip attachment appears to be the best method of preventing early migration of esophageal stents placed at difficult locations such as at the naive gastroesophageal junction. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Angulated Stents-A Novel Stent Improvisation to Manage Difficult Post-tuberculosis Bronchial Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Chee Kiang; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Kim, Hojoong

    2017-10-18

    Post-tuberculosis bronchostenosis (PTBS), a complication of endobronchial tuberculosis is currently treated by bronchial stenting. However, in cases of angulated bronchial stenoses, difficulty is often encountered in stent insertion and maintenance, resulting in stent migration, granulation tissue overgrowth, and restenosis. To accommodate the angulated alignment of the stenosis, we devised an "angulated stent"-a novel improvisation of the conventional stent via splicing and suturing to achieve a resultant angulated shape. A retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the performance of this stent. Among 283 PTBS patients who underwent interventional bronchoscopy at our center from 2004 to 2014, 21 were treated with at least one angulated stent. Clinical outcomes, including the stenting duration were investigated. After a median follow-up of 26 months, stent removal was successful in 7 (33.3%) out of 21 patients. In patients managed with angulated stents, the median duration to stent change or eventual removal was longer than those treated with straight tube stents (392 days vs. 86 days; p < 0.05). Angulated stents are a feasible treatment option in patients with angulated PTBS by reducing complications and prolonging the stent-changing interval.

  7. Primary and revision efficacy of cross-wired metallic stents for endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement in malignant hilar biliary strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T H; Moon, J H; Kim, J H; Park, D H; Lee, S S; Choi, H J; Cho, Y D; Park, S H; Kim, S J

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic bilateral drainage for inoperable malignant hilar biliary strictures (HBS) using metal stents is considered to be technically difficult. Furthermore, endoscopic revision of bilateral stenting after occlusion can be challenging. This study was performed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of cross-wired metallic stents in high-grade malignant HBS and planned endoscopic bilateral revision. A total of 84 patients with inoperable high-grade malignant HBS were enrolled from three academic tertiary referral centers. Two cross-wired metal stents were inserted using a bilateral stent-in-stent placement method. Bilateral endoscopic revision was also performed during follow-up using either identical metal stents or plastic stents. The main outcome measurements were technical and functional success, complications, stent patency, and endoscopic revision efficacy. The technical and clinical success rates of endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of cross-wired metallic stents were 95.2% (80/84) and 92.9% (78/84), respectively. Median patency (range) and survival were 238 days (10-429) and 256 days (10-1130), respectively. Obstruction of primary bilateral stents occurred in 30.8% (24/78) of patients with functionally successful stent placement. The technical and clinical success rates of planned bilateral endoscopic revision for occluded stents were 83.3% (20/24) and 79.2% (19/24), respectively. For revision, bilateral metallic stents were placed in 11 patients (55.0%); the remaining patients received plastic stents. Palliative endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of cross-wired metallic stents was effective in patients with inoperable HBS. Revision endoscopic bilateral stenting may be feasible and successful in cases where the primary deployed metal stents are occluded. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Endobronchial Occlusion Stent: A Preliminary Experimental Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yo Won; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Heo, Jeong Nam; Jeon, Seok Chol [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Gi Young; Song, Ho Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    To evaluate the safety and the technical feasibility of the use of an endobronchial occlusion stent and to get preliminary data for the development of the optimal material required for endobronchial occlusions. A commercialized, self-expandable tracheobronchial stent was modified; one half had a polyurethane cover with an occluded end and the other half was uncovered with a flaring configuration. The occluded end was placed such that it would face the distal lung. Under fluoroscopic guidance, seven stents were placed at the lower lobar bronchus in 6 mini-pigs. The bronchial obstruction was examined immediately after stent placement. Chest radiographs were taken at days 1, 7, 14, and 28 after stent placement and the removed airways from two, two, one, and one mini-pigs sacrificed on corresponding days were examined for the maintenance of bronchial obstruction. Stents were successfully placed and induced the immediate bronchial obstruction in all mini-pigs. Five of seven airways with occlusion stents maintained an obstruction until the mini-pigs were sacrificed. Proximal stent migration occurred in two mini-pigs (29%), and pulmonary consolidations were observed distal to four of the stents (57%). The placement of an endobronchial occlusion stent and the obstruction of targeted bronchi seem to be feasible, but an add-on check valve should be considered to prevent stent migration and obstructive pneumonia

  9. [Absorbable coronary stents. New promising technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbel, Raimund; Böse, Dirk; Haude, Michael; Kordish, Igor; Churzidze, Sofia; Malyar, Nasser; Konorza, Thomas; Sack, Stefan

    2007-06-01

    Coronary stent implantation started in Germany 20 years ago. In the beginning, the progress was very slow and accelerated 10 years later. Meanwhile, coronary stent implantation is a standard procedure in interventional cardiology. From the beginning of permanent stent implantation, research started to provide temporary stenting of coronary arteries, first with catheter-based systems, later with stent-alone technology. Stents were produced from polymers or metal. The first polymer stent implantation failed except the Igaki-Tamai stent in Japan. Newly developed absorbable polymer stents seem to be very promising, as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography have demonstrated. Temporary metal stents were developed based on iron and magnesium. Currently, the iron stent is tested in peripheral arteries. The absorbable magnesium stent (Biotronik, Berlin, Germany) was tested in peripheral arteries below the knee and meanwhile in the multicenter international PROGRESS-AMS (Clinical Performance and Angiographic Results of Coronary Stenting with Absorbable Metal Stents) study. The first magnesium stent implantation was performed on July 30, 2004 after extended experimental testing in Essen. The magnesium stent behaved like a bare-metal stent with low recoil of 5-7%. The stent struts were absorbed when tested with IVUS. Stent struts were not visible by fluoroscopy or computed tomography (CT) as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). That means, that the magnesium stent is invisible and therefore CT and MRI can be used for imaging of interventions. Only using micro-CT the stent struts were visible. The absorption process could be demonstrated in a patient 18 days after implantation due to suspected acute coronary syndrome, which was excluded. IVUS showed a nice open lumen. Stent struts were no longer visible, but replaced by tissue indicating the previous stent location. Coronary angiography after 4 months showed an ischemia-driven target lesion

  10. A new method for the measurement of intrahepatic shunts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefs, J.C.; Reynolds, T.B.; Pare, P.; Sakimura, I.

    1984-01-01

    After transhepatic portal pressure determination, 96 patients were assessed for the presence of intrahepatic shunts by injection of microspheres (25 +/- 5 micron diameter) into the portal vein using RISA-131I as an indicator of dilution. Multiple portal vein injections in each patient allowed blood sampling from the hepatic vein (site 1) and from two inferior vena cava sampling sites (site 2, at the junction of the hepatic vein orifice with the inferior vena cava, and site 3, 2 to 3 cm closer to or within the right atrium). Intrahepatic shunting was calculated from each site: hepatic vein in 57 patients and inferior vena cava, site 2 in 43 patients and site 3 in 77 patients. At least one valid IHS calculation was available in 92 of the patients. Intrahepatic shunting calculated from sequential portal vein injections with sampling from the hepatic vein was highly correlated (r . 0.98, p less than 0.0001, slope . 1.0), with a mean difference of 1.9% +/- 1.9%. There was no significant difference by t test comparison of the mean IHS calculated from sites 1, 2, and 3. Occasional marked discrepancies were noted between IHS calculated from site 1 or site 2 compared with site 3, and the site 3 calculation was always greater. A shunt index in all patients included shunts calculated from the hepatic vein in 57 patients plus shunt calculation from the inferior vena cava in the remaining patients (site 2 in 26 patients and site 3 in nine). The 82 patients with portal hypertension or chronic liver disease had a higher portal pressure, 13.8 +/- 4.6 mm Hg, and a significantly greater shunt index, 13.7% +/- 24.5% compared with controls. The frequency distribution of IHS in patients with chronic liver disease demonstrated less than 2% IHS in 49% of patients and less than 5% IHS in 63%. The validity of our methods and the implications of the infrequent demonstration of a large IHS are discussed

  11. A comparative evaluation of early stent occlusion among biliary conventional versus wing stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashab, Mouen A; Hutfless, Susan; Kim, Katherine; Lennon, Anne Marie; Canto, Marcia I; Jagannath, Sanjay B; Okolo, Patrick I; Shin, Eun Ji; Singh, Vikesh K

    2012-06-01

    Conventional plastic stents with a lumen typically have limited patency. The lumenless wing stent was engineered to overcome this problem. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of early stent occlusion (symptomatic occlusion/cholangitis necessitating re-insertion within 90 days) for wing stents and conventional plastic stents. Patients with biliary pathology treated with plastic biliary stenting during the period 2003-2009 comprised the study cohort. Patients who had at least one biliary wing stent placed comprised the wing stent group, whereas patients who underwent only conventional stent plastic placement comprised the conventional stent group. Patients were stratified by indication: benign biliary strictures (group 1), malignant biliary strictures (group 2), or benign biliary non-stricture pathology (group 3). The association of stent type with the occurrence of primary outcome by indication was analyzed by use of multivariable logistic regression. Three-hundred and forty-six patients underwent 612 ERCP procedures with placement of plastic biliary stent(s). On multivariate analysis, early stent occlusion did not differ between the wing and conventional groups in groups 1, 2, and 3. Among patients who achieved primary outcome in group 2, significantly fewer patients in the wing group had cholangitis (6.7% vs. 39.1%, P = 0.03). Among patients who achieved primary outcome in group 3, significantly fewer patients in the wing group had cholangitis (10% vs. 50%, P = 0.03). Early stent occlusion was similar for wing stents and conventional plastic stents. Wing stents, however, were associated with a lower incidence of cholangitis in patients with malignant biliary obstruction and benign non-stricturing biliary pathology.

  12. Recurrence of Subacute Stent Thrombosis and In-Stent Restenosis during Five Months after Stent Implantation in the LAD. A Case Report.

    OpenAIRE

    島田, 弘英; 大和, 眞史; 櫻井, 俊平; 疋田, 博之; 池田, 修一

    2001-01-01

    A coronary stent was deployed in the left anterior descending artery of an 82-year-old woman with unstable angina.Recurrence of subacute stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis occurred frequently during the five months after initial stent implantation.Balloon angioplasty and cutting balloon angioplasty failed to prevent these complications,but they ceased after re-stenting in the initial stent.In this case,tissue protrusion through the stent strut, deformation of the coil stent and inadequa...

  13. Multidetector Computed Tomography Assessment in Biliary Atresia for the Diagnosis of Portosystemic Collaterals before Liver Transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadavid A, Lina; Barber, Ignasi; Bueno, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic liver disease increases portal vein pressure and modifies splanchnic circulation. This is particularly significant in infants with biliary atresia. Large collaterals steal portal flow and increase the risk of post transplant portal vein thrombosis. Objective: to describe different types of portosystemic collaterals prior to liver transplantation with low-dose multidetector CT (MDCT) in patients with biliary atresia. Material and methods: 13 patients with severe liver dysfunction due to biliary atresia underwent low-dose 64-MDCT before liver transplantation (effective tube current ranged from 20 to 120 mAs according to weight, with a kilo voltage of 80-120 for all CT). Hepatic arterial and portal venous phases were performed after IV contrast administration [1.5-2 ml/kg]. The mean age of the study group was1 year (range, 4 months to 3.6 years). Two radiologists reviewed the CT images to determine the grade and types of the portosystemic collaterals. Results: A total of 16 CT scans were obtained.the most common portosystemic collaterals found were esophageal (11), gastric submucosal (8), gastric adventitial (7, splenic (7), hemorrhoidal (10), mesenteric [dilated or tortuous branches of the inferior mesenteric vein (8)], retroperitoneal varices [gastro renal shunt (10), splenorenal shunt (4)] and dilated or tortuous left gastric vein (13). Conclusion: MDCT provides important information on venous system patency, presence of varices, and location of venous shunts in pediatric patients with biliary atresia going to liver transplant. in addition, it is critical to detect collaterals that are not evident on ultrasound in order to avoid the steal phenomenon that may lead to portal vein thrombosis and graft failure.

  14. Predictors of stent dysfunction after self-expandable metal stent placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction: tumor ingrowth in uncovered stents and migration of covered stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yasuki; Naitoh, Itaru; Hayashi, Kazuki; Ban, Tesshin; Natsume, Makoto; Okumura, Fumihiro; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Takada, Hiroki; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Jinno, Naruomi; Togawa, Shozo; Ando, Tomoaki; Kataoka, Hiromi; Joh, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    Endoscopic metallic stenting is widely accepted as a palliation therapy for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). However, the predictors of stent dysfunction have not been clarified. We aimed to evaluate the predictors, especially tumor ingrowth in uncovered self-expandable metallic stents (U-SEMS) and migration of covered self-expandable metallic stents (C-SEMS), which are the main causes related to the stent characteristics. In this multicenter retrospective study, we compared patients with U-SEMS and C-SEMS in terms of clinical outcomes, and predictors of stent dysfunction. In total, 252 patients (126 with U-SEMS and 126 with C-SEMS) were enrolled. There were no significant differences in technical success, clinical success, GOO score, or time to stent dysfunction. Tumor ingrowth was significantly more frequent in U-SEMS (U-SEMS, 11.90% vs. C-SEMS, 0.79%; p = 0.002), and stent migration was significantly more frequent for C-SEMS (C-SEMS, 8.73% vs. U-SEMS, 0.79%; p = 0.005). Karnofsky performance status (p = 0.04), no presence of ascites (p = 0.02), and insufficient (stent expansion (p = 0.003) were significantly associated with tumor ingrowth in U-SEMS. Meanwhile, a shorter stent length (p = 0.05) and chemotherapy (p = 0.03) were predictors of C-SEMS migration. Both U-SEMS and C-SEMS are effective with comparable patencies. Tumor ingrowth and stent migration are the main causes of stent dysfunction for U-SEMS and C-SEMS, respectively. With regard to stent dysfunction, U-SEMS might be a good option for patients receiving chemotherapy, while C-SEMS with longer stents for patients in good condition. (Clinical trial registration number: UMIN000024059).

  15. Clinical experience in coronary stenting with the Vivant Z Stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, K H; Siaw, F S; Chan, C G; Chong, W P; Imran, Z A; Haizal, H K; Azman, W; Tan, K H

    2005-06-01

    This single centre study was designed to demonstrate feasibility, safety and efficacy of the Vivant Z stent (PFM AG, Cologne, Germany). Patients with de novo lesion were recruited. Coronary angioplasty was performed with either direct stenting or after balloon predilatation. Repeated angiogram was performed 6 months later or earlier if clinically indicated. Between January to June 2003, a total of 50 patients were recruited (mean age 55.8 +/- 9 years). A total of 52 lesions were stented successfully. Mean reference diameter was 2.77 mm (+/-0.59 SD, range 2.05-4.39 mm) with mean target lesion stenosis of 65.5% (+/-11.6 SD, range 50.1-93.3%). Forty-six lesions (88.5%) were American College of Cardiologist/American Heart Association class B/C types. Direct stenting was performed in 18 (34.6%) lesions. Mean stent diameter was 3.18 mm (+/-0.41 SD, range 2.5-4 mm), and mean stent length was 14.86 mm (+/-2.72 SD, range 9-18 mm). The procedure was complicated in only one case which involved the loss of side branch with no clinical sequelae. All treated lesions achieved Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction 3 flow. Mean residual diameter stenosis was 12.2% (+/-7.55 SD, range 0-22.6%) with acute gain of 1.72 mm (+/-0.50 SD, range 0.5-2.8). At 6 months, there was no major adverse cardiovascular event. Repeated angiography after 6 months showed a restenosis rate of 17% (defined as >50% diameter restenosis). Mean late loss was 0.96 mm (+/-0.48 SD) with loss index of 0.61 (+/-0.38 SD). The restenosis rate of those lesions less than 3.0 mm in diameter was 22.2% compared with 6.25% in those lesions more than 3.0 mm in diameter. The Vivant Z stent was shown to be safe and efficacious with low restenosis rate in de novo coronary artery lesion.

  16. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy characterized by parallel use of the continuous reaction time and portosystemic encephalopathy tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, M M; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O B; Vilstrup, H

    2015-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is a frequent complication to liver cirrhosis that causes poor quality of life, a great burden to caregivers, and can be treated. For diagnosis and grading the international guidelines recommend the use of psychometric tests of different modalities (computer...... based vs. paper and pencil). To compare results of the Continuous Reaction time (CRT) and the Portosystemic Encephalopathy (PSE) tests in a large unselected cohort of cirrhosis patients without clinically detectable brain impairment and to clinically characterize the patients according to their test...

  17. A method to determine the kink resistance of stents and stent delivery systems according to international standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandt-Wunderlich Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The kink behavior of vascular stents is of particular interest for clinicians, stent manufacturers and regulatory as a kinked stent generates a lumen loss in the stented vessel and can lead to in-stent restenosis. In this study methods to determine the kink resistance of stents and stent delivery systems according to the ISO 25539-2 and FDA guidance no. 1545 were presented. The methods are applicable for balloon expandable stents as well as for self-expanding stents and determine the lumen loss and residual diameter change dependent on the specific bending radius.

  18. Computer tomographic and angiographic studies of histologically confirmed intrahepatic masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janson, R.; Lackner, K.; Paquet, K.J.; Thelen, M.; Thurn, P.

    1980-01-01

    The computer tomographic and angiographic findings in 53 patients with intrahepatic masses were compared. The histological findings show that 17 were due to echinococcus, 12 were due to hepatic carcinoma, ten were metastases, five patients had focal nodular hyperplasia, three an alveolar echinococcus and there were three cases with an haemangioma of the liver and a further three liver abscesses. Computer tomography proved superior in peripherally situated lesions, and in those in the left lobe of the liver. Arteriography was better at demonstrating lesions below 2 cm in size, particularly vascular tumours. As a pre-operative measure, angiography is to be preferred since it is able to demonstrate anatomic anomalies and variations in the blood supply, as well as invasion of the portal vein or of the inferior vena cava. (orig.) [de

  19. Computer tomographic and angiographic studies of histologically confirmed intrahepatic masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janson, R.; Lackner, K.; Paquet, K.J.; Thelen, M.; Thurn, P.

    1980-06-01

    The computer tomographic and angiographic findings in 53 patients with intrahepatic masses were compared. The histological findings show that 17 were due to echinococcus, 12 were due to hepatic carcinoma, ten were metastases, five patients had focal nodular hyperplasia, three an alveolar echinococcus and there were three cases with an haemangioma of the liver and a further three liver abscesses. Computer tomography proved superior in peripherally situated lesions, and in those in the left lobe of the liver. Arteriography was better at demonstrating lesions below 2 cm in size, particularly vascular tumours. As a pre-operative measure, angiography is to be preferred since it is able to demonstrate anatomic anomalies and variations in the blood supply, as well as invasion of the portal vein or of the inferior vena cava.

  20. Molecular Pathogenesis and Current Therapy in Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Dan Taksony Solyom; O'Rourke, Colm J; Taranta, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    , the context of tumor plasticity and the causative features driving the disease. Molecular profiling and pathological techniques have begun to underline persistent alterations that may trigger inherited drug resistance (a hallmark of hepatobiliary and pancreatic cancers), metastasis and disease recurrence......Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA) comprises one of the most rapidly evolving cancer types. An underlying chronic inflammatory liver disease that precedes liver cancer development for several decades and creates a pro-oncogenic microenvironment frequently impairs progress in therapeutic...... clinical strategies and patient outcome. This was achieved for other cancers, such as breast carcinoma, facilitated by the delineation of patient subsets and of precision therapies. In iCCA, many questions persevere as to the evolutionary process and cellular origin of the initial transforming event...

  1. Intrahepatic cholestasis in subclinical and overt hyperthyroidism: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soylu Aliye

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Non-specific abnormalities in liver function tests might accompany the clinical course of hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism can cause the elevation of hepatic enzymes and bilirubin. Jaundice is rare in overt hyperthyroidism, especially in subclinical hyperthyroidism. On the other hand, the use of anti-thyroid drugs has rarely been associated with toxic hepatitis and cholestatic jaundice. Case presentation Here we present two cases of cholestasis that accompanied two distinct forms of clinical hyperthyroidism. The first patient had a clinical presentation of severe cholestasis in the absence of congestive failure related to hyperthyroidism. The second case had developed intrahepatic cholestasis in the presence of subclinical hyperthyroidism, and improved with rifampicin treatment. Conclusion Hyperthyroidism should be a consideration in non-specific liver dysfunction.

  2. A case of an intrahepatic fish bone penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, Kazuhiko; Nakajima, Yoshiro; Yamamoto, Shunji; Nagao, Masatoshi; Nishimura, Kazumasa.

    1981-01-01

    A 56-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of epigastric discomfort, appetite loss and body weight loss. A gallstone, signs of chronic inflammation and CEA-Z: 12.5 ng/ml were found. Abdominal CT scan revealed an intrahepatic low density nodule and an intra-and-extrahepatic high-dense, needle-like foreign body. By laparotomy a fish bone penetrating into the left lateral segment of the liver from the anterior wall of the prepyloric region of the stomach was found. Cholecystectomy was performed. The penetrating fish bone was withdrawn from the liver easily. The Postoperative course was smooth. The possibility of the definitive preoperative diagnosis of the intestinal fish bone penetration by abdominal CT scan was suggested. (author)

  3. An in Vitro Twist Fatigue Test of Fabric Stent-Grafts Supported by Z-Stents vs. Ringed Stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Whereas buckling can cause type III endoleaks, long-term twisting of a stent-graft was investigated here as a mechanism leading to type V endoleak or endotension. Two experimental device designs supported with Z-stents having strut angles of 35° or 45° were compared to a ringed control under accelerated twisting. Damage to each device was assessed and compared after different durations of twisting, with focus on damage that may allow leakage. Stent-grafts with 35° Z-stents had the most severe distortion and damage to the graft fabric. The 45° Z-stents caused less fabric damage. However, consistent stretching was still seen around the holes for sutures, which attach the stents to the graft fabric. Larger holes may become channels for fluid percolation through the wall. The ringed stent-graft had the least damage observed. Stent apexes with sharp angles appear to be responsible for major damage to the fabrics. Device manufacturers should consider stent apex angle when designing stent-grafts, and ensure their devices are resistant to twisting.

  4. Stent malapposition, as a potential mechanism of very late stent thrombosis after bare-metal stent implantation: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuma, Takumi, E-mail: higuma@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp; Abe, Naoki; Hanada, Kenji; Yokoyama, Hiroaki; Tomita, Hirofumi; Okumura, Ken

    2014-04-15

    A 90-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. He had a history of post-infarction angina pectoris 79 months ago and had a bare-metal stent (BMS) implanted in the proximal left anterior descending artery at our hospital. Emergent coronary angiography demonstrated thrombotic occlusion in the previously stented segment. After catheter thrombectomy, antegrade flow was restored, but 90% stenosis with haziness persisted in the proximal and distal portions of the previously stented segment. Intravascular ultrasound imaging showed interstrut cavities or stent malapposition at the proximal and distal sites of stented segment. In close proximity to the sites, residual thrombi were also observed. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) demonstrated neither lipid-laden neointimal tissue nor rupture but clearly demonstrated residual thrombus adjacent to the malapposed region in addition to the stent malapposition. PCI with balloon was successfully performed and stent apposition was confirmed by OCT. Stent malapposition is an unusual mechanism of very late stent thrombosis after BMS implantation. OCT can clearly reveal the etiology of stent thrombosis.

  5. An in Vitro Twist Fatigue Test of Fabric Stent-Grafts Supported by Z-Stents vs. Ringed Stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Guidoin, Robert; Du, Jia; Wang, Lu; Douglas, Graeham; Zhu, Danjie; Nutley, Mark; Perron, Lygia; Zhang, Ze; Douville, Yvan

    2016-02-16

    Whereas buckling can cause type III endoleaks, long-term twisting of a stent-graft was investigated here as a mechanism leading to type V endoleak or endotension. Two experimental device designs supported with Z-stents having strut angles of 35° or 45° were compared to a ringed control under accelerated twisting. Damage to each device was assessed and compared after different durations of twisting, with focus on damage that may allow leakage. Stent-grafts with 35° Z-stents had the most severe distortion and damage to the graft fabric. The 45° Z-stents caused less fabric damage. However, consistent stretching was still seen around the holes for sutures, which attach the stents to the graft fabric. Larger holes may become channels for fluid percolation through the wall. The ringed stent-graft had the least damage observed. Stent apexes with sharp angles appear to be responsible for major damage to the fabrics. Device manufacturers should consider stent apex angle when designing stent-grafts, and ensure their devices are resistant to twisting.

  6. Long-term results after carotid artery stenting. Restenosis after carotid artery stenting using self-expandable stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yasushi; Furui, Eisuke; Tsuboi, Ken; Takahashi, Akira; Ezura, Masayuki

    2008-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting has emerged as an acceptable treatment alternative in patients with carotid artery stenosis. Although early clinical results of carotid artery stenting have shown promise, long, term clinical results remain less certain. We report the frequency, management, and clinical results of in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting using a self-expandable stent. Between August 1998 and September 2004, 80 carotid artery stenting procedures in 78 patients were performed. We evaluated 76 of the 80 procedures in 75 of the 78 patients treated during this period who had a minimum 6-month clinical and imaging (ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance angiography) follow-up. Recurrent stenosis (≥50%) after carotid artery stenting occurred in 3 (3.9%) patients. The recurrent stenosis occurred within one year after the procedure in all cases. The low rate of in-stent restenosis using self-expandable stent suggested that carotid artery stenting may be an effective alternative treatment for carotid artery stenosis, but more data of long-term follow-up are required. (author)

  7. Placement of percutaneous transhepatic biliary stent using a silicone drain with channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Mineta, Sho; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Kawano, Yoichi; Sasaki, Junpei; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Aimoto, Takayuki; Tajiri, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a method for percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting with a BLAKE Silicone Drain, and discusses the usefulness of placement of the drain connected to a J-VAC Suction Reservoir for the treatment of stenotic hepaticojejunostomy. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was performed under ultrasonographic guidance in a patient with stenotic hepaticojejunostomy after hepatectomy for hepatic hilum malignancy. The technique used was as follows. After dilatation of the drainage root, an 11-Fr tube with several side holes was passed through the stenosis of the hepaticojejunostomy. A 10-Fr BLAKE Silicone Drain is flexible, which precludes one-step insertion. One week after insertion of the 11-Fr tube, a 0.035-inch guidewire was inserted into the tube. After removal of the 11-Fr tube, the guidewire was put into the channel of a 10-Fr BLAKE Silicone Drain. The drain was inserted into the jejunal limb through the intrahepatic bile duct and was connected to a J-VAC Suction Reservoir. Low-pressure continued suction was applied. Patients can be discharged after insertion of the 10-Fr BLAKE Silicone Drain connected to the J-VAC Suction Reservoir. Placement of a percutaneous transhepatic biliary stent using a 10-Fr BLAKE Silicone Drain connected to a J-VAC Suction Reservoir is useful for the treatment of stenotic hepaticojejunostomy. PMID:19725159

  8. Comparison of a New Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Metallic Stent to a Noncovered Stent in Canine Ureters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hwan-Hoon; Lee, Seung Hwa; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Hong Suk; Kim, Young Sik; Kang, Byung Chul; Frisoli, Joan K.; Razavi, Mahmood K.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a newly designed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered metallic stent in the ureter by comparing its effectiveness with that of the noncovered stent in a canine model. We placed 14 stents in the ureters of seven mongrel dogs that weighed 30-40 kg each. The covered and noncovered stents were deployed in the right and left ureters, respectively, of six dogs. In the seventh dog, a covered stent and a double-J catheter were inserted in the right ureter, and a covered stent only was inserted in the left ureter. The first six dogs were sacrificed at 5, 10, and 15 weeks after deployment of the stents (two for each follow-up period), and the seventh dog was sacrificed at 30 weeks. There was no migration or poor expansion of any of the stents observed on plain radiography. On intravenous pyelogram and retrograde pyelogram, all of the covered stents at each follow-up period had patent lumens at the stented segments without hydronephrosis, and the passage of contrast material through it was well preserved. The noncovered stents in the dogs sacrificed at 5 and 10 weeks and one of the two dogs sacrificed at 15 weeks showed near-complete occlusion of the stent lumen due to ingrowth of the soft tissue, and severe hydronephrosis was also noted. The noncovered stent in the other dog sacrificed at 15 weeks showed the passage of contrast material without hydronephrosis, but the lumen of the stent was still nearly occluded by the soft tissue. There was no evidence of hydronephrosis or passage disturbance of the contrast material in both ureters of the dog sacrificed at 30 weeks. We conclude that the newly designed PTFE-covered stent effectively prevented the luminal occlusion caused by urothelial hyperplasia compared to the near-total occlusion of the noncovered stents, and no migration of the covered stents was noted

  9. MR Angiography of Peripheral Arterial Stents: In Vitro Evaluation of 22 Different Stent Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias C. Burg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate stent lumen visibility of a large sample of different peripheral arterial (iliac, renal, carotid stents using magnetic resonance angiography in vitro. Materials and Methods. 21 different stents and one stentgraft (10 nitinol, 7 316L, 2 tantalum, 1 cobalt superalloy, 1 PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1 platinum alloy were examined in a vessel phantom (vessel diameters ranging from 5 to 13 mm filled with a solution of Gd-DTPA. Stents were imaged at 1.5 Tesla using a T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence. Image analysis was performed measuring three categories: Signal intensity in the stent lumen, lumen visibility of the stented lumen, and homogeneity of the stented lumen. The results were classified using a 3-point scale (good, intermediate, and poor results. Results. 7 stents showed good MR lumen visibility (4x nitinol, 2x tantalum, and 1x cobalt superalloy. 9 stents showed intermediate results (5x nitinol, 2x 316L, 1x PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1x platinum alloy and 6 stents showed poor results (1x nitinol, and 5x 316L. Conclusion. Stent lumen visibility varies depending on the stent material and type. Some products show good lumen visibility which may allow the detection of stenoses inside the lumen, while other products cause artifacts which prevent reliable evaluation of the stent lumen with this technique.

  10. Treatment of hepatic encephalopathy by retrograde transcaval coil embolization of an ileal vein-to-right gonadal vein portosystemic shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishie, Akihiro; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Honda, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Kuniyuki; Kuroiwa, Toshiro; Fukuya, Tatsuro; Irie, Hiroyuki; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Yoshimitsu, Takahiro; Hirakata, Hideki; Okuda, Seiya; Masuda, Kouji

    1997-01-01

    A 43-year-old non-cirrhotic woman suffered from encephalopathy caused by an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt between the ileal vein and inferior vena cava via the right gonadal vein. Percutaneous transcatheter embolization with stainless steel coils was performed by the retrograde systemic venous approach. Encephalopathy improved dramatically

  11. Hepatic gene expression and plasma albumin concentration related to outcome after attenuation of a congenital portosystemic shunt in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kummeling, A.; Penning, L.C.; Rothuizen, J.; Brinkhof, B.; Weber, M.F.; van Sluijs, F.J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In dogs with a congenital portosystemic shunt (CPSS), the outcome after CPSS attenuation is difficult to predict but is most likely related to hepatic and vascular proliferation that follows the attenuation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of shunt localization

  12. Polymeric Biodegradable Stent Insertion in the Esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal stent insertion has been used as a well-accepted and effective alternative to manage and improve the quality of life for patients diagnosed with esophageal diseases and disorders. Current stents are either permanent or temporary and are fabricated from either metal or plastic. The partially covered self-expanding metal stent (SEMS has a firm anchoring effect and prevent stent migration, however, the hyperplastic tissue reaction cause stent restenosis and make it difficult to remove. A fully covered SEMS and self-expanding plastic stent (SEPS reduced reactive hyperplasia but has a high migration rate. The main advantage that polymeric biodegradable stents (BDSs have over metal or plastic stents is that removal is not require and reduce the need for repeated stent insertion. But the slightly lower radial force of BDS may be its main shortcoming and a post-implant problem. Thus, strengthening support of BDS is a content of the research in the future. BDSs are often temporarily effective in esophageal stricture to relieve dysphagia. In the future, it can be expect that biodegradable drug-eluting stents (DES will be available to treat benign esophageal stricture, perforations or leaks with additional use as palliative modalities for treating malignant esophageal stricture, as the bridge to surgery or to maintain luminal patency during neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  13. Stent Design Affects Femoropopliteal Artery Deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacTaggart, Jason; Poulson, William; Seas, Andreas; Deegan, Paul; Lomneth, Carol; Desyatova, Anastasia; Maleckis, Kaspars; Kamenskiy, Alexey

    2018-03-23

    Poor durability of femoropopliteal artery (FPA) stenting is multifactorial, and severe FPA deformations occurring with limb flexion are likely involved. Different stent designs result in dissimilar stent-artery interactions, but the degree of these effects in the FPA is insufficiently understood. To determine how different stent designs affect limb flexion-induced FPA deformations. Retrievable markers were deployed into n = 28 FPAs of lightly embalmed human cadavers. Bodies were perfused and CT images were acquired with limbs in the standing, walking, sitting, and gardening postures. Image analysis allowed measurement of baseline FPA foreshortening, bending, and twisting associated with each posture. Markers were retrieved and 7 different stents were deployed across the adductor hiatus in the same limbs. Markers were then redeployed in the stented FPAs, and limbs were reimaged. Baseline and stented FPA deformations were compared to determine the influence of each stent design. Proximal to the stent, Innova, Supera, and SmartFlex exacerbated foreshortening, SmartFlex exacerbated twisting, and SmartControl restricted bending of the FPA. Within the stent, all devices except Viabahn restricted foreshortening; Supera, SmartControl, and AbsolutePro restricted twisting; SmartFlex and Innova exacerbated twisting; and Supera and Viabahn restricted bending. Distal to the stents, all devices except AbsolutePro and Innova exacerbated foreshortening, and Viabahn, Supera, Zilver, and SmartControl exacerbated twisting. All stents except Supera were pinched in flexed limb postures. Peripheral self-expanding stents significantly affect limb flexion-induced FPA deformations, but in different ways. Although certain designs seem to accommodate some deformation modes, no device was able to match all FPA deformations.

  14. Acute ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction after Coronary Stent Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafighdust, Abbasali; Eshraghi, Ali

    2015-10-27

    The invention of the drug-eluting stent (DES) has brought about revolutionary changes in the field of interventional cardiology. In the DES era, in-stent restenosis has declined but new issues such as stent thrombosis have emerged. One of the emerging paradigms in the DES era is stent fracture. There are reports about stent fracture leading to in-stent restenosis or stent thrombosis. Most of these reports concern the Sirolimus-eluting stent. The present case is a representation of a Biolimus-eluting stent fracture. We introduce a 64-year-old male patient, for whom the BioMatrix stent was deployed in the right coronary artery. Five months after the implantation, he experienced acute myocardial infarction, with stent fracture leading to stent thrombosis being the causative mechanism. Another DES (Cypher) was used to manage this situation, and the final result was good.

  15. Causes and prevention of in-stent restenosis of vertebral artery origin after stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Huipin; Li Shenmao; Zhang Guangping

    2010-01-01

    Vertebral artery stenosis is an important cause of posterior circulation stroke. Vertebral artery stenosis most commonly occurs at its origin site. In recent years, balloon angioplasty and stent implantation have been widely employed in the treatment of vertebral artery origin stenosis. However, the long term outcome of stent implantation is affected by in-stent restenosis. Multiple contributory factors have been identified, but clear understanding of the overall underlying mechanism remains an enigma. With the development of pathophysiology, prevention and treatment methods of in-stent restenosis have been improved. In recent years, drug-eluting stents, radioactive stents and magnetic stents have been widely applied. To some extent, these stents and drug therapy can solve the problem of restenosis. This article aims to review the clinical application and the up-to-date research progresses in preventing and managing vertebral artery origin restenosis. (authors)

  16. Evaluation of a novel stent technology: the Genous EPC capturing stent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, M.

    2012-01-01

    Tegenwoordig gebruiken ziekenhuizen een nieuwe stent bij dotterbehandelingen van kransslagadervernauwingen. Deze Genous-stent heeft een laag met antistoffen waardoor het behandelde bloedvat snel bedekt raakt met lichaamseigen cellen. Zo wordt tegengegaan dat er opnieuw een vernauwing optreedt of dat

  17. Comparison of self-expandable and balloon-expanding stents for hybrid ductal stenting in hypoplastic left heart complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goreczny, Sebastian; Qureshi, Shakeel A; Rosenthal, Eric; Krasemann, Thomas; Nassar, Mohamed S; Anderson, David R; Morgan, Gareth J

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to compare the procedural and mid-term performance of a specifically designed self-expanding stent with balloon-expandable stents in patients undergoing hybrid palliation for hypoplastic left heart syndrome and its variants. The lack of specifically designed stents has led to off-label use of coronary, biliary, or peripheral stents in the neonatal ductus arteriosus. Recently, a self-expanding stent, specifically designed for use in hypoplastic left heart syndrome, has become available. We carried out a retrospective cohort comparison of 69 neonates who underwent hybrid ductal stenting with balloon-expandable and self-expanding stents from December, 2005 to July, 2014. In total, 43 balloon-expandable stents were implanted in 41 neonates and more recently 47 self-expanding stents in 28 neonates. In the balloon-expandable stents group, stent-related complications occurred in nine patients (22%), compared with one patient in the self-expanding stent group (4%). During follow-up, percutaneous re-intervention related to the ductal stent was performed in five patients (17%) in the balloon-expandable stent group and seven patients (28%) in self-expanding stents group. Hybrid ductal stenting with self-expanding stents produced favourable results when compared with the results obtained with balloon-expandable stents. Immediate additional interventions and follow-up re-interventions were similar in both groups with complications more common in those with balloon-expandable stents.

  18. Forgotten Ureteral Stents: An Avoidable Morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtaza, B.; Alvi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical presentation of forgotten ureteral stents and highlight the etiological factors resulting in the retention of these stents. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Urology, Armed Forces Institute of Urology, Rawalpindi, from January 2010 to Jun 2011. Methodology: Thirty-eight patients, with forgotten ureteral stents, retained for more than 6 months duration, were enrolled. A detailed evaluation was performed, along with the questions regarding the patients' opinion about the ureteral stents. They were specially asked whether they knew about the stents or were they formally informed regarding the stents. Subsequently, the patients were managed according to their clinical condition. Results: The male to female ratio was 2.1:1 aged 23 - 69 years, mean being 40.24 ± 12.59 years. The time of presentation after the ureteral stenting was 7 - 180 months (mean = 28.89 ± 33.435 years). Seven patients (18.4 percentage) reported with chronic kidney disease, including ESRD in two cases. Recurrent UTI was seen in 28 cases (73.6 percentage), calculus formed over the stents in 20 cases (52.6 percentage), and stent fragmented in 5 patients (13.1 percentage). Majority of patients, (n = 23, 60.5 percentage), were not even aware of the placement of these stents while 8 (21.0 percentage) knew but were reluctant about its removal. In 3 cases (7.8 percentage), the relatives knew about the stent but never informed the patients. The stent had been removed in 2 cases (5.2 percentage), but the other broken fragment was missed. One case (2.6 percentage) each had a misconception about the permanent placement of the stents like cardiac stents and regarding degradation of the stents in situ. Conclusion: Forgotten ureteral stents produce clinical features ranging from recurrent UTI to ESRD. This preventable urological complication is primarily due to the unawareness or ignorance of the patients and their relatives

  19. Portal hypertension: a review of portosystemic collateral pathways and endovascular interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, A K; Andring, B; Patel, A; Trimmer, C; Kalva, S P

    2015-10-01

    The portal vein is formed at the confluence of the splenic and superior mesenteric vein behind the head of the pancreas. Normal blood pressure within the portal system varies between 5 and 10 mmHg. Portal hypertension is defined when the gradient between the portal and systemic venous blood pressure exceeds 5 mmHg. The most common cause of portal hypertension is cirrhosis. In cirrhosis, portal hypertension develops due to extensive fibrosis within the liver parenchyma causing increased vascular resistance. In addition, the inability of the liver to metabolise certain vasodilators leads to hyperdynamic splanchnic circulation resulting in increased portal blood flow. Decompression of the portal pressure is achieved by formation of portosystemic collaterals. In this review, we will discuss the pathophysiology, anatomy, and imaging findings of spontaneous portosystemic collaterals and clinical manifestations of portal hypertension with emphasis on the role of interventional radiology in the management of complications related to portal hypertension. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cellophane banding for the gradual attenuation of single extrahepatic portosystemic shunts in eleven dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youmans, K R; Hunt, G B

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and short term effects of a cellophane banding technique for progressive attenuation of canine single extrahepatic portosystemic shunts. A prospective trial of 11 dogs with single congenital extrahepatic shunts. Rectal ammonia tolerance testing and routine biochemical tests were performed preoperatively on all dogs. In seven dogs, preoperative abdominal Doppler ultrasonography was also performed. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a single extrahepatic portocaval shunt in each animal, which was attenuated using a cellophane band with an internal diameter of 2 to 3 mm. The abdomen was closed routinely. Follow-up biochemical analysis and abdominal Doppler ultrasonography or splenoportography were performed postoperatively. The shunt was not amenable to total ligation in 11 dogs, based upon reported criteria. All dogs recovered uneventfully from surgery without evidence of portal hypertension, and showed clinical improvement thereafter. Shunt occlusion was deemed to have occurred in 10 dogs based on resolution of biochemical and/or sonographic abnormalities. One dog continued to have sonographic evidence of portosystemic shunting when evaluated 3 weeks after surgery, despite normal ammonia tolerance, but was lost to subsequent follow-up. Two dogs, in which 3 mm cellophane bands were placed, experienced delayed shunt occlusion. Cellophane banding is simple to perform, and causes progressive attenuation of single extrahepatic shunts in dogs. Further work is needed to determine the maximum diameter of a cellophane band which will produce total attenuation, and the long-term safety and reliability of the treatment.