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Sample records for intrafraction motion evaluation

  1. SU-E-J-133: Evaluation of Inter- and Intra-Fractional Pancreas Tumor Residual Motions with Abdominal Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y; Shi, F; Tian, Z; Jia, X; Meyer, J; Jiang, S; Mao, W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Abdominal compression (AC) has been widely used to reduce pancreas motion due to respiration for pancreatic cancer patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). However, the inter-fractional and intra-fractional patient motions may degrade the treatment. The purpose of this work is to study daily CBCT projections and 4DCT to evaluate the inter-fractional and intra-fractional pancreatic motions. Methods: As a standard of care at our institution, 4D CT scan was performed for treatment planning. At least two CBCT scans were performed for daily treatment. Retrospective studies were performed on patients with implanted internal fiducial markers or surgical clips. The initial motion pattern was obtained by extracting marker positions on every phase of 4D CT images. Daily motions were presented by marker positions on CBCT scan projection images. An adaptive threshold segmentation algorithm was used to extract maker positions. Both marker average positions and motion ranges were compared among three sets of scans, 4D CT, positioning CBCT, and conformal CBCT, for inter-fractional and intra-fractional motion variations. Results: Data from four pancreatic cancer patients were analyzed. These patients had three fiducial markers implanted. All patients were treated by an Elekta Synergy with single fraction SBRT. CBCT projections were acquired by XVI. Markers were successfully detected on most of the projection images. The inter-fractional changes were determined by 4D CT and the first CBCT while the intra-fractional changes were determined by multiple CBCT scans. It is found that the average motion range variations are within 2 mm, however, the average marker positions may drift by 6.5 mm. Conclusion: The patients respiratory motion variation for pancreas SBRT with AC was evaluated by detecting markers from CBCT projections and 4DCT, both the inter-fraction and intra-fraction motion range change is small but the drift of marker positions may be comparable

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of intrafractional tumor motion by means of a robot driven phantom

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    Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Flentje, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, 97080 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of the work was to investigate the influence of intrafractional tumor motion to the accumulated (absorbed) dose. The accumulated dose was determined by means of calculations and measurements with a robot driven motion phantom. Methods: Different motion scenarios and compensation techniques were realized in a phantom study to investigate the influence of motion on image acquisition, dose calculation, and dose measurement. The influence of motion on the accumulated dose was calculated by employing two methods (a model based and a voxel based method). Results: Tumor motion resulted in a blurring of steep dose gradients and a reduction of dose at the periphery of the target. A systematic variation of motion parameters allowed the determination of the main influence parameters on the accumulated dose. The key parameters with the greatest influence on dose were the mean amplitude and the pattern of motion. Investigations on necessary safety margins to compensate for dose reduction have shown that smaller safety margins are sufficient, if the developed concept with optimized margins (OPT concept) was used instead of the standard internal target volume (ITV) concept. Both calculation methods were a reasonable approximation of the measured dose with the voxel based method being in better agreement with the measurements. Conclusions: Further evaluation of available systems and algorithms for dose accumulation are needed to create guidelines for the verification of the accumulated dose.

  3. Intra-fraction motion of larynx radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Ismail Faruk; Tas, Bora

    2018-02-01

    In early stage laryngeal radiotherapy, movement is an important factor. Thyroid cartilage can move from swallowing, breathing, sound and reflexes. The effects of this motion on the target volume (PTV) during treatment were examined. In our study, the target volume movement during the treatment for this purpose was examined. Thus, setup margins are re-evaluated and patient-based PTV margins are determined. Intrafraction CBCT was scanned in 246 fractions for 14 patients. During the treatment, the amount of deviation which could be lateral, vertical and longitudinal axis was determined. ≤ ± 0.1cm deviation; 237 fractions in the lateral direction, 202 fractions in the longitudinal direction, 185 fractions in the vertical direction. The maximum deviation values were found in the longitudinal direction. Intrafraction guide in laryngeal radiotherapy; we are sure of the correctness of the treatment, the target volume is to adjust the margin and dose more precisely, we control the maximum deviation of the target volume for each fraction. Although the image quality of intrafraction-CBCT scans was lower than the image quality of planning CT, they showed sufficient contrast for this work.

  4. Evaluation of initial setup accuracy and intrafraction motion for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy using stereotactic body frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaohui; Bondeson, John C; Lewis, John H; Mannarino, Edward G; Friesen, Scott A; Wagar, Matthew M; Balboni, Tracy A; Alexander, Brian M; Arvold, Nils D; Sher, David J; Hacker, Fred L

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to evaluate the initial setup accuracy and intrafraction motion for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using stereotactic body frames (SBFs) and (2) to validate an in-house-developed SBF using a commercial SBF as a benchmark. Thirty-two spine SBRT patients (34 sites, 118 fractions) were immobilized with the Elekta and in-house (BHS) SBFs. All patients were set up with the Brainlab ExacTrac system, which includes infrared and stereoscopic kilovoltage x-ray-based positioning. Patients were initially positioned in the frame with the use of skin tattoos and then shifted to the treatment isocenter based on infrared markers affixed to the frame with known geometry relative to the isocenter. ExacTrac kV imaging was acquired, and automatic 6D (6 degrees of freedom) bony fusion was performed. The resulting translations and rotations gave the initial setup accuracy. These translations and rotations were corrected for by use of a robotic couch, and verification imaging was acquired that yielded residual setup error. The imaging/fusion process was repeated multiple times during treatment to provide intrafraction motion data. The BHS SBF had greater initial setup errors (mean±SD): -3.9±5.5mm (0.2±0.9°), -1.6±6.0mm (0.5±1.4°), and 0.0±5.3mm (0.8±1.0°), respectively, in the vertical (VRT), longitudinal (LNG), and lateral (LAT) directions. The corresponding values were 0.6±2.7mm (0.2±0.6°), 0.9±5.3mm (-0.2±0.9°), and -0.9±3.0mm (0.3±0.9°) for the Elekta SBF. The residual setup errors were essentially the same for both frames and were -0.1±0.4mm (0.1±0.5°), -0.2±0.4mm (0.0±0.4°), and 0.0±0.4mm (0.0±0.4°), respectively, in VRT, LNG, and LAT. The intrafraction shifts in VRT, LNG, and LAT were 0.0±0.4mm (0.0±0.3°), 0.0±0.5mm (0.0±0.4°), and 0.0±0.4mm (0.0±0.3°), with no significant difference observed between the 2 frames. These results showed that the combination of the ExacTrac system with either

  5. SU-G-JeP4-07: Evaluation of Intrafraction Motion Using 3D Surface Guided Radiation Therapy in Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jermoumi, M; Cao, D; Mehta, V; Shepard, D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Surface guided radiation therapy (SGRT) uses stereoscopic video images in combination with patterns projected onto the patient’s surface to dynamically capture and reconstruct a 3D surface map. In this work, we used a C-RAD Catalyst HD system (C-RAD) to evaluate intrafraction motion in the delivery of lung SBRT. Methods: The surface acquired from the 4DCT images from our preliminary cohort of eight lung cancer patients treated with SBRT were matched to the surface images acquired prior to each treatment. Additionally, a CBCT image set was acquired. A linear regression model was established between the external and internal motion of tumor during pretreatment and used to predict the CBCT deviation during treatment. The shifts determined from CBCT and the shifts from surface map imaging were compared and assessed using Bland-Altman method. For intrafraction motion, we assessed the percentage of mean errors that fell outside of the threshold of 2 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm along the translational directions. The required PTV margin was quantified over the course of treatment. The correlation between intrafraction treatment time and mean error of 3D displacement was evaluated using the Pearson coefficient, r Results: A total of 7971 data points were analyzed. Deviations of 2mm, 3mm, and 5mm were observed less than 7%, 2 %, and 0 % of the time along the translational direction. CBCT and Catalyst showed close agreement during patient positioning. Furthermore, the calculated PTV margins were less than our clinical tolerance of 5 mm. Using the Pearson coefficient r,the mean error of 3D displacement showed significant correlation with treatment time (r=0.69, p= 0.000002). Conclusion: SGRT can be used to ensure accurate patient positioning during treatment without an additional delivery of dose to the patient. This study shows that importance of treatment time as a consideration during the treatment planning process.

  6. Influence of Antiflatulent Dietary Advice on Intrafraction Motion for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lips, Irene M., E-mail: I.M.Lips@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kotte, Alexis N.T.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gils, Carla H. van [Julius Center of Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Leerdam, Monique E. van [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heide, Uulke A. van der; Vulpen, Marco van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of an antiflatulent dietary advice on the intrafraction prostate motion in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 2002 and December 2009, 977 patients received five-beam IMRT for prostate cancer to a dose of 76 Gy in 35 fractions combined with fiducial markers for position verification. In July 2008, the diet, consisting of dietary guidelines to obtain regular bowel movements and to reduce intestinal gas by avoiding certain foods and air swallowing, was introduced to reduce the prostate motion. The intrafraction prostate movement was determined from the portal images of the first segment of all five beams. Clinically relevant intrafraction motion was defined as {>=}50% of the fractions with an intrafraction motion outside a range of 3 mm. Results: A total of 739 patients were treated without the diet and 105 patients were treated with radiotherapy after introduction of the diet. The median and interquartile range of the average intrafraction motion per patient was 2.53 mm (interquartile range, 2.2-3.0) without the diet and 3.00 mm (interquartile range, 2.4-3.5) with the diet (p < .0001). The percentage of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction motion increased statistically significant from 19.1% without diet to 42.9% with a diet (odds ratio, 3.18; 95% confidence interval, 2.07-4.88; p < .0001). Conclusions: The results of the present study suggest that antiflatulent dietary advice for patients undergoing IMRT for prostate cancer does not reduce the intrafraction movement of the prostate. Therefore, antiflatulent dietary advice is not recommended in clinical practice for this purpose.

  7. Influence of Antiflatulent Dietary Advice on Intrafraction Motion for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lips, Irene M.; Kotte, Alexis N.T.J.; Gils, Carla H. van; Leerdam, Monique E. van; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Vulpen, Marco van

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of an antiflatulent dietary advice on the intrafraction prostate motion in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 2002 and December 2009, 977 patients received five-beam IMRT for prostate cancer to a dose of 76 Gy in 35 fractions combined with fiducial markers for position verification. In July 2008, the diet, consisting of dietary guidelines to obtain regular bowel movements and to reduce intestinal gas by avoiding certain foods and air swallowing, was introduced to reduce the prostate motion. The intrafraction prostate movement was determined from the portal images of the first segment of all five beams. Clinically relevant intrafraction motion was defined as ≥50% of the fractions with an intrafraction motion outside a range of 3 mm. Results: A total of 739 patients were treated without the diet and 105 patients were treated with radiotherapy after introduction of the diet. The median and interquartile range of the average intrafraction motion per patient was 2.53 mm (interquartile range, 2.2–3.0) without the diet and 3.00 mm (interquartile range, 2.4–3.5) with the diet (p < .0001). The percentage of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction motion increased statistically significant from 19.1% without diet to 42.9% with a diet (odds ratio, 3.18; 95% confidence interval, 2.07–4.88; p < .0001). Conclusions: The results of the present study suggest that antiflatulent dietary advice for patients undergoing IMRT for prostate cancer does not reduce the intrafraction movement of the prostate. Therefore, antiflatulent dietary advice is not recommended in clinical practice for this purpose.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Radiation Therapy for External Beam Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: Evaluation of Delivered Dose and Intrafractional Cavity Motion

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    Acharya, Sahaja; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin W.; Mazur, Thomas R.; Curcuru, Austen; Sona, Karl; Kashani, Rojano; Green, Olga; Ochoa, Laura; Mutic, Sasa; Zoberi, Imran; Li, H. Harold; Thomas, Maria A., E-mail: mthomas@radonc.wustl.edu

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To use magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) to (1) determine intrafractional motion of the breast surgical cavity; and (2) assess delivered dose versus planned dose. Methods and Materials: Thirty women with breast cancer (stages 0-I) who underwent breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in a prospective registry evaluating APBI using a 0.35-T MR-IGRT system. Clinical target volume was defined as the surgical cavity plus a 1-cm margin (excluding chest wall, pectoral muscles, and 5 mm from skin). No additional margin was added for the planning target volume (PTV). A volumetric MR image was acquired before each fraction, and patients were set up to the surgical cavity as visualized on MR imaging. To determine the delivered dose for each fraction, the electron density map and contours from the computed tomography simulation were transferred to the pretreatment MR image via rigid registration. Intrafractional motion of the surgical cavity was determined by applying a tracking algorithm to the cavity contour as visualized on cine MR. Results: Median PTV volume was reduced by 52% when using no PTV margin compared with a 1-cm PTV margin used conventionally. The mean (± standard deviation) difference between planned and delivered dose to the PTV (V95) was 0.6% ± 0.1%. The mean cavity displacement in the anterior–posterior and superior–inferior directions was 0.6 ± 0.4 mm and 0.6 ± 0.3 mm, respectively. The mean margin required for at least 90% of the cavity to be contained by the margin for 90% of the time was 0.7 mm (5th-95th percentile: 0-2.7 mm). Conclusion: Minimal intrafractional motion was observed, and the mean difference between planned and delivered dose was less than 1%. Assessment of efficacy and cosmesis of this MR-guided APBI approach is under way.

  9. SU-G-JeP4-06: Evaluation of Interfractional and Intrafractional Tumor Motion in Stereotactic Liver Radiotherapy, Based On Four-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Using Fiducial Markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimohigashi, Y [Department of Radiological Technology, Kumamoto University Hospital, Department of Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kumamoto University (Japan); Araki, F [Department of Health Sciences, Kumamoto University (Japan); Toya, R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kumamoto University Hospital (Japan); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (United States); Maruyama, M; Nakaguchi, Y [Department of Radiological Technology, Kumamoto University Hospital (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the interfractional and intrafractional motion of liver tumors in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), based on four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography using fiducial markers. (4D-CBCT). Methods: Seven patients with liver tumors were treated by SBRT with abdominal compression (AC) in five fractions with image guidance based on 4D-CBCT. The 4D-CBCT studies were performed to determine the individualized internal margin for the planning simulation. The interfractional and intrafractional changes of liver tumor motion for all patients was measured, based on the planning simulation 4D-CBCT, pre-SBRT 4D-CBCT, and post-SBRT 4D-CBCT. The interfractional motion change was calculated from the difference in liver tumor amplitude on pre-SBRT 4D-CBCT relative to that of the planning simulation 4D-CBCT for each fraction. The intrafractional motion change was calculated from the difference between the liver tumor amplitudes of the pre- and post-SBRT 4D-CBCT for each fraction. Significant interfractional and intrafractional changes in liver tumor motion were defined as a change ≥3 mm. Statistical analysis was performed using the Pearson correlation. Results: The values of the mean amplitude of liver tumor, as indicated by planning simulation 4D-CBCT, were 1.6 ± 0.8 mm, 1.6 ± 0.9 mm, and 4.9 ± 2.2 mm in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions, respectively. Pearson correlation coefficients between the liver tumor amplitudes, based on planning simulation 4D-CBCT, and pre-SBRT 4D-CBCT during fraction treatment in the LR, AP, and SI directions were 0.6, 0.7, and 0.8, respectively. Interfractional and intrafractional motion changes of ≥3 mm occurred in 23% and 3% of treatment fractions, respectively. Conclusion: The interfractional and intrafractional changes of liver tumor motion were small in most patients who received liver SBRT with AC. In addition, planning

  10. Development of a real-time patient's intrafraction motion monitoring system during radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Hidenobu; Uchida, Yukihiro; Umeda, Tokuo; Shiizuka, Hisao

    2012-01-01

    In high precise conformal radiation therapy, patient's intrafraction motion decreases the accuracy of target coverage and organs at risk sparing. In our study, we designed and developed a new monitoring system for the motion. The system consisted of a web camera and a computer running our in-house software in which template matching algorithms with pre-image processing were implemented. The motion of a marker box on patient was tracked as a surrogate of the motion. The system accuracy was evaluated by employing a respiratory motion phantom. Additionally, the effectiveness of the system was investigated in healthy volunteers, in terms of the results from the differences in the intrafraction motion detectable between the marker positions. The monitoring system could achieve a 1 mm positional accuracy and also 50 msec temporal resolution. The system was found to be within AAPM Task Group 142 tolerance for respiratory-gated radiation therapy. The movement of the marker on the sternum was substantially decreased as compared with the abdomen. The measurement of the motion could be measured using the sternum as a position of the marker box. Our system can manage the intrafraction motion and also enables treatment irradiation to be undertaken with high accuracy. (author)

  11. An evaluation of intrafraction motion of the prostate in the prone and supine positions using electromagnetic tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Amish P.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Langen, Katja M.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate differences in target motion during prostate irradiation in the prone versus supine position using electromagnetic tracking to measure prostate mobility. Materials/methods: Twenty patients received prostate radiotherapy in the supine position utilizing the Calypso Localization System (registered) for prostate positioning and monitoring. For each patient, 10 treatment fractions were followed by a session in which the patient was repositioned prone, and prostate mobility was tracked. The fraction of time that the prostate was displaced by >3, 5, 7, and 10 mm was calculated for each patient, for both positions (400 tracking sessions). Results: Clear patterns of respiratory motion were seen in the prone tracks due to the influence of increased abdominal motion. Averaged over all patients, the prostate was displaced >3 and 5 mm for 37.8% and 10.1% of the total tracking time in the prone position, respectively. In the supine position, the prostate was displaced >3 and 5 mm for 12.6% and 2.9%, respectively. With both patient setups, inferior and posterior drifts of the prostate position were observed. Averaged over all prone tracking sessions, the prostate was displaced >3 mm in the posterior and inferior directions for 11.7% and 9.5% of the total time, respectively. Conclusions: With real-time tracking of the prostate, it is possible to study the effects of different setup positions on the prostate mobility. The percentage of time the prostate moved >3 and 5 mm was increased by a factor of three in the prone versus supine position. For larger displacements (>7 mm) no difference in prostate mobility was observed between prone and supine positions. To reduce rectal toxicity, radiotherapy in the prone position may be a suitable alternative provided respiratory motion is accounted for during treatment. Acute and late toxicity results remain to be evaluated for both patient positions.

  12. Simulating intrafraction prostate motion with a random walk model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommer, Tobias; Oh, Jung Hun; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per; Deasy, Joseph O

    2017-01-01

    Prostate motion during radiation therapy (ie, intrafraction motion) can cause unwanted loss of radiation dose to the prostate and increased dose to the surrounding organs at risk. A compact but general statistical description of this motion could be useful for simulation of radiation therapy delivery or margin calculations. We investigated whether prostate motion could be modeled with a random walk model. Prostate motion recorded during 548 radiation therapy fractions in 17 patients was analyzed and used for input in a random walk prostate motion model. The recorded motion was categorized on the basis of whether any transient excursions (ie, rapid prostate motion in the anterior and superior direction followed by a return) occurred in the trace and transient motion. This was separately modeled as a large step in the anterior/superior direction followed by a returning large step. Random walk simulations were conducted with and without added artificial transient motion using either motion data from all observed traces or only traces without transient excursions as model input, respectively. A general estimate of motion was derived with reasonable agreement between simulated and observed traces, especially during the first 5 minutes of the excursion-free simulations. Simulated and observed diffusion coefficients agreed within 0.03, 0.2 and 0.3 mm 2 /min in the left/right, superior/inferior, and anterior/posterior directions, respectively. A rapid increase in variance at the start of observed traces was difficult to reproduce and seemed to represent the patient's need to adjust before treatment. This could be estimated somewhat using artificial transient motion. Random walk modeling is feasible and recreated the characteristics of the observed prostate motion. Introducing artificial transient motion did not improve the overall agreement, although the first 30 seconds of the traces were better reproduced. The model provides a simple estimate of prostate motion during

  13. Determining intrafractional prostate motion using four dimensional ultrasound system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Mariwan; Behrens, Claus F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In prostate radiotherapy, it is essential that the prostate position is within the planned volume during the treatment delivery. The aim of this study is to investigate whether intrafractional motion of the prostate is of clinical consequence, using a novel 4D autoscan ultrasound probe....... Methods: Ten prostate patients were ultrasound (US) scanned at the time of CT imaging and once a week during their course of radiotherapy treatment in an ethics-approved study, using the transperineal Clarity autoscan system (Clarity®, Elekta Inc., Stockholm, Sweden). At each US scanning session (fraction......) the prostate was monitored for 2 to 2.5 min, a typical beam-on time to deliver a RapidArc® radiotherapy fraction. The patients were instructed to remain motionless in supine position throughout the US scans. They were also requested to comply with a bladder-filling protocol. In total, 51 monitoring curves were...

  14. Three-dimensional intrafractional internal target motions in accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kimiko; Yoshimura, Michio; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Inoue, Minoru; Sasaki, Makoto; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yano, Shinsuke; Nakata, Manabu; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated three-dimensional intrafractional target motion, divided into respiratory-induced motion and baseline drift, in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Paired fluoroscopic images were acquired simultaneously using orthogonal kV X-ray imaging systems at pre- and post-treatment for 23 patients who underwent APBI with external beam radiotherapy. The internal target motion was calculated from the surgical clips placed around the tumour cavity. The peak-to-peak respiratory-induced motions ranged from 0.6 to 1.5mm in all directions. A systematic baseline drift of 1.5mm towards the posterior direction and a random baseline drift of 0.3mm in the lateral-medial and cranial-caudal directions were observed. The baseline for an outer tumour cavity drifted towards the lateral and posterior directions, and that for an upper tumour cavity drifted towards the cranial direction. Moderate correlations were observed between the posterior baseline drift and the patients' physical characteristics. The posterior margin for intrafractional uncertainties was larger than 5mm in patients with greater fat thickness due to the baseline drift. The magnitude of the intrafractional motion was not uniform according to the direction, patients' physical characteristics, or tumour cavity location due to the baseline drift. Therefore, the intrafractional systematic movement should be properly managed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Study of Inter- and Intra-fraction Motion in Brain Tumor Patients Undergoing VMAT Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascencion Ybarra, Y.; Alfonso Laguardia, R.; Yartsev, S.

    2015-01-01

    Conforming dose to the tumor and sparing normal tissue can be challenging for brain tumors with complex shapes in close proximity to critical structures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the inter- and intra-fraction motion in brain tumor patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The image matching software was found to be very sensitive to the choice of the region of matching. It is recommended to use the same region of interest for comparing the image sets and perform the automatic matching based on bony landmarks in brain tumor cases. (Author)

  16. Management of three-dimensional intrafraction motion through real-time DMLC tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawant, Amit; Venkat, Raghu; Srivastava, Vikram; Carlson, David; Povzner, Sergey; Cattell, Herb; Keall, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Tumor tracking using a dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) represents a promising approach for intrafraction motion management in thoracic and abdominal cancer radiotherapy. In this work, we develop, empirically demonstrate, and characterize a novel 3D tracking algorithm for real-time, conformal, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-based radiation delivery to targets moving in three dimensions. The algorithm obtains real-time information of target location from an independent position monitoring system and dynamically calculates MLC leaf positions to account for changes in target position. Initial studies were performed to evaluate the geometric accuracy of DMLC tracking of 3D target motion. In addition, dosimetric studies were performed on a clinical linac to evaluate the impact of real-time DMLC tracking for conformal, step-and-shoot (S-IMRT), dynamic (D-IMRT), and VMAT deliveries to a moving target. The efficiency of conformal and IMRT delivery in the presence of tracking was determined. Results show that submillimeter geometric accuracy in all three dimensions is achievable with DMLC tracking. Significant dosimetric improvements were observed in the presence of tracking for conformal and IMRT deliveries to moving targets. A gamma index evaluation with a 3%-3 mm criterion showed that deliveries without DMLC tracking exhibit between 1.7 (S-IMRT) and 4.8 (D-IMRT) times more dose points that fail the evaluation compared to corresponding deliveries with tracking. The efficiency of IMRT delivery, as measured in the lab, was observed to be significantly lower in case of tracking target motion perpendicular to MLC leaf travel compared to motion parallel to leaf travel. Nevertheless, these early results indicate that accurate, real-time DMLC tracking of 3D tumor motion is feasible and can potentially result in significant geometric and dosimetric advantages leading to more effective management of intrafraction motion

  17. Time Dependence of Intrafraction Patient Motion Assessed by Repeat Stereoscopic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify intrafraction patient motion and its time dependence in immobilized intracranial and extracranial patients. The data can be used to optimize the intrafraction imaging frequency and consequent patient setup correction with an image guidance and tracking system, and to establish the required safety margins in the absence of such a system. Method and Materials: The intrafraction motion of 32 intracranial patients, immobilized with a thermoplastic mask, and 11 supine- and 14 prone-treated extracranial spine patients, immobilized with a vacuum bag, were analyzed. The motion was recorded by an X-ray, stereoscopic, image-guidance system. For each group, we calculated separately the systematic (overall mean and SD) and the random displacement as a function of elapsed intrafraction time. Results: The SD of the systematic intrafraction displacements increased linearly over time for all three patient groups. For intracranial-, supine-, and prone-treated patients, the SD increased to 0.8, 1.2, and 2.2 mm, respectively, in a period of 15 min. The random displacements for the prone-treated patients were significantly higher than for the other groups, namely 1.6 mm (1 SD), probably caused by respiratory motion. Conclusions: Despite the applied immobilization devices, patients drift away from their initial position during a treatment fraction. These drifts are in general small if compared with conventional treatment margins, but will significantly contribute to the margin for high-precision radiation treatments with treatment times of 15 min or longer

  18. Intra-fraction motion of the prostate is a random walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballhausen, H; Li, M; Hegemann, N-S; Ganswindt, U; Belka, C

    2015-01-21

    A random walk model for intra-fraction motion has been proposed, where at each step the prostate moves a small amount from its current position in a random direction. Online tracking data from perineal ultrasound is used to validate or reject this model against alternatives. Intra-fraction motion of a prostate was recorded by 4D ultrasound (Elekta Clarity system) during 84 fractions of external beam radiotherapy of six patients. In total, the center of the prostate was tracked for 8 h in intervals of 4 s. Maximum likelihood model parameters were fitted to the data. The null hypothesis of a random walk was tested with the Dickey-Fuller test. The null hypothesis of stationarity was tested by the Kwiatkowski-Phillips-Schmidt-Shin test. The increase of variance in prostate position over time and the variability in motility between fractions were analyzed. Intra-fraction motion of the prostate was best described as a stochastic process with an auto-correlation coefficient of ρ = 0.92  ±  0.13. The random walk hypothesis (ρ = 1) could not be rejected (p = 0.27). The static noise hypothesis (ρ = 0) was rejected (p random walk and neither static (like inter-fraction setup errors) nor stationary (like a cyclic motion such as breathing, for example). The prostate tends to drift away from the isocenter during a fraction, and this variance increases with time, such that shorter fractions are beneficial to the problem of intra-fraction motion. As a consequence, fixed safety margins (which would over-compensate at the beginning and under-compensate at the end of a fraction) cannot optimally account for intra-fraction motion. Instead, online tracking and position correction on-the-fly should be considered as the preferred approach to counter intra-fraction motion.

  19. Intrafractional prostate motion during online image guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budiharto, Tom; Slagmolen, Pieter; Haustermans, Karin; Maes, Frederik; Junius, Sara; Verstraete, Jan; Oyen, Raymond; Hermans, Jeroen; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Intrafractional motion consists of two components: (1) the movement between the on-line repositioning procedure and the treatment start and (2) the movement during the treatment delivery. The goal of this study is to estimate this intrafractional movement of the prostate during prostate cancer radiotherapy. Material and methods: Twenty-seven patients with prostate cancer and implanted fiducials underwent a marker match procedure before a five-field IMRT treatment. For all fields, in-treatment images were obtained and then processed to enable automatic marker detection. Combining the subsequent projection images, five positions of each marker were determined using the shortest path approach. The residual set-up error (RSE) after kV-MV based prostate localization, the prostate position as a function of time during a radiotherapy session and the required margins to account for intrafractional motion were determined. Results: The mean RSE and standard deviation in the antero-posterior, cranio-caudal and left-right direction were 2.3 ± 1.5 mm, 0.2 ± 1.1 mm and -0.1 ± 1.1 mm, respectively. Almost all motions occurred in the posterior direction before the first treatment beam as the percentage of excursions >5 mm was reduced significantly when the RSE was not accounted for. The required margins for intrafractional motion increased with prolongation of the treatment. Application of a repositioning protocol after every beam could decrease the 1 cm margin from CTV to PTV by 2 mm. Conclusions: The RSE is the main contributor to intrafractional motion. This RSE after on-line prostate localization and patient repositioning in the posterior direction emphasizes the need to speed up the marker match procedure. Also, a prostate IMRT treatment should be administered as fast as possible, to ensure that the pre-treatment repositioning efforts are not erased by intrafractional prostate motion. This warrants an optimized workflow with the use of faster treatment

  20. Intrafractional Target Motions and Uncertainties of Treatment Setup Reference Systems in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Ning J.; Goyal, Sharad; Zhou Jinghao; Khan, Atif J.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the magnitude of intrafractional motion and level of accuracy of various setup strategies in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: At lumpectomy, gold fiducial markers were strategically sutured to the surrounding walls of the cavity. Weekly fluoroscopy imaging was conducted at treatment to investigate the respiration-induced target motions. Daily pre- and post-RT kV imaging was performed, and images were matched to digitally reconstructed radiographs based on bony anatomy and fiducial markers, respectively, to determine the intrafractional motion magnitudes over the course of treatment. The positioning differences of the laser tattoo- and the bony anatomy-based setups compared with those of the marker-based setup (benchmark) were also determined. The study included 21 patients. Results: Although lung exhibited significant motion, the average marker motion amplitude on the fluoroscopic image was about 1 mm. Over a typical treatment time period, average intrafractional motion magnitude was 4.2 mm and 2.6 mm based on the marker and bony anatomy matching, respectively. The bony anatomy- and laser tattoo-based interfractional setup errors, with respect to the fiducial marker-based setup, were 7.1 and 9.0 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Respiration has limited effects on the target motion during APBI. Bony anatomy-based treatment setup improves the accuracy relative to that of the laser tattoo-based setup approach. Since fiducial markers are sutured directly to the surgical cavity, the marker-based approach can further improve the interfractional setup accuracy. On average, a seroma cavity exhibits intrafractional motion of more than 4 mm, a magnitude that is larger than that which is otherwise derived based on bony anatomy matching. A seroma-specific marker-based approach has the potential to improve treatment accuracy by taking the true inter

  1. Intra-fractional bladder motion and margins in adaptive radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Caroline; Vestergaard, Anne; Høyer, Morten

    2015-01-01

    and to estimate population-based and patient-specific intra-fractional margins, also relevant for a future re-optimisation strategy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Nine patients treated in a clinical phase II ART trial of daily plan selection for bladder cancer were included. In the library plans, 5 mm isotropic margins......BACKGROUND: The bladder is a tumour site well suited for adaptive radiotherapy (ART) due to large inter-fractional changes, but it also displays considerable intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to assess target coverage with a clinically applied method for plan selection ART...... were added to account for intra-fractional changes. Pre-treatment and weekly repeat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) series were acquired in which a full three-dimensional (3D) volume was scanned every second min for 10 min (a total of 366 scans in 61 series). Initially, the bladder clinical target...

  2. Evaluation of inter- and intrafractional motion of liver tumors using interstitial markers and implantable electromagnetic radiotransmitters in the context of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) - the ESMERALDA trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermehl, Daniel; Naumann, Patrick; Bendl, Rolf; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2015-07-14

    With the development of more conformal and precise radiation techniques such as Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) and Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT), patients with hepatic tumors could be treated with high local doses by sparing normal liver tissue. However, frequently occurring large HCC tumors are still a dosimetric challenge in spite of modern high sophisticated RT modalities. This interventional clinical study has been set up to evaluate the value of different fiducial markers, and to use the modern imaging methods for further treatment optimization using physical and informatics approaches. Surgically implanted radioopaque or electromagnetic markers are used to detect tumor local-ization during radiotherapy. The required markers for targeting and observation during RT can be implanted in a previously defined optimal position during the oncologically indicated operation. If there is no indication for a surgical resection or open biopsy, markers may be inserted into the liver or tumor tissue by using ultrasound-guidance. Primary study aim is the detection of the patients' anatomy at the time of RT by observation of the marker position during the indicated irradiation (IGRT). Secondary study aims comprise detection and recording of 3D liver and tumor motion during RT. Furthermore, the study will help to develop technical strategies and mechanisms based on the recorded information on organ motion to avoid inaccurate dose application resulting from fast organ motion and deformation. This is an open monocentric non-randomized, prospective study for the evaluation of organ motion using interstitial markers or implantable radiotransmitter. The trial will evaluate the full potential of different fiducial markers to further optimize treatment of moving targets, with a special focus on liver lesions.

  3. Intrafraction Bladder Motion in Radiation Therapy Estimated From Pretreatment and Posttreatment Volumetric Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Pham, Daniel; Bressel, Mathias; Gill, Suki; Kron, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of image guidance protocols using soft tissue anatomy identification before treatment can reduce interfractional variation. This makes intrafraction clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) changes more important, including those resulting from intrafraction bladder filling and motion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the required intrafraction margins for soft tissue image guidance from pretreatment and posttreatment volumetric imaging. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T2-T4) underwent an adaptive radiation therapy protocol using daily pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with weekly posttreatment CBCT. A total of 235 pairs of pretreatment and posttreatment CBCT images were retrospectively contoured by a single radiation oncologist (CBCT-CTV). The maximum bladder displacement was measured according to the patient's bony pelvis movement during treatment, intrafraction bladder filling, and bladder centroid motion. Results: The mean time between pretreatment and posttreatment CBCT was 13 minutes, 52 seconds (range, 7 min 52 sec to 30 min 56 sec). Taking into account patient motion, bladder centroid motion, and bladder filling, the required margins to cover intrafraction changes from pretreatment to posttreatment in the superior, inferior, right, left, anterior, and posterior were 1.25 cm (range, 1.19-1.50 cm), 0.67 cm (range, 0.58-1.12 cm), 0.74 cm (range, 0.59-0.94 cm), 0.73 cm (range, 0.51-1.00 cm), 1.20 cm (range, 0.85-1.32 cm), and 0.86 cm (range, 0.73-0.99), respectively. Small bladders on pretreatment imaging had relatively the largest increase in pretreatment to posttreatment volume. Conclusion: Intrafraction motion of the bladder based on pretreatment and posttreatment bladder imaging can be significant particularly in the anterior and superior directions. Patient motion, bladder centroid motion, and bladder filling all contribute to changes between

  4. Intrafraction Bladder Motion in Radiation Therapy Estimated From Pretreatment and Posttreatment Volumetric Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foroudi, Farshad, E-mail: farshad.foroudi@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Pham, Daniel [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Bressel, Mathias [Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Gill, Suki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: The use of image guidance protocols using soft tissue anatomy identification before treatment can reduce interfractional variation. This makes intrafraction clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) changes more important, including those resulting from intrafraction bladder filling and motion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the required intrafraction margins for soft tissue image guidance from pretreatment and posttreatment volumetric imaging. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T2-T4) underwent an adaptive radiation therapy protocol using daily pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with weekly posttreatment CBCT. A total of 235 pairs of pretreatment and posttreatment CBCT images were retrospectively contoured by a single radiation oncologist (CBCT-CTV). The maximum bladder displacement was measured according to the patient's bony pelvis movement during treatment, intrafraction bladder filling, and bladder centroid motion. Results: The mean time between pretreatment and posttreatment CBCT was 13 minutes, 52 seconds (range, 7 min 52 sec to 30 min 56 sec). Taking into account patient motion, bladder centroid motion, and bladder filling, the required margins to cover intrafraction changes from pretreatment to posttreatment in the superior, inferior, right, left, anterior, and posterior were 1.25 cm (range, 1.19-1.50 cm), 0.67 cm (range, 0.58-1.12 cm), 0.74 cm (range, 0.59-0.94 cm), 0.73 cm (range, 0.51-1.00 cm), 1.20 cm (range, 0.85-1.32 cm), and 0.86 cm (range, 0.73-0.99), respectively. Small bladders on pretreatment imaging had relatively the largest increase in pretreatment to posttreatment volume. Conclusion: Intrafraction motion of the bladder based on pretreatment and posttreatment bladder imaging can be significant particularly in the anterior and superior directions. Patient motion, bladder centroid motion, and bladder filling all contribute to changes between

  5. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Stereotactic Body Frame in Reducing Respiratory Intrafractional Organ Motion Using the Real-Time Tumor-Tracking Radiotherapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengua, Gerard; Ishikawa, Masayori; Sutherland, Kenneth; Horita, Kenji; Yamazaki, Rie; Fujita, Katsuhisa; Onimaru, Rikiya; Katoh, Noriwo; Inoue, Tetsuya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of the stereotactic body frame (SBF), with or without a diaphragm press or a breathing cycle monitoring device (Abches), in controlling the range of lung tumor motion, by tracking the real-time position of fiducial markers. Methods and Materials: The trajectories of gold markers in the lung were tracked with the real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. The SBF was used for patient immobilization and the diaphragm press and Abches were used to actively control breathing and for self-controlled respiration, respectively. Tracking was performed in five setups, with and without immobilization and respiration control. The results were evaluated using the effective range, which was defined as the range that includes 95% of all the recorded marker positions in each setup. Results: The SBF, with or without a diaphragm press or Abches, did not yield effective ranges of marker motion which were significantly different from setups that did not use these materials. The differences in the effective marker ranges in the upper lobes for all the patient setups were less than 1mm. Larger effective ranges were obtained for the markers in the middle or lower lobes. Conclusion: The effectiveness of controlling respiratory-induced organ motion by using the SBF+diaphragm press or SBF + Abches patient setups were highly dependent on the individual patient reaction to the use of these materials and the location of the markers. They may be considered for lung tumors in the lower lobes, but are not necessary for tumors in the upper lobes.

  6. Simulating intrafraction prostate motion with a random walk model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Pommer, PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: Random walk modeling is feasible and recreated the characteristics of the observed prostate motion. Introducing artificial transient motion did not improve the overall agreement, although the first 30 seconds of the traces were better reproduced. The model provides a simple estimate of prostate motion during delivery of radiation therapy.

  7. Six dimensional analysis with daily stereoscopic x-ray imaging of intrafraction patient motion in head and neck treatments using five points fixation masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linthout, Nadine; Verellen, Dirk; Tournel, Koen; Storme, Guy

    2006-01-01

    The safety margins used to define the Planning Target Volume (PTV) should reflect the accuracy of the target localization during treatment that comprises both the reproducibility of the patient positioning and the positional uncertainty of the target, so both the inter- and intrafraction motion of the target. Our first aim in this study was to determine the intrafraction motion of patients immobilized with a five-point thermoplastic mask for head and neck treatments. The five-point masks have the advantage that the patient's shoulders as well as the cranial part of the patient's head is covered with the thermoplastic material that improves the overall immobilization of the head and neck region of the patient. Thirteen patients were consecutively assigned to use a five-point thermoplastic mask. The patients were positioned by tracking of infrared markers (IR) fixed to the immobilization device and stereoscopic x-ray images were used for daily on-line setup verification. Repositioning was carried out prior to treatment as needed; rotations were not corrected. Movements during treatment were monitored by real-time IR tracking. Intrafraction motion and rotation was supplementary assessed by a six-degree-of-freedom (6-D) fusion of x-ray images, taken before and after all 385 treatments, with DRR images generated from the planning CT data. The latter evaluates the movement of the patient within the thermoplastic mask independent from the mask movement, where IR tracking evaluates the movement of the mask caused by patient movement in the mask. These two movements are not necessarily equal to each other. The maximum intrafraction movement detected by IR tracking showed a shift [mean (SD; range)] of -0.1(0.7; 6.0), 0.1(0.6; 3.6), -0.2(0.8;5.5) mm in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral direction, respectively, and rotations of 0.0(0.2; 1.6), 0.0(0.2; 1.7) and 0.2(0.2; 2.4) degrees about the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral axis, respectively. The standard deviations

  8. A Prospective Study of Intrafraction Prostate Motion in the Prone vs. Supine Position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, Richard B.; Chittenden, Lucy; Mesa, Albert V.; Bunyapanasarn, Jane; Agustin, Jeff; Lizarde, Jessica; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively analyze prostate intrafraction motion in the prone vs. supine position and to assess patient satisfaction with these two positions. Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate cancer patients underwent implantation of five fiducial gold seeds in their prostate for localization. Patients were treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy to 2,200 cGy followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 5,040 cGy. Patients underwent computed tomography simulation and IMRT in the prone position. For the first five IMRT treatments, an electronic portal imaging system was used to acquire anteroposterior (AP) and lateral images pretreatment and posttreatment. We then repositioned each patient supine and repeated the process, resulting in 600 images. Results: Mean ± standard deviation intrafraction prostate motion was 2.1 ± 1.2 mm and 1.7 ± 1.4 mm (AP, p = 0.47), 2.2 ± 2.0 mm and 1.6 ± 1.8 mm (superoinferior, p = 0.16), and 1.0 ± 1.2 mm and 0.6 ± 0.9 mm (left-right, p = 0.03) in the prone and supine positions, respectively. Eighty percent of patients stated that they were more comfortable in the supine position (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Prone and supine positions resulted in a similar magnitude of AP and superoinferior intrafraction prostate motion (2 mm). Because there was no significant difference in the magnitude of AP and superoinferior prostate motion prone vs. supine and patients were more comfortable in the supine position, patients now undergo IMRT to the prostate and seminal vesicles at our center in the supine position.

  9. Motion monitoring for particle therapy of intrafractional moving targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steidl, Peter; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Buerkelbach, Josef; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberger Ionentherapiezentrum (HIT) (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    For radiotherapy of organs influenced by respiratory motion using a scanned particle beam rescanning, gating, and beam tracking have been proposed. For gating and especially for beam tracking a high tumor conformity of the applied dose distribution can be achieved. One requirement to reach this goal is precise and high-frequent motion monitoring. Precise data can be determined by X-ray fluoroscopy which results into radiation dose and should thus be minimized. High-frequent data can be acquired by external surrogates that e.g. measure the expansion of the chest. Precise data with a high sampling rate can be generated by combining surrogate and X-ray data in a correlation model. We performed measurements to study the correlation of internal target motion and external motion surrogates. MV-X-ray-fluoroscopy images (SIEMENS ARTISTE) were taken temporally correlated to two external signals (GateRT and ANZAI belt). We successfully checked functionality and accuracy of the system in initial phantom measurements using a sliding table. We currently start collection of clinical data. The contribution presents data from the accuracy study as well as the correlation analysis for the first patients.

  10. SU-C-17A-05: Quantification of Intra-Fraction Motion of Breast Tumors Using Cine-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijst, T van; Philippens, M; Bongard, D van den; Asselen, B van; Lagendijk, J; Kleijnen, J; Hartogh, M den [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables direct characterization of intra-fraction motion ofbreast tumors, due to high softtissue contrast and geometric accuracy. The purpose is to analyzethis motion in early-stage breast-cancer patients using pre-operative supine cine-MRI. Methods: MRI was performed in 12 female early-stage breast-cancer patients on a 1.5-T Ingenia (Philips)wide-bore scanner in supine radiotherapy (RT) position, prior to breast-conserving surgery. Twotwodimensional (2D) T2-weighted balanced fast-field echo (cine-MRI) sequences were added tothe RT protocol, oriented through the tumor. They were alternately acquired in the transverse andsagittal planes, every 0.3 s during 1 min. A radiation oncologist delineated gross target volumes(GTVs) on 3D contrast-enhanced MRI. Clinical target volumes (CTV = GTV + 15 mm isotropic)were generated and transferred onto the fifth time-slice of the time-series, to which subsequents lices were registered using a non-rigid Bspline algorithm; delineations were transformed accordingly. To evaluate intra-fraction CTV motion, deformation fields between the transformed delineations were derived to acquire the distance ensuring 95% surface coverage during scanning(P95%), for all in-plane directions: anteriorposterior (AP), left-right (LR), and caudal-cranial(CC). Information on LR was derived from transverse scans, CC from sagittal scans, AP fromboth sets. Results: Time-series with registration errors - induced by motion artifacts - were excluded by visual inspection. For our analysis, 11 transverse, and 8 sagittal time-series were taken into account. Themedian P95% calculated in AP (19 series), CC (8), and LR (11) was 1.8 mm (range: 0.9–4.8), 1.7mm (0.8–3.6), and 1.0 mm (0.6–3.5), respectively. Conclusion: Intra-fraction motion analysis of breast tumors was achieved using cine-MRI. These first results show that in supine RT position, motion amplitudes are limited. This information can be used for adaptive RT

  11. TH-A-BRF-04: Intra-Fraction Motion Characterization for Early Stage Rectal Cancer Using Cine-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleijnen, J; Asselen, B; Burbach, M; Intven, M; Reerink, O; Philippens, M; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the intra-fraction motion in patients with early stage rectal cancer using cine-MRI. Methods: Sixteen patient diagnosed with early stage rectal cancer underwent 1.5 T MR imaging prior to each treatment fraction of their short course radiotherapy (n=76). During each scan session, three 2D sagittal cine-MRIs were performed: at the beginning (Start), after 9:30 minutes (Mid), and after 18 minutes (End). Each cine-MRI has a duration of one minute at 2Hz temporal resolution, resulting in a total of 3:48 hours of cine-MRI. Additionally, standard T2-weighted (T2w) imaging was performed. Clinical target volume (CTV) an tumor (GTV) were delineated on the T2w scan and transferred to the first time-point of each cine-MRI scan. Within each cine-MRI, the first frame was registered to the remaining frames of the scan, using a non-rigid B-spline registration. To investigate potential drifts, a similar registration was performed between the first frame of the Start and End scans.To evaluate the motion, the distances by which the edge pixels of the delineations move in anterior-posterior (AP) and cranial-caudal (CC) direction, were determined using the deformation field of the registrations. The distance which incorporated 95% of these edge pixels (dist95%) was determined within each cine-MRI, and between Start- End scans, respectively. Results: Within a cine-MRI, we observed an average dist95% for the CTV of 1.3mm/1.5mm (SD=0.7mm/0.6mm) and for the GTV of 1.2mm/1.5mm (SD=0.8mm/0.9mm), in respectively AP/CC. For the CTV motion between the Start and End scan, an average dist95% of 5.5mm/5.3mm (SD=3.1mm/2.5mm) was found, in respectively AP/CC. For the GTV motion, an average dist95% of 3.6mm/3.9mm (SD=2.2mm/2.5mm) was found in AP/CC, respectively. Conclusion: Although intra-fraction motion within a one minute cine-MRI is limited, substantial intra-fraction motion was observed within the 18 minute time period between the Start and End cine-MRI.

  12. TH-A-BRF-04: Intra-Fraction Motion Characterization for Early Stage Rectal Cancer Using Cine-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleijnen, J; Asselen, B; Burbach, M; Intven, M; Reerink, O; Philippens, M; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the intra-fraction motion in patients with early stage rectal cancer using cine-MRI. Methods: Sixteen patient diagnosed with early stage rectal cancer underwent 1.5 T MR imaging prior to each treatment fraction of their short course radiotherapy (n=76). During each scan session, three 2D sagittal cine-MRIs were performed: at the beginning (Start), after 9:30 minutes (Mid), and after 18 minutes (End). Each cine-MRI has a duration of one minute at 2Hz temporal resolution, resulting in a total of 3:48 hours of cine-MRI. Additionally, standard T2-weighted (T2w) imaging was performed. Clinical target volume (CTV) an tumor (GTV) were delineated on the T2w scan and transferred to the first time-point of each cine-MRI scan. Within each cine-MRI, the first frame was registered to the remaining frames of the scan, using a non-rigid B-spline registration. To investigate potential drifts, a similar registration was performed between the first frame of the Start and End scans.To evaluate the motion, the distances by which the edge pixels of the delineations move in anterior-posterior (AP) and cranial-caudal (CC) direction, were determined using the deformation field of the registrations. The distance which incorporated 95% of these edge pixels (dist95%) was determined within each cine-MRI, and between Start- End scans, respectively. Results: Within a cine-MRI, we observed an average dist95% for the CTV of 1.3mm/1.5mm (SD=0.7mm/0.6mm) and for the GTV of 1.2mm/1.5mm (SD=0.8mm/0.9mm), in respectively AP/CC. For the CTV motion between the Start and End scan, an average dist95% of 5.5mm/5.3mm (SD=3.1mm/2.5mm) was found, in respectively AP/CC. For the GTV motion, an average dist95% of 3.6mm/3.9mm (SD=2.2mm/2.5mm) was found in AP/CC, respectively. Conclusion: Although intra-fraction motion within a one minute cine-MRI is limited, substantial intra-fraction motion was observed within the 18 minute time period between the Start and End cine-MRI

  13. A method for selection of beam angles robust to intra-fractional motion in proton therapy of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casares-Magaz, Oscar; Toftegaard, Jakob; Muren, Ludvig P.

    2014-01-01

    WEPL variations caused by breathing-induced motion for all possible beam angles in a series of lung cancer patients. By studying the association between measures for WEPL variation and breathing-induced target dose degradation we aimed to develop and explore a tool to identify beam angles...... that are robust to patient-specific patterns of intra-fractional motion. Material and methods. Using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images of three lung cancer patients we evaluated the impact of the WEPL changes on target dose coverage for a series of coplanar single-beam plans. The plans were...... reduction was associated with the mean difference between the WEPL and the phase-averaged WEPL computed for all beam rays across all possible gantry-couch angle combinations. Results. The gantry-couch angle maps showed areas of both high and low WEPL variation, with overall quite similar patterns yet...

  14. Impact of Immobilization on Intrafraction Motion for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Winnie; Sahgal, Arjun; Foote, Matthew; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Jaffray, David A.; Letourneau, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) involves tight planning margins and steep dose gradients to the surrounding organs at risk (OAR). This study aimed to assess intrafraction motion using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for spine SBRT patients treated using three immobilization devices. Methods and Materials: Setup accuracy using CBCT was retrospectively analyzed for 102 treated spinal metastases in 84 patients. Thoracic and lumbar spine patients were immobilized with either an evacuated cushion (EC, n = 24) or a semirigid vacuum body fixation (BF, n = 60). For cases treated at cervical/upper thoracic (thoracic [T]1–T3) vertebrae, a thermoplastic S-frame (SF) mask (n = 18) was used. Patient setup was corrected by using bony anatomy image registration and couch translations only (no rotation corrections) with shifts confirmed on verification CBCTs. Repeat imaging was performed mid- and post-treatment. Patient translational and rotational positioning data were recorded to calculate means, standard deviations (SD), and corresponding margins ± 2 SD for residual setup errors and intrafraction motion. Results: A total of 355 localizations, 333 verifications, and 248 mid- and 280 post-treatment CBCTs were analyzed. Residual translations and rotations after couch corrections (verification scans) were similar for all immobilization systems, with SDs of 0.6 to 0.9 mm in any direction and 0.9° to 1.6°, respectively. Margins to encompass residual setup errors after couch corrections were within 2 mm. Including intrafraction motion, as measured on post-treatment CBCTs, SDs for total setup error in the left-right, cranial-caudal, and anterior-posterior directions were 1.3, 1.2, and 1.0 mm for EC; 0.9, 0.7, and 0.9 mm for BF; and 1.3, 0.9, and 1.1 mm for SF, respectively. The calculated margins required to encompass total setup error increased to 3 mm for EC and SF and remained within 2 mm for BF. Conclusion: Following image guidance, residual setup

  15. Strategies for reducing intra-fraction motion induced dosimetric effects in proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li

    Intra-fraction respiration motion during radiation delivery presents a major challenge to radiation therapy. There has been a growing effort to characterize and manage internal organ motion in radiation therapy, however very few studies focus on tackling this issue in proton therapy. Current practice for treating lung tumors in proton therapy is still to apply population-based margins to account for internal tumor motion, which can lead to target underdosage and normal tissue overdosage. This thesis explores the intra-fraction motion induced dosimetric effects from both computational treatment planning and experimental studies. Four-dimensional CT scans are used to analyze the patient-specific tumor motion characteristics. A feasible method to design the range compensator by using the maximum intensity projection (MIP) images is proposed. Results demonstrate that this MIP approach ensures adequate tumor coverage throughout the entire respiratory cycle whilst maintaining normal tissue dose under clinical constraints. Based on 4D-CT scans, dose convolution is used for assessing the accuracy of Gaussian probability density function for modeling the patient-specific respiratory motion on dose distribution. Non-negligible dose discrepancy is observed in comparisons of convolved dose distributions, and patient-specific respiration PDF is advocated. In addition, an experimental phantom study primarily focusing on the interplay effect between target motion and the scanning beam motion is implemented in two proton beam delivery systems: double scattering and uniform scanning. Measurement results suggest that dose blurring effect is dominant, and interplay effect is trivial in the uniform scanning system due to dose repainting.

  16. Kilovoltage Imaging of Implanted Fiducials to Monitor Intrafraction Motion With Abdominal Compression During Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Gastrointestinal Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorke, Ellen, E-mail: yorke@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Xiong, Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Han, Qian [Department of Radiotherapy, Henan Provincial People' s Hospital, Zhengzhou (China); Zhang, Pengpeng; Mageras, Gikas; Lovelock, Michael; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jian-Ping [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To assess intrafraction respiratory motion using a commercial kilovoltage imaging system for abdominal tumor patients with implanted fiducials and breathing constrained by pneumatic compression during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A pneumatic compression belt limited respiratory motion in 19 patients with radiopaque fiducials in or near their tumor during SBRT for abdominal tumors. Kilovoltage images were acquired at 5- to 6-second intervals during treatment using a commercial system. Intrafractional fiducial displacements were measured using in-house software. The dosimetric effect of the observed displacements was calculated for 3 sessions for each patient. Results: Intrafraction displacement patterns varied between patients and between individual treatment sessions. Averaged over 19 patients, 73 sessions, 7.6% of craniocaudal displacements exceeded 0.5 cm, and 1.2% exceeded 0.75 cm. The calculated single-session dose to 95% of gross tumor volume differed from planned by an average of −1.2% (range, −11.1% to 4.8%) but only for 4 patients was the total 3-session calculated dose to 95% of gross tumor volume more than 3% different from planned. Conclusions: Our pneumatic compression limited intrafractional abdominal target motion, maintained target position established at setup, and was moderately effective in preserving coverage. Commercially available intrafractional imaging is useful for surveillance but can be made more effective and reliable.

  17. Seminal vesicle intrafraction motion analysed with cinematic magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, Suki; Dang, Kim; Fox, Chris; Bressel, Mathias; Kron, Tomas; Bergen, Noelene; Ferris, Nick; Owen, Rebecca; Chander, Sarat; Tai, Keen Hun; Foroudi, Farshad

    2014-01-01

    This study analyses seminal vesicle displacement relative to the prostate and in relation to treatment time. A group of eleven patients undergoing prostate cancer radiotherapy were imaged with a continuous 3 T cine-MRI in the standard treatment setup position. Four images were recorded every 4 seconds for 15 minutes in the sagittal plane and every 6.5 seconds for 12 minutes in the coronal plane. The prostate gland and seminal vesicles were contoured on each MRI image. The coordinates of the centroid of the prostate and seminal vesicles on each image was analysed for displacement against time. Displacements between the 2.5 percentile and 97.5 percentile (i.e. the 2.5% trimmed range) for prostate and seminal vesicle centroid displacements were measured for 3, 5, 10 and 15 minutes time intervals in the anterior-posterior (AP), left-right (LR) and superior-inferior (SI) directions. Real time prostate and seminal vesicle displacement was compared for individual patients. The 2.5% trimmed range for 3, 5, 10 and 15 minutes for the seminal vesicle centroids in the SI direction measured 4.7 mm; 5.8 mm; 6.5 mm and 7.2 mm respectively. In the AP direction, it was 4.0 mm, 4.5 mm, 6.5 mm, and 7.0 mm. In the LR direction for 3, 5 and 10 minutes; for the left seminal vesicle, it was 2.7 mm, 2.8 mm, 3.4 mm and for the right seminal vesicle, it was 3.4 mm, 3.3 mm, and 3.4 mm. The correlation between the real-time prostate and seminal vesicle displacement varied substantially between patients indicating that the relationship between prostate displacement and seminal vesicles displacement is patient specific with the majority of the patients not having a strong relationship. Our study shows that seminal vesicle motion increases with treatment time, and that the prostate and seminal vesicle centroids do not move in unison in real time, and that an additional margin is required for independent seminal vesicle motion if treatment localisation is to the prostate

  18. SU-E-J-171: Surface Imaging Based Intrafraction Motion Assessments for Whole Brain Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiant, D; Vanderstraeten, C; Maurer, J; Pursley, J; Terrell, J; Sintay, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify and characterize intrafraction motion for whole brain radiotherapy treatments in open face masks using 3D surface imaging. Methods: Fifteen whole brain patients were monitored with 3D surface imaging over a total of 202 monitoring sessions. Mean translations and rotations were calculated over each minute, each session, and over all sessions combined. The percentage of each session that the root mean square (RMS) of the linear translations were outside of 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm were determined for each patient. Correlations between mean translations per minute and time and between standard deviation per minute and time were evaluated using Pearson's r value. Results: The mean RMS translation averaged over all patients was 1.45 mm +/− 1.52 mm. The patients spent an average of 18%, 10%, 6%, and 3% of the monitoring time outside of 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm RMS tolerances, respectively. The RMS values averaged over all patients were 1.31 mm +/− 0.98 mm, 1.52 +/- 1.04, and 1.30 mm +/− 0.71 mm over the 1th, 5th, and 10th minutes of monitoring, respectively. Neither, the RMS values (p = 0.15) or the standard deviations of the RMS values (p = 0.16) showed significant correlations with time. Conclusion: The patients were positioned within 2 mm of isocenter, which was the initial set-up tolerance, for the majority of their treatments. The average position changed by < 0.3 mm over 10 minutes of monitoring. Short term movements, reflected by the standard deviations, where on the order of 1 mm. This immobilization system provides adequate immobilization over a course of treatment for whole brain radiotherapy. This system may also be suitable for head and neck or stereotactic radiosurgery treatments as well

  19. Feasibility of Electromagnetic Transponder Use to Monitor Inter- and Intrafractional Motion in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, Eric T., E-mail: eric.t.shinohara@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Vanderbilt Clinic, Nashville, TN (United States); Kassaee, Alireza [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mitra, Nandita [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Vapiwala, Neha; Plastaras, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Drebin, Jeff [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wan, Fei [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of electromagnetic transponder implantation in patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Secondarily, the use of transponders to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, and the efficacy of breath holding for limiting target motion, were examined. Methods and Materials: During routine screening laparoscopy, 5 patients without metastatic disease were implanted with transponders peri-tumorally. The Calypso System's localization and tracking modes were used to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, respectively. Intrafractional motion, with and without breath holding, was also examined using Calypso tracking mode. Results: Transponder implantation was well tolerated in all patients, with minimal migration, aside from 1 patient who expulsed a single transponder. Interfractional motion based on mean shifts from setup using tattoos/orthogonal imaging to transponder based localization from 164 treatments was significant in all dimensions. Mean shift (in millimeters), followed by the standard deviation and p value, were as follows: X-axis: 4.5 mm (1.0, p = 0.01); Y axis: 6.4 mm (1.9, p = 0.03); and Z-axis 3.9 mm (0.6, p = 0.002). Mean intrafractional motion was also found to be significant in all directions: superior, 7.2 mm (0.9, p = 0.01); inferior, 11.9 mm (0.9, p < 0.01); anterior: 4.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.01); posterior, 2.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.02); left, 2.2 mm (0.4, p = 0.02); and right, 3.1 mm (0.6, p = 0.04). Breath holding during treatment significantly decreased tumor motion in all directions. Conclusions: Electromagnetic transponder implantation appears to be safe and effective for monitoring inter- and intrafractional motion. Based on these results a larger clinical trial is underway.

  20. Feasibility of Electromagnetic Transponder Use to Monitor Inter- and Intrafractional Motion in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Kassaee, Alireza; Mitra, Nandita; Vapiwala, Neha; Plastaras, John P.; Drebin, Jeff; Wan, Fei; Metz, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of electromagnetic transponder implantation in patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Secondarily, the use of transponders to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, and the efficacy of breath holding for limiting target motion, were examined. Methods and Materials: During routine screening laparoscopy, 5 patients without metastatic disease were implanted with transponders peri-tumorally. The Calypso System’s localization and tracking modes were used to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, respectively. Intrafractional motion, with and without breath holding, was also examined using Calypso tracking mode. Results: Transponder implantation was well tolerated in all patients, with minimal migration, aside from 1 patient who expulsed a single transponder. Interfractional motion based on mean shifts from setup using tattoos/orthogonal imaging to transponder based localization from 164 treatments was significant in all dimensions. Mean shift (in millimeters), followed by the standard deviation and p value, were as follows: X-axis: 4.5 mm (1.0, p = 0.01); Y axis: 6.4 mm (1.9, p = 0.03); and Z-axis 3.9 mm (0.6, p = 0.002). Mean intrafractional motion was also found to be significant in all directions: superior, 7.2 mm (0.9, p = 0.01); inferior, 11.9 mm (0.9, p < 0.01); anterior: 4.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.01); posterior, 2.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.02); left, 2.2 mm (0.4, p = 0.02); and right, 3.1 mm (0.6, p = 0.04). Breath holding during treatment significantly decreased tumor motion in all directions. Conclusions: Electromagnetic transponder implantation appears to be safe and effective for monitoring inter- and intrafractional motion. Based on these results a larger clinical trial is underway.

  1. Prostate and patient intrafraction motion: impact on treatment time-dependent planning margins for patients with endorectal balloon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Elisabeth; Georg, Dietmar; Goldner, Gregor; Stock, Markus

    2013-07-15

    To investigate intrafraction prostate and patient motion during different radiation therapy treatments as a function of treatment time; included were prostate patients with an endorectal balloon (ERB). Margins accounting for setup uncertainties and intrafraction motion were determined. The study included 17 patients undergoing prostate cancer radiation therapy. All patients received 3 fiducial gold markers implanted in the prostate and were then immobilized in the supine position with a knee support and treated with an ERB. Twelve patients with intermediate risk for pelvic lymph node metastases received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 5 patients at low risk received a 4-field box treatment. After setup based on skin marks, patients were imaged with a stereoscopic imaging system. If the marker displacement exceeded a 3-mm tolerance relative to planning computed tomography, patients were shifted and verification images were taken. All patients underwent additional imaging after treatment; IMRT patients also received additional imaging at halftime of treatment. Prostate and bone drifts were evaluated as a function of treatment time for more than 600 fractions, and margins were extracted. Patient motion evaluated by bone match was strongly patient dependent but in general was smallest in the superior-inferior (SI) direction. Prostate drifts were less patient dependent, showing an increase with treatment time in the SI and anterior-posterior (AP) directions. In the lateral (LAT) direction, the prostate stayed rather stable. Mean treatment times were 5.5 minutes for 4-field box, 10 minutes for 5-field boost IMRT, and 15 minutes or more for 9-field boost and 9-field pelvic IMRT treatments. Margins resulted in 2.2 mm, 3.9 mm, and 4.3 mm for 4-field box; 3.7 mm, 2.6 mm, and 3.6 mm for 5-field boost IMRT; 2.3 mm, 3.9 mm, and 6.2 mm for 9-field boost IMRT; and 4.2 mm, 5.1 mm, and 6.6 mm for 9-field pelvic IMRT in the LAT, SI, and AP directions, respectively

  2. Radiopaque marker motion during pre-treatment CBCT as a predictor of intra-fractional prostate movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Brink, Carsten; Agergaard, Soeren N.

    2013-01-01

    The intra-fractional movement of the prostate constitutes a hindrance for the reduction of the planning target volume margin for prostate cancer patients. Monitoring the movement of the prostate during treatment is a promising but in most centres not feasible solution. However, the projection images of the pre-treatment cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) provide information about the motion of the target immediately preceding the treatment. This motion information can be extracted from any standard CBCT scan which is available in many institutions. In this study we measure the motion of the prostate during the pre-treatment CBCT and investigate whether this motion is correlated with the intra-fractional movement of the prostate. Material and methods: Pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were made during a number of the fractions (average 11 range 8-12) for 13 prostate cancer patients during the radiation treatment course. The displacement of the post-treatment CBCT scans relative to the pre-treatment position was used to assess the intra-fractional motion. Automated image analysis was used to track the 2D position of radiopaque markers in the projection images of the scans. The most probable 3D trajectory of the markers during the CBCT scan was estimated based on a probability density function which was established for each individual scan. Results: The accuracy of the tracking algorithm was found satisfactory and the motion of the markers during the CBCT scans was successfully extracted from the projection images. This motion was generally small and uncorrelated with the subsequent intra-fractional movement of the prostate. The correlation coefficients were - 0.05, 0.07, and - 0.05 in the LR, AP, and CC direction, respectively. Conclusion: It is tempting to exploit the pre-treatment CBCT to predict the intra-fractional movement of the prostate but, unfortunately, we have found no correlation between the intra-fractional movement and the motion of the prostate

  3. Inter- and Intrafraction Target Motion in Highly Focused Single Vocal Cord Irradiation of T1a Larynx Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwa, Stefan L.S., E-mail: s.kwa@erasmusmc.nl; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Osman, Sarah O.S.; Gangsaas, Anne; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to verify clinical target volume–planning target volume (CTV-PTV) margins in single vocal cord irradiation (SVCI) of T1a larynx tumors and characterize inter- and intrafraction target motion. Methods and Materials: For 42 patients, a single vocal cord was irradiated using intensity modulated radiation therapy at a total dose of 58.1 Gy (16 fractions × 3.63 Gy). A daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan was performed to online correct the setup of the thyroid cartilage after patient positioning with in-room lasers (interfraction motion correction). To monitor intrafraction motion, CBCT scans were also acquired just after patient repositioning and after dose delivery. A mixed online-offline setup correction protocol (“O2 protocol”) was designed to compensate for both inter- and intrafraction motion. Results: Observed interfraction, systematic (Σ), and random (σ) setup errors in left-right (LR), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions were 0.9, 2.0, and 1.1 mm and 1.0, 1.6, and 1.0 mm, respectively. After correction of these errors, the following intrafraction movements derived from the CBCT acquired after dose delivery were: Σ = 0.4, 1.3, and 0.7 mm, and σ = 0.8, 1.4, and 0.8 mm. More than half of the patients showed a systematic non-zero intrafraction shift in target position, (ie, the mean intrafraction displacement over the treatment fractions was statistically significantly different from zero; P<.05). With the applied CTV-PTV margins (for most patients 3, 5, and 3 mm in LR, CC, and AP directions, respectively), the minimum CTV dose, estimated from the target displacements observed in the last CBCT, was at least 94% of the prescribed dose for all patients and more than 98% for most patients (37 of 42). The proposed O2 protocol could effectively reduce the systematic intrafraction errors observed after dose delivery to almost zero (Σ = 0.1, 0.2, 0.2 mm). Conclusions: With

  4. MO-FG-BRA-07: Intrafractional Motion Effect Can Be Minimized in Tomotherapy Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, A; Chang, S; Matney, J; Wang, A; Lian, J; Chao, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Tomotherapy has unique challenges in handling intrafractional motion compared to conventional LINAC. In this study, we analyzed the impact of intrafractional motion on cumulative dosimetry using actual patient motion data and investigated real time jaw/MLC compensation approaches to minimize the motion-induced dose discrepancy in Tomotherapy SBRT treatment. Methods: Intrafractional motion data recorded in two CyberKnife lung treatment cases through fiducial tracking and two LINAC prostate cases through Calypso tracking were used in this study. For each treatment site, one representative case has an average motion (6mm) and one has a large motion (10mm for lung and 15mm for prostate). The cases were re-planned on Tomotherapy for SBRT. Each case was planned with 3 different jaw settings: 1cm static, 2.5cm dynamic, and 5cm dynamic. 4D dose accumulation software was developed to compute dose with the recorded motions and theoretically compensate motions by modifying original jaw and MLC to track the trajectory of the tumor. Results: PTV coverage in Tomotherapy SBRT for patients with intrafractional motion depends on motion type, amplitude and plan settings. For the prostate patient with large motion, PTV coverage changed from 97.2% (motion-free) to 47.1% (target motion-included), 96.6% to 58.5% and 96.3% to 97.8% for the 1cm static jaw, 2.5cm dynamic jaw and 5cm dynamic jaw setting, respectively. For the lung patient with large motion, PTV coverage discrepancies showed a similar trend of change. When the jaw and MLC compensation program was engaged, the motion compromised PTV coverage was recovered back to >95% for all cases and plans. All organs at risk (OAR) were spared with < 5% increase from original motion-free plans. Conclusion: Tomotherapy SBRT is less motion-impacted when 5cm dynamic jaw is used. Once the motion pattern is known, the jaw and MLC compensation program can largely minimize the compromised target coverage and OAR sparing.

  5. Exploring the Margin Recipe for Online Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: An Intrafractional Seminal Vesicles Motion Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Yang, E-mail: Yang.Sheng@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, Taoran [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Q. Jackie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To provide a benchmark for seminal vesicle (SV) margin selection to account for intrafractional motion and to investigate the effectiveness of 2 motion surrogates in predicting intrafractional SV coverage. Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate patients were studied. Each patient had 5 pairs (1 patient had 4 pairs) of pretreatment and posttreatment cone beam CTs (CBCTs). Each pair of CBCTs was registered on the basis of prostate fiducial markers. All pretreatment SVs were expanded with 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 8-mm isotropic margins to form a series of planning target volumes, and their intrafractional coverage to the posttreatment SV determined the “ground truth” for exact coverage. Two motion surrogates, the center of mass (COM) and the border of contour, were evaluated by the use of Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient and exponential fitting for predicting SV underdosage. Action threshold of each surrogate was calculated. The margin for each surrogate was calculated according to a traditional margin recipe. Results: Ninety-five percent posttreatment SV coverage was achieved in 9%, 53%, 73%, 86%, 95%, and 97% of fractions with 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 8-mm margins, respectively. The 5-mm margins provided 95% intrafractional SV coverage in over 90% of fractions. The correlation between the COM and border was weak, moderate, and strong in the left-right (L-R), anterior-posterior (A-P), and superior-inferior (S-I) directions, respectively. Exponential fitting gave the underdosage threshold of 4.5 and 7.0 mm for the COM and border. The Van Herk margin recipe recommended 0-, 0.5-, and 0.8-mm margins in the L-R, A-P, and S-I directions based on the COM, and 1.2-, 3.9-, and 2.5-mm margins based on the border. Conclusions: Five-millimeter isotropic margins for the SV constitute the minimum required to mitigate the intrafractional motion. Both the COM and the border are acceptable predictors for SV underdosage with 4.5- and 7.0-mm action threshold

  6. Motion monitoring during a course of lung radiotherapy with anchored electromagnetic transponders. Quantification of inter- and intrafraction motion and variability of relative transponder positions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Daniela [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology (NCRO), Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology (NCRO), Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Joint Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Roeder, Falk [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiooncology, Heidelberg (Germany); University of Munich (LMU), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Gompelmann, Daniela; Herth, Felix [University of Heidelberg, Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); German Center for Lung Research, Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Anchored electromagnetic transponders for tumor motion monitoring during lung radiotherapy were clinically evaluated. First, intrafractional motion patterns were analyzed as well as their interfractional variations. Second, intra- and interfractional changes of the geometric transponder positions were investigated. Intrafractional motion data from 7 patients with an upper or middle lobe tumor and three implanted transponders each was used to calculate breathing amplitudes, overall motion amount and motion midlines in three mutual perpendicular directions and three-dimensionally (3D) for 162 fractions. For 6 patients intra- and interfractional variations in transponder distances and in the size of the triangle defined by the transponder locations over the treatment course were determined. Mean 3D values of all fractions were up to 4.0, 4.6 and 3.4 mm per patient for amplitude, overall motion amount and midline deviation, respectively. Intrafractional transponder distances varied with standard deviations up to 3.2 mm, while a maximal triangle shrinkage of 36.5% over 39 days was observed. Electromagnetic real-time motion monitoring was feasible for all patients. Detected respiratory motion was on average modest in this small cohort without lower lobe tumors, but changes in motion midline were of the same size as the amplitudes and greater midline motion can be observed in some fractions. Intra- and interfractional variations of the geometric transponder positions can be large, so for reliable motion management correlation between transponder and tumor motion needs to be evaluated per patient. (orig.) [German] Verankerte, elektromagnetische Transponder fuer die Bewegungserkennung des Tumors waehrend der Strahlentherapie der Lunge wurden klinisch evaluiert. Dafuer wurden intrafraktionelle Bewegungsmuster und ihre interfraktionellen Variationen analysiert und intra- und interfraktionelle Veraenderungen der geometrischen Transponderpositionen untersucht. Intrafraktionelle

  7. Quantification of intra-fraction motion in breast radiotherapy using supine magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heijst, Tristan C F; Philippens, Mariëlle E P; Charaghvandi, Ramona K; den Hartogh, Mariska D; Lagendijk, Jan J W; van den Bongard, H J G Desirée; van Asselen, Bram

    2016-02-07

    In early-stage breast-cancer patients, accelerated partial-breast irradiation techniques (APBI) and hypofractionation are increasingly implemented after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). For a safe and effective radiation therapy (RT), the influence of intra-fraction motion during dose delivery becomes more important as associated fraction durations increase and targets become smaller. Current image-guidance techniques are insufficient to characterize local target movement in high temporal and spatial resolution for extended durations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high soft-tissue contrast, allow fast imaging, and acquire images during longer periods. The goal of this study was to quantify intra-fraction motion using MRI scans from 21 breast-cancer patients, before and after BCS, in supine RT position, on two time scales. High-temporal 2-dimensional (2D) MRI scans (cine-MRI), acquired every 0.3 s during 2 min, and three 3D MRI scans, acquired over 20 min, were performed. The tumor (bed) and whole breast were delineated on 3D scans and delineations were transferred to the cine-MRI series. Consecutive scans were rigidly registered and delineations were transformed accordingly. Motion in sub-second time-scale (derived from cine-MRI) was generally regular and limited to a median of 2 mm. Infrequently, large deviations were observed, induced by deep inspiration, but these were temporary. Movement on multi-minute scale (derived from 3D MRI) varied more, although medians were restricted to 2.2 mm or lower. Large whole-body displacements (up to 14 mm over 19 min) were sparsely observed. The impact of motion on standard RT techniques is likely small. However, in novel hypofractionated APBI techniques, whole-body shifts may affect adequate RT delivery, given the increasing fraction durations and smaller targets. Motion management may thus be required. For this, on-line MRI guidance could be provided by a hybrid MRI/RT modality, such as the

  8. Effects of intra-fraction motion on IMRT dose delivery: statistical analysis and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortfeld, Thomas; Jokivarsi, Kimmo; Goitein, Michael; Kung, Jong; Jiang, Steve B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2002-07-07

    There has been some concern that organ motion, especially intra-fraction organ motion due to breathing, can negate the potential merit of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). We wanted to find out whether this concern is justified. Specifically, we wanted to investigate whether IMRT delivery techniques with moving parts, e.g., with a multileaf collimator (MLC), are particularly sensitive to organ motion due to the interplay between organ motion and leaf motion. We also wanted to know if, and by how much, fractionation of the treatment can reduce the effects. We performed a statistical analysis and calculated the expected dose values and dose variances for volume elements of organs that move during the delivery of the IMRT. We looked at the overall influence of organ motion during the course of a fractionated treatment. A linear-quadratic model was used to consider fractionation effects. Furthermore, we developed software to simulate motion effects for IMRT delivery with an MLC, with compensators, and with a scanning beam. For the simulation we assumed a sinusoidal motion in an isocentric plane. We found that the expected dose value is independent of the treatment technique. It is just a weighted average over the path of motion of the dose distribution without motion. If the treatment is delivered in several fractions, the distribution of the dose around the expected value is close to a Gaussian. For a typical treatment with 30 fractions, the standard deviation is generally within 1% of the expected value for MLC delivery if one assumes a typical motion amplitude of 5 mm (1 cm peak to peak). The standard deviation is generally even smaller for the compensator but bigger for scanning beam delivery. For the latter it can be reduced through multiple deliveries ('paintings') of the same field. In conclusion, the main effect of organ motion in IMRT is an averaging of the dose distribution without motion over the path of the motion. This is the same as for

  9. Effects of intra-fraction motion on IMRT dose delivery: statistical analysis and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortfeld, Thomas; Jokivarsi, Kimmo; Goitein, Michael; Kung, Jong; Jiang, Steve B.

    2002-01-01

    There has been some concern that organ motion, especially intra-fraction organ motion due to breathing, can negate the potential merit of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). We wanted to find out whether this concern is justified. Specifically, we wanted to investigate whether IMRT delivery techniques with moving parts, e.g., with a multileaf collimator (MLC), are particularly sensitive to organ motion due to the interplay between organ motion and leaf motion. We also wanted to know if, and by how much, fractionation of the treatment can reduce the effects. We performed a statistical analysis and calculated the expected dose values and dose variances for volume elements of organs that move during the delivery of the IMRT. We looked at the overall influence of organ motion during the course of a fractionated treatment. A linear-quadratic model was used to consider fractionation effects. Furthermore, we developed software to simulate motion effects for IMRT delivery with an MLC, with compensators, and with a scanning beam. For the simulation we assumed a sinusoidal motion in an isocentric plane. We found that the expected dose value is independent of the treatment technique. It is just a weighted average over the path of motion of the dose distribution without motion. If the treatment is delivered in several fractions, the distribution of the dose around the expected value is close to a Gaussian. For a typical treatment with 30 fractions, the standard deviation is generally within 1% of the expected value for MLC delivery if one assumes a typical motion amplitude of 5 mm (1 cm peak to peak). The standard deviation is generally even smaller for the compensator but bigger for scanning beam delivery. For the latter it can be reduced through multiple deliveries ('paintings') of the same field. In conclusion, the main effect of organ motion in IMRT is an averaging of the dose distribution without motion over the path of the motion. This is the same as for treatments

  10. An artificial neural network (ANN)-based lung-tumor motion predictor for intrafractional MR tumor tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jihyun; Mackenzie, Marc; Rathee, Satyapal; Robinson, Don; Fallone, B G

    2012-07-01

    To address practical issues of implementing artificial neural networks (ANN) for lung-tumor motion prediction in MRI-based intrafractional lung-tumor tracking. A feedforward four-layered ANN structure is used to predict future tumor positions. A back-propagation algorithm is used for ANN learning. Adaptive learning is incorporated by continuously updating weights and learning rate during prediction. An ANN training scheme specific for MRI-based tracking is developed. A multiple-ANN structure is developed to reduce tracking failures caused by the lower imaging rates of MRI. We used particle swarm optimization to optimize the ANN structure and initial weights (IW) for each patient and treatment fraction. Prediction accuracy is evaluated using the 1D superior-inferior lung-tumor motions of 29 lung cancer patients for system delays of 120-520 ms, in increments of 80 ms. The result is compared with four different scenarios: (1), (2) ANN structure optimization + with∕without IW optimization, and (3), (4) no ANN structure optimization + with∕without IW optimization, respectively. An additional simulation is performed to assess the value of optimizing the ANN structure for each treatment fraction. For 120-520 ms system delays, mean RMSE values (ranges 0.0-2.8 mm from 29 patients) of 0.5-0.9 mm are observed, respectively. Using patient specific ANN structures, a 30%-60% decrease in mean RMSE values is observed as a result of IW optimization, alone. No significant advantages in prediction performance are observed, however, by optimizing for each fraction. A new ANN-based lung-tumor motion predictor is developed for MRI-based intrafractional tumor tracking. The prediction accuracy of our predictor is evaluated using a realistic simulated MR imaging rate and system delays. For 120-520 ms system delays, mean RMSE values of 0.5-0.9 mm (ranges 0.0-2.8 mm from 29 patients) are achieved. Further, the advantage of patient specific ANN structure and IW in lung-tumor motion

  11. Planning Target Margin Calculations for Prostate Radiotherapy Based on Intrafraction and Interfraction Motion Using Four Localization Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, Chris; Herman, Michael G.; Davis, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine planning target volume (PTV) margins for prostate radiotherapy based on the internal margin (IM) (intrafractional motion) and the setup margin (SM) (interfractional motion) for four daily localization methods: skin marks (tattoo), pelvic bony anatomy (bone), intraprostatic gold seeds using a 5-mm action threshold, and using no threshold. Methods and Materials: Forty prostate cancer patients were treated with external radiotherapy according to an online localization protocol using four intraprostatic gold seeds and electronic portal images (EPIs). Daily localization and treatment EPIs were obtained. These data allowed inter- and intrafractional analysis of prostate motion. The SM for the four daily localization methods and the IM were determined. Results: A total of 1532 fractions were analyzed. Tattoo localization requires a SM of 6.8 mm left-right (LR), 7.2 mm inferior-superior (IS), and 9.8 mm anterior-posterior (AP). Bone localization requires 3.1, 8.9, and 10.7 mm, respectively. The 5-mm threshold localization requires 4.0, 3.9, and 3.7 mm. No threshold localization requires 3.4, 3.2, and 3.2 mm. The intrafractional prostate motion requires an IM of 2.4 mm LR, 3.4 mm IS and AP. The PTV margin using the 5-mm threshold, including interobserver uncertainty, IM, and SM, is 4.8 mm LR, 5.4 mm IS, and 5.2 mm AP. Conclusions: Localization based on EPI with implanted gold seeds allows a large PTV margin reduction when compared with tattoo localization. Except for the LR direction, bony anatomy localization does not decrease the margins compared with tattoo localization. Intrafractional prostate motion is a limiting factor on margin reduction

  12. Dosimetric effect of intrafraction tumor motion in phase gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Bo; Yang Yong; Li Tianfang; Li Xiang; Heron, Dwight E.; Huq, M. Saiful

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A major concern for lung intensity modulated radiation therapy delivery is the deviation of actually delivered dose distribution from the planned one due to simultaneous movements of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves and tumor. For gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment (SBRT), the situation becomes even more complicated because of SBRT's characteristics such as fewer fractions, smaller target volume, higher dose rate, and extended fractional treatment time. The purpose of this work is to investigate the dosimetric effect of intrafraction tumor motion during gated lung SBRT delivery by reconstructing the delivered dose distribution with real-time tumor motion considered. Methods: The tumor motion data were retrieved from six lung patients. Each of them received three fractions of stereotactic radiotherapy treatments with Cyberknife Synchrony (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). Phase gating through an external surrogate was simulated with a gating window of 5 mm. The resulting residual tumor motion curves during gating (beam-on) were retrieved. Planning target volume (PTV) was defined as physician-contoured clinical target volume (CTV) surrounded by an isotropic 5 mm margin. Each patient was prescribed with 60 Gy/3 fractions. The authors developed an algorithm to reconstruct the delivered dose with tumor motion. The DMLC segments, mainly leaf position and segment weighting factor, were recalculated according to the probability density function of tumor motion curve. The new DMLC sequence file was imported back to treatment planning system to reconstruct the dose distribution. Results: Half of the patients in the study group experienced PTV D95% deviation up to 26% for fractional dose and 14% for total dose. CTV mean dose dropped by 1% with tumor motion. Although CTV is almost covered by prescribed dose with 5 mm margin, qualitative comparison on the dose distributions reveals that CTV is on the verge of underdose. The discrepancy happens due to tumor

  13. Effect of Immobilization and Performance Status on Intrafraction Motion for Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy: Analysis of 133 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Winnie; Purdie, Thomas G.; Taremi, Mojgan; Fung, Sharon; Brade, Anthony; Cho, B.C. John; Hope, Andrew; Sun, Alexander; Jaffray, David A.; Bezjak, Andrea; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess intrafractional geometric accuracy of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients treated with volumetric image guidance. Methods and Materials: Treatment setup accuracy was analyzed in 133 SBRT patients treated via research ethics board–approved protocols. For each fraction, a localization cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan was acquired for soft-tissue registration to the internal target volume, followed by a couch adjustment for positional discrepancies greater than 3 mm, verified with a second CBCT scan. CBCT scans were also performed at intrafraction and end fraction. Patient positioning data from 2047 CBCT scans were recorded to determine systematic (Σ) and random (σ) uncertainties, as well as planning target volume margins. Data were further stratified and analyzed by immobilization method (evacuated cushion [n = 75], evacuated cushion plus abdominal compression [n = 33], or chest board [n = 25]) and by patients’ Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (PS): 0 (n = 31), 1 (n = 70), or 2 (n = 32). Results: Using CBCT internal target volume was matched within ±3 mm in 16% of all fractions at localization, 89% at verification, 72% during treatment, and 69% after treatment. Planning target volume margins required to encompass residual setup errors after couch corrections (verification CBCT scans) were 4 mm, and they increased to 5 mm with target intrafraction motion (post-treatment CBCT scans). Small differences (<1 mm) in the cranial–caudal direction of target position were observed between the immobilization cohorts in the localization, verification, intrafraction, and post-treatment CBCT scans (p < 0.01). Positional drift varied according to patient PS, with the PS 1 and 2 cohorts drifting out of position by mid treatment more than the PS 0 cohort in the cranial-caudal direction (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Image guidance ensures high geometric accuracy for lung SBRT irrespective of immobilization

  14. Effect of Immobilization and Performance Status on Intrafraction Motion for Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy: Analysis of 133 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Winnie, E-mail: winnie.li@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Purdie, Thomas G.; Taremi, Mojgan [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fung, Sharon [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brade, Anthony; Cho, B.C. John; Hope, Andrew; Sun, Alexander; Jaffray, David A.; Bezjak, Andrea; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To assess intrafractional geometric accuracy of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients treated with volumetric image guidance. Methods and Materials: Treatment setup accuracy was analyzed in 133 SBRT patients treated via research ethics board-approved protocols. For each fraction, a localization cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan was acquired for soft-tissue registration to the internal target volume, followed by a couch adjustment for positional discrepancies greater than 3 mm, verified with a second CBCT scan. CBCT scans were also performed at intrafraction and end fraction. Patient positioning data from 2047 CBCT scans were recorded to determine systematic ({Sigma}) and random ({sigma}) uncertainties, as well as planning target volume margins. Data were further stratified and analyzed by immobilization method (evacuated cushion [n = 75], evacuated cushion plus abdominal compression [n = 33], or chest board [n = 25]) and by patients' Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (PS): 0 (n = 31), 1 (n = 70), or 2 (n = 32). Results: Using CBCT internal target volume was matched within {+-}3 mm in 16% of all fractions at localization, 89% at verification, 72% during treatment, and 69% after treatment. Planning target volume margins required to encompass residual setup errors after couch corrections (verification CBCT scans) were 4 mm, and they increased to 5 mm with target intrafraction motion (post-treatment CBCT scans). Small differences (<1 mm) in the cranial-caudal direction of target position were observed between the immobilization cohorts in the localization, verification, intrafraction, and post-treatment CBCT scans (p < 0.01). Positional drift varied according to patient PS, with the PS 1 and 2 cohorts drifting out of position by mid treatment more than the PS 0 cohort in the cranial-caudal direction (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Image guidance ensures high geometric accuracy for lung SBRT irrespective of

  15. INTER- AND INTRAFRACTION MOTION FOR STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY IN DOGS AND CATS USING A MODIFIED BRAINLAB FRAMELESS STEREOTACTIC MASK SYSTEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Sonja; Zwingenberger, Allison; Hansen, Katherine; Pfeiffer, Isabella; Théon, Alain; Kent, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Precise and accurate patient positioning is necessary when doing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to ensure adequate dosing to the tumor and sparing of normal tissues. This prospective cross-sectional study aimed to assess feasibility of a commercially available modified frameless SRS positioning system for use in veterinary radiotherapy patients with brain tumors. Fifty-one dogs and 12 cats were enrolled. Baseline and verification CT images were acquired. The verification CT images from 32 dogs and five cats had sufficient images for fusion to baseline CT images. A rigid box-based fusion was performed to determine interfraction motion. Forty-eight dogs and 11 cats were assessed for intrafraction motion by cine CT. Seventy percent of dogs and 60% of cats had interfraction 3D vector translational shifts >1 mm, with mean values of 1.9 mm in dogs, and 1.8 mm in cats. In dogs muscle wasting was weakly correlated with translational shifts. The maximum angular interfraction motion observed was 6.3° (roll), 3.5° (pitch), and 3.3° (yaw). There was no correlation between angular interfraction motion and weight, brachycephaly, or muscle wasting. Fifty-seven percent of dogs and 50% of cats had respiration-related intrafraction motion. Of these, 4.5% of dogs and 10% of cats had intrafraction motion >1 mm. This study demonstrates the modified Brainlab system is feasible for SRS in dogs and cats. The smaller cranial size and difference in anatomy increases setup uncertainty in some animals beyond limits usually accepted in SRS. Image-guided positioning is recommended to achieve clinically acceptable setup accuracy (<1 mm) for SRS. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  16. A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial With Magnesium Oxide to Reduce Intrafraction Prostate Motion for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lips, Irene M., E-mail: i.m.lips@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gils, Carla H. van [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kotte, Alexis N.T.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Leerdam, Monique E. van [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Franken, Stefan P.G.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Vulpen, Marco van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether magnesium oxide during external-beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer reduces intrafraction prostate motion in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial. Methods and Materials: At the Department of Radiotherapy, prostate cancer patients scheduled for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (77 Gy in 35 fractions) using fiducial marker-based position verification were randomly assigned to receive magnesium oxide (500 mg twice a day) or placebo during radiotherapy. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction prostate motion, defined as the proportion of patients who demonstrated in {>=}50% of the fractions an intrafraction motion outside a range of 2 mm. Secondary outcome measures included quality of life and acute toxicity. Results: In total, 46 patients per treatment arm were enrolled. The primary endpoint did not show a statistically significant difference between the treatment arms with a percentage of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction motion of 83% in the magnesium oxide arm as compared with 80% in the placebo arm (p = 1.00). Concerning the secondary endpoints, exploratory analyses demonstrated a trend towards worsened quality of life and slightly more toxicity in the magnesium oxide arm than in the placebo arm; however, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Magnesium oxide is not effective in reducing the intrafraction prostate motion during external-beam radiotherapy, and therefore there is no indication to use it in clinical practice for this purpose.

  17. Quality assurance device for four-dimensional IMRT or SBRT and respiratory gating using patient-specific intrafraction motion kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, Benjamin E; Ehler, Eric; Bragg, Henry; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2007-09-17

    Emerging technologies such as four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) and implanted beacons are expected to allow clinicians to accurately model intrafraction motion and to quantitatively estimate internal target volumes (ITVs) for radiation therapy involving moving targets. In the case of intensity-modulated (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivery, clinicians must consider the interplay between the temporal nature of the modulation and the target motion within the ITV. A need exists for a 4D IMRT/SBRT quality assurance (QA) device that can incorporate and analyze customized intrafraction motion as it relates to dose delivery and respiratory gating. We built a 4D IMRT/SBRT prototype device and entered (X, Y, Z)(T) coordinates representing a motion kernel into a software application that 1. transformed the kernel into beam-specific two-dimensional (2D) motion "projections," 2. previewed the motion in real time, and 3. drove a recision X-Y motorized device that had, atop it, a mounted planar IMRT QA measurement device. The detectors that intersected the target in the beam's-eye-view of any single phase of the breathing cycle (a small subset of all the detectors) were defined as "target detectors" to be analyzed for dose uniformity between multiple fractions. Data regarding the use of this device to quantify dose variation fraction-to-fraction resulting from target motion (for several delivery modalities and with and without gating) have been recently published. A combined software and hardware solution for patient-customized 4D IMRT/SBRT QA is an effective tool for assessing IMRT delivery under conditions of intrafraction motion. The 4D IMRT QA device accurately reproduced the projected motion kernels for all beam's-eye-view motion kernels. This device has been proved to, effectively quantify the degradation in dose uniformity resulting from a moving target within a static planning target volume, and, integrate with a commercial

  18. Quality assurance device for four‐dimensional IMRT or SBRT and respiratory gating using patient‐specific intrafraction motion kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehler, Eric; Bragg, Henry; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2007-01-01

    Emerging technologies such as four‐dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) and implanted beacons are expected to allow clinicians to accurately model intrafraction motion and to quantitatively estimate internal target volumes (ITVs) for radiation therapy involving moving targets. In the case of intensity‐modulated (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivery, clinicians must consider the interplay between the temporal nature of the modulation and the target motion within the ITV. A need exists for a 4D IMRT/SBRT quality assurance (QA) device that can incorporate and analyze customized intrafraction motion as it relates to dose delivery and respiratory gating. We built a 4D IMRT/SBRT prototype device and entered (X, Y, Z)(T) coordinates representing a motion kernel into a software application that transformed the kernel into beam‐specific two‐dimensional (2D) motion “projections,”previewed the motion in real time, anddrove a precision X–Y motorized device that had, atop it, a mounted planar IMRT QA measurement device. The detectors that intersected the target in the beam's‐eye‐view of any single phase of the breathing cycle (a small subset of all the detectors) were defined as “target detectors” to be analyzed for dose uniformity between multiple fractions. Data regarding the use of this device to quantify dose variation fraction‐to‐fraction resulting from target motion (for several delivery modalities and with and without gating) have been recently published. A combined software and hardware solution for patient‐customized 4D IMRT/ SBRT QA is an effective tool for assessing IMRT delivery under conditions of intrafraction motion. The 4D IMRT QA device accurately reproduced the projected motion kernels for all beam's‐eye‐view motion kernels. This device has been proved to • effectively quantify the degradation in dose uniformity resulting from a moving target within a static planning target volume, and • integrate

  19. Evaluation of inter- and intrafractional motion of liver tumors using interstitial markers and implantable electromagnetic radiotransmitters in the context of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) – the ESMERALDA trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habermehl, Daniel; Naumann, Patrick; Bendl, Rolf; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2015-01-01

    With the development of more conformal and precise radiation techniques such as Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) and Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT), patients with hepatic tumors could be treated with high local doses by sparing normal liver tissue. However, frequently occurring large HCC tumors are still a dosimetric challenge in spite of modern high sophisticated RT modalities. This interventional clinical study has been set up to evaluate the value of different fiducial markers, and to use the modern imaging methods for further treatment optimization using physical and informatics approaches. Surgically implanted radioopaque or electromagnetic markers are used to detect tumor local-ization during radiotherapy. The required markers for targeting and observation during RT can be implanted in a previously defined optimal position during the oncologically indicated operation. If there is no indication for a surgical resection or open biopsy, markers may be inserted into the liver or tumor tissue by using ultrasound-guidance. Primary study aim is the detection of the patients´ anatomy at the time of RT by observation of the marker position during the indicated irradiation (IGRT). Secondary study aims comprise detection and recording of 3D liver and tumor motion during RT. Furthermore, the study will help to develop technical strategies and mechanisms based on the recorded information on organ motion to avoid inaccurate dose application resulting from fast organ motion and deformation. This is an open monocentric non-randomized, prospective study for the evaluation of organ motion using interstitial markers or implantable radiotransmitter. The trial will evaluate the full potential of different fiducial markers to further optimize treatment of moving targets, with a special focus on liver lesions

  20. SU-D-BRA-06: Investigation of Prostate Intrafractional Motion during External Beam Radiotherapy for a Large Patient Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, X; Chen, X; Li, J; Lin, M; Chen, L; Xu, Q; Ma, C

    2012-06-01

    To analyze and report prostate intrafractional motion recorded online during external beam radiotherapy and to provide guidance for advanced prostate IMRT. Prostate intrafractional motion during IMRT and RapidARC treatments was tracked and recorded using a Calypso 4D-localization system. Data for 8600 treatment fractions of 230 prostate patients was analyzed. The percentage of treatment fractions, the fractional treatment time, and the fractional time of any individual minute were analyzed separately for prostate movements greater than the thresholds (2, 3, 5 and 7mm). The percentages of fractions in which prostate shifted more than the thresholds for a duration >10 seconds are 66.2%, 34.9%, 8.9% and 2.6% (57.9%, 27.9%, 5.2% and 0.8% for >30 seconds duration), respectively. For 10 patients who exhibited the largest motion, the percentages are 95.2%, 76.0%, 43.2% and 14.7% (91.3%, 72.4%, 36.3% and 6.0% for >30 seconds duration). The fractional time for motion larger than the thresholds is 27.8%, 10.7%, 1.6% and 0.3% (56.2%, 33.7%, 11.2% and 2.1% for these patients). The posterior-direction motion is significantly higher than those in other directions. The fractional time of an individual minute with shift >3mm is higher at the 10th minute than at the 5th minute (20% vs. 10%) after the initial setup. For treatments completed within 5 minutes, the average fractional time with motion >3mm was lower than those within 10 minutes (4% vs. 12%). Irregular movements were observed most likely in the first minute after patient's setup, which were 12% and 7% among all fractions with movements >2mm and >3mm, respectively. The prostate intrafractional motion was within 3mm for most treatment fractions. However, larger movements were observed for some patients, who require real-time corrections or larger treatment margins. The results indicate that it is beneficial if the treatment can be completed within 5 minutes. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. A cinematic magnetic resonance imaging study of milk of magnesia laxative and an antiflatulent diet to reduce intrafraction prostate motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichol, Alan M; Warde, Padraig R; Lockwood, Gina A; Kirilova, Anna K; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Milosevic, Michael; Rosewall, Tara; Jaffray, David A; Catton, Charles N

    2010-07-15

    To determine the reduction of prostate motion during a typical radiotherapy (RT) fraction from a bowel regimen comprising an antiflatulent diet and daily milk of magnesia. Forty-two patients with T1c-T2c prostate cancer voided the bladder and rectum before three cinematic magnetic resonance imaging scans obtained every 9 s for 9 min in a vacuum immobilization device. The MRIs were at baseline without bowel regimen (MRI-BL), before CT planning with bowel regimen (MRI-CT), and before a randomly assigned RT fraction (1-42) with bowel regimen (MRI-RT). A single observer tracked displacement of the posterior midpoint (PM) of the prostate. The primary endpoints were comparisons of the proportion of time that the PM was displaced >3 mm (PTPM3) from its initial position, and the secondary endpoints were comparisons of the reduction of initial rectal area, with and without the bowel regimen. The mean rectal area was: 13.5 cm(2) at MRI-BL, 12.7 cm(2) at MRI-CT, and 12.3 cm(2) at MRI-RT (MRI-BL vs. MRI-CT, p = 0.11; MRI-BL vs. MRI-CT, p = 0.07). Moving rectal gas alone (56%) and moving gas and stool (18%) caused 74% of intrafraction prostate motion. The PTPM3 was 11.3% at MRI-BL, 4.8% at MRI-CT, and 12.0% at MRI-RT (MRI-BL vs. MRI-CT, p = 0.12; MRI-BL vs. MRI-RT, p = 0.89). For subjects voiding their rectum before imaging, an antiflatulent diet and milk of magnesia laxative did not significantly reduce initial rectal area or intrafraction prostate motion. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Cinematic Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Milk of Magnesia Laxative and an Antiflatulent Diet to Reduce Intrafraction Prostate Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichol, Alan M.; Warde, Padraig R.; Lockwood, Gina A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the reduction of prostate motion during a typical radiotherapy (RT) fraction from a bowel regimen comprising an antiflatulent diet and daily milk of magnesia. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients with T1c-T2c prostate cancer voided the bladder and rectum before three cinematic magnetic resonance imaging scans obtained every 9 s for 9 min in a vacuum immobilization device. The MRIs were at baseline without bowel regimen (MRI-BL), before CT planning with bowel regimen (MRI-CT), and before a randomly assigned RT fraction (1-42) with bowel regimen (MRI-RT). A single observer tracked displacement of the posterior midpoint (PM) of the prostate. The primary endpoints were comparisons of the proportion of time that the PM was displaced >3 mm (PTPM3) from its initial position, and the secondary endpoints were comparisons of the reduction of initial rectal area, with and without the bowel regimen. Results: The mean rectal area was: 13.5 cm 2 at MRI-BL, 12.7 cm 2 at MRI-CT, and 12.3 cm 2 at MRI-RT (MRI-BL vs. MRI-CT, p = 0.11; MRI-BL vs. MRI-CT, p = 0.07). Moving rectal gas alone (56%) and moving gas and stool (18%) caused 74% of intrafraction prostate motion. The PTPM3 was 11.3% at MRI-BL, 4.8% at MRI-CT, and 12.0% at MRI-RT (MRI-BL vs. MRI-CT, p = 0.12; MRI-BL vs. MRI-RT, p = 0.89). Conclusion: For subjects voiding their rectum before imaging, an antiflatulent diet and milk of magnesia laxative did not significantly reduce initial rectal area or intrafraction prostate motion.

  3. Assessment of planning target volume margins for intensity-modulated radiotherapy of the prostate gland: role of daily inter- and intrafraction motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyi, James A; He, Tongming; Summers, Paige A; Mburu, Ruth G; Kato, Catherine M; Rhodes, Stephen M; Hung, Arthur Y; Fuss, Martin

    2010-12-01

    To determine planning target volume margins for prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy based on inter- and intrafraction motion using four daily localization techniques: three-point skin mark alignment, volumetric imaging with bony landmark registration, volumetric imaging with implanted fiducial marker registration, and implanted electromagnetic transponders (beacons) detection. Fourteen patients who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer formed the basis of this study. Each patient was implanted with three electromagnetic transponders and underwent a course of 39 treatment fractions. Daily localization was based on three-point skin mark alignment followed by transponder detection and patient repositioning. Transponder positioning was verified by volumetric imaging with cone-beam computed tomography of the pelvis. Relative motion between the prostate gland and bony anatomy was quantified by offline analyses of daily cone-beam computed tomography. Intratreatment organ motion was monitored continuously by the Calypso® System for quantification of intrafraction setup error. As expected, setup error (that is, inter- plus intrafraction motion, unless otherwise stated) was largest with skin mark alignment, requiring margins of 7.5 mm, 11.4 mm, and 16.3 mm, in the lateral (LR), longitudinal (SI), and vertical (AP) directions, respectively. Margin requirements accounting for intrafraction motion were smallest for transponder detection localization techniques, requiring margins of 1.4 mm (LR), 2.6 mm (SI), and 2.3 mm (AP). Bony anatomy alignment required 2.1 mm (LR), 9.4 mm (SI), and 10.5 mm (AP), whereas image-guided marker alignment required 2.8 mm (LR), 3.7 mm (SI), and 3.2 mm (AP). No marker migration was observed in the cohort. Clinically feasible, rapid, and reliable tools such as the electromagnetic transponder detection system for pretreatment target localization and, subsequently, intratreatment target location monitoring

  4. SU-D-BRA-03: Simultaneous MV-KV Imaging for Intra-Fractional Motion Management during Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Delivery on the Varian TrueBeam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, M; Regmi, R; Zhang, P; Pham, H; Wang, P; Xiong, J; Morf, D; Mageras, G

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate a MV-kV intra-fractional imaging technique for use during volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with the Varian TrueBeam. MV-kV image pairs were acquired intra-fractionally during VMAT delivery. kV images (11 fps) were acquired throughout delivery using a standard pre-programmed imaging template. MV images (9.5 fps) were acquired simultaneously by deploying the EPID and passively collecting the resulting images using Varian proprietary software, iTools Capture. Localization accuracy was evaluated by imaging a Rando phantom implanted with 3 fiducials while moving the couch according to XML- programmed trajectories simulating typical prostate and respiratory motion. VMAT delivery was done using a single 360 degree arc in TrueBeam Developer mode. The effect on accuracy of total MU and gantry speed was studied. To improve image quality, MV frame averaging was performed and the MV and kV images were then registered to their corresponding DRRs using in-house registration software. From these 2D registrations, the 3D position at each MV-kV acquisition point was determined. Between 130 and 390 MV-kV pairs were acquired for each delivery. The mean difference between planned couch and measured fiducial 3D positions with prostate motion was less than 0.03 cm in each direction (SD 0.03 cm). Neither gantry speed nor MU significantly impacted accuracy. for respiratory motion, the mean difference between planned and measured position was less than 0.04 cm. Standard deviation averaged 0.06 cm but increased to 0.12 cm with large instantaneous motion and less MV dose per frame. MV frame averaging and inaccuracies in MV image gantry angle determination also affected accuracy, particularly with significant motion. With high quality MV imaging, MV-kV localization techniques can be highly accurate, even in the presence of significant motion. As clinical MV-kV methods become available, such techniques can provide an efficient and accurate method for monitoring intra-fractional

  5. Quantifying Appropriate PTV Setup Margins: Analysis of Patient Setup Fidelity and Intrafraction Motion Using Post-Treatment Megavoltage Computed Tomography Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabik, Donata M.; MacKenzie, Marc A.; Fallone, Gino B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To present a technique that can be implemented in-house to evaluate the efficacy of immobilization and image-guided setup of patients with different treatment sites on helical tomotherapy. This technique uses an analysis of alignment shifts between kilovoltage computed tomography and post-treatment megavoltage computed tomography images. The determination of the shifts calculated by the helical tomotherapy software for a given site can then be used to define appropriate planning target volume internal margins. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients underwent post-treatment megavoltage computed tomography scans on a helical tomotherapy machine to assess patient setup fidelity and net intrafraction motion. Shifts were studied for the prostate, head and neck, and glioblastoma multiforme. Analysis of these data was performed using automatic and manual registration of the kilovoltage computed tomography and post-megavoltage computed tomography images. Results: The shifts were largest for the prostate, followed by the head and neck, with glioblastoma multiforme having the smallest shifts in general. It appears that it might be more appropriate to use asymmetric planning target volume margins. Each margin value reported is equal to two standard deviations of the average shift in the given direction. Conclusion: This method could be applied using individual patient post-image scanning and combined with adaptive planning to reduce or increase the margins as appropriate

  6. WE-G-BRD-04: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): An Integrated Model-Based Intrafractional Organ Motion Tracking Approach with Dynamic MRI in Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Dolly, S; Anastasio, M; Li, H; Wooten, H; Gay, H; Mutic, S; Thorstad, W; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Victoria, J; Dempsey, J [ViewRay incorporated, Oakwood Village, Ohio (United States); Ruan, S [University of Rouen, QuantIF - EA 4108 LITIS, Rouen (France); Low, D [Deparment of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In-treatment dynamic cine images, provided by the first commercially available MRI-guided radiotherapy system, allow physicians to observe intrafractional motion of head and neck (H&N) internal structures. Nevertheless, high anatomical complexity and relatively poor cine image contrast/resolution have complicated automatic intrafractional motion evaluation. We proposed an integrated model-based approach to automatically delineate and analyze moving structures from on-board cine images. Methods: The H&N upper airway, a complex and highly deformable region wherein severe internal motion often occurs, was selected as the target-to-be-tracked. To reliably capture its motion, a hierarchical structure model containing three statistical shapes (face, face-jaw, and face-jaw-palate) was first built from a set of manually delineated shapes using principal component analysis. An integrated model-fitting algorithm was then employed to align the statistical shapes to the first to-be-detected cine frame, and multi-feature level-set contour propagation was performed to identify the airway shape change in the remaining frames. Ninety sagittal cine MR image sets, acquired from three H&N cancer patients, were utilized to demonstrate this approach. Results: The tracking accuracy was validated by comparing the results to the average of two manual delineations in 20 randomly selected images from each patient. The resulting dice similarity coefficient (93.28+/−1.46 %) and margin error (0.49+/−0.12 mm) showed good agreement with the manual results. Intrafractional displacements of anterior, posterior, inferior, and superior airway boundaries were observed, with values of 2.62+/−2.92, 1.78+/−1.43, 3.51+/−3.99, and 0.68+/−0.89 mm, respectively. The H&N airway motion was found to vary across directions, fractions, and patients, and highly correlated with patients’ respiratory frequency. Conclusion: We proposed the integrated computational approach, which for the first

  7. Evaluation of the geometric accuracy of surrogate-based gated VMAT using intrafraction kilovoltage x-ray images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Han, Bin; Koong, Albert; Xing Lei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the geometric accuracy of beam targeting in external surrogate-based gated volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using kilovoltage (kV) x-ray images acquired during dose delivery. Methods: Gated VMAT treatments were delivered using a Varian TrueBeam STx Linac for both physical phantoms and patients. Multiple gold fiducial markers were implanted near the target. The reference position was created for each implanted marker, representing its correct position at the gating threshold. The gating signal was generated from the RPM system. During the treatment, kV images were acquired immediately before MV beam-on at every breathing cycle, using the on-board imaging system. All implanted markers were detected and their 3D positions were estimated using in-house developed software. The positioning error of a marker is defined as the distance of the marker from its reference position for each frame of the images. The overall error of the system is defined as the average over all markers. For the phantom study, both sinusoidal motion (1D and 3D) and real human respiratory motion was simulated for the target and surrogate. In the baseline case, the two motions were synchronized for the first treatment fraction. To assess the effects of surrogate-target correlation on the geometric accuracy, a phase shift of 5% and 10% between the two motions was introduced. For the patient study, intrafraction kV images of five stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients were acquired for one or two fractions. Results: For the phantom study, a high geometric accuracy was achieved in the baseline case (average error: 0.8 mm in the superior-inferior or SI direction). However, the treatment delivery is prone to geometric errors if changes in the target-surrogate relation occur during the treatment: the average error was increased to 2.3 and 4.7 mm for the phase shift of 5% and 10%, respectively. Results obtained with real human respiratory curves show a similar trend

  8. TU-F-CAMPUS-J-01: Inference of Prostate PTV Margins in VMAT Delivery From Intra-Fraction Prostate Motion During SBRT Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thind, K; Wong, R; Gerdes, C; Chow, T [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Wong, D [McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively quantify the intra-fraction prostate motion during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment using CyberKnife’s target tracking system, which may provide insight into expansion margins from GTV to PTV used in gantry-based treatments. CyberKnife is equipped with an active tracking system (InTempo) that tracks the four fiducials placed in the prostate gland. The system acquires intra-fraction orthogonal kV images at 45° and 315° in a sequential fashion. Methods: A total of 38 patients treated with SBRT using CyberKnife between 2011 and 2013 were studied. Dose-regime was 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions (7.25 Gy/fraction, twice per week) as per RTOG 0938 guidelines. The CyberKnife image tracking logs for all SBRT treatments using InTempo were examined. A total of 13663 images were examined for the superior/inferior (SI), anterior/posterior (AP) and left/right (LR) translation as well as roll, pitch and yaw rotations for the target position relative to the last known model position. Results: The mean ± 2 SD of intra-fraction motion was contained within 3 mm for SI and LR and 4.5 mm for AP directions at 5 minutes into the treatment delivery. It was contained within 4 mm for SI and LR and 5 mm for AP at 10 minutes. At 15 minutes into delivery, all translations were contained within 5 mm. The mean ± 2 SD of prostate roll, pitch and yaw increased with time but were contained within 5 degree at 5, 10 and 15 minutes into treatment. Additionally, target translations and rotations were within ± 1 mm and ± 1 degree for 90% and 78% of the time. Conclusion: The organ motion component of PTV margin for 10 minute VMAT delivery is contained within 4 mm in SI and LR direction and within 5 mm in the AP direction.

  9. Extension of the NCAT phantom for the investigation of intra-fraction respiratory motion in IMRT using 4D Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGurk, Ross; Seco, Joao; Wolfgang, John; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Riboldi, Marco [TBMLab, Department of Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano University, P.za Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Segars, Paul [Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Labs, Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27705 (United States)], E-mail: ross.mcgurk@duke.edu

    2010-03-07

    The purpose of this work was to create a computational platform for studying motion in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Specifically, the non-uniform rational B-spline (NURB) cardiac and torso (NCAT) phantom was modified for use in a four-dimensional Monte Carlo (4D-MC) simulation system to investigate the effect of respiratory-induced intra-fraction organ motion on IMRT dose distributions as a function of diaphragm motion, lesion size and lung density. Treatment plans for four clinical scenarios were designed: diaphragm peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm and 3 cm, and two lesion sizes-2 cm and 4 cm diameter placed in the lower lobe of the right lung. Lung density was changed for each phase using a conservation of mass calculation. Further, a new heterogeneous lung model was implemented and tested. Each lesion had an internal target volume (ITV) subsequently expanded by 15 mm isotropically to give the planning target volume (PTV). The PTV was prescribed to receive 72 Gy in 40 fractions. The MLC leaf sequence defined by the planning system for each patient was exported and used as input into the MC system. MC simulations using the dose planning method (DPM) code together with deformable image registration based on the NCAT deformation field were used to find a composite dose distribution for each phantom. These composite distributions were subsequently analyzed using information from the dose volume histograms (DVH). Lesion motion amplitude has the largest effect on the dose distribution. Tumor size was found to have a smaller effect and can be mitigated by ensuring the planning constraints are optimized for the tumor size. The use of a dynamic or heterogeneous lung density model over a respiratory cycle does not appear to be an important factor with a {<=} 0.6% change in the mean dose received by the ITV, PTV and right lung. The heterogeneous model increases the realism of the NCAT phantom and may provide more accurate simulations in radiation therapy

  10. SU-E-J-150: Impact of Intrafractional Prostate Motion On the Accuracy and Efficiency of Prostate SBRT Delivery: A Retrospective Analysis of Prostate Tracking Log Files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, H; Hirsch, A; Willins, J; Kachnic, J [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Qureshi, M; Katz, M; Nicholas, B; Keohan, S [Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); De Armas, R [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Lu, H; Efstathiou, J; Zietman, A [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure intrafractional prostate motion by time-based stereotactic x-ray imaging and investigate the impact on the accuracy and efficiency of prostate SBRT delivery. Methods: Prostate tracking log files with 1,892 x-ray image registrations from 18 SBRT fractions for 6 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Patient setup and beam delivery sessions were reviewed to identify extended periods of large prostate motion that caused delays in setup or interruptions in beam delivery. The 6D prostate motions were compared to the clinically used PTV margin of 3–5 mm (3 mm posterior, 5 mm all other directions), a hypothetical PTV margin of 2–3 mm (2 mm posterior, 3 mm all other directions), and the rotation correction limits (roll ±2°, pitch ±5° and yaw ±3°) of CyberKnife to quantify beam delivery accuracy. Results: Significant incidents of treatment start delay and beam delivery interruption were observed, mostly related to large pitch rotations of ≥±5°. Optimal setup time of 5–15 minutes was recorded in 61% of the fractions, and optimal beam delivery time of 30–40 minutes in 67% of the fractions. At a default imaging interval of 15 seconds, the percentage of prostate motion beyond PTV margin of 3–5 mm varied among patients, with a mean at 12.8% (range 0.0%–31.1%); and the percentage beyond PTV margin of 2–3 mm was at a mean of 36.0% (range 3.3%–83.1%). These timely detected offsets were all corrected real-time by the robotic manipulator or by operator intervention at the time of treatment interruptions. Conclusion: The durations of patient setup and beam delivery were directly affected by the occurrence of large prostate motion. Frequent imaging of down to 15 second interval is necessary for certain patients. Techniques for reducing prostate motion, such as using endorectal balloon, can be considered to assure consistently higher accuracy and efficiency of prostate SBRT delivery.

  11. SU-E-J-150: Impact of Intrafractional Prostate Motion On the Accuracy and Efficiency of Prostate SBRT Delivery: A Retrospective Analysis of Prostate Tracking Log Files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, H; Hirsch, A; Willins, J; Kachnic, J; Qureshi, M; Katz, M; Nicholas, B; Keohan, S; De Armas, R; Lu, H; Efstathiou, J; Zietman, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To measure intrafractional prostate motion by time-based stereotactic x-ray imaging and investigate the impact on the accuracy and efficiency of prostate SBRT delivery. Methods: Prostate tracking log files with 1,892 x-ray image registrations from 18 SBRT fractions for 6 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Patient setup and beam delivery sessions were reviewed to identify extended periods of large prostate motion that caused delays in setup or interruptions in beam delivery. The 6D prostate motions were compared to the clinically used PTV margin of 3–5 mm (3 mm posterior, 5 mm all other directions), a hypothetical PTV margin of 2–3 mm (2 mm posterior, 3 mm all other directions), and the rotation correction limits (roll ±2°, pitch ±5° and yaw ±3°) of CyberKnife to quantify beam delivery accuracy. Results: Significant incidents of treatment start delay and beam delivery interruption were observed, mostly related to large pitch rotations of ≥±5°. Optimal setup time of 5–15 minutes was recorded in 61% of the fractions, and optimal beam delivery time of 30–40 minutes in 67% of the fractions. At a default imaging interval of 15 seconds, the percentage of prostate motion beyond PTV margin of 3–5 mm varied among patients, with a mean at 12.8% (range 0.0%–31.1%); and the percentage beyond PTV margin of 2–3 mm was at a mean of 36.0% (range 3.3%–83.1%). These timely detected offsets were all corrected real-time by the robotic manipulator or by operator intervention at the time of treatment interruptions. Conclusion: The durations of patient setup and beam delivery were directly affected by the occurrence of large prostate motion. Frequent imaging of down to 15 second interval is necessary for certain patients. Techniques for reducing prostate motion, such as using endorectal balloon, can be considered to assure consistently higher accuracy and efficiency of prostate SBRT delivery

  12. SU-G-JeP1-02: A New Intra-Fractional Prostate Motion Tracking Method in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Via 2D/3D Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Y; Rezaeian, N Hassan; Hannan, R; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Intra-fractional prostate motion leads uncertainty on delivered dose in radiotherapy and may cause significant dose deviation from the planned dose distribution. This is especially a concern in scenarios with a high dose per fraction and hence a long delivery time, e.g. stereotactic body radiotherapy. Knowledge about intra-fractional prostate motion is valuable to address this problem, e.g. by reconstructing delivered dose and performing adaptation. This study proposes a new approach to determine intra-fractional prostate motion in VMAT via 2D/3D maker registration. Methods: At our institution, each patient has three markers implanted in the prostate. During treatment delivery, kV triggered images were taken every three seconds to acquire 2D projection of 3D anatomy at the direction orthogonal to the therapeutic beam. Projected marker locations were identified on each projection image using template matching with geometric constraints. 3D prostate translation and rotation for each triggered image were obtained by solving an optimization problem, such that the calculated marker locations match the measured ones. Inter-image motion smoothness was employed as a constraint. We tested this method in simulation studies with five realistic prostate motion trajectories acquired via Calypso and in real phantom experiments. Results: For the simulation case, the motion range for these patients was 0.5∼6.0 mm. Root mean square (RMS) error of calculated motion along left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP) and cranial-caudal (CC) directions were 0.26mm, 0.36mm, and 0.016mm, respectively. The motion range in the phantom study along LR, AP, and CC directions were 15mm, 20mm and 10mm. The mean RMS errors along these directions were 1.99mm, 1.37mm and 0.22mm. Conclusion: A new prostate motion tracking algorithm based on kV triggered images has been developed and validated. Clinically acceptable accuracy has been achieved.

  13. Intrafractional Baseline Shift or Drift of Lung Tumor Motion During Gated Radiation Therapy With a Real-Time Tumor-Tracking System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takao, Seishin; Miyamoto, Naoki; Matsuura, Taeko; Onimaru, Rikiya; Katoh, Norio; Inoue, Tetsuya; Sutherland, Kenneth Lee; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Shirato, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the frequency and amplitude of baseline shift or drift (shift/drift) of lung tumors in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), using a real-time tumor-tracking radiation therapy (RTRT) system. Methods and Materials: Sixty-eight patients with peripheral lung tumors were treated with SBRT using the RTRT system. One of the fiducial markers implanted near the tumor was used for the real-time monitoring of the intrafractional tumor motion every 0.033 seconds by the RTRT system. When baseline shift/drift is determined by the system, the position of the treatment couch is adjusted to compensate for the shift/drift. Therefore, the changes in the couch position correspond to the baseline shift/drift in the tumor motion. The frequency and amount of adjustment to the couch positions in the left-right (LR), cranio-caudal (CC), and antero-posterior (AP) directions have been analyzed for 335 fractions administered to 68 patients. Results: The average change in position of the treatment couch during the treatment time was 0.45 ± 2.23 mm (mean ± standard deviation), −1.65 ± 5.95 mm, and 1.50 ± 2.54 mm in the LR, CC, and AP directions, respectively. Overall the baseline shift/drift occurs toward the cranial and posterior directions. The incidence of baseline shift/drift exceeding 3 mm was 6.0%, 15.5%, 14.0%, and 42.1% for the LR, CC, AP, and for the square-root of sum of 3 directions, respectively, within 10 minutes of the start of treatment, and 23.0%, 37.6%, 32.5%, and 71.6% within 30 minutes. Conclusions: Real-time monitoring and frequent adjustments of the couch position and/or adding appropriate margins are suggested to be essential to compensate for possible underdosages due to baseline shift/drift in SBRT for lung cancers.

  14. Impact of Intrafraction and Residual Interfraction Effect on Prostate Proton Pencil Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Shikui, E-mail: shktang@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Deville, Curtiland; Tochner, Zelig [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); McDonough, James; Vapiwala, Neha; Both, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the impact of interplay effect and plan robustness associated with intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion for pencil beam scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with weekly verification CTs underwent pencil beam scanning with the bilateral single-field uniform dose (SFUD) modality. A typical field had 10-15 energy layers and 500-1000 spots. According to their treatment logs, each layer delivery time was <1 s, with average time to change layers of approximately 8 s. Real-time intrafraction prostate motion was determined from our previously reported prospective study using Calypso beacon transponders. Prostate motion and beam delivering sequence of the worst-case scenario patient were synchronized to calculate the “true” dose received by the prostate. The intrafraction effect was examined by applying the worst-case scenario prostate motion on the planning CT, and the residual interfraction effect was examined on the basis of weekly CT scans. The resultant dose variation of target and critical structures was examined to evaluate the interplay effect. Results: The clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was degraded because of both effects. The CTV D{sub 99} (percentage dose to 99% of the CTV) varied up to 10% relative to the initial plan in individual fractions. However, over the entire course of treatment the total dose degradation of D{sub 99} was 2%-3%, with a standard deviation of <2%. Absolute differences between SFUD, intensity modulate proton therapy, and one-field-per-day SFUD plans were small. The intrafraction effect dominated over the residual interfraction effect for CTV coverage. Mean dose to the anterior rectal wall increased approximately 10% because of combined residual interfraction and intrafraction effects, the interfraction effect being dominant. Conclusions: Both intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion degrade CTV coverage within a

  15. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ruijiang; Han, Bin; Meng, Bowen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during millivolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results: The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions: Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  16. Impact of sampling interval in training data acquisition on intrafractional predictive accuracy of indirect dynamic tumor-tracking radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Akimoto, Mami; Miyabe, Yuki; Yokota, Kenji; Matsuo, Yukinori; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2017-08-01

    To explore the effect of sampling interval of training data acquisition on the intrafractional prediction error of surrogate signal-based dynamic tumor-tracking using a gimbal-mounted linac. Twenty pairs of respiratory motions were acquired from 20 patients (ten lung, five liver, and five pancreatic cancer patients) who underwent dynamic tumor-tracking with the Vero4DRT. First, respiratory motions were acquired as training data for an initial construction of the prediction model before the irradiation. Next, additional respiratory motions were acquired for an update of the prediction model due to the change of the respiratory pattern during the irradiation. The time elapsed prior to the second acquisition of the respiratory motion was 12.6 ± 3.1 min. A four-axis moving phantom reproduced patients' three dimensional (3D) target motions and one dimensional surrogate motions. To predict the future internal target motion from the external surrogate motion, prediction models were constructed by minimizing residual prediction errors for training data acquired at 80 and 320 ms sampling intervals for 20 s, and at 500, 1,000, and 2,000 ms sampling intervals for 60 s using orthogonal kV x-ray imaging systems. The accuracies of prediction models trained with various sampling intervals were estimated based on training data with each sampling interval during the training process. The intrafractional prediction errors for various prediction models were then calculated on intrafractional monitoring images taken for 30 s at the constant sampling interval of a 500 ms fairly to evaluate the prediction accuracy for the same motion pattern. In addition, the first respiratory motion was used for the training and the second respiratory motion was used for the evaluation of the intrafractional prediction errors for the changed respiratory motion to evaluate the robustness of the prediction models. The training error of the prediction model was 1.7 ± 0.7 mm in 3D for all sampling

  17. Dosimetric effect of intrafraction motion and residual setup error for hypofractionated prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy with online cone beam computed tomography image guidance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adamson, Justus

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: To quantify the dosimetric effect and margins required to account for prostate intrafractional translation and residual setup error in a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy protocol. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Prostate position after online correction was measured during dose delivery using simultaneous kV fluoroscopy and posttreatment CBCT in 572 fractions to 30 patients. We reconstructed the dose distribution to the clinical tumor volume (CTV) using a convolution of the static dose with a probability density function (PDF) based on the kV fluoroscopy, and we calculated the minimum dose received by 99% of the CTV (D(99)). We compared reconstructed doses when the convolution was performed per beam, per patient, and when the PDF was created using posttreatment CBCT. We determined the minimum axis-specific margins to limit CTV D(99) reduction to 1%. RESULTS: For 3-mm margins, D(99) reduction was <\\/=5% for 29\\/30 patients. Using post-CBCT rather than localizations at treatment delivery exaggerated dosimetric effects by ~47%, while there was no such bias between the dose convolved with a beam-specific and patient-specific PDF. After eight fractions, final cumulative D(99) could be predicted with a root mean square error of <1%. For 90% of patients, the required margins were <\\/=2, 4, and 3 mm, with 70%, 40%, and 33% of patients requiring no right-left (RL), anteroposterior (AP), and superoinferior margins, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: For protocols with CBCT guidance, RL, AP, and SI margins of 2, 4, and 3 mm are sufficient to account for translational errors; however, the large variation in patient-specific margins suggests that adaptive management may be beneficial.

  18. Motion sensor evaluation using simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmutz, J.D.; McNerney, G.M.; Workhoven, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    Thorough evaluation testing of interior motion sensors requires repeated testing under a variety of environmental conditions. Although the sensors are intended primarily for interior installations, many of the buildings where protection may be required are warehouses or bunkers without environmental control. In evaluating sensors for such installations, it becomes important to collect data not only on coverage or sensitivity at room temperature but also at environmental extremes. This paper describes a system Sandia National Laboratories at Albuquerque (SNLA) has designed and built to provide repeatability in environmental testing. The system has been dubbed Sandia Intruder Motion Simulator (SIMS). This system is used to acquire much of the data now collected on sensors in the laboratory and a duplicate system has been delivered to the Belvoir R and D Center so that the laboratory can now run similar tests. 11 figures

  19. Initial clinical evaluation of PET-based ion beam therapy monitoring under consideration of organ motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Christopher; Bauer, Julia; Unholtz, Daniel; Richter, Daniel; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia

    2016-02-01

    Intrafractional organ motion imposes considerable challenges to scanned ion beam therapy and demands for a thorough verification of the applied treatment. At the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), the scanned ion beam delivery is verified by means of postirradiation positron-emission-tomography (PET) imaging. This work presents a first clinical evaluation of PET-based treatment monitoring in ion beam therapy under consideration of target motion. Three patients with mobile liver lesions underwent scanned carbon ion irradiation at HIT and postirradiation PET/CT (x-ray-computed-tomography) imaging with a commercial scanner. Respiratory motion was recorded during irradiation and subsequent image acquisition. This enabled a time-resolved (4D) calculation of the expected irradiation-induced activity pattern and, for one patient where an additional 4D CT was acquired at the PET/CT scanner after treatment, a motion-compensated PET image reconstruction. For the other patients, PET data were reconstructed statically. To verify the treatment, calculated prediction and reconstructed measurement were compared with a focus on the ion beam range. Results in the current three patients suggest that for motion amplitudes in the order of 2 mm there is no benefit from incorporating respiratory motion information into PET-based treatment monitoring. For a target motion in the order of 10 mm, motion-related effects become more severe and a time-resolved modeling of the expected activity distribution can lead to an improved data interpretation if a sufficient number of true coincidences is detected. Benefits from motion-compensated PET image reconstruction could not be shown conclusively at the current stage. The feasibility of clinical PET-based treatment verification under consideration of organ motion has been shown for the first time. Improvements in noise-robust 4D PET image reconstruction are deemed necessary to enhance the clinical potential.

  20. Technical Note: Intrafractional changes in time lag relationship between anterior–posterior external and superior–inferior internal motion signals in abdominal tumor sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regmi, Rajesh; Lovelock, D. Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jianping; Yorke, Ellen D.; Mageras, Gig S., E-mail: magerasg@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Goodman, Karyn A.; Wu, Abraham J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate constancy, within a treatment session, of the time lag relationship between implanted markers in abdominal tumors and an external motion surrogate. Methods: Six gastroesophageal junction and three pancreatic cancer patients (IRB-approved protocol) received two cone-beam CTs (CBCT), one before and one after treatment. Time between scans was less than 30 min. Each patient had at least one implanted fiducial marker near the tumor. In all scans, abdominal displacement (Varian RPM) was recorded as the external motion signal. Purpose-built software tracked fiducials, representing internal signal, in CBCT projection images. Time lag between superior–inferior (SI) internal and anterior–posterior external signals was found by maximizing the correlation coefficient in each breathing cycle and averaging over all cycles. Time-lag-induced discrepancy between internal SI position and that predicted from the external signal (external prediction error) was also calculated. Results: Mean ± standard deviation time lag, over all scans and patients, was 0.10 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.36 s). External signal lagged the internal in 17/18 scans. Change in time lag between pre- and post-treatment CBCT was 0.06 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.22 s), corresponding to 3.1% ± 3.7% (range 0.6%–10.8%) of gate width (range 1.6–3.1 s). In only one patient, change in time lag exceeded 10% of the gate width. External prediction error over all scans of all patients varied from 0.1 ± 0.1 to 1.6 ± 0.4 mm. Conclusions: Time lag between internal motion along SI and external signals is small compared to the treatment gate width of abdominal patients examined in this study. Change in time lag within a treatment session, inferred from pre- to post-treatment measurements is also small, suggesting that a single measurement of time lag at the session start is adequate. These findings require confirmation in a larger number of patients.

  1. WE-G-BRF-01: Adaptation to Intrafraction Tumor Deformation During Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: First Proof-Of-Principle Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Y; OBrien, R; Shieh, C; Booth, J; Keall, P [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intrafraction tumor deformation limits targeting accuracy in radiotherapy and cannot be adapted to by current motion management techniques. This study simulated intrafractional treatment adaptation to tumor deformations using a dynamic Multi-Leaf Collimator (DMLC) tracking system during Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for the first time. Methods: The DMLC tracking system was developed to adapt to the intrafraction tumor deformation by warping the planned beam aperture guided by the calculated deformation vector field (DVF) obtained from deformable image registration (DIR) at the time of treatment delivery. Seven single phantom deformation images up to 10.4 mm deformation and eight tumor system phantom deformation images up to 21.5 mm deformation were acquired and used in tracking simulation. The intrafraction adaptation was simulated at the DMLC tracking software platform, which was able to communicate with the image registration software, reshape the instantaneous IMRT field aperture and log the delivered MLC fields.The deformation adaptation accuracy was evaluated by a geometric target coverage metric defined as the sum of the area incorrectly outside and inside the reference aperture. The incremental deformations were arbitrarily determined to take place equally over the delivery interval. The geometric target coverage of delivery with deformation adaptation was compared against the delivery without adaptation. Results: Intrafraction deformation adaptation during dynamic IMRT plan delivery was simulated for single and system deformable phantoms. For the two particular delivery situations, over the treatment course, deformation adaptation improved the target coverage by 89% for single target deformation and 79% for tumor system deformation compared with no-tracking delivery. Conclusion: This work demonstrated the principle of real-time tumor deformation tracking using a DMLC. This is the first step towards the development of an

  2. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

    1996-07-01

    This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants

  3. Intra- and interfractional patient motion for a variety of immobilization devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelsman, Martijn; Rosenthal, Stanley J.; Michaud, Susan L.; Adams, Judith A.; Schneider, Robert J.; Bradley, Stephen G.; Flanz, Jacob B.; Kooy, Hanne M.

    2005-01-01

    The magnitude of inter- and intrafractional patient motion has been assessed for a broad set of immobilization devices. Data was analyzed for the three ordinal directions - left-right (x), sup-inf (y), and ant-post (z) - and the combined spatial displacement. We have defined 'rigid' and 'nonrigid' immobilization devices depending on whether they could be rigidly and reproducibly connected to the treatment couch or not. The mean spatial displacement for intrafractional motion for rigid devices is 1.3 mm compared to 1.9 mm for nonrigid devices. The modified Gill-Thomas-Cosman frame performed best at controlling intrafractional patient motion, with a 95% probability of observing a three-dimensional (3D) vector length of motion (v 95 ) of less than 1.8 mm, but could not be evaluated for interfractional motion. All other rigid and nonrigid immobilization devices had a v 95 of more than 3 mm for intrafractional patient motion. Interfractional patient motion was only evaluated for the rigid devices. The mean total interfractional displacement was at least 3.0 mm for these devices while v 95 was at least 6.0 mm

  4. Impact of inter- and intrafraction deviations and residual set-up errors on PTV margins. Different alignment techniques in 3D conformal prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langsenlehner, T.; Doeller, C.; Winkler, P.; Kapp, K.S. [Graz Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology; Galle, G. [Graz Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Urology

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this work was to analyze interfraction and intrafraction deviations and residual set-up errors (RSE) after online repositioning to determine PTV margins for 3 different alignment techniques in prostate cancer radiotherapy. The present prospective study included 44 prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducials treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy. Daily localization was based on skin marks followed by marker detection using kilovoltage (kV) imaging and subsequent patient repositioning. Additionally, in-treatment megavoltage (MV) images were obtained for each treatment field. In an off-line analysis of 7,273 images, interfraction prostate motion, RSE after marker-based prostate localization, prostate position during each treatment session, and the effect of treatment time on intrafraction deviations were analyzed to evaluate PTV margins. Margins accounting for interfraction deviation, RSE and intrafraction motion were 14.1, 12.9, and 15.1 mm in anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right (LR) direction for skin mark alignment and 9.6, 8.7, and 2.6 mm for bony structure alignment, respectively. Alignment to implanted markers required margins of 4.6, 2.8, and 2.5 mm. As margins to account for intrafraction motion increased with treatment prolongation PTV margins could be reduced to 3.9, 2.6, and 2.4 mm if treatment time was {<=} 4 min. With daily online correction and repositioning based on implanted fiducials, a significant reduction of PTV margins can be achieved. The use of an optimized workflow with faster treatment techniques such as volumetric modulated arc techniques (VMAT) could allow for a further decrease. (orig.)

  5. Impact of inter- and intrafraction deviations and residual set-up errors on PTV margins. Different alignment techniques in 3D conformal prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langsenlehner, T; Döller, C; Winkler, P; Gallé, G; Kapp, K S

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze interfraction and intrafraction deviations and residual set-up errors (RSE) after online repositioning to determine PTV margins for 3 different alignment techniques in prostate cancer radiotherapy. The present prospective study included 44 prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducials treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy. Daily localization was based on skin marks followed by marker detection using kilovoltage (kV) imaging and subsequent patient repositioning. Additionally, in-treatment megavoltage (MV) images were obtained for each treatment field. In an off-line analysis of 7,273 images, interfraction prostate motion, RSE after marker-based prostate localization, prostate position during each treatment session, and the effect of treatment time on intrafraction deviations were analyzed to evaluate PTV margins. Margins accounting for interfraction deviation, RSE and intrafraction motion were 14.1, 12.9, and 15.1 mm in anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right (LR) direction for skin mark alignment and 9.6, 8.7, and 2.6 mm for bony structure alignment, respectively. Alignment to implanted markers required margins of 4.6, 2.8, and 2.5 mm. As margins to account for intrafraction motion increased with treatment prolongation PTV margins could be reduced to 3.9, 2.6, and 2.4 mm if treatment time was ≤ 4 min. With daily online correction and repositioning based on implanted fiducials, a significant reduction of PTV margins can be achieved. The use of an optimized workflow with faster treatment techniques such as volumetric modulated arc techniques (VMAT) could allow for a further decrease.

  6. Impact of inter- and intrafraction deviations and residual set-up errors on PTV margins. Different alignment techniques in 3D conformal prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langsenlehner, T.; Doeller, C.; Winkler, P.; Kapp, K.S.; Galle, G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze interfraction and intrafraction deviations and residual set-up errors (RSE) after online repositioning to determine PTV margins for 3 different alignment techniques in prostate cancer radiotherapy. The present prospective study included 44 prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducials treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy. Daily localization was based on skin marks followed by marker detection using kilovoltage (kV) imaging and subsequent patient repositioning. Additionally, in-treatment megavoltage (MV) images were obtained for each treatment field. In an off-line analysis of 7,273 images, interfraction prostate motion, RSE after marker-based prostate localization, prostate position during each treatment session, and the effect of treatment time on intrafraction deviations were analyzed to evaluate PTV margins. Margins accounting for interfraction deviation, RSE and intrafraction motion were 14.1, 12.9, and 15.1 mm in anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right (LR) direction for skin mark alignment and 9.6, 8.7, and 2.6 mm for bony structure alignment, respectively. Alignment to implanted markers required margins of 4.6, 2.8, and 2.5 mm. As margins to account for intrafraction motion increased with treatment prolongation PTV margins could be reduced to 3.9, 2.6, and 2.4 mm if treatment time was ≤ 4 min. With daily online correction and repositioning based on implanted fiducials, a significant reduction of PTV margins can be achieved. The use of an optimized workflow with faster treatment techniques such as volumetric modulated arc techniques (VMAT) could allow for a further decrease. (orig.)

  7. Inter- and Intrafraction Uncertainty in Prostate Bed Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Kitty; Palma, David A.; Scott, Danielle; McGregor, Danielle; Gaede, Stewart; Yartsev, Slav; Bauman, Glenn; Louie, Alexander V.; Rodrigues, George

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goals of this study were to measure inter- and intrafraction setup error and prostate bed motion (PBM) in patients undergoing post-prostatectomy image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and to propose appropriate population-based three-dimensional clinical target volume to planning target volume (CTV–PTV) margins in both non-IGRT and IGRT scenarios. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, 14 patients underwent adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy to the prostate bed under image guidance using linac-based kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT). Inter- and intrafraction uncertainty/motion was assessed by offline analysis of three consecutive daily kV-CBCT images of each patient: (1) after initial setup to skin marks, (2) after correction for positional error/immediately before radiation treatment, and (3) immediately after treatment. Results: The magnitude of interfraction PBM was 2.1 mm, and intrafraction PBM was 0.4 mm. The maximum inter- and intrafraction prostate bed motion was primarily in the anterior–posterior direction. Margins of at least 3–5 mm with IGRT and 4–7 mm without IGRT (aligning to skin marks) will ensure 95% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume in 90% of patients. Conclusions: PBM is a predominant source of intrafraction error compared with setup error and has implications for appropriate PTV margins. Based on inter- and estimated intrafraction motion of the prostate bed using pre- and post-kV-CBCT images, CBCT IGRT to correct for day-to-day variances can potentially reduce CTV–PTV margins by 1–2 mm. CTV–PTV margins for prostate bed treatment in the IGRT and non-IGRT scenarios are proposed; however, in cases with more uncertainty of target delineation and image guidance accuracy, larger margins are recommended.

  8. Effect of rectal enema on intrafraction prostate movement during image-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngmin; Kwak, Dong-Won; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Hur, Won-Joo; Cho, Won-Yeol; Sung, Gyung Tak; Kim, Tae-Hyo; Kim, Soo-Dong; Yun, Seong-Guk

    2015-04-01

    Rectal volume and movement are major factors that influence prostate location. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a rectal enema on intrafraction prostate motion. The data from 12 patients with localised prostate cancer were analysed. Each patient underwent image-guided radiotherapy (RT), receiving a total dose of 70 Gy in 28 fractions. Rectal enemas were administered to all of the patients before each RT fraction. The location of the prostate was determined by implanting three fiducial markers under the guidance of transrectal ultrasound. Each patient underwent preparation for IGRT twice before an RT fraction and in the middle of the fraction. The intrafraction displacement of the prostate was calculated by comparing fiducial marker locations before and in the middle of an RT fraction. The rectal enemas were well tolerated by patients. The mean intrafraction prostate movement in 336 RT fractions was 1.11 ± 0.77 mm (range 0.08-7.20 mm). Intrafraction motions of 1, 2 and 3 mm were observed in 56.0%, 89.0% and 97.6% of all RT fractions, respectively. The intrafraction movements on supero-inferior and anteroposterior axes were larger than on the right-to-left axes (P movement, calculated using the van Herk formula (2.5Σ + 0.7σ), was 1.50 mm. A daily rectal enema before each RT fraction was tolerable and yielded little intrafraction prostate displacement. We think the use of rectal enemas is a feasible method to reduce prostate movement during RT. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  9. Effect of rectal enema on intrafraction prostate movement during image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Youngmin; Kwak, Dong-Won; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Hur, Won-Jooh; Cho, Won-Yeol; Sung, Gyung Tak; Kim, Tae-Hyo; Kim, Soo-Dong; Yun, Seong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    Rectal volume and movement are major factors that influence prostate location. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a rectal enema on intrafraction prostate motion. The data from 12 patients with localised prostate cancer were analysed. Each patient underwent image-guided radiotherapy (RT), receiving a total dose of 70 Gy in 28 fractions. Rectal enemas were administered to all of the patients before each RT fraction. The location of the prostate was determined by implanting three fiducial markers under the guidance of transrectal ultrasound. Each patient underwent preparation for IGRT twice before an RT fraction and in the middle of the fraction. The intrafraction displacement of the prostate was calculated by comparing fiducial marker locations before and in the middle of an RT fraction. The rectal enemas were well tolerated by patients. The mean intrafraction prostate movement in 336 RT fractions was 1.11 ± 0.77 mm (range 0.08–7.20 mm). Intrafraction motions of 1, 2 and 3 mm were observed in 56.0%, 89.0% and 97.6% of all RT fractions, respectively. The intrafraction movements on supero-inferior and anteroposterior axes were larger than on the right-to-left axes (P < 0.05). The CTV-to-PTV margin necessary to allow for movement, calculated using the van Herk formula (2.5Σ + 0.7σ), was 1.50 mm. A daily rectal enema before each RT fraction was tolerable and yielded little intrafraction prostate displacement. We think the use of rectal enemas is a feasible method to reduce prostate movement during RT.

  10. Intrafractional Tracking Accuracy of a Transperineal Ultrasound Image Guidance System for Prostate Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Amy S; Najafi, Mohammad; Hristov, Dimitre H; Phillips, Tiffany

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the tracking accuracy of a commercial ultrasound system under relevant treatment conditions and demonstrate its clinical utility for detecting significant treatment deviations arising from inadvertent intrafractional target motion. A multimodality male pelvic phantom was used to simulate prostate image-guided radiotherapy with the system under evaluation. Target motion was simulated by placing the phantom on a motion platform. The tracking accuracy of the ultrasound system was evaluated using an independent optical tracking system under the conditions of beam-on, beam-off, poor image quality with an acoustic shadow introduced, and different phantom motion cycles. The time delay between the ultrasound-detected and actual phantom motion was investigated. A clinical case example of prostate treatment is presented as a demonstration of the utility of the system in practice. Time delay between the motion phantom and ultrasound tracking system is 223 ± 45.2 milliseconds including video and optical tracking system frame rates. The tracking accuracy and precision were better with a longer period. The precision of ultrasound tracking performance in the axial (superior-inferior) direction was better than that in the lateral (left-right) direction (root mean square errors are 0.18 and 0.25 mm, respectively). The accuracy of ultrasound tracking performance in the lateral direction was better than that in the axial direction (the mean position errors are 0.23 and 0.45 mm, respectively). Interference by radiation and image quality do not affect tracking ability significantly. Further, utilizing the tracking system as part of a clinical study for prostate treatment further verified the accuracy and clinical appropriateness. It is feasible to use transperineal ultrasound daily to monitor prostate motion during treatment. Our results verify the accuracy and precision of an ultrasound system under typical external beam treatment conditions and

  11. Intra-fraction setup variability: IR optical localization vs. X-ray imaging in a hypofractionated patient population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piperno Gaia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to investigate intra-fraction setup variability in hypo-fractionated cranial and body radiotherapy; this is achieved by means of integrated infrared optical localization and stereoscopic kV X-ray imaging. Method and Materials We analyzed data coming from 87 patients treated with hypo-fractionated radiotherapy at cranial and extra-cranial sites. Patient setup was realized through the ExacTrac X-ray 6D system (BrainLAB, Germany, consisting of 2 infrared TV cameras for external fiducial localization and X-ray imaging in double projection for image registration. Before irradiation, patients were pre-aligned relying on optical marker localization. Patient position was refined through the automatic matching of X-ray images to digitally reconstructed radiographs, providing 6 corrective parameters that were automatically applied using a robotic couch. Infrared patient localization and X-ray imaging were performed at the end of treatment, thus providing independent measures of intra-fraction motion. Results According to optical measurements, the size of intra-fraction motion was (median ± quartile 0.3 ± 0.3 mm, 0.6 ± 0.6 mm, 0.7 ± 0.6 mm for cranial, abdominal and lung patients, respectively. X-ray image registration estimated larger intra-fraction motion, equal to 0.9 ± 0.8 mm, 1.3 ± 1.2 mm, 1.8 ± 2.2 mm, correspondingly. Conclusion Optical tracking highlighted negligible intra-fraction motion at both cranial and extra-cranial sites. The larger motion detected by X-ray image registration showed significant inter-patient variability, in contrast to infrared optical tracking measurement. Infrared localization is put forward as the optimal strategy to monitor intra-fraction motion, featuring robustness, flexibility and less invasivity with respect to X-ray based techniques.

  12. Systematic errors in respiratory gating due to intrafraction deformations of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebenthal, Martin von; Szekely, Gabor; Lomax, Antony J.; Cattin, Philippe C.

    2007-01-01

    This article shows the limitations of respiratory gating due to intrafraction deformations of the right liver lobe. The variability of organ shape and motion over tens of minutes was taken into account for this evaluation, which closes the gap between short-term analysis of a few regular cycles, as it is possible with 4DCT, and long-term analysis of interfraction motion. Time resolved MR volumes (4D MR sequences) were reconstructed for 12 volunteers and subsequent non-rigid registration provided estimates of the 3D trajectories of points within the liver over time. The full motion during free breathing and its distribution over the liver were quantified and respiratory gating was simulated to determine the gating accuracy for different gating signals, duty cycles, and different intervals between patient setup and treatment. Gating effectively compensated for the respiratory motion within short sequences (3 min), but deformations, mainly in the anterior inferior part (Couinaud segments IVb and V), led to systematic deviations from the setup position of more than 5 mm in 7 of 12 subjects after 20 min. We conclude that measurements over a few breathing cycles should not be used as a proof of accurate reproducibility of motion, not even within the same fraction, if it is longer than a few minutes. Although the diaphragm shows the largest magnitude of motion, it should not be used to assess the gating accuracy over the entire liver because the reproducibility is typically much more limited in inferior parts. Simple gating signals, such as the trajectory of skin motion, can detect the exhalation phase, but do not allow for an absolute localization of the complete liver over longer periods because the drift of these signals does not necessarily correlate with the internal drift

  13. Intrafraction Variability and Deformation Quantification in the Breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glide-Hurst, Carri K., E-mail: churst2@hfhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health Systems, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Shah, Mira M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health Systems, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Price, Ryan G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health Systems, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Liu, Chang; Kim, Jinkoo; Mahan, Meredith; Fraser, Correen; Chetty, Indrin J.; Aref, Ibrahim; Movsas, Benjamin; Walker, Eleanor M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health Systems, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intrafraction variability and deformation of the lumpectomy cavity (LC), breast, and nearby organs. Methods and Materials: Sixteen left-sided postlumpectomy and 1 bilateral breast cancer cases underwent free-breathing CT (FBCT) and 10-phase 4-dimensional CT (4DCT). Deformable image registration was used for deformation analysis and contour propagation of breast, heart, lungs, and LC between end-exhale and end-inhale 4DCT phases. Respiration-induced motion was calculated via centroid analysis. Two planning target volumes (PTVs) were compared: PTV{sub FBCT} from the FBCT volume with an isotropic 10 mm expansion (5 mm excursion and 5 mm setup error) and PTV{sub 4DCT} generated from the union of 4DCT contours with isotropic 5 mm margin for setup error. Volume and geometry were evaluated via percent difference and bounding box analysis, respectively. Deformation correlations between breast/cavity, breast/lung, and breast/heart were evaluated. Associations were tested between cavity deformation and proximity to chest wall and breast surface. Results: Population-based 3-dimensional vector excursions were 2.5 ± 1.0 mm (range, 0.8-3.8 mm) for the cavity and 2.0 ± 0.8 mm (range, 0.7-3.0 mm) for the ipsilateral breast. Cavity excursion was predominantly in the anterior and superior directions (1.0 ± 0.8 mm and −1.8 ± 1.2 mm, respectively). Similarly, for all cases, LCs and ipsilateral breasts yielded median deformation values in the superior direction. For 14 of 17 patients, the LCs and breast interquartile ranges tended toward the anterior direction. The PTV{sub FBCT} was 51.5% ± 10.8% larger (P<.01) than PTV{sub 4DCT}. Bounding box analysis revealed that PTV{sub FBCT} was 9.8 ± 1.2 (lateral), 9.0 ± 2.2 (anterior–posterior), and 3.9 ± 1.8 (superior–inferior) mm larger than PTV{sub 4DCT}. Significant associations between breast and cavity deformation were found for 6 of 9 axes. No dependency was found between cavity

  14. Effect of Body Mass Index on Intrafraction Prostate Displacement Monitored by Real-Time Electromagnetic Tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Wayne M.; Morris, Mallory N.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Kurko, Brian S.; Murray, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, using real-time monitoring of implanted radiofrequency transponders, the intrafraction prostate displacement of patients as a function of body mass index (BMI). Methods and Materials: The motions of Beacon radiofrequency transponders (Calypso Medical Technologies, Seattle, WA) implanted in the prostate glands of 66 men were monitored throughout the course of intensity modulated radiation therapy. Data were acquired at 10 Hz from setup to the end of treatment, but only the 1.7 million data points with a “beam on” tag were used in the analysis. There were 21 obese patients, with BMI ≥30 and 45 nonobese patients in the study. Results: Mean displacements were least in the left-right lateral direction (0.56 ± 0.24 mm) and approximately twice that magnitude in the superior-inferior and anterior-posterior directions. The net vector displacement was larger still, 1.95 ± 0.47 mm. Stratified by BMI cohort, the mean displacements per patient in the 3 Cartesian axes as well as the net vector for patients with BMI ≥30 were slightly less (<0.2 mm) but not significantly different than the corresponding values for patients with lower BMIs. As a surrogate for the magnitude of oscillatory noise, the standard deviation for displacements in all measured planes showed no significant differences in the prostate positional variability between the lower and higher BMI groups. Histograms of prostate displacements showed a lower frequency of large displacements in obese patients, and there were no significant differences in short-term and long-term velocity distributions. Conclusions: After patients were positioned accurately using implanted radiofrequency transponders, the intrafractional displacements in the lateral, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions as well as the net vector displacements were smaller, but not significantly so, for obese men than for those with lower BMI.

  15. Electromagnetic Tracking of Intrafraction Prostate Displacement in Patients Externally Immobilized in the Prone Position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, Nathan; Butler, Wayne M.; Reed, Joshua L.; Murray, Brian C.; Kurko, Brian S.; Wallner, Kent E.; Merrick, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intrafraction prostate displacement among patients immobilized in the prone position using real-time monitoring of implanted radiofrequency transponders. Methods and Materials: The Calypso localization system was used to track prostate motion in patients receiving external beam radiation therapy (XRT) for prostate cancer. All patients were treated in the prone position and immobilized with a thermoplastic immobilization device. Real-time measurement of prostate displacement was recorded for each treatment fraction. These measurements were used to determine the duration and magnitude of displacement along the three directional axes. Results: The calculated centroid of the implanted transponders was offset from the treatment isocenter by ≥2 mm, ≥3 mm, and ≥4 mm for 38.0%, 13.9%, and 4.5% of the time. In the lateral dimension, the centroid was offset from the treatment isocenter by ≥2 mm, ≥3 mm, and ≥4 mm for 2.7%, 0.4%, and 0.06% of the time. In the superior-inferior dimension, the centroid was offset from the treatment isocenter by ≥2 mm, ≥3 mm, and ≥4 mm for 16.1%, 4.7%, and 1.5% of the time, respectively. In the anterior-posterior dimension, the centroid was offset from the treatment isocenter by ≥2 mm, ≥3 mm, and ≥4 mm for 13.4%, 3.0%, and 0.5% of the time. Conclusions: Intrafraction prostate displacement in the prone position is comparable to that in the supine position. For patients with large girth, in whom the supine position may preclude accurate detection of implanted radiofrequency transponders, treatment in the prone position is a suitable alternative.

  16. Motion Evaluation for Rehabilitation Training of the Disabled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Young; Park, Jun; Lim, Cheol-Su

    In this paper, a motion evaluation technique for rehabilitation training is introduced. Motion recognition technologies have been developed for determining matching motions in the training set. However, we need to measure how well and how much of the motion has been followed for training motion evaluation. We employed a Finite State Machine as a framework of motion evaluation. For similarity analysis, we used weighted angular value differences although any template matching algorithm may be used. For robustness under illumination changes, IR LED's and cameras with IR-pass filter were used. Developed technique was successfully used for rehabilitation training of the disabled. Therapists appraised the system as practically useful.

  17. Real-Time 3D Image Guidance Using a Standard LINAC: Measured Motion, Accuracy, and Precision of the First Prospective Clinical Trial of Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring-Guided Gating for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keall, Paul J; Ng, Jin Aun; Juneja, Prabhjot

    2016-01-01

    for prostate cancer radiation therapy. In this paper we report on the measured motion accuracy and precision using real-time KIM-guided gating. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Imaging and motion information from the first 200 fractions from 6 patient prostate cancer radiation therapy volumetric modulated arc therapy...

  18. Motion Reliability Modeling and Evaluation for Manipulator Path Planning Task

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tong; Jia, Qingxuan; Chen, Gang; Sun, Hanxu

    2015-01-01

    Motion reliability as a criterion can reflect the accuracy of manipulator in completing operations. Since path planning task takes a significant role in operations of manipulator, the motion reliability evaluation of path planning task is discussed in the paper. First, a modeling method for motion reliability is proposed by taking factors related to position accuracy of manipulator into account. In the model, multidimensional integral for PDF is carried out to calculate motion reliability. Co...

  19. MSPT: Motion Simulator for Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In proton therapy, the delivery method named spot scanning, can provide a particularly efficient treatment in terms of tumor coverage and healthy tissues protection. The dosimetric benefits of proton therapy may be greatly degraded due to intra-fraction motions. Hence, the study of mitigation or adaptive methods is necessary. For this purpose, we developed an open-source 4D dose computation and evaluation software, MSPT (Motion Simulator for Proton Therapy), for the spot-scanning delivery technique. It aims at highlighting the impact of intra-fraction motions during a treatment delivery by computing the dose distribution in the moving patient. In addition, the use of MSPT allowed us to develop and propose a new motion mitigation strategy based on the adjustment of the beam's weight when the proton beam is scanning across the tumor. In photon therapy, a main concern for deliveries using a multi-leaf collimator (MLC) relies on finding a series of MLC configurations to deliver properly the treatment. The efficiency of such series is measured by the total beam-on time and the total setup time. In our work, we study the minimization of these efficiency criteria from an algorithmic point of view, for new variants of MLCs: the rotating MLC and the dual-layer MLC. In addition, we propose an approximation algorithm to find a series of configurations that minimizes the total beam-on time for the rotating MLC. (author) [fr

  20. SU-F-J-30: Application of Intra-Fractional Imaging for Pretreatment CBCT of Breath-Hold Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, D; Jermoumi, M; Mehta, V; Shepard, D [Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Clinical implementation of gated lung SBRT requires tools to verify the accuracy of the target positioning on a daily basis. This is a particular challenge on Elekta linacs where the XVI imaging system does not interface directly to any commercial gating solution. In this study, we used the Elekta’s intra-fractional imaging functionality to perform the pretreatment CBCT verifications and evaluated both the image quality and gating accuracy. Methods: To use intrafraction imaging tools for pretreatment verifications, we planned a 360-degree arc with 1mmx5mm MLC opening. This beam was designed to drive the gantry during the gated CBCT data collection. A Catphan phantom was used to evaluate the image quality for the intra-fractional CBCT. A CIRS lung phantom with a 3cm sphereinsert and a moving chest plate were programmed with a simulated breathhold breathing pattern was used to check the gating accuracy. A C-Rad CatalystHD surface mapping system was used to provide the gating signal. Results: The total delivery time of the arc was 90 seconds. The uniformity and low contrast resolution for the intra-fractional CBCT was 1.5% and 3.6%, respectively. The values for the regular CBCT were 1.7% and 2.5%, respectively. The spatial resolution was 7 line-pairs/cm and the 3D spatial integrity was less than 1mm for the intra-fractional CBCT. The gated CBCT clearly demonstrated the accuracy of the gating image acquisition. Conclusion: The intra-fraction CBCT capabilities on an Elekta linac can be used to acquire pre-treatment gated images to verify the accuracy patient positioning. This imaging capability should provide for accurate patient alignments for the delivery of lung SBRT. This research was partially supported by Elekta.

  1. Three-dimensional MRI-linac intra-fraction guidance using multiple orthogonal cine-MRI planes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Troels; Crijns, Sjoerd; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of integrated MRI-radiation therapy systems will offer live intra-fraction imaging. We propose a feasible low-latency multi-plane MRI-linac guidance strategy. In this work we demonstrate how interleaved acquired, orthogonal cine-MRI planes can be used for low-latency tracking...... of the 3D trajectory of a soft-tissue target structure. The proposed strategy relies on acquiring a pre-treatment 3D breath-hold scan, extracting a 3D target template and performing template matching between this 3D template and pairs of orthogonal 2D cine-MRI planes intersecting the target motion path....... For a 60 s free-breathing series of orthogonal cine-MRI planes, we demonstrate that the method was capable of accurately tracking the respiration related 3D motion of the left kidney. Quantitative evaluation of the method using a dataset designed for this purpose revealed a translational error of 1.15 mm...

  2. Earthquake Ground Motion Measures for Seismic Response Evaluation of Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, In-Kil; Ahn, Seong-Moon; Choun, Young-Sun; Seo, Jeong-Moon

    2007-03-15

    This study used the assessment results of failure criteria - base shear, story drift, top acceleration and top displacement - for a PSC containment building subjected to 30 sets of near-fault ground motions to evaluate the earthquake ground motion intensity measures. Seven intensity measures, peak ground acceleration(PGA), peak ground velocity(PGV), spectral acceleration(Sa), velocity(Sv), spectrum intensity for acceleration(SIa), velocity(SIv) and displacement(SId), were used to represent alternative ground motion. The regression analyses of the failure criteria for a PSC containment building were carried out to evaluate a proper intensity measure by using two regression models and seven ground motion parameters. The regression analysis results demonstrate the correlation coefficients of the failure criteria in terms of the candidate IM. From the results, spectral acceleration(Sa) is estimated as the best parameter for a evaluation of the structural safety for a seismic PSA.

  3. Motion Reliability Modeling and Evaluation for Manipulator Path Planning Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Motion reliability as a criterion can reflect the accuracy of manipulator in completing operations. Since path planning task takes a significant role in operations of manipulator, the motion reliability evaluation of path planning task is discussed in the paper. First, a modeling method for motion reliability is proposed by taking factors related to position accuracy of manipulator into account. In the model, multidimensional integral for PDF is carried out to calculate motion reliability. Considering the complex of multidimensional integral, the approach of equivalent extreme value is introduced, with which multidimensional integral is converted into one dimensional integral for convenient calculation. Then a method based on the maximum entropy principle is proposed for model calculation. With the method, the PDF can be obtained efficiently at the state of maximum entropy. As a result, the evaluation of motion reliability can be achieved by one dimensional integral for PDF. Simulations on a particular path planning task are carried out, with which the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods are verified. In addition, the modeling method which takes the factors related to position accuracy into account can represent the contributions of these factors to motion reliability. And the model calculation method can achieve motion reliability evaluation with high precision and efficiency.

  4. The random walk model of intrafraction movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballhausen, H; Reiner, M; Kantz, S; Belka, C; Söhn, M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to understand intrafraction movement as a stochastic process driven by random external forces. The hypothetically proposed three-dimensional random walk model has significant impact on optimal PTV margins and offers a quantitatively correct explanation of experimental findings. Properties of the random walk are calculated from first principles, in particular fraction-average population density distributions for displacements along the principal axes. When substituted into the established optimal margin recipes these fraction-average distributions yield safety margins about 30% smaller as compared to the suggested values from end-of-fraction Gaussian fits. Stylized facts of a random walk are identified in clinical data, such as the increase of the standard deviation of displacements with the square root of time. Least squares errors in the comparison to experimental results are reduced by about 50% when accounting for non-Gaussian corrections from the random walk model. (paper)

  5. The random walk model of intrafraction movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballhausen, H; Reiner, M; Kantz, S; Belka, C; Söhn, M

    2013-04-07

    The purpose of this paper is to understand intrafraction movement as a stochastic process driven by random external forces. The hypothetically proposed three-dimensional random walk model has significant impact on optimal PTV margins and offers a quantitatively correct explanation of experimental findings. Properties of the random walk are calculated from first principles, in particular fraction-average population density distributions for displacements along the principal axes. When substituted into the established optimal margin recipes these fraction-average distributions yield safety margins about 30% smaller as compared to the suggested values from end-of-fraction gaussian fits. Stylized facts of a random walk are identified in clinical data, such as the increase of the standard deviation of displacements with the square root of time. Least squares errors in the comparison to experimental results are reduced by about 50% when accounting for non-gaussian corrections from the random walk model.

  6. WE-DE-BRA-01: SCIENCE COUNCIL JUNIOR INVESTIGATOR COMPETITION WINNER: Acceleration of a Limited-Angle Intrafraction Verification (LIVE) System Using Adaptive Prior Knowledge Based Image Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Yin, F; Ren, L [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Zhang, Y [UT Southwestern Medical Ctr at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an adaptive prior knowledge based image estimation method to reduce the scan angle needed in the LIVE system to reconstruct 4D-CBCT for intrafraction verification. Methods: The LIVE system has been previously proposed to reconstructs 4D volumetric images on-the-fly during arc treatment for intrafraction target verification and dose calculation. This system uses limited-angle beam’s eye view (BEV) MV cine images acquired from the treatment beam together with the orthogonally acquired limited-angle kV projections to reconstruct 4D-CBCT images for target verification during treatment. In this study, we developed an adaptive constrained free-form deformation reconstruction technique in LIVE to further reduce the scanning angle needed to reconstruct the CBCT images. This technique uses free form deformation with energy minimization to deform prior images to estimate 4D-CBCT based on projections acquired in limited angle (orthogonal 6°) during the treatment. Note that the prior images are adaptively updated using the latest CBCT images reconstructed by LIVE during treatment to utilize the continuity of patient motion.The 4D digital extended-cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom was used to evaluate the efficacy of this technique with LIVE system. A lung patient was simulated with different scenario, including baseline drifts, amplitude change and phase shift. Limited-angle orthogonal kV and beam’s eye view (BEV) MV projections were generated for each scenario. The CBCT reconstructed by these projections were compared with the ground-truth generated in XCAT.Volume-percentage-difference (VPD) and center-of-mass-shift (COMS) were calculated between the reconstructed and the ground-truth tumors to evaluate the reconstruction accuracy. Results: Using orthogonal-view of 6° kV and BEV- MV projections, the VPD/COMS values were 12.7±4.0%/0.7±0.5 mm, 13.0±5.1%/0.8±0.5 mm, and 11.4±5.4%/0.5±0.3 mm for the three scenarios, respectively. Conclusion: The

  7. WE-DE-BRA-01: SCIENCE COUNCIL JUNIOR INVESTIGATOR COMPETITION WINNER: Acceleration of a Limited-Angle Intrafraction Verification (LIVE) System Using Adaptive Prior Knowledge Based Image Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y; Yin, F; Ren, L; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an adaptive prior knowledge based image estimation method to reduce the scan angle needed in the LIVE system to reconstruct 4D-CBCT for intrafraction verification. Methods: The LIVE system has been previously proposed to reconstructs 4D volumetric images on-the-fly during arc treatment for intrafraction target verification and dose calculation. This system uses limited-angle beam’s eye view (BEV) MV cine images acquired from the treatment beam together with the orthogonally acquired limited-angle kV projections to reconstruct 4D-CBCT images for target verification during treatment. In this study, we developed an adaptive constrained free-form deformation reconstruction technique in LIVE to further reduce the scanning angle needed to reconstruct the CBCT images. This technique uses free form deformation with energy minimization to deform prior images to estimate 4D-CBCT based on projections acquired in limited angle (orthogonal 6°) during the treatment. Note that the prior images are adaptively updated using the latest CBCT images reconstructed by LIVE during treatment to utilize the continuity of patient motion.The 4D digital extended-cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom was used to evaluate the efficacy of this technique with LIVE system. A lung patient was simulated with different scenario, including baseline drifts, amplitude change and phase shift. Limited-angle orthogonal kV and beam’s eye view (BEV) MV projections were generated for each scenario. The CBCT reconstructed by these projections were compared with the ground-truth generated in XCAT.Volume-percentage-difference (VPD) and center-of-mass-shift (COMS) were calculated between the reconstructed and the ground-truth tumors to evaluate the reconstruction accuracy. Results: Using orthogonal-view of 6° kV and BEV- MV projections, the VPD/COMS values were 12.7±4.0%/0.7±0.5 mm, 13.0±5.1%/0.8±0.5 mm, and 11.4±5.4%/0.5±0.3 mm for the three scenarios, respectively. Conclusion: The

  8. Interfraction and intrafraction performance of the Gamma Knife Extend system for patient positioning and immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, David; Xu, Zhiyuan; Taylor, Frances; Yen, Chun-Po; Sheehan, Jason

    2012-12-01

    The Extend system for the Gamma Knife Perfexion makes possible multifractional Gamma Knife treatments. The Extend system consists of a vacuum-monitored immobilization frame and a positioning measurement system used to determine the location of the patient's head within the frame at the time of simulation imaging and before each treatment fraction. The measurement system consists of a repositioning check tool (RCT), which attaches to the Extend frame, and associated digital measuring gauges. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of the Extend system for patient repositioning before each treatment session (fraction) and patient immobilization between (interfraction) and during (intrafraction) each session in the first 10 patients (36 fractional treatments) treated at the University of Virginia. The RCT was used to acquire a set of reference measurements for each patient position at the time of CT simulation. Repositioning measurements were acquired before each fraction, and the patient position was adjusted until the residual radial difference from the reference position measurements was less than 1 mm. After treatment, patient position measurements were acquired, and the difference between those measurements and the ones obtained for patient position before the fraction was calculated as a measure of immobilization capability. Analysis of patient setup and immobilization performance included calculation of the group mean, standard deviation (SD), and distribution of systematic (components affecting all fractions) and random (per fraction) uncertainty components. Across all patients and fractions, the mean radial setup difference from the reference measurements was 0.64 mm, with an SD of 0.24 mm. The distribution of systematic uncertainty (Σ) was 0.17 mm, and the distribution of random uncertainty (σ) was 0.16 mm. The root mean square (RMS) differences for each plate of the RCT were as follows: right = 0.35 mm; left = 0.41 mm; superior = 0.28 mm

  9. Inter- and Intrafraction Patient Positioning Uncertainties for Intracranial Radiotherapy: A Study of Four Frameless, Thermoplastic Mask-Based Immobilization Strategies Using Daily Cone-Beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tryggestad, Erik; Christian, Matthew; Ford, Eric; Kut, Carmen; Le Yi; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Song, Danny Y.; Kleinberg, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether frameless thermoplastic mask-based immobilization is adequate for image-guided cranial radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Cone-beam CT localization data from patients with intracranial tumors were studied using daily pre- and posttreatment scans. The systems studied were (1) Type-S IMRT (head only) mask (Civco) with head cushion; (2) Uni-Frame mask (Civco) with head cushion, coupled with a BlueBag body immobilizer (Medical Intelligence); (3) Type-S head and shoulder mask with head and shoulder cushion (Civco); (4) same as previous, coupled with a mouthpiece. The comparative metrics were translational shift magnitude and average rotation angle; systematic inter-, random inter-, and random intrafraction positioning error was computed. For strategies 1-4, respectively, the analysis for interfraction variability included data from 20, 9, 81, and 11 patients, whereas that for intrafraction variability included a subset of 7, 9, 16, and 8 patients. The results were compared for statistical significance using an analysis of variance test. Results: Immobilization system 4 provided the best overall accuracy and stability. The mean interfraction translational shifts (± SD) were 2.3 (± 1.4), 2.2 (± 1.1), 2.7 (± 1.5), and 2.1 (± 1.0) mm whereas intrafraction motion was 1.1 (± 1.2), 1.1 (± 1.1), 0.7 (± 0.9), and 0.7 (± 0.8) mm for devices 1-4, respectively. No significant correlation between intrafraction motion and treatment time was evident, although intrafraction motion was not purely random. Conclusions: We find that all frameless thermoplastic mask systems studied are viable solutions for image-guided intracranial radiosurgery. With daily pretreatment corrections, symmetric PTV margins of 1 mm would likely be adequate if ideal radiation planning and targeting systems were available.

  10. Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Take the mystery out of motion. Our resource gives you everything you need to teach young scientists about motion. Students will learn about linear, accelerating, rotating and oscillating motion, and how these relate to everyday life - and even the solar system. Measuring and graphing motion is easy, and the concepts of speed, velocity and acceleration are clearly explained. Reading passages, comprehension questions, color mini posters and lots of hands-on activities all help teach and reinforce key concepts. Vocabulary and language are simplified in our resource to make them accessible to str

  11. Feasibility study of patient motion monitoring using tactile array sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Kang, Seong Hee; Kim, Dong Su; Cho, Min Seok; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Si Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate patient pretreatment set-up error and intra-fraction motion using the tactile array sensors (Pressure Profile Systems Inc, Los Angeles, CA) which could measure distributed pressure profiles along the contacting surface and to check a feasibility of the sensor (tactile array sensor) in the patient motion monitoring. Laser alignment and optical camera based monitoring system are very useful for reduce patient set-up error but these systems could not monitor the blind area like patient's back position. Actually after patient alignment using laser or optical monitoring system, it was assumed that there is no error in the patient's back position (pressure profile distribution). But if an error occurs in the patient's back position, it will affect the radiation therapy accuracy. In spite of optical motion monitoring or using the immobilization tool, distributed pressure profiles of patient's back position was changed during inter and intra-fraction. For more accurate patient set-up, blind area (patient's back) monitoring was necessary. We expect that the proposed method will be very useful for make up for the weakness of optical monitoring method.

  12. SU-E-J-61: Monitoring Tumor Motion in Real-Time with EPID Imaging During Cervical Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, W; Hrycushko, B; Yan, Y; Foster, R; Albuquerque, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Traditional external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer requires setup by external skin marks. In order to improve treatment accuracy and reduce planning margin for more conformal therapy, it is essential to monitor tumor positions interfractionally and intrafractionally. We demonstrate feasibility of monitoring cervical tumor motion online using EPID imaging from Beam’s Eye View. Methods: Prior to treatment, 1∼2 cylindrical radio opaque markers were implanted into inferior aspect of cervix tumor. During external beam treatments on a Varian 2100C by 4-field 3D plans, treatment beam images were acquired continuously by an EPID. A Matlab program was developed to locate internal markers on MV images. Based on 2D marker positions obtained from different treatment fields, their 3D positions were estimated for every treatment fraction. Results: There were 398 images acquired during different treatment fractions of three cervical cancer patients. Markers were successfully located on every frame of image at an analysis speed of about 1 second per frame. Intrafraction motions were evaluated by comparing marker positions relative to the position on the first frame of image. The maximum intrafraction motion of the markers was 1.6 mm. Interfraction motions were evaluated by comparing 3D marker positions at different treatment fractions. The maximum interfraction motion was up to 10 mm. Careful comparison found that this is due to patient positioning since the bony structures shifted with the markers. Conclusion: This method provides a cost-free and simple solution for online tumor tracking for cervical cancer treatment since it is feasible to acquire and export EPID images with fast analysis in real time. This method does not need any extra equipment or deliver extra dose to patients. The online tumor motion information will be very useful to reduce planning margins and improve treatment accuracy, which is particularly important for SBRT treatment with long

  13. SU-E-J-61: Monitoring Tumor Motion in Real-Time with EPID Imaging During Cervical Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, W; Hrycushko, B; Yan, Y; Foster, R; Albuquerque, K [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Traditional external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer requires setup by external skin marks. In order to improve treatment accuracy and reduce planning margin for more conformal therapy, it is essential to monitor tumor positions interfractionally and intrafractionally. We demonstrate feasibility of monitoring cervical tumor motion online using EPID imaging from Beam’s Eye View. Methods: Prior to treatment, 1∼2 cylindrical radio opaque markers were implanted into inferior aspect of cervix tumor. During external beam treatments on a Varian 2100C by 4-field 3D plans, treatment beam images were acquired continuously by an EPID. A Matlab program was developed to locate internal markers on MV images. Based on 2D marker positions obtained from different treatment fields, their 3D positions were estimated for every treatment fraction. Results: There were 398 images acquired during different treatment fractions of three cervical cancer patients. Markers were successfully located on every frame of image at an analysis speed of about 1 second per frame. Intrafraction motions were evaluated by comparing marker positions relative to the position on the first frame of image. The maximum intrafraction motion of the markers was 1.6 mm. Interfraction motions were evaluated by comparing 3D marker positions at different treatment fractions. The maximum interfraction motion was up to 10 mm. Careful comparison found that this is due to patient positioning since the bony structures shifted with the markers. Conclusion: This method provides a cost-free and simple solution for online tumor tracking for cervical cancer treatment since it is feasible to acquire and export EPID images with fast analysis in real time. This method does not need any extra equipment or deliver extra dose to patients. The online tumor motion information will be very useful to reduce planning margins and improve treatment accuracy, which is particularly important for SBRT treatment with long

  14. Evaluation Method of Collision Risk by Using True Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayama Imazu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to develop a useful application to use big data like as AIS for safety and efficiency of ship operation. AIS is very useful system to collect targets information, but this information is not effective use yet. The evaluation method of collision risk is one of the cause disturb. Usually the collision risk of ship is evaluated by the value of the Closest Point of Approach (CPA which is related to a relative motion. So, it becomes difficult to find out a safety pass in a congested water. Here, Line of Predicted Collision (LOPC and Obstacle Zone by Target (OZT for evaluation of collision risk are introduced, these values are related to a true motion and it became visible of dangerous place, so it will make easy to find out a safety pass in a congested water.

  15. Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Motion is all around us. Learn how it is used in art, technology, and engineering. Five easy-to-read chapters explain the science behind motion, as well as its real-world applications. Vibrant, full-color photos, bolded glossary words, and a key stats section let readers zoom in even deeper. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Zoom is a division of ABDO.

  16. Evaluation of LMFBR fuel-motion diagnostics instrumentation with PARKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.E. Jr.; Orndoff, J.D.; Talbert, W.L. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    To aid in the design of LMFBR safety test experiments and safety test facilities (STF), a program of evaluation of concepts for fuel-motion diagnostics instrumentation has been undertaken. A part of this evaluation is beng done at PARKA, a Rover project critical assembly which has been modified to study the self nuclear image from driven FTR-type fuel assemblies. Feasibility of obtaining fast-neutron images of single-pin voids in assemblies of up to 127 fuel pins has been demonstrated, albeit marginally for the larger fuel bundles. The feasibility of using in-core detectors as fuel-motion monitors has also been studied. Use of PARKA in a pulsed mode to study STF transient phenomena is discussed

  17. Ground Motion Saturation Evaluation (GMSE) Data Needs Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NA

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the data needs workshop is to identify potential near-term (12-18 month) studies that would reduce uncertainty in extremely low probability ( -5 /yr) earthquake ground motions at Yucca Mountain. Recommendations made at the workshop will be considered by BSC and DOE management in formulating plans for FY05 seismic-related investigations. Based on studies done earlier this year, a bound on peak ground velocities (PGVs), consisting of a uniform distribution from 150 cm/s to 500 cm/s, has been applied to the existing PGV hazard curve for the underground repository horizon, for use in the forthcoming License Application. The technical basis for this bounding distribution is being documented, along with the basis for a slightly less conservative bound in the form of a roughly triangular distribution from 153 cm/s to 451 cm/s. The objective of the GMSE studies is to provide a technical basis for reducing remaining excessive conservatism, if any, in the extremely low probability ground motions that are used in postclosure performance assessments. Potential studies that have already been suggested include: (1) Additional tests of failure-strains of repository rocks, at, above, and below the repository horizon; (2) Identification and evaluation of nuclear explosion data that may help establish strain limits in tuff; (3) Numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation through repository rock column to test hypothesis that nonwelded tuffs below the repository horizon would fail in tension and prevent extreme strains from being transmitted to the repository; (4) Evaluation of seismic failure threshold of bladed, fragile-appearing lithophysal crystals; (5) Evaluation of whether a ground motion parameter other than PGV would correlate better with calculated drip-shield and waste-package damage states; (6) Qualification and use of finite seismic-source model to evaluate probabilities of extreme ground motions from extreme scenario earthquakes (e.g., magnitude 6

  18. Cone-Beam CT Assessment of Interfraction and Intrafraction Setup Error of Two Head-and-Neck Cancer Thermoplastic Masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velec, Michael; Waldron, John N.; O'Sullivan, Brian; Bayley, Andrew; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John J.; Ringash, Jolie; Breen, Stephen L.; Lockwood, Gina A.; Dawson, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare setup error in standard thermoplastic masks and skin-sparing masks (SSMs) modified with low neck cutouts for head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty head-and-neck IMRT patients were randomized to be treated in a standard mask (SM) or SSM. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans, acquired daily after both initial setup and any repositioning, were used for initial and residual interfraction evaluation, respectively. Weekly, post-IMRT CBCT scans were acquired for intrafraction setup evaluation. The population random (σ) and systematic (Σ) errors were compared for SMs and SSMs. Skin toxicity was recorded weekly by use of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: We evaluated 762 CBCT scans in 11 patients randomized to the SM and 9 to the SSM. Initial interfraction σ was 1.6 mm or less or 1.1 deg. or less for SM and 2.0 mm or less and 0.8 deg. for SSM. Initial interfraction Σ was 1.0 mm or less or 1.4 deg. or less for SM and 1.1 mm or less or 0.9 deg. or less for SSM. These errors were reduced before IMRT with CBCT image guidance with no significant differences in residual interfraction or intrafraction uncertainties between SMs and SSMs. Intrafraction σ and Σ were less than 1 mm and less than 1 deg. for both masks. Less severe skin reactions were observed in the cutout regions of the SSM compared with non-cutout regions. Conclusions: Interfraction and intrafraction setup error is not significantly different for SSMs and conventional masks in head-and-neck radiation therapy. Mask cutouts should be considered for these patients in an effort to reduce skin toxicity.

  19. A new methodology for inter- and intrafraction plan adaptation for the MR-linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontaxis, C; Bol, G H; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2015-01-01

    The new era of hybrid MRI and linear accelerator machines, including the MR-linac currently being installed in the University Medical Center Utrecht (Utrecht, The Netherlands), will be able to provide the actual anatomy and real-time anatomy changes of the patient’s target(s) and organ(s) at risk (OARs) during radiation delivery. In order to be able to take advantage of this input, a new generation of treatment planning systems is needed, that will allow plan adaptation to the latest anatomy state in an online regime. In this paper, we present a treatment planning algorithm for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), which is able to compensate for patient anatomy changes. The system consists of an iterative sequencing loop open to anatomy updates and an inter- and intrafraction adaptation scheme that enables convergence to the ideal dose distribution without the need of a final segment weight optimization (SWO). The ability of the system to take into account organ motion and adapt the plan to the latest anatomy state is illustrated using artificial baseline shifts created for three different kidney cases. Firstly, for two kidney cases of different target volumes, we show that the system can account for intrafraction motion, delivering the intended dose to the target with minimal dose deposition to the surroundings compared to conventional plans. Secondly, for a third kidney case we show that our algorithm combined with the interfraction scheme can be used to deliver the prescribed dose while adapting to the changing anatomy during multi-fraction treatments without performing a final SWO. (paper)

  20. Inter- and intrafractional movement of the tumour in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy of NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik R; Hansen, Olfred; Hjelm-Hansen, Mogens

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to determine the inter- and intra-fractional respiration induced tumour movements as well as setup accuracy in a stereotactic body frame for stereotactic treatments of NSCLC patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From August 2005 to March 2008, 26 patients with NSCLC....... These coordinate constitute the data of this study. RESULTS: The standard deviations of the respiration induced intra-fractional movements were: LR: 0.9 mm, AP: 1.6 mm and CC: 2.0 mm (1 SD). The inter-fractional movements were: LR: 1.1 mm, AP: 1.3 mm and CC: 1.7 mm (1 SD). Finally the set up accuracies in the body...... frame were LR: 1.5 mm, AP: 1.1 mm and CC: 1.7 mm (1 SD). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Consecutive CT scans can be used to evaluate the respiration induced tumour movement. For patients immobilized in a stereotactic body frame, large movements of the tumour are rarely seen within the lung...

  1. Accuracy evaluation of structure from motion surface 3D reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyaz, Vladimir; Zheltov, Sergey

    2017-06-01

    Structure from motion approach became a powerful mean for scene 3D reconstruction using only a sequence of images from moving camera as initial data. Such a technique has a significant potential for unmanned aerial or unmanned ground vehicles for navigation in unknown environments. Different techniques are used for estimation the 3D structure of a scene such as optical flow approach, feature detection and matching in the set of images, features tracking through a sequence of images. Robustness and accuracy of scene 3D coordinates measurements are the important characteristics of structure from motion algorithms which has to provide the reliability of the navigation. The technique for scene 3D reconstruction using unmanned aerial vehicle imagery is developed based on preliminary features detection and matching in a set of stereo pairs with appropriate basis which allows reaching reasonable accuracy of 3D measurements. The results of accuracy evaluation for two variants of surface 3D reconstruction from image sequence are presented and discussed: for the case of un-calibrated images and for images with known interior orientation. The ways for improving the accuracy of the developed 3D reconstruction technique are discussed.

  2. Reducing scan angle using adaptive prior knowledge for a limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system for conformal arc radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yawei; Yin, Fang-Fang; Zhang, You; Ren, Lei

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an adaptive prior knowledge guided image estimation technique to reduce the scan angle needed in the limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system for 4D-CBCT reconstruction. The LIVE system has been previously developed to reconstruct 4D volumetric images on-the-fly during arc treatment for intrafraction target verification and dose calculation. In this study, we developed an adaptive constrained free-form deformation reconstruction technique in LIVE to further reduce the scanning angle needed to reconstruct the 4D-CBCT images for faster intrafraction verification. This technique uses free form deformation with energy minimization to deform prior images to estimate 4D-CBCT based on kV-MV projections acquired in extremely limited angle (orthogonal 3°) during the treatment. Note that the prior images are adaptively updated using the latest CBCT images reconstructed by LIVE during treatment to utilize the continuity of the respiratory motion. The 4D digital extended-cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom and a CIRS 008A dynamic thoracic phantom were used to evaluate the effectiveness of this technique. The reconstruction accuracy of the technique was evaluated by calculating both the center-of-mass-shift (COMS) and 3D volume-percentage-difference (VPD) of the tumor in reconstructed images and the true on-board images. The performance of the technique was also assessed with varied breathing signals against scanning angle, lesion size, lesion location, projection sampling interval, and scanning direction. In the XCAT study, using orthogonal-view of 3° kV and portal MV projections, this technique achieved an average tumor COMS/VPD of 0.4  ±  0.1 mm/5.5  ±  2.2%, 0.6  ±  0.3 mm/7.2  ±  2.8%, 0.5  ±  0.2 mm/7.1  ±  2.6%, 0.6  ±  0.2 mm/8.3  ±  2.4%, for baseline drift, amplitude variation, phase shift, and patient breathing signal variation

  3. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knybel, Lukas [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Cvek, Jakub, E-mail: Jakub.cvek@fno.cz [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P<.001). Motion amplitudes >15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P<.001). Interfraction variations and baseline changes >3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe

  4. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knybel, Lukas; Cvek, Jakub; Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P<.001). Motion amplitudes >15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P<.001). Interfraction variations and baseline changes >3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe

  5. Evaluating regional body surface motion during breathing using stereophotogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, L. P.; Rüther, H.; Klein, M.

    The stereophotometric analysis of biological forms in medicine has been usefully employed for many years. Generally, the methods adopted have involved the use of stereo pairs of traditional photographs or radiographs. Although very successful, the traditional methods are time-consuming. Developments in solid-state and videoscan cameras, in computer hardware and in image processing technology have lead to real-time photogrammetry (RTP) or near-real-time photogrammetry (NRTP). It is anticipated that RTP and NRTP will play a vital role in biostereometric studies. This paper discusses the development of a low-cost PC-based NRTP system and the possibility of using NRTP in an ongoing biostereometric study which has been developed for studying regional body surface motion in the evaluation of respiratory muscle function and in which digital cameras will be substituted for analogue cameras and computer digitisation will be substituted for manual observation.

  6. In-flight evaluation of an optical head motion tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawada, Kazuho

    2009-05-01

    We have presented a new approach for Optical HMT (Head Motion Tracker) last year (Proc. SPIE 6955, 69550A1-11, 2008) [1]. In existing Magnetic HMT, it is inevitable to conduct pre-mapping in order to obtain sufficient accuracy because of magnetic field's distortion caused by metallic material around HMT, such as cockpit and helmet. Optical HMT is commonly known as mapping-free tracker; however, it has some disadvantages on accuracy, stability against sunlight conditions, in terms of comparison with Magnetic HMT. We have succeeded to develop new Optical HMT, which can overcome particular disadvantages by integration with two area cameras, LED markers, image processing techniques and inertial sensors with simple algorithm in laboratory level environment. We have also reported some experimental results conducted in laboratory, which proves good accuracy even in the sunlight condition. This time, we show actual performance of the Optical HMT in flight condition, including evaluation of stability against sunlight. Shimadzu Corp. and JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) is conducting joint research named SAVERH (Situation Awareness and Visual Enhancer for Rescue Helicopter) [2] that aims at inventing method of presenting suitable information to the pilot to support search and rescue missions by helicopters. The Optical HMT has been evaluated through a series of flight evaluation in SAVERH and demonstrated the operation concept.

  7. First clinical release of an online, adaptive, aperture-based image-guided radiotherapy strategy in intensity-modulated radiotherapy to correct for inter- and intrafractional rotations of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Heinz; Kametriser, Gerhard; Steininger, Philipp; Scherer, Philipp; Schöller, Helmut; Gaisberger, Christoph; Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Fastner, Gert; Wurstbauer, Karl; Jeschke, Stephan; Forstner, Rosemarie; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2012-08-01

    We developed and evaluated a correction strategy for prostate rotations using direct adaptation of segments in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Implanted fiducials (four gold markers) were used to determine interfractional translations, rotations, and dilations of the prostate. We used hybrid imaging: The markers were automatically detected in two pretreatment planar X-ray projections; their actual position in three-dimensional space was reconstructed from these images at first. The structure set comprising prostate, seminal vesicles, and adjacent rectum wall was transformed accordingly in 6 degrees of freedom. Shapes of IMRT segments were geometrically adapted in a class solution forward-planning approach, derived within seconds on-site and treated immediately. Intrafractional movements were followed in MV electronic portal images captured on the fly. In 31 of 39 patients, for 833 of 1013 fractions (supine, flat couch, knee support, comfortably full bladder, empty rectum, no intraprostatic marker migrations >2 mm of more than one marker), the online aperture adaptation allowed safe reduction of margins clinical target volume-planning target volume (prostate) down to 5 mm when only interfractional corrections were applied: Dominant L-R rotations were found to be 5.3° (mean of means), standard deviation of means ±4.9°, maximum at 30.7°. Three-dimensional vector translations relative to skin markings were 9.3 ± 4.4 mm (maximum, 23.6 mm). Intrafractional movements in 7.7 ± 1.5 min (maximum, 15.1 min) between kV imaging and last beam's electronic portal images showed further L-R rotations of 2.5° ± 2.3° (maximum, 26.9°), and three-dimensional vector translations of 3.0 ±3.7 mm (maximum, 10.2 mm). Addressing intrafractional errors could further reduce margins to 3 mm. We demonstrated the clinical feasibility of an online adaptive image-guided, intensity-modulated prostate protocol on a standard linear accelerator to correct 6 degrees of freedom of

  8. First Clinical Release of an Online, Adaptive, Aperture-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy Strategy in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to Correct for Inter- and Intrafractional Rotations of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutschmann, Heinz, E-mail: h.deutschmann@salk.at [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Kametriser, Gerhard [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); Steininger, Philipp [radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Scherer, Philipp; Schoeller, Helmut [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); Gaisberger, Christoph [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Mooslechner, Michaela [radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Fastner, Gert; Wurstbauer, Karl [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); Jeschke, Stephan [University Clinic for Urology and Andrology, Salzburg (Austria); Forstner, Rosemarie [University Clinic for Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Sedlmayer, Felix [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We developed and evaluated a correction strategy for prostate rotations using direct adaptation of segments in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Method and Materials: Implanted fiducials (four gold markers) were used to determine interfractional translations, rotations, and dilations of the prostate. We used hybrid imaging: The markers were automatically detected in two pretreatment planar X-ray projections; their actual position in three-dimensional space was reconstructed from these images at first. The structure set comprising prostate, seminal vesicles, and adjacent rectum wall was transformed accordingly in 6 degrees of freedom. Shapes of IMRT segments were geometrically adapted in a class solution forward-planning approach, derived within seconds on-site and treated immediately. Intrafractional movements were followed in MV electronic portal images captured on the fly. Results: In 31 of 39 patients, for 833 of 1013 fractions (supine, flat couch, knee support, comfortably full bladder, empty rectum, no intraprostatic marker migrations >2 mm of more than one marker), the online aperture adaptation allowed safe reduction of margins clinical target volume-planning target volume (prostate) down to 5 mm when only interfractional corrections were applied: Dominant L-R rotations were found to be 5.3 Degree-Sign (mean of means), standard deviation of means {+-}4.9 Degree-Sign , maximum at 30.7 Degree-Sign . Three-dimensional vector translations relative to skin markings were 9.3 {+-} 4.4 mm (maximum, 23.6 mm). Intrafractional movements in 7.7 {+-} 1.5 min (maximum, 15.1 min) between kV imaging and last beam's electronic portal images showed further L-R rotations of 2.5 Degree-Sign {+-} 2.3 Degree-Sign (maximum, 26.9 Degree-Sign ), and three-dimensional vector translations of 3.0 {+-}3.7 mm (maximum, 10.2 mm). Addressing intrafractional errors could further reduce margins to 3 mm. Conclusion: We demonstrated the clinical feasibility of an online

  9. Evaluation of motion management strategies based on required margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawkey, D; Svatos, M; Zankowski, C

    2012-01-01

    Strategies for delivering radiation to a moving lesion each require a margin to compensate for uncertainties in treatment. These motion margins have been determined here by separating the total uncertainty into components. Probability density functions for the individual sources of uncertainty were calculated for ten motion traces obtained from the literature. Motion margins required to compensate for the center of mass motion of the clinical treatment volume were found by convolving the individual sources of uncertainty. For measurements of position at a frequency of 33 Hz, system latency was the dominant source of positional uncertainty. Averaged over the ten motion traces, the motion margin for tracking with a latency of 200 ms was 4.6 mm. Gating with a duty cycle of 33% required a mean motion margin of 3.2–3.4 mm, and tracking with a latency of 100 ms required a motion margin of 3.1 mm. Feasible reductions in the effects of the sources of uncertainty, for example by using a simple prediction algorithm to anticipate the lesion position at the end of the latency period, resulted in a mean motion margin of 1.7 mm for tracking with a latency of 100 ms, 2.4 mm for tracking with a latency of 200 ms, and 2.1–2.2 mm for the gating strategies with duty cycles of 33%. A crossover tracking latency of 150 ms was found, below which tracking strategies could take advantage of narrower motion margins than gating strategies. The methods described here provide a means to guide selection of a motion management strategy for a given patient. (paper)

  10. The use of vestibular models for design and evaluation of flight simulator motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussolari, Steven R.; Young, Laurence R.; Lee, Alfred T.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative models for the dynamics of the human vestibular system are applied to the design and evaluation of flight simulator platform motion. An optimal simulator motion control algorithm is generated to minimize the vector difference between perceived spatial orientation estimated in flight and in simulation. The motion controller has been implemented on the Vertical Motion Simulator at NASA Ames Research Center and evaluated experimentally through measurement of pilot performance and subjective rating during VTOL aircraft simulation. In general, pilot performance in a longitudinal tracking task (formation flight) did not appear to be sensitive to variations in platform motion condition as long as motion was present. However, pilot assessment of motion fidelity by means of a rating scale designed for this purpose, were sensitive to motion controller design. Platform motion generated with the optimal motion controller was found to be generally equivalent to that generated by conventional linear crossfeed washout. The vestibular models are used to evaluate the motion fidelity of transport category aircraft (Boeing 727) simulation in a pilot performance and simulator acceptability study at the Man-Vehicle Systems Research Facility at NASA Ames Research Center. Eighteen airline pilots, currently flying B-727, were given a series of flight scenarios in the simulator under various conditions of simulator motion. The scenarios were chosen to reflect the flight maneuvers that these pilots might expect to be given during a routine pilot proficiency check. Pilot performance and subjective rating of simulator fidelity was relatively insensitive to the motion condition, despite large differences in the amplitude of motion provided. This lack of sensitivity may be explained by means of the vestibular models, which predict little difference in the modeled motion sensations of the pilots when different motion conditions are imposed.

  11. The Evaluation of a Motion Base Driving Simulator in a Cave at TACOM

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mollenhauer, M. A; Romano, R. A; Brumm, B

    2004-01-01

    .... In the first study, field (FOV), display system, and motion cueing algorithm were evaluate. In the second study, the optimum configuration from the first study was compared to off-road driving performance in TACOM's Ride Motion Simulator (RMS). In addition to performance evaluation, several simulator sickness mitigation techniques were also tested. The important findings from each of these evaluations will be discussed.

  12. Evaluation of the RACON 15000 microwave motion detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A series of tests was performed on the RACON 15000 motion detection system. The primary objectives of these tests were to determine sensor detection patterns and to quantitate the effects of intruder velocity. System susceptibility to fluorescent lights, oscillatory motion, and environmental factors was also examined

  13. Methods for evaluating cervical range of motion in trauma settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voss Sarah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immobilisation of the cervical spine is a common procedure following traumatic injury. This is often precautionary as the actual incidence of spinal injury is low. Nonetheless, stabilisation of the head and neck is an important part of pre-hospital care due to the catastrophic damage that may follow if further unrestricted movement occurs in the presence of an unstable spinal injury. Currently available collars are limited by the potential for inadequate immobilisation and complications caused by pressure on the patient’s skin, restricted airway access and compression of the jugular vein. Alternative approaches to cervical spine immobilisation are being considered, and the investigation of these new methods requires a standardised approach to the evaluation of neck movement. This review summarises the research methods and scientific technology that have been used to assess and measure cervical range of motion, and which are likely to underpin future research in this field. A systematic search of international literature was conducted to evaluate the methodologies used to assess the extremes of movement that can be achieved in six domains. 34 papers were included in the review. These studies used a range of methodologies, but study quality was generally low. Laboratory investigations and biomechanical studies have gradually given way to methods that more accurately reflect the real-life situations in which cervical spine immobilisation occurs. Latterly, new approaches using virtual reality and simulation have been developed. Coupled with modern electromagnetic tracking technology this has considerable potential for effective application in future research. However, use of these technologies in real life settings can be problematic and more research is needed.

  14. Positron emission tomography for the dose monitoring of intra-fractionally moving targets in ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuetzer, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Ion beam therapy (IBT) is a promising treatment option in radiotherapy. The characteristic physical and biological properties of light ion beams allow for the delivery of highly tumor conformal dose distributions. Related to the sparing of surrounding healthy tissue and nearby organs at risk, it is feasible to escalate the dose in the tumor volume to reach higher tumor control and survival rates. Remarkable clinical outcome was achieved with IBT for radio-resistant, deep-seated, static and well fixated tumor entities. Presumably, more patients could benefit from the advantages of IBT if it would be available for more frequent tumor sites. Those located in the thorax and upper abdominal region are commonly subjected to intra-fractional, respiration related motion. Different motion-compensated dose delivery techniques have been developed for active field shaping with scanned pencil beams and are at least available under experimental conditions at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany. Since minor unexpected anatomical changes e.g. related to patient mispositioning, tumour shrinkage or tissue swelling could already lead to remarkable deviations between planned and delivered dose distribution, a valuable dose monitoring system is desired for IBT. So far, positron emission tomography (PET) is the only in vivo, in situ and non-invasive qualitative dose monitoring method applied under clinical conditions. Conclusions about the delivered dose distribution can be drawn indirectly from a comparison between two β + -activity distributions: the measured one and an expected one generated by a Monte-Carlo simulation. Dedicated phantoms mainly made up of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and a motion table for regular one-dimensional (1D) motion patterns have been designed and manufactured for the experiments. Furthermore, the general applicability of the 4D MLEM algorithm for more complex motion patterns has been demonstrated by the

  15. Positron emission tomography for the dose monitoring of intra-fractionally moving targets in ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuetzer, Kristin

    2014-07-01

    Ion beam therapy (IBT) is a promising treatment option in radiotherapy. The characteristic physical and biological properties of light ion beams allow for the delivery of highly tumor conformal dose distributions. Related to the sparing of surrounding healthy tissue and nearby organs at risk, it is feasible to escalate the dose in the tumor volume to reach higher tumor control and survival rates. Remarkable clinical outcome was achieved with IBT for radio-resistant, deep-seated, static and well fixated tumor entities. Presumably, more patients could benefit from the advantages of IBT if it would be available for more frequent tumor sites. Those located in the thorax and upper abdominal region are commonly subjected to intra-fractional, respiration related motion. Different motion-compensated dose delivery techniques have been developed for active field shaping with scanned pencil beams and are at least available under experimental conditions at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany. Since minor unexpected anatomical changes e.g. related to patient mispositioning, tumour shrinkage or tissue swelling could already lead to remarkable deviations between planned and delivered dose distribution, a valuable dose monitoring system is desired for IBT. So far, positron emission tomography (PET) is the only in vivo, in situ and non-invasive qualitative dose monitoring method applied under clinical conditions. Conclusions about the delivered dose distribution can be drawn indirectly from a comparison between two β{sup +}-activity distributions: the measured one and an expected one generated by a Monte-Carlo simulation. Dedicated phantoms mainly made up of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and a motion table for regular one-dimensional (1D) motion patterns have been designed and manufactured for the experiments. Furthermore, the general applicability of the 4D MLEM algorithm for more complex motion patterns has been demonstrated by the

  16. Evaluation of motion and its effect on brain magnetic resonance image quality in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afacan, Onur; Erem, Burak; Roby, Diona P.; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Warfield, Simon K. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Roth, Noam; Roth, Amir [Robin Medical Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Motion artifacts pose significant problems for the acquisition of MR images in pediatric populations. To evaluate temporal motion metrics in MRI scanners and their effect on image quality in pediatric populations in neuroimaging studies. We report results from a large pediatric brain imaging study that shows the effect of motion on MRI quality. We measured motion metrics in 82 pediatric patients, mean age 13.4 years, in a T1-weighted brain MRI scan. As a result of technical difficulties, 5 scans were not included in the subsequent analyses. A radiologist graded the images using a 4-point scale ranging from clinically non-diagnostic because of motion artifacts to no motion artifacts. We used these grades to correlate motion parameters such as maximum motion, mean displacement from a reference point, and motion-free time with image quality. Our results show that both motion-free time (as a ratio of total scan time) and average displacement from a position at a fixed time (when the center of k-space was acquired) were highly correlated with image quality, whereas maximum displacement was not as good a predictor. Among the 77 patients whose motion was measured successfully, 17 had average displacements of greater than 0.5 mm, and 11 of those (14.3%) resulted in non-diagnostic images. Similarly, 14 patients (18.2%) had less than 90% motion-free time, which also resulted in non-diagnostic images. We report results from a large pediatric study to show how children and young adults move in the MRI scanner and the effect that this motion has on image quality. The results will help the motion-correction community in better understanding motion patterns in pediatric populations and how these patterns affect MR image quality. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of motion and its effect on brain magnetic resonance image quality in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afacan, Onur; Erem, Burak; Roby, Diona P.; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Warfield, Simon K.; Roth, Noam; Roth, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Motion artifacts pose significant problems for the acquisition of MR images in pediatric populations. To evaluate temporal motion metrics in MRI scanners and their effect on image quality in pediatric populations in neuroimaging studies. We report results from a large pediatric brain imaging study that shows the effect of motion on MRI quality. We measured motion metrics in 82 pediatric patients, mean age 13.4 years, in a T1-weighted brain MRI scan. As a result of technical difficulties, 5 scans were not included in the subsequent analyses. A radiologist graded the images using a 4-point scale ranging from clinically non-diagnostic because of motion artifacts to no motion artifacts. We used these grades to correlate motion parameters such as maximum motion, mean displacement from a reference point, and motion-free time with image quality. Our results show that both motion-free time (as a ratio of total scan time) and average displacement from a position at a fixed time (when the center of k-space was acquired) were highly correlated with image quality, whereas maximum displacement was not as good a predictor. Among the 77 patients whose motion was measured successfully, 17 had average displacements of greater than 0.5 mm, and 11 of those (14.3%) resulted in non-diagnostic images. Similarly, 14 patients (18.2%) had less than 90% motion-free time, which also resulted in non-diagnostic images. We report results from a large pediatric study to show how children and young adults move in the MRI scanner and the effect that this motion has on image quality. The results will help the motion-correction community in better understanding motion patterns in pediatric populations and how these patterns affect MR image quality. (orig.)

  18. Seismic Data for Evaluation of Ground Motion Hazards in Las Vegas in Support of Test Site Readiness Ground Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, A

    2008-01-16

    In this report we describe the data sets used to evaluate ground motion hazards in Las Vegas from nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. This analysis is presented in Rodgers et al. (2005, 2006) and includes 13 nuclear explosions recorded at the John Blume and Associates network, the Little Skull Mountain earthquake and a temporary deployment of broadband station in Las Vegas. The data are available in SAC format on CD-ROM as an appendix to this report.

  19. Design and Evaluation of Accelerometer based Motional Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Pranjic, Emilio; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2015-01-01

    and enable radical design changes in the loudspeaker which can lead to efficiency improvements. In combination this has motivated a revisit of the accelerometer based motional feedback technique. Experimental results on a 8 inch subwoofer show that the total harmonic distortion can be significantly reduced...

  20. Procedures for evaluation of vibratory ground motions of soil deposits at nuclear power plant sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    According to USNRC requirements set forth in Appendix A, 10 CFR, Part 100, vibratory ground motion criteria for a nuclear plant must be based on local soil conditions, as well as on the seismicity, geology, and tectonics of the region. This report describes how such criteria can be developed by applying the latest technology associated with analytical predictions of site-dependent ground motions and with the use of composite spectra obtained from the current library of strong motion records. Recommended procedures for defining vibratory ground motion criteria contain the following steps: (1) geologic and seismologic studies; (2) site soils investigations; (3) site response sensitivity studies; (4) evaluation of local site response characteristics; (5) selection of site-matched records; and (6) appraisal and selection of seismic input criteria. An in-depth discussion of the engineering characteristics of earthquake ground motions including parameters used to characterize earthquakes and strong motion records, geologic factors that influence ground shaking, the current strong motion data base, and case histories of the effects of past earthquake events is presented. Next, geotechnical investigations of the seismologic, geologic, and site soil conditions required to develop vibratory motion criteria are briefly summarized. The current technology for establishing vibratory ground motion criteria at nuclear plant sites, including site-independent and site-dependent procedures that use data from strong motion records and from soil response analyses is described. (auth)

  1. The first clinical treatment with kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM): A real-time image guidance method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keall, Paul J.; Aun Ng, Jin; O'Brien, Ricky

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM) is a real-time image guidance method that uses widely available radiotherapy technology, i.e., a gantry-mounted x-ray imager. The authors report on the geometric and dosimetric results of the first patient treatment using KIM which occurred...... on September 16, 2014. Methods: KIM uses current and prior 2D x-ray images to estimate the 3D target position during cancer radiotherapy treatment delivery. KIM software was written to process kilovoltage (kV) images streamed from a standard C-arm linear accelerator with a gantry-mounted kV x-ray imaging...... system. A 120° pretreatment kV imaging arc was acquired to build the patient-specific 2D to 3D motion correlation. The kV imager was activated during the megavoltage (MV) treatment, a dual arc VMAT prostate treatment, to estimate the 3D prostate position in real-time. All necessary ethics, legal...

  2. Analysis of strong ground motions to evaluate regional attenuation relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Montaldo

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Italian attenuation relationships at regional scale have been refined using a data set of 322 horizontal components of strong ground motions recorded mainly during the 1997-1998 Umbria-Marche, Central Italy, earthquake sequence. The data set includes records generated by events with local magnitude (M L ranging between 4.5 and 5.9, recorded at rock or soil sites and epicentral distance smaller than 100 km. Through a multiple step regression analysis, we calculated empirical equations for the peak ground acceleration and velocity, the Arias Intensity and for the horizontal components of the 5% damped velocity pseudo response spectra, corresponding to 14 frequencies ranging from 0.25 to 25 Hz. We compared our results with well known predictive equations, widely used on the national territory for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis. The results obtained in this study show smaller values for all the analyzed ground motion indicators compared to other predictive equations.

  3. Evaluation and Comparison of Motion Estimation Algorithms for Video Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Avinash Nayak; Bijayinee Biswal; S. K. Sabut

    2013-01-01

    Video compression has become an essential component of broadcast and entertainment media. Motion Estimation and compensation techniques, which can eliminate temporal redundancy between adjacent frames effectively, have been widely applied to popular video compression coding standards such as MPEG-2, MPEG-4. Traditional fast block matching algorithms are easily trapped into the local minima resulting in degradation on video quality to some extent after decoding. In this paper various computing...

  4. POD evaluation for joint angles from inertial and optical motion capturing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Kai; Kobayashi, Futoshi; Nakamoto, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that advances in preventive maintenance can improve the sustainment of systems, facilities, and infrastructure. Robot technologies have also received attention for maintenance applications. In order to operate delicate tasks, multi-fingered robot hands have been proposed in cases where human capability is deficient. This paper deals with motion capturing systems for controlling the hand/arm robot remotely. Several types of motion capturing systems have been developed so far. However, it is difficult for individual motion capturing systems to measure precise joint angles of a human arm. Therefore, in this paper, we integrate the inertial motion capturing system with the optical motion capturing system to capture a human arm posture. By evaluating the reliability of each motion capturing system, the integration is carried out. The probability of detection (POD) is applied to evaluate and compare the reliability of datasets measured by each motion capturing system. POD is one of the widely used statistical techniques to determine reliability. We apply the â analysis to determine the POD(a) function from the data set. Based on the POD evaluation, two motion capturing systems are integrated. (author)

  5. Quantitative evaluation of toothbrush and arm-joint motion during tooth brushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Emi; Saitoh, Issei; Yu, Yong; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Murakami, Daisuke; Takemoto, Yoshihiko; Morizono, Ken; Iwasaki, Tomonori; Iwase, Yoko; Yamasaki, Youichi

    2015-07-01

    It is very difficult for dental professionals to objectively assess tooth brushing skill of patients, because an obvious index to assess the brushing motion of patients has not been established. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate toothbrush and arm-joint motion during tooth brushing. Tooth brushing motion, performed by dental hygienists for 15 s, was captured using a motion-capture system that continuously calculates the three-dimensional coordinates of object's motion relative to the floor. The dental hygienists performed the tooth brushing on the buccal and palatal sides of their right and left upper molars. The frequencies and power spectra of toothbrush motion and joint angles of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist were calculated and analyzed statistically. The frequency of toothbrush motion was higher on the left side (both buccal and palatal areas) than on the right side. There were no significant differences among joint angle frequencies within each brushing area. The inter- and intra-individual variations of the power spectrum of the elbow flexion angle when brushing were smaller than for any of the other angles. This study quantitatively confirmed that dental hygienists have individual distinctive rhythms during tooth brushing. All arm joints moved synchronously during brushing, and tooth brushing motion was controlled by coordinated movement of the joints. The elbow generated an individual's frequency through a stabilizing movement. The shoulder and wrist control the hand motion, and the elbow generates the cyclic rhythm during tooth brushing.

  6. Exterior field evaluation of new generation video motion detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    Recent advancements in video motion detection (VMD) system design and technology have resulted in several new commercial VMD systems. Considerable interest in the new VMD systems has been generated because the systems are advertised to work effectively in exterior applications. Previous VMD systems, when used in an exterior environment, tended to have very high nuisance alarm rates due to weather conditions, wildlife activity and lighting variations. The new VMD systems advertise more advanced processing of the incoming video signal which is aimed at rejecting exterior environmental nuisance alarm sources while maintaining a high detection capability. This paper discusses the results of field testing, in an exterior environment, of two new VMD systems

  7. Model-Based Description of Human Body Motions for Ergonomics Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Sayaka

    This paper presents modeling of Working Process and Working Simulation factory works. I focus on an example work (motion), its actual work(motion) and reference between them. An example work and its actual work can be analyzed and described as a sequence of atomic action. In order to describe workers' motion, some concepts of Atomic Unit, Model Events and Mediator are introduced. By using these concepts, we can analyze a workers' action and evaluate their works. Also, we consider it as a possible way for unifying all the data used in various applications (CAD/CAM, etc) during the design process and evaluating all subsystems in a virtual Factory.

  8. Inter- and intrafractional localisation errors in cone-beam CT guided stereotactic radiation therapy of tumours in the liver and lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worm, Esben S.; Hansen, Anders T.; Petersen, Joergen B.; Muren, Ludvig P.; Praestegaard, Lars H.; Hoeyer, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Background. Localisation errors in cone-beam CT (CBCT) guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) were evaluated and compared to positioning using the external coordinates of a stereotactic body frame (SBF) alone. Possible correlations to patient- or treatment-specific factors such as body mass index (BMI), planning time, treatment delivery time, and distance between tumour and spinal cord were explored to determine whether they influenced on the benefit of image-guidance. Material and methods. A total of 34 patients received SBRT (3 fractions) for tumours in the liver (15 patients) or the lung (19 patients). Immobilisation and positioning was obtained with a SBF. Pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were registered with the bony anatomy of the planning CT to find inter- and intrafractional patient positioning errors (PPE). For lung tumour patients, matching was also performed on the tumours to find the tumour positioning errors (TPE) and baseline shifts relative to bony anatomy. Results. The mean inter- and intrafractional 3D vector PPE was 4.5 ± 2.7 mm (average ± SD) and 1.5 ± 0.6 mm, respectively, for the combined group of patients. For lung tumours, the interfractional misalignment was 5.6 ± 1.8 mm. The baseline shift was 3.9 ± 2.0 mm. Intrafractional TPE and baseline shifts were 2.1 ± 0.7 mm and 1.9 ± 0.6 mm, respectively. The magnitude of interfractional baseline shift was closely correlated with the distance between the tumour and the spinal cord. Intrafractional errors were independent of patient BMI, age or gender. Conclusion. Image-guidance reduced setup errors considerably. The study demonstrated the benefit of CBCT-guidance regardless of patient specific factors such as BMI, age or gender. Protection of the spinal cord was facilitated by the correlation between the tumour position relative to the spinal cord and the magnitude of baseline shift.

  9. Mathematical Modeling and Evaluation of Human Motions in Physical Therapy Using Mixture Density Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakanski, A; Ferguson, J M; Lee, S

    2016-12-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to develop a methodology for modeling and evaluation of human motions, which will potentially benefit patients undertaking a physical rehabilitation therapy (e.g., following a stroke or due to other medical conditions). The ultimate aim is to allow patients to perform home-based rehabilitation exercises using a sensory system for capturing the motions, where an algorithm will retrieve the trajectories of a patient's exercises, will perform data analysis by comparing the performed motions to a reference model of prescribed motions, and will send the analysis results to the patient's physician with recommendations for improvement. The modeling approach employs an artificial neural network, consisting of layers of recurrent neuron units and layers of neuron units for estimating a mixture density function over the spatio-temporal dependencies within the human motion sequences. Input data are sequences of motions related to a prescribed exercise by a physiotherapist to a patient, and recorded with a motion capture system. An autoencoder subnet is employed for reducing the dimensionality of captured sequences of human motions, complemented with a mixture density subnet for probabilistic modeling of the motion data using a mixture of Gaussian distributions. The proposed neural network architecture produced a model for sets of human motions represented with a mixture of Gaussian density functions. The mean log-likelihood of observed sequences was employed as a performance metric in evaluating the consistency of a subject's performance relative to the reference dataset of motions. A publically available dataset of human motions captured with Microsoft Kinect was used for validation of the proposed method. The article presents a novel approach for modeling and evaluation of human motions with a potential application in home-based physical therapy and rehabilitation. The described approach employs the recent progress in the field of

  10. Mathematical Modeling and Evaluation of Human Motions in Physical Therapy Using Mixture Density Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakanski, A; Ferguson, JM; Lee, S

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of the proposed research is to develop a methodology for modeling and evaluation of human motions, which will potentially benefit patients undertaking a physical rehabilitation therapy (e.g., following a stroke or due to other medical conditions). The ultimate aim is to allow patients to perform home-based rehabilitation exercises using a sensory system for capturing the motions, where an algorithm will retrieve the trajectories of a patient’s exercises, will perform data analysis by comparing the performed motions to a reference model of prescribed motions, and will send the analysis results to the patient’s physician with recommendations for improvement. Methods The modeling approach employs an artificial neural network, consisting of layers of recurrent neuron units and layers of neuron units for estimating a mixture density function over the spatio-temporal dependencies within the human motion sequences. Input data are sequences of motions related to a prescribed exercise by a physiotherapist to a patient, and recorded with a motion capture system. An autoencoder subnet is employed for reducing the dimensionality of captured sequences of human motions, complemented with a mixture density subnet for probabilistic modeling of the motion data using a mixture of Gaussian distributions. Results The proposed neural network architecture produced a model for sets of human motions represented with a mixture of Gaussian density functions. The mean log-likelihood of observed sequences was employed as a performance metric in evaluating the consistency of a subject’s performance relative to the reference dataset of motions. A publically available dataset of human motions captured with Microsoft Kinect was used for validation of the proposed method. Conclusion The article presents a novel approach for modeling and evaluation of human motions with a potential application in home-based physical therapy and rehabilitation. The described approach

  11. Methodology to evaluate the site standard seismic motion to a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    For the seismic design of nuclear facilities, the input motion is normally defined by the predicted maximum ground horizontal acceleration and the free field ground response spectrum. This spectrum is computed on the basis of records of strong motion earthquakes. The pair maximum acceleration-response spectrum is called the site standard seismic motion. An overall view of the subjects involved in the determination of the site standard seismic motion to a nuclear facility is presented. The main topics discussed are: basic principles of seismic instrumentation; dynamic and spectral concepts; design earthquakes definitions; fundamentals of seismology; empirical curves developed from prior seismic data; available methodologies and recommended procedures to evaluate the site standard seismic motion. (Author) [pt

  12. Quantitative evaluation of PET respiratory motion correction using real- time PET/MR simulated data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polycarpou, Irene [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King’s College London, London (United Kingdom); Tsoumpas, Charalampos [Division of Medical Physics, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); King, Andrew; Marsden, Paul K [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King’s College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-29

    The impact of respiratory motion correction on quantitative accuracy in PET imaging is evaluated using real-time simulations for variable patient specific characteristics such as tumor malignancy and respiratory pattern. Respiratory patterns from real patients were acquired, with long quiescent motion periods (type-1) as commonly observed in most of the patients and with long term amplitude variability as it is expected under conditions of difficult breathing (type-2). The respiratory patterns were combined with an MR-derived motion model to simulate real-time 4D PET/MR datasets. Lung and liver tumors were simulated with diameters ranging of 10 and 12 mm and tumor to background ratio ranging from 3:1 to 6:1. Projection data for 6 and 3 mm PET resolution were generated for Philips Gemini scanner and reconstructed without and with motion correction using OSEM (2 iterations, 23 subsets). Motion correction was incorporated into the reconstruction process based on MR-derived motion fields. Tumors peak standardized uptake values (SUVpeak) were calculated from thirty noise realizations. Respiratory motion correction improves the quantitative performance with the greatest benefit observed for patients of breathing type-2. For breathing type-1 after applying motion correction SUVpeak of 12 mm liver tumor with 6:1 contrast was increased by 46% for a current PET resolution (i.e. 6 mm) and 47% for a higher PET resolution (i.e. 3 mm). Furthermore, the benefit of higher scanner resolution is small for torso imaging unless motion correction is applied. In particular, for large liver tumor (12 mm) with low contrast (3:1) after motion correction the SUVpeak was 34% increased for 6 mm resolution and 50% increased for a higher PET resolution (i.e. 3 mm resolution. This investigation indicates high impact of respiratory motion correction on tumor quantitative accuracy and its importance in order to benefit from the increased resolution of future PET scanners.

  13. An evaluation of control rod motion simulator of research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanda

    2010-01-01

    Motion simulator for rod control research reactor has been carried out using a servo motor. Reactor rod motion control at any point should be in the right position, one of the motors that can move in a precise and correct is the servo motor. To ensure that the servo motor to move in accordance with the desired program, then the servo motor function test should be carried out to ensure having good performance. Tests carried out on meshes stress disorder, the load is stable within a certain period and travel time safety control rod up and down, travel time regulating control rods up and down and travel time compensation control rods up and down. In testing the breakdown voltage V out nets at 24 V, 6.5 A with 12 Q load deviation obtained V0= V1 = 0.1% and 0.65% and for the stability of the load in a certain time deviation V = 0.7125% , next to the breakdown voltage V out nets at 12 V, 4.2 A with a 6 Q load deviation obtained V0= V1 = 0.275% and 1.158% for the stability of the load in a certain time deviation V = 1.463% and the net-voltage noise nets on V out 24 V, 4.5 A with 12 Q load deviation obtained V0 = V1 = 0.196% and 0.496% and for the stability of the load in a certain time deviation V = 0.3625%. While the travel time of a safety control rod up and down, up and down the regulator and compensation rise and fall showed a steady linear graph. The results show that the performance of the servo motor is very stable with the working area below the tolerance limit, it is 5% - 10%.(author)

  14. Clinical Evaluation of a Robotic 6-Degree of Freedom Treatment Couch for Frameless Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevaert, Thierry; Verellen, Dirk; Engels, Benedikt; Depuydt, Tom; Heuninckx, Karina; Tournel, Koen; Duchateau, Michael; Reynders, Truus; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the added value of 6–degree of freedom (DOF) patient positioning with a robotic couch compared with 4DOF positioning for intracranial lesions and to estimate the immobilization characteristics of the BrainLAB frameless mask (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany), more specifically, the setup errors and intrafraction motion. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 40 patients with 66 brain metastases treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery and a 6DOF robotic couch. Patient positioning was performed with the BrainLAB ExacTrac stereoscopic X-ray system. Positioning results were collected before and after treatment to assess patient setup error and intrafraction motion. Existing treatment planning data were loaded and simulated for 4DOF positioning and compared with the 6DOF positioning. The clinical relevance was analyzed by means of the Paddick conformity index and the ratio of prescribed isodose volume covered with 4DOF to that obtained with the 6DOF positioning. Results: The mean three-dimensional setup error before 6DOF correction was 1.91 mm (SD, 1.25 mm). The rotational errors were larger in the longitudinal (mean, 0.23°; SD, 0.82°) direction compared with the lateral (mean, –0.09°; SD, 0.72°) and vertical (mean, –0.10°; SD, 1.03°) directions (p < 0.05). The mean three-dimensional intrafraction shift was 0.58 mm (SD, 0.42 mm). The mean intrafractional rotational errors were comparable for the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions: 0.01° (SD, 0.35°), 0.03° (SD, 0.31°), and –0.03° (SD, 0.33°), respectively. The mean conformity index decreased from 0.68 (SD, 0.08) (6DOF) to 0.59 (SD, 0.12) (4DOF) (p < 0.05). A loss of prescribed isodose coverage of 5% (SD, 0.08) was found with the 4DOF positioning (p < 0.05). Half a degree for longitudinal and lateral rotations can be identified as a threshold for coverage loss. Conclusions: With a mask immobilization, patient setup error and intrafraction motions need to be

  15. Clinical Evaluation of a Robotic 6-Degree of Freedom Treatment Couch for Frameless Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevaert, Thierry, E-mail: thierry.gevaert@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Verellen, Dirk; Engels, Benedikt; Depuydt, Tom; Heuninckx, Karina; Tournel, Koen; Duchateau, Michael; Reynders, Truus; De Ridder, Mark [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the added value of 6-degree of freedom (DOF) patient positioning with a robotic couch compared with 4DOF positioning for intracranial lesions and to estimate the immobilization characteristics of the BrainLAB frameless mask (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany), more specifically, the setup errors and intrafraction motion. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 40 patients with 66 brain metastases treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery and a 6DOF robotic couch. Patient positioning was performed with the BrainLAB ExacTrac stereoscopic X-ray system. Positioning results were collected before and after treatment to assess patient setup error and intrafraction motion. Existing treatment planning data were loaded and simulated for 4DOF positioning and compared with the 6DOF positioning. The clinical relevance was analyzed by means of the Paddick conformity index and the ratio of prescribed isodose volume covered with 4DOF to that obtained with the 6DOF positioning. Results: The mean three-dimensional setup error before 6DOF correction was 1.91 mm (SD, 1.25 mm). The rotational errors were larger in the longitudinal (mean, 0.23 Degree-Sign ; SD, 0.82 Degree-Sign ) direction compared with the lateral (mean, -0.09 Degree-Sign ; SD, 0.72 Degree-Sign ) and vertical (mean, -0.10 Degree-Sign ; SD, 1.03 Degree-Sign ) directions (p < 0.05). The mean three-dimensional intrafraction shift was 0.58 mm (SD, 0.42 mm). The mean intrafractional rotational errors were comparable for the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions: 0.01 Degree-Sign (SD, 0.35 Degree-Sign ), 0.03 Degree-Sign (SD, 0.31 Degree-Sign ), and -0.03 Degree-Sign (SD, 0.33 Degree-Sign ), respectively. The mean conformity index decreased from 0.68 (SD, 0.08) (6DOF) to 0.59 (SD, 0.12) (4DOF) (p < 0.05). A loss of prescribed isodose coverage of 5% (SD, 0.08) was found with the 4DOF positioning (p < 0.05). Half a degree for longitudinal and lateral rotations can be identified as a threshold

  16. Evaluation of the relationship between motion sickness symptomatology and blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybiel, A.; Lackner, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the development of symptoms of motion sickness and changes in blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature. Twelve subjects were each evaluated four times using the vestibular-visual interaction test (Graybiel and Lackner, 1980). The results were analyzed both within and across individual subjects. Neither a systematic group nor consistent individual relationship was found between the physiological parameters and the appearance of symptoms of motion sickness. These findings suggest that biofeedback control of the physiological variables studied is not likely to prevent the expression of motion sickness symptomatology.

  17. Methodology to evaluate the site standard seismic motion for a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, W.A.

    1983-03-01

    An overall view of the subjects involved in the determination of the site standard seismic motion to a nuclear facility is presented. The main topics discussed are: basic priciples of seismic instrumentation; dynamic and spectral concepts; design earthquakes definitions; fundamentals of seismology; empirical curves developed from prior seismic data; avalable methodologies and recommended procedures to evaluate the site standard seismic motion. (E.G.) [pt

  18. Evaluation of feature detection algorithms for structure from motion

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, N

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available their results on a given set of input images. The evaluation will be preformed by comparing the calibration data, the fundamental matrix and the rotation and translation errors extracted from each algorithm with ground truth data....

  19. Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring for Prostate Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy: First Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Jin Aun; Booth, Jeremy T.; Poulsen, Per R.; Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben Schjødt; Eade, Thomas; Hegi, Fiona; Kneebone, Andrew; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Most linear accelerators purchased today are equipped with a gantry-mounted kilovoltage X-ray imager which is typically used for patient imaging prior to therapy. A novel application of the X-ray system is kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM), in which the 3-dimensional (3D) tumor position is determined during treatment. In this paper, we report on the first use of KIM in a prospective clinical study of prostate cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducial markers undergoing conventionally fractionated IMAT (RapidArc) were enrolled in an ethics-approved study of KIM. KIM involves acquiring kV images as the gantry rotates around the patient during treatment. Post-treatment, markers in these images were segmented to obtain 2D positions. From the 2D positions, a maximum likelihood estimation of a probability density function was used to obtain 3D prostate trajectories. The trajectories were analyzed to determine the motion type and the percentage of time the prostate was displaced ≥3, 5, 7, and 10 mm. Independent verification of KIM positional accuracy was performed using kV/MV triangulation. Results: KIM was performed for 268 fractions. Various prostate trajectories were observed (ie, continuous target drift, transient excursion, stable target position, persistent excursion, high-frequency excursions, and erratic behavior). For all patients, 3D displacements of ≥3, 5, 7, and 10 mm were observed 5.6%, 2.2%, 0.7% and 0.4% of the time, respectively. The average systematic accuracy of KIM was measured at 0.46 mm. Conclusions: KIM for prostate IMAT was successfully implemented clinically for the first time. Key advantages of this method are (1) submillimeter accuracy, (2) widespread applicability, and (3) a low barrier to clinical implementation. A disadvantage is that KIM delivers additional imaging dose to the patient.

  20. Seismic Hazard Assessment in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations: Ground Motion Prediction Equations and Site Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this publication is to provide the state-of-the-art practice and detailed technical elements related to ground motion evaluation by ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) and site response in the context of seismic hazard assessments as recommended in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSG-9, Seismic Hazards in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations. The publication includes the basics of GMPEs, ground motion simulation, selection and adjustment of GMPEs, site characterization, and modelling of site response in order to improve seismic hazard assessment. The text aims at delineating the most important aspects of these topics (including current practices, criticalities and open problems) within a coherent framework. In particular, attention has been devoted to filling conceptual gaps. It is written as a reference text for trained users who are responsible for planning preparatory seismic hazard analyses for siting of all nuclear installations and/or providing constraints for anti-seismic design and retrofitting of existing structures

  1. A preliminary study of MR sickness evaluation using visual motion aftereffect for advanced driver assistance systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Sawako; Ino, Shuichi; Ifukube, Tohru

    2007-01-01

    Mixed Reality (MR) technologies have recently been explored in many areas of Human-Machine Interface (HMI) such as medicine, manufacturing, entertainment and education. However MR sickness, a kind of motion sickness is caused by sensory conflicts between the real world and virtual world. The purpose of this paper is to find out a new evaluation method of motion and MR sickness. This paper investigates a relationship between the whole-body vibration related to MR technologies and the motion aftereffect (MAE) phenomenon in the human visual system. This MR environment is modeled after advanced driver assistance systems in near-future vehicles. The seated subjects in the MR simulator were shaken in the pitch direction ranging from 0.1 to 2.0 Hz. Results show that MAE is useful for evaluation of MR sickness incidence. In addition, a method to reduce the MR sickness by auditory stimulation is proposed.

  2. On development and improvement of evaluation techniques for strong ground motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsumi, Hideaki; Wu, Changjiang; Kobayashi, Genyu; Mamada, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    The NSC regulatory guide for reviewing seismic design, revised in September 2006 requires revision of evaluation method for design seismic ground motion. The new design seismic ground motion must be evaluated based on not only response spectra method but also fault model method. In the case of evaluation method using fault model, factors which affect ground motion (heterogeneous fault rupture, frequency dependence of radiation pattern on seismic waves and high-frequency reduction on observed spectrum (fmax)) were studied in order to apply the models to actual phenomenon. In the case of response spectra, attenuation relationships for earthquake response spectra on seismic basement, considering the earthquake source types (e.g. inter-plate, intra-plate and crustal types), were developed. In addition, in coping with the problems on evaluating ground motion amplification and attenuation in deep underground, JNES drills 3000 m deep boring and acquires the data for verification of new evaluation methods at deep borehole locating on sedimentary rock site in the Niigata Institute of Technology. Moreover JNES develops borehole seismometer enduring high temperature and high pressure and enabling multi-depth seismic observation system to perform vertical seismic array observation. (author)

  3. A strategy to correct for intrafraction target translation in conformal prostate radiotherapy: Simulation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keall, P. J.; Lauve, A. D.; Hagan, M. P.; Siebers, J. V.

    2007-01-01

    A strategy is proposed in which intrafraction internal target translation is corrected for by repositioning the multileaf collimator position aperture to conform to the new target pose in the beam projection, and the beam monitor units are adjusted to account for the change in the geometric relationship between the target and the beam. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric stability of the prostate and critical structures in the presence of internal target translation using the dynamic compensation strategy. Twenty-five previously treated prostate cancer patients were replanned using a four-field conformal technique to deliver 72 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). Internal translation was introduced by displacing the prostate PTV (no rotation or deformation was considered). Thirty-six randomly selected isotropic displacements of magnitude 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 cm were sampled for each patient, for a total of 3600 errors. Due to their anatomic relation to the prostate, the rectum and bladder contours were also moved with the same magnitude and direction as the prostate. The dynamic compensation strategy was used to correct each of these errors by conforming the beam apertures to the new target pose and adjusting the monitor units using inverse-square and off-axis factor corrections. The dynamic compensation strategy plans were then compared to the original treatment plans via dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Changes of more than 5% of the prescription dose (3.6 Gy) were deemed clinically significant. Compared to the original treatment plans, the dynamic compensation strategy produced small discrepancies in isodose distributions and DVH analyses for all structures considered apart from the femoral heads. These differences increased with the magnitude of the internal motion. Coverage of the PTV was excellent: D 5 , D 95 , and D mean were not increased or decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose for any of the 3600

  4. Evaluation of tumor motion effect in canine model for diagnostic and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sangkeun; Nam, Taewon; Kim, Kyeongmin [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seungwoo; Han, Suchul; Ji, Younghoon [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Nohwon; Eom, Kidong [Konkuk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The internal organs move up to 35mm maximum and it provides information and uncertainty that has been distorted in the diagnosis and treatment. Previous most studies for the effect of respiration have been performed with external monitoring systems but it cannot represent internal organ motion such as liver, pancreas, and lung. Positron emission tomography (PET) is more influenced by motion than computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since measurement time for image acquisition is longer than CT and MRI. Thus, count of tumor is to be underestimated and region of tumor is to be overestimated. The first aim of this study was developing the artificial pulmonary nodule which can be performed non-invasive transplant into thorax of dogs and second is to assess the effect of respiratory motion on PET image with evaluating the applicability of the artificial model using dogs for diagnosis and treatment. The developed artificial pulmonary nodule showed reproducibility and motion effect as respiratory cycle and it was verified in PET images. Radiation dose estimated was not changed and was reduced slightly of 10 rpm and 15 rpm, respectively, in both of glass dosimeter and ion chamber. The developed artificial pulmonary nodule will be useful tool for evaluating respiratory motion and better research performance for diagnosis and treatment will be expected with performing simulated experiment using the nodule conducted in this study.

  5. Development and Application of a Rubric for Evaluating Students' Performance on Newton's Laws of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocakulah, Mustafa Sabri

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to develop and apply a rubric to evaluate the solutions of pre-service primary science teachers to questions about Newton's Laws of Motion. Two groups were taught the topic using the same teaching methods and administered four questions before and after teaching. Furthermore, 76 students in the experiment group were instructed…

  6. Prefraction displacement and intrafraction drift of the prostate due to perineal ultrasound probe pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Minglun; Hegemann, Nina-Sophie; Manapov, Farkhad; Kolberg, Anne; Thum, Patrick Dominik; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Ballhausen, Hendrik [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); University Hospital of LMU Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    In image-guided EBRT of the prostate, transperineal ultrasound (US) probes exert pressure on the perineum both during planning and treatment. Through tissue deformation and relaxation, this causes target and risk organ displacement and drift. In this study, prefraction shift and intrafraction drift of the prostate are quantified during robotic transperineal 4DUS. The position of the prostate was recorded for different positions of the probe before treatment in 10 patients (16 series of measurements). During treatment (15 patients, 273 fractions), intrafraction motion of the prostate was tracked (total of 27 h and 24 min) with the transperineal probe in place. Per 1 mm shift of the US probe in the cranial direction, a displacement of the prostate by 0.42 ± 0.09 mm in the cranial direction was detected. The relationship was found to be linear (R{sup 2} = 0.97) and highly significant (p < 0.0001). After initial contact of the probe and the perineum (no pressure), a shift of the probe of about 5-10 mm was typically necessary to achieve good image quality, corresponding to a shift of the prostate of about 2-4 mm in the cranial direction. Tissue compression and prostate displacement were well visible. During treatment, the prostate drifted at an average rate of 0.075 mm/min in the cranial direction (p = 0.0014). The pressure applied by a perineal US probe has a quantitatively similar impact on prostate displacement as transabdominal pressure. Shifts are predominantly in the cranial direction (typically 2-4 mm) with some component in the anterior direction (typically <1 mm). Slight probe pressure can improve image quality, but excessive probe pressure can distort the surrounding anatomy and potentially move risk organs closer to the high-dose area. (orig.) [German] In der bildgefuehrten Strahlentherapie der Prostata ueben perineale Ultraschallkoepfe waehrend Planung und Behandlung Druck auf das Perineum aus. Durch Gewebedeformation verursacht dies Verschiebungen von

  7. The method of micro-motion cycle feature extraction based on confidence coefficient evaluation criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuanzi; Ren, Hongmei; Bo, Li; Jing, Huang

    2017-11-01

    In radar target recognition, the micro motion characteristics of target is one of the characteristics that researchers pay attention to at home and abroad, in which the characteristics of target precession cycle is one of the important characteristics of target movement characteristics. Periodic feature extraction methods have been studied for years, the complex shape of the target and the scattering center stack lead to random fluctuations of the RCS. These random fluctuations also exist certain periodicity, which has a great influence on the target recognition result. In order to solve the problem, this paper proposes a extraction method of micro-motion cycle feature based on confidence coefficient evaluation criteria.

  8. Evaluation of a new antinauseant drug for the prevention of motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybiel, A.; Knepton, J.

    1977-01-01

    The new drug, AHR 5645B, together with other drugs was evaluated in tests, conducted with eight male subjects, concerning its ability to prevent motion sickness. It was found that AHR 5645B, used in doses of 20, 50, and 100 mg, was not efficacious in preventing experimental motion sickness. A combination of 50 mg meclizine and 25 mg ephedrine sulfate produced the best results. Favorable results were also obtained with a combination of 12.5 mg promethazine hydrochloride and 12.5 mg ephedrine sulfate. The findings in the reported experiment point to the difficulty of identifying a highly efficacious antimotion sickness drug for everyone.

  9. A Movable Phantom Design for Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Correction Studies on High Resolution PET Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Svarer, C.; Sibomana, M.

    2010-01-01

    , movable, mechanical PET phantom to simulate patients' head movements while being scanned. This can be used for evaluating motion correction methods. A low-cost phantom controlled by a rotary stage motor was built and tested for axial rotations of 1 degrees - 10 degrees with the multiple acquisition frame...... method. The phantom is able to perform stepwise and continuous axial rotations with submillimeter accuracy, and the movements are repeatable. The scans were acquired on the high resolution research tomograph dedicated brain scanner. The scans were reconstructed with the new 3-D ordered subset expectation...... maximization algorithm with modeling of the point spread function (3DOSEM-PSF), and they were corrected for motions based on external tracking information using the Polaris Vicra real-time stereo motion-tracking system. The new automatic, movable phantom has a robust design and is a potential quality...

  10. Left ventricular wall motion abnormalities evaluated by factor analysis as compared with Fourier analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Kazuyoshi; Ikuno, Yoshiyasu; Nishikimi, Toshio

    1986-01-01

    Factor analysis was applied to multigated cardiac pool scintigraphy to evaluate its ability to detect left ventricular wall motion abnormalities in 35 patients with old myocardial infarction (MI), and in 12 control cases with normal left ventriculography. All cases were also evaluated by conventional Fourier analysis. In most cases with normal left ventriculography, the ventricular and atrial factors were extracted by factor analysis. In cases with MI, the third factor was obtained in the left ventricle corresponding to wall motion abnormality. Each case was scored according to the coincidence of findings of ventriculography and those of factor analysis or Fourier analysis. Scores were recorded for three items; the existence, location, and degree of asynergy. In cases of MI, the detection rate of asynergy was 94 % by factor analysis, 83 % by Fourier analysis, and the agreement in respect to location was 71 % and 66 %, respectively. Factor analysis had higher scores than Fourier analysis, but this was not significant. The interobserver error of factor analysis was less than that of Fourier analysis. Factor analysis can display locations and dynamic motion curves of asynergy, and it is regarded as a useful method for detecting and evaluating left ventricular wall motion abnormalities. (author)

  11. Cone beam CT for organs motion evaluation in pediatric abdominal neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazmy, Mohamed Soliman; Khafaga, Yasser; Mousa, Amr; Khalil, Ehab

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: To quantify the organ motion relative to bone in different breathing states in pediatric neuroblastoma using cone beam CT (CBCT) for better definition of the planning margins during abdominal IMRT. Methods and materials: Forty-two datasets of kV CBCT for 9 pediatric patients with abdominal neuroblastoma treated with IMRT were evaluated. Organs positions on planning CT scan were considered the reference position against which organs and target motions were evaluated. The position of the kidneys and the liver was assessed in all scans. The target movement was evaluated in four patients who were treated for gross residual disease. Results: The mean age of the patients was 4.1 ± 1.6 years. The range of target movement in the craniocaudal direction (CC) was 5 mm. In the CC direction, the range of movement was 10 mm for the right kidney, and 8 mm for the left kidney. Similarly, the liver upper edge range of motion was 11 mm while the lower edge range of motion was 13 mm. Conclusions: With the use of daily CBCT we may be able to reduce the PTV margin. If CBCT is not used daily, a wider margin is needed.

  12. Development of a usability evaluation method using natural product-use motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joonho; Jung, Kihyo; Lee, Wonsup; You, Heecheon

    2017-04-01

    The present study developed and tested a new usability evaluation method which considers natural product-use motions. The proposed method measures both natural product-use motions (NMs) and actual product-use motions (AMs) for a product using an optical motion capture system and examines the usability of the product based on motion similarity (MS; %) between NMs and AMs. The proposed method was applied to a usability test of four vacuum cleaners (A, B, C, and D) with 15 participants and their MSs were compared with EMG measurements and subjective discomfort ratings. Cleaners A (44.6%) and C (44.2%) showed higher MSs than cleaners B (42.9%) and D (41.7%); the MSs mostly corresponded to the EMG measurements, which could indicate that AMs deviated from NMs may increase muscular efforts. However, the MSs were slightly different from the corresponding discomfort ratings. The proposed method demonstrated its usefulness in usability testing, but further research is needed with various products to generalize its effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of COPD's diaphragm motion extracted from 4D-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swastika, Windra; Masuda, Yoshitada; Kawata, Naoko; Matsumoto, Koji; Suzuki, Toshio; Iesato, Ken; Tada, Yuji; Sugiura, Toshihiko; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Ohnishi, Takashi; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a method called intersection profile method to construct a 4D-MRI (3D+time) from time-series of 2D-MRI. The basic idea is to find the best matching of the intersection profile from the time series of 2D-MRI in sagittal plane (navigator slice) and time series of 2D-MRI in coronal plane (data slice). In this study, we use 4D-MRI to semiautomatically extract the right diaphragm motion of 16 subjects (8 healthy subjects and 8 COPD patients). The diaphragm motion is then evaluated quantitatively by calculating the displacement of each subjects and normalized it. We also generate phase-length map to view and locate paradoxical motion of the COPD patients. The quantitative results of the normalized displacement shows that COPD patients tend to have smaller displacement compared to healthy subjects. The average normalized displacement of total 8 COPD patients is 9.4mm and the average of normalized displacement of 8 healthy volunteers is 15.3mm. The generated phase-length maps show that not all of the COPD patients have paradoxical motion, however if it has paradoxical motion, the phase-length map is able to locate where does it occur.

  14. Motion of the esophagus due to cardiac motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Palmer

    Full Text Available When imaging studies (e.g. CT are used to quantify morphological changes in an anatomical structure, it is necessary to understand the extent and source of motion which can give imaging artifacts (e.g. blurring or local distortion. The objective of this study was to assess the magnitude of esophageal motion due to cardiac motion. We used retrospective electrocardiogram-gated contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography images for this study. The anatomic region from the carina to the bottom of the heart was taken at deep-inspiration breath hold with the patients' arms raised above their shoulders, in a position similar to that used for radiation therapy. The esophagus was delineated on the diastolic phase of cardiac motion, and deformable registration was used to sequentially deform the images in nearest-neighbor phases among the 10 cardiac phases, starting from the diastolic phase. Using the 10 deformation fields generated from the deformable registration, the magnitude of the extreme displacements was then calculated for each voxel, and the mean and maximum displacement was calculated for each computed tomography slice for each patient. The average maximum esophageal displacement due to cardiac motion for all patients was 5.8 mm (standard deviation: 1.6 mm, maximum: 10.0 mm in the transverse direction. For 21 of 26 patients, the largest esophageal motion was found in the inferior region of the heart; for the other patients, esophageal motion was approximately independent of superior-inferior position. The esophagus motion was larger at cardiac phases where the electrocardiogram R-wave occurs. In conclusion, the magnitude of esophageal motion near the heart due to cardiac motion is similar to that due to other sources of motion, including respiratory motion and intra-fraction motion. A larger cardiac motion will result into larger esophagus motion in a cardiac cycle.

  15. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamare, F., E-mail: frederic.lamare@chu-bordeaux.fr; Fernandez, P. [Univ. Bordeaux, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); Service de Médecine Nucléaire, Hôpital Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D. [INSERM, UMR1101, LaTIM, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, 29609 Brest (France); Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P. [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Mendelstr. 11, 48149 Münster (Germany); Rimoldi, O. E. [Vita-Salute University and Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy and CNR Istituto di Bioimmagini e Fisiologia Molecolare, Milan (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging suffers from both respiratory and cardiac motion. One of the proposed solutions involves double gated acquisitions. Although such an approach may lead to both respiratory and cardiac motion compensation there are issues associated with (a) the combination of data from cardiac and respiratory motion bins, and (b) poor statistical quality images as a result of using only part of the acquired data. The main objective of this work was to evaluate different schemes of combining binned data in order to identify the best strategy to reconstruct motion free cardiac images from dual gated positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions. Methods: A digital phantom study as well as seven human studies were used in this evaluation. PET data were acquired in list mode (LM). A real-time position management system and an electrocardiogram device were used to provide the respiratory and cardiac motion triggers registered within the LM file. Acquired data were subsequently binned considering four and six cardiac gates, or the diastole only in combination with eight respiratory amplitude gates. PET images were corrected for attenuation, but no randoms nor scatter corrections were included. Reconstructed images from each of the bins considered above were subsequently used in combination with an affine or an elastic registration algorithm to derive transformation parameters allowing the combination of all acquired data in a particular position in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Images were assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, image profile, coefficient-of-variation (COV), and relative difference of the recovered activity concentration. Results: Regardless of the considered motion compensation strategy, the nonrigid motion model performed better than the affine model, leading to higher SNR and contrast combined with a lower COV. Nevertheless, when compensating for respiration only, no statistically significant differences were

  16. An evaluation method on seat comfort based on optical motion capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing TAO

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To research the sitting posture comfort evaluation method, through the example of comfort evaluation of the ergonomic seat and standard office seat, a methodology is introduced to evaluate the sitting posture comfort combining ergonomics theory. The proposed method is based on optical motion capture system, pressure sensor and JACK software, and TRC file is acquired by using EVART real-time capture software for identifying the spatial motion trail of human body. Then MATLAB software is used to analyze the human body motion data, and the sitting posture angle difference data for human body in different seats is acquired. TRC file is loaded into JACK software, and with the TAT REPORTER of JACK software, muscle force, moment of force and fatigue data, etc. are output, which are compared with the actual measured data from experiments, and ergonomics method is used for the evaluation. The result shows that the method of considering joint angles combining JACK software for data output is effective for evaluating sitting comfort.

  17. Evaluation of high frequency ground motion effects on the seismic capacity of NPP equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, In Kil; Seo, Jeong Moon; Choun, Young Sun

    2003-04-01

    In this study, the uniform hazard spectrum for the example Korean nuclear power plants sites were developed and compared with various response spectra used in past seismic PRA and SMA. It shows that the high frequency ground motion effects should be considered in seismic safety evaluations. The floor response spectra were developed using the direct generation method that can develop the floor response spectra from the input response spectrum directly with only the dynamic properties of structures obtained from the design calculation. Most attachment of the equipments to the structure has a minimum distortion capacity. This makes it possible to drop the effective frequency of equipment to low frequency before it is severely damaged. The results of this study show that the high frequency ground motion effects on the floor response spectra were significant, and the effects should be considered in the SPRA and SMA for the equipments installed in a building. The high frequency ground motion effects are more important for the seismic capacity evaluation of functional failure modes. The high frequency ground motion effects on the structural failure of equipments that attached to the floor by welding can be reduced by the distortion capacity of welded anchorage

  18. Simplified seismic stability evaluation of gravity dams subjected to high frequency eastern North American ground motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leger, P.; Ftima, M.B. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2004-09-01

    This study examined the use of simplified seismic analysis procedures to evaluate the dynamic stability of concrete dams subjected to high frequencies that are typical of eastern North America (ENA) earthquake ground motions. A typical 60 meter high concrete gravity dam was used to illustrate that dams subjected to severe high frequency ground motions are likely to experience cracking and sliding in the upper section where dynamic amplification is critical. In particular, this study examined the possibility of computing in-structure response spectra (ISRS) at the base of a sliding block to define suitable spectra compatible accelerograms. Analyzing the cracked component requires a definition of seismic input motions at the base of the block while considering dynamic amplification. It was concluded that it is not conservative to use accelerograms compatible with the linear, uncracked dam ISRS to perform transient rigid body sliding response analyses. It was noted that dynamic properties depend on dam base and upper joint cracking. Therefore, the intensity and frequency of seismic motions are modified as they propagate across the height of the dam. A nonlinear ISRS computed from cracked beam models is recommended for obtaining a conservative estimate of the residual sliding displacement of the upper block. 12 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs.

  19. Key features of hip hop dance motions affect evaluation by judges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nahoko; Nunome, Hiroyuki; Ikegami, Yasuo

    2014-06-01

    The evaluation of hip hop dancers presently lacks clearly defined criteria and is often dependent on the subjective impressions of judges. Our study objective was to extract hidden motion characteristics that could potentially distinguish the skill levels of hip hop dancers and to examine the relationship between performance kinematics and judging scores. Eleven expert, six nonexpert, and nine novice dancers participated in the study, where each performed the "wave" motion as an experimental task. The movements of their upper extremities were captured by a motion capture system, and several kinematic parameters including the propagation velocity of the wave were calculated. Twelve judges evaluated the performances of the dancers, and we compared the kinematic parameters of the three groups and examined the relationship between the judging scores and the kinematic parameters. We found the coefficient of variation of the propagation velocity to be significantly different among the groups (P < .01) and highly correlated with the judging scores (r = -0.800, P < .01). This revealed that the variation of propagation velocity was the most dominant variable representing the skill level of the dancers and that the smooth propagation of the wave was most closely related to the evaluation by judges.

  20. SU-E-T-133: Dosimetric Impact of Scan Orientation Relative to Target Motion During Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoker, J; Summers, P; Li, X; Gomez, D; Sahoo, N; Zhu, X; Gillin, M [MD Anderson Cancer Ctr., Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study seeks to evaluate the dosimetric effects of intra-fraction motion during spot scanning proton beam therapy as a function of beam-scan orientation and target motion amplitude. Method: Multiple 4DCT scans were collected of a dynamic anthropomorphic phantom mimicking respiration amplitudes of 0 (static), 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 cm. A spot-scanning treatment plan was developed on the maximum intensity projection image set, using an inverse-planning approach. Dynamic phantom motion was continuous throughout treatment plan delivery.The target nodule was designed to accommodate film and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Film and TLDs were uniquely labeled by location within the target. The phantom was localized on the treatment table using the clinically available orthogonal kV on-board imaging device. Film inserts provided data for dose uniformity; TLDs provided a 3% precision estimate of absolute dose. An inhouse script was developed to modify the delivery order of the beam spots, to orient the scanning direction parallel or perpendicular to target motion.TLD detector characterization and analysis was performed by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core group (IROC)-Houston. Film inserts, exhibiting a spatial resolution of 1mm, were analyzed to determine dose homogeneity within the radiation target. Results: Parallel scanning and target motions exhibited reduced target dose heterogeneity, relative to perpendicular scanning orientation. The average percent deviation in absolute dose for the motion deliveries relative to the static delivery was 4.9±1.1% for parallel scanning, and 11.7±3.5% (p<<0.05) for perpendicularly oriented scanning. Individual delivery dose deviations were not necessarily correlated to amplitude of motion for either scan orientation. Conclusions: Results demonstrate a quantifiable difference in dose heterogeneity as a function of scan orientation, more so than target amplitude. Comparison to the analyzed planar dose of a single

  1. Ambulatory measurement of knee motion and physical activity: preliminary evaluation of a smart activity monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malchau Henrik

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a paucity of devices available for continuous, long-term monitoring of human joint motion. Non-invasive, inexpensive devices capable of recording human activity and joint motion have many applications for medical research. Such a device could be used to quantify range of motion outside the gait laboratory. The purpose of this study was to test the accuracy of the modified Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA in measuring knee flexion angles, to detect different physical activities, and to quantify how often healthy subjects use deep knee flexion in the ambulatory setting. Methods We compared Biomotion Laboratory (BML "gold standard" data to simultaneous IDEEA measures of knee motion and gait, step up/down, and stair descent in 5 healthy subjects. In addition, we used a series of choreographed physical activities outside the BML to confirm the IDEEA's ability to accurately measure 7 commonly-performed physical activities. Subjects then continued data collection during ordinary activities outside the gait laboratory. Results Pooled correlations between the BML and IDEEA knee flexion angles were .97 +/- .03 for step up/down, .98 +/- .02 for stair descent, and .98 +/- .01 for gait. In the BML protocol, the IDEEA accurately identified gait, but was less accurate in identifying step up/down and stair descent. During sampling outside the BML, the IDEEA accurately detected walking, running, stair ascent, stair descent, standing, lying, and sitting. On average, subjects flexed their knees >120° for 0.17% of their data collection periods outside the BML. Conclusion The modified IDEEA system is a useful clinical tool for evaluating knee motion and multiple physical activities in the ambulatory setting. These five healthy subjects rarely flexed their knees >120°.

  2. Effects of head motion correction on the evaluation of endogenous dopamine release in striatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Cho, Sang Soo; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Sang Eun

    2004-01-01

    Neuroreceptor PET studies require 60-90 minutes to complete. Head motion of the subject increases the uncertainty in measured activity. In this study, the effects of the data-driven head motion correction on the evaluation of endogenous dopamine (DA) release in the striatum were investigated. [ 11 C]raclopride PET scans on 4 normal volunteers acquired with bolus plus constant infusion protocol were retrospectively analyzed. Following the 50 min resting period, the participants played a video game with a monetary reward for 40 min. Dynamic frames acquired during the equilibrium condition (rest: 30-50 min, game: 70-90 min) were realigned to the first frame at resting condition. Intra-condition registration between the frames during both the rest and game condition were performed, and average image for each condition was created and registered with each other again (inter-condition registration). Resting PET image was then co-registered to own MRI of each participant and transformation parameters were reapplied to the other one. Volumes of interest (VOl) for dorsal putamen (PU) and caudate (CA), ventral striatum (VS), and cerebellum were defined on the MRI. Binding potential (BP) was measured and DA release was calculated as the percent change of BP after the video game. Changes in position and orientation of the striatum during the PET scan were observed before the head motion correction. BP values at resting condition were not changed significantly after the intra-condition registration. However, the BP values during the video game and DA release (PU: 29.2→3.9%, CA: 57.4→14.1%, ST: 17.7→0.6%) were significantly changed after the correction. The results suggest that overestimation of the DA release caused by the head motion during PET scan and misalignment of MRI-based VOl and the striatum in PET image was remedied by the data-driven head motion correction

  3. A Method for Evaluating the Electro-Mechanical Characteristics of Piezoelectric Actuators during Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Jia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The electro-mechanical characteristics of piezoelectric actuators which have being driven are evaluated in this paper. The force generated by actuators is measured as an inertial force of a corner cub prism which is attached to the actuators. The Doppler frequency shift of a laser beam, due to the motion of actuator, is accurately measured by a heterodyne interferometer. Subsequently, the mechanical quantities, such as velocity, acceleration, force, power and displacement, are calculated from the Doppler frequency shift. With the measurement results of current and voltage of the actuator, the relationships between electrical and mechanical characteristics are evaluated.

  4. Performance Evaluation of an Indoor Positioning Scheme Using Infrared Motion Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changqiang Jing

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Internet of Things (IoT for Smart Environments (SE is a new scenario that collects useful information and provides convenient services to humans via sensing and wireless communications. Infra-Red (IR motion sensors have recently been widely used for indoor lighting because they allow the system to detect whether a human is inside or outside the sensors’ range. In this paper, the performance of a position estimation scheme based on IR motion sensor is evaluated in an indoor SE. The experimental results show that we can track the dynamic position of a pedestrian in straight moving model as well as two dimensional models. Experimental results also show that higher performance in accuracy and dynamic tracking in real indoor environment can be achieved without other devices.

  5. Design and performance evaluation of a coarse/fine precision motion control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, H; Buice, E S; Smith, S T; Hocken, R J; Fagan, T J; Trumper, D L; Otten, D; Seugling, R M

    2005-03-02

    This abstract presents current collaborative work on the development of a stage system for accurate nanometer level positioning for scanning specimens spanning an area of 50 mm x 50 mm. The completed system employs a coarse/fine approach which comprises a short-range, six degree-of-freedom fine-motion platform (5 microns 200 micro-radians) carried by a long-range, two-axis X-Y coarse positioning system. Relative motion of the stage to a fixed metrology frame will be measured using a heterodyne laser in an eight-pass interferometer configuration. The final stage system will be housed in a vacuum environment and operated in a temperature-controlled laboratory. Results from a simple single coarse/fine axis system will be the design basis for the final multi-axis system. It is expected that initial stage performance evaluation will be presented at the conference.

  6. Use of item response curves of the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation to compare Japanese and American students' views on force and motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Michi; Davenport, Glen; Wittmann, Michael C.

    2017-12-01

    Student views of force and motion reflect the personal experiences and physics education of the student. With a different language, culture, and educational system, we expect that Japanese students' views on force and motion might be different from those of American students. The Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation (FMCE) is an instrument used to probe student views on force and motion. It was designed using research on American students, and, as such, the items might function differently for Japanese students. Preliminary results from a translated version indicated that Japanese students had similar misconceptions as those of American students. In this study, we used item response curves (IRCs) to make more detailed item-by-item comparisons. IRCs show the functioning of individual items across all levels of performance by plotting the proportion of each response as a function of the total score. Most of the IRCs showed very similar patterns on both correct and incorrect responses; however, a few of the plots indicate differences between the populations. The similar patterns indicate that students tend to interact with FMCE items similarly, despite differences in culture, language, and education. We speculate about the possible causes for the differences in some of the IRCs. This report is intended to show how IRCs can be used as a part of the validation process when making comparisons across languages and nationalities. Differences in IRCs can help to pinpoint artifacts of translation, contextual effects because of differences in culture, and perhaps intrinsic differences in student understanding of Newtonian motion.

  7. Use of item response curves of the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation to compare Japanese and American students’ views on force and motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michi Ishimoto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Student views of force and motion reflect the personal experiences and physics education of the student. With a different language, culture, and educational system, we expect that Japanese students’ views on force and motion might be different from those of American students. The Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation (FMCE is an instrument used to probe student views on force and motion. It was designed using research on American students, and, as such, the items might function differently for Japanese students. Preliminary results from a translated version indicated that Japanese students had similar misconceptions as those of American students. In this study, we used item response curves (IRCs to make more detailed item-by-item comparisons. IRCs show the functioning of individual items across all levels of performance by plotting the proportion of each response as a function of the total score. Most of the IRCs showed very similar patterns on both correct and incorrect responses; however, a few of the plots indicate differences between the populations. The similar patterns indicate that students tend to interact with FMCE items similarly, despite differences in culture, language, and education. We speculate about the possible causes for the differences in some of the IRCs. This report is intended to show how IRCs can be used as a part of the validation process when making comparisons across languages and nationalities. Differences in IRCs can help to pinpoint artifacts of translation, contextual effects because of differences in culture, and perhaps intrinsic differences in student understanding of Newtonian motion.

  8. Clinical evaluation of motion and position sense in the upper extremities of the elderly using motion analysis system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li KY

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kuan-yi Li,1 Yi-hui Wu2 1Department of Occupational Therapy and Graduate Institute of Behavioral Sciences, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kwei-shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan; 2Department of Rehabilitation, Taoyuan Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan Abstract: The purpose of this study was to measure kinesthetic accuracy in healthy older adults by using arm position and motion matching tests. We investigated the effect of task type, joint angle, and matching arm results on kinesthetic accuracy in the upper extremities of 17 healthy right-handed older adults. Blinded subjects were asked to match positions and motions at four reference joint angles: 1 shoulder flexion, 0°–60°; 2 elbow flexion, 90°–135°; 3 wrist extension, 0°–50° in the sagittal plane; and 4 shoulder abduction, 0°–60° in the frontal plane. The absolute difference in angular displacement between the reference and matching arms was calculated to determine kinesthetic accuracy. Results showed that subjects were more accurate at matching motion than position tasks (P=0.03. Shoulder and elbow joints were more sensitive than wrist joints in perceiving passive positions and motions (P<0.05. The effect of the matching arm was found only when matching the joint angles of shoulder abduction and wrist extension (P<0.01. These results are comparable to findings of other studies that used machine-generated kinesthetic stimuli. The manual measurement of kinesthetic accuracy could be effective as a preliminary screening tool for therapists in clinical settings. Keywords: joint position matching, proprioception, velocity perception

  9. Assessment of Bladder Motion for Clinical Radiotherapy Practice Using Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBain, Catherine A.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Buckley, David L.; Sykes, Jonathan S.; Green, Melanie M.; Cowan, Richard A.; Hutchinson, Charles E.; Moore, Christopher J.; Price, Patricia M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Organ motion is recognized as the principal source of inaccuracy in bladder radiotherapy (RT), but there is currently little information on intrafraction bladder motion. Methods and Materials: We used cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) to study bladder motion relevant to intrafraction RT delivery. On two occasions, a 28 minute cine-MRI sequence was acquired from 10 bladder cancer patients and 5 control participants immediately after bladder emptying, after abstinence from drinking for the preceding hour. From the resulting cine sequences, bladder motion was subjectively assessed. To quantify bladder motion, the bladder was contoured in imaging volume sets at 0, 14, and 28 min to measure changes to bladder volumes, wall displacements, and center of gravity (COG) over time. Results: The dominant source of bladder motion during imaging was bladder filling (up to 101% volume increase); rectal and small bowel movements were transient, with minimal impact. Bladder volume changes were similar for all participants. However for bladder cancer patients, wall displacements were larger (up to 58 mm), less symmetrical, and more variable compared with nondiseased control bladders. Conclusions: Significant and individualized intrafraction bladder wall displacements may occur during bladder RT delivery. This important source of inaccuracy should be incorporated into treatment planning and verification.

  10. Performance Evaluation of Redundant Parallel Manipulators Assimilating Motion/Force Transmissibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fugui Xie

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Performance evaluation is one of the most important issues in the field of parallel kinematic manipulators (PKMs. As a very important class of PKMs, the redundant PKMs have been studied intensively. However, the performance evaluation of this type of PKMs is still unresolved and a challenging endeavor. In this paper, indices that assimilate motion/force transmissibility are proposed to evaluate the performance of redundant PKMs. To illustrate the application of these indices, three PKMs with different kinds of redundancies are taken as examples, and performance atlases are plotted based on the definitions of the indices. Transmissibility comparisons between redundant PKMs and the corresponding non-redundant ones are carried out. To determine the inverse solutions of the PKMs with kinematic redundancy, an optimization strategy is presented, and the rationality of this method is demonstrated. The indices introduced here can be applied to the performance evaluation of redundant parallel manipulators.

  11. Performance Evaluation of Redundant Parallel Manipulators Assimilating Motion/Force Transmissibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fugui Xie

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Performance evaluation is one of the most important issues in the field of parallel kinematic manipulators (PKMs. As a very important class of PKMs, the redundant PKMs have been studied intensively. However, the performance evaluation of this type of PKMs is still unresolved and a challenging endeavor. In this paper, indices that assimilate motion/force transmissibility are proposed to evaluate the performance of redundant PKMs. To illustrate the application of these indices, three PKMs with different kinds of redundancies are taken as examples, and performance atlases are plotted based on the definitions of the indices. Transmissibility comparisons between redundant PKMs and the corresponding non‐redundant ones are carried out. To determine the inverse solutions of the PKMs with kinematic redundancy, an optimization strategy is presented, and the rationality of this method is demonstrated. The indices introduced here can be applied to the performance evaluation of redundant parallel manipulators.

  12. Evaluation of maritime object detection methods for full motion video applications using the PASCAL VOC Challenge framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszewski, Martin; Parameswaran, Shibin; Hallenborg, Eric; Bagnall, Bryan

    2015-03-01

    We present an initial target detection performance evaluation system for the RAPid Image Exploitation Resource (RAPIER) Full Motion Video (RFMV) maritime target tracking software. We test and evaluate four statistical target detection methods using 30 Hz full motion video from aerial platforms. Using appropriate algorithm performance criteria inspired by the PASCAL Visual Object Classes (VOC) Challenge, we address the tradeoffs between detection fidelity and computational speed/throughput.

  13. Applying model analysis to a resource-based analysis of the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor I. Smith

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we analyzed the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation in terms of a resources-based model that allows for clustering of questions so as to provide useful information on how students correctly or incorrectly reason about physics. In this paper, we apply model analysis to show that the associated model plots provide more information regarding the results of investigations using these question clusters than normalized gain graphs. We provide examples from two different institutions to show how the use of model analysis with our redefined clusters can provide previously hidden insight into the effectiveness of instruction.

  14. Quantifying motion for pancreatic radiotherapy margin calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitfield, Gillian; Jain, Pooja; Green, Melanie; Watkins, Gillian; Henry, Ann; Stratford, Julie; Amer, Ali; Marchant, Thomas; Moore, Christopher; Price, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Pancreatic radiotherapy (RT) is limited by uncertain target motion. We quantified 3D patient/organ motion during pancreatic RT and calculated required treatment margins. Materials and methods: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and orthogonal fluoroscopy images were acquired post-RT delivery from 13 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Bony setup errors were calculated from CBCT. Inter- and intra-fraction fiducial (clip/seed/stent) motion was determined from CBCT projections and orthogonal fluoroscopy. Results: Using an off-line CBCT correction protocol, systematic (random) setup errors were 2.4 (3.2), 2.0 (1.7) and 3.2 (3.6) mm laterally (left–right), vertically (anterior–posterior) and longitudinally (cranio-caudal), respectively. Fiducial motion varied substantially. Random inter-fractional changes in mean fiducial position were 2.0, 1.6 and 2.6 mm; 95% of intra-fractional peak-to-peak fiducial motion was up to 6.7, 10.1 and 20.6 mm, respectively. Calculated clinical to planning target volume (CTV–PTV) margins were 1.4 cm laterally, 1.4 cm vertically and 3.0 cm longitudinally for 3D conformal RT, reduced to 0.9, 1.0 and 1.8 cm, respectively, if using 4D planning and online setup correction. Conclusions: Commonly used CTV–PTV margins may inadequately account for target motion during pancreatic RT. Our results indicate better immobilisation, individualised allowance for respiratory motion, online setup error correction and 4D planning would improve targeting.

  15. Motion-Base Simulator Evaluation of an Aircraft Using an External Vision System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Williams, Steven P.; Arthur, J. J.; Rehfeld, Sherri A.; Harrison, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Twelve air transport-rated pilots participated as subjects in a motion-base simulation experiment to evaluate the use of eXternal Vision Systems (XVS) as enabling technologies for future supersonic aircraft without forward facing windows. Three head-up flight display concepts were evaluated -a monochromatic, collimated Head-up Display (HUD) and a color, non-collimated XVS display with a field-of-view (FOV) equal to and also, one significantly larger than the collimated HUD. Approach, landing, departure, and surface operations were conducted. Additionally, the apparent angle-of-attack (AOA) was varied (high/low) to investigate the vertical field-of-view display requirements and peripheral, side window visibility was experimentally varied. The data showed that lateral approach tracking performance and lateral landing position were excellent regardless of AOA, display FOV, display collimation or whether peripheral cues were present. However, the data showed glide slope approach tracking appears to be affected by display size (i.e., FOV) and collimation. The monochrome, collimated HUD and color, uncollimated XVS with Full FOV display had (statistically equivalent) glide path performance improvements over the XVS with HUD FOV display. Approach path performance results indicated that collimation may not be a requirement for an XVS display if the XVS display is large enough and employs color. Subjective assessments of mental workload and situation awareness also indicated that an uncollimated XVS display may be feasible. Motion cueing appears to have improved localizer tracking and touchdown sink rate across all displays.

  16. Evaluation of modal pushover-based scaling of one component of ground motion: Tall buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Erol; Chopra, Anil K.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear response history analysis (RHA) is now increasingly used for performance-based seismic design of tall buildings. Required for nonlinear RHAs is a set of ground motions selected and scaled appropriately so that analysis results would be accurate (unbiased) and efficient (having relatively small dispersion). This paper evaluates accuracy and efficiency of recently developed modal pushover–based scaling (MPS) method to scale ground motions for tall buildings. The procedure presented explicitly considers structural strength and is based on the standard intensity measure (IM) of spectral acceleration in a form convenient for evaluating existing structures or proposed designs for new structures. Based on results presented for two actual buildings (19 and 52 stories, respectively), it is demonstrated that the MPS procedure provided a highly accurate estimate of the engineering demand parameters (EDPs), accompanied by significantly reduced record-to-record variability of the responses. In addition, the MPS procedure is shown to be superior to the scaling procedure specified in the ASCE/SEI 7-05 document.

  17. A Comparison of the Use of Bony Anatomy and Internal Markers for Offline Verification and an Evaluation of the Potential Benefit of Online and Offline Verification Protocols for Prostate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNair, Helen A.; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Parker, Christopher; Evans, Phil M.; Norman, Andrew; Miles, Elizabeth; Harris, Emma J.; Del-Acroix, Louise; Smith, Elizabeth; Keane, Richard; Khoo, Vincent S.; Thompson, Alan C.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of intraprostatic markers in the treatment verification of prostate cancer radiotherapy. Specific aims were: to compare the effectiveness of offline correction protocols, either using gold markers or bony anatomy; to estimate the potential benefit of online correction protocol's using gold markers; to determine the presence and effect of intrafraction motion. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with three gold markers inserted had pretreatment and posttreatment images acquired and were treated using an offline correction protocol and gold markers. Retrospectively, an offline protocol was applied using bony anatomy and an online protocol using gold markers. Results: The systematic errors were reduced from 1.3, 1.9, and 2.5 mm to 1.1, 1.1, and 1.5 mm in the right-left (RL), superoinferior (SI), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively, using the offline correction protocol and gold markers instead of bony anatomy. The subsequent decrease in margins was 1.7, 3.3, and 4 mm in the RL, SI, and AP directions, respectively. An offline correction protocol combined with an online correction protocol in the first four fractions reduced random errors further to 0.9, 1.1, and 1.0 mm in the RL, SI, and AP directions, respectively. A daily online protocol reduced all errors to <1 mm. Intrafraction motion had greater impact on the effectiveness of the online protocol than the offline protocols. Conclusions: An offline protocol using gold markers is effective in reducing the systematic error. The value of online protocols is reduced by intrafraction motion

  18. SU-F-I-15: Evaluation of a New MR-Compatible Respiratory Motion Device at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, A; Chugh, B; Keller, B; Sahgal, A; Song, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Recent advances in MRI-guided radiotherapy has inspired the development of MRI-compatible motion devices that simulate patient periodic motion in the scanner, particularly respiratory motion. Most commercial devices rely on non MR-safe ferromagnetic stepper motors which are not practical for regular QA testing. This work evaluates the motion performance of a new fully MRI compatible respiratory motion device at 3T. Methods: The QUASAR™ MRI-compatible respiratory motion phantom has been recently developed by Modus QA Inc., London, ON, Canada. The prototype is constructed from diamagnetic materials with linear motion generated using MRI-compatible piezoelectric motors that can be safely inserted in the scanner bore. The tumor was represented by a fillable sphere and is attached to the linear motion generator. The spherical tumor-representative and its surroundings were filled with different concentrations of MnCl2 to produce realistic relaxation times. The motion was generated along the longitudinal (H/F) axis of the bore using sinusoidal reference waveform (amplitude = 15 mm, frequency 0.25 Hz). Imaging was then performed on 3T Philips Achieva using a 32-channel cardiac coil. Fast 2D spoiled gradient-echo was used with a spatial resolution of 1.8 × 1.8 mm 2 and slice thickness of 4 mm. The motion waveform was then measured on the resultant image series by tracking the centroid of the sphere through the time series. This image-derived measured motion was compared to the software-generated reference waveform. Results: No visible distortions from the device were observed on the images. Excellent agreement between the measured and the reference waveforms were obtained. Negligible motion was observed in the lateral (R/L) direction. Conclusion: Our investigation demonstrates that this piezo-electric motor design is effective at simulating periodic motion and is a potential candidate for MRI-radiotherapy respiratory motion simulation. Future work should focus

  19. SU-F-I-15: Evaluation of a New MR-Compatible Respiratory Motion Device at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, A [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chugh, B; Keller, B [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sahgal, A; Song, W [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Recent advances in MRI-guided radiotherapy has inspired the development of MRI-compatible motion devices that simulate patient periodic motion in the scanner, particularly respiratory motion. Most commercial devices rely on non MR-safe ferromagnetic stepper motors which are not practical for regular QA testing. This work evaluates the motion performance of a new fully MRI compatible respiratory motion device at 3T. Methods: The QUASAR™ MRI-compatible respiratory motion phantom has been recently developed by Modus QA Inc., London, ON, Canada. The prototype is constructed from diamagnetic materials with linear motion generated using MRI-compatible piezoelectric motors that can be safely inserted in the scanner bore. The tumor was represented by a fillable sphere and is attached to the linear motion generator. The spherical tumor-representative and its surroundings were filled with different concentrations of MnCl2 to produce realistic relaxation times. The motion was generated along the longitudinal (H/F) axis of the bore using sinusoidal reference waveform (amplitude = 15 mm, frequency 0.25 Hz). Imaging was then performed on 3T Philips Achieva using a 32-channel cardiac coil. Fast 2D spoiled gradient-echo was used with a spatial resolution of 1.8 × 1.8 mm{sup 2} and slice thickness of 4 mm. The motion waveform was then measured on the resultant image series by tracking the centroid of the sphere through the time series. This image-derived measured motion was compared to the software-generated reference waveform. Results: No visible distortions from the device were observed on the images. Excellent agreement between the measured and the reference waveforms were obtained. Negligible motion was observed in the lateral (R/L) direction. Conclusion: Our investigation demonstrates that this piezo-electric motor design is effective at simulating periodic motion and is a potential candidate for MRI-radiotherapy respiratory motion simulation. Future work should

  20. Geometric and dosimetric evaluations of an online image-guidance strategy for 3D-CRT of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qiuwen; Ivaldi, Giovanni; Liang Jian; Lockman, David; Yan Di; Martinez, Alvaro

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate an online image-guidance strategy for conformal treatment of prostate cancer and to estimate margin-reduction benefits. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients with at least 16 helical computed tomography scans were each used in this study. Two prostate soft-tissue registration methods, including sagittal rotation, were evaluated. Setup errors and rigid organ motion were corrected online; non-rigid and intrafraction motion were included in offline analysis. Various clinical target volume-planning target volume (CTV-PTV) margins were applied. Geometrical evaluations included analyses of isocenter shifts and rotations and overlap index. Dosimetric evaluations included minimum dose and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for prostate and gEUD for rectum. Results: Average isocenter shift and rotation were (dX,dY,dZ,θ) = (0.0 ± 0.7,-1.1 ± 4.0,-0.1 ± 2.5,0.7 o ± 2.0 o ) mm. Prostate motion in anterior-posterior (AP) direction was significantly higher than superior-inferior and left-right (LR) directions. This observation was confirmed by isocenter shift in perspectives AP (1.8 ± 1.8 mm) and RL (3.7 ± 3.0 mm). Organ motion degrades target coverage and reduces doses to rectum. If 2% dose reduction on prostate D 99 is allowed for 90% patients, then minimum 3 mm margins are necessary with ideal image registration. Conclusions: Significant margin reduction can be achieved through online image guidance. Certain margins are still required for nonrigid and intrafraction motion. To further reduce margin, a strategy that combines online geometric intervention and offline dose replanning is necessary

  1. Early radiation-induced changes evaluated by intravoxel incoherent motion in the major salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Simona; Forina, Chiara; Marucci, Laura; Giovinazzo, Giuseppe; Giordano, Carolina; Piludu, Francesca; Landoni, Valeria; Spriano, Giuseppe; Vidiri, Antonello

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the potential of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) MRI for early evaluation of irradiated major salivary glands. Thirty-four patients with head-neck cancer were included in a prospective study. All patients underwent three serial IVIM-MRI: before, half-way through, and at the end of radiotherapy (RT). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), ADClow derived in the low b-value range, perfusion fraction f, and pure diffusion coefficient D were estimated. Pretreatment values and early changes of diffusion parameters were correlated with parotid mean dose (Dmean ) and volume reduction after RT. Changes in diffusion parameters over time were all significant (P salivary glands can be noninvasively evaluated by IVIM-MRI. Perfusion-related coefficients in conjunction with dosimetric information increase our capability to predict the change in parotid volume and hence, if further validated, guide treatment strategy in RT. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Evaluating the influence of organ motion during photon vs. proton therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer using biological models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Kia; G Andersen, Andreas; Casares-Magaz, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    beam angles for pelvic irradiation, we aimed to evaluate the influence of organ motion for PT using biological models, and to compare this with contemporary photon-based RT. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eight locally advanced prostate cancer patients with a planning CT (pCT) and 8-9 repeated CT scans (r......BACKGROUND: Proton therapy (PT) may have a normal tissue sparing potential when co-irradiating pelvic lymph nodes in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, but may also be more sensitive towards organ motion in the pelvis. Building upon a previous study identifying motion-robust proton...

  3. Isotoxic dose escalation in the treatment of lung cancer by means of heterogeneous dose distributions in the presence of respiratory motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Mariwan; Nielsen, Morten; Hansen, Olfred

    2011-01-01

    To test, in the presence of intrafractional respiration movement, a margin recipe valid for a homogeneous and conformal dose distribution and to test whether the use of smaller margins combined with heterogeneous dose distributions allows an isotoxic dose escalation when respiratory motion...

  4. Evaluating correlation between geometrical relationship and dose difference caused by respiratory motion using statistical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong Seok; Kim, Dong Su; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Yoon, Do Kun; Suh, Tae Suk [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seong Hee [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Min Seok [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Yu Yoon [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Three-dimensional dose (3D dose) can consider coverage of moving target, however it is difficult to provide dosimetric effect which occurs by respiratory motions. Four-dimensional dose (4D dose) which uses deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images can consider dosimetric effect by respiratory motions. The dose difference between 3D dose and 4D dose can be varied according to the geometrical relationship between a planning target volume (PTV) and an organ at risk (OAR). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the correlation between the overlap volume histogram (OVH), which quantitatively shows the geometrical relationship between the PTV and OAR, and the dose differences. In conclusion, no significant statistical correlation was found between the OVH and dose differences. However, it was confirmed that a higher difference between the 3D and 4D doses could occur in cases that have smaller OVH value. No significant statistical correlation was found between the OVH and dose differences. However, it was confirmed that a higher difference between the 3D and 4D doses could occur in cases that have smaller OVH value.

  5. Strategies to evaluate the impact of rectal volume on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Diniz Fortuna Poli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the rectal volume influence on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one patients with prostate cancer underwent a series of three computed tomography scans including an initial planning scan and two subsequent scans during 3D-CRT. The organs of interest were outlined. The prostate contour was compared with the initial CT images considering the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior and lateral edges of the organ. Variations in the anterior limits and volume of the rectum were assessed and correlated with prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction. Results: The maximum range of prostate motion was observed in the superoinferior direction, followed by the anteroposterior direction. A significant correlation was observed between prostate motion and rectal volume variation ( p = 0.037. A baseline rectal volume superior to 70 cm3 had a significant influence on the prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction ( p = 0.045. Conclusion: The present study showed a significant interfraction motion of the prostate during 3D-CRT with greatest variations in the superoinferior and anteroposterior directions, and that a large rectal volume influences the prostate motion with a cutoff value of 70 cm3. Therefore, the treatment of patients with a rectal volume > 70 cm3 should be re-planned with appropriate rectal preparation.

  6. Strategies to evaluate the impact of rectal volume on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poli, Ana Paula Diniz Fortuna, E-mail: anapaulafortuna@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (CAISM/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Centro de Atencao Integrada a Saude da Mulher. Divisao de Radioterapia; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Divisao de Radioterapia

    2016-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the rectal volume influence on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one patients with prostate cancer underwent a series of three computed tomography scans including an initial planning scan and two subsequent scans during 3D-CRT. The organs of interest were outlined. The prostate contour was compared with the initial CT images considering the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior and lateral edges of the organ. Variations in the anterior limits and volume of the rectum were assessed and correlated with prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction. Results: The maximum range of prostate motion was observed in the superoinferior direction, followed by the anteroposterior direction. A significant correlation was observed between prostate motion and rectal volume variation (p = 0.037). A baseline rectal volume superior to 70 cm{sup 3} had a significant influence on the prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction (p = 0.045). Conclusion: The present study showed a significant interfraction motion of the prostate during 3D-CRT with greatest variations in the superoinferior and anteroposterior directions, and that a large rectal volume influences the prostate motion with a cutoff value of 70 cm{sup 3}. Therefore, the treatment of patients with a rectal volume > 70 cm{sup 3} should be re-planned with appropriate rectal preparation. Keywords: Rectal volume; Prostate cancer; Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. (author)

  7. Quantitative Evaluation of Motion of Awa Odori Dance by Three Dimensional Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Kenji; Fukuhara, Toru

    “AWA ODDRI” dance is one of the traditional dance festival of Tokushima Prefecture in Japan. Basic operation of “AWA ODORI” dance needs harmony of hands and legs, and the rhythm of duple time, but it is not possible that the beginners do these actions completely. We have already developed the method of quantifying evaluation of the skill of “AWA ODORI” dance. But the three dimensional movements are not able to be evaluated by image squences. In this paper, the authors proposed a method of quantifying evaluation of the skill of “AWA ODORI” dance by using the three dimensional data. In this method, the image sequence of dance scenes is obtained by a stereo camera with a simple of structure. The dynamics of motion is detected by three dimensional data calculated by the stereo camera. The input data and model data of excellent dancers are compared. In this paper, we describe the algorithm of quantifying evaluation of the skill using the stereo view and show some experimental results obtained by using a simple experimental system to verify effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Evaluation of motion measurement using cine MRI for image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy on a new phantom platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Wang, Ziheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate accuracy of motion tracking of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy. A phantom platform was developed in this work to fulfill the goal. The motion phantom consisted of a platform, a solid thread, a motor and a control system that can simulate motion in various modes. To validate its reproducibility, the phantom platform was setup three times and imaged with fluoroscopy using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for the same motion profile. After the validation test, the phantom platform was evaluated using cine MRI at 2.5 frames/second on a 1.5T GE scanner using five different artificial profiles and five patient profiles. The above profiles were again measured with EPID fluoroscopy and used as references. Discrepancies between measured profiles from cine MRI and EPID were quantified using root-mean-square (RMS) and standard deviation (SD). Pearson’s product moment correlational analysis was used to test correlation. The standard deviation for the reproducibility test was 0.28 mm. The discrepancies (RMS) between all profiles measured by cine MRI and EPID fluoroscopy ranged from 0.30 to 0.49 mm for artificial profiles and ranged from 0.75 to 0.91 mm for five patient profiles. The cine MRI sequence could precisely track phantom motion and the proposed motion phantom was feasible to evaluate cine MRI accuracy. PMID:29296304

  9. Construction of a biomechanical head and neck motion model as a guide to evaluation of deformable image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Hendrik; Bartelheimer, Kathrin; Meis, Jan; Bendl, Rolf; Stoiber, Eva M.; Giske, Kristina

    2017-06-01

    The use of deformable image registration methods in the context of adaptive radiotherapy leads to uncertainties in the simulation of the administered dose distributions during the treatment course. Evaluation of these methods is a prerequisite to decide if a plan adaptation will improve the individual treatment. Current approaches using manual references limit the validity of evaluation, especially for low-contrast regions. In particular, for the head and neck region, the highly flexible anatomy and low soft tissue contrast in control images pose a challenge to image registration and its evaluation. Biomechanical models promise to overcome this issue by providing anthropomorphic motion modelling of the patient. We introduce a novel biomechanical motion model for the generation and sampling of different postures of the head and neck anatomy. Motion propagation behaviour of the individual bones is defined by an underlying kinematic model. This model interconnects the bones by joints and thus is capable of providing a wide range of motion. Triggered by the motion of the individual bones, soft tissue deformation is described by an extended heterogeneous tissue model based on the chainmail approach. This extension, for the first time, allows the propagation of decaying rotations within soft tissue without the necessity for explicit tissue segmentation. Overall motion simulation and sampling of deformed CT scans including a basic noise model is achieved within 30 s. The proposed biomechanical motion model for the head and neck site generates displacement vector fields on a voxel basis, approximating arbitrary anthropomorphic postures of the patient. It was developed with the intention of providing input data for the evaluation of deformable image registration.

  10. Chronic kidney disease: Pathological and functional evaluation with intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wei; Zhou, Jianjun; Zeng, Mengsu; Ding, Yuqin; Qu, Lijie; Chen, Caizhong; Ding, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Yaqiong; Fu, Caixia

    2018-05-01

    Because chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide problem, accurate pathological and functional evaluation is required for planning treatment and follow-up. Intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging (IVIM-DWI) can assess both capillary perfusion and tissue diffusion and may be helpful in evaluating renal function and pathology. To evaluate functional and pathological alterations in CKD by applying IVIM-DWI. Prospective study. In all, 72 CKD patients who required renal biopsy and 20 healthy volunteers. 1.5T. All subjects underwent IVIM-DWI of the kidneys, and image analysis was performed by two radiologists. The mean values of true diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo diffusion coefficient (D*), and perfusion fraction (f) were acquired from renal parenchyma. Correlation between IVIM-DWI parameters and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), as well as pathological damage, were assessed. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), paired sample t-test and Spearman correlation analysis. The paired sample t-test revealed that IVIM-DWI parameters were significantly lower in medulla than cortex for both patients and controls (P Imaging 2018;47:1251-1259. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Comparative assessment of liver tumor motion using cine-magnetic resonance imaging versus 4-dimensional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Annemarie T; Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Yin, Lingshu; Zou, Wei; Rosen, Mark; Plastaras, John P; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Metz, James M; Teo, Boon-Keng

    2015-04-01

    To compare the extent of tumor motion between 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and cine-MRI in patients with hepatic tumors treated with radiation therapy. Patients with liver tumors who underwent 4DCT and 2-dimensional biplanar cine-MRI scans during simulation were retrospectively reviewed to determine the extent of target motion in the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and lateral directions. Cine-MRI was performed over 5 minutes. Tumor motion from MRI was determined by tracking the centroid of the gross tumor volume using deformable image registration. Motion estimates from 4DCT were performed by evaluation of the fiducial, residual contrast (or liver contour) positions in each CT phase. Sixteen patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (n=11), cholangiocarcinoma (n=3), and liver metastasis (n=2) were reviewed. Cine-MRI motion was larger than 4DCT for the superior-inferior direction in 50% of patients by a median of 3.0 mm (range, 1.5-7 mm), the anterior-posterior direction in 44% of patients by a median of 2.5 mm (range, 1-5.5 mm), and laterally in 63% of patients by a median of 1.1 mm (range, 0.2-4.5 mm). Cine-MRI frequently detects larger differences in hepatic intrafraction tumor motion when compared with 4DCT most notably in the superior-inferior direction, and may be useful when assessing the need for or treating without respiratory management, particularly in patients with unreliable 4DCT imaging. Margins wider than the internal target volume as defined by 4DCT were required to encompass nearly all the motion detected by cine-MRI for some of the patients in this study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Adaptive radiation therapy for postprostatectomy patients using real-time electromagnetic target motion tracking during external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bharat, Shyam; Michalski, Jeff M; Gay, Hiram A; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Parikh, Parag J

    2013-03-15

    Using real-time electromagnetic (EM) transponder tracking data recorded by the Calypso 4D Localization System, we report inter- and intrafractional target motion of the prostate bed, describe a strategy to evaluate treatment adequacy in postprostatectomy patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and propose an adaptive workflow. Tracking data recorded by Calypso EM transponders was analyzed for postprostatectomy patients that underwent step-and-shoot IMRT. Rigid target motion parameters during beam delivery were calculated from recorded transponder positions in 16 patients with rigid transponder geometry. The delivered doses to the clinical target volume (CTV) were estimated from the planned dose matrix and the target motion for the first 3, 5, 10, and all fractions. Treatment adequacy was determined by comparing the delivered minimum dose (Dmin) with the planned Dmin to the CTV. Treatments were considered adequate if the delivered CTV Dmin is at least 95% of the planned CTV Dmin. Translational target motion was minimal for all 16 patients (mean: 0.02 cm; range: -0.12 cm to 0.07 cm). Rotational motion was patient-specific, and maximum pitch, yaw, and roll were 12.2, 4.1, and 10.5°, respectively. We observed inadequate treatments in 5 patients. In these treatments, we observed greater target rotations along with large distances between the CTV centroid and transponder centroid. The treatment adequacy from the initial 10 fractions successfully predicted the overall adequacy in 4 of 5 inadequate treatments and 10 of 11 adequate treatments. Target rotational motion could cause underdosage to partial volume of the postprostatectomy targets. Our adaptive treatment strategy is applicable to post-prostatectomy patients receiving IMRT to evaluate and improve radiation therapy delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dosimetric Evaluation of Individualized Adaptive Motion Margins for Abdominal and Thoracic Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Cho, Byungchul; Keall, Paul

    the former ignores motion correlation along different axes the latter tends to overestimate the dosimetric consequences of random motion. The purpose of this study was to propose and investigate an individualized adaptive margin approach that accounts for motion correlation while still considering......, the smallest Dmin was 71%. The mean PTV volume was 7.6 cm3 for adaptive margins (4.3 mm, 1.6 mm, 1.0 mm margins) and 8.2 cm3 for standard margins (1.8 mm, 3.4 mm, 2.4 mm margins). Conclusions: A strategy for individualized adaptive margins that accounts for motion correlation was proposed. Compared to standard...... motion axes, while σ is the SD of random motion-induced errors along the tumor motion axes. The applied value for σ was the largest of the population-based random motion and the individually CBCT estimated random motion. The individual value for σ was largest (and therefore used for margin calculation...

  14. A piloted evaluation of an oblique-wing research aircraft motion simulation with decoupling control laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempel, Robert W.; Mcneill, Walter E.; Gilyard, Glenn B.; Maine, Trindel A.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center developed an oblique-wing research plane from NASA's digital fly-by-wire airplane. Oblique-wing airplanes show large cross-coupling in control and dynamic behavior which is not present on conventional symmetric airplanes and must be compensated for to obtain acceptable handling qualities. The large vertical motion simulator at NASA Ames-Moffett was used in the piloted evaluation of a proposed flight control system designed to provide decoupled handling qualities. Five discrete flight conditions were evaluated ranging from low altitude subsonic Mach numbers to moderate altitude supersonic Mach numbers. The flight control system was effective in generally decoupling the airplane. However, all participating pilots objected to the high levels of lateral acceleration encountered in pitch maneuvers. In addition, the pilots were more critical of left turns (in the direction of the trailing wingtip when skewed) than they were of right turns due to the tendency to be rolled into the left turns and out of the right turns. Asymmetric side force as a function of angle of attack was the primary cause of lateral acceleration in pitch. Along with the lateral acceleration in pitch, variation of rolling and yawing moments as functions of angle of attack caused the tendency to roll into left turns and out of right turns.

  15. Evaluation of right ventricular regional wall motion in inferior myocardial infarction by cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Masami; Ohnishi, Shusaku; Hasegawa, Shinji

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate right ventricular regional wall motion in inferior myocardial infarction by cine MRI. Thirteen patients with inferior myocardial infarction were investigated by cine MRI and were divided into proximal group which consisted of seven patients: >90% stenosis in segment 1 or 2 of right coronary artery and distal group which consisted of six patients: >90% stenosis in segment 3 or 4 of right coronary artery. Cine MRI was performed by 1.5 tesla magnet system (Signa, GE). To depict the regional asynergy, right ventricular wall was divided into 6 segments as follows: Segments 1 and 2 were upper and lower segments in transverse planes, respectively. Segments 3 and 4 were free wall and diaphragmatic segments of outflow tract, and segments 5 and 6 were of inflow tract in sagittal planes. Our results were as follows: (1) In proximal group, right ventricular asynergy was detected in six patients but in distal group it was detected in only one patient; (2) Right ventricular asynergy was detected most frequently at diaphragmatic segments in sagittal planes; (3) All the patients who had shown the hemodynamic deterioration of right ventricle on acute phase of inferior myocardial infarction presented the broad asynergy in right ventricle; (4) Cine MRI is clinically useful in evaluating right ventricular regional wall movement and diagnosing right ventricular infarction. (author)

  16. In-flight evaluation of an Optical Head Motion Tracker II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawada, Kazuho; Omura, Koji

    2010-04-01

    We resented a new approach for Optical HMT (Head Motion Tracker) past years (Proc. SPIE 6955, 69550A, 2008, Proc. SPIE 7326, 732607/73260L, 2009) [1]-[3]. In existing Magnetic HMT, it is inevitable to conduct pre-mapping in order to obtain sufficient accuracy because of magnetic field's distortion caused by metallic material around HMT, such as cockpit and helmet. Optical HMT is commonly known as mapping-free tracker; however, it has some disadvantages on accuracy, stability against sunlight conditions, in terms of comparison with Magnetic HMT. We had succeeded to develop new Optical HMT, which can overcome particular disadvantages by integration with two area cameras, LED markers, image processing techniques and inertial sensors with simple algorithm in laboratory level environment (2007). We have also reported some experimental results conducted in flight test, which proves good accuracy even in the sunlight condition (2008). Shimadzu Corp. and JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) are conducting joint research named SAVERH (Situation Awareness and Visual Enhancer for Rescue Helicopter) [2]-[3] that aims at inventing method of presenting suitable information to the pilot to support search and rescue missions by helicopters. The Optical HMT has been evaluated through a series of flight evaluation in SAVERH and demonstrated the operation concept. Through 16 flights including night flights, the potential capability of the system was demonstrated and issues for further improvement were identified.

  17. Evaluation of interpolation methods for surface-based motion compensated tomographic reconstruction for cardiac angiographic C-arm data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Kerstin; Schwemmer, Chris; Hornegger, Joachim; Zheng Yefeng; Wang Yang; Lauritsch, Günter; Rohkohl, Christopher; Maier, Andreas K.; Schultz, Carl; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: For interventional cardiac procedures, anatomical and functional information about the cardiac chambers is of major interest. With the technology of angiographic C-arm systems it is possible to reconstruct intraprocedural three-dimensional (3D) images from 2D rotational angiographic projection data (C-arm CT). However, 3D reconstruction of a dynamic object is a fundamental problem in C-arm CT reconstruction. The 2D projections are acquired over a scan time of several seconds, thus the projection data show different states of the heart. A standard FDK reconstruction algorithm would use all acquired data for a filtered backprojection and result in a motion-blurred image. In this approach, a motion compensated reconstruction algorithm requiring knowledge of the 3D heart motion is used. The motion is estimated from a previously presented 3D dynamic surface model. This dynamic surface model results in a sparse motion vector field (MVF) defined at control points. In order to perform a motion compensated reconstruction, a dense motion vector field is required. The dense MVF is generated by interpolation of the sparse MVF. Therefore, the influence of different motion interpolation methods on the reconstructed image quality is evaluated. Methods: Four different interpolation methods, thin-plate splines (TPS), Shepard's method, a smoothed weighting function, and a simple averaging, were evaluated. The reconstruction quality was measured on phantom data, a porcine model as well as on in vivo clinical data sets. As a quality index, the 2D overlap of the forward projected motion compensated reconstructed ventricle and the segmented 2D ventricle blood pool was quantitatively measured with the Dice similarity coefficient and the mean deviation between extracted ventricle contours. For the phantom data set, the normalized root mean square error (nRMSE) and the universal quality index (UQI) were also evaluated in 3D image space. Results: The quantitative evaluation of all

  18. In-flight evaluation of an optical head motion tracker III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawada, Kazuho; Okamoto, Masakazu

    2011-06-01

    We have presented a new approach for Optical HMT (Head Motion Tracker) past years [1]-[4]. In existing Magnetic HMT, it is inevitable to conduct pre-mapping in order to obtain sufficient accuracy because of magnetic field's distortion caused by metallic material around HMT, such as cockpit and helmet. Optical HMT is commonly known as mapping-free tracker; however, it has some disadvantages on accuracy, stability against sunlight conditions, in terms of comparison with Magnetic HMT. We had succeeded to develop new HMT system, which can overcome particular disadvantages by integration with two area cameras, optical markers, image processing techniques and inertial sensors with simple algorithm in laboratory level environment (2008). We have also reported some experimental results conducted in flight test, which proved good accuracy even in the sunlight condition (2009). We have also reported some experimental results conducted in flight test, which proved good performance even in the night flight (2010). Shimadzu Corp. and JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) are conducting joint research named SAVERH (Situation Awareness and Visual Enhancer for Rescue Helicopter) [2]-[4] that aims at inventing method of presenting suitable information to the pilot to support search and rescue missions by helicopters. The HMT system has been evaluated through a series of flight evaluation in SAVERH and demonstrated the operation concept. In this report, we show result of the final evaluation of the HMD system through 12 flights including night flight. Also, those evaluation was done by integrated HMT system that was newly developed for the tests in this year.

  19. A new goldfish model to evaluate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of drugs used for motion sickness in different gravity loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathers, Claire M.; Mukai, Chiaki; Smith, Cedric M.; Schraeder, Paul L.

    2001-08-01

    This paper proposes a new goldfish model to predict pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic effects of drugs used to treat motion sickness administered in differing gravity loads. The assumption of these experiments is that the vestibular system is dominant in producing motion sickness and that the visual system is secondary or of small import in the production of motion sickness. Studies will evaluate the parameter of gravity and the contribution of vision to the role of the neurovestibular system in the initiation of motion sickness with and without pharmacologic agents. Promethazine will be studied first. A comparison of data obtained in different groups of goldfish will be done (normal vs. acutely and chronically bilaterally blinded vs. sham operated). Some fish will be bilaterally blinded 10 months prior to initiation of the experiment (designated the chronically bilaterally blinded group of goldfish) to evaluate the neuroplasticity of the nervous system and the associated return of neurovestibular function. Data will be obtained under differing gravity loads with and without a pharmacological agent for motion sickness. Experiments will differentiate pharmacological effects on vision vs. neurovestibular input to motion sickness. Comparison of data obtained in the normal fish and in acutely and chronically bilaterally blinded fish with those obtained in fish with intact and denervated otoliths will differentiate if the visual or neurovestibular system is dominant in response to altered gravity and/or drugs. Experiments will contribute to validation of the goldfish as a model for humans since plasticity of the central nervous system allows astronauts to adapt to the altered visual stimulus conditions of 0-g. Space motion sickness may occur until such an adaptation is achieved.

  20. Evaluation of the peak MA-6600L microwave motion detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    A series of tests was performed on the Peak MA-6600L motion detection system. The primary objectives of these tests were to determine sensor detection patterns and to quantitate the effects of intruder velocity. System susceptibility to fluorescent lights, oscillatory motion, and environmental factors was also examined

  1. Evaluation of the Johnson AG-1007-7 (G-7) microwave motion detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A series of tests was performed on the Johnson Model AG-1007-7 motion detection system. The primary objectives of these tests were to determine sensor detection patterns and to quantitate the effects of intruder velocity. System susceptibility to fluorescent lights, oscillatory motion, and environmental factors was also examined

  2. A Prospective Cohort Study of Gated Stereotactic Liver Radiation Therapy Using Continuous Internal Electromagnetic Motion Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Esben S; Høyer, Morten; Hansen, Rune

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Intrafraction motion can compromise the treatment accuracy in liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Respiratory gating can improve treatment delivery; however, gating based on external motion surrogates is inaccurate. The present study reports the use of Calypso-based internal.......0 percentage points (range 0.7-22.0) without gating and 0.8 percentage point (range 0.2-2.0) with gating. CONCLUSIONS: Gating using internal motion monitoring was successfully applied for liver SBRT. It markedly improved the geometric and dosimetric accuracy compared with nongated standard treatment....

  3. Dosimetric and clinical effects of interfraction and intrafraction correlation errors during marker-based real-time tumor tracking for liver SBRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosu, Keita; Sumida, Iori; Suzuki, Osamu; Shiomi, Hiroya; Ota, Seiichi; Otani, Keisuke; Tamari, Keisuke; Seo, Yuji; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2018-03-01

    Correlation model error (CME) between the internal target and the external surrogate, and marker-tumor correlation error (MTCE) between the tumor and the implanted marker occur during marker-based real-time tumor tracking. The effects of these intrafraction and interfraction errors on the dose coverage in the clinical target volume (CTV) and on tumor control probability (TCP) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were evaluated in this study. Eight HCC patients treated with non-isocentric dose delivery by a robotic radiosurgery system were enrolled. The CMEs were extracted from the treatment log file, and the MTCEs were calculated from the preceding study. The CMEs and MTCEs were randomly added to each beam's robot position, and the changes in the TCP and the 2%, 95% and 99% dose coverage values for the CTV (D2, D95 and D99) were simulated. The data were statistically analyzed as a function of the CTV to planning target volume (PTV) margin, the dose fraction and the marker-tumor distance. Significant differences were observed in the majority of the CTV D2, D95 and D99 values and the TCP values. However, a linear regression revealed that ∆CTV D2, D95 and D99 have a weak correlation with ∆TCP. A dose-difference metric would be unable to detect a critical error for tumor control if the coverage changes for the CTV and ∆TCP were weakly correlated. Because the simulated TCP-based parameter determination was based on the dose simulation, including predicted interfraction and intrafraction errors, we concluded that a 95th percentile TCP-based parameter determination would be a robust strategy for ensuring tumor control while reducing doses to normal structures.

  4. Validating the Japanese Translation of the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation and Comparing Performance Levels of American and Japanese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Michi; Thornton, Ronald K.; Sokoloff, David R.

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses the Japanese translation of the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation (FMCE). Researchers are often interested in comparing the conceptual ideas of students with different cultural backgrounds. The FMCE has been useful in identifying the concepts of English-speaking students from different backgrounds. To identify effectively…

  5. Evaluation of motion correction for clinical dynamic contrast enhanced MRI of the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, M. J. A.; Kuijf, H. J.; Veldhuis, W. B.; Wessels, F. J.; van Leeuwen, M. S.; Pluim, J. P. W.

    2017-10-01

    Motion correction of 4D dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) series is required for diagnostic evaluation of liver lesions. The registration, however, is a challenging task, owing to rapid changes in image appearance. In this study, two different registration approaches are compared; a conventional pairwise method applying mutual information as metric and a groupwise method applying a principal component analysis based metric, introduced by Huizinga et al (2016). The pairwise method transforms the individual 3D images one by one to a reference image, whereas the groupwise registration method computes the metric on all the images simultaneously, exploiting the temporal information, and transforms all 3D images to a common space. The performance of the two registration methods was evaluated using 70 clinical 4D DCE-MRI series with the focus on the liver. The evaluation was based on the smoothness of the time intensity curves in lesions, lesion volume change after deformation and the smoothness of spatial deformation. Furthermore, the visual quality of subtraction images (pre-contrast image subtracted from the post contrast images) before and after registration was rated by two observers. Both registration methods improved the alignment of the DCE-MRI images in comparison to the non-corrected series. Furthermore, the groupwise method achieved better temporal alignment with smoother spatial deformations than the pairwise method. The quality of the subtraction images was graded satisfactory in 32% of the cases without registration and in 77% and 80% of the cases after pairwise and groupwise registration, respectively. In conclusion, the groupwise registration method outperforms the pairwise registration method and achieves clinically satisfying results. Registration leads to improved subtraction images.

  6. Real-time 2D/3D registration using kV-MV image pairs for tumor motion tracking in image guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Hugo; Steiner, Elisabeth; Stock, Markus; Georg, Dietmar; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Intra-fractional respiratory motion during radiotherapy leads to a larger planning target volume (PTV). Real-time tumor motion tracking by two-dimensional (2D)/3D registration using on-board kilo-voltage (kV) imaging can allow for a reduction of the PTV though motion along the imaging beam axis cannot be resolved using only one projection image. We present a retrospective patient study investigating the impact of paired portal mega-voltage (MV) and kV images on registration accuracy. Material and methods. We used data from 10 patients suffering from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) lung treatment. For each patient we acquired a planning computed tomography (CT) and sequences of kV and MV images during treatment. We compared the accuracy of motion tracking in six degrees-of-freedom (DOF) using the anterior-posterior (AP) kV sequence or the sequence of kV-MV image pairs. Results. Motion along cranial-caudal direction could accurately be extracted when using only the kV sequence but in AP direction we obtained large errors. When using kV-MV pairs, the average error was reduced from 2.9 mm to 1.5 mm and the motion along AP was successfully extracted. Mean registration time was 188 ms. Conclusion. Our evaluation shows that using kV-MV image pairs leads to improved motion extraction in six DOF and is suitable for real-time tumor motion tracking with a conventional LINAC.

  7. [An Introduction to A Newly-developed "Acupuncture Needle Manipulation Training-evaluation System" Based on Optical Motion Capture Technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ao; Yan, Xing-Ke; Liu, An-Guo

    2016-12-25

    In the present paper, the authors introduce a newly-developed "Acupuncture Needle Manipulation Training-evaluation System" based on optical motion capture technique. It is composed of two parts, sensor and software, and overcomes some shortages of mechanical motion capture technique. This device is able to analyze the data of operations of the pressing-hand and needle-insertion hand during acupuncture performance and its software contains personal computer (PC) version, Android version, and Internetwork Operating System (IOS) Apple version. It is competent in recording and analyzing information of any ope-rator's needling manipulations, and is quite helpful for teachers in teaching, training and examining students in clinical practice.

  8. Design and evaluation of an augmented reality simulator using leap motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Trinette; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Eagleson, Roy

    2017-10-01

    Advances in virtual and augmented reality (AR) are having an impact on the medical field in areas such as surgical simulation. Improvements to surgical simulation will provide students and residents with additional training and evaluation methods. This is particularly important for procedures such as the endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV), which residents perform regularly. Simulators such as NeuroTouch, have been designed to aid in training associated with this procedure. The authors have designed an affordable and easily accessible ETV simulator, and compare it with the existing NeuroTouch for its usability and training effectiveness. This simulator was developed using Unity, Vuforia and the leap motion (LM) for an AR environment. The participants, 16 novices and two expert neurosurgeons, were asked to complete 40 targeting tasks. Participants used the NeuroTouch tool or a virtual hand controlled by the LM to select the position and orientation for these tasks. The length of time to complete each task was recorded and the trajectory log files were used to calculate performance. The resulting data from the novices' and experts' speed and accuracy are compared, and they discuss the objective performance of training in terms of the speed and accuracy of targeting accuracy for each system.

  9. Parallel implementation and evaluation of motion estimation system algorithms on a distributed memory multiprocessor using knowledge based mappings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Alok Nidhi; Leung, Mun K.; Huang, Thomas S.; Patel, Janak H.

    1989-01-01

    Several techniques to perform static and dynamic load balancing techniques for vision systems are presented. These techniques are novel in the sense that they capture the computational requirements of a task by examining the data when it is produced. Furthermore, they can be applied to many vision systems because many algorithms in different systems are either the same, or have similar computational characteristics. These techniques are evaluated by applying them on a parallel implementation of the algorithms in a motion estimation system on a hypercube multiprocessor system. The motion estimation system consists of the following steps: (1) extraction of features; (2) stereo match of images in one time instant; (3) time match of images from different time instants; (4) stereo match to compute final unambiguous points; and (5) computation of motion parameters. It is shown that the performance gains when these data decomposition and load balancing techniques are used are significant and the overhead of using these techniques is minimal.

  10. Evaluation of knee range of motion: Correlation between measurements using a universal goniometer and a smartphone goniometric application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Rafael Aparecido; Derhon, Viviane; Brandalize, Michelle; Brandalize, Danielle; Rossi, Luciano Pavan

    2017-07-01

    Goniometers are commonly used to measure range of motion in the musculoskeletal system. Recently smartphone goniometry applications have become available to clinicians. Compare angular measures using a universal goniometer and a smartphone application. Thirty four healthy women with at least 20° of limited range of motion regarding knee extension were recruited. Knee flexion angles of the dominant limb were measured with a universal goniometer and the ROM © goniometric application for the smartphone. Three trained examiners compared the two assessment tools. Strong correlations were found between the measures of the universal goniometer and smartphone application (Pearson's correlation and interclass correlation coefficient > 0.93). The measurements with both devices demonstrated low dispersion and little variation. Measurements obtained using the smartphone goniometric application analyzed are as reliable as those of a universal goniometer. This application is therefore a useful tool for the evaluation of knee range of motion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Measuring interfraction and intrafraction lung function changes during radiation therapy using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipritidis, John; Keall, Paul J.; Hugo, Geoffrey; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Adaptive ventilation guided radiation therapy could minimize the irradiation of healthy lung based on repeat lung ventilation imaging (VI) during treatment. However the efficacy of adaptive ventilation guidance requires that interfraction (e.g., week-to-week), ventilation changes are not washed out by intrafraction (e.g., pre- and postfraction) changes, for example, due to patient breathing variability. The authors hypothesize that patients undergoing lung cancer radiation therapy exhibit larger interfraction ventilation changes compared to intrafraction function changes. To test this, the authors perform the first comparison of interfraction and intrafraction lung VI pairs using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI), a novel technique for functional lung imaging. Methods: The authors analyzed a total of 215 4D-CBCT scans acquired for 19 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) patients over 4–6 weeks of radiation therapy. This set of 215 scans was sorted into 56 interfraction pairs (including first day scans and each of treatment weeks 2, 4, and 6) and 78 intrafraction pairs (including pre/postfraction scans on the same-day), with some scans appearing in both sets. VIs were obtained from the Jacobian determinant of the transform between the 4D-CBCT end-exhale and end-inhale images after deformable image registration. All VIs were deformably registered to their corresponding planning CT and normalized to account for differences in breathing effort, thus facilitating image comparison in terms of (i) voxelwise Spearman correlations, (ii) mean image differences, and (iii) gamma pass rates for all interfraction and intrafraction VI pairs. For the side of the lung ipsilateral to the tumor, we applied two-sided t-tests to determine whether interfraction VI pairs were more different than intrafraction VI pairs. Results: The (mean ± standard deviation) Spearman correlation for interfraction VI pairs was r - Inter =0.52±0

  12. A comparison of the use of bony anatomy and internal markers for offline verification and an evaluation of the potential benefit of online and offline verification protocols for prostate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Helen A; Hansen, Vibeke N; Parker, Christopher C; Evans, Phil M; Norman, Andrew; Miles, Elizabeth; Harris, Emma J; Del-Acroix, Louise; Smith, Elizabeth; Keane, Richard; Khoo, Vincent S; Thompson, Alan C; Dearnaley, David P

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate the utility of intraprostatic markers in the treatment verification of prostate cancer radiotherapy. Specific aims were: to compare the effectiveness of offline correction protocols, either using gold markers or bony anatomy; to estimate the potential benefit of online correction protocol's using gold markers; to determine the presence and effect of intrafraction motion. Thirty patients with three gold markers inserted had pretreatment and posttreatment images acquired and were treated using an offline correction protocol and gold markers. Retrospectively, an offline protocol was applied using bony anatomy and an online protocol using gold markers. The systematic errors were reduced from 1.3, 1.9, and 2.5 mm to 1.1, 1.1, and 1.5 mm in the right-left (RL), superoinferior (SI), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively, using the offline correction protocol and gold markers instead of bony anatomy. The subsequent decrease in margins was 1.7, 3.3, and 4 mm in the RL, SI, and AP directions, respectively. An offline correction protocol combined with an online correction protocol in the first four fractions reduced random errors further to 0.9, 1.1, and 1.0 mm in the RL, SI, and AP directions, respectively. A daily online protocol reduced all errors to markers is effective in reducing the systematic error. The value of online protocols is reduced by intrafraction motion.

  13. Dosimetric implications of inter- and intrafractional prostate positioning errors during tomotherapy. Comparison of gold marker-based registrations with native MVCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wust, Peter; Joswig, Marc; Graf, Reinhold; Boehmer, Dirk; Beck, Marcus; Barelkowski, Thomasz; Budach, Volker; Ghadjar, Pirus [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiotherapy, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    For high-dose radiation therapy (RT) of prostate cancer, image-guided (IGRT) and intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) approaches are standard. Less is known regarding comparisons of different IGRT techniques and the resulting residual errors, as well as regarding their influences on dose distributions. A total of 58 patients who received tomotherapy-based RT up to 84 Gy for high-risk prostate cancer underwent IGRT based either on daily megavoltage CT (MVCT) alone (n = 43) or the additional use of gold markers (n = 15) under routine conditions. Planned Adaptive (Accuray Inc., Madison, WI, USA) software was used for elaborated offline analysis to quantify residual interfractional prostate positioning errors, along with systematic and random errors and the resulting safety margins after both IGRT approaches. Dosimetric parameters for clinical target volume (CTV) coverage and exposition of organs at risk (OAR) were also analyzed and compared. Interfractional as well as intrafractional displacements were determined. Particularly in the vertical direction, residual interfractional positioning errors were reduced using the gold marker-based approach, but dosimetric differences were moderate and the clinical relevance relatively small. Intrafractional prostate motion proved to be quite high, with displacements of 1-3 mm; however, these did not result in additional dosimetric impairments. Residual interfractional positioning errors were reduced using gold marker-based IGRT; however, this resulted in only slightly different final dose distributions. Therefore, daily MVCT-based IGRT without markers might be a valid alternative. (orig.) [German] Bei der hochdosierten Bestrahlung des Prostatakarzinoms sind die bildgesteuerte (IGRT) und die intensitaetsmodulierte Bestrahlung (IMRT) Standard. Offene Fragen gibt es beim Vergleich von IGRT-Techniken im Hinblick auf residuelle Fehler und Beeinflussungen der Dosisverteilung. Bei 58 Patienten, deren Hochrisiko-Prostatakarzinom am

  14. Evaluation of older driver head functional range of motion using portable immersive virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Karen B; Xu, Xu; Lin, Jia-Hua; Radwin, Robert G

    2015-10-01

    The number of drivers over 65 years of age continues to increase. Although neck rotation range has been identified as a factor associated with self-reported crash history in older drivers, it was not consistently reported as indicators of older driver performance or crashes across previous studies. It is likely that drivers use neck and trunk rotation when driving, and therefore the functional range of motion (ROM) (i.e. overall rotation used during a task) of older drivers should be further examined. Evaluate older driver performance in an immersive virtual reality, simulated, dynamic driving blind spot target detection task. A cross-sectional laboratory study recruited twenty-six licensed drivers (14 young between 18 and 35 years, and 12 older between 65 to 75 years) from the local community. Participants were asked to detect targets by performing blind spot check movements while neck and trunk rotation was tracked. Functional ROM, target detection success, and time to detection were analyzed. In addition to neck rotation, older and younger drivers on average rotated their trunks 9.96° and 18.04°, respectively. The younger drivers generally demonstrated 15.6° greater functional ROM (p<.001), were nearly twice as successful in target detection due to target location (p=.008), and had 0.46 s less target detection time (p=.016) than the older drivers. Assessing older driver functional ROM may provide more comprehensive assessment of driving ability than neck ROM. Target detection success and time to detection may also be part of the aging process as these measures differed between driver groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparing the force and motion conceptual evaluation and the force concept inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald K Thornton

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we compare and contrast student’s pretest/post-test performance on the Halloun-Hestenes force concept inventory (FCI to the Thornton-Sokoloff force and motion conceptual evaluation (FMCE. Both tests are multiple-choice assessment instruments whose results are used to characterize how well a first term, introductory physics course promotes conceptual understanding. However, the two exams have slightly different content domains, as well as different representational formats; hence, one exam or the other might better fit the interests of a given instructor or researcher. To begin the comparison, we outline how to determine a single-number score for the FMCE and present ranges of normalized gains on this exam. We then compare scores on the FCI and the FMCE for approximately 2000 students enrolled in the Studio Physics course at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute over a period of eight years (1998–2006 that encompassed significant evolution of the course and many different instructors. We found that the mean score on the FCI is significantly higher than the mean score on the FMCE, however there is a very strong relationship between scores on the two exams. The slope of a best fit line drawn through FCI versus FMCE data is approximately 0.54, and the correlation coefficient is approximately r=0.78, for preinstructional and postinstructional testings combined. In spite of this strong relationship, the assessments measure different normalized gains under identical circumstances. Additionally, students who scored well on one exam did not necessarily score well on the other. We use this discrepancy to uncover some subtle, but important, differences between the exams. We also present ranges of normalized gains for the FMCE in a variety of instructional settings.

  16. SU-E-J-187: Management of Optic Organ Motion in Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, M; Maurer, J [Cone Health Cancer Center, Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for optic nerve tumors can potentially use planning target volume (PTV) expansions as small as 1–5 mm. However, the motion of the intraorbital segment of the optic nerve has not been studied. Methods: A subject with a right optic nerve sheath meningioma underwent CT simulation in three fixed gaze positions: right, left, and fixed forward at a marker. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and the organs-at-risk (OAR) were contoured on all three scans. An IMRT plan using 10 static non-coplanar fields to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions was designed to treat the fixed-forward gazing GTV with a 1 mm PTV, then resulting coverage was evaluated for the GTV in the three positions. As an alternative, the composite structures were computed to generate the internal target volume (ITV), 1 mm expansion free-gazing PTV, and planning organat-risk volumes (PRVs) for free-gazing treatment. A comparable IMRT plan was created for the free-gazing PTV. Results: If the patient were treated using the fixed forward gaze plan looking straight, right, and left, the V100% for the GTV was 100.0%, 33.1%, and 0.1%, respectively. The volumes of the PTVs for fixed gaze and free-gazing plans were 0.79 and 2.21 cc, respectively, increasing the PTV by a factor of 2.6. The V100% for the fixed gaze and free-gazing plans were 0.85 cc and 2.8 cc, respectively increasing the treated volume by a factor of 3.3. Conclusion: Fixed gaze treatment appears to provide greater organ sparing than free-gazing. However unanticipated intrafraction right or left gaze can produce a geometric miss. Further study of optic nerve motion appears to be warranted in areas such as intrafraction optical confirmation of fixed gaze and optimized gaze directions to minimize lens and other normal organ dose in cranial radiotherapy.

  17. A Novel Markerless Technique to Evaluate Daily Lung Tumor Motion Based on Conventional Cone-Beam CT Projection Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yin; Zhong Zichun; Guo Xiaohu; Wang Jing; Anderson, John; Solberg, Timothy; Mao Weihua

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we present a novel markerless technique, based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) raw projection data, to evaluate lung tumor daily motion. Method and Materials: The markerless technique, which uses raw CBCT projection data and locates tumors directly on every projection, consists of three steps. First, the tumor contour on the planning CT is used to create digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) at every projection angle. Two sets of DRRs are created: one showing only the tumor, and another with the complete anatomy without the tumor. Second, a rigid two-dimensional image registration is performed to register the DRR set without the tumor to the CBCT projections. After the registration, the projections are subtracted from the DRRs, resulting in a projection dataset containing primarily tumor. Finally, a second registration is performed between the subtracted projection and tumor-only DRR. The methodology was evaluated using a chest phantom containing a moving tumor, and retrospectively in 4 lung cancer patients treated by stereotactic body radiation therapy. Tumors detected on projection images were compared with those from three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) CBCT reconstruction results. Results: Results in both static and moving phantoms demonstrate that the accuracy is within 1 mm. The subsequent application to 22 sets of CBCT scan raw projection data of 4 lung cancer patients includes about 11,000 projections, with the detected tumor locations consistent with 3D and 4D CBCT reconstruction results. This technique reveals detailed lung tumor motion and provides additional information than conventional 4D images. Conclusion: This technique is capable of accurately characterizing lung tumor motion on a daily basis based on a conventional CBCT scan. It provides daily verification of the tumor motion to ensure that these motions are within prior estimation and covered by the treatment planning volume.

  18. Field-In-Field Technique With Intrafractionally Modulated Junction Shifts for Craniospinal Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yom, Sue S.; Frija, Erik K. C.; Mahajan, Anita; Chang, Eric; Klein, Kelli C.; Shiu, Almon; Ohrt, Jared; Woo, Shiao

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To plan craniospinal irradiation with 'field-in-field' (FIF) homogenization in combination with daily, intrafractional modulation of the field junctions, to minimize the possibility of spinal cord overdose. Methods and Materials: Lateral cranial fields and posterior spinal fields were planned using a forward-planned, step-and-shoot FIF technique. Field junctions were automatically modulated and custom-weighted for maximal homogeneity within each treatment fraction. Dose-volume histogram analyses and film dosimetry were used to assess results. Results: Plan inhomogeneity improved with FIF. Planning with daily modulated junction shifts provided consistent dose delivery during each fraction of treatment across the junctions. Modulation minimized the impact of a 5-mm setup error at the junction. Film dosimetry confirmed that no point in the junction exceeded the anticipated dose. Conclusions: Field-in-field planning and modulated junction shifts improve the homogeneity and consistency of daily dose delivery, simplify treatment, and reduce the impact of setup errors

  19. Real-time intensity based 2D/3D registration using kV-MV image pairs for tumor motion tracking in image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, H.; Steiner, E.; Stock, M.; Georg, D.; Birkfellner, W.

    2014-03-01

    Intra-fractional respiratorymotion during radiotherapy is one of themain sources of uncertainty in dose application creating the need to extend themargins of the planning target volume (PTV). Real-time tumormotion tracking by 2D/3D registration using on-board kilo-voltage (kV) imaging can lead to a reduction of the PTV. One limitation of this technique when using one projection image, is the inability to resolve motion along the imaging beam axis. We present a retrospective patient study to investigate the impact of paired portal mega-voltage (MV) and kV images, on registration accuracy. We used data from eighteen patients suffering from non small cell lung cancer undergoing regular treatment at our center. For each patient we acquired a planning CT and sequences of kV and MV images during treatment. Our evaluation consisted of comparing the accuracy of motion tracking in 6 degrees-of-freedom(DOF) using the anterior-posterior (AP) kV sequence or the sequence of kV-MV image pairs. We use graphics processing unit rendering for real-time performance. Motion along cranial-caudal direction could accurately be extracted when using only the kV sequence but in AP direction we obtained large errors. When using kV-MV pairs, the average error was reduced from 3.3 mm to 1.8 mm and the motion along AP was successfully extracted. The mean registration time was of 190+/-35ms. Our evaluation shows that using kVMV image pairs leads to improved motion extraction in 6 DOF. Therefore, this approach is suitable for accurate, real-time tumor motion tracking with a conventional LINAC.

  20. Evaluation of a motion artifacts removal approach on breath-hold cine-magnetic resonance images of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancur, Julián.; Simon, Antoine; Schnell, Frédéric; Donal, Erwan; Hernández, Alfredo; Garreau, Mireille

    2013-11-01

    The acquisition of ECG-gated cine magnetic resonance images of the heart is routinely performed in apnea in order to suppress the motion artifacts caused by breathing. However, many factors including the 2D nature of the acquisition and the use of di erent beats to acquire the multiple-view cine images, cause this kind of artifacts to appear. This paper presents the qualitative evaluation of a method aiming to remove motion artifacts in multipleview cine images acquired on patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy diagnosis. The approach uses iconic registration to reduce for in-plane artifacts in long-axis-view image stacks and in-plane and out-of-plane motion artifacts in sort-axis-view image stack. Four similarity measures were evaluated: the normalized correlation, the normalized mutual information, the sum of absolute voxel di erences and the Slomka metric proposed by Slomka et al. The qualitative evaluation assessed the misalignment of di erent anatomical structures of the left ventricle as follows: the misalignment of the interventricular septum and the lateral wall for short-axis-view acquisitions and the misalignment between the short-axis-view image and long-axis-view images. Results showed the correction using the normalized correlation as the most appropriated with an 80% of success.

  1. Impact of an intra-cycle motion correction algorithm on overall evaluability and diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontone, Gianluca; Bertella, Erika; Baggiano, Andrea; Mushtaq, Saima; Loguercio, Monica; Segurini, Chiara; Conte, Edoardo; Beltrama, Virginia; Annoni, Andrea; Formenti, Alberto; Petulla, Maria; Trabattoni, Daniela; Pepi, Mauro [Centro Cardiologico Monzino, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); Andreini, Daniele; Montorsi, Piero; Bartorelli, Antonio L. [Centro Cardiologico Monzino, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Cardiovascular Sciences and Community Health, Milan (Italy); Guaricci, Andrea I. [University of Foggia, Department of Cardiology, Foggia (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a novel intra-cycle motion correction algorithm (MCA) on overall evaluability and diagnostic accuracy of cardiac computed tomography coronary angiography (CCT). From a cohort of 900 consecutive patients referred for CCT for suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), we enrolled 160 (18 %) patients (mean age 65.3 ± 11.7 years, 101 male) with at least one coronary segment classified as non-evaluable for motion artefacts. The CCT data sets were evaluated using a standard reconstruction algorithm (SRA) and MCA and compared in terms of subjective image quality, evaluability and diagnostic accuracy. The mean heart rate during the examination was 68.3 ± 9.4 bpm. The MCA showed a higher Likert score (3.1 ± 0.9 vs. 2.5 ± 1.1, p < 0.001) and evaluability (94%vs.79 %, p < 0.001) than the SRA. In a 45-patient subgroup studied by clinically indicated invasive coronary angiography, specificity, positive predictive value and accuracy were higher in MCA vs. SRA in segment-based and vessel-based models, respectively (87%vs.73 %, 50%vs.34 %, 85%vs.73 %, p < 0.001 and 62%vs.28 %, 66%vs.51 % and 75%vs.57 %, p < 0.001). In a patient-based model, MCA showed higher accuracy vs. SCA (93%vs.76 %, p < 0.05). MCA can significantly improve subjective image quality, overall evaluability and diagnostic accuracy of CCT. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of ranges of motion of a new constrained acetabular prosthesis for canine total hip replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Total hip replacement (THR) is considered to be the most effective treatment option for advanced osteoarthritis of the hip in large breed dogs. However, a proportion of post-THR patients suffer prosthesis dislocation for various reasons, which may be addressed by a constrained acetabular prosthesis design. The study proposed a new THR with constrained acetabular component that aimed to decrease the incidence of postoperative dislocation while maintaining the necessary range of motion (ROM); and, through computer-simulated implantations, evaluated the ROM of the THR with and without malpositioning of the acetabular component. Methods A new THR with a constrained acetabular component that had an inward eccentric lining and a 60° cut-out on the dorsal side was designed, and its computer-aided design models were implanted into the pelvic and femoral models reconstructed from the computed tomography data of six healthy Labrador Retriever dogs. The allowable and functional ROM of the implanted THR were determined via computer simulations. The contact patterns between the bone or the prosthetic components at extreme positions of the THR were analyzed. Influence of malpositioning of the acetabular component on the ROM was assessed. Results The means (SD) of the functional ranges for flexion, extension, adduction, abduction, internal rotation and external rotation were 51.8° (6.6°), 163.3° (7.3°), 33.5° (5.7°), 74.0° (3.7°), 41.5° (8.3°) and 65.2° (9.9°), respectively. Malpositioning of the acetabular component by 20° in one direction was found to reduce ROM in other directions (reducing lateral opening: flexion: 12°, adduction: 20°, internal/external rotations: < 20°; increasing lateral opening: extension and abduction: < 16°; reducing retroversion: extension: < 20°, abduction: 15°, external rotation: < 20°; increasing retroversion: flexion: < 20°, abduction, adduction and internal rotation: 20°). Conclusions From the computer

  3. Evaluation of soft-tissue artifacts when using anatomical and technical markers to measure mandibular motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chih Chen

    2011-06-01

    Conclusions: It appears that markers on the frontal nose bridge are good alternatives to transoral rigid devices for measuring mandibular motion, compared to optical frame markers and other skin markers on the face. The results of the current study will be helpful for establishing guidelines for marker placement when measuring mandibular movements in patients with potential temporomandibular disorders.

  4. Evaluation of strength and irradiated movement pattern resulting from trunk motions of the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontijo, Luciana Bahia; Pereira, Polianna Delfino; Neves, Camila Danielle Cunha; Santos, Ana Paula; Machado, Dionis de Castro Dutra; Bastos, Victor Hugo do Vale

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) is a physiotherapeutic concept based on muscle and joint proprioceptive stimulation. Among its principles, the irradiation is the reaction of the distinct regional muscle contractions to the position of the application of the motions. Objective. To investigate the presence of irradiated dorsiflexion and plantar flexion and the existing strength generated by them during application of PNF trunk motions. Methods. The study was conducted with 30 sedentary and female volunteers, the PNF motions of trunk flexion, and extension with the foot (right and left) positioned in a developed equipment coupled to the load cell, which measured the strength irradiated in Newton. Results. Most of the volunteers irradiated dorsal flexion in the performance of the flexion and plantar flexion during the extension motion, both presenting an average force of 8.942 N and 10.193 N, respectively. Conclusion. The distal irradiation in lower limbs became evident, reinforcing the therapeutic actions to the PNF indirect muscular activation.

  5. Evaluation of Strength and Irradiated Movement Pattern Resulting from Trunk Motions of the Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Bahia Gontijo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF is a physiotherapeutic concept based on muscle and joint proprioceptive stimulation. Among its principles, the irradiation is the reaction of the distinct regional muscle contractions to the position of the application of the motions. Objective. To investigate the presence of irradiated dorsiflexion and plantar flexion and the existing strength generated by them during application of PNF trunk motions. Methods. The study was conducted with 30 sedentary and female volunteers, the PNF motions of trunk flexion, and extension with the foot (right and left positioned in a developed equipment coupled to the load cell, which measured the strength irradiated in Newton. Results. Most of the volunteers irradiated dorsal flexion in the performance of the flexion and plantar flexion during the extension motion, both presenting an average force of 8.942 N and 10.193 N, respectively. Conclusion. The distal irradiation in lower limbs became evident, reinforcing the therapeutic actions to the PNF indirect muscular activation.

  6. Transient severe motion artifact related to gadoxetate disodium-enhanced liver MRI. Frequency and risk evaluation at a German institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Well, Lennart; Rausch, Vanessa Hanna; Adam, Gerhard; Henes, Frank Oliver; Bannas, Peter [Univ. Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2017-07-15

    Varying frequencies (5 - 18%) of contrast-related transient severe motion (TSM) imaging artifacts during gadoxetate disodium-enhanced arterial phase liver MRI have been reported. Since previous reports originated from the United States and Japan, we aimed to determine the frequency of TSM at a German institution and to correlate it with potential risk factors and previously published results. Two age- and sex-matched groups were retrospectively selected (gadoxetate disodium n = 89; gadobenate dimeglumine n = 89) from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI examinations in a single center. Respiratory motion-related artifacts in non-enhanced and dynamic phases were assessed independently by two readers blinded to contrast agents on a 4-point scale. Scores of ≥3 were considered as severe motion artifacts. Severe motion artifacts in arterial phases were considered as TSM if scores in all other phases were < 3. Potential risk factors for TSM were evaluated via logistic regression analysis. For gadoxetate disodium, the mean score for respiratory motion artifacts was significantly higher in the arterial phase (2.2 ± 0.9) compared to all other phases (1.6 ± 0.7) (p < 0.05). The frequency of TSM was significantly higher with gadoxetate disodium (n = 19; 21.1 %) than with gadobenate dimeglumine (n = 1; 1.1%) (p < 0.001). The frequency of TSM at our institution is similar to some, but not all previously published findings. Logistic regression analysis did not show any significant correlation between TSM and risk factors (all p>0.05). We revealed a high frequency of TSM after injection of gadoxetate disodium at a German institution, substantiating the importance of a diagnosis-limiting phenomenon that so far has only been reported from the United States and Japan. In accordance with previous studies, we did not identify associated risk factors for TSM.

  7. Rotational angiography with motion compensation: first-in-man use for the 3D evaluation of transcatheter valve prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Carl J; Lauritsch, Guenter; Van Mieghem, Nicholas; Rohkohl, Christopher; Serruys, Patrick W; van Geuns, Robert Jan; de Jaegere, Peter P T

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated a novel motion-compensating 3D reconstruction technique applied to rotational angiography (R-angio) which produces MSCT-like images for evaluation of implanted TAVI prostheses without requiring rapid pacing. Fifty-one consecutive patients were retrospectively identified who were evaluated with rotational angiography (R-angio) using the Siemens Artis zee angiographic C-arm system after TAVI with a Medtronic CoreValve prosthesis. A novel 3D image reconstruction technique was applied which corrects for cardiac motion. CoreValve frame geometry was evaluated according to the same protocol for MSCT and R-angio at the level of: 1) the inflow, 2) the nadirs, 3) central coaptation, and 4) the commissures. The native aortic annulus dimensions were measured at the nadirs of the three leaflets. Sizing ratio, prosthesis expansion and frame ellipticity were assessed. Good quality 3D reconstructions were obtained in 43 patients (84%) and failure was predictable prior to reconstruction in six of the other seven patients (superposition of radiographically dense object n=4, obesity n=2). Prosthesis inflow ellipticity and expansion were correlated with implantation depth (respectively r=-0.46, pprosthesis ellipticity at the level of central coaptation (median [25th-75th percentile]: 1.15 [1.10-1.20] vs. 1.08 [1.06-1.12], p=0.009). The inter-observer, inter-modality (MSCT, R-angio) variability in measurement at the level of coaptation for minimum diameter, maximum diameter and area were all low (respectively, mean ±SD:1.2% ±1.2; 1.7% ±1.8 and 2.0% ±1.3). R-angio with motion-compensated reconstruction offers new possibilities for evaluation of the post-implantation geometry of percutaneous structural heart prostheses and the potential clinical effects.

  8. Measurements and evaluation of building response to ground motion at various stages of construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, K.K.

    1976-01-01

    Architectural elements contribute significantly to the total seismic response of high-rise frame buildings. Although the characteristics of ground motion have considerable effect on the response of buildings, architectural elements increase the stiffness of the total system and reduce its period. The measurements also showed that partition influence is reduced over a period of time, as indicated by the lengthening of periods. At low levels of motion where the partitions contribute lateral stiffness to the system, they carry a proportional amount of the total lateral load and add sizable energy-absorbing capacity to the system. However, when the partitions are removed, the load formerly carried by the partitions is again transferred to the structural system. Because of the different response mode shapes of the models, the interstory drift at the first floor for the same roof displacement can vary significantly among models. In the models studied, the building without partitions at the first floor had the largest interstory drift

  9. Evaluation of imaging of the ventilatory lung motion in pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tadashige; Kanai, Hisakata; Tanaka, Masao; Hirayama, Jiro; Handa, Kenjiro

    1988-01-01

    Using perfusion lung scintigram with 99m Tc-macroaggregated albumin at maximal expiration (E) and inspiration (I), images of the motion of the regional pulmonary areas and lung margins during ventilation ((E-I)/I) was obtained in patients with various respiratory diseases. The image of (E-I)/I consisted of positive and negative components. The former component visualized the motion of the regional pulmonary areas that corresponded with the ventilatory amplitude of the videodensigram. The sum of the positive component of (E-I)/I in both lungs correlated with the vital capacity (n = 50, r = 0.62). It was 163.5 ± 52.5 in cases with a vital capacity of more than 3.01, 94.1 ± 61.5 in primary lung cancer, 89.2 ± 44.7 in chronic obstructive lung diseases and 69.0 ± 27.5 in diffuse interstitial pneumonia. The distribution pattern of pulmonary perfusion and the positive component of (E-I)/I matched fairly in many cases, but did not match in some cases. The negative component of (E-I)/I demonstrated the ventilatory motion of the lung margin and its decreased activity was shown in cases with hypoventilation of various causes including pleural diseases. The sum of the negative component of (E-I)/I in the both lungs correlated with the vital capacity (n = 50, r = 0.44). These results suggest that this technique is useful to estimate the regional pulmonary ventilatioin and motion of the lung margins. (author)

  10. Visualizing Stable Features in Live Cell Nucleus for Evaluation of the Cell Global Motion Compensation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sorokin, D.V.; Suchánková, Jana; Bártová, Eva; Matula, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2014), s. 45-49 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP302/12/G157; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : cell global motion compensation * UV laser bleaching * image registration Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  11. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies: impacts on risk assessment of uniform hazard spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.C.; Sewell, R.T.

    1996-07-01

    Conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates are studied: effects of uniform hazard spectrum (UHS) are examined for deriving probabilistic estimates of risk and in-structure demand levels, as compared to the more-exact use of realistic time history inputs (of given probability) that depend explicitly on magnitude and distance. This approach differs from the conventional in its exhaustive treatment of the ground-motion threat and in its more detailed assessment of component responses to that threat. The approximate UH-ISS (in-structure spectrum) obtained based on UHS appear to be very close to the more-exact results directed computed from scenario earthquakes. This conclusion does not depend on site configurations and structural characteristics. Also, UH-ISS has composite shapes and may not correspond to the characteristics possessed a single earthquake. The shape is largely affected by the structural property in most cases and can be derived approximately from the corresponding UHS. Motions with smooth spectra, however, will not have the same damage potential as those of more realistic motions with jagged spectral shapes. As a result, UHS-based analysis may underestimate the real demands in nonlinear structural analyses

  12. Quantification of organ motion based on an adaptive image-based scale invariant feature method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganelli, Chiara [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, piazza L. Da Vinci 32, Milano 20133 (Italy); Peroni, Marta [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, piazza L. Da Vinci 32, Milano 20133, Italy and Paul Scherrer Institut, Zentrum für Protonentherapie, WMSA/C15, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Italy); Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, piazza L. Da Vinci 32, Milano 20133, Italy and Bioengineering Unit, Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100 (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The availability of corresponding landmarks in IGRT image series allows quantifying the inter and intrafractional motion of internal organs. In this study, an approach for the automatic localization of anatomical landmarks is presented, with the aim of describing the nonrigid motion of anatomo-pathological structures in radiotherapy treatments according to local image contrast.Methods: An adaptive scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) was developed from the integration of a standard 3D SIFT approach with a local image-based contrast definition. The robustness and invariance of the proposed method to shape-preserving and deformable transforms were analyzed in a CT phantom study. The application of contrast transforms to the phantom images was also tested, in order to verify the variation of the local adaptive measure in relation to the modification of image contrast. The method was also applied to a lung 4D CT dataset, relying on manual feature identification by an expert user as ground truth. The 3D residual distance between matches obtained in adaptive-SIFT was then computed to verify the internal motion quantification with respect to the expert user. Extracted corresponding features in the lungs were used as regularization landmarks in a multistage deformable image registration (DIR) mapping the inhale vs exhale phase. The residual distances between the warped manual landmarks and their reference position in the inhale phase were evaluated, in order to provide a quantitative indication of the registration performed with the three different point sets.Results: The phantom study confirmed the method invariance and robustness properties to shape-preserving and deformable transforms, showing residual matching errors below the voxel dimension. The adapted SIFT algorithm on the 4D CT dataset provided automated and accurate motion detection of peak to peak breathing motion. The proposed method resulted in reduced residual errors with respect to standard SIFT

  13. Digital goniometric measurement of knee joint motion. Evaluation of usefulness for research settings and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleffken, Berry; van Breukelen, Gerard; Brink, Peter; van Mameren, Henk; Olde Damink, Steven

    2007-10-01

    An accurate and reproducible measurement method for joint motion is essential for classification of success or failure in therapeutic intervention. Digital goniometry is increasingly used as a method of classification for knee joint excursion. The reliability of goniometry however remains debatable. Aim of the study was to determine both intra- and inter-rater reproducibility in degrees, with an electronic digital inclinometer (EDI 320) for active and passive maximum flexion and active maximum extension of the knee joint and to determine the reproducibility of active and passive range of motion. A classical crossover design, with strict measurement protocol was used. Two raters measured 72 knee motions each, in 42 healthy subjects in four sessions. The smallest detectable difference (SDD) was calculated by using adjusted Bland and Altman plots for each knee excursion. No differences in joint excursions between the sexes were found. Passive maximum flexion showed larger excursions than active maximum flexion with additional higher levels of reproducibility. SDDs for inter-rater comparisons yielded: 0+/-3.9 degrees for active maximum extension, 0+/-7.4 degrees for active maximum flexion, 0+/-6.4 degrees for passive maximum flexion, 0+/-7.6 degrees for AROM and 0+/-5.4 degrees for PROM. Intra-rater SDDs showed increased reproducibility by 0.4-1.9 degrees. We conclude that interpretation of knee joint excursions in clinical settings is with these SDDs. Clinical and statistical differences in research settings within these SDDs are not a true difference but should be attributed to measurement error.

  14. Evaluation of an injectable hydrogel and polymethyl methacrylate in restoring mechanics to compressively fractured spine motion segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkovec, Christian; Vernengo, Andrea J; Stevenson, Peter; McGill, Stuart M

    2016-11-01

    Compressive fracture can produce profound changes to the mechanical profile of a spine segment. Minimally invasive repair has the potential to restore both function and structural integrity to an injured spine. Use of both hydrogels to address changes to the disc, combined with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) to address changes to the vertebral body, has the potential to facilitate repair. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if the combined use of hydrogel injection and PMMA could restore the mechanical profile of an axially injured spinal motion segment. This is a basic science study evaluating a combination of hydrogel injection and vertebroplasty on restoring mechanics to compressively injured porcine spine motion segments. Fourteen porcine spine motion segments were subject to axial compression until fracture using a dynamic servohydraulic testing apparatus. Rotational and compressive stiffness was measured for each specimen under the following conditions: initial undamaged, fractured, fatigue loading under compression, hydrogel injection, PMMA injection, and fatigue loading under compression. Group 1 received hydrogel injection followed by PMMA injection, whereas Group 2 received PMMA injection followed by hydrogel injection. This study was funded under a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada discovery grant. PMMA injection was found to alter the compressive stiffness properties of axially injured spine motion segments, restoring values from Groups 1 and 2 to 89.3%±29.3% and 81%±27.9% of initial values respectively. Hydrogel injection was found to alter the rotational stiffness properties, restoring specimens in Groups 1 and 2 to 151.5%±81% and 177.2%±54.9% of initial values respectively. Prolonged restoration of function was not possible, however, after further fatigue loading. Using this repair technique, replication of the mechanism of injury appears to cause a rapid deterioration in function of the motion segments

  15. Development of a robotic evaluation system for the ability of proprioceptive sensation in slow hand motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Mizoe, Genki; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a simple diagnostic methodology for checking the ability of proprioceptive/kinesthetic sensation by using a robotic device. The perception ability of virtual frictional forces is examined in operations of the robotic device by the hand at a uniform slow velocity along the virtual straight/circular path. Experimental results by healthy subjects demonstrate that percentage of correct answers for the designed perceptual tests changes in the motion direction as well as the arm configuration and the HFM (human force manipulability) measure. It can be supposed that the proposed methodology can be applied into the early detection of neuromuscular/neurological disorders.

  16. Motion and shape change when using an endorectal balloon during prostate radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, Laurence E.; D'Amico, Anthony V.; Kadam, Dnyanesh; Cormack, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate motion and shape change when using an endorectal balloon (ERB) in patients receiving radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods: In nine patients treated for prostate cancer using an ERB, the anterior wall of the ERB was contoured on right lateral images taken immediately before irradiation, and on left lateral images taken immediately after irradiation. Changes in the contours were used to calculate inter-fraction shape change and inter-imaging motion and shape change. Inter-imaging motion describes changes that occur after the right lateral image is taken that are seen in the left lateral image. Results: Eighty-six percent of all inter-imaging shifts of the anterior wall of the ERB were in the posterior direction (mean: 1.8 mm, 1 SD: 1.8 mm, maximum posterior shift: 2.8-7.2 mm). The inter-fraction shape change (1 SD) of the anterior wall was equivalent to a change in the angle of the balloon of 2.5-5.7 deg., with a range of 8-20 deg., depending on the patient. Inter-imaging shape changes were similar in size. Conclusions: The inter-imaging motion and shape changes may be explained by the patient relaxing some time after insertion of the ERB, indicating that it could be reduced by a waiting period after insertion before irradiation. Development of image-guided localization strategies should consider intra-fraction motion and also inter- and intra-fraction shape change

  17. Detecting Intra-Fraction Motion in Patients Undergoing Radiation Treatment Using a Low-Cost Wireless Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel J. P. C. Rodrigues

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The utility of a novel, high-precision, non-intrusive, wireless, accelerometerbased patient orientation monitoring system (APOMS in determining orientation change in patients undergoing radiation treatment is reported here. Using this system a small wireless accelerometer sensor is placed on a patient’s skin, broadcasting its orientation to the receiving station connected to a PC in the control area. A threshold-based algorithm is developed to identify the exact amount of the patient’s head orientation change. Through real-time measurements, an audible alarm can alert the radiation therapist if the user-defined orientation threshold is violated. Our results indicate that, in spite of its low-cost and simplicity, the APOMS is highly sensitive and offers accurate measurements. Furthermore, the APOMS is patient friendly, vendor neutral, and requires minimal user training. The versatile architecture of the APOMS makes it potentially suitable for variety of applications, including study of correlation between external and internal markers during Image-Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT, with no major changes in hardware setup or algorithm.

  18. Design and study of ultrasound-based automatic patient movement monitoring device for quantifying the intrafraction motion during teletherapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, S; Vinothraj, R

    2012-11-08

    The aim of the present study is to fabricate indigenously ultrasonic-based automatic patient's movement monitoring device (UPMMD) that immediately halts teletherapy treatment if a patient moves, claiming accurate field treatment. The device consists of circuit board, magnetic attachment device, LED indicator, speaker, and ultrasonic emitter and receiver, which are placed on either side of the treatment table. The ultrasonic emitter produces the ultrasound waves and the receiver accepts the signal from the patient. When the patient moves, the receiver activates the circuit, an audible warning sound will be produced in the treatment console room alerting the technologist to stop treatment. Simultaneously, the electrical circuit to the teletherapy machine will be interrupted and radiation will be halted. The device and alarm system can detect patient movements with a sensitivity of about 1 mm. Our results indicate that, in spite of its low-cost, low-power, high-precision, nonintrusive, light weight, reusable and simplicity features, UPMMD is highly sensitive and offers accurate measurements. Furthermore, UPMMD is patient-friendly and requires minimal user training. This study revealed that the device can prevent the patient's normal tissues from unnecessary radiation exposure, and also it is helpful to deliver the radiation to the correct tumor location. Using this alarming system the patient can be repositioned after interrupting the treatment machine manually. It also enables the technologists to do their work more efficiently.

  19. Intrafraction Variation of Mean Tumor Position During Image-Guided Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Chirag; Grills, Inga S.; Kestin, Larry L.; McGrath, Samuel; Ye Hong; Martin, Shannon K.; Yan Di

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Prolonged delivery times during daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) introduce concerns regarding intrafraction variation (IFV) of the mean target position (MTP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of the IFV-MTP and to assess target margins required to compensate for IFV and postonline CBCT correction residuals. Patient, treatment, and tumor characteristics were analyzed with respect to their impact on IFV-MTP. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with 140 tumors underwent 659 fractions of lung SBRT. Dose prescribed was 48 or 60 Gy in 12 Gy fractions. Translational target position correction of the MTP was performed via onboard CBCT. IFV-MTP was measured as the difference in MTP between the postcorrection CBCT and the posttreatment CBCT excluding residual error. Results: IFV-MTP was 0.2 ± 1.8 mm, 0.1 ± 1.9 mm, and 0.01 ± 1.5 mm in the craniocaudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral dimensions and the IFV-MTP vector was 2.3 ± 2.1 mm. Treatment time and excursion were found to be significant predictors of IFV-MTP. An IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 and 5 mm was seen in 40.8% and 7.2% of fractions, respectively. IFV-MTP greater than 2 mm was seen in heavier patients with larger excursions and longer treatment times. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were seen between immobilization devices. The stereotactic frame immobilization device was found to be significantly less likely to have an IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 mm compared with the alpha cradle, BodyFIX, and hybrid immobilization devices. Conclusions: Treatment time and respiratory excursion are significantly associated with IFV-MTP. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were found between immobilization devices. Target margins for IFV-MTP plus post-correction residuals are dependent on immobilization device with 5-mm uniform margins being acceptable for the frame immobilization device.

  20. Evaluation of the Leap Motion Controller during the performance of visually-guided upper limb movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niechwiej-Szwedo, Ewa; Gonzalez, David; Nouredanesh, Mina; Tung, James

    2018-01-01

    Kinematic analysis of upper limb reaching provides insight into the central nervous system control of movements. Until recently, kinematic examination of motor control has been limited to studies conducted in traditional research laboratories because motion capture equipment used for data collection is not easily portable and expensive. A recently developed markerless system, the Leap Motion Controller (LMC), is a portable and inexpensive tracking device that allows recording of 3D hand and finger position. The main goal of this study was to assess the concurrent reliability and validity of the LMC as compared to the Optotrak, a criterion-standard motion capture system, for measures of temporal accuracy and peak velocity during the performance of upper limb, visually-guided movements. In experiment 1, 14 participants executed aiming movements to visual targets presented on a computer monitor. Bland-Altman analysis was conducted to assess the validity and limits of agreement for measures of temporal accuracy (movement time, duration of deceleration interval), peak velocity, and spatial accuracy (endpoint accuracy). In addition, a one-sample t-test was used to test the hypothesis that the error difference between measures obtained from Optotrak and LMC is zero. In experiment 2, 15 participants performed a Fitts' type aiming task in order to assess whether the LMC is capable of assessing a well-known speed-accuracy trade-off relationship. Experiment 3 assessed the temporal coordination pattern during the performance of a sequence consisting of a reaching, grasping, and placement task in 15 participants. Results from the t-test showed that the error difference in temporal measures was significantly different from zero. Based on the results from the 3 experiments, the average temporal error in movement time was 40±44 ms, and the error in peak velocity was 0.024±0.103 m/s. The limits of agreement between the LMC and Optotrak for spatial accuracy measures ranged between

  1. An interdimensional correlation framework for real-time estimation of six degree of freedom target motion using a single x-ray imager during radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D. T.; Bertholet, J.; Kim, J.-H.; O'Brien, R.; Booth, J. T.; Poulsen, P. R.; Keall, P. J.

    2018-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that intrafraction tumour motion monitoring needs to include both 3D translations and 3D rotations. Presently, methods to estimate the rotation motion require the 3D translation of the target to be known first. However, ideally, translation and rotation should be estimated concurrently. We present the first method to directly estimate six-degree-of-freedom (6DoF) motion from the target’s projection on a single rotating x-ray imager in real-time. This novel method is based on the linear correlations between the superior-inferior translations and the motion in the other five degrees-of-freedom. The accuracy of the method was evaluated in silico with 81 liver tumour motion traces from 19 patients with three implanted markers. The ground-truth motion was estimated using the current gold standard method where each marker’s 3D position was first estimated using a Gaussian probability method, and the 6DoF motion was then estimated from the 3D positions using an iterative method. The 3D position of each marker was projected onto a gantry-mounted imager with an imaging rate of 11 Hz. After an initial 110° gantry rotation (200 images), a correlation model between the superior-inferior translations and the five other DoFs was built using a least square method. The correlation model was then updated after each subsequent frame to estimate 6DoF motion in real-time. The proposed algorithm had an accuracy (±precision) of  -0.03  ±  0.32 mm, -0.01  ±  0.13 mm and 0.03  ±  0.52 mm for translations in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions respectively; and, 0.07  ±  1.18°, 0.07  ±  1.00° and 0.06  ±  1.32° for rotations around the LR, SI and AP axes respectively on the dataset. The first method to directly estimate real-time 6DoF target motion from segmented marker positions on a 2D imager was devised. The algorithm was evaluated using 81

  2. Left ventricular regional myocardial motion and twist function in repaired tetralogy of Fallot evaluated by magnetic resonance tissue phase mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Meng-Chu; Peng, Hsu-Hsia; Wu, Ming-Ting; Weng, Ken-Pen; Su, Mao-Yuan; Menza, Marius; Huang, Hung-Chieh

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to characterise regional myocardial motion and twist function in the left ventricles (LV) in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF) and preserved LV global function. We recruited 47 rTOF patients and 38 age-matched normal volunteers. Tissue phase mapping (TPM) was performed for evaluating the LV myocardial velocity in longitudinal, radial, and circumferential (Vz, Vr, and VOe) directions in basal, middle, and apical slices. The VOe peak-to-peak (PTP) during systolic phases, the rotation angle of each slice, and VOe inconsistency were computed for evaluating LV twist function and VOe dyssynchrony. As compared to the controls, the rTOF patients presented decreased RV ejection fraction (RVEF) (p = 0.002) and preserved global LV ejection fraction (LVEF). They also demonstrated decreased systolic and diastolic Vz in several LV segments and higher diastolic Vr in the septum (all p < 0.05). A lower VOe PTP, higher VOe inconsistency, and reduced peak net rotation angle (all p < 0.05) were observed. The aforementioned indices demonstrated an altered LV twist function in rTOF patients in an early disease stage. MR TPM could provide information about early abnormalities of LV regional motion and twist function in rTOF patients with preserved LV global function. (orig.)

  3. Left ventricular regional myocardial motion and twist function in repaired tetralogy of Fallot evaluated by magnetic resonance tissue phase mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Meng-Chu; Peng, Hsu-Hsia [National Tsing Hua University, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Hsinchu (China); Wu, Ming-Ting [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung (China); National Yang-Ming University, Faculty of Medicine, Taipei (China); Weng, Ken-Pen [National Yang-Ming University, Faculty of Medicine, Taipei (China); Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung (China); Shu-Zen Junior College of Medicine and Management, Department of Physical Therapy, Kaohsiung (China); Su, Mao-Yuan [National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); Menza, Marius [Medical Center University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Huang, Hung-Chieh [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung (China)

    2018-01-15

    We aimed to characterise regional myocardial motion and twist function in the left ventricles (LV) in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF) and preserved LV global function. We recruited 47 rTOF patients and 38 age-matched normal volunteers. Tissue phase mapping (TPM) was performed for evaluating the LV myocardial velocity in longitudinal, radial, and circumferential (Vz, Vr, and VOe) directions in basal, middle, and apical slices. The VOe peak-to-peak (PTP) during systolic phases, the rotation angle of each slice, and VOe inconsistency were computed for evaluating LV twist function and VOe dyssynchrony. As compared to the controls, the rTOF patients presented decreased RV ejection fraction (RVEF) (p = 0.002) and preserved global LV ejection fraction (LVEF). They also demonstrated decreased systolic and diastolic Vz in several LV segments and higher diastolic Vr in the septum (all p < 0.05). A lower VOe PTP, higher VOe inconsistency, and reduced peak net rotation angle (all p < 0.05) were observed. The aforementioned indices demonstrated an altered LV twist function in rTOF patients in an early disease stage. MR TPM could provide information about early abnormalities of LV regional motion and twist function in rTOF patients with preserved LV global function. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation on Usefulness of Abdomen and Chest Motion Control Device (ABCHES) for the Tumor with a Large Respiratory Motion in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yoon Jin; Jeon, Mi Jin; Shin, Dong Bong; Kim, Jong Dae; Kim, Sel Joon; Ha, Jin Sook; Im, Jung Ho; Lee, Ik Jae

    2012-01-01

    It is essential to minimize the respiratory-induced motion of involved organs in the Tomotherapy for tumor located in the chest and abdominal region. However, the application of breathing control system to Tomotherapy is limited. This study was aimed to investigate the possible application of the ABCHES system and its efficacy as a means of breathing control in the tomotherapy treatment. Five subjects who were treated with a Hi-Art Tomotherapy system for lung, liver, gallbladder and pancreatic tumors. All patients undertook trained on two breathing method using an ABCHES, free breathing method and shallow breathing method. When the patients could carry out the breathing control, 4D-CT scan was a total of 10 4D tomographic images were acquired. A radiologist resident manually drew the tumor region, including surrounding normal organs, on each of CT images at the inhalation phase, the exhalation phase and the 40% phase (mid-inhalation) and average CT image. Those CT images were then exported to the Tomotherapy planning station. Data exported from the Tomotherapy planning station was analyzed to quantify characteristics of dose-volume histograms and motion of tumors. Organ motions under free breathing and shallow breathing were examined six directions, respectively. Radiation exposure to the surrounding organs were also measured and compared. Organ motion is in the six directions with more than a 5 mm displacement. A total of 12 Organ motions occurred during free breathing while organ motions decreased to 2 times during shallow breathing under the use of Abches. Based on the quantitative analysis of the dose-volume histograms shallow breathing showed lower resulting values, compared to free breathing, in every measure. That is, treatment volume, the dose of radiation to the tumor and two surrounding normal organs (mean doses), the volume of healthy tissue exposed to radiation were lower at the shallow breathing state. This study proposes that the use of ABCHES is

  5. Correlation between hip function and knee kinematics evaluated by three-dimensional motion analysis during lateral and medial side-hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Hiromitsu; Takiguchi, Kohei; Shibata, Yohei; Okubo, Satoshi; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Kuroda, Ryosuke

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] Kinematic and kinetic characteristics of the limb during side-hopping and hip/knee interaction during this motion have not been clarified. The purposes of this study were to examine the biomechanical parameters of the knee during side hop and analyze its relationship with clinical measurements of hip function. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven male college rugby players were included. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to assess motion characteristics of the knee during side hop. In addition, hip range of motion and muscle strength were evaluated. Subsequently, the relationship between knee motion and the clinical parameters of the hip was analyzed. [Results] In the lateral touchdown phase, the knee was positioned in an abducted and externally rotated position, and increasing abduction moment was applied to the knee. An analysis of the interaction between knee motion and hip function showed that range of motion for hip internal rotation was significantly correlated with external rotation angle and external rotation/abduction moments of the knee during the lateral touchdown phase. [Conclusion] Range of motion for hip internal rotation should be taken into consideration for identifying the biomechanical characteristics in the side hop test results.

  6. Key motion characteristics of side-step movements in hip-hop dance and their effect on the evaluation by judges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nahoko; Nunome, Hiroyuki; Ikegami, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    In hip-hop dance, the elements of motion that discriminate the skill levels of dancers and that influence the evaluations by judges have not been clearly identified. This study set out to extract these motion characteristics from the side-step movements of hip-hop dancing. Eight expert and eight non-expert dancers performed side-step movements, which were recorded using a motion capture system. Nine experienced judges evaluated the dancers' performances. Several parameters, including the range of motion (ROM) of the joint angles (neck, trunk, hip, knee, and face inclination) and phase delays between these angular motions were calculated. A quarter-cycle phase delay between the neck motion and other body parts, seen only in the expert dancers, is highlighted as an element that can distinguish dancers' skill levels. This feature of the expert dancers resulted in a larger ROM during the face inclination than that for the non-expert dancers. In addition, the experts exhibited a bottom-to-top segmental sequence in the horizontal direction while the non-experts did not demonstrate any such sequential motion. Of these kinematic parameters, only the ROM of the face inclination was highly correlated to the judging score and is regarded as being the most appealing element of the side-step movement.

  7. Evaluation of prospective motion correction of high-resolution 3D-T2-FLAIR acquisitions in epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Sjoerd B; Micallef, Caroline; Barkhof, Frederik; Hill, Andrea; Winston, Gavin P; Ourselin, Sebastien; Duncan, John S

    2018-03-02

    T2-FLAIR is the single most sensitive MRI contrast to detect lesions underlying focal epilepsies but 3D sequences used to obtain isotropic high-resolution images are susceptible to motion artefacts. Prospective motion correction (PMC) - demonstrated to improve 3D-T1 image quality in a pediatric population - was applied to high-resolution 3D-T2-FLAIR scans in adult epilepsy patients to evaluate its clinical benefit. Coronal 3D-T2-FLAIR scans were acquired with a 1mm isotropic resolution on a 3T MRI scanner. Two expert neuroradiologists reviewed 40 scans without PMC and 40 with navigator-based PMC. Visual assessment addressed six criteria of image quality (resolution, SNR, WM-GM contrast, intensity homogeneity, lesion conspicuity, diagnostic confidence) on a seven-point Likert scale (from non-diagnostic to outstanding). SNR was also objectively quantified within the white matter. PMC scans had near-identical scores on the criteria of image quality to non-PMC scans, with the notable exception that intensity homogeneity was generally worse. Using PMC, the percentage of scans with bad image quality was substantially lower than without PMC (3.25% vs. 12.5%) on the other five criteria. Quantitative SNR estimates revealed that PMC and non-PMC had no significant difference in SNR (p=0.07). Application of prospective motion correction to 3D-T2-FLAIR sequences decreased the percentage of low-quality scans, reducing the number of scans that need to be repeated to obtain clinically useful data. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Evaluation of motion compensation method for assessing the gastrointestinal motility using three dimensional endoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Fujinaga, Tetsuji; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2016-03-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) are the most common gastrointestinal disorders. The term "functional" is generally applied to disorders where there are no structural abnormalities. Gastrointestinal dysmotility is one of the several mechanisms that have been proposed for the pathogenesis of FGID and is usually examined by manometry, a pressure test. There have been no attempts to examine the gastrointestinal dysmotility by endoscopy. We have proposed an imaging system for the assessment of gastric motility using a three-dimensional endoscope. After we newly developed a threedimensional endoscope and constructed a wave simulated model, we established a method of extracting three-dimensional contraction waves derived from a three-dimensional profile of the wave simulated model obtained with the endoscope. In the study, the endoscope and the wave simulated model were fixed to the ground. However, in a clinical setting, it is hard for endoscopists to keep the endoscope still. Moreover, stomach moves under the influence of breathing. Thus, three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall is necessary for the accurate assessment of gastrointestinal motility. In this paper, we propose a motion compensation method using three-dimensional scene flow. The scene flow of the feature point calculated by obtained images in a time series enables the three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall. We confirmed the validity of a proposed method first by a known-movement object and then by a wave simulated model.

  9. Procedural Audio in Computer Games Using Motion Controllers: An Evaluation on the Effect and Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Böttcher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A study has been conducted into whether the use of procedural audio affects players in computer games using motion controllers. It was investigated whether or not (1 players perceive a difference between detailed and interactive procedural audio and prerecorded audio, (2 the use of procedural audio affects their motor-behavior, and (3 procedural audio affects their perception of control. Three experimental surveys were devised, two consisting of game sessions and the third consisting of watching videos of gameplay. A skiing game controlled by a Nintendo Wii balance board and a sword-fighting game controlled by a Wii remote were implemented with two versions of sound, one sample based and the other procedural based. The procedural models were designed using a perceptual approach and by alternative combinations of well-known synthesis techniques. The experimental results showed that, when being actively involved in playing or purely observing a video recording of a game, the majority of participants did not notice any difference in sound. Additionally, it was not possible to show that the use of procedural audio caused any consistent change in the motor behavior. In the skiing experiment, a portion of players perceived the control of the procedural version as being more sensitive.

  10. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A STRUCTURE AND MOTION STRATEGY IN ARCHITECTURE AND CULTURAL HERITAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Roncella

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A large number of strategies and implementations of Structure from Motion (SFM have been developed; some are being included in photogrammetric software packages. However, finding specific parameters highlighting the efficiency, the accuracy and the reliability of a SFM strategy it is difficult. While most strategies will almost always succeed in any given task (i.e. the orientation of a certain image sequence, judging how good is actually the result, is somehow still an open issue. In the first part of this paper some alternatives and parameters are presented and their pro and cons discussed, with the objective to find out whether there are alternatives to the well-established method of the check points. In the second part, the results of most of the image sequences made available by the workshop organizers, processed with the SFM approach developed by the authors, are presented; results for the sequences where external information (such as ground control points or a DTM were available are presented in more detail.

  11. Clinical value of kinematic MR imaging in the evaluation of patients with exacerbated pain in cervical spine motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhle, C.; Brossmann, J.; Biederer, J.; Grimm, J.; Mohr, A.; Heller, M.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of kinematic MR imaging in patients with cervical radiculopathy and increasing symptoms after provocative maneuvers at flexion, extension, axial rotation and coupled motion of the cervical spine. Methods: Thirty-five patients with cervical disc herniation or cervical spondylosis in whom symptoms were elicited at flexion, extension, axial rotation and coupled motion were studied inside a positioning device using T 2 -weighted TSE, 2D-FLASH, and reformatted 3D DESS and 3D-FISP sequences. The images were evaluated for the size of disc herniations, the foraminal size and cervical cord displacement at provocative position compared with neutral position (0 ). In addition, the value of kinematic MR images were interpretated with regard to changes in the therapeutic procedure and intraoperative patient positioning. Results: Compared with the neutral position (0 ) a change in disc herniations was not found in any (0%) of the provocative positions. In five patients (14%) cervical cord displacement was noted at axial rotation. The foraminal size varied depending on the provocative position, increasing at flexion and decreasing at extension. Conclusion: Kinematic MR imaging in patients with cervical radiculopathy and increasing symptoms at provocative maneuvers provides no additional information for the therapeutic decision-making process. (orig.) [de

  12. A simple and inexpensive test-rig for evaluating the performance of motion sensors used in movement disorders research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Thushara; Yohanandan, Shivanthan A C; McDermott, Hugh J

    2016-03-01

    Since the advent of electromyogram recording, precise measures of tremor and gait have been used to study movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Now, a wide range of accelerometers and other motion-tracking technologies exist to better inform researchers and clinicians, yet such systems are rarely tested for accuracy or suitability before use. Our inexpensive test-rig can produce sinusoidal displacements using a simple cantilever system driven by a subwoofer. Controlled sinusoids were generated using computer software, and the displacement amplitudes of the test-rig were verified with fiducial marker tracking. To illustrate the use of the test-rig, we evaluated an accelerometer and an electromagnetic motion tracker. Accelerometry recordings were accurate to within ±0.09 g of actual peak-to-peak amplitude with a frequency response close to unity gain between 1 and 20 Hz. The electromagnetic sensor underestimated peak displacement by 2.68 mm, which was largely due to a diminishing gain with increasing frequency. Both sensors had low distortion. Overall sensitivity was limited by noise for the accelerometer and quantisation resolution for the electromagnetic sensor. Our simple and low-cost test-rig can be used to bench-test sensors used in movement disorders research. It was able to produce reliable sinusoidal displacements and worked across the 1- to 20-Hz frequency range.

  13. Evaluation of the respiratory motion influence in the 3D dose distribution of IMRT breast radiation therapy treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizar, J. C.; Santos, L. F.; Brandão, F. C.; Volpato, K. C.; Guimarães, F. S.; Pavoni, J. F.

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to evaluate the motion influence in the tridimensional dose distribution due to respiratory for IMRT breast planning technique. To simulate the breathing movement an oscillating platform was used. To simulate the breast, MAGIC-f phantoms were used. CT images of a static phantom were obtained and the IMRT treatment was planned based on them. One phantom was irradiated static in the platform and two other phantoms were irradiated while oscillating in the platform with amplitudes of 0.34 cm and 1.22 cm, the fourth phantom was used as reference in the MRI acquisition. The percentage of points approved in the 3D global gamma analyses (3%/3mm) when comparing the dose distribution of the static phantom with the oscillating ones was 91% for the 0.34cm amplitude and 62% for the 1.22 cm amplitude. Considering this result, the differences found in the dosimetric analyses for the oscillating amplitude of 0.34cm could be considered acceptable in a real treatment. The isodose distribution analyses showed a decrease of dose in the anterior breast region and an increase of dose on the posterior breast region, being these differences most pronounced for large amplitude motion.

  14. The urethral motion profile: a novel method to evaluate urethral support and mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Ka Lai; Dietz, Hans Peter

    2008-06-01

    Urethral hypermobility is one of the theories developed to explain stress urinary incontinence. Traumatic damage to urethral supports during vaginal childbirth may be an important contributor. To establish a methodology to study urethral mobility, to determine the urethral motion profile in a cohort of young nulliparous women, and to determine changes in urethral mobility after childbirth. Ultrasound volume datasets of 44 nulligravidae and the 4D antepartum and post-partum datasets of 73 nulliparous women were assessed using post-processing software. Volumes were acquired translabially, at rest and on Valsalva, after voiding while supine. We marked six equidistant points from bladder neck to external urethral meatus and determined the position of these points relative to the inferoposterior symphyseal margin. Mobility vector distances for these points were determined by the formula radical{(Vy - Ry)(2)+ (Vx - Rx)(2)} (V = Valsalva; R = rest). Reproducibility was determined in a test-retest series of 21 patients. Changes in urethral mobility after delivery were determined by comparing antepartum and post-partum mobility vectors. The method was highly reproducible, with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.80 (confidence interval 0.73-0.86) for mobility vectors. The distal urethra was consistently found to be less mobile than the proximal part (P mobility was significantly increased in five out of six segments. There was a trend towards more marked changes in mobility after vaginal operative delivery. Urethral mobility can be studied using 3D/4D translabial ultrasound. There is an increase in urethral mobility after childbirth, especially after instrumental delivery, suggesting an alteration in urethral support. This increase in mobility seems to affect the entire urethra.

  15. A pilot application of a questionnaire to evaluate visually induced motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo G. Solimini

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: The increasing popularity of tri-dimensional (3D movies has raised public concern and media interest about the safety of projected images for spectators. No specific instrument exists to assess the occurrence of visually induced motion sickness (VIMS symptoms in 3D movie spectators in movie theaters.

    Methods: We developed a questionnaire containing 20 items divided into socio demographics, individual characteristics, movie vision characteristics and VIMS symptoms (during, right after, and at two hours from the viewing of the movie . The questionnaire was self administered to 38 subjects, asking them to report time taken for its completion, comments and eventual difficulties in interpreting items.

    Results: Poor understanding or problems in identifying the correct item choice were noted for 4 questions belonging to the socio demographics section that were simplified in the final version of the questionnaire. Two other questions were merged into one after homogeneity analysis. Most VIMS symptoms were observed during the movie and quickly thereafter. Tired eyes was the symptom most often reported (39.5% of responders followed by headache (18.4%, dizziness (18.4% and nausea (15.8%. Double vision and palpitation were reported with very low frequency (respectively 5.3% and 2.3% and vomit was not reported by any respondent. Homogeneity of symptom items was good (Cronbach alpha= 0.69. Reliability analysis showed satisfactory item-total correlations (alpha coefficient ranging from 0.61 to 0.73.

    Conclusions: The refined survey questionnaire can be applied in future studies to assess the frequency of VIMS symptoms in spectators of 3D movies and to identify the risk factors connected to inter-individual differences in susceptibility and to the characteristics of the movie viewing.

  16. A phantom model demonstration of tomotherapy dose painting delivery, including managed respiratory motion without motion management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kissick, Michael W; Mo Xiaohu; McCall, Keisha C; Mackie, Thomas R [Department of Medical Physics, Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research, 111 Highland Avenue, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Schubert, Leah K [Radiation Oncology Department, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Westerly, David C, E-mail: mwkissick@wisc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)

    2010-05-21

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate a potential alternative scenario for accurate dose-painting (non-homogeneous planned dose) delivery at 1 cm beam width with helical tomotherapy (HT) in the presence of 1 cm, three-dimensional, intra-fraction respiratory motion, but without any active motion management. A model dose-painting experiment was planned and delivered to the average position (proper phase of a 4DCT scan) with three spherical PTV levels to approximate dose painting to compensate for hypothetical hypoxia in a model lung tumor. Realistic but regular motion was produced with the Washington University 4D Motion Phantom. A small spherical Virtual Water(TM) phantom was used to simulate a moving lung tumor inside of the LUNGMAN(TM) anthropomorphic chest phantom to simulate realistic heterogeneity uncertainties. A piece of 4 cm Gafchromic EBT(TM) film was inserted into the 6 cm diameter sphere. TomoTherapy, Inc., DQA(TM) software was used to verify the delivery performed on a TomoTherapy Hi-Art II(TM) device. The dose uncertainty in the purposeful absence of motion management and in the absence of large, low frequency drifts (periods greater than the beam width divided by the couch velocity) or randomness in the breathing displacement yields very favorable results. Instead of interference effects, only small blurring is observed because of the averaging of many breathing cycles and beamlets and the avoidance of interference. Dose painting during respiration with helical tomotherapy is feasible in certain situations without motion management. A simple recommendation is to make respiration as regular as possible without low frequency drifting. The blurring is just small enough to suggest that it may be acceptable to deliver without motion management if the motion is equal to the beam width or smaller (at respiration frequencies) when registered to the average position.

  17. A phantom model demonstration of tomotherapy dose painting delivery, including managed respiratory motion without motion management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kissick, Michael W; Mo Xiaohu; McCall, Keisha C; Mackie, Thomas R; Schubert, Leah K; Westerly, David C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate a potential alternative scenario for accurate dose-painting (non-homogeneous planned dose) delivery at 1 cm beam width with helical tomotherapy (HT) in the presence of 1 cm, three-dimensional, intra-fraction respiratory motion, but without any active motion management. A model dose-painting experiment was planned and delivered to the average position (proper phase of a 4DCT scan) with three spherical PTV levels to approximate dose painting to compensate for hypothetical hypoxia in a model lung tumor. Realistic but regular motion was produced with the Washington University 4D Motion Phantom. A small spherical Virtual Water(TM) phantom was used to simulate a moving lung tumor inside of the LUNGMAN(TM) anthropomorphic chest phantom to simulate realistic heterogeneity uncertainties. A piece of 4 cm Gafchromic EBT(TM) film was inserted into the 6 cm diameter sphere. TomoTherapy, Inc., DQA(TM) software was used to verify the delivery performed on a TomoTherapy Hi-Art II(TM) device. The dose uncertainty in the purposeful absence of motion management and in the absence of large, low frequency drifts (periods greater than the beam width divided by the couch velocity) or randomness in the breathing displacement yields very favorable results. Instead of interference effects, only small blurring is observed because of the averaging of many breathing cycles and beamlets and the avoidance of interference. Dose painting during respiration with helical tomotherapy is feasible in certain situations without motion management. A simple recommendation is to make respiration as regular as possible without low frequency drifting. The blurring is just small enough to suggest that it may be acceptable to deliver without motion management if the motion is equal to the beam width or smaller (at respiration frequencies) when registered to the average position.

  18. Predicting respiratory tumor motion with multi-dimensional adaptive filters and support vector regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, Nadeem; Wiersma, Rodney; Mao Weihua; Xing Lei; Shanker, Piyush; Gudmundsson, Olafur; Widrow, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Intra-fraction tumor tracking methods can improve radiation delivery during radiotherapy sessions. Image acquisition for tumor tracking and subsequent adjustment of the treatment beam with gating or beam tracking introduces time latency and necessitates predicting the future position of the tumor. This study evaluates the use of multi-dimensional linear adaptive filters and support vector regression to predict the motion of lung tumors tracked at 30 Hz. We expand on the prior work of other groups who have looked at adaptive filters by using a general framework of a multiple-input single-output (MISO) adaptive system that uses multiple correlated signals to predict the motion of a tumor. We compare the performance of these two novel methods to conventional methods like linear regression and single-input, single-output adaptive filters. At 400 ms latency the average root-mean-square-errors (RMSEs) for the 14 treatment sessions studied using no prediction, linear regression, single-output adaptive filter, MISO and support vector regression are 2.58, 1.60, 1.58, 1.71 and 1.26 mm, respectively. At 1 s, the RMSEs are 4.40, 2.61, 3.34, 2.66 and 1.93 mm, respectively. We find that support vector regression most accurately predicts the future tumor position of the methods studied and can provide a RMSE of less than 2 mm at 1 s latency. Also, a multi-dimensional adaptive filter framework provides improved performance over single-dimension adaptive filters. Work is underway to combine these two frameworks to improve performance.

  19. Construction method and application of 3D velocity model for evaluation of strong seismic motion and its cost performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Hisanori; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Based on experiences of making subsurface structure models for seismic strong motion evaluation, the advantages and disadvantages in terms of convenience and cost for several methods used to make such models were reported. As for the details, gravity and micro-tremor surveys were considered to be highly valid in terms of convenience and cost. However, stratigraphy and seismic velocity structure are required to make accurate 3-D subsurface structures. To realize these, methods for directly examining subsurface ground or using controlled tremor sources (at high cost) are needed. As a result, it was summarized that in modeling subsurface structures, some sort of plan including both types of methods is desirable and that several methods must be combined to match one's intended purposes and budget. (authors)

  20. Extreme hip motion in professional ballet dancers: dynamic and morphological evaluation based on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolo, Frank C; Charbonnier, Caecilia; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Duc, Sylvain R; Lubbeke, Anne; Duthon, Victoria B; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Menetrey, Jacques; Becker, Christoph D

    2013-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) of the cam or pincer type based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a group of adult female professional ballet dancers, and to quantify, in vivo, the range of motion (ROM) and congruence of the hip joint in the splits position. Institutional review board approval and informed consent from each volunteer were obtained. Thirty symptomatic or asymptomatic adult female professional ballet dancers (59 hips) and 14 asymptomatic non-dancer adult women (28 hips, control group) were included in the present study. All subjects underwent MRI in the supine position, while, for the dancers, additional images were acquired in the splits position. Labral abnormalities, cartilage lesions, and osseous abnormalities of the acetabular rim were assessed at six positions around the acetabulum. A morphological analysis, consisting of the measurement of the α angle, acetabular depth, and acetabular version, was performed. For the dancers, ROM and congruency of the hip joint in the splits position were measured. Acetabular cartilage lesions greater than 5 mm were significantly more frequent in dancer's hips than in control hips (28.8 vs 7.1%, p = 0.026), and were mostly present at the superior position in dancers. Distribution of labral lesions between the dancers and the control group showed substantially more pronounced labral lesions at the superior, posterosuperior, and anterosuperior positions in dancers (54 lesions in 28 dancer's hips vs 10 lesions in 8 control hips). Herniation pits were found significantly more often (p = 0.002) in dancer's hips (n = 31, 52.5%), 25 of them being located in a superior position. A cam-type morphology was found for one dancer and a retroverted hip was noted for one control. Femoroacetabular subluxations were observed in the splits position (mean: 2.05 mm). The prevalence of typical FAI of the cam or pincer type was low in this selected population of professional ballet

  1. 4D in-beam positron emission tomography for verification of motion-compensated ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parodi, Katia; Saito, Nami; Chaudhri, Naved; Richter, Christian; Durante, Marco; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Rietzel, Eike; Bert, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Clinically safe and effective treatment of intrafractionally moving targets with scanned ion beams requires dedicated delivery techniques such as beam tracking. Apart from treatment delivery, also appropriate methods for validation of the actual tumor irradiation are highly desirable. In this contribution the feasibility of four-dimensionally (space and time) resolved, motion-compensated in-beam positron emission tomography (4DibPET) was addressed in experimental studies with scanned carbon ion beams. Methods: A polymethyl methracrylate block sinusoidally moving left-right in beam's eye view was used as target. Radiological depth changes were introduced by placing a stationary ramp-shaped absorber proximal of the moving target. Treatment delivery was compensated for motion by beam tracking. Time-resolved, motion-correlated in-beam PET data acquisition was performed during beam delivery with tracking the moving target and prolonged after beam delivery first with the activated target still in motion and, finally, with the target at rest. Motion-compensated 4DibPET imaging was implemented and the results were compared to a stationary reference irradiation of the same treatment field. Data were used to determine feasibility of 4DibPET but also to evaluate offline in comparison to in-beam PET acquisition. Results: 4D in-beam as well as offline PET imaging was found to be feasible and offers the possibility to verify the correct functioning of beam tracking. Motion compensation of the imaged β + -activity distribution allows recovery of the volumetric extension of the delivered field for direct comparison with the reference stationary condition. Observed differences in terms of lateral field extension and penumbra in the direction of motion were typically less than 1 mm for both imaging strategies in comparison to the corresponding reference distributions. However, in-beam imaging retained a better spatial correlation of the measured activity with the delivered

  2. Fast motion-including dose error reconstruction for VMAT with and without MLC tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravkilde, Thomas; Keall, Paul J.; Grau, Cai

    2014-01-01

    Multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking is a promising and clinically emerging treatment modality for radiotherapy of mobile tumours. Still, new quality assurance (QA) methods are warranted to safely introduce MLC tracking in the clinic. The purpose of this study was to create and experimentally...... validate a simple model for fast motion-including dose error reconstruction applicable to intrafractional QA of MLC tracking treatments of moving targets. MLC tracking experiments were performed on a standard linear accelerator with prototype MLC tracking software guided by an electromagnetic transponder...

  3. Motion sickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bles, Willem; Bos, Jelte E.; Kruit, Hans

    2000-01-01

    The number of recently published papers on motion sickness may convey the impression that motion sickness is far from being understood. The current review focusses on a concept which tends to unify the different manifestations and theories of motion sickness. The paper highlights the relations

  4. Artificial neural network based gynaecological image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatment planning correction of intra-fractional organs at risk dose variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Jaberi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Intra-fractional organs at risk (OARs deformations can lead to dose variation during image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT. The aim of this study was to modify the final accepted brachytherapy treatment plan to dosimetrically compensate for these intra-fractional organs-applicators position variations and, at the same time, fulfilling the dosimetric criteria. Material and methods : Thirty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT of 45-50 Gy over five to six weeks with concomitant weekly chemotherapy, and qualified for intracavitary high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy with tandem-ovoid applicators were selected for this study. Second computed tomography scan was done for each patient after finishing brachytherapy treatment with applicators in situ. Artificial neural networks (ANNs based models were used to predict intra-fractional OARs dose-volume histogram parameters variations and propose a new final plan. Results : A model was developed to estimate the intra-fractional organs dose variations during gynaecological intracavitary brachytherapy. Also, ANNs were used to modify the final brachytherapy treatment plan to compensate dosimetrically for changes in ‘organs-applicators’, while maintaining target dose at the original level. Conclusions : There are semi-automatic and fast responding models that can be used in the routine clinical workflow to reduce individually IGABT uncertainties. These models can be more validated by more patients’ plans to be able to serve as a clinical tool.

  5. Evaluation of four instruments with different working motion using artificial plastic model with C-shaped single canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, Miki; Maeda, Munehiro; Katsuumi, Ichiroh; Igarashi, Masaru

    2018-02-10

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate four instruments with different working motion for preparation of a C-shaped single canal wall using the same artificial plastic models reproduced from a human tooth. One tooth with root canal morphology C1 (the shape is an uninterrupted "C" with no separation or division) was selected among three-dimensional micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging data of extracted human teeth. Imaging data were then converted into STL form data, and twenty-four C-shaped root canal model blocks were manufactured using this STL form data. These blocks were randomly divided into four groups of six blocks each and instrumented as follows: stainless steel K-files (SSK), Self-Adjusting File (SAF), ProTaper NEXT (PTN) and RECIPROC (REC). Micro-CT images taken before and after canal preparation were superimposed, and instrumented canal area, percentage of instrumented canal area, part of instrumented canal area, volume of instrumented canal and time taken for instrumentation were evaluated for each group. The greatest instrumented canal area, percentage of instrumented canal area and volume of instrumented canal were as follows (in decreasing order): SSK > SAF > PTN > REC (P instrumentation was as follows (in decreasing order): SAF > SSK > PTN > REC (P instrumented all root canal walls equally. PTN and REC required less time taken for instrumentation, but showed unequal instrumentation.

  6. Evaluation of adaptation to visually induced motion sickness based on the maximum cross-correlation between pulse transmission time and heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiba Shigeru

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer graphics and virtual reality techniques are useful to develop automatic and effective rehabilitation systems. However, a kind of virtual environment including unstable visual images presented to wide field screen or a head mounted display tends to induce motion sickness. The motion sickness induced in using a rehabilitation system not only inhibits effective training but also may harm patients' health. There are few studies that have objectively evaluated the effects of the repetitive exposures to these stimuli on humans. The purpose of this study is to investigate the adaptation to visually induced motion sickness by physiological data. Methods An experiment was carried out in which the same video image was presented to human subjects three times. We evaluated changes of the intensity of motion sickness they suffered from by a subjective score and the physiological index ρmax, which is defined as the maximum cross-correlation coefficient between heart rate and pulse wave transmission time and is considered to reflect the autonomic nervous activity. Results The results showed adaptation to visually-induced motion sickness by the repetitive presentation of the same image both in the subjective and the objective indices. However, there were some subjects whose intensity of sickness increased. Thus, it was possible to know the part in the video image which related to motion sickness by analyzing changes in ρmax with time. Conclusion The physiological index, ρmax, will be a good index for assessing the adaptation process to visually induced motion sickness and may be useful in checking the safety of rehabilitation systems with new image technologies.

  7. Evaluation of H.264 and H.265 full motion video encoding for small UAS platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Christopher D.; Walker, David; Taylor, Clark; Hill, Kerry; Hoffman, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Of all the steps in the image acquisition and formation pipeline, compression is the only process that degrades image quality. A selected compression algorithm succeeds or fails to provide sufficient quality at the requested compression rate depending on how well the algorithm is suited to the input data. Applying an algorithm designed for one type of data to a different type often results in poor compression performance. This is mostly the case when comparing the performance of H.264, designed for standard definition data, to HEVC (High Efficiency Video Coding), which the Joint Collaborative Team on Video Coding (JCT-VC) designed for high-definition data. This study focuses on evaluating how HEVC compares to H.264 when compressing data from small UAS platforms. To compare the standards directly, we assess two open-source traditional software solutions: x264 and x265. These software-only comparisons allow us to establish a baseline of how much improvement can generally be expected of HEVC over H.264. Then, specific solutions leveraging different types of hardware are selected to understand the limitations of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) options. Algorithmically, regardless of the implementation, HEVC is found to provide similar quality video as H.264 at 40% lower data rates for video resolutions greater than 1280x720, roughly 1 Megapixel (MPx). For resolutions less than 1MPx, H.264 is an adequate solution though a small (roughly 20%) compression boost is earned by employing HEVC. New low cost, size, weight, and power (CSWAP) HEVC implementations are being developed and will be ideal for small UAS systems.

  8. Evaluation of ICA-AROMA and alternative strategies for motion artifact removal in resting state fMRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruim, R.H.; Mennes, M.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Beckmann, C.F.

    2015-01-01

    We proposed ICA-AROMA as a strategy for the removal of motion-related artifacts from fMRI data (Pruim et al., submitted for publication). ICA-AROMA automatically identifies and subsequently removes data-driven derived components that represent motion-related artifacts. Here we present an extensive

  9. Evaluation of Underground Zinc Mine Investment Based on Fuzzy-Interval Grey System Theory and Geometric Brownian Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Gligoric

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Underground mine projects are often associated with diverse sources of uncertainties. Having the ability to plan for these uncertainties plays a key role in the process of project evaluation and is increasingly recognized as critical to mining project success. To make the best decision, based on the information available, it is necessary to develop an adequate model incorporating the uncertainty of the input parameters. The model is developed on the basis of full discounted cash flow analysis of an underground zinc mine project. The relationships between input variables and economic outcomes are complex and often nonlinear. Fuzzy-interval grey system theory is used to forecast zinc metal prices while geometric Brownian motion is used to forecast operating costs over the time frame of the project. To quantify the uncertainty in the parameters within a project, such as capital investment, ore grade, mill recovery, metal content of concentrate, and discount rate, we have applied the concept of interval numbers. The final decision related to project acceptance is based on the net present value of the cash flows generated by the simulation over the time project horizon.

  10. Evaluation of the added mass for a spheroid-type unmanned underwater vehicle by vertical planar motion mechanism test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Keon Lee

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows added mass and inertia can be acquired from the pure heaving motion and pure pitching motion respectively. A Vertical Planar Motion Mechanism (VPMM test for the spheroid-type Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (UUV was compared with a theoretical calculation and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD analysis in this paper. The VPMM test has been carried out at a towing tank with specially manufactured equipment. The linear equations of motion on the vertical plane were considered for theoretical calculation, and CFD results were obtained by commercial CFD package. The VPMM test results show good agreement with theoretical calculations and the CFD results, so that the applicability of the VPMM equipment for an underwater vehicle can be verified with a sufficient accuracy.

  11. Dynamic Evaluation of the Contact Characteristics and Three-Dimensional Motion for the Ankle Joint with Lateral Ligament Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kensaku; Omori, Go; Terashima, Shojiro; Sakamoto, Makoto; Hara, Toshiaki

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the dynamic changes in contact pressure distribution and three-dimensional ankle joint motion before and after lateral ligament injuries. Five fresh and frozen intact cadaveric ankles were examined. Each ankle was mounted on a specially designed frame that preserved five degrees of freedom motion. The direct linear transformation technique was used to measure the three-dimensional ankle motion, and a pressure-sensitive conductive rubber sensor was inserted into the talocrural joint space to determine the contact pressure distribution. The contact area on the talus for intact ankle moved anteriorly and laterally with increasing dorsiflexion. An area of high pressure was observed in the medial aspect of the articular surface after the ligament was cut. Supination significantly increased after a combined anterior talofibular ligament (ATF) and calcaneofibular ligament (CF) were cut in comparison with after only an ATF was cut, and no significant differences were observed in motional properties under each experimental condition.

  12. Evaluation of an automated deformable image matching method for quantifying lung motion in respiration-correlated CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pevsner, A.; Davis, B.; Joshi, S.; Hertanto, A.; Mechalakos, J.; Yorke, E.; Rosenzweig, K.; Nehmeh, S.; Erdi, Y.E.; Humm, J.L.; Larson, S.; Ling, C.C.; Mageras, G.S.

    2006-01-01

    We have evaluated an automated registration procedure for predicting tumor and lung deformation based on CT images of the thorax obtained at different respiration phases. The method uses a viscous fluid model of tissue deformation to map voxels from one CT dataset to another. To validate the deformable matching algorithm we used a respiration-correlated CT protocol to acquire images at different phases of the respiratory cycle for six patients with nonsmall cell lung carcinoma. The position and shape of the deformable gross tumor volumes (GTV) at the end-inhale (EI) phase predicted by the algorithm was compared to those drawn by four observers. To minimize interobserver differences, all observers used the contours drawn by a single observer at end-exhale (EE) phase as a guideline to outline GTV contours at EI. The differences between model-predicted and observer-drawn GTV surfaces at EI, as well as differences between structures delineated by observers at EI (interobserver variations) were evaluated using a contour comparison algorithm written for this purpose, which determined the distance between the two surfaces along different directions. The mean and 90% confidence interval for model-predicted versus observer-drawn GTV surface differences over all patients and all directions were 2.6 and 5.1 mm, respectively, whereas the mean and 90% confidence interval for interobserver differences were 2.1 and 3.7 mm. We have also evaluated the algorithm's ability to predict normal tissue deformations by examining the three-dimensional (3-D) vector displacement of 41 landmarks placed by each observer at bronchial and vascular branch points in the lung between the EE and EI image sets (mean and 90% confidence interval displacements of 11.7 and 25.1 mm, respectively). The mean and 90% confidence interval discrepancy between model-predicted and observer-determined landmark displacements over all patients were 2.9 and 7.3 mm, whereas interobserver discrepancies were 2.8 and 6

  13. Seismic Response and Performance Evaluation of Self-Centering LRB Isolators Installed on the CBF Building under NF Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwon Seo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly treats the seismic behavior of lead-rubber bearing (LRB isolation systems with superealstic shape memory alloy (SMA bending bars functioning as damper and self-centering devices. The conventional LRB isolators that are usually installed at the column bases supply extra flexibility to the centrically braced frame (CBF building with a view to elongate its vibration period, and thus make a contribution to mitigating seismic acceleration transferred from ground to structure. However, these base isolation systems are somehow susceptible to shear failure due to the lack of lateral resistance. In the construction site, they have been used to be integrated with displacement control dampers additionally withstanding lateral seismic forces. For this motivation, LRB isolation systems equipped with superelastic SMA bending bars, which possess not only excellent energy dissipation but also outstanding recentering capability, are proposed in this study. These reinforced and recentering LRB base isolators are modeled as nonlinear component springs, and then assigned into the bases of 2D frame models used for numerical simulation. Their seismic performance and capacity in the base-isolated frame building can be evaluated through nonlinear dynamic analyses conducted with historic ground motion data. After comparative study with analyses results, it is clearly shown that 2D frame models with proposed LRB isolators generally have smaller maximum displacements than those with conventional LRB isolators. Furthermore, the LRB isolation systems with superelastic SMA bending bars effectively reduce residual displacement as compared to those with steel bending bars because they provide more flexibility and recentering force to the entire building structure.

  14. Abnormal Motion of the Interventricular Septum after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: Comprehensive Evaluation with MR Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seong Hoon; Choi, Sang Il; Chun, Eun Ju; Chang, Huk Jae; Park, Kay Hyun; Lim, Cheong; Kim, Shin Jae; Kang, Joon Won; Lim, Tae Hwan

    2010-01-01

    To define the mechanism associated with abnormal septal motion (ASM) after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) using comprehensive MR imaging techniques. Eighteen patients (mean age, 58 ± 12 years; 15 males) were studied with comprehensive MR imaging using rest/stress perfusion, rest cine, and delayed enhancement (DE)-MR techniques before and after CABG. Myocardial tagging was also performed following CABG. Septal wall motion was compared in the ASM and non-ASM groups. Preoperative and postoperative results with regard to septal wall motion in the ASM group were also compared. We then analyzed circumferential strain after CABG in both the septal and lateral walls in the ASM group. All patients had normal septal wall motion and perfusion without evidence of non-viable myocardium prior to surgery. Postoperatively, ASM at rest and/or stress state was documented in 10 patients (56%). However, all of these had normal rest/stress perfusion and DE findings at the septum. Septal wall motion after CABG in the ASM group was significantly lower than that in the non- ASM group (2.1±5.3 mm vs. 14.9±4.7 mm in the non-ASM group; p < 0.001). In the ASM group, the degree of septal wall motion showed a significant decrease after CABG (preoperative vs. postoperative = 15.8±4.5 mm vs. 2.1±5.3 mm; p = 0.007). In the ASM group after CABG, circumferential shortening of the septum was even larger than that of the lateral wall (-20.89±5.41 vs. -15.41±3.7, p < 0.05) Abnormal septal motion might not be caused by ischemic insult. We suggest that ASM might occur due to an increase in anterior cardiac mobility after incision of the pericardium

  15. Carotid artery wall motion analysis from B-mode ultrasound using adaptive block matching: in silico evaluation and in vivo application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastounioti, A; Golemati, S; Stoitsis, J S; Nikita, K S

    2013-12-21

    Valid risk stratification for carotid atherosclerotic plaques represents a crucial public health issue toward preventing fatal cerebrovascular events. Although motion analysis (MA) provides useful information about arterial wall dynamics, the identification of motion-based risk markers remains a significant challenge. Considering that the ability of a motion estimator (ME) to handle changes in the appearance of motion targets has a major effect on accuracy in MA, we investigated the potential of adaptive block matching (ABM) MEs, which consider changes in image intensities over time. To assure the validity in MA, we optimized and evaluated the ABM MEs in the context of a specially designed in silico framework. ABM(FIRF2), which takes advantage of the periodicity characterizing the arterial wall motion, was the most effective ABM algorithm, yielding a 47% accuracy increase with respect to the conventional block matching. The in vivo application of ABM(FIRF2) revealed five potential risk markers: low movement amplitude of the normal part of the wall adjacent to the plaques in the radial (RMA(PWL)) and longitudinal (LMA(PWL)) directions, high radial motion amplitude of the plaque top surface (RMA(PTS)), and high relative movement, expressed in terms of radial strain (RSI(PL)) and longitudinal shear strain (LSSI(PL)), between plaque top and bottom surfaces. The in vivo results were reproduced by OF(LK(WLS)) and ABM(KF-K2), MEs previously proposed by the authors and with remarkable in silico performances, thereby reinforcing the clinical values of the markers and the potential of those MEs. Future in vivo studies will elucidate with confidence the full potential of the markers.

  16. Carotid artery wall motion analysis from B-mode ultrasound using adaptive block matching: in silico evaluation and in vivo application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastounioti, A; Stoitsis, J S; Nikita, K S; Golemati, S

    2013-01-01

    Valid risk stratification for carotid atherosclerotic plaques represents a crucial public health issue toward preventing fatal cerebrovascular events. Although motion analysis (MA) provides useful information about arterial wall dynamics, the identification of motion-based risk markers remains a significant challenge. Considering that the ability of a motion estimator (ME) to handle changes in the appearance of motion targets has a major effect on accuracy in MA, we investigated the potential of adaptive block matching (ABM) MEs, which consider changes in image intensities over time. To assure the validity in MA, we optimized and evaluated the ABM MEs in the context of a specially designed in silico framework. ABM FIRF2 , which takes advantage of the periodicity characterizing the arterial wall motion, was the most effective ABM algorithm, yielding a 47% accuracy increase with respect to the conventional block matching. The in vivo application of ABM FIRF2 revealed five potential risk markers: low movement amplitude of the normal part of the wall adjacent to the plaques in the radial (RMA PWL ) and longitudinal (LMA PWL ) directions, high radial motion amplitude of the plaque top surface (RMA PTS ), and high relative movement, expressed in terms of radial strain (RSI PL ) and longitudinal shear strain (LSSI PL ), between plaque top and bottom surfaces. The in vivo results were reproduced by OF LK(WLS) and ABM KF-K2 , MEs previously proposed by the authors and with remarkable in silico performances, thereby reinforcing the clinical values of the markers and the potential of those MEs. Future in vivo studies will elucidate with confidence the full potential of the markers. (paper)

  17. Early evaluation of irradiated parotid glands with intravoxel incoherent motion MR imaging: correlation with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Nan; Chu, Chen; Dou, Xin; Li, Ming; Liu, Song; Zhu, Lijing; Liu, Baorui; Guo, Tingting; Chen, Weibo; He, Jian; Yan, Jing; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced parotid damage is one of the most common complications in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been reported for evaluating irradiated parotid damage. However, the changes of IVIM perfusion-related parameters in irradiated parotid glands have not been confirmed by conventional perfusion measurements obtained from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging. The purposes of this study were to monitor radiation-induced parotid damage using IVIM and DCE MR imaging and to investigate the correlations between changes of these MR parameters. Eighteen NPC patients underwent bilateral parotid T1-weighted, IVIM and DCE MR imaging pre-RT (2 weeks before RT) and post-RT (4 weeks after RT). Parotid volume; IVIM MR parameters, including apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), pure diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*), and perfusion fraction (f); and DCE MR parameters, including maximum relative enhancement (MRE), time to peak (TTP), Wash in Rate, and the degree of xerostomia were recorded. Correlations of parotid MR parameters with mean radiation dose, atrophy rate and xerostomia degree, as well as the relationships between IVIM and DCE MR parameters, were investigated. From pre-RT to post-RT, all of the IVIM and DCE MR parameters increased significantly (p < 0.001 for ADC, D, f, MRE, Wash in Rate; p = 0.024 for D*; p = 0.037 for TTP). Change rates of ADC, f and MRE were negatively correlated with atrophy rate significantly (all p < 0.05). Significant correlations were observed between the change rates of D* and MRE (r = 0.371, p = 0.026) and between the change rates of D* and TTP (r = 0.396, p = 0.017). The intra- and interobserver reproducibility of IVIM and DCE MR parameters was good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.633–0.983). Early radiation-induced changes of parotid glands could be evaluated by IVIM and

  18. A Pilot Evaluation of a 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Scheme Based on Simultaneous Motion Estimation and Image Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Jun; Gu, Xuejun; Pan, Tinsu; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a 4-dimensional (4-D) cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) reconstruction scheme based on simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) through patient studies. Methods and Materials: The SMEIR algorithm contains 2 alternating steps: (1) motion-compensated CBCT reconstruction using projections from all phases to reconstruct a reference phase 4D-CBCT by explicitly considering the motion models between each different phase and (2) estimation of motion models directly from projections by matching the measured projections to the forward projection of the deformed reference phase 4D-CBCT. Four lung cancer patients were scanned for 4 to 6 minutes to obtain approximately 2000 projections for each patient. To evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm on a conventional 1-minute CBCT scan, the number of projections at each phase was reduced by a factor of 5, 8, or 10 for each patient. Then, 4D-CBCTs were reconstructed from the down-sampled projections using Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, total variation (TV) minimization, prior image constrained compressive sensing (PICCS), and SMEIR. Using the 4D-CBCT reconstructed from the fully sampled projections as a reference, the relative error (RE) of reconstructed images, root mean square error (RMSE), and maximum error (MaxE) of estimated tumor positions were analyzed to quantify the performance of the SMEIR algorithm. Results: The SMEIR algorithm can achieve results consistent with the reference 4D-CBCT reconstructed with many more projections per phase. With an average of 30 to 40 projections per phase, the MaxE in tumor position detection is less than 1 mm in SMEIR for all 4 patients. Conclusion: The results from a limited number of patients show that SMEIR is a promising tool for high-quality 4D-CBCT reconstruction and tumor motion modeling

  19. Effects of motion correction for dynamic [11C]Raclopride brain PET data on the evaluation of endogenous dopamine release in striatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Cho, Sang Soo; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Sang Eun; Choe, Yearn Seong; Kang, Eun Joo

    2005-01-01

    Neuroreceptor PET studies require 60-120 minutes to complete and head motion of the subject during the PET scan increases the uncertainty in measured activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of the data-driven head motion correction on the evaluation of endogenous dopamine release (DAR) in the striatum during the motor task which might have caused significant head motion artifact. [ 11 C]raclopride PET scans on 4 normal volunteers acquired with bolus plus constant infusion protocol were retrospectively analyzed. Following the 50 min resting period, the participants played a video game with a momentary reward for 40 min. Dynamic frames acquired during the equilibrium condition (pre-task: 30-50 min, task: 70-90 min, post-task:110-120 min) were realigned to the first frame in pre-task condition. Intra-condition registrations between the frames were performed, and average image for each condition was created and registered to the pre-task image (inter-condition registration). Pre-task PET image was then co-registered to own MRI of each participant and transformation parameters were reapplied to the others. Volumes of interest (VOI) for dorsal putamen (PU) and caudate (CA), ventral striatum (VS), and cerebellum were defined on the MRI. Binding potential (BP) was measured and DAR was calculated as the percent change of BP during and after the task. SPM analyses on the BP parametric images were also performed to explore the regional difference in the effects of head motion on BP and DAR estimation. Changes in position and orientation of the striatum during the PET scans were observed before the head motion correction. BP values at pre-task condition were not changed significantly after the intra-condition registration. However, the BP values during and after the task and DAR were significantly changed after the correction. SPM analysis also showed that the extent and significance of the BP differences were significantly changed by the head motion correction

  20. Motion characterization scheme to minimize motion artifacts in intravital microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungon; Courties, Gabriel; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weissleder, Ralph; Vinegoni, Claudio

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory- and cardiac-induced motion artifacts pose a major challenge for in vivo optical imaging, limiting the temporal and spatial imaging resolution in fluorescence laser scanning microscopy. Here, we present an imaging platform developed for in vivo characterization of physiologically induced axial motion. The motion characterization system can be straightforwardly implemented on any conventional laser scanning microscope and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of different motion stabilization schemes. This method is particularly useful to improve the design of novel tissue stabilizers and to facilitate stabilizer positioning in real time, therefore facilitating optimal tissue immobilization and minimizing motion induced artifacts.

  1. Measurement and evaluation of high-rise building response to ground motion generated by underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, K.K.

    1976-01-01

    As part of the structural response research program being conducted for ERDA, the response behavior of high-rise buildings in Las Vegas, Nevada, due to ground motion caused by underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has been measured for the past 12 years. Results obtained include variation in dynamic response properties as a function of amplitude of motion, influence of nonstructural partitions in the building response, and comparison of calculated and measured response. These data for three reinforced concrete high-rise buildings, all designed as moment-resisting space frames are presented

  2. Man-systems evaluation of moving base vehicle simulation motion cues. [human acceleration perception involving visual feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, M.; Brye, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    A motion cue investigation program is reported that deals with human factor aspects of high fidelity vehicle simulation. General data on non-visual motion thresholds and specific threshold values are established for use as washout parameters in vehicle simulation. A general purpose similator is used to test the contradictory cue hypothesis that acceleration sensitivity is reduced during a vehicle control task involving visual feedback. The simulator provides varying acceleration levels. The method of forced choice is based on the theory of signal detect ability.

  3. Comparison of improved range of motion between cam-type femoroacetabular impingement and borderline developmental dysplasia of the hip -evaluation by virtual osteochondroplasty using computer simulation-

    OpenAIRE

    Kubota, So; Inaba, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Naomi; Choe, Hyonmin; Tezuka, Taro; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2017-01-01

    Background While cam resection is essential to achieve a good clinical result with respect to femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), it is unclear whether it should also be performed in cases of borderline developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) with a cam deformity. The aim of this study was to evaluate improvements in range of motion (ROM) in cases of cam-type FAI and borderline DDH after virtual osteochondroplasty using a computer impingement simulation. Methods Thirty-eight symptomatic hips...

  4. Intrafractional setup errors in patients undergoing non-invasive fixation using an immobilization system during hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Meguru; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kuriyama, Kengo

    2013-01-01

    Intrafractional setup errors during hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) were investigated on the patient under voluntary breath-holding conditions with non-invasive immobilization on the CT-linac treatment table. A total of 30 patients with primary and metastatic lung tumors were treated with the hypofractionated SRT with a total dose of 48-60 Gy with four treatment fractions. The patient was placed supine and stabilized on the table with non-invasive patient fixation. Intrafractional setup errors in Right/Left (R.L.), Posterior/Anterior (P.A.), and Inferior/Superior (I.S.) dimensions were analyzed with pre- and post-irradiation CT images. The means and one standard deviation of the intrafractional errors were 0.9±0.7 mm (R.L.), 0.9±0.7 mm (P.A.) and 0.5±1.0 mm (I.S.). Setup errors in each session of the treatment demonstrated no statistically significant difference in the mean value between any two sessions. The frequency within 3 mm displacement was 98% in R.L., 98% in P.A. and 97% in I.S. directions. SRT under the non-invasive patient fixation immobilization system with a comparatively loose vacuum pillow demonstrated satisfactory reproducibility of minimal setup errors with voluntary breath-holding conditions that required a small internal margin. (author)

  5. Mechanistic Evaluation of Motion in Redox-Driven Rotaxanes Reveals Longer Linkers Hasten Forward Escape's and Hinder Backward Translations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. S.; Share, A. I.; Poulsen, B. L.

    2014-01-01

    temperatures to provide activation enthalpies (Delta H-double dagger) and entropies (Delta S-double dagger). Longer glycol linkers led to modest increases in the forward escape (t(1/2) = 60 to 69 s); though not because of a diffusive walk. The reduced rate of motion backward depended on folded structures...

  6. Evaluation of Soil-Structure Interaction on the Seismic Response of Liquid Storage Tanks under Earthquake Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Farajian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil-structure interaction (SSI could affect the seismic response of structures. Since liquid storage tanks are vital structures and must continue their operation under severe earthquakes, their seismic behavior should be studied. Accordingly, the seismic response of two types of steel liquid storage tanks (namely, broad and slender, with aspect ratios of height to radius equal to 0.6 and 1.85 founded on half-space soil is scrutinized under different earthquake ground motions. For a better comparison, the six considered ground motions are classified, based on their pulse-like characteristics, into two groups, named far and near fault ground motions. To model the liquid storage tanks, the simplified mass-spring model is used and the liquid is modeled as two lumped masses known as sloshing and impulsive, and the interaction of fluid and structure is considered using two coupled springs and dashpots. The SSI effect, also, is considered using a coupled spring and dashpot. Additionally, four types of soils are used to consider a wide variety of soil properties. To this end, after deriving the equations of motion, MATLAB programming is employed to obtain the time history responses. Results show that although the SSI effect leads to a decrease in the impulsive displacement, overturning moment, and normalized base shear, the sloshing (or convective displacement is not affected by such effects due to its long period.

  7. Treatment simulations with a statistical deformable motion model to evaluate margins for multiple targets in radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thörnqvist, Sara; Hysing, Liv B.; Zolnay, Andras G.; Söhn, Matthias; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Muren, Ludvig P.; Bentzen, Lise; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Deformation and correlated target motion remain challenges for margin recipes in radiotherapy (RT). This study presents a statistical deformable motion model for multiple targets and applies it to margin evaluations for locally advanced prostate cancer i.e. RT of the prostate (CTV-p), seminal vesicles (CTV-sv) and pelvic lymph nodes (CTV-ln). Material and methods: The 19 patients included in this study, all had 7–10 repeat CT-scans available that were rigidly aligned with the planning CT-scan using intra-prostatic implanted markers, followed by deformable registrations. The displacement vectors from the deformable registrations were used to create patient-specific statistical motion models. The models were applied in treatment simulations to determine probabilities for adequate target coverage, e.g. by establishing distributions of the accumulated dose to 99% of the target volumes (D 99 ) for various CTV–PTV expansions in the planning-CTs. Results: The method allowed for estimation of the expected accumulated dose and its variance of different DVH parameters for each patient. Simulations of inter-fractional motion resulted in 7, 10, and 18 patients with an average D 99 >95% of the prescribed dose for CTV-p expansions of 3 mm, 4 mm and 5 mm, respectively. For CTV-sv and CTV-ln, expansions of 3 mm, 5 mm and 7 mm resulted in 1, 11 and 15 vs. 8, 18 and 18 patients respectively with an average D 99 >95% of the prescription. Conclusions: Treatment simulations of target motion revealed large individual differences in accumulated dose mainly for CTV-sv, demanding the largest margins whereas those required for CTV-p and CTV-ln were comparable

  8. Current status of ground motions evaluation in seismic design guide for nuclear power facilities. Investigation on IAEA and US.NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Masato; Ito, Hiroshi; Hirata, Kazuta

    2009-01-01

    Recently, IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) and US.NRC (US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission) published several standards and technical reports on seismic design and safety evaluation for nuclear power facilities. This report summarizes the current status of the international guidelines on seismic design and safety evaluation for nuclear power facilities in order to explore the future research topics. The main results obtained are as follows: 1 IAEA: (1) In the safety standard series, two levels are defined as seismic design levels, and design earthquake ground motion is determined corresponding to each seismic design level. (2) A new framework on seismic design which consists of conventional deterministic method and risk-based method is discussed in the technical report although the framework is not adopted in the safety guidelines. 2 USA: (1) US.NRC discusses a performance-based seismic design framework which has been originally developed by the private organization (American Society of Civil Engineers). (2) Design earthquakes and earthquake ground motion are mainly evaluated and determined based on probabilistic seismic hazard evaluations. 3 Future works: It should be emphasized that IAEA and US.NRC have investigated the implementation of risk-based concept into seismic design. The implementation of risk-based concept into regulation and seismic design makes it possible to consider various uncertainties and to improve accountability. Therefore, we need to develop the methods for evaluating seismic risk of structures, and to correlate seismic margin and seismic risk quantitatively. Moreover, the probabilistic method of earthquake ground motions, that is required in the risk-based design, should be applied to sites in Japan. (author)

  9. Time-Resolved Intrafraction Target Translations and Rotations During Stereotactic Liver Radiation Therapy: Implications for Marker-based Localization Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertholet, Jenny, E-mail: jennbe@rm.dk [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C (Denmark); Worm, Esben S. [Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C (Denmark); Fledelius, Walther; Høyer, Morten; Poulsen, Per R. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: Image guided liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) often relies on implanted fiducial markers. The target localization accuracy decreases with increased marker-target distance. This may occur partly because of liver rotations. The aim of this study was to examine time-resolved translations and rotations of liver marker constellations and investigate if time-resolved intrafraction rotational corrections can improve localization accuracy in liver SBRT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients with 3 implanted markers received SBRT in 3 to 6 fractions. The time-resolved trajectory of each marker was estimated from the projections of 1 to 3 daily cone beam computed tomography scans and used to calculate the translation and rotation of the marker constellation. In all cone beam computed tomography projections, the time-resolved position of each marker was predicted from the position of another surrogate marker by assuming that the marker underwent either (1) the same translation as the surrogate marker; or (2) the same translation as the surrogate marker corrected by the rotation of the marker constellation. The localization accuracy was quantified as the root-mean-square error (RMSE) between the estimated and the actual marker position. For comparison, the RMSE was also calculated when the marker's position was estimated as its mean position for all the projections. Results: The mean translational and rotational range (2nd-98th percentile) was 2.0 mm/3.9° (right-left), 9.2 mm/2.9° (superior-inferior), 4.0 mm/4.0° (anterior-posterior), and 10.5 mm (3-dimensional). Rotational corrections decreased the mean 3-dimensional RMSE from 0.86 mm to 0.54 mm (P<.001) and halved the RMSE increase per millimeter increase in marker distance. Conclusions: Intrafraction rotations during liver SBRT reduce the accuracy of marker-guided target localization. Rotational correction can improve the localization accuracy with a factor of approximately 2

  10. Evaluation of influence of different perturbing accelerations on accuracy of probabilistic model of asteroid 2011 MD motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syusina, O. M.; Sambarov, G. E.

    2017-11-01

    This paper is devoted to investigation of the influence of various perturbing factors on accuracy of probabilistic model of asteroid 2011 MD motion. The degree of influence of each perturbing acceleration has been estimated using indicator of the force model. This indicator has been determined on the basis of the algorithm in which the errors of force models are tightly connected with sizes of confidence regions and displacements of the least-square estimations defined for different models of motion of asteroids. For object 2011 MD the influence of the Sun oblateness and relativistic effects caused by the Sun has been of less importance then the influence of gravitational perturbations from the Moon and the Earth oblateness. The investigation probabilistic orbital evolution on the basis of different force models has shown that the neglect of perturbing accelerations whose indicator of the force model is greater than the threshold value can lead to divergence of orbits.

  11. Performance evaluation of a wearable inertial motion capture system for capturing physical exposures during manual material handling tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunwook; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2013-01-01

    With a long-term goal of improving quantification of physical exposures in the workplace, this study examined the ability of a commercially available inertial motion capture (IMC) system in quantifying exposures during five different simulated manual material handling tasks. Fourteen participants repeated all these tasks in three 20 min sequential time blocks. Performance of the IMC system was compared against an optical motion capture (OMC) system ('gold standard') in terms of joint angles, angular velocities and moments at selected body parts. Though several significant changes in performance over time were found, the magnitudes of these were relatively small and may have limited practical relevance. The IMC system yielded peak kinematic values that differed by up to 28% from the OMC system. The IMC system, in some cases, incorrectly reflected the actual extremity positions of a participant, and which can cause relatively large errors in joint moment estimation. Given the potential limitations, practical recommendations are offered and discussed. Use of an inertial motion capture system can advance the quantification of physical exposures in situ. Results indicate a good potential capacity for capturing physical exposure data in the field for an extended period, while highlighting potential limitations. Future system application can help provide better understandings of dose-exposure relationships.

  12. Evaluation of regional wall motion abnormalities of the heart. Comparison with Doppler tissue echocardiography, MR-tagging and levocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivelitz, D.E.; Enzweiler, C.N.H.; Hamm, B.; Borges, A.C.; Walde, T.; Rutsch, W.; Baumann, G.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the visual analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the tagging technique and Doppler tissue echocardiography with invasive ventriculography in detecting and quantifying regional left ventricular wall motion abnormalities. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients with coronary artery disease and a history of prior myocardial infarction underwent invasive ventriculography. Doppler tissue echocardiography and MR-tagging within one week. Regional wall motion abnormalities (WMA) were detected in all patients. WMA were graded as normal=1; hypokinetic=2; akinetic=3; or dyskinetic=4. For agreement between MRI, echocardiography, and ventriculography the kappa coefficient (κ) according to Cohen was calculated. Results: The kappa coefficient (κ) was 0.962 for agreement between MRI and echocardiography and 0.602 for agreement between MRI and ventriculography as well as between echocardiography and ventriculography. Conclusion: Reliable analysis of regional left ventricular wall motion abnormalities is feasible using visual analysis of MR-tagging. MRI and Doppler tissue echocardiography detect more WMA than invasive ventriculography and grade them as more severe. (orig.)

  13. A comparative evaluation of adaptive noise cancellation algorithms for minimizing motion artifacts in a forehead-mounted wearable pulse oximeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comtois, Gary; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Ramuka, Piyush

    2007-01-01

    Wearable physiological monitoring using a pulse oximeter would enable field medics to monitor multiple injuries simultaneously, thereby prioritizing medical intervention when resources are limited. However, a primary factor limiting the accuracy of pulse oximetry is poor signal-to-noise ratio since photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals, from which arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate (HR) measurements are derived, are compromised by movement artifacts. This study was undertaken to quantify SpO2 and HR errors induced by certain motion artifacts utilizing accelerometry-based adaptive noise cancellation (ANC). Since the fingers are generally more vulnerable to motion artifacts, measurements were performed using a custom forehead-mounted wearable pulse oximeter developed for real-time remote physiological monitoring and triage applications. This study revealed that processing motion-corrupted PPG signals by least mean squares (LMS) and recursive least squares (RLS) algorithms can be effective to reduce SpO2 and HR errors during jogging, but the degree of improvement depends on filter order. Although both algorithms produced similar improvements, implementing the adaptive LMS algorithm is advantageous since it requires significantly less operations.

  14. Designing a compact MRI motion phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmiedel Max

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Even today, dealing with motion artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a challenging task. Image corruption due to spontaneous body motion complicates diagnosis. In this work, an MRI phantom for rigid motion is presented. It is used to generate motion-corrupted data, which can serve for evaluation of blind motion compensation algorithms. In contrast to commercially available MRI motion phantoms, the presented setup works on small animal MRI systems. Furthermore, retrospective gating is performed on the data, which can be used as a reference for novel motion compensation approaches. The motion of the signal source can be reconstructed using motor trigger signals and be utilized as the ground truth for motion estimation. The proposed setup results in motion corrected images. Moreover, the importance of preprocessing the MRI raw data, e.g. phase-drift correction, is demonstrated. The gained knowledge can be used to design an MRI phantom for elastic motion.

  15. Evaluation of multiple image-based modalities for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate carcinoma: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayyas, Essa; Chetty, Indrin J.; Chetvertkov, Mikhail; Wen, Ning; Neicu, Toni; Nurushev, Teamor; Ren Lei; Pradhan, Deepak; Movsas, Benjamin; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Lu Mei; Stricker, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Setup errors and prostate intrafraction motion are main sources of localization uncertainty in prostate cancer radiation therapy. This study evaluates four different imaging modalities 3D ultrasound (US), kV planar images, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and implanted electromagnetic transponders (Calypso/Varian) to assess inter- and intrafraction localization errors during intensity-modulated radiation therapy based treatment of prostate cancer. Methods: Twenty-seven prostate cancer patients were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study and treated to a total dose of 75.6 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction). Overall, 1100 fractions were evaluated. For each fraction, treatment targets were localized using US, kV planar images, and CBCT in a sequence defined to determine setup offsets relative to the patient skin tattoos, intermodality differences, and residual errors for each patient and patient cohort. Planning margins, following van Herk's formalism, were estimated based on error distributions. Calypso-based localization was not available for the first eight patients, therefore centroid positions of implanted gold-seed markers imaged prior to and immediately following treatment were used as a motion surrogate during treatment. For the remaining 19 patients, Calypso transponders were used to assess prostate intrafraction motion. Results: The means (μ), and standard deviations (SD) of the systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) of interfraction prostate shifts (relative to initial skin tattoo positioning), as evaluated using CBCT, kV, and US, averaged over all patients and fractions, were: [μ CBCT = (−1.2, 0.2, 1.1) mm, Σ CBCT = (3.0, 1.4, 2.4) mm, σ CBCT = (3.2, 2.2, 2.5) mm], [μ kV = (−2.9, −0.4, 0.5) mm, Σ kV = (3.4, 3.1, 2.6) mm, σ kV = (2.9, 2.0, 2.4) mm], and [μ US = (−3.6, −1.4, 0.0) mm, Σ US = (3.3, 3.5, 2.8) mm, σ US = (4.1, 3.8, 3.6) mm], in the anterior–posterior (A/P), superior–inferior (S/I), and the left–right (L

  16. Evaluation of multiple image-based modalities for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate carcinoma: A prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayyas, Essa; Chetty, Indrin J.; Chetvertkov, Mikhail; Wen, Ning; Neicu, Toni; Nurushev, Teamor; Ren Lei; Pradhan, Deepak; Movsas, Benjamin; Elshaikh, Mohamed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Lu Mei [Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Michigan 48202 (United States); Stricker, Hans [Department of Urology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Setup errors and prostate intrafraction motion are main sources of localization uncertainty in prostate cancer radiation therapy. This study evaluates four different imaging modalities 3D ultrasound (US), kV planar images, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and implanted electromagnetic transponders (Calypso/Varian) to assess inter- and intrafraction localization errors during intensity-modulated radiation therapy based treatment of prostate cancer. Methods: Twenty-seven prostate cancer patients were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study and treated to a total dose of 75.6 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction). Overall, 1100 fractions were evaluated. For each fraction, treatment targets were localized using US, kV planar images, and CBCT in a sequence defined to determine setup offsets relative to the patient skin tattoos, intermodality differences, and residual errors for each patient and patient cohort. Planning margins, following van Herk's formalism, were estimated based on error distributions. Calypso-based localization was not available for the first eight patients, therefore centroid positions of implanted gold-seed markers imaged prior to and immediately following treatment were used as a motion surrogate during treatment. For the remaining 19 patients, Calypso transponders were used to assess prostate intrafraction motion. Results: The means ({mu}), and standard deviations (SD) of the systematic ({Sigma}) and random errors ({sigma}) of interfraction prostate shifts (relative to initial skin tattoo positioning), as evaluated using CBCT, kV, and US, averaged over all patients and fractions, were: [{mu}{sub CBCT}= (-1.2, 0.2, 1.1) mm, {Sigma}{sub CBCT}= (3.0, 1.4, 2.4) mm, {sigma}{sub CBCT}= (3.2, 2.2, 2.5) mm], [{mu}{sub kV}= (-2.9, -0.4, 0.5) mm, {Sigma}{sub kV}= (3.4, 3.1, 2.6) mm, {sigma}{sub kV}= (2.9, 2.0, 2.4) mm], and [{mu}{sub US}= (-3.6, -1.4, 0.0) mm, {Sigma}{sub US}= (3.3, 3.5, 2.8) mm, {sigma}{sub US}= (4.1, 3.8, 3.6) mm], in the anterior

  17. Evaluation of fault-normal/fault-parallel directions rotated ground motions for response history analysis of an instrumented six-story building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Erol; Kwong, Neal S.

    2012-01-01

    According to regulatory building codes in United States (for example, 2010 California Building Code), at least two horizontal ground-motion components are required for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of buildings. For sites within 5 km of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal/fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHA analyses should be performed separately (when FN and then FP are aligned with the transverse direction of the structural axes). It is assumed that this approach will lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. This assumption is examined here using a 3D computer model of a six-story reinforced-concrete instrumented building subjected to an ensemble of bidirectional near-fault ground motions. Peak responses of engineering demand parameters (EDPs) were obtained for rotation angles ranging from 0° through 180° for evaluating the FN/FP directions. It is demonstrated that rotating ground motions to FN/FP directions (1) does not always lead to the maximum responses over all angles, (2) does not always envelope the range of possible responses, and (3) does not provide maximum responses for all EDPs simultaneously even if it provides a maximum response for a specific EDP.

  18. Developing a Motion Comic for HIV/STD Prevention for Young People Ages 15-24, Part 2: Evaluation of a Pilot Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Leigh A; Kachur, Rachel; Castellanos, Ted J; Nichols, Kristen; Mendoza, Maria C B; Gaul, Zaneta J; Spikes, Pilgrim; Gamayo, Ashley C; Durham, Marcus D; LaPlace, Lisa; Straw, Julie; Staatz, Colleen; Buge, Hadiza; Hogben, Matthew; Robinson, Susan; Brooks, John; Sutton, Madeline Y

    2018-03-01

    In the United States, young people (ages 15-24 years) are disproportionately affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), due at least in part to inadequate or incorrect HIV/STD-related knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behavioral intentions (KABI). Comic book narratives are a proven method of HIV/STD prevention communication to strengthen KABI for HIV/STD prevention. Motion comics, a new type of comic media, are an engaging and low-cost means of narrative storytelling. The objective of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of a pilot six-episode HIV/STD-focused motion comic series to improve HIV/STD-related KABI among young people. We assessed change in HIV/STD knowledge, HIV stigma, condom attitudes, HIV/STD testing attitudes, and behavioral intentions among 138 participants in 15 focus groups immediately before and after viewing the motion comic series. We used paired t-tests and indicators of overall improvement to assess differences between surveys. We found a significant decrease in HIV stigma (p STD-related KABI of young adult viewers by reducing HIV stigma and increasing behavioral intentions to engage in safer sex. Our results demonstrate the promise of this novel intervention and support its use to deliver health messages to young people.

  19. Evaluation of a Kalman-based block matching method to assess the bi-dimensional motion of the carotid artery wall in B-mode ultrasound sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnd, Guillaume; Orkisz, Maciej; Sérusclat, André; Moulin, Philippe; Vray, Didier

    2013-07-01

    We aim at investigating arterial diseases at early stage, by assessing the longitudinal (i.e. in the same direction as the blood flow) motion of the intima-media complex. This recently evidenced phenomenon has been shown to provide relevant and complementary information about vascular health. Our method assesses the longitudinal and radial motion from clinical in vivo B-mode ultrasound sequences. To estimate the trajectory of a selected point during the cardiac cycle, we introduce a block matching method that involves a temporal update of the reference block using a pixel-wise Kalman filter. The filter uses the initial gray-level of the pixel as control signal to avoid divergence due to cumulating errors. The block and search-window sizes are adapted to the tissue of interest. The method was evaluated on image sequences of the common carotid artery, acquired in 57 healthy volunteers and in 25 patients at high cardiovascular risk. Reference trajectories were generated for each sequence by averaging the tracings performed by three observers. Six different computerized techniques were also compared to our method. With a pixel size of 30 μm, the average absolute motion estimation errors were 84 ± 107 μm and 20 ± 19 μm for the longitudinal and radial directions, respectively. This accuracy was of the same order of magnitude as the inter- and intra-observers variability, and smaller than for the other methods. The estimated longitudinal motion amplitude was significantly reduced in at-risk patients compared with healthy volunteers (408 ± 281 μm vs. 643 ± 274 μm, p<0.0001). Our method can constitute a reliable and time-saving technique to investigate the arterial stiffness in clinical studies, in the objective to detect early-stage atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation equivalent pulse of pulse-like ground motion to estimate the response of RC moment-resisting frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Rohollah Hosseini Vaez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study the ability of equivalent pulse extracted by a mathematical model from pulse-like ground motion is investigated in order to estimate the response of RC moment-resisting frames. By examining the mathematical model, it is obvious that the model-based elastic response spectra are compatible with the actual pulse-like record. Also, the model simulates the long-period portion of actual pulse-like records by a high level of precision. The results indicate that the model adequately simulates the components of time histories. In order to investigate the ability of equivalent pulse of pulse-like ground motion in estimating the response of RC moment-resisting frames, five frame models including 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 stories analyzed under actual record and simulated one. The results of the base shear demand, the maximum value of the inter-story drift and the distribution of inter-story drift along the height of the structures in three levels of design ductility is investigated. According to the results of this study, the equivalent pulses can predict accurately the response of regular RC moment-resisting frames when the fundamental period of the structure is equal to or greater than the equivalent pulse of the record. For the ground motion with high-frequency content the difference is high; but with increasing the number of stories and approaching pulse period to the fundamental period of the structure and increasing the level of design ductility of structure, more accurately predict the structural response.

  1. Prosthesis alignment affects axial rotation motion after total knee replacement: a prospective in vivo study combining computed tomography and fluoroscopic evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harman Melinda K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical consequences of alignment errors in total knee replacement (TKR have led to the rigorous evaluation of surgical alignment techniques. Rotational alignment in the transverse plane has proven particularly problematic, with errors due to component malalignment relative to bone anatomic landmarks and an overall mismatch between the femoral and tibial components’ relative positions. Ranges of nominal rotational alignment are not well defined, especially for the tibial component and for relative rotational mismatch, and some studies advocate the use of mobile-bearing TKR to accommodate the resulting small rotation errors. However, the relationships between prosthesis rotational alignment and mobile-bearing polyethylene insert motion are poorly understood. This prospective, in vivo study evaluates whether component malalignment and mismatch affect axial rotation motions during passive knee flexion after TKR. Methods Eighty patients were implanted with mobile-bearing TKR. Rotational alignment of the femoral and tibial components was measured from postoperative CT scans. All TKR were categorized into nominal or outlier groups based on defined norms for surgical rotational alignment relative to bone anatomic landmarks and relative rotational mismatch between the femoral and tibial components. Axial rotation motion of the femoral, tibial and polyethylene bearing components was measured from fluoroscopic images acquired during passive knee flexion. Results Axial rotation motion was generally accomplished in two phases, dominated by polyethylene bearing rotation on the tibial component in early to mid-flexion and then femoral component rotation on the polyethylene articular surface in later flexion. Opposite rotations of the femur-bearing and bearing-baseplate articulations were evident at flexion greater than 80°. Knees with outlier alignment had lower magnitudes of axial rotation and distinct transitions from external to

  2. Motion-capture-based walking simulation of digital human adapted to laser-scanned 3D as-is environments for accessibility evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsubasa Maruyama

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Owing to our rapidly aging society, accessibility evaluation to enhance the ease and safety of access to indoor and outdoor environments for the elderly and disabled is increasing in importance. Accessibility must be assessed not only from the general standard aspect but also in terms of physical and cognitive friendliness for users of different ages, genders, and abilities. Meanwhile, human behavior simulation has been progressing in the areas of crowd behavior analysis and emergency evacuation planning. However, in human behavior simulation, environment models represent only “as-planned” situations. In addition, a pedestrian model cannot generate the detailed articulated movements of various people of different ages and genders in the simulation. Therefore, the final goal of this research was to develop a virtual accessibility evaluation by combining realistic human behavior simulation using a digital human model (DHM with “as-is” environment models. To achieve this goal, we developed an algorithm for generating human-like DHM walking motions, adapting its strides, turning angles, and footprints to laser-scanned 3D as-is environments including slopes and stairs. The DHM motion was generated based only on a motion-capture (MoCap data for flat walking. Our implementation constructed as-is 3D environment models from laser-scanned point clouds of real environments and enabled a DHM to walk autonomously in various environment models. The difference in joint angles between the DHM and MoCap data was evaluated. Demonstrations of our environment modeling and walking simulation in indoor and outdoor environments including corridors, slopes, and stairs are illustrated in this study.

  3. Setup error and motion during deep inspiration breath-hold breast radiotherapy measured with continuous portal imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutz, Christina Maria; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Fledelius, Walther

    2016-01-01

    ). At every third treatment fraction, continuous portal images were acquired. The time-resolved chest wall position during treatment was compared with the planned position to determine the inter-fraction setup errors and the intra-fraction motion of the chest wall. RESULTS: The DIBH compliance was 95% during...... both recruitment periods. A tendency of smaller inter-fraction setup errors and intra-fraction motion was observed for group 2 (medial marker block position). However, apart from a significantly reduced inter-field random shift (σ = 1.7 mm vs. σ = 0.9 mm, p = 0.005), no statistically significant...... differences between the groups were found. In a combined analysis, the group mean inter-fraction setup error was M = - 0.1 mm, with random and systematic errors of σ = 1.7 mm and Σ = 1.4 mm. The group mean inter-field shift was M = 0.0 (σ = 1.3 mm and Σ = 1.1 mm) and the group mean standard deviation...

  4. Evaluating the Benefit of Elevated Acoustic Output in Harmonic Motion Estimation in Ultrasonic Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yufeng; Palmeri, Mark L; Rouze, Ned C; Haystead, Clare M; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2018-02-01

    Harmonic imaging techniques have been applied in ultrasonic elasticity imaging to obtain higher-quality tissue motion tracking data. However, harmonic tracking can be signal-to-noise ratio and penetration depth limited during clinical imaging, resulting in decreased yield of successful shear wave speed measurements. A logical approach is to increase the source pressure, but the in situ pressures used in diagnostic ultrasound have been subject to a de facto upper limit based on the Food and Drug Administration guideline for the mechanical index (MI estimation yield by 27% at a focal depth of 5 cm, with larger yield increase in more difficult-to-image patients. High-MI tracking improved harmonic tracking data quality by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio and decreasing jitter in the tissue motion data. We conclude that there is clinical benefit to use of elevated acoustic output in shear wave tracking, particularly in difficult-to-image patients. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Technical concept and evaluation of a novel shoulder simulator with adaptive muscle force generation and free motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verjans Mark

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The human shoulder is one of the most complex joints of the human body, and due to the high range of motion and the complex soft tissue apparatus prone to injuries. Surgical therapies and joint replacements often lead to unsatisfactory results. To improve the understanding of the complex biomechanics of the shoulder, experimental investigations have to be conducted. For this purpose a new shoulder simulator with an innovative muscle force generation was developed. On the basis of a modular concept six artificial pneumatic muscles were integrated to represent the functionally most important muscles of the shoulder joint, whereby a free and controlled movement of the humerus can be conducted. For each muscle individual setpoints for muscle length control based on a user defined shoulder movement for any artificial or cadaver specimen are created by manual motion “Teach-In”. Additional to muscle forces and lengths, optical tracking and a joint force measurement is used to enable different biomechanical studies of the shoulder joint. This paper describes the technical setup as well as the control strategy and first results of its experimental functional validation.

  6. Body temperature and motion: Evaluation of an online monitoring system in pigs challenged with Porcine Reproductive & Respiratory Syndrome Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süli, Tamás; Halas, Máté; Benyeda, Zsófia; Boda, Réka; Belák, Sándor; Martínez-Avilés, Marta; Fernández-Carrión, Eduardo; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel

    2017-10-01

    Highly contagious and emerging diseases cause significant losses in the pig producing industry worldwide. Rapid and exact acquisition of real-time data, like body temperature and animal movement from the production facilities would enable early disease detection and facilitate adequate response. In this study, carried out within the European Union research project RAPIDIA FIELD, we tested an online monitoring system on pigs experimentally infected with the East European subtype 3 Porcine Reproductive & Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) strain Lena. We linked data from different body temperature measurement methods and the real-time movement of the pigs. The results showed a negative correlation between body temperature and movement of the animals. The correlation was similar with both body temperature obtaining methods, rectal and thermal sensing microchip, suggesting some advantages of body temperature measurement with transponders compared with invasive and laborious rectal measuring. We also found a significant difference between motion values before and after the challenge with a virulent PRRSV strain. The decrease in motion values was noticeable before any clinical sign was recorded. Based on our results the online monitoring system could represent a practical tool in registering early warning signs of health status alterations, both in experimental and commercial production settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. SU-D-210-06: Feasibility for Monitoring the Head of the Pancreas Motion Through a Surrogate Using Ultrasound During Radiation Therapy Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omari, E; Noid, G; Ehlers, C; Erickson, B; Quiroz, F; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Cooper, D; Lachaine, M [Elekta Inc., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Substantial target motion during the delivery of radiation therapy (RT) for pancreatic cancer is well recognized as a major limiting factor on RT effectiveness. The aim of this work is to monitor intra-fractional motion of the pancreas using ultrasound during RT delivery. Methods: Transabdominal Ultrasound B-mode images were collected from 5 volunteers using a research version of the Clarity Autoscan System (Elekta). The autoscan transducer with center frequency of 5 MHz was utilized for the scans. Imaging parameters were adjusted to acquire images at the desired depth with good contrast and a wide sweep angle. Since well-defined boundaries of the pancreas can be difficult to find on ultrasound B-mode images, the portal vein was selected as a surrogate for motion estimation of the head of the pancreas. The selection was due to its anatomical location posterior to the neck of the pancreas and close proximity to the pancreas head. The portal vein was contoured on the ultrasound images acquired during simulation using the Clarity Research AFC Workstation software. Volunteers were set up in a similar manner to the simulation for their monitoring session and the ultrasound transducer was mounted on an arm fixed to the couch. A video segment of the portal vein motion was captured. Results: The portal vein was visualized and segmented. Successful monitoring sessions of the portal vein were observed. In addition, our results showed that the ultrasound transducer itself reduces breathing related motion. This is analogous to the use of a compression plate to suppress respiration motion during thorax or abdominal irradiation. Conclusion: We demonstrate the feasibility of tracking the pancreas through the localization of the portal vein using abdominal ultrasound. This will allow for real-time tracking of the intra-fractional motion to justify PTV-margin and to account for unusual motions, thus, improving normal tissue sparing. This research was funding in part by

  8. SU-F-J-151: Evaluation of a Magnetic Resonance Image Gated Radiotherapy System Using a Motion Phantom and Radiochromic Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, J; Ginn, J; O’Connell, D; Thomas, D; Agazaryan, N; Cao, M; Yang, Y; Low, D [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance image (MRI) guided radiotherapy enables gating directly on target position for soft-tissue targets in the lung and abdomen. We present a dosimetric evaluation of a commercially-available FDA-approved MRI-guided radiotherapy system’s gating performance using a MRI-compatible respiratory motion phantom and radiochromic film. Methods: The MRI-compatible phantom was capable of one-dimensional motion. The phantom consisted of a target rod containing high-contrast target inserts which moved inside a body structure containing background contrast material. The target rod was equipped with a radiochromic film insert. Treatment plans were generated for a 3 cm diameter spherical target, and delivered to the phantom at rest and in motion with and without gating. Both sinusoidal and actual tumor trajectories (two free-breathing trajectories and one repeated-breath hold) were used. Gamma comparison at 5%/3mm was used to measure fidelity to the static target dose distribution. Results: Without gating, gamma pass rates were 24–47% depending on motion trajectory. Using our clinical standard of repeated breath holds and a gating window of 3 mm with 10% of the target allowed outside the gating boundary, the gamma pass rate was 99.6%. Relaxing the gating window to 5 mm resulted in gamma pass rate of 98.6% with repeated breath holds. For all motion trajectories gated with 3 mm margin and 10% allowed out, gamma pass rates were between 64–100% (mean:87.5%). For a 5 mm margin and 10% allowed out, gamma pass rates were between 57–98% (mean: 82.49%), significantly lower than for 3 mm by paired t-test (p=0.01). Conclusion: We validated the performance of respiratory gating based on real-time cine MRI images with the only FDA-approved MRI-guided radiotherapy system. Our results suggest that repeated breath hold gating should be used when possible for best accuracy. A 3 mm gating margin is statistically significantly more accurate than a 5 mm gating margin.

  9. Respiration Induced Heart Motion and Indications of Gated Delivery for Left-Sided Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, X. Sharon; Hu, Angela; Wang Kai; Newman, Francis; Crosby, Marcus; Hu Bin; White, Julia; Li, X. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate respiration-induced heart motion for left-sided breast irradiation using a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) technique and to determine novel indications to assess heart motion and identify breast patients who may benefit from a gated treatment. Methods and Materials: Images of 4DCT acquired during free breathing for 20 left-sided breast cancer patients, who underwent whole breast irradiation with or without regional nodal irradiation, were analyzed retrospectively. Dose distributions were reconstructed in the phases of 0%, 20%, and 50%. The intrafractional heart displacement was measured in three selected transverse CT slices using D LAD (the distance from left ascending aorta to a fixed line [connecting middle point of sternum and the body] drawn on each slice) and maximum heart depth (MHD, the distance of the forefront of the heart to the line). Linear regression analysis was used to correlate these indices with mean heart dose and heart dose volume at different breathing phases. Results: Respiration-induced heart displacement resulted in observable variations in dose delivered to the heart. During a normal free-breathing cycle, heart-induced motion D LAD and MHD changed up to 9 and 11 mm respectively, resulting in up to 38% and 39% increases of mean doses and V 25.2 for the heart. MHD and D LAD were positively correlated with mean heart dose and heart dose volume. Respiratory-adapted gated treatment may better spare heart and ipsilateral-lung compared with the conventional non-gated plan in a subset of patients with large D LAD or MHD variations. Conclusion: Proposed indices offer novel assessment of heart displacement based on 4DCT images. MHD and D LAD can be used independently or jointly as selection criteria for respiratory gating procedure before treatment planning. Patients with great intrafractional MHD variations or tumor(s) close to the diaphragm may particularly benefit from the gated treatment.

  10. Summary and evaluation of transient test data on extended fuel motion resulting from unprotected loss of flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickerman, C E

    1977-06-01

    Experimental data on fuel failure and its consequences are used to provide predictions of the extended fuel motion that would occur after a hypothetical core-disruptive loss-of-flow accident without scram in the Fast Test Reactor. These data indicate the existence of fuel-dispersal mechanisms, slow collapse of fresh fuel, resistance to collapse of irradiated fuel, the absence of accelerated collapse mechanisms (such as cladding-coolant vapor ''explosions''), and the fact that real LMFBR conditions inhibit rapid sodium-vaporization events. These data indicate that severely damaged subassemblies will not be coolable in situ by returning sodium after the accident, because of steel and fuel blockages, and suggest that the severely damaged, melted fuel will eventually disperse upward under the influence of vapor generated by decay heating.

  11. Shoulder motion assistance using a single-joint Hybrid Assistive Limb®robot: Evaluation of its safety and validity in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makihara, Takeshi; Kadone, Hideki; Onishi, Shinzo; Kubota, Shigeki; Hada, Yasushi; Shimizu, Yukiyo; Kawamoto, Hiroaki; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using the single-joint Hybrid Assistive Limb ® robot (HAL) to assist with shoulder flexion-extension in healthy adults, and to assess the capacity of the HAL to analyze the bioelectrical signals of muscle activity for shoulder flexion-extension. This cross-sectional feasibility study included six healthy adult men with no impairment in shoulder motion. The single-joint HAL was fixed to a custom-designed platform and upper arm attachment, and aligned 3 cm below the acromion process. Vital signs, shoulder fatigue, and shoulder pain were evaluated before and after the shoulder elevation exercise performed with and without the HAL. Activity of selected muscles of the shoulder was recorded using a wireless superficial electromyography device. Shoulder movement was captured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The HAL supported smooth flexion-extension of the arm at the shoulder joint, with no negative effects on vital signs, shoulder fatigue, and shoulder pain. The HAL decreased muscle activity levels, with a 55% decrease in trapezius muscle activity. The upward rotation angle of the scapula was significantly lower with the HAL at 120° of shoulder flexion. The single-joint HAL provided safe and effective assistance to scapular plane shoulder flexion-extension among healthy adults.

  12. Impact of residual and intrafractional errors on strategy of correction for image-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Xiao-Mao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cone beam CT (CBCT guided radiation can reduce the systematic and random setup errors as compared to the skin-mark setup. However, the residual and intrafractional (RAIF errors are still unknown. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the magnitude of RAIF errors and correction action levels needed in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT guided accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI. Methods Ten patients were enrolled in the prospective study of CBCT guided APBI. The postoperative tumor bed was irradiated with 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions over 5 days. Two cone-beam CT data sets were obtained with one before and one after the treatment delivery. The CBCT images were registered online to the planning CT images using the automatic algorithm followed by a fine manual adjustment. An action level of 3 mm, meaning that corrections were performed for translations exceeding 3 mm, was implemented in clinical treatments. Based on the acquired data, different correction action levels were simulated, and random RAIF errors, systematic RAIF errors and related margins before and after the treatments were determined for varying correction action levels. Results A total of 75 pairs of CBCT data sets were analyzed. The systematic and random setup errors based on skin-mark setup prior to treatment delivery were 2.1 mm and 1.8 mm in the lateral (LR, 3.1 mm and 2.3 mm in the superior-inferior (SI, and 2.3 mm and 2.0 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP directions. With the 3 mm correction action level, the systematic and random RAIF errors were 2.5 mm and 2.3 mm in the LR direction, 2.3 mm and 2.3 mm in the SI direction, and 2.3 mm and 2.2 mm in the AP direction after treatments delivery. Accordingly, the margins for correction action levels of 3 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm, 6 mm and no correction were 7.9 mm, 8.0 mm, 8.0 mm, 7.9 mm and 8.0 mm in the LR direction; 6.4 mm, 7.1 mm, 7.9 mm, 9.2 mm and 10.5 mm in the SI direction; 7.6 mm, 7.9 mm, 9.4 mm, 10

  13. Poster - 46: Intra-fraction tumor position assessment for lung SBRT in patients treated without customized immobilization devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamri, Iqbal; Faria, Sergio; Gluszko, Jessica; Patrocinio, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess intra-fraction positional stability of lung cancer tumours in patients treated by kilo-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) without the use of customized immobilization devices. Material and Methods: Twenty-two patients underwent 4D-CT in the supine position with the arms in a wing board but without customized immobilization. The PTV was the internal target volume based on maximum intensity projections and a 5mm symmetric setup margin. Treatments were planned using 7–9 static fields or two volumetric modulated arcs. At treatment, the patient position was adjusted using pre-treatment CBCT. A post-treatment CBCT was taken immediately after the treatment ended. The 41 CBCT pairs were automatically matched and the transitional shifts between the two CBCTs recorded. The mean values and standard deviations were calculated for these displacements. Results and conclusions: The mean time between CBCTs (treatment time) was 16.5 ± 6 minutes (range: 10 to 34 minutes). In all cases the tumour remained inside the PTV in the post-treatment CBCT. The mean shifts between pre and post-treatment CBCTs were −0.7 ± 1.6 mm (range −5.0 to 3.0 mm) vertically, −0.3 ± 1.7 mm (range −4.8 to 3.0 mm) longitudinally, and −0.4 ± 1.5 mm (range −4.0 to 2.0 mm) laterally. Our results suggest little systematic shifting during treatment, and standard deviations that are consistent with another published report for treatments where customized immobilization was used. This result is encouraging for SBRT programs in clinics with limited resources.

  14. SU-E-T-250: New IMRT Sequencing Strategy: Towards Intra-Fraction Plan Adaptation for the MR-Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontaxis, C; Bol, G; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a new sequencer for IMRT planning that during treatment makes the inclusion of external factors possible and by doing so accounts for intra-fraction anatomy changes. Given a real-time imaging modality that will provide the updated patient anatomy during delivery, this sequencer is able to take these changes into account during the calculation of subsequent segments. Methods: Pencil beams are generated for each beam angle of the treatment and a fluence optimization is performed. The pencil beams, together with the patient anatomy and the above optimal fluence form the input of our algorithm. During each iteration the following steps are performed: A fluence optimization is done and each beam's fluence is then split to discrete intensity levels. Deliverable segments are calculated for each one of these. Each segment's area multiplied by its intensity describes its efficiency. The most efficient segment among all beams is then chosen to deliver a part of the calculated fluence and the dose that will be delivered by this segment is calculated. This delivered dose is then subtracted from the remaining dose. This loop is repeated until 90% of the dose has been delivered and a final segment weight optimization is performed to reach full convergence. Results: This algorithm was tested in several prostate cases yielding results that meet all clinical constraints. Quality assurance was performed on Delta4 and film phantoms for one of these prostate cases and received clinical acceptance after passing both gamma analyses with the 3%/3mm criteria. Conclusion: A new sequencing algorithm was developed to facilitate the needs of intensity modulated treatment. The first results on static anatomy confirm that it can calculate clinical plans equivalent to those of the commercially available planning systems. We are now working towards 100% dose convergence which will allow us to handle anatomy deformations. This work is financially supported by Elekta

  15. Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Cine–Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measured Lung Tumor Motion Consistency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Danny [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sidney, NSW (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Ludbrook, Joanna; Arm, Jameen; Hunter, Perry [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Pollock, Sean; Makhija, Kuldeep; O' brien, Ricky T. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sidney, NSW (Australia); Kim, Taeho [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sidney, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Keall, Paul, E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sidney, NSW (Australia)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of an audiovisual (AV) biofeedback on intra- and interfraction tumor motion for lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Lung tumor motion was investigated in 9 lung cancer patients who underwent a breathing training session with AV biofeedback before 2 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sessions. The breathing training session was performed to allow patients to become familiar with AV biofeedback, which uses a guiding wave customized for each patient according to a reference breathing pattern. In the first MRI session (pretreatment), 2-dimensional cine-MR images with (1) free breathing (FB) and (2) AV biofeedback were obtained, and the second MRI session was repeated within 3-6 weeks (mid-treatment). Lung tumors were directly measured from cine-MR images using an auto-segmentation technique; the centroid and outlier motions of the lung tumors were measured from the segmented tumors. Free breathing and AV biofeedback were compared using several metrics: intra- and interfraction tumor motion consistency in displacement and period, and the outlier motion ratio. Results: Compared with FB, AV biofeedback improved intrafraction tumor motion consistency by 34% in displacement (P=.019) and by 73% in period (P<.001). Compared with FB, AV biofeedback improved interfraction tumor motion consistency by 42% in displacement (P<.046) and by 74% in period (P=.005). Compared with FB, AV biofeedback reduced the outlier motion ratio by 21% (P<.001). Conclusions: These results demonstrated that AV biofeedback significantly improved intra- and interfraction lung tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. These results demonstrate that AV biofeedback can facilitate consistent tumor motion, which is advantageous toward achieving more accurate medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  16. Prehospital Cervical Spine Motion: Immobilization Versus Spine Motion Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Erik E; Tucker, W Steven; Nowak, Matthew; Roberto, Jason; Hollingworth, Amy; Decoster, Laura C; Trimarco, Thomas W; Mihalik, Jason P

    2018-02-16

    This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of two different spinal immobilization techniques on cervical spine movement in a simulated prehospital ground transport setting. A counterbalanced crossover design was used to evaluate two different spinal immobilization techniques in a standardized environment. Twenty healthy male volunteers (age = 20.9 ± 2.2 yr) underwent ambulance transport from a simulated scene to a simulated emergency department setting in two separate conditions: utilizing traditional spinal immobilization (TSI) and spinal motion restriction (SMR). During both transport scenarios, participants underwent the same simulated scenario. The main outcome measures were cervical spine motion (cumulative integrated motion and peak range of motion), vital signs (heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation), and self-reported pain. Vital signs and pain were collected at six consistent points throughout each scenario. Participants experienced greater transverse plane cumulative integrated motion during TSI compared to SMR (F 1,57 = 4.05; P = 0.049), and greater transverse peak range of motion during participant loading/unloading in TSI condition compared to SMR (F 1,57 = 17.32; P TSI compared to 25% of participants during SMR (χ 2 = 1.29; P = 0.453). Spinal motion restriction controlled cervical motion at least as well as traditional spinal immobilization in a simulated prehospital ground transport setting. Given these results, along with well-documented potential complications of TSI in the literature, SMR is supported as an alternative to TSI. Future research should involve a true patient population.

  17. Seismic Response and Evaluation of SDOF Self-Centering Friction Damping Braces Subjected to Several Earthquake Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Wan Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly deals with seismic response and performance for self-centering friction damping braces (SFDBs subjected to several maximum- or design-leveled earthquake ground motions. The self-centering friction damping brace members consist of core recentering components fabricated with superelastic shape memory alloy wires and energy dissipation devices achieved through shear friction mechanism. As compared to the conventional brace members for use in the steel concentrically braced frame structure, these self-centering friction damping brace members make the best use of their representative characteristics to minimize residual deformations and to withstand earthquake loads without member replacement. The configuration and response mechanism of self-centering friction damping brace systems are firstly described in this study, and then parametric investigations are conducted through nonlinear time-history analyses performed on numerical single degree-of-freedom spring models. After observing analysis results, adequate design methodologies that optimally account for recentering capability and energy dissipation according to their comparative parameters are intended to be suggested in order to take advantage of energy capacity and to minimize residual deformation simultaneously.

  18. Soft tissue artifact evaluation of the cervical spine in motion patterns of flexion and lateral bending: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Soft tissue artifact (STA is increasingly becoming a focus of research as the skin marker method is widely employed in motion capture technique. At present, medical imaging methods provide reliable ways to investigate the cervical STA. Among these approaches, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a highly preferred tool because of its low radiation. Methods. In the study, the 3D spatial location of vertebral landmarks and corresponding skin markers of the spinous processes of the second (C2, fifth (C5, and sixth (C6 cervical levels during flexion and lateral bending were investigated. A series of static postures were scanned using MRI. Skin deformation was obtained by the Mimics software. Results. Results shows that during flexion, the maximum skin deformation occurs at C6, in the superior–inferior (Z direction. Upon lateral bending, the maximum skin displacement occurs at C2 level, in the left–right (Y direction. The result presents variability of soft tissue in the terms of direction and magnitude, which is consistent with the prevailing opinion. Discussion. The results testified variability of cervical STA. Future studies involving large ranges of subject classification, such as age, sex, height, gravity, and etc. should be performed to completely verify the existing hypothesis on human cervical skin deformation.

  19. Evaluation of performance, acceptance, and compliance of an auto-injector in healthy and rheumatoid arthritic subjects measured by a motion capture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao; Li, Wei; Clawson, Corbin; Karvani, David; Sondag, Perceval; Hahn, James K

    2018-01-01

    The study aimed to develop a motion capture system that can track, visualize, and analyze the entire performance of self-injection with the auto-injector. Each of nine healthy subjects and 29 rheumatoid arthritic (RA) patients with different degrees of hand disability performed two simulated injections into an injection pad while six degrees of freedom (DOF) motions of the auto-injector and the injection pad were captured. We quantitatively measured the performance of the injection by calculating needle displacement from the motion trajectories. The max, mean, and SD of needle displacement were analyzed. Assessments of device acceptance and usability were evaluated by a survey questionnaire and independent observations of compliance with the device instruction for use (IFU). A total of 80 simulated injections were performed. Our results showed a similar level of performance among all the subjects with slightly larger, but not statistically significant, needle displacement in the RA group. In particular, no significant effects regarding previous experience in self-injection, grip method, pain in hand, and Cochin score in the RA group were found to have an impact on the mean needle displacement. Moreover, the analysis of needle displacement for different durations of injections indicated that most of the subjects reached their personal maximum displacement in 15 seconds and remained steady or exhibited a small amount of increase from 15 to 60 seconds. Device acceptance was high for most of the questions (ie, >4; >80%) based on a 0-5-point scale or percentage of acceptance. The overall compliance with the device IFU was high for the first injection (96.05%) and reached 98.02% for the second injection. We demonstrated the feasibility of tracking the motions of injection to measure the performance of simulated self-injection. The comparisons of needle displacement showed that even RA patients with severe hand disability could properly perform self-injection with this

  20. Evaluation of Lower Limb Motor Function Using Wireless Motion Sensors—A Comparison of Normal Elderly Subjects and those Requiring Support Level 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Numata, Takayuki; Kuwae, Yutaka; Sekine, Masaki; Tsuji, Miwa; Okabe, Ichiro; Hara, Keita; Fujimoto, Toshiro; Tamura, Toshiyo

    This study quantitatively compared lower limb motility of normal subjects and those requiring support level 1 (support_1). We developed a wireless inertia sensor with an embedded tri-axial accelerometer and angular velocity sensor. Six normal elderly subjects and ten elderly subjects who were classified as support_1 by the Japanese care insurance system participated in the study. We attached the wireless motion sensors to the center of the lower back and both thighs in the subjects. Subjects were then asked to walk 10 m and perform a stepping exercise. For the evaluation, the cadence, pitch angle, and pitch angular velocity of the thigh auto-correlation function and root mean square (RMS) on the lower back were calculated. The autocorrelation coefficient function for the support_1 subjects was smaller than in the normal subjects, while the RMS was larger in support_1. These differences indicated that the gait and balance abilities of the support_1 subjects were poorer than those of the normal subjects. This suggests that our wireless motion sensor is useful for assessing the motility of the lower limbs while walking and climbing steps.

  1. Deficient Biological Motion Perception in Schizophrenia: Results from a Motion Noise Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jejoong eKim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Schizophrenia patients exhibit deficient processing of perceptual and cognitive information. However, it is not well understood how basic perceptual deficits contribute to higher level cognitive problems in this mental disorder. Perception of biological motion, a motion-based cognitive recognition task, relies on both basic visual motion processing and social cognitive processing, thus providing a useful paradigm to evaluate the potentially hierarchical relationship between these two levels of information processing. Methods: In this study, we designed a biological motion paradigm in which basic visual motion signals were manipulated systematically by incorporating different levels of motion noise. We measured the performances of schizophrenia patients (n=21 and healthy controls (n=22 in this biological motion perception task, as well as in coherent motion detection, theory of mind, and a widely used biological motion recognition task. Results: Schizophrenia patients performed the biological motion perception task with significantly lower accuracy than healthy controls when perceptual signals were moderately degraded by noise. A more substantial degradation of perceptual signals, through using additional noise, impaired biological motion perception in both groups. Performance levels on biological motion recognition, coherent motion detection and theory of mind tasks were also reduced in patients. Conclusion: The results from the motion-noise biological motion paradigm indicate that in the presence of visual motion noise, the processing of biological motion information in schizophrenia is deficient. Combined with the results of poor basic visual motion perception (coherent motion task and biological motion recognition, the association between basic motion signals and biological motion perception suggests a need to incorporate the improvement of visual motion perception in social cognitive remediation.

  2. Evaluation of intersegmental vertebral motion during performance of dynamic mobilization exercises in cervical lateral bending in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Hilary M; Kaiser, Leeann J; Lavagnino, Michael; Stubbs, Narelle C

    2012-08-01

    To identify differences in intersegmental bending angles in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar portions of the vertebral column between the end positions during performance of 3 dynamic mobilization exercises in cervical lateral bending in horses. 8 nonlame horses. Skin-fixed markers on the head, cervical transverse processes (C1-C6) and spinous processes (T6, T8, T10, T16, L2, L6, S2, and S4) were tracked with a motion analysis system with the horses standing in a neutral position and in 3 lateral bending positions to the left and right sides during chin-to-girth, chin-to-hip, and chin-to-tarsus mobilization exercises. Intersegmental angles for the end positions in the various exercises performed to the left and right sides were compared. The largest changes in intersegmental angles were at C6, especially for the chin-to-hip and chin-to-tarsus mobilization exercises. These exercises were also associated with greater lateral bending from T6 to S2, compared with the chin-to-girth mobilization or neutral standing position. The angle at C1 revealed considerable bending in the chin-to-girth position but not in the 2 more caudal positions. The amount of bending in different parts of the cervical vertebral column differed among the dynamic mobilization exercises. As the horse's chin moved further caudally, bending in the caudal cervical and thoracolumbar regions increased, suggesting that the more caudal positions may be particularly effective for activating and strengthening the core musculature that is used to bend and stabilize the horse's back.

  3. Evaluation of the evolving stress field of the Yellowstone volcanic plateau, 1988 to 2010, from earthquake first-motion inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, E.; Waite, G. P.; Tibaldi, A.

    2017-03-01

    Although the last rhyolite eruption occurred around 70 ka ago, the silicic Yellowstone volcanic field is still considered active due to high hydrothermal and seismic activity and possible recent magma intrusions. Geodetic measurements document complex deformation patterns in crustal strain and seismic activity likewise reveal spatial and temporal variations in the stress field. We use earthquake data recorded between 1988 and 2010 to investigate these variations and their possible causes in more detail. Earthquake relocations and a set of 369 well-constrained, double-couple, focal mechanism solutions were computed. Events were grouped according to location and time to investigate trends in faulting. The majority of the events have normal-faulting solutions, subordinate strike-slip kinematics, and very rarely, reverse motions. The dominant direction of extension throughout the 0.64 Ma Yellowstone caldera is nearly ENE, consistent with the perpendicular direction of alignments of volcanic vents within the caldera, but our study also reveals spatial and temporal variations. Stress-field solutions for different areas and time periods were calculated from earthquake focal mechanism inversion. A well-resolved rotation of σ3 was found, from NNE-SSW near the Hebgen Lake fault zone, to ENE-WSW near Norris Junction. In particular, the σ3 direction changed throughout the years around Norris Geyser Basin, from being ENE-WSW, as calculated in the study by Waite and Smith (2004), to NNE-SSW, while the other σ3 directions are mostly unchanged over time. The presence of ;chocolate tablet; structures, with two sets of nearly perpendicular normal faults, was identified in many stages of the deformation history both in the Norris Geyser Basin area and inside the caldera.

  4. Optimized balance rehabilitation training strategy for the elderly through an evaluation of balance characteristics in response to dynamic motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, HoHyun; Chun, Keyoung Jin; Hong, Jaesoo; Lim, Dohyung

    2015-01-01

    Balance is important in daily activities and essential for maintaining an independent lifestyle in the elderly. Recent studies have shown that balance rehabilitation training can improve the balance ability of the elderly, and diverse balance rehabilitation training equipment has been developed. However, there has been little research into optimized strategies for balance rehabilitation training. To provide an optimized strategy, we analyzed the balance characteristics of participants in response to the rotation of a base plate on multiple axes. Seven male adults with no musculoskeletal or nervous system-related diseases (age: 25.5±1.7 years; height: 173.9±6.4 cm; body mass: 71.3±6.5 kg; body mass index: 23.6±2.4 kg/m2) were selected to investigate the balance rehabilitation training using customized rehabilitation equipment. Rotation of the base plate of the equipment was controlled to induce dynamic rotation of participants in the anterior–posterior, right-diagonal, medial–lateral, and left-diagonal directions. We used a three-dimensional motion capture system employing infrared cameras and the Pedar Flexible Insoles System to characterize the major lower-extremity joint angles, center of body mass, and center of pressure. We found statistically significant differences between the changes in joint angles in the lower extremities in response to dynamic rotation of the participants (P0.05). These results indicate that optimizing rotation control of the base plate of balance rehabilitation training equipment to induce anterior–posterior and medial–lateral dynamic rotation preferentially can lead to effective balance training. Additional tests with varied speeds and ranges of angles of base plate rotation are expected to be useful as well as an analysis of the balance characteristics considering a balance index that reflects the muscle activity and cooperative characteristics. PMID:26508847

  5. Stability evaluation of ground considering dynamic vertical ground motion. Pt. 3. Effect of dynamic vertical motions on sliding safety factor of foundation ground and surrounding slope in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Sato, Hiroaki; Kawai, Tadashi; Kanatani, Mamoru

    2003-01-01

    In this report, time differences of the peak accelerations between horizontal and vertical motions were investigated based on the earthquake records on the rock sites and analytical studies were carried out in order to investigate the effect of them to the fluctuations of the minimum sliding safety factors of the foundation ground and surrounding slope of nuclear power plants. Summaries of this report were as follows; (1) Maximum time difference of the peak accelerations between horizontal and vertical motions on the rock sites was approximately 10 seconds in the earthquakes within the epicenter distance of 100 km. (2) Analytical studies that employed the equivalent linear analysis with horizontal and vertical input motions were carried out against the representative models and ground properties of the foundation grounds and surrounding slopes in nuclear power plants. The combinations of the horizontal and vertical motions were determined from the above-mentioned investigation results based on the actual earthquake records. It was revealed that the fluctuations of the minimum sliding safety factors were not seriously affected by the time difference of the peak accelerations between horizontal and vertical motions. (author)

  6. Auditory motion capturing ambiguous visual motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen eAlink

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it is demonstrated that moving sounds have an effect on the direction in which one sees visual stimuli move. During the main experiment sounds were presented consecutively at four speaker locations inducing left- or rightwards auditory apparent motion. On the path of auditory apparent motion, visual apparent motion stimuli were presented with a high degree of directional ambiguity. The main outcome of this experiment is that our participants perceived visual apparent motion stimuli that were ambiguous (equally likely to be perceived as moving left- or rightwards more often as moving in the same direction than in the opposite direction of auditory apparent motion. During the control experiment we replicated this finding and found no effect of sound motion direction on eye movements. This indicates that auditory motion can capture our visual motion percept when visual motion direction is insufficiently determinate without affecting eye movements.

  7. Auditory Motion Elicits a Visual Motion Aftereffect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Christopher C; Ehrsson, H Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The visual motion aftereffect is a visual illusion in which exposure to continuous motion in one direction leads to a subsequent illusion of visual motion in the opposite direction. Previous findings have been mixed with regard to whether this visual illusion can be induced cross-modally by auditory stimuli. Based on research on multisensory perception demonstrating the profound influence auditory perception can have on the interpretation and perceived motion of visual stimuli, we hypothesized that exposure to auditory stimuli with strong directional motion cues should induce a visual motion aftereffect. Here, we demonstrate that horizontally moving auditory stimuli induced a significant visual motion aftereffect-an effect that was driven primarily by a change in visual motion perception following exposure to leftward moving auditory stimuli. This finding is consistent with the notion that visual and auditory motion perception rely on at least partially overlapping neural substrates.

  8. SU-E-J-42: Evaluation of Fiducial Markers for Ultrasound and X-Ray Images Used for Motion Tracking in Pancreas SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, SK; Armour, E; Su, L; Zhang, Y; Wong, J; Ding, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Iordachita, I [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Sen, H Tutkun; Kazanzides, P; Bell, M Lediju [Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Ultrasound tracking of target motion relies on visibility of vascular and/or anatomical landmark. However this is challenging when the target is located far from vascular structures or in organs that lack ultrasound landmark structure, such as in the case of pancreas cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate visibility, artifacts and distortions of fusion coils and solid gold markers in ultrasound, CT, CBCT and kV images to identify markers suitable for real-time ultrasound tracking of tumor motion in SBRT pancreas treatment. Methods Two fusion coils (1mm × 5mm and 1mm × 10 mm) and a solid gold marker (0.8mm × 10mm) were embedded in a tissue–like ultrasound phantom. The phantom (5cm × 12cm × 20cm) was prepared using water, gelatin and psyllium-hydrophilic-mucilloid fiber. Psylliumhydrophilic mucilloid acts as scattering medium to produce echo texture that simulates sonographic appearance of human tissue in ultrasound images while maintaining electron density close to that of water in CT images. Ultrasound images were acquired using 3D-ultrasound system with markers embedded at 5, 10 and 15mm depth from phantom surface. CT images were acquired using Philips Big Bore CT while CBCT and kV images were acquired with XVI-system (Elexta). Visual analysis was performed to compare visibility of the markers and visibility score (1 to 3) were assigned. Results All markers embedded at various depths are clearly visible (score of 3) in ultrasound images. Good visibility of all markers is observed in CT, CBCT and kV images. The degree of artifact produced by the markers in CT and CBCT images are indistinguishable. No distortion is observed in images from any modalities. Conclusion All markers are visible in images across all modalities in this homogenous tissue-like phantom. Human subject data is necessary to confirm the marker type suitable for real-time ultrasound tracking of tumor motion in SBRT pancreas treatment.

  9. Non-invasive detection of ischemic left ventricular dysfunction using rest gated SPECT. Expectation of simultaneous evaluation of both myocardial perfusion and wall motion abnormality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeba, Hirofumi; Takehana, Kazuya; Nakamura, Seishi; Yoshida, Susumu; Ueyama, Takanao; Hatada, Kengo; Iwasaka, Toshiji

    2008-01-01

    Although the accurate detection of ischemic etiology is important in the management of patients with severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, it is difficult to determine using a non-invasive strategy. The present study investigates whether perfusion and regional functional abnormalities identified by quantitative electrocardiographic gated single-photon emission computed tomography (QGS) at rest can detect ischemic LV dysfunction in patients with severe LV dysfunction. Rest QGS with 99m Tc-tetrofosmin was performed on 54 consecutive patients with LV ejection fraction of ≤40%. Ischemic LV dysfunction (n=32) was defined according to the established standard. Regional perfusion and wall motion were calculated using a 14-segment model (six mid-ventricular and eight apical segments) and compared with a normal control group. The numbers of reduced [mean -1 standard deviation (SD) of normal individuals] and severely reduced (mean -2 SD) wall motion segments were similar between patients with ischemic and non-ischemic LV dysfunction (13.5±1.1 vs. 13.6±0.9 and 10.6±2.0 vs. 9.9±3.0 segments, respectively). The number of hypoperfused (mean -1 SD) segments was significantly greater in patients with ischemic LV dysfunction than in those with non-ischemic LV dysfunction (9.3±3.8 vs. 2.0±2.8 segments, P<0.0001). The analysis of the receiver operating characteristics showed that a cut-off value of 4 hypoperfused segments among 14 segments provided the best separation between ischemic and non-ischemic LV dysfunction (sensitivity=88% and specificity=91%). Furthermore, patients with non-ischemic LV dysfunction had no severely hypoperfused (mean -2 SD) segments in any of the segments, whereas patients with ischemic LV dysfunction had 4.4±0.2 segments. The QGS strategy at rest can accurately differentiate patients with ischemic LV dysfunction from those with severe LV dysfunction by simultaneous regional evaluation of wall motion and myocardial perfusion. (author)

  10. Motion control report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a short discount publication. In today's manufacturing environment, Motion Control plays a major role in virtually every project.The Motion Control Report provides a comprehensive overview of the technology of Motion Control:* Design Considerations* Technologies* Methods to Control Motion* Examples of Motion Control in Systems* A Detailed Vendors List

  11. Motion management in gastrointestinal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Hassan; Chang, Bryan; Chen, Zhe Jay

    2014-06-01

    The presence of tumor and organ motions complicates the planning and delivery of radiotherapy for gastrointestinal cancers. Without proper accounting of the movements, target volume could be under-dosed and the nearby normal critical organs could be over-dosed. This situation is further exacerbated by the close proximity of abdominal tumors to many normal organs at risk (OARs). A number of strategies have been developed to deal with tumor and organ motions in radiotherapy. This article presents a review of the techniques used in the evaluation, quantification, and management of tumor and organ motions for radiotherapy of gastrointestinal cancers.

  12. Motion correction in thoracic positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gigengack, Fabian; Dawood, Mohammad; Schäfers, Klaus P

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion leads to image degradation in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which impairs quantification. In this book, the authors present approaches to motion estimation and motion correction in thoracic PET. The approaches for motion estimation are based on dual gating and mass-preserving image registration (VAMPIRE) and mass-preserving optical flow (MPOF). With mass-preservation, image intensity modulations caused by highly non-rigid cardiac motion are accounted for. Within the image registration framework different data terms, different variants of regularization and parametric and non-parametric motion models are examined. Within the optical flow framework, different data terms and further non-quadratic penalization are also discussed. The approaches for motion correction particularly focus on pipelines in dual gated PET. A quantitative evaluation of the proposed approaches is performed on software phantom data with accompanied ground-truth motion information. Further, clinical appl...

  13. A Simulation Study of a Radiofrequency Localization System for Tracking Patient Motion in Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostyn, Mark; Kim, Siyong; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2016-04-13

    One of the most widely used tools in cancer treatment is external beam radiotherapy. However, the major risk involved in radiotherapy is excess radiation dose to healthy tissue, exacerbated by patient motion. Here, we present a simulation study of a potential radiofrequency (RF) localization system designed to track intrafraction motion (target motion during the radiation treatment). This system includes skin-wearable RF beacons and an external tracking system. We develop an analytical model for direction of arrival measurement with radio frequencies (GHz range) for use in a localization estimate. We use a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the relationship between a localization estimate and angular resolution of sensors (signal receivers) in a simulated room. The results indicate that the external sensor needs an angular resolution of about 0.03 degrees to achieve millimeter-level localization accuracy in a treatment room. This fundamental study of a novel RF localization system offers the groundwork to design a radiotherapy-compatible patient positioning system for active motion compensation.

  14. SU-F-J-105: Towards a Novel Treatment Planning Pipeline Delivering Pareto- Optimal Plans While Enabling Inter- and Intrafraction Plan Adaptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontaxis, C; Bol, G; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B; Breedveld, S; Sharfo, A; Heijmen, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a new IMRT treatment planning methodology suitable for the new generation of MR-linear accelerator machines. The pipeline is able to deliver Pareto-optimal plans and can be utilized for conventional treatments as well as for inter- and intrafraction plan adaptation based on real-time MR-data. Methods: A Pareto-optimal plan is generated using the automated multicriterial optimization approach Erasmus-iCycle. The resulting dose distribution is used as input to the second part of the pipeline, an iterative process which generates deliverable segments that target the latest anatomical state and gradually converges to the prescribed dose. This process continues until a certain percentage of the dose has been delivered. Under a conventional treatment, a Segment Weight Optimization (SWO) is then performed to ensure convergence to the prescribed dose. In the case of inter- and intrafraction adaptation, post-processing steps like SWO cannot be employed due to the changing anatomy. This is instead addressed by transferring the missing/excess dose to the input of the subsequent fraction. In this work, the resulting plans were delivered on a Delta4 phantom as a final Quality Assurance test. Results: A conventional static SWO IMRT plan was generated for two prostate cases. The sequencer faithfully reproduced the input dose for all volumes of interest. For the two cases the mean relative dose difference of the PTV between the ideal input and sequenced dose was 0.1% and −0.02% respectively. Both plans were delivered on a Delta4 phantom and passed the clinical Quality Assurance procedures by achieving 100% pass rate at a 3%/3mm gamma analysis. Conclusion: We have developed a new sequencing methodology capable of online plan adaptation. In this work, we extended the pipeline to support Pareto-optimal input and clinically validated that it can accurately achieve these ideal distributions, while its flexible design enables inter- and intrafraction plan

  15. SU-F-J-105: Towards a Novel Treatment Planning Pipeline Delivering Pareto- Optimal Plans While Enabling Inter- and Intrafraction Plan Adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontaxis, C; Bol, G; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breedveld, S; Sharfo, A; Heijmen, B [Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a new IMRT treatment planning methodology suitable for the new generation of MR-linear accelerator machines. The pipeline is able to deliver Pareto-optimal plans and can be utilized for conventional treatments as well as for inter- and intrafraction plan adaptation based on real-time MR-data. Methods: A Pareto-optimal plan is generated using the automated multicriterial optimization approach Erasmus-iCycle. The resulting dose distribution is used as input to the second part of the pipeline, an iterative process which generates deliverable segments that target the latest anatomical state and gradually converges to the prescribed dose. This process continues until a certain percentage of the dose has been delivered. Under a conventional treatment, a Segment Weight Optimization (SWO) is then performed to ensure convergence to the prescribed dose. In the case of inter- and intrafraction adaptation, post-processing steps like SWO cannot be employed due to the changing anatomy. This is instead addressed by transferring the missing/excess dose to the input of the subsequent fraction. In this work, the resulting plans were delivered on a Delta4 phantom as a final Quality Assurance test. Results: A conventional static SWO IMRT plan was generated for two prostate cases. The sequencer faithfully reproduced the input dose for all volumes of interest. For the two cases the mean relative dose difference of the PTV between the ideal input and sequenced dose was 0.1% and −0.02% respectively. Both plans were delivered on a Delta4 phantom and passed the clinical Quality Assurance procedures by achieving 100% pass rate at a 3%/3mm gamma analysis. Conclusion: We have developed a new sequencing methodology capable of online plan adaptation. In this work, we extended the pipeline to support Pareto-optimal input and clinically validated that it can accurately achieve these ideal distributions, while its flexible design enables inter- and intrafraction plan

  16. SU-E-J-258: Inter- and Intra-Fraction Setup Stability and Couch Change Tolerance for Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teboh, Forbang R; Agee, M; Rowe, L; Creasy, T; Schultz, J; Bell, R; Wong, J; Armour, E [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Immobilization devices combine rigid patient fixation as well as comfort and play a key role providing the stability required for accurate radiation delivery. In the setup step, couch re-positioning needed to align the patient is derived via registration of acquired versus reference image. For subsequent fractions, replicating the initial setup should yield identical alignment errors when compared to the reference. This is not always the case and further couch re-positioning can be needed. An important quality assurance measure is to set couch tolerances beyond which additional investigations are needed. The purpose of this work was to study the inter-fraction couch changes needed to re-align the patient and the intra-fraction stability of the alignment as a guide to establish the couch tolerances. Methods: Data from twelve patients treated on the Accuray CyberKnife (CK) system for fractionated intracranial radiotherapy and immobilized with Aquaplast RT, U-frame, F-Head-Support (Qfix, PA, USA) was used. Each fraction involved image acquisitions and registration with the reference to re-align the patient. The absolute couch position corresponding to the approved setup alignment was recorded per fraction. Intra-fraction set-up corrections were recorded throughout the treatment. Results: The average approved setup alignment was 0.03±0.28mm, 0.15±0.22mm, 0.06±0.31mm in the L/R, A/P, S/I directions respectively and 0.00±0.35degrees, 0.03±0.32degrees, 0.08±0.45degrees for roll, pitch and yaw respectively. The inter-fraction reproducibility of the couch position was 6.65mm, 10.55mm, and 4.77mm in the L/R, A/P and S/I directions respectively and 0.82degrees, 0.71degrees for roll and pitch respectively. Intra-fraction monitoring showed small average errors of 0.21±0.21mm, 0.00±0.08mm, 0.23±0.22mm in the L/R, A/P, S/I directions respectively and 0.03±0.12degrees, 0.04±0.25degrees, and 0.13±0.15degrees in the roll, pitch and yaw respectively. Conclusion

  17. SU-E-J-258: Inter- and Intra-Fraction Setup Stability and Couch Change Tolerance for Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teboh, Forbang R; Agee, M; Rowe, L; Creasy, T; Schultz, J; Bell, R; Wong, J; Armour, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Immobilization devices combine rigid patient fixation as well as comfort and play a key role providing the stability required for accurate radiation delivery. In the setup step, couch re-positioning needed to align the patient is derived via registration of acquired versus reference image. For subsequent fractions, replicating the initial setup should yield identical alignment errors when compared to the reference. This is not always the case and further couch re-positioning can be needed. An important quality assurance measure is to set couch tolerances beyond which additional investigations are needed. The purpose of this work was to study the inter-fraction couch changes needed to re-align the patient and the intra-fraction stability of the alignment as a guide to establish the couch tolerances. Methods: Data from twelve patients treated on the Accuray CyberKnife (CK) system for fractionated intracranial radiotherapy and immobilized with Aquaplast RT, U-frame, F-Head-Support (Qfix, PA, USA) was used. Each fraction involved image acquisitions and registration with the reference to re-align the patient. The absolute couch position corresponding to the approved setup alignment was recorded per fraction. Intra-fraction set-up corrections were recorded throughout the treatment. Results: The average approved setup alignment was 0.03±0.28mm, 0.15±0.22mm, 0.06±0.31mm in the L/R, A/P, S/I directions respectively and 0.00±0.35degrees, 0.03±0.32degrees, 0.08±0.45degrees for roll, pitch and yaw respectively. The inter-fraction reproducibility of the couch position was 6.65mm, 10.55mm, and 4.77mm in the L/R, A/P and S/I directions respectively and 0.82degrees, 0.71degrees for roll and pitch respectively. Intra-fraction monitoring showed small average errors of 0.21±0.21mm, 0.00±0.08mm, 0.23±0.22mm in the L/R, A/P, S/I directions respectively and 0.03±0.12degrees, 0.04±0.25degrees, and 0.13±0.15degrees in the roll, pitch and yaw respectively. Conclusion

  18. Dizziness and Motion Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You Dizziness and Motion Sickness Dizziness and Motion Sickness Patient Health Information News media interested in covering the latest ... medications Remember: Most cases of dizziness and motion sickness are ... Health Home Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head ...

  19. Motion sickness on tilting trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Bernard; Dai, Mingjia; Ogorodnikov, Dmitri; Laurens, Jean; Raphan, Theodore; Müller, Philippe; Athanasios, Alexiou; Edmaier, Jürgen; Grossenbacher, Thomas; Stadtmüller, Klaus; Brugger, Ueli; Hauser, Gerald; Straumann, Dominik

    2011-11-01

    Trains that tilt on curves can go faster, but passengers complain of motion sickness. We studied the control signals and tilts to determine why this occurs and how to maintain speed while eliminating motion sickness. Accelerometers and gyros monitored train and passenger yaw and roll, and a survey evaluated motion sickness. The experimental train had 3 control configurations: an untilted mode, a reactive mode that detected curves from sensors on the front wheel set, and a predictive mode that determined curves from the train's position on the tracks. No motion sickness was induced in the untilted mode, but the train ran 21% slower than when it tilted 8° in either the reactive or predictive modes (113 vs. 137 km/h). Roll velocities rose and fell faster in the predictive than the reactive mode when entering and leaving turns (0.4 vs. 0.8 s for a 4°/s roll tilt, P<0.001). Concurrently, motion sickness was greater (P<0.001) in the reactive mode. We conclude that the slower rise in roll velocity during yaw rotations on entering and leaving curves had induced the motion sickness. Adequate synchronization of roll tilt with yaw velocity on curves will reduce motion sickness and improve passenger comfort on tilting trains.

  20. Prostate gland motion assessed with cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghilezan, Michel J.; Jaffray, David A.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Herk, Marcel van; Shetty, Anil; Sharpe, Michael B.; Zafar Jafri, Syed; Vicini, Frank A.; Matter, Richard C.; Brabbins, Donald S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify prostate motion during a radiation therapy treatment using cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) for time frames comparable to that expected in an image-guided radiation therapy treatment session (20-30 min). Materials and Methods: Six patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer were imaged on 3 days, over the course of therapy (Weeks 1, 3, and 5). Four hundred images were acquired during the 1-h MRI session in 3 sagittal planes through the prostate at 6-s intervals. Eleven anatomic points of interest (POIs) have been used to characterize prostate/bony pelvis/abdominal wall displacement. Motion traces and standard deviation for each of the 11 POIs have been determined. The probability of displacement over time has also been calculated. Results: Patients were divided into 2 groups according to rectal filling status: full vs. empty rectum. The displacement of POIs (standard deviation) ranged from 0.98 to 1.72 mm for the full-rectum group and from 0.68 to 1.04 mm for the empty-rectum group. The low standard deviations in position (2 mm or less) would suggest that these excursions have a low frequency of occurrence. The most sensitive prostate POI to rectal wall motion was the midposterior with a standard deviation of 1.72 mm in the full-rectum group vs. 0.79 mm in the empty-rectum group (p 0.0001). This POI has a 10% probability of moving more than 3 mm in a time frame of ∼1 min if the rectum is full vs. ∼20 min if the rectum is empty. Conclusion: Motion of the prostate and seminal vesicles during a time frame similar to a standard treatment session is reduced compared to that reported in interfraction studies. The most significant predictor for intrafraction prostate motion is the status of rectal filling. A prostate displacement of <3 mm (90%) can be expected for the 20 min after the moment of initial imaging for patients with an empty rectum. This is not the case for patients presenting with full rectum. The determination

  1. Respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic motion monitoring during stereotactic liver radiation therapy: First results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Worm, Esben Schjødt; Hansen, Rune; Larsen, Lars Peter; Grau, Cai; Høyer, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Intrafraction motion may compromise the target dose in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of tumors in the liver. Respiratory gating can improve the treatment delivery, but gating based on an external surrogate signal may be inaccurate. This is the first paper reporting on respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic monitoring during liver SBRT. Two patients with solitary liver metastases were treated with respiratory-gated SBRT guided by three implanted electromagnetic transponders. The treatment was delivered in end-exhale with beam-on when the centroid of the three transponders deviated less than 3 mm [left-right (LR) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions] and 4mm [cranio-caudal (CC)] from the planned position. For each treatment fraction, log files were used to determine the transponder motion during beam-on in the actual gated treatments and in simulated treatments without gating. The motion was used to reconstruct the dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) with and without gating. The reduction in D95 (minimum dose to 95% of the CTV) relative to the plan was calculated for both treatment courses. With gating the maximum course mean (standard deviation) geometrical error in any direction was 1.2 mm (1.8 mm). Without gating the course mean error would mainly increase for Patient 1 [to -2.8 mm (1.6 mm) (LR), 7.1 mm (5.8 mm) (CC), -2.6 mm (2.8mm) (AP)] due to a large systematic cranial baseline drift at each fraction. The errors without gating increased only slightly for Patient 2. The reduction in CTV D95 was 0.5% (gating) and 12.1% (non-gating) for Patient 1 and 0.3% (gating) and 1.7% (non-gating) for Patient 2. The mean duty cycle was 55%. Respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic motion monitoring was performed for two liver SBRT patients. The gating added robustness to the dose delivery and ensured a high CTV dose even in the presence of large intrafraction motion.

  2. Interfractional and intrafractional errors assessed by daily cone-beam computed tomography in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Heming; Lin Hui; Feng Guosheng

    2012-01-01

    This prospective study was to assess interfractional and intrafractional errors and to estimate appropriate margins for planning target volume (PTV) by using daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Daily pretreatment and post-treatment CBCT scans were acquired separately after initial patient setup and after the completion of each treatment fraction in 10 patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Online corrections were made before treatment if any translational setup error was found. Interfractional and intrafractional errors were recorded in the right-left (RL), superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions. For the translational shifts, interfractional errors >2 mm occurred in 21.7% of measurements in the RL direction, 12.7% in the SI direction and 34.1% in the AP direction, respectively. Online correction resulted in 100% of residual errors ≤2 mm in the RL and SI directions, and 95.5% of residual errors ≤2 mm in the AP direction. No residual errors >3 mm occurred in the three directions. For the rotational shifts, a significant reduction was found in the magnitudes of residual errors compared with those of interfractional errors. A margin of 4.9 mm, 4.0 mm and 6.3 mm was required in the RL, SI and AP directions, respectively, when daily CBCT scans were not performed. With daily CBCT, the margins were reduced to 1.2 mm in all directions. In conclusion, daily CBCT guidance is an effective modality to improve the accuracy of IMRT for NPC. The online correction could result in a 70-81% reduction in margin size. (author)

  3. SU-G-BRA-09: Estimation of Motion Tracking Uncertainty for Real-Time Adaptive Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, H [Capital Medical University, Beijing, Beijing (China); Chen, Z [Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); Nath, R; Liu, W [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: kV fluoroscopic imaging combined with MV treatment beam imaging has been investigated for intrafractional motion monitoring and correction. It is, however, subject to additional kV imaging dose to normal tissue. To balance tracking accuracy and imaging dose, we previously proposed an adaptive imaging strategy to dynamically decide future imaging type and moments based on motion tracking uncertainty. kV imaging may be used continuously for maximal accuracy or only when the position uncertainty (probability of out of threshold) is high if a preset imaging dose limit is considered. In this work, we propose more accurate methods to estimate tracking uncertainty through analyzing acquired data in real-time. Methods: We simulated motion tracking process based on a previously developed imaging framework (MV + initial seconds of kV imaging) using real-time breathing data from 42 patients. Motion tracking errors for each time point were collected together with the time point’s corresponding features, such as tumor motion speed and 2D tracking error of previous time points, etc. We tested three methods for error uncertainty estimation based on the features: conditional probability distribution, logistic regression modeling, and support vector machine (SVM) classification to detect errors exceeding a threshold. Results: For conditional probability distribution, polynomial regressions on three features (previous tracking error, prediction quality, and cosine of the angle between the trajectory and the treatment beam) showed strong correlation with the variation (uncertainty) of the mean 3D tracking error and its standard deviation: R-square = 0.94 and 0.90, respectively. The logistic regression and SVM classification successfully identified about 95% of tracking errors exceeding 2.5mm threshold. Conclusion: The proposed methods can reliably estimate the motion tracking uncertainty in real-time, which can be used to guide adaptive additional imaging to confirm the

  4. SU-G-BRA-09: Estimation of Motion Tracking Uncertainty for Real-Time Adaptive Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, H; Chen, Z; Nath, R; Liu, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: kV fluoroscopic imaging combined with MV treatment beam imaging has been investigated for intrafractional motion monitoring and correction. It is, however, subject to additional kV imaging dose to normal tissue. To balance tracking accuracy and imaging dose, we previously proposed an adaptive imaging strategy to dynamically decide future imaging type and moments based on motion tracking uncertainty. kV imaging may be used continuously for maximal accuracy or only when the position uncertainty (probability of out of threshold) is high if a preset imaging dose limit is considered. In this work, we propose more accurate methods to estimate tracking uncertainty through analyzing acquired data in real-time. Methods: We simulated motion tracking process based on a previously developed imaging framework (MV + initial seconds of kV imaging) using real-time breathing data from 42 patients. Motion tracking errors for each time point were collected together with the time point’s corresponding features, such as tumor motion speed and 2D tracking error of previous time points, etc. We tested three methods for error uncertainty estimation based on the features: conditional probability distribution, logistic regression modeling, and support vector machine (SVM) classification to detect errors exceeding a threshold. Results: For conditional probability distribution, polynomial regressions on three features (previous tracking error, prediction quality, and cosine of the angle between the trajectory and the treatment beam) showed strong correlation with the variation (uncertainty) of the mean 3D tracking error and its standard deviation: R-square = 0.94 and 0.90, respectively. The logistic regression and SVM classification successfully identified about 95% of tracking errors exceeding 2.5mm threshold. Conclusion: The proposed methods can reliably estimate the motion tracking uncertainty in real-time, which can be used to guide adaptive additional imaging to confirm the

  5. Intravoxel incoherent motion MR imaging for breast lesions: comparison and correlation with pharmacokinetic evaluation from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chunling; Liu, Zaiyi; Zhang, Jine; He, Hui; Zhang, Shuixing; Liang, Changhong [Guangdong General Hospital/Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, GuangZhou (China); Wang, Kun [Guangdong General Hospital/Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Department of Breast Cancer, Cancer Center, GuangZhou (China); Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, 6/F, Core Building 1, 1 Science Park East Avenue, Hong Kong Science Park, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)

    2016-11-15

    To compare diagnostic performance for breast lesions by quantitative parameters derived from intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to explore whether correlations exist between these parameters. IVIM and DCE MRI were performed on a 1.5-T MRI scanner in patients with suspicious breast lesions. Thirty-six breast cancers and 23 benign lesions were included in the study. Quantitative parameters from IVIM (D, f and D*) and DCE MRI (K{sup trans}, K{sub ep}, V{sub e} and V{sub p}) were calculated and compared between malignant and benign lesions. Spearman correlation test was used to evaluate correlations between them. D, f, D* from IVIM and K{sup trans}, K{sub ep}, V{sub p} from DCE MRI were statistically different between breast cancers and benign lesions (p < 0.05, respectively) and D demonstrated the largest area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.917) and had the highest specificity (83 %). The f value was moderately statistically correlated with V{sub p} (r = 0.692) and had a poor correlation with K{sup trans} (r = 0.456). IVIM MRI is useful in the differentiation of breast lesions. Significant correlations were found between perfusion-related parameters from IVIM and DCE MRI. IVIM may be a useful adjunctive tool to standard MRI in diagnosing breast cancer. (orig.)

  6. Motion in radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia

    2012-01-01

    This review considers the management of motion in photon radiation therapy. An overview is given of magnitudes and variability of motion of various structures and organs, and how the motion affects images by producing artifacts and blurring. Imaging of motion is described, including 4DCT and 4DPE...

  7. Structure-from-Motion (SfM) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) evaluation of the Ohuka landslide, North Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Martin; Bevan, David; Prebble, Warwick; Tunnicliffe, Jon; Richards, Nick

    2017-04-01

    Globally, slope failures cause many thousands of deaths per year and damage infrastructure, costing billions of dollars to repair. There is a clear need for efficient and affordable techniques that can assess and evaluate ongoing slope instability. Of particular importance when assessing and evaluating ongoing landslide deformation is the availability of high-resolution Digital Surface Models (DSMs). Here, we applied the Structure-from-Motion (SfM) approach to low-altitude aerial images collected by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) at the Ohuka coastal landslide on the North Island of New Zealand. The SfM image-based approach was selected as a mapping tool in order to provide a rapid, cost-effective, and highly automated method, generating high-resolution topography and coregistered texture (colour) from an unstructured set of overlapping photographs taken from varying viewpoints. This overcomes many of the cost, time, and logistical limitations of LiDAR and other topographic surveying methods. The SfM photogrammetry was undertaken in conjunction with Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) to image the subsurface and provide an interpretation of the hydrogeology, due to the technique's high sensitivity to lateral and vertical changes in moisture content. Landslide features include a large arcuate scarp, flanked by gullies, which indicate the lateral boundaries of initial slope failure. Other topographic features include a 200 m wide bench with uphill-facing scarps, pull-apart zones, and surface flows from ongoing reactivation. ERT has proved useful in imaging the near-surface moisture movement driving the landsliding processes. Failure mechanisms include block-sliding along a clay seam in the early-Miocene Koheroa siltstone, and weathered deposits of the c. 1 Ma Kidnappers tephra. Cyclic variation in moisture content and formation of perched water tables above clay and tephra seam aquitards plays a key role in reactivation.

  8. Correcting for respiratory motion in liver PET/MRI: preliminary evaluation of the utility of bellows and navigated hepatobiliary phase imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hope, Thomas A. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Radiology, San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Verdin, Emily F. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Bergsland, Emily K. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ohliger, Michael A. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Radiology, San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, CA (United States); Corvera, Carlos University; Nakakura, Eric K. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-09-18

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of bellows-based respiratory compensation and navigated hepatobiliary phase imaging to correct for respiratory motion in the setting of dedicated liver PET/MRI. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Six patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumor were imaged using Ga-68 DOTA-TOC PET/MRI. Whole body imaging and a dedicated 15-min liver PET acquisition was performed, in addition to navigated and breath-held hepatobiliary phase (HBP) MRI. Liver PET data was reconstructed three ways: the entire data set (liver PET), gated using respiratory bellows (RC-liver PET), and a non-gated data set reconstructed using the same amount of data used in the RC-liver PET (shortened liver PET). Liver lesions were evaluated using SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub peak}, SUV{sub mean}, and Vol{sub isocontour}. Additionally, the displacement of each lesion between the RC-liver PET images and the navigated and breath-held HBP images was calculated. Respiratory compensation resulted in a 43 % increase in SUVs compared to ungated data (liver vs RC-liver PET SUV{sub max} 26.0 vs 37.3, p < 0.001) and a 25 % increase compared to a non-gated reconstruction using the same amount of data (RC-liver vs shortened liver PET SUV{sub max} 26.0 vs 32.6, p < 0.001). Lesion displacement was minimized using navigated HBP MRI (1.3 ± 1.0 mm) compared to breath-held HBP MRI (23.3 ± 1.0 mm). Respiratory bellows can provide accurate respiratory compensation when imaging liver lesions using PET/MRI, and results in increased SUVs due to a combination of increased image noise and reduced respiratory blurring. Additionally, navigated HBP MRI accurately aligns with respiratory compensated PET data.

  9. Sensing Movement: Microsensors for Body Motion Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansong Zeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of body posture and motion is an important physiological function that can keep the body in balance. Man-made motion sensors have also been widely applied for a broad array of biomedical applications including diagnosis of balance disorders and evaluation of energy expenditure. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art sensing components utilized for body motion measurement. The anatomy and working principles of a natural body motion sensor, the human vestibular system, are first described. Various man-made inertial sensors are then elaborated based on their distinctive sensing mechanisms. In particular, both the conventional solid-state motion sensors and the emerging non solid-state motion sensors are depicted. With their lower cost and increased intelligence, man-made motion sensors are expected to play an increasingly important role in biomedical systems for basic research as well as clinical diagnostics.

  10. Dynamic visual attention: motion direction versus motion magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bur, A.; Wurtz, P.; Müri, R. M.; Hügli, H.

    2008-02-01

    Defined as an attentive process in the context of visual sequences, dynamic visual attention refers to the selection of the most informative parts of video sequence. This paper investigates the contribution of motion in dynamic visual attention, and specifically compares computer models designed with the motion component expressed either as the speed magnitude or as the speed vector. Several computer models, including static features (color, intensity and orientation) and motion features (magnitude and vector) are considered. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations are performed by comparing the computer model output with human saliency maps obtained experimentally from eye movement recordings. The model suitability is evaluated in various situations (synthetic and real sequences, acquired with fixed and moving camera perspective), showing advantages and inconveniences of each method as well as preferred domain of application.

  11. The management of tumor motions in the stereotactic irradiation to lung cancer under the use of Abches to control active breathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarohda, Tohru I.; Ishiguro, Mitsuru; Hasegawa, Kouhei; Kohda, Yukihiko; Onishi, Hiroaki; Aoki, Tetsuya; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi [Department of Radiology, Asanogawa General Hospital, 83 Kosaka-naka, Kanazawa 920-8621 (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Asanogawa General Hospital, 83 Kosaka-naka, Kanazawa 920-8621 (Japan); Naruwa Clinic, 1-16-6 Naruwa, Kanazawa 920-0818 (Japan); Department of Radiation Therapy, Kanazawa University, 13-1 Takaramachi, Kanazawa 920-8641 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Breathing control is crucial to ensuring the accuracy of stereotactic irradiation for lung cancer. This study monitored respiration in patients with inoperable nonsmall-cell lung cancer using a respiration-monitoring apparatus, Abches, and investigated the reproducibility of tumor position in these patients. Methods: Subjects comprised 32 patients with nonsmall-cell lung cancer who were administered stereotactic radiotherapy under breath-holding conditions monitored by Abches. Computed tomography (CT) was performed under breath-holding conditions using Abches (Abches scan) for treatment planning. A free-breathing scan was performed to determine the range of tumor motions in a given position. After the free-breathing scan, Abches scan was repeated and the tumor position thus defined was taken as the intrafraction tumor position. Abches scan was also performed just before treatment, and the tumor position thus defined was taken as the interfraction tumor position. To calculate the errors, tumor positions were compared based on Abches scan for the initial treatment plan. The error in tumor position was measured using the BrainSCAN treatment-planning device, then compared for each lung lobe. Results: Displacements in tumor position were calculated in three dimensions (i.e., superior-inferior (S-I), left-right (L-R), and anterior-posterior (A-P) dimensions) and recorded as absolute values. For the whole lung, average intrafraction tumor displacement was 1.1 mm (L-R), 1.9 mm (A-P), and 2.0 mm (S-I); the average interfraction tumor displacement was 1.1 mm (L-R), 2.1 mm (A-P), and 2.0 mm (S-I); and the average free-breathing tumor displacement was 2.3 mm (L-R), 3.5 mm (A-P), and 7.9 mm (S-I). The difference between using Abches and free breathing could be reduced from approximately 20 mm at the maximum to approximately 3 mm in the S-I direction for both intrafraction and interfraction positions in the lower lobe. In addition, maximum intrafraction tumor

  12. The management of tumor motions in the stereotactic irradiation to lung cancer under the use of Abches to control active breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarohda, Tohru I.; Ishiguro, Mitsuru; Hasegawa, Kouhei; Kohda, Yukihiko; Onishi, Hiroaki; Aoki, Tetsuya; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Breathing control is crucial to ensuring the accuracy of stereotactic irradiation for lung cancer. This study monitored respiration in patients with inoperable nonsmall-cell lung cancer using a respiration-monitoring apparatus, Abches, and investigated the reproducibility of tumor position in these patients. Methods: Subjects comprised 32 patients with nonsmall-cell lung cancer who were administered stereotactic radiotherapy under breath-holding conditions monitored by Abches. Computed tomography (CT) was performed under breath-holding conditions using Abches (Abches scan) for treatment planning. A free-breathing scan was performed to determine the range of tumor motions in a given position. After the free-breathing scan, Abches scan was repeated and the tumor position thus defined was taken as the intrafraction tumor position. Abches scan was also performed just before treatment, and the tumor position thus defined was taken as the interfraction tumor position. To calculate the errors, tumor positions were compared based on Abches scan for the initial treatment plan. The error in tumor position was measured using the BrainSCAN treatment-planning device, then compared for each lung lobe. Results: Displacements in tumor position were calculated in three dimensions (i.e., superior-inferior (S-I), left-right (L-R), and anterior-posterior (A-P) dimensions) and recorded as absolute values. For the whole lung, average intrafraction tumor displacement was 1.1 mm (L-R), 1.9 mm (A-P), and 2.0 mm (S-I); the average interfraction tumor displacement was 1.1 mm (L-R), 2.1 mm (A-P), and 2.0 mm (S-I); and the average free-breathing tumor displacement was 2.3 mm (L-R), 3.5 mm (A-P), and 7.9 mm (S-I). The difference between using Abches and free breathing could be reduced from approximately 20 mm at the maximum to approximately 3 mm in the S-I direction for both intrafraction and interfraction positions in the lower lobe. In addition, maximum intrafraction tumor

  13. Prediction of earthquake ground motion at rock sites in Japan: evaluation of empirical and stochastic approaches for the PEGASOS Refinement Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Benjamin; Fäh, Donat

    2017-11-01

    Strong ground-motion databases used to develop ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs) and calibrate stochastic simulation models generally include relatively few recordings on what can be considered as engineering rock or hard rock. Ground-motion predictions for such sites are therefore susceptible to uncertainty and bias, which can then propagate into site-specific hazard and risk estimates. In order to explore this issue we present a study investigating the prediction of ground motion at rock sites in Japan, where a wide range of recording-site types (from soil to very hard rock) are available for analysis. We employ two approaches: empirical GMPEs and stochastic simulations. The study is undertaken in the context of the PEGASOS Refinement Project (PRP), a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 4 probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of Swiss nuclear power plants, commissioned by swissnuclear and running from 2008 to 2013. In order to reduce the impact of site-to-site variability and expand the available data set for rock and hard-rock sites we adjusted Japanese ground-motion data (recorded at sites with 110 m s-1 800 m s-1) was found to be comparable (within expected levels of epistemic uncertainty) to predictions using an empirical GMPE, with reduced residual misfit. As expected, due to including site-specific information in the simulations, the reduction in misfit could be isolated to a reduction in the site-related within-event uncertainty. The results of this study support the use of finite or pseudo-finite fault stochastic simulation methods in estimating strong ground motions in regions of weak and moderate seismicity, such as central and northern Europe. Furthermore, it indicates that weak-motion data has the potential to allow estimation of between- and within-site variability in ground motion, which is a critical issue in site-specific seismic hazard analysis, particularly for safety critical structures.

  14. Which shoulder motions cause subacromial impingement? Evaluating the vertical displacement and peak strain of the coracoacromial ligament by ultrasound speckle tracking imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Sung-Eun; Bae, Sung-Ho; Byun, Chu-Hwan; Kim, Yang-Soo

    2015-11-01

    Subacromial impingement is a common cause of shoulder pain and one cause of rotator cuff disease. We aimed to identify which shoulder motions cause subacromial impingement by measuring the vertical displacement and peak strain of the coracoacromial ligament using ultrasound speckle tracking imaging. Sixteen shoulders without shoulder disability were enrolled. All subjects were men, and the average age was 28.6 years. The vertical displacement and peak strain of the coracoacromial ligament were analyzed by the motion tracing program during the following active assisted motions (active motion controlled by the examiner): (1) forward flexion in the scapular plane, (2) horizontal abduction in the axial plane, (3) external rotation with the arm at 0° abduction (ER0), (4) internal rotation with the arm at 0° abduction (IR0), (5) internal rotation with the arm at 90° abduction (IR90), and (6) internal rotation at the back (IRB). The mean vertical displacement of the coracoacromial ligament during forward flexion (2.2 mm), horizontal abduction (2.2 mm), and IR90 (2.4 mm) was significantly greater than that during the other motions (ER0, -0.7 mm; IR0, 0.5 mm; IRB, 1.0 mm; P impingement. It is recommended that patients with impingement syndrome or a repaired rotator cuff avoid these shoulder motions. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of Visual Motion, Suggestion, and Illusory Motion on Self-Motion Perception in the Horizontal Plane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven David Rosenblatt

    Full Text Available A moving visual field can induce the feeling of self-motion or vection. Illusory motion from static repeated asymmetric patterns creates a compelling visual motion stimulus, but it is unclear if such illusory motion can induce a feeling of self-motion or alter self-motion perception. In these experiments, human subjects reported the perceived direction of self-motion for sway translation and yaw rotation at the end of a period of viewing set visual stimuli coordinated with varying inertial stimuli. This tested the hypothesis that illusory visual motion would influence self-motion perception in the horizontal plane. Trials were arranged into 5 blocks based on stimulus type: moving star field with yaw rotation, moving star field with sway translation, illusory motion with yaw, illusory motion with sway, and static arrows with sway. Static arrows were used to evaluate the effect of cognitive suggestion on self-motion perception. Each trial had a control condition; the illusory motion controls were altered versions of the experimental image, which removed the illusory motion effect. For the moving visual stimulus, controls were carried out in a dark room. With the arrow visual stimulus, controls were a gray screen. In blocks containing a visual stimulus there was an 8s viewing interval with the inertial stimulus occurring over the final 1s. This allowed measurement of the visual illusion perception using objective methods. When no visual stimulus was present, only the 1s motion stimulus was presented. Eight women and five men (mean age 37 participated. To assess for a shift in self-motion perception, the effect of each visual stimulus on the self-motion stimulus (cm/s at which subjects were equally likely to report motion in either direction was measured. Significant effects were seen for moving star fields for both translation (p = 0.001 and rotation (p0.1 for both. Thus, although a true moving visual field can induce self-motion, results of this

  16. Stereotactic radiotherapy using tomotherapy for early-stage non-small cell lung carcinoma: analysis of intrafaction tumour motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggs, Drexell Hunter; Feigenberg, Steven; Walter, Robert; Wissing, Dennis; Patel, Bijal; Wu, Terry; Rosen, Lane

    2014-01-01

    Intrafraction tumour motion in helical tomotherapy was investigated by comparing pre- and mid-fraction CT scans in patients with early non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) to assess the efficacy of a 7-mm margin around gross tumour volumes (GTVs) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Thirty patients with early-stage NSCLC received SBRT in four or five fractions for a total of 141 treatments. A slow positron emission tomography/CT scan was fused with the simulation CT to determine the GTV. A planning target volume was created by placing an isotropic margin of 7mm around the GTV. Data were retrospectively analyzed to assess translational tumour positional changes along the x, y and z axes and vector changes in millimeters from the pretreatment megavoltage (MV)-CT to the mid-fraction MV-CT. Average movements for all 141 treatment days along the x, y and z axes were 0.5±2.3, −0.3±3.0 and 0.9±3.0mm, respectively. Average movements for each patient along the x, y and z axes were 0.5±1.5, −0.2±2.0 and 0.9±1.9mm, respectively. Average vector displacement was 4.3±2.4mm for all treatment days and 4.2±1.7mm for each patient. Of 141 treatments, 137 (97.2%) fell within 7.0mm in all axes. The addition of a 7-mm margin to the GTV for patients receiving SBRT for NSCLC using tomotherapy is adequate to account for tumour movement. Mid-fraction CT scans proved to be valuable in assessing intrafraction tumour motion.

  17. An evaluation of data-driven motion estimation in comparison to the usage of external-surrogates in cardiac SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Joyeeta Mitra; Johnson, Karen L; Pretorius, P Hendrik; King, Michael A; Hutton, Brian F

    2013-01-01

    Motion estimation methods in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be classified into methods which depend on just the emission data (data-driven), or those that use some other source of information such as an external surrogate. The surrogate-based methods estimate the motion exhibited externally which may not correlate exactly with the movement of organs inside the body. The accuracy of data-driven strategies on the other hand is affected by the type and timing of motion occurrence during acquisition, the source distribution, and various degrading factors such as attenuation, scatter, and system spatial resolution. The goal of this paper is to investigate the performance of two data-driven motion estimation schemes based on the rigid-body registration of projections of motion-transformed source distributions to the acquired projection data for cardiac SPECT studies. Comparison is also made of six intensity based registration metrics to an external surrogate-based method. In the data-driven schemes, a partially reconstructed heart is used as the initial source distribution. The partially-reconstructed heart has inaccuracies due to limited angle artifacts resulting from using only a part of the SPECT projections acquired while the patient maintained the same pose. The performance of different cost functions in quantifying consistency with the SPECT projection data in the data-driven schemes was compared for clinically realistic patient motion occurring as discrete pose changes, one or two times during acquisition. The six intensity-based metrics studied were mean-squared difference, mutual information, normalized mutual information (NMI), pattern intensity (PI), normalized cross-correlation and entropy of the difference. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of the performance is reported using Monte-Carlo simulations of a realistic heart phantom including degradation factors such as attenuation, scatter and system spatial resolution. Further the

  18. Towards fast online intrafraction replanning for free-breathing stereotactic body radiation therapy with the MR-linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaxis, C.; Bol, G. H.; Stemkens, B.; Glitzner, M.; Prins, F. M.; Kerkmeijer, L. G. W.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2017-09-01

    The hybrid MRI-radiotherapy machines, like the MR-linac (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) installed at the UMC Utrecht (Utrecht, The Netherlands), will be able to provide real-time patient imaging during treatment. In order to take advantage of the system’s capabilities and enable online adaptive treatments, a new generation of software should be developed, ranging from motion estimation to treatment plan adaptation. In this work we present a proof of principle adaptive pipeline designed for high precision stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) suitable for sites affected by respiratory motion, like renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We utilized our research MRL treatment planning system (MRLTP) to simulate a single fraction 25 Gy free-breathing SBRT treatment for RCC by performing inter-beam replanning for two patients and one volunteer. The simulated pipeline included a combination of (pre-beam) 4D-MRI and (online) 2D cine-MR acquisitions. The 4DMRI was used to generate the mid-position reference volume, while the cine-MRI, via an in-house motion model, provided three-dimensional (3D) deformable vector fields (DVFs) describing the anatomical changes during treatment. During the treatment fraction, at an inter-beam interval, the mid-position volume of the patient was updated and the delivered dose was accurately reconstructed on the underlying motion calculated by the model. Fast online replanning, targeting the latest anatomy and incorporating the previously delivered dose was then simulated with MRLTP. The adaptive treatment was compared to a conventional mid-position SBRT plan with a 3 mm planning target volume margin reconstructed on the same motion trace. We demonstrate that our system produced tighter dose distributions and thus spared the healthy tissue, while delivering more dose to the target. The pipeline was able to account for baseline variations/drifts that occurred during treatment ensuring target coverage at the end of the treatment fraction.

  19. Real-time monitoring for detection of retained surgical sponges and team motion in the surgical operation room using radio-frequency-identification (RFID) technology: a preclinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzfelder, Michael; Zywitza, Dorit; Jell, Thomas; Schneider, Armin; Gillen, Sonja; Friess, Helmut; Feussner, Hubertus

    2012-06-15

    Technical progress in the surgical operating room (OR) increases constantly, facilitating the development of intelligent OR systems functioning as "safety backup" in the background of surgery. Precondition is comprehensive data retrieval to identify imminent risky situations and inaugurate adequate security mechanisms. Radio-frequency-identification (RFID) technology may have the potential to meet these demands. We set up a pilot study investigating feasibility and appliance reliability of a stationary RFID system for real-time surgical sponge monitoring (passive tagged sponges, position monitoring: mayo-stand/abdominal situs/waste bucket) and OR team tracking (active transponders, position monitoring: right/left side of OR table). In vitro: 20/20 sponges (100%) were detected on the mayo-stand and within the OR-phantom, however, real-time detection accuracy declined to 7/20 (33%) when the tags were moved simultaneously. All retained sponges were detected correctly. In vivo (animal): 7-10/10 sterilized sponges (70%-100%) were detected correctly within the abdominal cavity. OR-team: detection accuracy within the OR (surveillance antenna) and on both sides of the OR table (sector antenna) was 100%. Mean detection time for position change (left to right side and contrariwise) was 30-60 s. No transponder failure was noted. This is the first combined RFID system that has been developed for stationary use in the surgical OR. Preclinical evaluation revealed a reliable sponge tracking and correct detection of retained textiles (passive RFID) but also demonstrated feasibility of comprehensive data acquisition of team motion (active RFID). However, detection accuracy needs to be further improved before implementation into the surgical OR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Seismic rupture modelling, strong motion prediction and seismic hazard assessment: fundamental and applied approaches; Modelisation de la rupture sismique, prediction du mouvement fort, et evaluation de l'alea sismique: approches fondamentale et appliquee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge-Thierry, C

    2007-05-15

    The defence to obtain the 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches' is a synthesis of the research work performed since the end of my Ph D. thesis in 1997. This synthesis covers the two years as post doctoral researcher at the Bureau d'Evaluation des Risques Sismiques at the Institut de Protection (BERSSIN), and the seven consecutive years as seismologist and head of the BERSSIN team. This work and the research project are presented in the framework of the seismic risk topic, and particularly with respect to the seismic hazard assessment. Seismic risk combines seismic hazard and vulnerability. Vulnerability combines the strength of building structures and the human and economical consequences in case of structural failure. Seismic hazard is usually defined in terms of plausible seismic motion (soil acceleration or velocity) in a site for a given time period. Either for the regulatory context or the structural specificity (conventional structure or high risk construction), seismic hazard assessment needs: to identify and locate the seismic sources (zones or faults), to characterize their activity, to evaluate the seismic motion to which the structure has to resist (including the site effects). I specialized in the field of numerical strong-motion prediction using high frequency seismic sources modelling and forming part of the IRSN allowed me to rapidly working on the different tasks of seismic hazard assessment. Thanks to the expertise practice and the participation to the regulation evolution (nuclear power plants, conventional and chemical structures), I have been able to work on empirical strong-motion prediction, including site effects. Specific questions related to the interface between seismologists and structural engineers are also presented, especially the quantification of uncertainties. This is part of the research work initiated to improve the selection of the input ground motion in designing or verifying the stability of structures. (author)

  1. Tumor Tracking Method Based on a Deformable 4D CT Breathing Motion Model Driven by an External Surface Surrogate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fassi, Aurora, E-mail: aurora.fassi@mail.polimi.it [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Schaerer, Joël; Fernandes, Mathieu [CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, Université Lyon 1, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France); Riboldi, Marco [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy); Sarrut, David [CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, Université Lyon 1, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France); Baroni, Guido [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a tumor tracking method based on a surrogate-driven motion model, which provides noninvasive dynamic localization of extracranial targets for the compensation of respiration-induced intrafraction motion in high-precision radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The proposed approach is based on a patient-specific breathing motion model, derived a priori from 4-dimensional planning computed tomography (CT) images. Model parameters (respiratory baseline, amplitude, and phase) are retrieved and updated at each treatment fraction according to in-room radiography acquisition and optical surface imaging. The baseline parameter is adapted to the interfraction variations obtained from the daily cone beam (CB) CT scan. The respiratory amplitude and phase are extracted from an external breathing surrogate, estimated from the displacement of the patient thoracoabdominal surface, acquired with a noninvasive surface imaging device. The developed method was tested on a database of 7 lung cancer patients, including the synchronized information on internal and external respiratory motion during a CBCT scan. Results: About 30 seconds of simultaneous acquisition of CBCT and optical surface images were analyzed for each patient. The tumor trajectories identified in CBCT projections were used as reference and compared with the target trajectories estimated from surface displacement with the a priori motion model. The resulting absolute differences between the reference and estimated tumor motion along the 2 image dimensions ranged between 0.7 and 2.4 mm; the measured phase shifts did not exceed 7% of the breathing cycle length. Conclusions: We investigated a tumor tracking method that integrates breathing motion information provided by the 4-dimensional planning CT with surface imaging at the time of treatment, representing an alternative approach to point-based external–internal correlation models. Although an in-room radiograph-based assessment of the

  2. Real-time motion-adaptive-optimization (MAO) in TomoTherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weiguo; Chen, Mingli; Ruchala, Kenneth J; Chen, Quan; Langen, Katja M; Kupelian, Patrick A; Olivera, Gustavo H

    2009-07-21

    IMRT delivery follows a planned leaf sequence, which is optimized before treatment delivery. However, it is hard to model real-time variations, such as respiration, in the planning procedure. In this paper, we propose a negative feedback system of IMRT delivery that incorporates real-time optimization to account for intra-fraction motion. Specifically, we developed a feasible workflow of real-time motion-adaptive-optimization (MAO) for TomoTherapy delivery. TomoTherapy delivery is characterized by thousands of projections with a fast projection rate and ultra-fast binary leaf motion. The technique of MAO-guided delivery calculates (i) the motion-encoded dose that has been delivered up to any given projection during the delivery and (ii) the future dose that will be delivered based on the estimated motion probability and future fluence map. These two pieces of information are then used to optimize the leaf open time of the upcoming projection right before its delivery. It consists of several real-time procedures, including 'motion detection and prediction', 'delivered dose accumulation', 'future dose estimation' and 'projection optimization'. Real-time MAO requires that all procedures are executed in time less than the duration of a projection. We implemented and tested this technique using a TomoTherapy research system. The MAO calculation took about 100 ms per projection. We calculated and compared MAO-guided delivery with two other types of delivery, motion-without-compensation delivery (MD) and static delivery (SD), using simulated 1D cases, real TomoTherapy plans and the motion traces from clinical lung and prostate patients. The results showed that the proposed technique effectively compensated for motion errors of all test cases. Dose distributions and DVHs of MAO-guided delivery approached those of SD, for regular and irregular respiration with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 3 cm, and for medium and large prostate motions. The results conceptually proved that

  3. Real-time motion-adaptive-optimization (MAO) in TomoTherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weiguo; Chen Mingli; Ruchala, Kenneth J; Chen Quan; Olivera, Gustavo H; Langen, Katja M; Kupelian, Patrick A

    2009-01-01

    IMRT delivery follows a planned leaf sequence, which is optimized before treatment delivery. However, it is hard to model real-time variations, such as respiration, in the planning procedure. In this paper, we propose a negative feedback system of IMRT delivery that incorporates real-time optimization to account for intra-fraction motion. Specifically, we developed a feasible workflow of real-time motion-adaptive-optimization (MAO) for TomoTherapy delivery. TomoTherapy delivery is characterized by thousands of projections with a fast projection rate and ultra-fast binary leaf motion. The technique of MAO-guided delivery calculates (i) the motion-encoded dose that has been delivered up to any given projection during the delivery and (ii) the future dose that will be delivered based on the estimated motion probability and future fluence map. These two pieces of information are then used to optimize the leaf open time of the upcoming projection right before its delivery. It consists of several real-time procedures, including 'motion detection and prediction', 'delivered dose accumulation', 'future dose estimation' and 'projection optimization'. Real-time MAO requires that all procedures are executed in time less than the duration of a projection. We implemented and tested this technique using a TomoTherapy (registered) research system. The MAO calculation took about 100 ms per projection. We calculated and compared MAO-guided delivery with two other types of delivery, motion-without-compensation delivery (MD) and static delivery (SD), using simulated 1D cases, real TomoTherapy plans and the motion traces from clinical lung and prostate patients. The results showed that the proposed technique effectively compensated for motion errors of all test cases. Dose distributions and DVHs of MAO-guided delivery approached those of SD, for regular and irregular respiration with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 3 cm, and for medium and large prostate motions. The results conceptually

  4. Stochastic Blind Motion Deblurring

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Lei

    2015-05-13

    Blind motion deblurring from a single image is a highly under-constrained problem with many degenerate solutions. A good approximation of the intrinsic image can therefore only be obtained with the help of prior information in the form of (often non-convex) regularization terms for both the intrinsic image and the kernel. While the best choice of image priors is still a topic of ongoing investigation, this research is made more complicated by the fact that historically each new prior requires the development of a custom optimization method. In this paper, we develop a stochastic optimization method for blind deconvolution. Since this stochastic solver does not require the explicit computation of the gradient of the objective function and uses only efficient local evaluation of the objective, new priors can be implemented and tested very quickly. We demonstrate that this framework, in combination with different image priors produces results with PSNR values that match or exceed the results obtained by much more complex state-of-the-art blind motion deblurring algorithms.

  5. Comparison of gated planar Tc-99m tetrofosmin scintigraphy with radionuclide ventriculography and echocardiography in the evaluation of left ventricular wall motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canbaz, F.; Basoglu, T.; Yilmaz, O.; Yazici, M.; Sahin, M.

    2003-01-01

    -correlations of I-GPTF were r=0.92, p<0.001 and r=0.53, p<0.001 respectively. In segmental quantification, amplitude values of all segments in I-GPTF were better RVG-correlated than in NI-GPTF. In conclusion, GPTF could be a time saving alternative to ECHO in the evaluation of wall motion by the nuclear medicine physician. Because of differing segmental RVG correlations, NI-GPTF and I-GPTF should be both interpreted to improve the diagnostic value of the method. Cine-mode and parametric image interpretations in GPTF studies should be done simultaneously since the former is more closely correlated to RVG. (author)

  6. Objects in Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  7. Predicting articulated human motion from spatial processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauberg, Søren; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup

    2011-01-01

    coordinates, the approach allows us to construct high quality application specific motion models with little effort. Thirdly, the state space is a real vector space, which allows us to use off-the-shelf stochastic processes as motion models, which is rarely possible when working with joint angles. Fourthly...... recent work where prior models are derived in terms of joint angles. This approach has several advantages. First of all, it allows us to construct motion models in low dimensional spaces, which makes motion estimation more robust. Secondly, as many types of motion are easily expressed in spatial......, we avoid the problem of accumulated variance, where noise in one joint affects all joints further down the kinematic chains. All this combined allows us to more easily construct high quality motion models. In the evaluation, we show that an activity independent version of our model is superior...

  8. SU-D-18A-02: Towards Real-Time On-Board Volumetric Image Reconstruction for Intrafraction Target Verification in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X; Iliopoulos, A; Zhang, Y; Pitsianis, N; Sun, X; Yin, F; Ren, L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To expedite on-board volumetric image reconstruction from limited-angle kV—MV projections for intrafraction verification. Methods: A limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system has recently been developed for real-time volumetric verification of moving targets, using limited-angle kV—MV projections. Currently, it is challenged by the intensive computational load of the prior-knowledge-based reconstruction method. To accelerate LIVE, we restructure the software pipeline to make it adaptable to model and algorithm parameter changes, while enabling efficient utilization of rapidly advancing, modern computer architectures. In particular, an innovative two-level parallelization scheme has been designed: At the macroscopic level, data and operations are adaptively partitioned, taking into account algorithmic parameters and the processing capacity or constraints of underlying hardware. The control and data flows of the pipeline are scheduled in such a way as to maximize operation concurrency and minimize total processing time. At the microscopic level, the partitioned functions act as independent modules, operating on data partitions in parallel. Each module is pre-parallelized and optimized for multi-core processors (CPUs) and graphics processing units (GPUs). Results: We present results from a parallel prototype, where most of the controls and module parallelization are carried out via Matlab and its Parallel Computing Toolbox. The reconstruction is 5 times faster on a data-set of twice the size, compared to recently reported results, without compromising on algorithmic optimization control. Conclusion: The prototype implementation and its results have served to assess the efficacy of our system concept. While a production implementation will yield much higher processing rates by approaching full-capacity utilization of CPUs and GPUs, some mutual constraints between algorithmic flow and architecture specifics remain. Based on a careful analysis

  9. Visualization system of swirl motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, K.; Umeda, K.; Ichikawa, T.; Nagano, T.; Sakata, H.

    2004-01-01

    The instrumentation of a system composed of an experimental device and numerical analysis is presented to visualize flow and identify swirling motion. Experiment is performed with transparent material and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) instrumentation, by which velocity vector field is obtained. This vector field is then analyzed numerically by 'swirling flow analysis', which estimates its velocity gradient tensor and the corresponding eigenvalue (swirling function). Since an instantaneous flow field in steady/unsteady states is captured by PIV, the flow field is analyzed, and existence of vortices or swirling motions and their locations are identified in spite of their size. In addition, intensity of swirling is evaluated. The analysis enables swirling motion to emerge, even though it is hidden in uniform flow and velocity filed does not indicate any swirling. This visualization system can be applied to investigate condition to control flow or design flow. (authors)

  10. Comparison of improved range of motion between cam-type femoroacetabular impingement and borderline developmental dysplasia of the hip -evaluation by virtual osteochondroplasty using computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, So; Inaba, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Naomi; Choe, Hyonmin; Tezuka, Taro; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2017-10-16

    While cam resection is essential to achieve a good clinical result with respect to femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), it is unclear whether it should also be performed in cases of borderline developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) with a cam deformity. The aim of this study was to evaluate improvements in range of motion (ROM) in cases of cam-type FAI and borderline DDH after virtual osteochondroplasty using a computer impingement simulation. Thirty-eight symptomatic hips in 31 patients (11male and 20 female) diagnosed with cam-type FAI or borderline DDH were analyzed. There were divided into a cam-type FAI group (cam-FAI group: 15 hips), borderline DDH without cam group (DDH W/O cam group: 12 hips), and borderline DDH with cam group (DDH W/ cam group: 11 hips). The bony impingement point on the femoral head-neck junction at 90° flexion and maximum internal rotation of the hip joint was identified using ZedHip® software. Virtual osteochondroplasty of the impingement point was then performed in all cases. The maximum flexion angle and maximum internal rotation angle at 90° flexion were measured before and after virtual osteochondroplasty at two resection ranges (i.e., slight and sufficient). The mean improvement in the internal rotation angle in the DDH W/ cam group after slight resection was significantly greater than that in the DDH W/O cam group (P = 0.046). Furthermore, the mean improvement in the internal rotation angle in the DDH W/ cam and cam-FAI groups after sufficient resection was significantly greater than that in the DDH W/O cam group (DDH W/ cam vs DDH W/O cam: P = 0.002, cam-FAI vs DDH W/O cam: P = 0.043). Virtual osteochondroplasty resulted in a significant improvement in internal rotation angle in DDH W/ cam group but not in DDH W/O cam group. Thus, borderline DDH cases with cam deformity may be better to consider performing osteochondroplasty.

  11. Quantitative evaluation of 3D mouse behaviors and motor function in the open-field after spinal cord injury using markerless motion tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison L Sheets

    Full Text Available Thousands of scientists strive to identify cellular mechanisms that could lead to breakthroughs in developing ameliorative treatments for debilitating neural and muscular conditions such as spinal cord injury (SCI. Most studies use rodent models to test hypotheses, and these are all limited by the methods available to evaluate animal motor function. This study's goal was to develop a behavioral and locomotor assessment system in a murine model of SCI that enables quantitative kinematic measurements to be made automatically in the open-field by applying markerless motion tracking approaches. Three-dimensional movements of eight naïve, five mild, five moderate, and four severe SCI mice were recorded using 10 cameras (100 Hz. Background subtraction was used in each video frame to identify the animal's silhouette, and the 3D shape at each time was reconstructed using shape-from-silhouette. The reconstructed volume was divided into front and back halves using k-means clustering. The animal's front Center of Volume (CoV height and whole-body CoV speed were calculated and used to automatically classify animal behaviors including directed locomotion, exploratory locomotion, meandering, standing, and rearing. More detailed analyses of CoV height, speed, and lateral deviation during directed locomotion revealed behavioral differences and functional impairments in animals with mild, moderate, and severe SCI when compared with naïve animals. Naïve animals displayed the widest variety of behaviors including rearing and crossing the center of the open-field, the fastest speeds, and tallest rear CoV heights. SCI reduced the range of behaviors, and decreased speed (r = .70 p<.005 and rear CoV height (r = .65 p<.01 were significantly correlated with greater lesion size. This markerless tracking approach is a first step toward fundamentally changing how rodent movement studies are conducted. By providing scientists with sensitive, quantitative

  12. Quantitative evaluation of 3D mouse behaviors and motor function in the open-field after spinal cord injury using markerless motion tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Alison L; Lai, Po-Lun; Fisher, Lesley C; Basso, D Michele

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of scientists strive to identify cellular mechanisms that could lead to breakthroughs in developing ameliorative treatments for debilitating neural and muscular conditions such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Most studies use rodent models to test hypotheses, and these are all limited by the methods available to evaluate animal motor function. This study's goal was to develop a behavioral and locomotor assessment system in a murine model of SCI that enables quantitative kinematic measurements to be made automatically in the open-field by applying markerless motion tracking approaches. Three-dimensional movements of eight naïve, five mild, five moderate, and four severe SCI mice were recorded using 10 cameras (100 Hz). Background subtraction was used in each video frame to identify the animal's silhouette, and the 3D shape at each time was reconstructed using shape-from-silhouette. The reconstructed volume was divided into front and back halves using k-means clustering. The animal's front Center of Volume (CoV) height and whole-body CoV speed were calculated and used to automatically classify animal behaviors including directed locomotion, exploratory locomotion, meandering, standing, and rearing. More detailed analyses of CoV height, speed, and lateral deviation during directed locomotion revealed behavioral differences and functional impairments in animals with mild, moderate, and severe SCI when compared with naïve animals. Naïve animals displayed the widest variety of behaviors including rearing and crossing the center of the open-field, the fastest speeds, and tallest rear CoV heights. SCI reduced the range of behaviors, and decreased speed (r = .70 p<.005) and rear CoV height (r = .65 p<.01) were significantly correlated with greater lesion size. This markerless tracking approach is a first step toward fundamentally changing how rodent movement studies are conducted. By providing scientists with sensitive, quantitative measurement methods

  13. Time-motion analysis as a novel approach for evaluating the impact of environmental heat exposure on labor loss in agriculture workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ioannou, Leonidas G; Tsoutsoubi, Lydia; Samoutis, George

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In this study we (i) introduced time-motion analysis for assessing the impact of workplace heat on the work shift time spent doing labor (WTL) of grape-picking workers, (ii) examined whether seasonal environmental differences can influence their WTL, and (iii) investigated whether t...

  14. Evaluation of the recorded ground motions for the unusual earthquake of 13 August 2006 ( M w 5.3) in Michoacán México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Gaytán, Alejandro; Jaimes, Miguel A.; Bandy, William L.; Huerfano, Victor M.; Salido-Ruiz, Ricardo A.

    2015-10-01

    The focal mechanism of the moderate earthquake of 13 August 2006 M w = 5.3, which occurred in the border coastal area between Michoacán and Colima, México, is unusual. As shown by the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) project and the Servicio Sismológico Nacional de Mexico (SSN), the thrust mechanism is striking almost perpendicularly to the majority of earthquakes occurring along the subduction zone of the Mexican Pacific continental margin which commonly strike nearly parallel to the trench. The purpose of this study is to analyze the observed ground motions of this particular event relative to those of the common events. First, we apply the H/V technique to verify that the stations involved in this study are nearly free of site effects. Then, we compare the observed ground motions with (i) three empirical ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) appropriate for the region, (ii) ground motions of four real earthquakes with the common mechanism, and (iii) the Fourier spectrum of a selected common event.

  15. The Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Image Guided Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Initial Clinical Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Winnie; Cho, Young-Bin [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ansell, Steve [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Laperriere, Normand; Ménard, Cynthia; Millar, Barbara-Ann [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Macfeeters-Hamilton Centre for Neuro-oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kongkham, Paul; Bernstein, Mark [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chung, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.chung.md@gmail.com [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The present study used cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to measure the inter- and intrafraction uncertainties for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using the Leksell Gamma Knife (GK). Methods and Materials: Using a novel CBCT system adapted to the GK radiosurgery treatment unit, CBCT images were acquired immediately before and after treatment for each treatment session within the context of a research ethics board–approved prospective clinical trial. Patients were immobilized in the Leksell coordinate frame (LCF) for both volumetric CBCT imaging and GK-SRS delivery. The relative displacement of the patient's skull to the stereotactic reference (interfraction motion) was measured for each CBCT scan. Differences between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were used to determine the intrafraction motion. Results: We analyzed 20 pre- and 17 post-treatment CBCT scans in 20 LCF patients treated with SRS. The mean translational pretreatment setup error ± standard deviation in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.19 ± 0.32, 0.06 ± 0.27, and −0.23 ± 0.2 mm, with a maximum of −0.74, −0.53, and −0.68 mm, respectively. After an average time between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans of 82 minutes (range 27-170), the mean intrafraction error ± standard deviation for the LCF was −0.03 ± 0.05, −0.03 ± 0.18, and −0.03 ± 0.12 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudual direction, respectively. Conclusions: Using CBCT on a prototype image guided GK Perfexion unit, we were able to measure the inter- and intrafraction positional changes for GK-SRS using the invasive frame. In the era of image guided radiation therapy, the use of CBCT image guidance for both frame- and non–frame-based immobilization systems could serve as a useful quality assurance tool. Our preliminary measurements can guide the application of achievable thresholds for inter- and intrafraction

  16. Rolling Shutter Motion Deblurring

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Shuochen

    2015-06-07

    Although motion blur and rolling shutter deformations are closely coupled artifacts in images taken with CMOS image sensors, the two phenomena have so far mostly been treated separately, with deblurring algorithms being unable to handle rolling shutter wobble, and rolling shutter algorithms being incapable of dealing with motion blur. We propose an approach that delivers sharp and undis torted output given a single rolling shutter motion blurred image. The key to achieving this is a global modeling of the camera motion trajectory, which enables each scanline of the image to be deblurred with the corresponding motion segment. We show the results of the proposed framework through experiments on synthetic and real data.

  17. Direct reconstruction of parametric images for brain PET with event-by-event motion correction: evaluation in two tracers across count levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germino, Mary; Gallezot, Jean-Dominque; Yan, Jianhua; Carson, Richard E

    2017-07-07

    Parametric images for dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) are typically generated by an indirect method, i.e. reconstructing a time series of emission images, then fitting a kinetic model to each voxel time activity curve. Alternatively, 'direct reconstruction', incorporates the kinetic model into the reconstruction algorithm itself, directly producing parametric images from projection data. Direct reconstruction has been shown to achieve parametric images with lower standard error than the indirect method. Here, we present direct reconstruction for brain PET using event-by-event motion correction of list-mode data, applied to two tracers. Event-by-event motion correction was implemented for direct reconstruction in the Parametric Motion-compensation OSEM List-mode Algorithm for Resolution-recovery reconstruction. The direct implementation was tested on simulated and human datasets with tracers [ 11 C]AFM (serotonin transporter) and [ 11 C]UCB-J (synaptic density), which follow the 1-tissue compartment model. Rigid head motion was tracked with the Vicra system. Parametric images of K 1 and distribution volume (V T   =  K 1 /k 2 ) were compared to those generated by the indirect method by regional coefficient of variation (CoV). Performance across count levels was assessed using sub-sampled datasets. For simulated and real datasets at high counts, the two methods estimated K 1 and V T with comparable accuracy. At lower count levels, the direct method was substantially more robust to outliers than the indirect method. Compared to the indirect method, direct reconstruction reduced regional K 1 CoV by 35-48% (simulated dataset), 39-43% ([ 11 C]AFM dataset) and 30-36% ([ 11 C]UCB-J dataset) across count levels (averaged over regions at matched iteration); V T CoV was reduced by 51-58%, 54-60% and 30-46%, respectively. Motion correction played an important role in the dataset with larger motion: correction increased regional V T by 51% on average in the

  18. Smoothing Motion Estimates for Radar Motion Compensation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Simple motion models for complex motion environments are often not adequate for keeping radar data coherent. Eve n perfect motion samples appli ed to imperfect models may lead to interim calculations e xhibiting errors that lead to degraded processing results. Herein we discuss a specific i ssue involving calculating motion for groups of pulses, with measurements only available at pulse-group boundaries. - 4 - Acknowledgements This report was funded by General A tomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI) Mission Systems under Cooperative Re search and Development Agre ement (CRADA) SC08/01749 between Sandia National Laboratories and GA-ASI. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI), an affilia te of privately-held General Atomics, is a leading manufacturer of Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) systems, radars, and electro-optic and rel ated mission systems, includin g the Predator(r)/Gray Eagle(r)-series and Lynx(r) Multi-mode Radar.

  19. Curves from Motion, Motion from Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    tautochrone and brachistochrone properties. To Descartes, however, the rectification of curves such as the spiral (3) and the cycloid (4) was suspect - they...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP012017 TITLE: Curves from Motion, Motion from Curves DISTRIBUTION...Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report: TITLE: International Conference on Curves and Surfaces [4th

  20. Development of a Synthetic Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Prediction Model for Tumor Motion Tracking in External Radiotherapy by Evaluating Various Data Clustering Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanzadeh, Leila; Torshabi, Ahmad Esmaili; Nabipour, Jamshid Soltani; Arbatan, Moslem Ahmadi

    2016-04-01

    In image guided radiotherapy, in order to reach a prescribed uniform dose in dynamic tumors at thorax region while minimizing the amount of additional dose received by the surrounding healthy tissues, tumor motion must be tracked in real-time. Several correlation models have been proposed in recent years to provide tumor position information as a function of time in radiotherapy with external surrogates. However, developing an accurate correlation model is still a challenge. In this study, we proposed an adaptive neuro-fuzzy based correlation model that employs several data clustering algorithms for antecedent parameters construction to avoid over-fitting and to achieve an appropriate performance in tumor motion tracking compared with the conventional models. To begin, a comparative assessment is done between seven nuero-fuzzy correlation models each constructed using a unique data clustering algorithm. Then, each of the constructed models are combined within an adaptive sevenfold synthetic model since our tumor motion database has high degrees of variability and that each model has its intrinsic properties at motion tracking. In the proposed sevenfold synthetic model, best model is selected adaptively at pre-treatment. The model also updates the steps for each patient using an automatic model selectivity subroutine. We tested the efficacy of the proposed synthetic model on twenty patients (divided equally into two control and worst groups) treated with CyberKnife synchrony system. Compared to Cyberknife model, the proposed synthetic model resulted in 61.2% and 49.3% reduction in tumor tracking error in worst and control group, respectively. These results suggest that the proposed model selection program in our synthetic neuro-fuzzy model can significantly reduce tumor tracking errors. Numerical assessments confirmed that the proposed synthetic model is able to track tumor motion in real time with high accuracy during treatment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Structural motion engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Connor, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    This innovative volume provides a systematic treatment of the basic concepts and computational procedures for structural motion design and engineering for civil installations. The authors illustrate the application of motion control to a wide spectrum of buildings through many examples. Topics covered include optimal stiffness distributions for building-type structures, the role of damping in controlling motion, tuned mass dampers, base isolation systems, linear control, and nonlinear control. The book's primary objective is the satisfaction of motion-related design requirements, such as restrictions on displacement and acceleration. The book is ideal for practicing engineers and graduate students. This book also: ·         Broadens practitioners' understanding of structural motion control, the enabling technology for motion-based design ·         Provides readers the tools to satisfy requirements of modern, ultra-high strength materials that lack corresponding stiffness, where the motion re...

  2. The use of active breathing control (ABC) to reduce margin for breathing motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, John W.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Jaffray, David A.; Kini, Vijay R.; Robertson, John M.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Martinez, Alavro A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: For tumors in the thorax and abdomen, reducing the treatment margin for organ motion due to breathing reduces the volume of normal tissues that will be irradiated. A higher dose can be delivered to the target, provided that the risk of marginal misses is not increased. To ensure safe margin reduction, we investigated the feasibility of using active breathing control (ABC) to temporarily immobilize the patient's breathing. Treatment planning and delivery can then be performed at identical ABC conditions with minimal margin for breathing motion. Methods and Materials: An ABC apparatus is constructed consisting of 2 pairs of flow monitor and scissor valve, 1 each to control the inspiration and expiration paths to the patient. The patient breathes through a mouth-piece connected to the ABC apparatus. The respiratory signal is processed continuously, using a personal computer that displays the changing lung volume in real-time. After the patient's breathing pattern becomes stable, the operator activates ABC at a preselected phase in the breathing cycle. Both valves are then closed to immobilize breathing motion. Breathing motion of 12 patients were held with ABC to examine their acceptance of the procedure. The feasibility of applying ABC for treatment was tested in 5 patients by acquiring volumetric scans with a spiral computed tomography (CT) scanner during active breath-hold. Two patients had Hodgkin's disease, 2 had metastatic liver cancer, and 1 had lung cancer. Two intrafraction ABC scans were acquired at the same respiratory phase near the end of normal or deep inspiration. An additional ABC scan near the end of normal expiration was acquired for 2 patients. The ABC scans were also repeated 1 week later for a Hodgkin's patient. In 1 liver patient, ABC scans were acquired at 7 different phases of the breathing cycle to facilitate examination of the liver motion associated with ventilation. Contours of the lungs and livers were outlined when applicable

  3. SU-E-J-183: Quantification of Motion During Hypo-Fractionated Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindranath, B; Zhang, P; Xiong, J; Mageras, G; Hunt, M [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify patient motion during hypo-fractionated prostate cancer treatment as tracked by Calypso™ 4D localization system. Methods: 50 prostate cancer patients with implanted Calypso beacons underwent hypofractionated IMRT treatment. Typical fraction size was 5 with doses of 5–8 Gy/fraction. 213 traces from the 50 patients were analyzed to quantify the probability of motion vs time starting from beam-on. Couch corrections applied by therapists were undone to obtain the natural course of patient motion. The Calypso data was used to identify vector displacements greater than 2 mm from the starting position. The direction of this vector was classified into one of the 26 directions (combinations of L/R, A/P, S/I). The probability of motion >2mm was estimated by computing the fraction of traces that exceed the 2mm threshold at each time point. The violating motion points were also binned by direction in order to identify specific directions that were more prone to movement. Results: The overall probability of motion greater than 2 mm at 5 and 10 minutes from beam-on were 27 % and 50% respectively. The primary directions in which motion occurred were Posterior-Inferior (PI) and Inferior (I) with a probability of 8.5% and 4% at 5 minutes and 10% for both at 10 minutes. Motion was classified into the following bins: 0–2, 2–3, 3–4, 4–5, 5–6, 6–7, 7–8 and greater than 8 mm. It is observed that motion < 2mm decreases from the first 5 minutes to the next while the higher magnitude components increase with time. Conclusion: The probability of prostate motion increases with time. The trend seen in the PI and I directions can be attributed to physiological factors like bladder filling. This probability can be factored in for scheduling intrafraction imaging and used to compare dosimetric impact of VMAT vs. IMRT plans. This work is supported in part by Varian Medical Systems.

  4. Evaluation of motion correction effect and image quality with the periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) (BLADE) and parallel imaging acquisition technique in the upper abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, Yuusuke; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Maetani, Yoji S; Arizono, Shigeki; Shimada, Kotaro; Togashi, Kaori

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate motion correction effect and image quality in the upper abdomen with the periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) (BLADE) and parallel imaging acquisition technique. A total of 50 consecutive patients underwent abdominal MR imaging. Fat-saturated T2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences were obtained by respiratory triggering. The subjects were examined with three different conditions of echo train length (ETL), blade width, and percent k-space coverage in the same scanning time: 19/30/100%, 30/30/100%, and 30/52/175%, which were designated as L/C(1), L/C(2), and L/C(3), respectively. The parallel imaging acquisition technique was used to either reduce ETL from 30 to 19 in L/C(1) or increase k-space coverage from 100% to 175% in L/C(3) compared with L/C(2). Motion and streak artifacts, and overall image quality were evaluated visually by two radiologists, independently. Motion and streak artifacts were mostly reduced in L/C(3) condition. The L/C(3) image also gave the best overall image quality compared with other conditions (P parallel imaging in the same scanning time. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Methods for Motion Correction Evaluation Using 18F-FDG Human Brain Scans on a High-Resolution PET Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H.; Sibomana, Merence; Olesen, Oline Vinter

    2012-01-01

    by the optical motion tracking system) were selected from F-18-FDG scans acquired on a PET scanner. The motion was measured as the maximum displacement of the markers attached to the subject's head and was considered to be major if larger than 4 mm and minor if less than 2 mm. After allowing a 40- to 60-min...... uptake time after tracer injection, we acquired a 6-min transmission scan, followed by a 40-min emission list-mode scan. Each emission list-mode dataset was divided into 8 frames of 5 min. The reconstructed time-framed images were aligned to a selected reference frame using either EMT or the AIR...

  6. Evaluation of hip internal and external rotation range of motion as an injury risk factor for hip, abdominal and groin injuries in professional baseball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinning Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal hip range of motion (ROM is essential in running and transfer of energy from lower to upper extremities during overhead throwing. Dysfunctional hip ROM may alter lower extremity kinematics and predispose athletes to hip and groin injuries. The purpose of this study is characterize hip internal/external ROM (Arc and its effect on the risk of hip, hamstring, and groin injuries in professional baseball players. Bilateral hip internal and external ROM was measured on all baseball players (N=201 in one professional organization (major and minor league during spring training. Players were organized according to their respective positions. All injuries were documented prospectively for an entire MLB season (2010 to 2011. Data was analyzed according to position and injuries during the season. Total number of players (N=201 with an average age of 24±3.6 (range=17-37. Both pitchers (N=93 and catchers (N=22 had significantly decreased mean hip internal rotation and overall hip arc of motion compared to the positional players (N=86. Players with hip, groin, and hamstring injury also had decreased hip rotation arc when compared to the normal group. Overall, there is a correlation between decreased hip internal rotation and total arc of motion with hip, hamstring, and groin injuries.

  7. Novel techniques for data decomposition and load balancing for parallel processing of vision systems: Implementation and evaluation using a motion estimation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Alok Nidhi; Leung, Mun K.; Huang, Thomas S.; Patel, Janak H.

    1989-01-01

    Computer vision systems employ a sequence of vision algorithms in which the output of an algorithm is the input of the next algorithm in the sequence. Algorithms that constitute such systems exhibit vastly different computational characteristics, and therefore, require different data decomposition techniques and efficient load balancing techniques for parallel implementation. However, since the input data for a task is produced as the output data of the previous task, this information can be exploited to perform knowledge based data decomposition and load balancing. Presented here are algorithms for a motion estimation system. The motion estimation is based on the point correspondence between the involved images which are a sequence of stereo image pairs. Researchers propose algorithms to obtain point correspondences by matching feature points among stereo image pairs at any two consecutive time instants. Furthermore, the proposed algorithms employ non-iterative procedures, which results in saving considerable amounts of computation time. The system consists of the following steps: (1) extraction of features; (2) stereo match of images in one time instant; (3) time match of images from consecutive time instants; (4) stereo match to compute final unambiguous points; and (5) computation of motion parameters.

  8. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Internal Motion Tracking Should Be Used to Validate 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Abdominal Radiation Therapy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rankine, Leith; Wan, Hanlin; Parikh, Parag; Maughan, Nichole [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Poulsen, Per [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); DeWees, Todd; Klein, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Santanam, Lakshmi, E-mail: lsantanam@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that fiducial tracking during pretreatment Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) can accurately measure tumor motion and that this method should be used to validate 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) margins before each treatment fraction. Methods and Materials: For 31 patients with abdominal tumors and implanted fiducial markers, tumor motion was measured daily with CBCT and fluoroscopy for 202 treatment fractions. Fiducial tracking and maximum-likelihood algorithms extracted 3-dimensional fiducial trajectories from CBCT projections. The daily internal margin (IM) (ie, range of fiducial motion) was calculated for CBCT and fluoroscopy as the 5th-95th percentiles of displacement in each cardinal direction. The planning IM from simulation 4DCT (IM{sub 4DCT}) was considered adequate when within ±1.2 mm (anterior–posterior, left–right) and ±3 mm (superior–inferior) of the daily measured IM. We validated CBCT fiducial tracking as an accurate predictive measure of intrafraction motion by comparing the daily measured IM{sub CBCT} with the daily IM measured by pretreatment fluoroscopy (IM{sub pre-fluoro}); these were compared with pre- and posttreatment fluoroscopy (IM{sub fluoro}) to identify those patients who could benefit from imaging during treatment. Results: Four-dimensional CT could not accurately predict intrafractional tumor motion for ≥80% of fractions in 94% (IM{sub CBCT}), 97% (IM{sub pre-fluoro}), and 100% (IM{sub fluoro}) of patients. The IM{sub CBCT} was significantly closer to IM{sub pre-fluoro} than IM{sub 4DCT} (P<.01). For patients with median treatment time t < 7.5 minutes, IM{sub CBCT} was in agreement with IM{sub fluoro} for 93% of fractions (superior–inferior), compared with 63% for the t > 7.5 minutes group, demonstrating the need for patient-specific intratreatment imaging. Conclusions: Tumor motion determined from 4DCT simulation does not accurately predict the daily motion observed on CBCT or fluoroscopy. Cone-beam CT could

  9. Difference in diaphragmatic motion during tidal breathing in a standing position between COPD patients and normal subjects: Time-resolved quantitative evaluation using dynamic chest radiography with flat panel detector system (“dynamic X-ray phrenicography”)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yoshitake, E-mail: yamada@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Ueyama, Masako, E-mail: ueyamam@fukujuji.org [Department of Health Care, Fukujuji Hospital, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association, 3-1-24 Matsuyama, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8522 (Japan); Abe, Takehiko, E-mail: takehikoabe@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Fukujuji Hospital, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association, 3-1-24 Matsuyama, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8522 (Japan); Araki, Tetsuro, E-mail: TARAKI@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Abe, Takayuki, E-mail: abe.t@keio.jp [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Biostatistics Unit at Clinical and Translational Research Center, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Nishino, Mizuki, E-mail: Mizuki_Nishino11@dfci.harvard.edu [Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Jinzaki, Masahiro, E-mail: jinzaki@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hatabu, Hiroto, E-mail: hhatabu@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); and others

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Dynamic X-ray phrenicography is a useful method for the evaluation of the diaphragms. • Its radiation dose is comparable to conventional two projection chest radiography. • Diaphragm motion during tidal breathing is larger in COPD than in normal subjects. • Higher BMI is also associated with increased excursions of the bilateral diaphragm. - Abstract: Objectives: To quantitatively compare diaphragmatic motion during tidal breathing in a standing position between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and normal subjects using dynamic chest radiography. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine COPD patients (35 males; age, 71.3 ± 8.4 years) and 47 normal subjects (non-smoker healthy volunteers) (20 males; age, 54.8 ± 9.8 years) underwent sequential chest radiographs during tidal breathing using dynamic chest radiography with a flat panel detector system. We evaluated the excursions and peak motion speeds of the diaphragms. The results were analyzed using an unpaired t-test and a multiple linear regression model. Results: The excursions of the diaphragms in COPD patients were significantly larger than those in normal subjects (right, 14.7 ± 5.5 mm vs. 10.2 ± 3.7 mm, respectively, P < 0.001; left, 17.2 ± 4.9 mm vs. 14.9 ± 4.2 mm, respectively, P = 0.022). Peak motion speeds in inspiratory phase were significantly faster in COPD patients compared to normal subjects (right, 16.3 ± 5.0 mm/s vs. 11.8 ± 4.2 mm/s, respectively, P < 0