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Sample records for intracranial thrombosis

  1. Endovascular treatment for intracranial venous sinus thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qiang; Li Shenmao; Ji Xunming; Miao Zhongrong; Zhu Fengshui; Zhi Xinglong; Ling Feng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and risk of endovascular treatment for intracranial venous sinus thrombosis. Methods: Twenty seven patients with intracranial venous sinus thrombosis confirmed by CT, MRI, MRV and/or DSA, from 2004 September to 2006 September, were treated with anticoagulant therapy but without response and then followed by multiple modalities including endovascular treatment. Nineteen of them accepted intravenous thrombolysis and mechanical thrombus maceration, another 5 accepted intravenous thrombolysis, mechanical thrombus maceration and intraarterial thrombolysis and the last 3 with stenting. Results: After thrombolysis, symptoms and signs of 23 patients improved obviously and headache disappeared in 18 of them, but with only mild degree in other 5 and no improvement in 3. Twenty one patients among them achieved recanalization of sinuses completely as confirmed on postprocedural angiography, MRI and MRV studies taken prior to hospital discharge and other 3 achieved recanalization of sinuses partly. Conclusion: Endovascular treatment is an effective and safe measure for potentially catastrophic intracranial dural sinus thrombosis. (authors)

  2. [Intracranial sinus thrombosis secondary to the consumption of inhaled speed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Sánchez, Fabiola; Guisado, Juan A; Palacios, Ramón; Teva, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Speed is a psychostimulant of the Central Nervous System that can cause behavioral alterations, euphoria, psychosis and diverse organic medical pictures. The case of a 19 year old male patient, who consumes amphetamines, who had behavioral alterations and heteroaggressiveness, circumstances that required psychiatric admission is presented. After performing brain imaging tests, intracranial venous sinus thrombosis was found, which has not, up to the present date, developed significant symptoms. The aim of the above-mentioned report is to know the mechanism of action of the speed and to relate it consumption to the appearance of intracranial sinus thrombosis. To do so, a search was conducted in the PubMed database using the following terms: amphetamines and intracranial sinus thrombosis; street drugs and cerebrovascular disease; and adverse effects of the drugs.

  3. Paradoxical presentation of orthostatic headache associated with increased intracranial pressure in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung B Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Headache is the most common symptom of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT; however, the detailed underlying mechanisms and characteristics of headache in CVT have not been well described. Here, we report two cases of CVT whose primary and lasting presentation was orthostatic headache, suggestive of decreased intracranial pressure. Contrary to our expectations, the headaches were associated with elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography showed characteristic voiding defects consistent with CVT. We suggest that orthostatic headache can be developed in a condition of decreased intracranial CSF volume in both intracranial hypotensive and intracranial hypertensive states. In these cases, orthostatic headache in CVT might be caused by decreased intracranial CSF volume that leads to the inferior displacement of the brain and traction on pain-sensitive intracranial vessels, despite increased CSF pressure on measurement. CVT should be considered in the differential diagnosis when a patient complains of orthostatic headache.

  4. [Progressive Intracranial Hypertension due to Superior Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis Following Mild Head Trauma: A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Yuta; Maruya, Jun; Watanabe, Jun; Nishimaki, Keiichi

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis after mild head trauma without skull fracture or intracranial hematoma is exceptionally rare. We describe an unusual case of progressive intracranial hypertension due to superior sagittal sinus thrombosis following mild head trauma. A 17-year-old boy presented with nape pain a day after a head blow during a gymnastics competition (backward double somersault). On admission, he showed no neurological deficit. CT scans revealed no skull fractures, and there were no abnormalities in the brain parenchyma. However, his headache worsened day-by-day and he had begun to vomit. Lumbar puncture was performed on Day 6, and the opening pressure was 40 cm of water. After tapping 20 mL, he felt better and the headache diminished for a few hours. MR venography performed on Day 8 revealed severe flow disturbance in the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus with multiple venous collaterals. Because of the beneficial effects of lumbar puncture, we decided to manage his symptoms of intracranial hypertension conservatively with repeated lumbar puncture and administration of glycerol. After 7 days of conservative treatment, his symptoms resolved completely, and he was discharged from the hospital. Follow-up MR venography performed on Day 55 showed complete recanalization of the superior sagittal sinus. The exact mechanism of sinus thrombosis in this case is not clear, but we speculate that endothelial damage caused by shearing stress because of strong rotational acceleration or direct impact to the superior sagittal sinus wall may have initiated thrombus formation.

  5. Strategies in the treatment for intracranial venous sinus thrombosis

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    JIA Qiang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST is a special type of cerebrovascular disease with high morbidity and mortality which often has an unpredictable outcome. It is usually misdiagnosed because of different causes and variable clinical manifestations. How to improve the diagnosis and therapy of CVST is always the hotspot in clinic. This article aims to investigate the effective and safe strategies in the treatment for CVST. Methods Clinical data of 52 patients diagnosed with CVST were retrospectively analyzed. These patients were subdivided into mild type and severe type according to the features of symptoms, signs, lumbar puncture pressure and imaging. The patients with mild type were treated with systemic anticoagulant therapy combined with intravenous thrombolysis [continuous intravenous infusion of heparin (12.50-25 × 103 U/d for 7-10 d followed by a continuous infusion of urokinase (0.50-0.75 ×106 U/d for 5-7d]. The patients with severe type were treated with endovascular thrombolysis [injection of urokinase (0.50-1 × 106 U, 0.10 × 106 U/min via carotid or vertebral artery; or intravenous infusion of urokinase 1 ×106 U/d and heparin 25 ×103 U/d for 5-7 d], and superior sagittal sinus cut-open/ intrasinus thrombolysis separately. All the patients took oral warfarin for 6-12 months, and follow-up was performed after operation by the method of magnetic resonance venography (MRV. Results Among the 27 cases of mild type receiving systemic anticoagulant agents and intravenous thrombolysis, 14 were cured; 9 were improved; 4 were ineffective. Among the 22 cases of severe type receiving systemic anticoagulant drugs and endovascular thrombolysis, 18 were cured; 3 were improved; 1 was dead. The left 3 cases with gravis type received superior sagittal sinus cut-open/intrasinus thrombolysis and were cured. The period of follow-up was between 6 months and 60 months (the median time was 36 months, and no recurrence happened. Conclusion

  6. Cerebral venous thrombosis and isolated intracranial hypertension without papilledema in CDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrone, A; Bono, F; Oliveri, R L; Gambardella, A; Pirritano, D; Labate, A; Lucisano, A; Valentino, P; Zappia, M; Aguglia, U; Lavano, A; Fera, F; Pardatscher, K

    2001-07-10

    There is evidence that patients with chronic daily headache (CDH) may have isolated intracranial hypertension without papilledema (IHWOP). Recent studies have emphasized that isolated IH may be due to cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). To detect the occurrence of CVT in patients with CDH. The authors investigated the occurrence of CVT in 114 consecutive patients with CDH by using MR venography (MRV). A portion of these patients underwent a lumbar puncture (LP) to measure CSF pressure. MRV and LP were also performed in 28 age-matched control subjects. In all the control subjects, both MRV and CSF pressure were normal. One hundred three of the 114 patients with CDH had normal MRV. Twenty-seven (Group 1) of these 103 patients underwent LP, and all of them had normal CSF pressure. Eleven (9.6%) of the 114 patients with CDH had CVT of one or both transverse sinuses. Six of these 11 patients had flowing abnormalities of one transverse sinus (Group 2), whereas the remaining five patients showed involvement of both transverse sinuses (Group 3). The CSF pressure of Group 2 was higher than that of either Group 1 or the control subjects, and one of the six patients showed isolated IHWOP. Patients of Group 3 displayed the highest CSF pressure, and four of five had isolated IHWOP. The headache profiles of patients with CDH and CVT did not differ from those of patients with CDH but normal MRV. CVT, as detected by MRV, occurred in 9.6% of patients who presented with CDH. Almost half of the patients with CVT had isolated IHWOP. These results suggest that MRV may be a useful tool for selecting patients with CDH who should have LP to exclude isolated IHWOP.

  7. POSTSPINAL INTRACRANIAL SUBDURAL HEMATOMA AND CEREBRAL SINUS THROMBOSIS: REPORT OF A CASE

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    Ali ihsan Uysal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare but a serious complication of spinal anesthesia. It usually occurs in the presence of predisposing factors such as pregnancy, puerperium, use of oral contraceptive drugs, malignancies, thrombocytopenia and the most frequent symptom is headache. Twenty-two years of age, pregnant woman had a complaint of headache after spinal anesthesia for caesarean section and diagnosed as post-dural puncture headache, the treatment was begun. After detecting responsiveness to treatment, radiological imaging procedures were performed and subdural hematoma and transverse sinus thrombosis were detected. In this case report, it was concluded under current literatures that the subdural hematoma and transverse sinus thrombosis should be kept in mind during the diagnosis of post-dural puncture headache. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(2.000: 116-120

  8. Intracranial venous sinus thrombosis as a complication of otitis media in children: Critical review of diagnosis and management.

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    Zanoletti, Elisabetta; Cazzador, Diego; Faccioli, Chiara; Sari, Marianna; Bovo, Roberto; Martini, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    Otogenic lateral sinus thrombosis (LST) is a rare intracranial complication of acute otitis media (AOM), which can lead to severe neurological sequelae and death. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical presentation, management and outcome of LST in children, investigating a possible correlation between clinical aspects, radiological findings and anatomical variations. At a tertiary Italian hospital, a retrospective review was conducted on the medical records of eight patients diagnosed with otogenic LST over a 3-year period. Four children were males and mean age was 4.7 years. All patients had a history of otitis media at diagnosis and 4/8 presented also with more than one neurological sign or symptom. Mastoiditis signs were detected in 5/8 patients. Thrombosis was diagnosed by computed tomography, enhanced magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance venography. Treatment was medical, alone or combined with surgery. Medical treatment consisted in anticoagulants eventually combined with anti-edema medication on clinical basis. Mastoidectomy and/or myringotomy±trans-tympanic drainage placement were performed in 7/8 patients. Complete vessel recanalization was obtained in 6/8 children after a median follow-up time of 4.8 months. No complications, neither clinical sequelae occurred. In our series, neurological signs and symptoms were significantly associated with the presence of hypoplasia of the contralateral venous sinus (p=0.029). LST is a severe condition occurring even in absence of otological signs, and despite adequate antibiotic therapy for AOM, which should be ruled out and promptly treated. A dominant neurological presentation is associated in our series with anatomical variations of cerebral sinus venous drainage patterns. This should be carefully evaluated and considered in diagnosis, treatment planning and prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fetal MR imaging of posterior intracranial dural sinus thrombosis: a report of three cases with variable outcomes

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    Byrd, Sharon E.; Elias, Dean [Rush Medical College and Rush University Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Section of Neuroradiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Abramowicz, Jacques S. [Rush Medical College and Rush University Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rush Fetal and Neonatal Medicine Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Kent, Paul [Rush Medical College and Rush University Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Chicago, IL (United States); Kimura, Robert E. [Rush Medical College and Rush University Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Chicago, IL (United States); Heydeman, Peter T. [Rush Medical College and Rush University Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Thrombosis of fetal intracranial dural sinuses is a rare entity. A specific type of midline dural sinus thrombosis (DST) at the torcular Herophili with extension into the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) was initially seen on fetal US and was referred to fetal MRI for definite diagnosis and better delineation. Retrospective comparison to medical literature of three cases, diagnosed at our institution, of midline fetal DST with MR imaging findings and clinical outcomes. We reviewed MRI findings on T2-weighted images of our three cases of fetal midline DST and clinical outcomes of these fetuses and compared our findings to medical literature. The MR imaging and clinical findings of our cases extend over 6 years. They consist of three pregnant women, 31-39 years of age each with a single fetus, with fetal MR imaging performed at different gestational ages (GA). Case 1 the MR imaging was performed at 21 5/7 weeks' GA, case 2 at 24 and 33 4/7 weeks' GA, and case 3 at 22 and 25 weeks' GA. Postnatal MRI was performed in case 2 at 6 months of life and case 3 at 1 day of life. Clinical follow-up occurred during the last 6 years. In all of our cases, T2-W MR imaging demonstrated ballooned midline torcular Herophili with iso- to hypointense mass with or without focal eccentric area of greater hypointensity occupying the torcular Herophili with extension into the SSS. Case 3 had associated leptomeningeal dural vascular malformation overlying the left cerebral hemisphere with development of migrational disorder in the left cerebral hemisphere. Clinical outcome consisted of fetal demise in case 1, normal postnatal outcome in case 2 and severe brain damage with poor postnatal outcome in case 3. Our findings of large iso-hypointense thrombus with or without a focal eccentric area more hypointense to thrombus in a dilated torcular Herophili with extension into the SSS on T2-W images corresponds to the majority of cases of this rare type of DST in the medical literature

  10. Use of scintigraphy and cine-angio-scintigraphy to diagnose thrombosis of the superficial intracranial vein sinuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, M.H.; Rousseaux, P.; Scherpereel, B.; Guyot, J.F.; Morel, M.; Valeyre, J.

    14 cases of venous thrombosis of the large superficial ultracranial sinus were studied. The isotopic examinations were performed by two methods: standard brain scintigraphy ( 111 In-DTPA) and brain cine-angio-scintigraphy (sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate). The data supplied by both these explorations are analysed. The thrombosis is seen directly in cine-angio-scintigraphy taken with dorsal incidence: the isotopic sinusogram appears clearly from the data accumulated over the first minute following injection. Uni- or bilateral vein softening upstream from the thrombosis is revealed by a maximum pathological uptake in the later stages of standard scintigraphy. A prognostic idea of how the venous thrombosis will develop may even emerge. However a single normal isotopic exploration does not allow elimination of the diagnosis [fr

  11. Hydrocephalus in cerebral venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Susanna M.; van den Berg, René; Troost, Dirk; Majoie, Charles B.; Stam, Jan; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure is common in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), but hydrocephalus is rarely reported in these patients. We examined the frequency, pathophysiology and associated clinical manifestations of hydrocephalus in patients with CVT admitted to our hospital between 2000 and

  12. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joash, Dr.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology is not only rare but an important cause of new daily persistent headaches among young & middle age individuals. The Etiology & Pathogenesis is generally caused by spinal CSF leak. Precise cause remains largely unknown, underlying structural weakness of spinal meninges is suspected. There are several MR Signs of Intracranial Hypotension that include:- diffuse pachymeningeal (dural) enhancement; bilateral subdural, effusion/hematomas; Downward displacement of brain; enlargement of pituitary gland; Engorgement of dural venous sinuses; prominence of spinal epidural venous plexus and Venous sinus thrombosis & isolated cortical vein thrombosis. The sum of volumes of intracranial blood, CSF & cerebral tissue must remain constant in an intact cranium. Treatment in Many cases can be resolved spontaneously or by use Conservative approach that include bed rest, oral hydration, caffeine intake and use of abdominal binder. Imaging Modalities for Detection of CSF leakage include CT myelography, Radioisotope cisternography, MR myelography, MR imaging and Intrathecal Gd-enhanced MR

  13. Idiopathic thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombosis involves a group of inherited thrombophilia predisposed to severe thrombosis of early onset and associated with an adverse outcome due to recurrence, and therefore, requires long-term anticoagulation therapy. The causative factors of a predisposition to thrombosis include immobility, dehydration, infection, surgery, injury, cancer, pregnancy, and estrogen use. The inherited deficiencies of antithrombin (AT), protein C (PC), and protein S (PS) are specified as "Specific Pediatric Chronic Diseases." However, medical expense assistance for patients terminates when they reach the age of 20 years. On April 1 st 2017, "Idiopathic Thrombosis due to Inherited Thrombophilia," consisting of inherited AT, PC, and PS deficiencies, was specified as an "Intractable Disease," and aid for medical expenses became available. Accordingly, progress in the research and practice of idiopathic thrombosis is expected in future to improve the medical care system and to construct a database via clinical surveys.

  14. Intracardiac and intracerebral thrombosis associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thromboembolic complications are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in cases of nephrotic syndrome. Hereditary thrombophilias are also known to increase vascular thrombosis. We present a case that has been followed up for steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (NS) in which intracardiac and intracranial ...

  15. Multiple cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (1). Headache was present in our patient. This symptom, in association with vomiting is a feature of intracranial hypertension. Normal cerebro-spinal fluid flow patterns have the final common pathway as the reabsorption by the arachnoid granulations and flow into the venous sinuses (6). Thrombosis within the sinuses block.

  16. Intracranial Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvedstrup, Jeppe; Radojicic, Aleksandra; Moudrous, Walid

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a new method of noninvasive intracranial pressure (nICP) measurement with conventional lumbar puncture (LP) opening pressure. METHODS: In a prospective multicenter study, patients undergoing LP for diagnostic purposes underwent intracranial pressure measurements with HeadSen...

  17. Traumatic dural venous sinus thrombosis: A Mini Review

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    Moscote-Salazar Luis Rafael

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dural venous sinus thrombosis is a benign disease, representing about 1% of cerebral vascular events. In some cases the development of the disease increased intracranial pressure or symptomatic epilepsy. The development towards a dural venous sinus thrombosis is rare, but is a condition to be considered before the development of ischemic vascular events and a history of recent head trauma. Intracranial hematomas or skull fractures can lead to the establishment of obstructive pathology of the dural venous sinuses. The knowledge of this entity is necessary for the critical care staff and neurosurgery staff.

  18. Clinical Outcome of Anticoagulant Treatment in Head or Neck Infection-Associated Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Susanna M.; Coutinho, Jonathan M.; Stam, Jan; Canhão, Patricia; Barinagarrementeria, Fernando; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Ferro, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Local infections of the head or neck are a cause of cerebral venous thrombosis. Treatment of infectious cerebral venous thrombosis with heparin is controversial. We examined whether this treatment was associated with intracranial hemorrhagic complications and poor clinical

  19. Intracranial haemorrhage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Consultant Neurosurgeon, Division of Neurosurgery, University of Cape Town and Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town. David Le Feuvre .... evacuation. This, together with criticism of various limitations of the STICH trial, has led to the initiation of STICH II.[19]. Intracranial haematomas may also be dealt with during another ...

  20. Intracranial Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a life-threatening condition, the outcome of which can be improved by intensive care. Intracranial hemorrhage may be spontaneous, precipitated by an underlying vascular malformation, induced by trauma, or related to therapeutic anticoagulation. The goals of critical care are to assess the proximate cause, minimize the risks of hemorrhage expansion through blood pressure control and correction of coagulopathy, and obliterate vascular lesions with a high risk of acute rebleeding. Simple bedside scales and interpretation of computed tomography scans assess the severity of neurological injury. Myocardial stunning and pulmonary edema related to neurological injury should be anticipated, and can usually be managed. Fever (often not from infection) is common and can be effectively treated, although therapeutic cooling has not been shown to improve outcomes after intracranial hemorrhage. Most functional and cognitive recovery takes place weeks to months after discharge; expected levels of functional independence (no disability, disability but independence with a device, dependence) may guide conversations with patient representatives. Goals of care impact mortality, with do-not-resuscitate status increasing the predicted mortality for any level of severity of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Future directions include refining the use of bedside neuromonitoring (electroencephalogram, invasive monitors), novel approaches to reduce intracranial hemorrhage expansion, minimizing vasospasm, and refining the assessment of quality of life to guide rehabilitation and therapy. PMID:22167847

  1. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

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    Hernando Raphael Alvis-Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment.

  2. Portal Vein Thrombosis

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    Hakan Demirci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of presinusoidal portal hypertension. Portal vein thrombosis commonly occurs in patient with cirrhosis, malignancy and prothrombotic states. Patients with acute portal vein thrombosis have immediate onset. Patients with chronic portal vein thrombosis have developed portal hypertension and cavernous portal transformation. Portal vein thrombosis is diagnosed with doppler ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Therapy with low molecular weight heparin achieves recanalization in more than half of acute cases.

  3. Multiple cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: Case report | Mogere ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon clinical problem and can be characterised by nonspecific and common symptoms of headaches and vomiting due to the intracranial hypertension. Alternate diagnoses are entertained especially when procoagulant factors are not elicited. We present a 35 year old female, ...

  4. Intracranial lipomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takashi; Shojima, Kazuhito; Moritaka, Kazuhiko; Utsunomiya, Hidetsuna; Konishi, Jun

    1984-01-01

    Intracranial lipomas are very rare and reports of infantile lipomas are scarce. Nine cases of intracranial lipomas, five in infants and four in adults are described and characteristic findings of the CT are presented. Two of the six cases involved lipomas at the corpus callosum that were associated with frontal dysraphism and cranium bifidum at the midline of frontal region. Five of the nine cases involved lipomas at the quadrigeminal cistern. In one case with an advanced enlargement in circumference of the head in the perinatal period, a V-P shunt was conducted for obstructive hydrocephalus. Another case had widely ranging agenesis of the corpus callosum associated with an interhemispheric cyst showing the right sided parietal and occipital lobes through the callosal agenesis. One of the nine cases had a lipoma in the left sylvian fissure and in the adult was in the interpeduncular cistern. Four of the nine cases were associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum. Based on these cases and published reports, the CT features of intracranial lipoma are discussed. (author)

  5. Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation

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    ... PARTNERSHIPS Meet our Fundraising Partners Tweet Welcome Intracranial hypertension (IH) is the general term for the neurological ... high. (Old names for IH include Benign Intracranial Hypertension and Pseudotumor Cerebri). The Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation ...

  6. What Is Deep Vein Thrombosis?

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    ... To Health Topics / Deep Vein Thrombosis Deep Vein Thrombosis Leer en español What Is Deep vein thrombosis ( ... life-threatening problems if not treated. Deep Vein Thrombosis Only about half of the people who have ...

  7. L-Asparaginase Therapy with Concomitant Cranial Venous Thrombosis: Can Mri Help Avoiding Stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eloraby, A.

    2009-01-01

    To prospectively use MRI in the early detection of intracranial sino-venous thrombosis during the L-asparaginase induction therapy of acute leukemia thus preventing the evolution of brain venous infarct. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of seventy patients receiving L-asparaginase induction therapy for acute leukemia in the National Cancer Institute of Cairo University presenting with clinical neurological signs suggestive of aseptic intracranial venous thrombosis. All the patients were studied by 1.5 Tesla magnet using conventional MRI pulse sequences and MR veno graphic studies. The imaging findings were processed as regards the detection of venous thrombosis, its signal criteria and the evaluation of any companion brain parenchymal ischemic insults. Results: Eleven patients were diagnosed with d ural venous sinus thrombosis with subsequent specific signal pattern of the thrombus that could be linked to the duration of thrombosis. The MR veno graphic studies detected the thrombosis in nine cases out of eleven. Ten cases scored brain parenchymal signal abnormality that could indicate infarction, eight of them were hemorrhagic in nature. Conclusion: L-asparaginase therapy is accompanied by high risk of venous thrombosis that could involve the intra-cranial sino-venous structures. MRI could be used effectively in the early diagnosis of such serious, curable complication using a combination of conventional spin echo pulse sequences and MR veno graphic studies. Hemorrhagic venous infarcts should draw the attention to underlying established venous thrombosis.

  8. Venous thrombosis - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100168.htm Venous thrombosis - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Deep Vein Thrombosis A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  9. Deep Vein Thrombosis

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    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein ... the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  10. Mesenteric venous thrombosis

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    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001157.htm Mesenteric venous thrombosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT) is a blood clot in one or ...

  11. Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis

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    Rebecca Ichord

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT is a rare but serious cerebrovascular disorder affecting children from the newborn period through childhood and adolescence. The incidence is estimated at 0.6/100,000/year, with 30–50% occurring in newborns. Causes are diverse and are highly age dependent. Acute systemic illness is the dominant risk factor among newborns. In childhood CSVT, acute infections of the head and neck such as mastoiditis are most common, followed by chronic underlying diseases such as nephrotic syndrome, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Signs and symptoms are also age related. Seizures and altered mental status are the commonest manifestations in newborns. Headache, vomiting, and lethargy, sometimes with 6th nerve palsy, are the most common symptoms in children and adolescents. Recent multicenter cohort studies from North America and Europe have provided updated information on risk factors, clinical presentations, treatment practices, and outcomes. While systemic anticoagulation is the most common specific treatment used, there are wide variations and many uncertainties even among experts concerning best practice. The treatment dilemma is especially pronounced for neonatal CSVT. This is due in part to the higher prevalence of intracranial hemorrhage among newborns on the one hand, and the clear evidence that newborns suffer greater long-term neurologic morbidity on the other hand. With the advent of widespread availability and acceptance of acute endovascular therapy for arterial ischemic stroke, there is renewed interest in this therapy for children with CSVT. Limited published evidence exists regarding the benefits and risks of these invasive therapies. Therefore, the authors of current guidelines advise reserving this therapy for children with progressive and severe disease who have failed optimal medical management. As research focused on childhood cerebrovascular disease continues to grow rapidly, the future prospects

  12. Novel balloon-and-aspiration method for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: dental-floss technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Okada, Hideo; Chung, Joonho; Webster Crowley, R; Lopes, Demetrius K

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is sometimes fatal. The standard treatment for sinus thrombosis is anticoagulation, but endovascular intervention must be considered when medical treatment fails. Mechanical thrombectomy is usually required when a large clot burden exits. Unfortunately, in sinus thrombosis attributable to a clot burden larger than that in an intracranial artery, the conventional technique used for intraarterial acute stroke intervention with a stent retriever and/or aspiration is not very effective. The authors describe here their endovascular approach to mechanical thrombectomy for sinus thrombosis using aspiration combined with angioplasty balloon support.

  13. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haritanti, A.; Karacostas, D.; Drevelengas, A.; Kanellopoulos, V.; Paraskevopoulou, E.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Economou, I.; Dimitriadis, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon but increasingly recognized syndrome. Orthostatic headache with typical findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the key to diagnosis. Delayed diagnosis of this condition may subject patients to unnecessary procedures and prolong morbidity. We describe six patients with SIH and outline the important clinical and neuroimaging findings. They were all relatively young, 20-54 years old, with clearly orthostatic headache, minimal neurological signs (only abducent nerve paresis in two) and diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement on brain MRI, while two of them presented subdural hygromas. Spinal MRI was helpful in detecting a cervical cerebrospinal fluid leak in three patients and dilatation of the vertebral venous plexus with extradural fluid collection in another. Conservative management resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms in five patients (10 days-3 weeks) and in one who developed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, the condition resolved in 2 months. However, this rapid clinical improvement was not accompanied by an analogous regression of the brain MR findings that persisted on a longer follow-up. Along with recent literature data, our patients further point out that SIH, to be correctly diagnosed, necessitates increased alertness by the attending physician, in the evaluation of headaches

  14. Understanding idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Keira A; Mollan, Susan P; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder characterised by raised intracranial pressure that predominantly affects young, obese women. Pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated, but several causal factors have been proposed. Symptoms can include headaches, visual loss, pulsatile tinnitus...

  15. Intracranial pressure monitoring (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intracranial pressure monitoring is performed by inserting a catheter into the head with a sensing device to monitor the pressure around the brain. An increase in intracranial pressure can cause a decrease in blood flow to ...

  16. Demonstration of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis by indium-111 platelet scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridgers, S.L.; Strauss, E.; Smith, E.O.; Reed, D.; Ezekowitz, M.D.

    1986-10-01

    Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis, documented by cerebral angiography, was demonstrated by indium-111 platelet scintigraphy in a 40-year-old man presenting with seizures and intracerebral hematoma. Early scintigraphy demonstrated focal increased indium-111 activity at the two ends of the thrombus, while later scintigraphy showed diffuse increased activity in the area of the sinus. This initial experience suggests that platelet scintigraphy may provide unique information regarding the natural history of intracranial venous thrombosis.

  17. Intracardiac and intracerebral thrombosis associated with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase A1298C homozygote mutation in paediatric steroidresistant nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahime Renda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Thromboembolic complications are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in cases of nephrotic syndrome. Hereditary thrombophilias are also known to increase vascular thrombosis. We present a case that has been followed up for steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (NS in which intracardiac and intracranial thrombosis subsequently developed. The patient was found to have a homozygote mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene as an additional risk factor for recurrent thrombosis. MTHFR mutation with NS was considered to have an important effect on the development of life-threatening thrombosis.

  18. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure During Intracranial Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intracranial endoscopy is a minimum invasive procedure, which reduces trauma to the brain, is cost-effective, and carries a shortened hospital stay with an improved postoperative outcome. Objective: To monitor intracranial pressure changes during intracranial endoscopy among children and adults under general anesthesia/sedation, and to compare the intracranial pressure changes between children and adults receiving general anesthesia and among adults receiving general anesthesia and sedation. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted in one of the tertiary care hospitals of Lucknow. This was carried out in the department of neurosurgery from January 2008 to December 2008. Patients who were not fit for general anesthesia received local anesthesia under sedation. Patients participating in the study were divided into three groups. Intracranial pressure was recorded at specific intervals. Parametric data were subjected to statistical analysis using a student\\s t test. Result: A total of 70 patients were undergoing intracranial endoscopy under general anesthesia during the study period. In both groups A and B, intracranial pressure increases the maximum during inflation of the balloon. In group C, all the variations in ICP were found to be statistically significant. In the comparison of intracranial pressure changes between groups A and B, no significant difference was found. All correlations in the comparison of groups B and C were found to be statistically significant (p< 0.001. Conclusion: There is a need for continuous intraoperative monitoring of ICP intracranial endoscopy, because ICP increases in various stages of the procedure, which can be detrimental to the perfusion of the brain. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(4.000: 240-245

  19. Neonatal Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The presentation, treatment, and outcome of neonatal cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (SVT were studied in 42 children, using neurology clinic records (1986-2005 at Indiana University School of Medicine.

  20. Sixth Nerve Palsy in Paediatric Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Julia E; Reem, Rachel E; Aylward, Shawn C; Rogers, David L

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the incidence and describe the characteristics of sixth cranial nerve (CN VI) palsy in paediatric patients with intracranial hypertension (IH). A retrospective chart review of central Ohio children diagnosed with IH over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. IH without identifiable cause was defined as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), whereas IH with identifiable pathologic aetiology was deemed secondary intracranial hypertension (SIH). A subset of patients with CN VI palsy was identified. Data collected included patient age, gender, past medical history, aetiology of SIH, ophthalmic examination, lumbar puncture results, neuroimaging results, and response to treatment. Seventy-eight children with intracranial hypertension were included in the study. Nine (11.5%) children (four males, five females; median age 14, range: 3-18) were found to have a unilateral ( n = 2) or bilateral ( n = 7) CN VI palsy. Five children had IIH; the remaining four had SIH from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis ( n = 2) and infection ( n = 2). The mean lumbar puncture opening pressure for the nine patients with CN VI palsy was 40 cm H 2 O (range: 21-65 cm H 2 O). Papilloedema was present in 8/9 (89%) patients. One patient required a lumboperitoneal shunt, and two others required optic nerve sheath fenestrations in addition to medical management. All cases of CN VI palsy resolved with treatment. In our primary service area, the incidence of CN VI palsy is approximately 12% among paediatric IH patients. The majority of cases with CN VI palsy presented with papilloedema and all cases resolved with treatment of intracranial hypertension.

  1. Safety of low-dose aspirin in endovascular treatment for intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ma

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the safety of low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel versus high-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel in prevention of vascular risk within 90 days of duration of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients treated with intracranial endovascular treatment. METHODS: From January 2012 to December 2013, this prospective and observational study enrolled 370 patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis of ≥70% with poor collateral undergoing intracranial endovascular treatment. Antiplatelet therapy consists of aspirin, at a low-dose of 100 mg or high-dose of 300 mg daily; clopidogrel, at a dose of 75 mg daily for 5 days before endovascular treatment. The dual antiplatelet therapy continued for 90 days after intervention. The study endpoints include acute thrombosis, subacute thrombosis, stroke or death within 90 days after intervention. RESULTS: Two hundred and seventy three patients received low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel and 97 patients received high-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel before intracranial endovascular treatment. Within 90 days after intervention, there were 4 patients (1.5% with acute thrombosis, 5 patients (1.8% with subacute thrombosis, 17 patients (6.2% with stroke, and 2 death (0.7% in low-dose aspirin group, compared with no patient (0% with acute thrombosis, 2 patient (2.1% with subacute thrombosis, 6 patients (6.2% with stroke, and 2 death (2.1% in high-dose aspirin group, and there were no significant difference in all study endpoints between two groups. CONCLUSION: Low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel is comparative in safety with high-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel within 90 days of duration of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients treated with intracranial endovascular treatment.

  2. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fullam, L

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous\\/primary intracranial hypotension is characterised by orthostatic headache and is associated with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings. CASE REPORT: We present a case report of a patient with typical symptoms and classical radiological images. DISCUSSION: Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an under-recognised cause of headache and can be diagnosed by history of typical orthostatic headache and findings on MRI brain.

  3. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, D

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm results in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a subtype of stroke with an incidence of 9 per 100,000 person-years and a case-fatality around 35%. In order to prevent SAH, patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms can be treated by neurosurgical or

  4. Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in a nephrotic child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Marcelo Masruha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotic syndrome in infancy and childhood is known to be associated with a hypercoagulable state and thromboembolic complications, but cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CST is a very rare and serious one, with only a few isolated reports in the literature. A case is presented of a 9-year-old boy with nephrotic syndrome that acutely developed signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension syndrome. CST was diagnosed on cranial CT and MRI and he gradually recovered after treatment with anticoagulants. The diagnosis of CST should be considered in any patient with nephrotic syndrome who develops neurologic symptoms. The discussion of this case, coupled with a review of the literature, emphasizes that early diagnosis is essential for institution of anticoagulation therapy and a successful outcome. This report also illustrates the difficulties that may be encountered in managing such a patient.

  5. Venous thrombosis: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, C.W.

    1986-07-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease contributes to morbidity and mortality in certain groups of hospitalized patients, particularly those who have undergone surgery. Although principles of treatment have changed relatively little during the past 20 years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Venography, once the only reliable diagnostic technique, has been largely replaced by noninvasive tests: impedance plethysmography, venous Doppler, /sup 125/I-radiofibrinogen-uptake test, and phleborheography. Virchow's triad of stasis, vessel injury, and hypercoagulability remains a valid explanation of the pathogenesis of thrombus formation, but laboratory and clinical data have refined our knowledge of how these factors interact to result in clinically significant disease. Knowledge of the natural history of venous thrombosis, plus heightened awareness of the long-term morbidity and expense associated with the postphlebitic syndrome, have led to increased interest in preventing DVT. Clinically and economically, venous thrombosis is best managed by prevention. 61 references.

  6. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Portal vein thrombosis (PVT is the blockage or narrowing of the portal vein by a thrombus. It is relatively rare and has been linked with the presence of an underlying liver disease or prothrombotic disorders. We present a case of a young male who presented with vague abdominal symptoms for approximately one week. Imaging revealed the presence of multiple nonocclusive thrombi involving the right portal vein, the splenic vein, and the left renal vein, as well as complete occlusion of the left portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein. We discuss pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of both acute and chronic thrombosis. The presence of PVT should be considered as a clue for prothrombotic disorders, liver disease, and other local and general factors that must be carefully investigated. It is hoped that this case report will help increase awareness of the complexity associated with portal vein thrombosis among the medical community.

  7. Cerebral venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvis, Suzanne M.; de Sousa, Diana Aguiar; Ferro, José M.; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an important cause of stroke in young adults. Data from large international registries published in the past two decades have greatly improved our knowledge about the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and prognosis of CVT. The presentation of symptoms is

  8. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-05

    This podcast discusses the risk for deep vein thrombosis in long-distance travelers and ways to minimize that risk.  Created: 4/5/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/5/2012.

  9. cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-05-05

    May 5, 2010 ... This was better demonstrated on sagittal (Figure 1C) reformatted scans which showed lack of enhancement in the superior sagittal sinus. A diagnosis of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis with bilateral parasagittal infarcts, the right being haemorrhagic was made. The patient was managed with I.V heparin.

  10. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OWNER

    ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in hospitalized surgical patients. The occurrence of the disease is related to presence of risk factors, which are related primarily to trauma, venous stasis and hyper-coagulability. DVT seems not to be taken seriously ...

  11. Mesenteric vein thrombosis: CT identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, A.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.; Kelvin, F.M.

    1984-07-01

    Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis was identified on computed tomographic scans in six patients. In each case, contrast-enhanced scans showed a high-density superior mesenteric vein wall surrounding a central filling defect. Four fo the six patients had isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis. A fifth patient had associated portal vein and splenic vein thrombosis, and the sixth patient had associated portal vein and inferior vena cava thrombosis. One of the six patients had acute ischemic bowel disease. The other five patients did not have acute ischemic bowel symptoms associated with their venous occlusion. This study defines the computed tomographic appearance of mesenteric vein thrombosis.

  12. Mesenteric vein thrombosis: CT identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, A.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.; Kelvin, F.M.

    1984-01-01

    Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis was identified on computed tomographic scans in six patients. In each case, contrast-enhanced scans showed a high-density superior mesenteric vein wall surrounding a central filling defect. Four fo the six patients had isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis. A fifth patient had associated portal vein and splenic vein thrombosis, and the sixth patient had associated portal vein and inferior vena cava thrombosis. One of the six patients had acute ischemic bowel disease. The other five patients did not have acute ischemic bowel symptoms associated with their venous occlusion. This study defines the computed tomographic appearance of mesenteric vein thrombosis

  13. Traumatic Distal Ulnar Artery Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet A. Karaarslan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about a posttraumatic distal ulnar artery thrombosis case that has occurred after a single blunt trauma. The ulnar artery thrombosis because of chronic trauma is a frequent condition (hypothenar hammer syndrome but an ulnar artery thrombosis because of a single direct blunt trauma is rare. Our patient who has been affected by a single blunt trauma to his hand and developed ulnar artery thrombosis has been treated by resection of the thrombosed ulnar artery segment. This report shows that a single blunt trauma can cause distal ulnar artery thrombosis in the hand and it can be treated merely by thrombosed segment resection in suitable cases.

  14. Prophylaxis of Venous Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, Samuel Z.

    2001-06-01

    Mechanical measures such as graduated compression stockings and intermittent compression boots are available for venous thrombosis prophylaxis, but compliance may be limited. Plantar venous pneumatic compression devices have attained widespread acceptance by both patients and nurses because of their comfort and compact size, but their track record for efficacy is poor. Inferior vena cava filters prevent pulmonary embolism, but do not halt the thrombotic process or prevent venous thrombosis. Pharmacologic prophylaxis traditionally has relied upon minidose unfractionated heparin; however, re-examination is warranted in the face of increasingly ill and complex patients. My opinion is that small, fixed doses of once-daily low molecular weight heparin will eventually replace minidose unfractionated heparin as the standard pharmacologic prophylaxis regimen for most surgical and medical patients. Prolongation of prophylaxis after hospital discharge should receive increased emphasis. Most patients being transferred to a skilled nursing facility should receive venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. Similarly, most patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement should receive prolonged preventive regimens, with at least 1 month of anticoagulation. Despite advances, certain aspects of venous thrombosis prophylaxis remain problematic. First, a surprisingly high number of hospitalized patients develop venous thrombosis because of failed (rather than omitted) prophylaxis. Second, many patients in intensive care have a combination of peripheral vascular disease and active bleeding (usually gastrointestinal) that precludes mechanical or pharmacologic prophylaxis. Third, neurosurgical patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumors suffer a high rate of venous thrombosis and major pulmonary embolism despite the routine use of combined mechanical and pharmacologic prophylaxis. My opinion is that these three areas, in addition to the hospital culture of prophylaxis, should receive

  15. Intracerebral Hemorrhage After Transcatheter Thrombolysis of Non-Occluding Superior Mesenteric Artery Thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumori, Tetsuya; Katoh, Kazuharu; Takase, Keisuke; Nishiue, Takashi; Tani, Naoki; Shirato, Mitsuru; Hino, Akihiko; Fujimoto, Masato; Maeda, Tomoho

    1998-01-01

    We performed transcatheter thrombolysis on a 64-year-old man with non-occluding superior mesenteric artery (SMA) thrombosis because his severe symptoms could not be controlled with medication. An enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan revealed intramural thrombosis in the SMA. We were concerned that the narrowing of the SMA lumen might progress to complete occlusion, resulting in a high likelihood of mortality. After dissolution of the SMA thrombosis, the original symptoms almost completely disappeared. However, intracranial hemorrhage occurred 8 hr after thrombolysis, requiring surgical intervention. Transcatheter thrombolysis is thought to be a useful treatment for SMA thrombosis, especially in elderly patients with a high operative risk; however, the possibility of intracerebral hemorrhage must be taken into consideration

  16. Device Thrombosis During Destination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Rohan; Rajapreyar, Indranee; Jaiswal, Abhishek; Payne, Brian; Cassidy, Mark; Weaver, Michael; Le Jemtel, Thierry H

    2016-05-01

    Device thrombosis remains a complication of long-term mechanical circulatory support with HeartMate II. Retrospective analysis of patients who underwent destination therapy (DT) with HeartMate II from January 2010-December 2013 at Tulane University Medical Center. Eighteen HeartMate II were implanted for DT. Survival rates were 72.2% at 1 year and 37% at 2 years. Device thrombosis in 7 of the 18 patients (39%) accounted for the low survival rate at 2 years. Known risk factors for device thrombosis were equally present in patients with and without device thrombosis. In contrast to patients without device thrombosis, all patients with device thrombosis had a pre-existing systemic inflammatory condition. Patients with pre-existing systemic inflammatory conditions are at risk of device thrombosis during DT. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  18. Life-threatening Cerebral Venous Thrombosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Agustin Godoy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT can compromise dural sinus, cerebral veins or both. It is an uncommon condition and it is more prevalent in young women. Several prothrombotic states are the principal predisposing factors. Clinical spectrum of presentation is wide, so this entity requires a high suspect index for correct and prompt diagnosis. CVT may develop serious complications that can be life-threatening such as hemorrhagic venous infarctions, cerebral edema, and intracranial hypertension. This report describes the case of a woman who was in treatment for unspecific vaginal bleeding with oral contraceptives. Suddenly she deteriorated to coma with severe respiratory compromise. Neuroimaging showed thrombosis of multiple venous sinus. Physiological neuroprotection, osmotherapy, mechanical ventilation and anticoagulation therapy were the keystones of treatment. In a few months, the patient has recovered a good functional status, while maintaining a motor deficit on the right hand.

  19. Sudden Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss Secondary to Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad-Nu’aim Ishak

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL is an important otological emergency. Up to 90% of the cases are idiopathic. Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is an extremely rare identifiable cause as it only represents 0.5% of all strokes.   Case Report: In this paper, an unusual case of bilateral SSNHL secondary to bilateral CVT with rapid and complete recovery is reported. The patient presented with sudden bilateral hearing loss associated with some neurological symptoms. Initial computed tomography (CT venography revealed a CVT of bilateral transverse sinuses. The patient was started on an anticoagulant and imaging was repeated after five days, revealing the absence of the thrombosis. Serial pure tone audiometry (PTA showed complete recovery of bilateral hearing within 10 days.   Conclusion: Early detection and intervention may fasten hearing recovery and improve the quality of life. The immediate restoration of venous blood flow and intracranial pressure may lead to the complete recovery of bilateral hearing loss.

  20. Intracranial Infectious Aneurysm in Orbital Cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brian; Kim, Charles; Carrasco, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Infectious intracranial aneurysm and cavernous sinus thrombosis are rare complications of orbital cellulitis. We report the case of a 46-year-old male presenting with sinusitis and orbital cellulitis complicated by the development of an orbital mass. Following orbitotomy with debulking, the patient underwent bony orbital decompression for increasing proptosis postoperatively. While his exam stabilized, the patient developed complete ptosis and extraocular motor palsy in the contralateral eye after undergoing bilateral sinus debridement. Imaging was notable for the presence of a pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery, which was treated with a stent. This report demonstrates rare complications of orbital cellulitis. These patients should be monitored carefully with noninvasive imaging studies, such as cerebral angiography, for early detection of vascular abnormalities that can progress rapidly.

  1. Flow Conditions in the Intracranial Aneurysm Lumen Are Associated with Inflammation and Degenerative Changes of the Aneurysm Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebral, J; Ollikainen, E; Chung, B J; Mut, F; Sippola, V; Jahromi, B R; Tulamo, R; Hernesniemi, J; Niemelä, M; Robertson, A; Frösen, J

    2017-01-01

    Saccular intracranial aneurysm is a common disease that may cause devastating intracranial hemorrhage. Hemodynamics, wall remodeling, and wall inflammation have been associated with saccular intracranial aneurysm rupture. We investigated how saccular intracranial aneurysm hemodynamics is associated with wall remodeling and inflammation of the saccular intracranial aneurysm wall. Tissue samples resected during a saccular intracranial aneurysm operation (11 unruptured, 9 ruptured) were studied with histology and immunohistochemistry. Patient-specific computational models of hemodynamics were created from preoperative CT angiographies. More stable and less complex flows were associated with thick, hyperplastic saccular intracranial aneurysm walls, while slower flows with more diffuse inflow were associated with degenerated and decellularized saccular intracranial aneurysm walls. Wall degeneration (P = .041) and rupture were associated with increased inflammation (CD45+, P = .031). High wall shear stress (P = .018), higher vorticity (P = .046), higher viscous dissipation (P = .046), and high shear rate (P = .046) were associated with increased inflammation. Inflammation was also associated with lack of an intact endothelium (P = .034) and the presence of organized luminal thrombosis (P = .018), though overall organized thrombosis was associated with low minimum wall shear stress (P = .034) and not with the flow conditions associated with inflammation. Flow conditions in the saccular intracranial aneurysm are associated with wall remodeling. Inflammation, which is associated with degenerative wall remodeling and rupture, is related to high flow activity, including elevated wall shear stress. Endothelial injury may be a mechanism by which flow induces inflammation in the saccular intracranial aneurysm wall. Hemodynamic simulations might prove useful in identifying saccular intracranial aneurysms at risk of developing inflammation, a potential biomarker for rupture.

  2. Portal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Yogesh K; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion.

  3. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Yogesh K.; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion. PMID:25941431

  4. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have little effect on headaches caused by intracranial hypertension, they may temporarily affect the intensity of a ... study in which 26 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) were treated with octreotide, a synthetic hormone ...

  5. Red blood cells in thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, James R; Wolberg, Alisa S

    2017-10-19

    Red blood cells (RBCs) have historically been considered passive bystanders in thrombosis. However, clinical and epidemiological studies have associated quantitative and qualitative abnormalities in RBCs, including altered hematocrit, sickle cell disease, thalassemia, hemolytic anemias, and malaria, with both arterial and venous thrombosis. A growing body of mechanistic studies suggests that RBCs can promote thrombus formation and enhance thrombus stability. These findings suggest that RBCs may contribute to thrombosis pathophysiology and reveal potential strategies for therapeutically targeting RBCs to reduce thrombosis. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The aims of this article are to characterize the headache in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and to field-test the ICHD diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to IIH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We included 44 patients with new-onset IIH. Thirty-four patients with suspected but u...... tinnitus may suggest intracranial hypertension. Based on data from a well-defined IIH cohort, we propose a revision of the ICDH-3 beta diagnostic criteria with improved clinical applicability and increased sensitivity and specificity....

  7. Recurrent cerebral thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Abe, Shin-e; Kubo, Hideki; Hanyu, Haruo; Takasaki, Masaru

    1992-01-01

    Neuroradiological techniques were used to elucidate pathophysiology of recurrent cerebral thrombosis. Twenty-two patients with cerebral thrombosis who suffered a second attack under stable conditions more than 22 days after the initial stroke were studied. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia were also seen in 20, 8, and 12 patients, respectively. The patients were divided into three groups according to their symptoms: (I) symptoms differed between the first and second strokes (n=12); (II) initial symptoms were suddenly deteriorated (n=6); and (III) symptoms occurring in groups I and II were seen (n=4). In group I, contralateral hemiparesis or suprabulbar palsy was often associated with the initial hemiparesis. The time of recurrent stroke varied from 4 months to 9 years. CT and MRI showed not only lacunae in both hemispheres, but also deep white-matter ischemia of the centrum semi-ovale. In group II, hemiparesis or visual field defect was deteriorated early after the initial stroke. In addition, neuroimaging revealed that infarction in the posterior cerebral artery was progressed on the contralateral side, or that white matter lesion in the middle artery was enlarged in spite of small lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere. All patients in group III had deterioration of right hemiparesis associated with aphasia. CT, MRI, SPECT, and angiography indicated deep white-matter ischemia caused by main trunk lesions in the left hemisphere. Group III seemed to be equivalent to group II, except for laterality of the lesion. Neuroradiological assessment of the initial stroke may help to predict the mode of recurrence, although pathophysiology of cerebral thrombosis is complicated and varies from patient to patient. (N.K.)

  8. Numerical simulations of thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar G Ramunigari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mathematical approaches for biological events have gained significant importance in development of biomedical research. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT is caused by blood clot in veins deeply rooted in the body, resulting in loss of blood, pain, and numbness of the body part associated with that vein. This situation can get complicated and can be fatal, when the blood clot travels to other parts of the body which may result in pulmonary embolism (PE. PE causes approximately 300,000 deaths annually in the United States alone. Materials and Methods: We are trying to propose a computational approach for understanding venous thrombosis using the theory of fluid mechanics. In our study, we are trying to establish a computational model that mimics the venous blood flow containing unidirectional venous valves and will be depicting the blood flow in the veins. We analyzed the flow patterns in veins, which are included with lump like substances. This lump like substances can be clots, tissue debris, collagen or even cholesterol. Our study will facilitate better understanding of the biophysical process in case of thrombosis. Results: The predicted model analyzes the consequences that occur due to the clot formations in veins. Knowledge of Navier-Stokes equations in fluid dynamics along with the computational model of a complex biological system would help in diagnosis of the problem at much faster rate of time. Valves of the deep veins are damaged as a result of DVT, with no valves to prevent deep system reflux, the hydrostatic venous pressure in the lower extremity increases dramatically. Conclusion: Our model is used to determine the effects of an interrupted blood flow as a result of thrombin formation, which might result in disturbed systemic circulation. Our results indicated a positive inverse correlation exists between clots and the flow velocity. This would support medical practitioners to recommend faster curing measures.

  9. Inflammation, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Maat, M.P.M.; Bladbjerg, E.M.; Drivsholm, T.

    2003-01-01

    of inflammatory and hemostatic markers and the severity of atherosclerosis is not yet well studied. We have evaluated 325 men and 370 women of 60 years, participating in the Danish Glostrup study. We diagnosed atherosclerosis by ultrasonographic measurement of intima-media thickness (IMT) of the right carotid...... CRP and the other hemostatic variables and the number of plaques. Genetic variation in the t-PA and MTHFR gene was associated with IMT. In conclusion, in the Glostrup population study, thrombosis and inflammation are associated with the severity of atherosclerosis, as reflected by IMT and plaque...

  10. Cerebral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, A; Bousser, M G

    1992-02-01

    Neuroimagining facilities allow early recognition of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), which now appears far more common than previously assumed. The diagnosis remains difficult because of a wide spectrum of clinical presentation and a highly variable mode of onset. Numerous conditions (presently mostly noninfectious) can cause or predispose to CVT, which therefore requires an extensive etiologic work-up. The functional and vital prognosis is much better than classically thought with, in noninfectious CVT, a fatality rate of less than 10% and a complete recovery in over 70%. Although spontaneous recovery is possible, the efficacy of heparin is now well established.

  11. Intracranial pressure after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoerle, Tommaso; Lombardo, Alessandra; Colombo, Angelo; Longhi, Luca; Zanier, Elisa R; Rampini, Paolo; Stocchetti, Nino

    2015-01-01

    To describe mean intracranial pressure after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, to identify clinical factors associated with increased mean intracranial pressure, and to explore the relationship between mean intracranial pressure and outcome. Analysis of a prospectively collected observational database. Neuroscience ICU of an academic hospital. One hundred sixteen patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracranial pressure monitoring. None. Episodes of intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg lasting at least 5 minutes and the mean intracranial pressure for every 12-hour interval were analyzed. The highest mean intracranial pressure was analyzed in relation to demographic characteristics, acute neurologic status, initial radiological findings, aneurysm treatment, clinical vasospasm, and ischemic lesion. Mortality and 6-month outcome (evaluated using a dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale) were also introduced in multivariable logistic models. Eighty-one percent of patients had at least one episode of high intracranial pressure and 36% had a highest mean intracranial pressure more than 20 mm Hg. The number of patients with high intracranial pressure peaked 3 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage and declined after day 7. Highest mean intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg was significantly associated with initial neurologic status, aneurysmal rebleeding, amount of blood on CT scan, and ischemic lesion within 72 hours from subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patients with highest mean intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg had significantly higher mortality. When death, vegetative state, and severe disability at 6 months were pooled, however, intracranial pressure was not an independent predictor of unfavorable outcome. High intracranial pressure is a common complication in the first week after subarachnoid hemorrhage in severe cases admitted to ICU. Mean intracranial pressure is associated with the severity of early brain injury and with mortality.

  12. Presentation and management of lateral sinus thrombosis following posterior fossa surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apra, Caroline; Kotbi, Owais; Turc, Guillaume; Corns, Robert; Pagès, Mélanie; Souillard-Scémama, Raphaëlle; Dezamis, Edouard; Parraga, Eduardo; Meder, Jean-François; Sauvageon, Xavier; Devaux, Bertrand; Oppenheim, Catherine; Pallud, Johan

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE There are no guidelines for the management of postoperative lateral sinus thrombosis following posterior fossa surgery. Introducing treatment-dose anticoagulant therapy during the immediate postoperative period increases the risk of intracranial bleeding. This study assessed the incidence of and risk factors associated with postoperative lateral sinus thrombosis and the complications related to thrombosis and/or anticoagulation. METHODS This study was a retrospective monocentric analysis of adult patients who underwent surgical removal of a posterior fossa space-occupying lesion with available postoperative imaging. Postoperative lateral sinus thrombosis was defined as a T2 * hypointensity within the venous sinus and/or a filling defect on postcontrast MRI or CT scan. RESULTS Among 180 patients, 12 (6.7%; 95% CI 3.0-10.4) were found to have lateral sinus thrombosis on postoperative imaging, none of whom were symptomatic. Unadjusted risk factors for postoperative lateral sinus thrombosis were a history of deep venous thrombosis (p = 0.016), oral contraceptive pill (p = 0.004), midline surgical approach (p = 0.035), and surgical exposure of the sinus (p < 0.001). Seven of the patients (58.3%) with a postoperative lateral sinus thrombosis received immediate treatment-dose anticoagulant therapy. Lateral sinus recanalization occurred radiologically at a mean time of 272 ± 23 days in 85.7% of patients (6 of 7) undergoing treatment-dose anticoagulant therapy and in 20% of patients (1 of 5) not receiving treatment-dose anticoagulant therapy. Postoperative complications occurred in 56.2% of patients (9 of 16) who received treatment-dose curative anticoagulant therapy and in 27% of patients (45 of 164) who did not. CONCLUSIONS Incidental radiological lateral sinus thrombosis following posterior fossa surgery has an incidence of 6.7%. To further define the benefit-to-risk ratio of a treatment-dose anticoagulant therapy, a prospective trial should be considered.

  13. Raised intracranial pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is article presents an approach to raised intracranial pressure (ICP) constructed in a question-answer fashion. ..... Given that raised ICP is a serious and potentially life-threatening emergency, fast and reliable referral and transfer mechanisms should be established to ensure patients with this condition are effectively treated.

  14. Intracranial atherosclerosis following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, M.H.; Burger, P.C.; Heinz, E.R.; Friedman, A.H.; Halperin, E.C.; Schold, S.C. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a case of severe intracranial atherosclerosis in a young man who had received therapeutic radiation for a presumed brain neoplasm. Since there was no evidence of vascular disease outside the radiation ports, we speculate that accelerated atherosclerosis was induced by radiation and that hyperlipidemia may have predisposed him to this effect

  15. Intracranial artery dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema, T.; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Eshghi, O.; De Keyser, J.; Brouns, R.; van Dijk, J.M.C.; Luijckx, G. J.

    The aim of this narrative review is to evaluate the pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of intracranial artery dissection (IAD). IAD is a rare and often unrecognized cause of stroke or subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), especially in young adults. Two types of IAD can be

  16. Intracranial tuberculoma: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, P.; Zenteno, M.A.; Rodriguez-Carbajal, J.; Brutto, O.H. del; Talamas, O.

    1989-01-01

    MR studies of 6 patients with intracranial tuberculoma are reviewed. All patients also underwent CT scans which showed hypo- or isodense lesions with abnormal enhancement following contrast administration. MR showed lesions with prolongation of the T1 relaxation time in every case. On the T2-weighted sequences, the signal properties of the tuberculoma varied according to the stage of evolution of the lesion. Incipient tuberculomas appeared as scattered areas of hypointensity surrounded by edema. Mature tuberculomas were composed of a dark necrotic center surrounded by an isointense capsule which was, in turn, surrounded by edema. In one patient, the center of the lesion was hyperintense probably because of liquefaction and pus formation (tuberculous abscess). While both, CT and MR, were equally sensitive in visualizing the intracranial tuberculoma in every patient, MR was slightly superior in demonstrating the extent of the lesion, especially for brainstem tuberculomas. Nevertheless, the potential role for MR diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma is limited by the fact that other infectious or neoplasic diseases may present similar findings. The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma should rest on a proper integration of data from clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and neuroimaging studies. (orig.)

  17. Intracranial tuberculoma: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, P.; Zenteno, M.A.; Rodriguez-Carbajal, J.; Brutto, O.H. del; Talamas, O.

    1989-09-01

    MR studies of 6 patients with intracranial tuberculoma are reviewed. All patients also underwent CT scans which showed hypo- or isodense lesions with abnormal enhancement following contrast administration. MR showed lesions with prolongation of the T1 relaxation time in every case. On the T2-weighted sequences, the signal properties of the tuberculoma varied according to the stage of evolution of the lesion. Incipient tuberculomas appeared as scattered areas of hypointensity surrounded by edema. Mature tuberculomas were composed of a dark necrotic center surrounded by an isointense capsule which was, in turn, surrounded by edema. In one patient, the center of the lesion was hyperintense probably because of liquefaction and pus formation (tuberculous abscess). While both, CT and MR, were equally sensitive in visualizing the intracranial tuberculoma in every patient, MR was slightly superior in demonstrating the extent of the lesion, especially for brainstem tuberculomas. Nevertheless, the potential role for MR diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma is limited by the fact that other infectious or neoplasic diseases may present similar findings. The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma should rest on a proper integration of data from clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and neuroimaging studies. (orig.).

  18. Superficial vein thrombosis and deep vein thrombosis – a comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Krasiński, Zbigniew; Aniukiewicz, Krzysztof; Krasińska, Aleksandra; Krasińska, Beata; Gabriel, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Although superficial vein thrombosis is commonly considered a rather minor condition, a number of studies indicate that its consequences can be much more severe. Since the introduction of Doppler ultrasonography to common diagnosis of venous diseases, the approach to threats associated with superficial vein thrombosis has changed, mainly in the context of venous thromboembolism. Superficial thrombosis in varicose veins must be differentiated from that occurring in patients without...

  19. Cerebral venous thrombosis: Update on clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leys Didier

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT has a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that may mimic many other neurological disorders and lead to misdiagnoses. Headache is the most common symptom and may be associated with other symptoms or remain isolated. The other frequent manifestations are focal neurological deficits and diffuse encephalopathies with seizures. The key to the diagnosis is the imaging of the occluded vessel or of the intravascular thrombus, by a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance venography (MRV. Causes and risk factors include medical, surgical and obstetrical causes of deep vein thrombosis, genetic and acquired prothrombotic disorders, cancer and hematological disorders, inflammatory systemic disorders, pregnancy and puerperium, infections and local causes such as tumors, arteriovenous malformations, trauma, central nervous system infections and local infections. The breakdown of causes differs in different parts of the world. A meta-analysis of the most recent prospectively collected series showed an overall 15% case-fatality or dependency rate. Heparin therapy is the standard therapy at the acute stage, followed by 3-6 months of oral anticoagulation. Patients with isolated intracranial hypertension may require a lumbar puncture to remove cerebrospinal fluid before starting heparin when they develop a papilloedema that may threaten the visual acuity or decompressive hemicraniectomy. Patients who develop seizures should receive antiepileptic drugs. Cerebral venous thrombosis - even pregnancy-related - should not contraindicate future pregnancies. The efficacy and safety of local thrombolysis and decompressive hemicraniectomy should be tested

  20. Thrombosis in Inherited Fibrinogen Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Wolfgang; Poon, Man-Chiu; Iorio, Alfonso; Makris, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Although inherited fibrinogen disorders (IFD) are primarily considered to be bleeding disorders, they are associated with a higher thrombotic complication risk than defects in other clotting factors. Managing IFD patients with thrombosis is challenging as anticoagulant treatment may exacerbate the underlying bleeding risk which can be life-threatening. Due to the low prevalence of IFD, there is little information on pathophysiology or optimal treatment of thrombosis in these patients. We searched the literature for cases of thrombosis among IFD patients and identified a total of 128 patient reports. In approximately half of the cases, thromboses were spontaneous, while in the others trauma, surgery, and parturition contributed to the risk. The true mechanism(s) of thrombosis in IFD patients remain to be elucidated. A variety of anticoagulant treatments have been used in the treatment or prevention of thrombosis, sometimes with concurrent fibrinogen replacement therapy. There is no definite evidence that fibrinogen supplementation increases the risk of thrombosis, and it may potentially be effective in the treatment and prevention of both thrombosis and hemorrhage in IFD patients. PMID:28503122

  1. Epidemiology of recurrent venous thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, D.D.; Lijfering, W.M.; Barreto, S.M.; Rosendaal, F.R.; Rezende, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Venous thrombosis, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a common disease that frequently recurs. Recurrence can be prevented by anticoagulants, but this comes at the risk of bleeding. Therefore, assessment of the risk of recurrence is important to balance the risks and benefits of anticoagulant treatment. This review briefly outlines what is currently known about the epidemiology of recurrent venous thrombosis, and focuses in more detail on potential new risk factors for venous recurrence. The general implications of these findings in patient management are discussed. PMID:22183247

  2. Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is the most common proximate mechanism of ischemic stroke worldwide. Approximately half of those affected are Asians. For diagnosis of ICAD, intra-arterial angiography is the gold standard to identify extent of stenosis. However, noninvasive techniques including transcranial ultrasound and MRA are now emerging as reliable modalities to exclude moderate to severe (50%–99% stenosis. Little is known about measures for primary prevention of the disease. In terms of secondary prevention of stroke due to intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis, aspirin continues to be the preferred antiplatelet agent although clopidogrel along with aspirin has shown promise in the acute phase. Among Asians, cilostazol has shown a favorable effect on symptomatic stenosis and is of benefit in terms of fewer bleeds. Moreover, aggressive risk factor management alone and in combination with dual antiplatelets been shown to be most effective in this group of patients. Interventional trials on intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis have so far only been carried out among Caucasians and have not yielded consistent results. Since the Asian population is known to be preferentially effected, focused trials need to be performed to establish treatment modalities that are most effective in this population.

  3. Deep Cerebral Vein Thrombosis: A Clinical Masquerader

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Prabhat; Sasmal, Gargi; Mahto, Subodh Kumar; Gupta, Shreya; Gupta, Harish

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral Vein Thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke. Thrombosis can occur in superficial veins, deep venous system or cortical veins of brain. The term Deep Cerebral Vein Thrombosis (DCVT) is used for thrombosis of internal cerebral vein, vein of Galen and basal vein of Rosenthal. Only 10% cases of CVT are because of thrombosis of deep cerebral vein. The diagnosis of DCVT is often missed because of its heterogenous presentation. Herein, we present a case of DCVT which was initially ...

  4. Intracranial chondroma: a rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Veena; Mehdi, Ghazala; Varshney, Manoranjan; Jain, Anshu; Vashishtha, Sonal; Gaur, Kavita; Srivastava, Vinod Kumar

    2011-05-12

    Intracranial chondroma is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour with an incidence of less than 1% of all primary intracranial tumours. The authors are reporting here a case of intracranial chondroma in a 40-year-old man who presented with 5-month history of headache and gradual diminution of vision. A tentative diagnosis of chondroma was made on imprint cytology which was confirmed on histopathological examination.

  5. Thrombosis and platelets: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koupenova, Milka; Kehrel, Beate E; Corkrey, Heather A; Freedman, Jane E

    2017-03-14

    Haemostasis and thrombosis are complex, multifactorial processes. There is an evolving understanding of the mechanisms influencing vascular occlusion and the role of inflammation and immunity. Despite major advances in elucidating the mechanistic pathways mediating platelet function and thrombosis, challenges in the treatment of vascular occlusive diseases persist. Pharmacological advances have greatly affected thrombotic outcomes, but this has led to the unwanted side effect of bleeding. Detailed assessment of the impact of non-thrombotic diseases on haemostasis and thrombosis is necessary to better evaluate thrombotic risk and establish optimal treatment. This review will focus on recent advances in understanding the contribution of evolving risk factors to thrombosis. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Combined oral contraceptives: venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bastos, Marcos; Stegeman, Bernardine H; Rosendaal, Frits R; Van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; Helmerhorst, Frans M; Stijnen, Theo; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2014-03-03

    Combined oral contraceptive (COC) use has been associated with venous thrombosis (VT) (i.e., deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism). The VT risk has been evaluated for many estrogen doses and progestagen types contained in COC but no comprehensive comparison involving commonly used COC is available. To provide a comprehensive overview of the risk of venous thrombosis in women using different combined oral contraceptives. Electronic databases (Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier and ScienceDirect) were searched in 22 April 2013 for eligible studies, without language restrictions. We selected studies including healthy women taking COC with VT as outcome. The primary outcome of interest was a fatal or non-fatal first event of venous thrombosis with the main focus on deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Publications with at least 10 events in total were eligible. The network meta-analysis was performed using an extension of frequentist random effects models for mixed multiple treatment comparisons. Unadjusted relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were reported.Two independent reviewers extracted data from selected studies. 3110 publications were retrieved through a search strategy; 25 publications reporting on 26 studies were included. Incidence of venous thrombosis in non-users from two included cohorts was 0.19 and 0.37 per 1 000 person years, in line with previously reported incidences of 0,16 per 1 000 person years. Use of combined oral contraceptives increased the risk of venous thrombosis compared with non-use (relative risk 3.5, 95% confidence interval 2.9 to 4.3). The relative risk of venous thrombosis for combined oral contraceptives with 30-35 μg ethinylestradiol and gestodene, desogestrel, cyproterone acetate, or drospirenone were similar and about 50-80% higher than for combined oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel. A dose related effect of ethinylestradiol was observed for gestodene

  7. Imaging of Intracranial Pressure Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, John; Saindane, Amit M

    2017-03-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the pressure inside the bony calvarium and can be affected by a variety of processes, such as intracranial masses and edema, obstruction or leakage of cerebrospinal fluid, and obstruction of venous outflow. This review focuses on the imaging of 2 important but less well understood ICP disorders: idiopathic intracranial hypertension and spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Both of these ICP disorders have salient imaging findings that are important to recognize to help prevent their misdiagnosis from other common neurological disorders. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  8. [Management of superficial vein thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frappé, Paul; Bertoletti, Laurent; Moulin, Nathalie; Décousus, Hervé

    2015-02-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have highlighted the potential severity of superficial vein thrombosis of the lower limbs (SVT). Diagnosis is based on clinical and Doppler ultrasonography evaluation, and define its therapeutic management. If SVT is associated with objectively confirmed deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, curative anticoagulation is indicated. If SVT is isolated and measured over 5 cm long, prophylactic dosage of fondaparinux may be provided for 45 days.

  9. Benign intracranial hypertension associated to blood coagulation derangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niglio Alferio

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benign Intracranial Hypertension (BIH may be caused, at least in part, by intracranial sinus thrombosis. Thrombosis is normally due to derangements in blood coagulation cascade which may predispose to abnormal clotting activation or deficiency in natural inhibitors' control. The aim of the study is to examine the strength of the association between risk factors for thrombosis and BIH. Patients and methods The incidence of prothrombotic abnormalities among a randomly investigated cohort of 17 patients with BIH, was compared with 51 healthy subjects matched for sex, age, body mass index, height and social background. Results The number of subjects with protein C deficiency was significantly higher in patients than in controls (3 vs 1, p Increased plasma levels of prothrombin fragment 1+2, fibrinopeptide A (FPA, and PAI-1 were demonstrated in patients group (5.7 ± 1.15 nM vs 0.45 ± 0.35 nM; 8.7 ± 2.5 ng/mL vs 2.2 ± 1.25 ng/mL; 45.7 ± 12.5 ng/mL vs 8.5 ± 6.7 ng/mL, respectively; p Discussion In agreement with other authors our data suggest a state of hypercoagulability in BIH associated with gene polymorphisms. Our findings also showed that mutations in cardiovascular genes significantly discriminate subjects with a BIH history. The association between coagulation and gene derangements, usually regarded to as cryptogenic, may suggest a possible pathogenetic mechanism in BIH. So, a prothrombotic tendency may exist that would, at least in part, explain some cases of BIH. Although based on a small population, these findings raise the exciting possibility of using these haemostatic factors as markers for selecting high-risk subjects in BIH disease.

  10. INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Widiyanthi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Intracranial pressure is total of pressure that is produced by brain, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid/CSF in the tight cranial space. As a respon to intracranial pressure increasing, compensation begin by movement of CSF from ventricle to cerebral subarachnoidal space, and increase the absorption of CSF. Increasing of ICP usually caused by increasing of brain volume (cerebral oedem, blood (intracranial bleeding, space occupying lesion, or CSF (hidrocephalus. Indication in ICP monitoring can be seen from : neurological criteria, abnormal CT-scan result when admission, normal CT-scan result, but had more two risk factors. According to the procedure that must be done, there are two methods in ICP monitoring: invasive ICP monitoring methodes and non-invasive measuring method. Increasing of ICP will decrease the compliance of brain, pulsation of artery more clearly, and the component of vein is lost. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  11. Sinogenic intracranial complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Mikkel Seremet; Fisker, Niels; Christensen, Anne Estmann

    2018-01-01

    We present two 11-year-old girls with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis, treated with adalimumab. Both developed severe intracranial complications to sinusitis. Patient 1 had been treated with adalimumab for 15 months when she developed acute sinusitis complicated by an orbital abscess...... and subcortical abscesses in combination with sinusitis. She was treated with endoscopic sinus surgery and intravenous antibiotics. Both patients had developed psoriasis and episodes of infection during treatment. They were non-septic and had low fever on presentation. None of the patients suffered any long...

  12. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raboel, P H; Bartek, J; Andresen, M

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) has been used for decades in the fields of neurosurgery and neurology. There are multiple techniques: invasive as well as noninvasive. This paper aims to provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the most common and well-known methods...... standard in terms of accurate measurement of pressure, although microtransducers generally are just as accurate. Both invasive techniques are associated with a minor risk of complications such as hemorrhage and infection. Furthermore, zero drift is a problem with selected microtransducers. The non...

  13. Intracranial Hemorrhage in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshan B. Hameed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A pregnant woman with a mechanical prosthetic mitral valve was anticoagulated with low-molecular-weight heparin in the first trimester followed by warfarin until 36 weeks' gestation. She was then switched to intravenous unfractionated heparin infusion to allow for regional anesthesia in anticipation of vaginal delivery. She developed severe headache on hospital day 2 that was refractory to pain medications. Cranial imaging demonstrated a large subdural hematoma with midline shift. She delivered a healthy baby girl by cesarean section. Eventually, symptoms and intracranial abnormalities resolved over time. In conclusion, subdural hematoma is a relatively rare complication that requires multidisciplinary management plan.

  14. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in children: Diagnostic and management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albakr, Abdulrahman; Hamad, Muddathir H; Alwadei, Ali H; Bashiri, Fahad A; Hassan, Hamdy H; Idris, Hiyam; Hassan, Saeed; Muayqil, Taim; Altweijri, Ikhlass; Salih, Mustafa A

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare neurological disorder in children. It is characterized by raised intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of brain parenchymal lesion, vascular malformations, hydrocephalus, or central nervous system (CNS) infection. The diagnosis is usually confirmed by high opening pressure of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with exclusion of secondary causes of intracranial hypertension. If not treated properly, it may lead to severe visual dysfunction. Here we review the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic criteria and management of IIH in children through illustration of the clinical and radiological presentation of a 13-year-old overweight girl who presented with severe headache, diplopia and bilateral papilledema. Otherwise, she had unremarkable neurological and systemic examinations. Lumbar puncture showed a high CSF opening pressure (360-540 mmH2O). Her investigations showed normal complete blood count (CBC), normal renal, liver, and thyroid function tests. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood chemistry were unremarkable. Magnetic resonant image (MRI) of the brain demonstrated empty sella turcica, tortuous optic nerves, and flattening of the posterior sclera. Magnetic resonant venography (MRV) showed focal narrowing of the distal transverse sinuses and absence of venous sinus thrombosis. She required treatment with acetazolamide and prednisolone. With medical treatment, weight reduction, and exercise, our patient had a remarkable improvement in her symptoms with resolution of papilledema in two months. This review highlights the importance of early recognition and management of IIH to prevent permanent visual loss.

  15. Dural sinus thrombosis - A rare manifestation of internal jugular venous occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Binnani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dural sinus thrombosis is an uncommon complication of a commonly done procedure of central venous catheterisation. We present a case of massive hemorrhagic venous infarct with gross cerebral edema due to dural sinus thrombosis along with right internal jugular vein thrombus. A 21-year-old male patient presented to the emergency department with fever and swelling of the right neck four days following discharge after his prior hospitalization two weeks ago for acute renal failure due to severe gastroenteritis, when he underwent hemodialysis through right internal jugular access. On presentation, he was conscious, with swelling on right side of the neck, which was diagnosed as right internal jugular vein occlusion. However, he rapidly dete-riorated and developed signs of raised intracranial pressure despite being on treatment with heparin. He was diagnosed as having massive hemorrhagic cerebral venous infarct with gross cerebral edema complicated with shift of the ventricles to the left due to dural sinus thrombosis. Despite emergency decompressive craniotomy, he succumbed in the next two days due to coning. Asymptomatic catheter-related thrombosis is frequent in the intensive care units, but major complications like retrograde extension into dural sinus causing thrombosis is rare. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this major catastrophe for an early and meaningful intervention.

  16. Thrombosis and von Willebrand Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, Minoo

    2017-01-01

    One of the key players in both hemostasis and thrombosis is von Willebrand factor (vWF), which demonstrates a duality between these two processes. Thrombus is structured by numerous elements, including endothelial cells, platelets, plasma proteins and shear stress alteration. In circulation, once a vessel wall is injured, collagen is exposed and platelets attach to the site of injury. Accordingly, vWF mediates adherence of platelets to the damaged vessel wall by binding both to the collagen and platelet receptor. A growing body of data also indicates a role for neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in human thrombosis as scaffolds for vWF, promoting thrombosis. VWF also mediates the protection of factor VIII, a main cofactor of the intrinsic clotting pathway. Since vWF plays a critical role in both thrombotic and bleeding events, a decreased plasma level of this factor may point to a bleeding disorder, while an elevated plasma level may predict occurrence of thrombosis. Since thrombotic events are the foremost cause of death, inhibiting the vWF activity would be a novel prophylaxis to reduce these events. Though, accumulated data have made vWF a promising focus for research on cardiovascular diseases (CVD). This chapter, however, aims to clarify the role of vWF in thrombus formation and pathogenesis of thrombosis.

  17. Factors Associated with Bleeding and Thrombosis in Children Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Heidi J; Reeder, Ron; Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Holubkov, Richard; Berg, Robert A; Zuppa, Athena; Moler, Frank W; Shanley, Thomas; Pollack, Murray M; Newth, Christopher; Berger, John; Wessel, David; Carcillo, Joseph; Bell, Michael; Heidemann, Sabrina; Meert, Kathleen L; Harrison, Richard; Doctor, Allan; Tamburro, Robert F; Dean, J Michael; Jenkins, Tammara; Nicholson, Carol

    2017-09-15

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is used for respiratory and cardiac failure in children but is complicated by bleeding and thrombosis. (1) To measure the incidence of bleeding (blood loss requiring transfusion or intracranial hemorrhage) and thrombosis during ECMO support; (2) to identify factors associated with these complications; and (3) to determine the impact of these complications on patient outcome. This was a prospective, observational cohort study in pediatric, cardiac, and neonatal intensive care units in eight hospitals, carried out from December 2012 to September 2014. ECMO was used on 514 consecutive patients under age 19 years. Demographics, anticoagulation practices, severity of illness, circuitry components, bleeding, thrombotic events, and outcome were recorded. Survival was 54.9%. Bleeding occurred in 70.2%, including intracranial hemorrhage in 16%, and was independently associated with higher daily risk of mortality. Circuit component changes were required in 31.1%, and patient-related clots occurred in 12.8%. Laboratory sampling contributed to transfusion requirement in 56.6%, and was the sole reason for at least one transfusion in 42.2% of patients. Pump type was not associated with bleeding, thrombosis, hemolysis, or mortality. Hemolysis was predictive of subsequent thrombotic events. Neither hemolysis nor thrombotic events increased the risk of mortality. The incidences of bleeding and thrombosis are high during ECMO support. Laboratory sampling is a major contributor to transfusion during ECMO. Strategies to reduce the daily risk of bleeding and thrombosis, and different thresholds for transfusion, may be appropriate subjects of future trials to improve outcomes of children requiring this supportive therapy.

  18. Meningiomas among intracranial neoplasms in Johannesburg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Worldwide there are varying reports on the prevalence of meningiomas among intracranial neoplasms. Different reports state intracranial meningiomas, gliomas or metastatic tumours as the most common tumour among intracranial neoplasms. We present our institutions' experience of patients with intracranial ...

  19. Mesenteric vein thrombosis following laparoscopic appendectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Jamie Harris; Brian Blackwood; Srikumar Pillai; Bill Chiu

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis is an uncommon complication following laparoscopic surgery. A review of the literature has shown that there is a higher incidence of thrombosis following laparoscopic bariatric procedures, including the gastric sleeve procedure and roux-en-y gastric bypass surgery. Additionally, pylephlebitis, thrombosis of portal or mesenteric veins, has been described following perforated appendicitis. However no report has described mesenteric vein thrombosis following laparoscop...

  20. Genetic risk factors of venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franco, R. F.; Reitsma, P. H.

    2001-01-01

    Venous thrombosis, whose main clinical presentations include deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, represents a major health problem worldwide. Numerous conditions are known to predispose to venous thrombosis and these conditions are commonly referred to as risk indicators or risk factors.

  1. Venous and arterial thrombosis in dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocak, Gurbey; Vossen, Carla Y.; Rotmans, Joris I.; Lijfering, Willem M.; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Parlevliet, Karien J.; Krediet, Ray T.; Boeschoten, Els W.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Verduijn, Marion

    2011-01-01

    Whether the risk of both venous and arterial thrombosis is increased in dialysis patients as compared to the general population is unknown. In addition, it is unknown which subgroups are at highest risk. Furthermore, it is unknown whether having a history of venous thrombosis or arterial thrombosis

  2. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J.; Guillemin, F.; Proust, F.; Molyneux, A.J.; Fox, A.J.; Claiborne, J.S.; Meder, J.-F.; Rouleau, I.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The preventive treatment of unruptured aneur­ysms has been performed for decades despite the lack of evidence of a clinical benefit. Reports of observational studies such as the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) suggest that preventive treatments are rarely justified. Are these reports compelling enough to guide clinical practice? The ISUIA methods and data are reviewed and analysed in a more conventional manner. The design of the appropriate clinical research program is approached by steps, reviewing potential problems, from the formulation of the precise research question to the interpretation of subgroup analyses, including sample size, representativity, duration of observation period, blin­ding, definition of outcome events, analysis of cross-overs, losses to follow-up, and data reporting. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms observed in ISUIA ruptured at a minimal annual rate of 0.8% (0.5-1%), despite multiple methodological difficulties biased in favour of a benign natural history. Available registries do not have the power or the design capable of providing normative guidelines for clinical decisions. The appropriate method to solve the clinical dilemma is a multicentric trial comparing the incidence of a hard clinical outcome events in approximately 2000 patients randomly allocated to a treatment group and a deferred treatment group, all followed for ten years or more. Observational studies have failed to provide reliable evidence in favour or against the preventive treatment of unruptured aneurysms. A randomized trial is in order to clarify what is the role of prevention in this common clinical problem. PMID:20557790

  3. A novel intracranial enterprise stent together with colis for the treatment of very small intracranial wide-necked aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Haidong; Zhao Kai; Gu Jianwen; Qu Yan; Yang Tao; Xia Xun; Lin Long; Zhang Hui

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To make a preliminary investigation and summary of the technique and efficacy of the novel intracranial stent, Enterprise, together with hydro-detachable coils for the treatment of very small intracranial wide-necked aneurysms (diameter < 3 mm and body-to-neck ratio < 1.5). Methods: Six cases with very small intracranial wide-necked aneurysms were treated with Enterprise stents and hydrodetachable coils. In 5 cases the Enterprise stent was implanted to cover the neck of the aneurysm, which was followed by the introduction of a microcatheter into the aneurysmal sac through the stent mesh to stuff hydrodetachable coils in order to fill the aneurysmal sac. In the remaining case, the microcatheter was placed into the aneurysmal sac before the Enterprise stent was inserted to embolize the aneurysm. Postoperative follow-up was conducted for 3-6 months. Results: The operation was successfully completed in all 6 patients, with the implanted stents being in right place. The parent arteries remained patency in all patients. No complications occurred. Complete occlusion of aneurysmal cavity was obtained in four cases, and the occlusion degree of the aneurysmal cavity above 95% was seen in 2 cases. After the procedure, all the patients recovered well. Neither rebleeding nor symptoms related to thrombosis occurred during a clinic followup of 3-6 months. Conclusion: Endovascular embolization with Enterprise stent together with hydrodetachable coils is a safe and effective method for the treatment of very small intracranial wide-necked aneurysms.However, its long-term effect needs to be further observed. (authors)

  4. Dural Sinus (Cerebral Venous) Thrombosis in a Pediatric Trauma Patient: A Rare Complication After Closed Head Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcher, Jonathan; Pannell, Michelle

    2016-12-01

    Closed head injury rarely predisposes patients, particularly children, to the development of dural sinus thrombosis. In addition, most cases of sinus thrombosis are subacute in nature. The following is a case report of a precipitous course of dural sinus thrombosis after closed head injury in a pediatric trauma patient. A 14-year-old African American girl presented to the emergency department as a trauma activation. She was an unrestrained rear-seat passenger involved in a motor vehicle collision during which she was ejected. She experienced loss of consciousness and was found unresponsive at the scene. She was intubated and then transported via helicopter to the level I trauma center. Initial head computed tomography (CT) revealed no acute intracranial abnormality. The head CT was repeated 15 hours later when nursing noted the patient to be acutely hypertensive and tachycardic with an 8-mm nonreactive right pupil. The repeated CT showed interval development of extensive dural sinus thrombosis, cerebellar edema and infarct, as well as mild downward transtentorial herniation. Because of multiple coexistent injuries and complications, treatment of the dural sinus thrombosis was difficult. The hospital course was complicated and there was very little improvement in the patient's condition. The multisystem injured trauma patient poses many clinical challenges. Treatment of dural sinus thrombosis is difficult and controversial and requires an investigation into possible risk factors for a hypercoagulable state. Clinical outcomes vary from excellent to dismal.

  5. Hormonal contraception, thrombosis and age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This paper reviews the risk of thrombosis with use of different types of hormonal contraception in women of different ages. AREAS COVERED: Combined hormonal contraceptives with desogestrel, gestodene, drospirenone or cyproterone acetate (high-risk products) confer a sixfold increased...

  6. Cerebral and Sinus Vein Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thrombosis Stephan Moll , Beth Waldron Download PDF https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.113.008018 Circulation. 2014; 130: ... e68-e70 , originally published August 18, 2014 https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.113.008018 Citation Manager Formats ...

  7. Doping and thrombosis in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2011-11-01

    Historically, humans have long sought to enhance their "athletic" performance to increase body weight, aggressiveness, mental concentration and physical strength, contextually reducing fatigue, pain, and improving recovery. Although regular training is the mainstay for achieving these targets, the ancillary use of ergogenic aids has become commonplace in all sports. The demarcation between ergogenic aids and doping substances or practices is continuously challenging and mostly based on perceptions regarding the corruption of the fairness of competition and the potential side effects or adverse events arising from the use of otherwise unnecessary ergogenic substances. A kaleidoscope of side effects has been associated with the use of doping agents, including behavioral, skeletal, endocrinologic, metabolic, hemodynamic, and cardiovascular imbalances. Among the various doping substances, the most striking association with thrombotic complications has been reported for androgenic anabolic steroids (i.e., cardiomyopathy, fatal and nonfatal arrhythmias, myocardial infarction [MI], intracardiac thrombosis, stroke, venous thromboembolism [VTE], limb arterial thrombosis, branch retinal vein occlusion, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis) and blood boosting (i.e., VTE and MI, especially for epoetin and analogs). The potential thrombotic complication arising from misuse of other doping agents such as the administration of cortisol, growth hormone, prolactin, cocaine, and platelet-derived preparations is instead speculative or anecdotal at best. The present article provides an overview on the epidemiological association as well as the underlying biochemical and biological mechanisms linking the practice of doping in sports with the development of thrombosis. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  8. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... post pubescent teenagers, tends to fit the adult stereotype. How is pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension diagnosed? If ... Subscribe to AOJ Allied Health Resources for School Nurses About AAPOS Our Association Staff Contacts Medical Disclaimer ...

  9. Mesenteric vein thrombosis following laparoscopic appendectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Harris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mesenteric vein thrombosis is an uncommon complication following laparoscopic surgery. A review of the literature has shown that there is a higher incidence of thrombosis following laparoscopic bariatric procedures, including the gastric sleeve procedure and roux-en-y gastric bypass surgery. Additionally, pylephlebitis, thrombosis of portal or mesenteric veins, has been described following perforated appendicitis. However no report has described mesenteric vein thrombosis following laparoscopy for nonperforated appendicitis in the pediatric population. The cause of this thrombosis is hypothesized to be secondary to venous stasis secondary to insufflation during laparoscopy.

  10. Deep Cerebral Vein Thrombosis: A Clinical Masquerader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prabhat; Sasmal, Gargi; Mahto, Subodh Kumar; Gupta, Shreya; Gupta, Harish

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral Vein Thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke. Thrombosis can occur in superficial veins, deep venous system or cortical veins of brain. The term Deep Cerebral Vein Thrombosis (DCVT) is used for thrombosis of internal cerebral vein, vein of Galen and basal vein of Rosenthal. Only 10% cases of CVT are because of thrombosis of deep cerebral vein. The diagnosis of DCVT is often missed because of its heterogenous presentation. Herein, we present a case of DCVT which was initially treated as meningoencephalitis. A timely advised brain imaging helped in making the diagnosis and patient recovered completely after institution of anticoagulation.

  11. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype or a...... antibiotic treatment, signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure resolved completely. Syphilis is a rare, but very important, differential diagnosis that in this case was clinically indistinguishable from IIH....

  12. [Sinus pericranii associated to spontaneous thrombosis of the ophthalmic vein: neuroimaging studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murias, E; Villota, E; Saiz, A; Gil, A; Calleja, S

    2009-01-01

    Sinus pericranii is an abnormal venous communication between the intracranial dural sinuses and epicranial venous dilatations. The periorbital location is uncommon; spontaneous partial thromboses of the subcutaneous varices have been reported in association with local signs and symptoms; however, to our knowledge there are no reports of sinus pericranii associated to thrombosis in the ophthalmic vein. Sinus pericranii is related to arteriovenous and lymphatic-venous malformations. We present the case of a patient with a generalized and diffuse disorder of venous drainage that affected the right cerebral hemisphere who presented at the emergency department with ophthalmologic signs and symptoms after thrombosis of the superior ophthalmic vein and who had three sinus pericranii located in the frontal, parietal, and occipital areas.

  13. Contraceptives and cerebral thrombosis: a five-year national case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Kreiner, Svend

    2002-01-01

    Oral contraceptives; Cerebral thrombosis; Thrombotic stroke; Transitory cerebral ischemic attack; Thrombosis......Oral contraceptives; Cerebral thrombosis; Thrombotic stroke; Transitory cerebral ischemic attack; Thrombosis...

  14. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis complicated by subdural hematomas: Case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akins, Paul T; Axelrod, Yekaterina K; Ji, Cheng; Ciporen, Jeremy N; Arshad, Syed T; Hawk, Mark W; Guppy, Kern H

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) can cause elevated intracranial pressure, hemorrhagic venous infarct, and cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage. We present a case series and literature review to illustrate that CVST can also present with subdural hematoma (SDH). Chart review was completed on a retrospective case series of CVST with spontaneous SDH. We also conducted a literature search. Over a 6 year interval, three patients with CVST and SDH were admitted to the neurointensive care unit. A 38-year-old woman had both SDH and a hemorrhagic venous infarct associated with a transverse sinus thrombosis. She was managed conservatively with long-term anticoagulation. A 68-year-old woman presented with an acute SDH requiring craniotomy and a thrombosed cortical vein was noted intraoperatively. Computed tomography venography showed thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus. She had polycythemia vera with the V617 Jak2 gene mutation and was managed with aspirin and hydroxyurea. A 60-year-old male had recurrence of a spontaneous convexity SDH requiring reoperation. Neuroimaging identified ipsilateral transverse sinus thrombosis with retrograde flow into the opposite sinus. Manometry demonstrated elevated venous pressures and these normalized after thrombectomy. Angiography performed after endovascular treatment demonstrated a normal venous drainage pattern. There have been limited reports of SDH complicating CVST in the literature. This case series and literature review demonstrates that CVST can also present with spontaneous SDH with or without associated venous infarctions. Treatment must be individualized. This is the first published description of endovascular thrombectomy for recurrent symptomatic SDH due to CVST.

  15. Noncontrast computed tomographic Hounsfield unit evaluation of cerebral venous thrombosis: a quantitative evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besachio, David A. [University of Utah, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City (United States); United States Navy, Bethesda, MD (United States); Quigley, Edward P.; Shah, Lubdha M.; Salzman, Karen L. [University of Utah, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Our objective is to determine the utility of noncontrast Hounsfield unit values, Hounsfield unit values corrected for the patient's hematocrit, and venoarterial Hounsfield unit difference measurements in the identification of intracranial venous thrombosis on noncontrast head computed tomography. We retrospectively reviewed noncontrast head computed tomography exams performed in both normal patients and those with cerebral venous thrombosis, acquiring Hounsfield unit values in normal and thrombosed cerebral venous structures. Also, we acquired Hounsfield unit values in the internal carotid artery for comparison to thrombosed and nonthrombosed venous structures and compared the venous Hounsfield unit values to the patient's hematocrit. A significant difference is identified between Hounsfield unit values in thrombosed and nonthrombosed venous structures. Applying Hounsfield unit threshold values of greater than 65, a Hounsfield unit to hematocrit ratio of greater than 1.7, and venoarterial difference values greater than 15 alone and in combination, the majority of cases of venous thrombosis are identifiable on noncontrast head computed tomography. Absolute Hounsfield unit values, Hounsfield unit to hematocrit ratios, and venoarterial Hounsfield unit value differences are a useful adjunct in noncontrast head computed tomographic evaluation of cerebral venous thrombosis. (orig.)

  16. Noncontrast computed tomographic Hounsfield unit evaluation of cerebral venous thrombosis: a quantitative evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besachio, David A.; Quigley, Edward P.; Shah, Lubdha M.; Salzman, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective is to determine the utility of noncontrast Hounsfield unit values, Hounsfield unit values corrected for the patient's hematocrit, and venoarterial Hounsfield unit difference measurements in the identification of intracranial venous thrombosis on noncontrast head computed tomography. We retrospectively reviewed noncontrast head computed tomography exams performed in both normal patients and those with cerebral venous thrombosis, acquiring Hounsfield unit values in normal and thrombosed cerebral venous structures. Also, we acquired Hounsfield unit values in the internal carotid artery for comparison to thrombosed and nonthrombosed venous structures and compared the venous Hounsfield unit values to the patient's hematocrit. A significant difference is identified between Hounsfield unit values in thrombosed and nonthrombosed venous structures. Applying Hounsfield unit threshold values of greater than 65, a Hounsfield unit to hematocrit ratio of greater than 1.7, and venoarterial difference values greater than 15 alone and in combination, the majority of cases of venous thrombosis are identifiable on noncontrast head computed tomography. Absolute Hounsfield unit values, Hounsfield unit to hematocrit ratios, and venoarterial Hounsfield unit value differences are a useful adjunct in noncontrast head computed tomographic evaluation of cerebral venous thrombosis. (orig.)

  17. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  18. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José V. Manjón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden.

  19. Deep vein thrombosis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman-Brochu, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a review of the incidence, pathophysiology, and treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in pregnancy, a rare but serious complication of pregnancy. The incidence of DVT in pregnancy varies widely, but it is a leading cause of maternal morbidity in both the United States and the United Kingdom. Risk factors during pregnancy include prolonged bed rest or immobility, pelvic or leg trauma, and obesity. Additional risk factors are preeclampsia, Cesarean section, instrument-assisted delivery, hemorrhage, multiparity, varicose veins, a previous history of a thromboembolic event, and hereditary or acquired thrombophilias such as Factor V Leiden. Heparin is the anticoagulant of choice to treat active thromboembolic disease or to administer for thromboprophylaxis, but low molecular-weight heparin is being used with increasing frequency in the pregnant woman. Perinatal nurses should be aware of the symptoms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options available to manage active thrombosis during pregnancy and in the intrapartum and postpartum periods.

  20. Thrombosis and Hemostasis in Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Anne-Mette; Larsen, Julie Brogaard; Pasalic, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    .g., bleeding disorders, cancer, or developmental hemostatic changes in pediatric patients), to anticoagulant medication or complications such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), or to inherent risks of a particular surgical procedure or affected organ (e.g., hepatobiliary surgery or renal......The present issue of Seminars in Thrombosis & Hemostasis focuses on challenges related to hemostatic and thromboembolic complications in surgery or trauma. Multiple factors contribute to perioperative bleeding or thromboembolic risk. These factors might be related to the individual patient (e...

  1. Ultrasound thrombolysis in stent thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, T; Desmet, W; Piessens, J; Rosenschein, U

    2000-11-01

    Recent refinement in stent implantation technique and peri-procedural pharmacological treatment has lowered the incidence of stent thrombosis significantly. Still, all stent thromboses are associated with major adverse events. In previous studies it has been suggested that intravascular ultrasound fibrinolysis is safe and effective. In this report, ultrasound successfully reperfused thrombotically occluded stents. These observations suggest that ultrasound may dissolve occlusive platelet-rich thrombus effectively and safely. Cathet. Cardiovasc. Intervent. 51:332-334, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    . The female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  3. Intracranial dural metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Lakshmi; Abrey, Lauren E; Iwamoto, Fabio M

    2009-05-01

    : Intracranial dural metastases (IDM) are found at autopsy in 9% of patients with advanced systemic cancer. However, to the authors' knowledge, IDM have not been studied systematically in the modern neuroimaging era. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the demographics, clinical presentation, imaging, treatment, and prognosis of patients with IDM. : The current study was a retrospective review of 122 patients with IDM diagnosed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1999 and 2006. Patients with concurrent brain or leptomeningeal metastases were excluded. : Sixty-one percent of the patients were women; the median age at diagnosis was 59 years, the median Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) at diagnosis was 80, and the median time to IDM diagnosis from initial cancer diagnosis was 37 months. Breast (34%) and prostate (17%) cancers were the most frequent primary tumors associated with IDM. Fifty-six percent of patients had a single dural metastasis. On imaging, 70% had metastases of the overlying skull, 44% had dural tail metastases, 53% had vasogenic edema, and 34% had brain invasion. Direct extension from skull metastases was the most common mode of spread. Eighty-three percent of patients had active systemic disease at the time of IDM diagnosis. A lower KPS and lung cancer were associated with worse overall survival. Surgical resection and chemotherapy improved progression-free survival, but only resection was found to be associated with improved overall survival. : IDM affect a significant proportion of cancer patients. KPS and status of systemic cancer should guide treatment decisions. Cancer 2009. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society.

  4. [Involvement of thrombophilia in coronary thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal Dit Sollier, C; Drouet, L

    2017-12-01

    This review of thrombophilia and coronary thrombosis takes into account the "classical" thrombophilia commonly found in venous pathology and the conditions under which their research may be useful in certain forms of arterial thrombosis especially coronary thrombosis. In addition to the classical thrombophilia, exceptional thrombophilia are evoked, which are both factors of venous thrombosis but also arterial thrombosis. There are also thrombophilia that are more specific to the arterial system such as - homocystein which is potentially both a thrombosis factor but also an agent of arterial parietal lesion or - serotonin which is a factor of arterial spasm and especially coronary spasm. Finally, under the term thrombophilia, it is possible to include thrombophilic conditions, in particular cancers and inflammatory conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious condition, occurring more frequently in females than in males. SAH is mainly caused by rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which is formed by localized dilation of the intracranial arterial vessel wall, usually at the apex of the arterial bifurcation. T....... The female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  6. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype...... or an atypical disease course should alert the physician to reevaluate a presumed IIH-diagnosis. The authors report a case of a 32-year-old non-obese male with intracranial hypertension, secondary to a syphilitic central nervous system infection, initially misdiagnosed as being idiopathic. Upon relevant...... antibiotic treatment, signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure resolved completely. Syphilis is a rare, but very important, differential diagnosis that in this case was clinically indistinguishable from IIH....

  7. Thrombosis after liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Ida; Ponziani, Francesca R; Maino, Alberto; Bhoori, Sherrie; Abbattista, Maria; Maggi, Umberto; De Feo, Tullia M; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Artoni, Andrea; Longhi, Elena; Serafini, Marta; Rossi, Giorgio; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    The influence of thrombosis on the prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after liver transplantation (LT) and the role of the commonest inherited thrombophilia abnormalities factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A in the development of thrombosis are unknown. We investigated a cohort of patients who underwent LT for HCC with the aim to estimate the incidence rate (IR) of thrombosis, its influence on mortality and re-transplantation rates and, in the frame of a nested case-control study, the role of thrombophilia in donors and recipients for the development of thrombosis. Four-hundred and thirty patients underwent LT and were followed for a median of 7.2 years. Twenty-six recipients (6%) developed thrombosis (IR 1.06 [95%CI: 0.71-1.53] per 100 pts-yr). Mortality rate after LT was 3.95 (95%CI: 3.22-4.79) per 100 pts-yr and was not influenced by thrombosis. Re-transplantation was planned for 33 patients and was more common in patients with thrombosis than in those without (HR 2.50 [95%CI: 0.87-7.17]). The risk of thrombosis was 4 times higher in recipients with thrombophilia than in those without (OR 4.23 [95%CI: 0.99-18.04]) and 6 times higher when the analysis was restricted to venous thrombosis (OR 6.26 [95%CI: 1.19-32.85]). The presence of inherited thrombophilia in the donors did not increase the risk of thrombosis of the recipient. In conclusion, thrombosis is a complication of 6% of patients transplanted for HCC and increases the risk of re-transplantation but not of mortality. The risk of thrombosis, particularly venous, is increased in the presence of thrombophilia abnormalities in the recipients.

  8. Outcome following surgery for intracranial meningiomas in the aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konglund, A; Rogne, S G; Lund-Johansen, M; Scheie, D; Helseth, E; Meling, T R

    2013-03-01

    To prospectively assess mortality, morbidity and the functional and symptomatic outcome following intracranial surgery for meningiomas in elderly patients at two neurosurgical institutions in Norway. Patients ≥60 years who underwent craniotomies for intracranial meningiomas at Oslo University Hospital and Haukeland University Hospital in 2008 and 2009 were included (n = 54). Outcome was assessed at 6 months. Thirty-five females and 19 males of median age 70 (60-84) years were assessed pre- and post-operatively, 87% attended follow-up at 6 months. The surgical mortality rate was 5.6% at 30 days and 7.4% at 3 and 6 months. The rates of complications were: post-operative hematomas 5.6%, deep venous thrombosis 1.9%, osteitis 1.9%, cerebrospinal fluid disturbances 13.0% and neurological sequelae 13.0%. Surgery resulted in a significant improvement in the MMSE score, with a further 14.9% obtaining scores of ≥25 without a significant change in the level of independence according to the Karnofsky performance scale. QoL assessments showed good functioning post-operatively compared to other cancer patient groups, yet slightly reduced when compared to data from the general population. In our series, we found that meningioma surgery in the aging patient carries a higher risk of mortality and morbidity compared to intracranial tumor surgery in general. Our findings indicate, however, that the survivors have improved cognitive function and acceptable QoL, and we did not see any significant decrease in the proportion of independent patients according to the KPS. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms with the pipeline embolization device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Santosh B; Shah, Shreyansh; Venkatasubba Rao, Chethan P; Bershad, Eric M; Suarez, Jose I

    2014-01-01

    The pipeline embolization device (PED; ev3 Endovascular, Plymouth, MN, USA) is a flow-diverter used in the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms, particularly those with unfavorable configurations. It causes progressive flow redirection leading to aneurysm thrombosis. This study aimed to present a systematic review of the published literature on the clinical outcomes of PED. A Medline search of the English language literature was performed using the keywords "intracranial aneurysms" and "pipeline embolization device" or "flow diverters". The inclusion criteria were: n>10 patients; unruptured aneurysms; documentation of complications; and at least 3 months of follow-up. A total of 13 studies, with 905 patients and 1043 aneurysms, were included. The mean age was 53.8 years, with women comprising 76.3% of patients. The mean aneurysm diameter was 11.1mm with 37% classed as large aneurysms and 10% classed as giant. The cumulative mortality rate was 2.3%. Seventeen patients had a stroke (1.9%), while 19 (2.0%) had a transient ischemic attack and 21 patients (2.3%) had an intracranial hemorrhage. The two outcome measures were the cumulative event rate (16.7%) and the 6 month aneurysm occlusion rate (79.7%). A funnel plot with study size plotted against the two outcome measures revealed publication bias. Data from recent studies suggest that complication and mortality rates associated with PED may be similar to other contemporary endovascular techniques, with a better 6 month aneurysm occlusion rate. More prospective clinical trials are warranted to further validate these results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R. [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); Pandey, Tarun [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Radiology Department, Little Rock, AR (United States); Badawi, Mona H. [Al-Adan Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Kuwait (Kuwait)

    2008-01-15

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  11. CT findings in ileo-caval thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, T.; Distelmaier, W.; Koester, O.

    1982-01-01

    Thrombosis of a large vein can be demonstrated by CT. The thrombosed vein has a hyperdense lumen, with a somewhat increased diameter which does not opacify after intravenous contrast injection, but which shows a narrow hyperdense margin. Collateral vesels in the pelvic or paravertebral plexus and dilated veins in the abdominal skin are indirect evidence of ileo-caval thrombosis. CT can also demonstrate the cranial extent of a caval thrombosis. Venous thrombosis demonstrated by CT is an important additional finding in the pre-operative examination of the abdomen. (orig.) [de

  12. PORTAL VEIN THROMBOSIS-ULTRASOUND IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trajkovska Meri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Portal venous system, apart from the main portal vein, includes its tributaries: superior and inferior mesenteric vein, as well as splenic vein, so the term portal venous thrombosis encompasses a broad spectrum of pathological conditions. Usually, one or more causative factors can be recognized, either local endothelial/ flow disturbances, or systemic inherited /acquired conditions. Portal vein thrombosis can be associated with benign or malignant disorders. Weather we are speaking about acute or chronic thrombosis, the clinical presentation is different. Acute thrombosis can be presented in a wide range, from mild abdominal discomfort to a state of intestinal ischemia and life-threatening infarction. Chronic thrombosis is usually recognized when variceal bleeding or other symptoms of portal hypertension express. Fast and accurate diagnosis sometimes is a life-saving procedure, especially in acute vascular alterations. Recently, due to the improvement of imaging procedures the number of patients with diagnosed portal vein thrombosis is increasingly growing. With a negative predictive value of 98% color Doppler ultrasound is considered as imaging modality of choice in detecting portal vein thrombosis. Based on large studies it is presumed that overall risk of getting portal vein thrombosis during lifetime is 1% in general population, but much bigger 5%-15% in cirrhotic patients. Existence of specific ultrasound criteria, if fulfilled, has ensured that diagnosis of portal vein thrombosis is fast and non-invasive. Procedure is convenient for the patient and healthcare providers, and above all, allows prompt treatment preventing further deterioration.

  13. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype...... or an atypical disease course should alert the physician to reevaluate a presumed IIH-diagnosis. The authors report a case of a 32-year-old non-obese male with intracranial hypertension, secondary to a syphilitic central nervous system infection, initially misdiagnosed as being idiopathic. Upon relevant...

  14. Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Deena M; Brown, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) occur in approximately 2-3 % of the population. Most of these lesions are incidentally found, asymptomatic and typically carry a benign course. Although the risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is low, this complication can result in significant morbidity and mortality, making assessment of this risk the cornerstone of UIA management. This article reviews important factors to consider when managing unruptured intracranial aneurysms including patient demographics, comorbidities, family history, symptom status, and aneurysm characteristics. It also addresses screening, monitoring, medical management and current surgical and endovascular therapies.

  15. [Thrombosis during thrombopoietin receptor agonist treatment for immune thrombocytopenia. A French multicentric observational study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, E; Moulis, G; Mahévas, M; Guy, C; Lioger, B; Durieu, I; Hunault, M; Ramanantsoa, M; Royer, B; Default, A; Pérault-Pochat, M-C; Moachon, L; Bernard, N; Bardy, G; Jonville-Bera, A-P; Geniaux, H; Godeau, B; Cathébras, P

    2017-03-01

    Thrombopoietin-receptor agonists (TPO-RA) are marketed for immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). They have been associated to thrombosis occurrence in randomized controlled trials. However, the characteristics of these thromboses in the real-life practice as well as their management are poorly known. The objectives of this study were to determine the risk factors, circumstances and management of thrombosis occurring during exposure to TPO-RA in ITP. We carried out a multicentre retrospective study in France. Moreover, all cases reported to the French pharmacovigilance system were also analyzed. Overall, 41 thrombosis (13 arterial) in 36 ITP patients (14 males and 22 females, mean age: 59 years) were recorded between January 2009 and October 2015. Twenty patients were treated with romiplostim, 15 with eltrombopag and 1 was treated by both medications. Thirty-three (92%) of the patients had another risk factor for thrombosis. Ten (28%) had an history of thrombosis and 13 (36%) received immunoglobulin in the month preceding the thrombotic event. Three had antiphospholipid antibodies; congenital low-risk thrombophilia was found in 4 cases; 18 patients (50%) were splenectomized. Median platelet count at the time of thrombosis was 172G/l (1-1049G/l). In 22 patients (56%), a good prognosis was associated with the thrombosis and was not linked with TPO-RA withdrawal. Bleeding events occurred in 14% of the patients treated with antiplatelet or anticoagulant drug, including 5% serious events (1 death of intracranial haemorrhage, 1 death of haemorrhagic shock). The thrombotic risk may be carefully assessed before starting TPO-RA in ITP patients. The impact of antiphospholipid antibodies and of congenital thrombophilia remains to be defined. Thrombosis evolution seems independent of TPO-RA management. Bleeding manifestations seem rare. Poor prognosis was mainly due to ischemic sequelae. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI

  16. Therapeutic effect of enterprise stent-assisted embolization for very small ruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Feiyun; Li, Zhenbao; Fang, Xinggen; Zhao, Xintong; Liu, Jiaqiang; Wu, Degang; Lai, Niansheng

    2017-08-01

    Enterprise stent has been widespread used in wide-necked intracranial aneurysms and good efficacy has been achieved, but there are few reports on its applications in very small ruptured intracranial aneurysms in literatures. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Enterprise stent-assisted coiling embolization of very small ruptured intracranial aneurysms.We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and imaging data from 37 patients with very small ruptured intracranial aneurysms who had SAC using Enterprise stents performed from February 2012 to July 2016 in our department. Data collected and analyzed included patient demographics, morphologic features of the aneurysm, treatment results, and follow-up results. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS).Enterprise stents were successfully implanted in all 37 patients with very small ruptured intracranial aneurysms. Of the 37 individuals, 28 patients exhibited complete occlusion at Raymond grade I, 5 patients exhibited occlusion at Raymond grade II, and 4 patients at Raymond grade III. Procedure-related complications occurred in 3 of 37 patients (8.1%), including 1 case of intraprocedure aneurysm rupture who died from cerebral herniation caused by severe postoperative cerebral ischemia during the hospital stay, and the other 2 complications were acute in-stent thrombosis, and occlusion of parent artery caused by falling-off internal carotid artery plaque, respectively. A total of 36 patients underwent postoperative clinical follow-up visits for 6 to 24 months of which 31 patients recovered (GOS ≥ 4). One patient had hemiplegic paralysis, and no rehemorrhage was found. A total of 25 patients underwent follow-up digital subtraction angiography (DSA) at 3-21 months postintervention, in whom there were 22 cases with complete occlusion, 2 cases with recurrence of aneurysm neck, and 1 case with in-stent restenosis, but there was no patient with neurologic deficits.The Enterprise

  17. Intracranial hemorrhage: ultrasound, CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-03-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is one of the most common causes of acute focal neurologic deficit in children and adults. Neuroimaging including ultrasonography (US), computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is essential in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage. Imaging findings should guide treatment. The highly variable appearance of an intracranial hemorrhage can be challenging. A thorough knowledge of hematoma evolution and US, CT and MR hematoma characteristics is mandatory for adequate interpretation of findings. The purpose of this review is (1) to summarize the imaging characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage on various imaging techniques and (2) to review the various types of intracranial hemorrhage, and their causes. (orig.)

  18. Ambient air pollution and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Sarah; Miller, Mark R

    2018-01-03

    Air pollution is a growing public health concern of global significance. Acute and chronic exposure is known to impair cardiovascular function, exacerbate disease and increase cardiovascular mortality. Several plausible biological mechanisms have been proposed for these associations, however, at present, the pathways are incomplete. A seminal review by the American Heart Association (2010) concluded that the thrombotic effects of particulate air pollution likely contributed to their effects on cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The aim of the current review is to appraise the newly accumulated scientific evidence (2009-2016) on contribution of haemostasis and thrombosis towards cardiovascular disease induced by exposure to both particulate and gaseous pollutants.Seventy four publications were reviewed in-depth. The weight of evidence suggests that acute exposure to fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) induces a shift in the haemostatic balance towards a pro-thrombotic/pro-coagulative state. Insufficient data was available to ascertain if a similar relationship exists for gaseous pollutants, and very few studies have addressed long-term exposure to ambient air pollution. Platelet activation, oxidative stress, interplay between interleukin-6 and tissue factor, all appear to be potentially important mechanisms in pollution-mediated thrombosis, together with an emerging role for circulating microvesicles and epigenetic changes.Overall, the recent literature supports, and arguably strengthens, the contention that air pollution contributes to cardiovascular morbidity by promoting haemostasis. The volume and diversity of the evidence highlights the complexity of the pathophysiologic mechanisms by which air pollution promotes thrombosis; multiple pathways are plausible and it is most likely they act in concert. Future research should address the role gaseous pollutants play in the cardiovascular effects of air pollution mixture and direct comparison of potentially

  19. Management of superficial vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmi, B

    2015-07-01

    Superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) is less well studied than deep vein thrombosis (DVT), because it has been considered to be a minor, self-limiting disease that is easily diagnosed on clinical grounds and that requires only symptomatic relief. The most frequently involved sites of the superficial vein system are the lower limbs, especially the saphenous veins, mostly in relation to varicosities. Lower-limb SVT shares the same risk factors as DVT; it can propagate into the deep veins, and have a complicated course with pulmonary embolism. Clinical diagnosis may not be accurate, and ultrasonography is currently indicated for both confirmation and evaluation of SVT extension. Treatment aims are symptom relief and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in relation to the thrombotic burden. SVT of the long saphenous vein within 3 cm of the saphenofemoral junction (SFJ) is considered to be equivalent to a DVT, and thus deserving of therapeutic anticoagulation. Less severe forms of lower-limb SVT not involving the SFJ have been included in randomized clinical trials of surgery, compression hosiery, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, unfractionated heparin, and low molecular weight heparins, with inconclusive results. The largest randomized clinical trial available, on 3004 patients with lower-limb SVT not involving the SFJ, showed that fondaparinux 2.5 mg once daily for 6 weeks is more effective than placebo in reducing the risk of the composite of death from any cause and symptomatic VTE (0.9% versus 5.9%). Further studies are needed to define the optimal management strategies for SVT of the lower limbs and other sites, such as the upper limbs. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  20. Haemorrhage in intracranial tuber- culosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Intracranial tuberculosis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries where tuberculosis is endemic.1 In the central nervous system tuberculosis manifests as cerebritis, cerebral abscess, tuberculoma, and tubercu- lous meningitis (TBM).1-5 TBM is thought to arise from cerebrospinal.

  1. Canine Intracranial Meningioma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Gomes de Carvalho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Carvalho J.R.G., Vasconcellos C.H.C., Bastos I. P.B., Trajano F.L.C., Costa T.S. & Fernandes J.I [Canine Intracranial Meningioma: Case report.] Meningioma intracraniano canino: Relato de caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(supl. 3:1- 7, 2016. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Veterinária, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465 Km 7, Seropédica, RJ 23.897-000, Brasil, E-mail: vetjulio@yahoo.com.br Intracranial neoplasms usually show their signals in a moderate way, revealing a long background of nonspecific signs, making the diagnosis more difficult. The meningioma is the most common intracranial neoplasm in dogs and cats. Along the years, the Veterinary Medicine has experienced important technological improvements, making it possible the diagnosis of a lot of diseases. Therefore, diseases considered not common in the past, started being diagnosed more frequently, for instance, brain lesions. The objective of this research is to report a case of intracranial meningioma in a Boxer dog that arrived at the Veterinary Hospital of the Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro, highlighting its clinical improvement, diagnosis and treatment.

  2. What Is IH (Intracranial Hypertension)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Store What is IH? What is IH? Intracranial hypertension literally means that the pressure of cerebrospinal fluid ( ... is too high. “Intracranial” means “within the skull.” “Hypertension” means “high fluid pressure.” To understand how this ...

  3. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Alex P; Marshall-Bowman, Karina

    2015-06-01

    Although once a widely speculated about and largely theoretical topic, spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension has gained acceptance as a distinct clinical phenomenon, yet the underlying physiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. In the past, many terms were used to describe the symptoms of malaise, nausea, vomiting, and vertigo, though longer duration spaceflights have increased the prevalence of overlapping symptoms of headache and visual disturbance. Spaceflight-induced visual pathology is thought to be a manifestation of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) because of its similar presentation to cases of known intracranial hypertension on Earth as well as the documentation of increased ICP by lumbar puncture in symptomatic astronauts upon return to gravity. The most likely mechanisms of spaceflight-induced increased ICP include a cephalad shift of body fluids, venous outflow obstruction, blood-brain barrier breakdown, and disruption to CSF flow. The relative contribution of increased ICP to the symptoms experienced during spaceflight is currently unknown, though other factors recently posited to contribute include local effects on ocular structures, individual differences in metabolism, and the vasodilator effects of carbon dioxide. This review article attempts to consolidate the literature regarding spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension and distinguish it from other pathologies with similar symptomatology. It discusses the proposed physiological causes and the pathological manifestations of increased ICP in the spaceflight environment and provides considerations for future long-term space travel. In the future, it will be critical to develop countermeasures so that astronauts can participate at their peak potential and return safely to Earth.

  4. Imaging intracranial tuberculosis in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, D.H. [Dept. of Radiology, Red Cross War Memorial Children`s Hospital, Rondebosch (South Africa)

    1995-05-01

    A morphologically based imaging review of intracranial tuberculosis in childhood is presented. The computed tomography and magnetic resonance features of parenchymal tuberculoma, tuberculous meningitis and meningeal/meniningocerebral tuberculoma are illustrated. Recent insight into the nature of tuberculoma necrosis and its magnetic resonance correlation is reviewed. Pathogenesis, relevant clinical background and the role of modern imaging is discussed. (orig.)

  5. Resistive NMR of intracranial hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Grossman, R.I.; Levine, R.S.; Lynch, R.; Goldberg, H.I.; Samuel, L.; Edelstein, W.; Bottomley, P.; Redington, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Comparison between computed tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in 17 patients with intracranial hematomas indicate a distinct role for NMR in evaluating the stable patient with hematoma. NMR is useful for delineating the extent of the hematoma, the relationship of the hematoma to brain anatomy, and the presence of hematoma at a time when the hematoma is isodense on CT.

  6. Spectrum of Visual Impairment in Cerebral Venous Thrombosis: Importance of Tailoring Therapies Based on Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Sanjith; Arthur, Anupriya; Prabakhar, A T; Mannam, Pavitra; Shyamkumar, N K; Mani, Sunithi; Mathew, Vivek; Peter, Jeyanthi; Sivadasan, Ajith; Alexander, Anika; Karthik, M; Benjamin, Rohith Ninan; Alexander, Mathew

    2017-01-01

    Visual impairment can complicate cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). Here, we describe the various pathophysiological mechanisms and treatments available. A retrospective chart review of all patients treated for CVT in a large quaternary teaching hospital was done, and cases with visual impairment due to CVT were identified. The various mechanisms causing visual impairment in CVT were (1) raised intracranial pressure (ICP) caused by venous thrombosis without venous infarcts resulting in a benign intracranial hypertension-like presentation of CVT, (2) venous infarcts involving the occipital cortex, (3) raised ICP following the development of a secondary dural arteriovenous (AV) fistula, and (4) arterial occipital infarcts due to posterior cerebral artery compression secondary to herniation in large venous infarcts. Apart from using systemic anticoagulants to attempt recanalization and drugs with carbonic anhydrase inhibitor activity to reduce the ICPs, treatment modalities employed to save vision were (1) recanalization by local thrombolysis, stenting, or mechanical devices; (2) cerebrospinal fluid diversion procedures such as theco-periotoneal shunting; (3) optic nerve sheath fenestration; and (4) specific treatment for conditions such as dural AV fistula occurring as a late complication. CVT can cause visual impairment through different pathophysiological mechanisms. Depending on the mechanism, treatment strategies need to be tailored. Furthermore, very close monitoring is needed both in the acute and in the follow-up period, as new pathophysiological mechanisms can arise, compromising the vision. This may require a different treatment approach. Literature on this aspect of CVT is lacking.

  7. HEPARIN-INDUCED THROMBOCYTOPAENIA/THROMBOSIS: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... uncommon adverse effects of therapy which are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Objective: To ..... sequalae of HIT) heparin (past 30 days) day 0= first day of heparin therapy. Thrombosis or other Proven new thrombosis: Progressive or recurrent. None .... the medicinal leech Hirudo medicinalis.

  8. Thrombosis in adult patients with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Del Principe, Domenico; Venditti, Adriano

    2017-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that the risk of thrombosis in hematologic patients may be similar or even higher than that found in patients with solid tumors. However, available information about pathogenesis and incidence of thrombosis in acute leukemia is limited. This review focuses on mechanisms underlying thrombosis in acute leukemia and discusses recent literature data. In the last few years, proofs have been provided that leukemic cells release free prothrombotic products, such as micro-vesicles, tissue factors, circulating free DNA and RNA. Furthermore, leukemic blasts can activate the procoagulant population of platelets, which initiate and amplify coagulation, causing thrombosis. In addition to factors produced by acute leukemia itself, others concur to trigger thrombosis. Some drugs, infections and insertion of central venous catheter have been described to increase risk of thrombosis in patients with acute leukemia. Thrombosis represents a serious complication in patients affected by myeloid and lymphoid acute leukemia. A proper knowledge of its pathophysiology and of the predisposing risk factors may allow to implement strategies of prevention. Improving prevention of thrombosis appears a major goal in patients whose frequent conditions of thrombocytopenia impede an adequate delivery of anticoagulant therapy.

  9. Incidence and predictors of coronary stent thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Bollati, Mario; Clementi, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Stent thrombosis remains among the most feared complications of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting. However, data on its incidence and predictors are sparse and conflicting. We thus aimed to perform a collaborative systematic review on incidence and predictors of stent...... thrombosis....

  10. HEPARIN-INDUCED THROMBOCYTOPAENIA/THROMBOSIS: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... HEPARIN-INDUCED THROMBOCYTOPAENIA/THROMBOSIS: A CLINICO-. PATHOLOGIC REVIEW. P. A. DAVE. ABSTRACT. Background:Heparin is widely used for the prophylaxis of venous thrombo-embolism and pulmonary embolism. Thrombocytopaenia and the sequale of thrombosis are uncommon ...

  11. Scintiangiographic diagnosis of acute mesenteric venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.W.; Selby, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    Scintiangiographic findings of prolonged mesenteric activity in a case of acute mesenteric thrombosis is described and 105 cases with abdominal scintiangiography are reviewed. Usual peak mesenteric blush occurred 5 to 15 sec after initial visualization of the aorta. Normal clearance of this activity was 15 to 30 sec. Future cases should confirm the importance of this observation in early diagnosis of mesenteric venous thrombosis

  12. Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nisio, Marcello; van Es, Nick; Büller, Harry R.

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, collectively referred to as venous thromboembolism, constitute a major global burden of disease. The diagnostic work-up of suspected deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism includes the sequential application of a clinical decision rule and D-dimer

  13. Sex-specific aspects of venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roach, Rachel Elizabeth Jo

    2014-01-01

    Venous thrombosis is a disease that occurs in 1-2 per 1000 people per year. At the time of their first venous thrombosis, approximately 50% of women are exposed to reproductive risk factors (oral contraception, postmenopausal hormone therapy, pregnancy and the puerperium). In this thesis, we showed

  14. Microparticles in hemostasis and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, A Phillip; Mackman, Nigel

    2011-05-13

    Blood contains microparticles (MPs) derived from a variety of cell types, including platelets, monocytes, and endothelial cells. In addition, tumors release MPs into the circulation. MPs are formed from membrane blebs that are released from the cell surface by proteolytic cleavage of the cytoskeleton. All MPs are procoagulant because they provide a membrane surface for the assembly of components of the coagulation protease cascade. Importantly, procoagulant activity is increased by the presence of anionic phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylserine (PS), and the procoagulant protein tissue factor (TF), which is the major cellular activator of the clotting cascade. High levels of platelet-derived PS(+) MPs are present in healthy individuals, whereas the number of TF(+), PS(+) MPs is undetectable or very low. However, levels of PS(+), TF(+) MPs are readily detected in a variety of diseases, and monocytes appear to be the primary cellular source. In cancer, PS(+), TF(+) MPs are derived from tumors and may serve as a useful biomarker to identify patients at risk for venous thrombosis. This review will summarize our current knowledge of the role of procoagulant MPs in hemostasis and thrombosis.

  15. Acute mesenteric vein thrombosis: factors associated with evolution to chronic mesenteric vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vietti Violi, Naïk; Fournier, Nicolas; Duran, Rafael; Schmidt, Sabine; Bize, Pierre; Guiu, Boris; Denys, Alban

    2014-07-01

    Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis signs at MDCT are well described, but the literature lacks studies assessing their evolution. We aimed to describe the radiologic evolution of isolated acute mesenteric venous thrombosis and associated prognostic factors. Patients with isolated acute mesenteric venous thrombosis with follow-up for a minimum of 1 month with MDCT were selected. Images at the acute phase and on follow-up were reviewed in consensus reading. For acute mesenteric venous thrombosis, we searched for low-attenuated intraluminal filling defect. For chronic mesenteric venous thrombosis, we searched for vessel stenosis or occlusion associated with collateral mesenteric veins. Treatment, thrombosis risk factor, symptoms, location, and length and diameter of mesenteric venous thrombosis were reported and correlated with evolution over time. Twenty patients (nine women and 11 men; mean age, 52 years) were selected. Four patients recovered without radiologic sequelae, and 16 developed chronic mesenteric venous thrombosis signs. Anticoagulation did not influence recovery (p = 1). Patients with recovery compared with patients with chronic mesenteric venous thrombosis showed more frequent central lesions (p = 0.03). At diagnosis, the thrombosed segment was shorter and larger in the complete radiologic recovery group compared with the chronic mesenteric venous thrombosis signs group: mean length (± SD) 6.25 ± 3.21 cm and 12.81 ± 5.96 cm, respectively (p = 0.01); mean transverse diameter 1.82 ± 0.42 cm and 1.12 ± 0.34 cm, respectively (p = 0.01). Mesenteric fat infiltration at diagnosis was more frequent in the chronic mesenteric venous thrombosis signs group than in the complete recovery group (p = 0.03). Most cases of acute mesenteric venous thrombosis evolve toward the chronic form with vein stenosis or occlusion and development of collateral veins. Location, length of mesenteric venous thrombosis, transverse diameter of the vein, and mesenteric fat

  16. Reduction of venous thrombosis complicating phlebography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettmann, M.A.; Salzman, E.W.; Rosenthal, D.; Clagett, P.; Davies, G.; Nebesar, R.; Rabinov, K.; Ploetz, J.; Skillman, J.

    1980-01-01

    Patients who underwent radiographic phlebography were studied to determine the frequency of postphlebographic venous thrombosis. In a group of 23 patients who had negative phlebograms performed with standard contrast agent (60% sodium methylglucamine diatrizoate), nine had positive 125 I-fibrinogen leg scans. On repeat phlebography, three had confirmed deep vein thrombosis, six overall developed deep or superficial thrombosis, and three had positive scans without demonstrable thrombi. In a second group of 34 patients studied with the contrast material diluted to 45%, only three developed positive scans, one due to deep venous thrombosis and two to superficial thrombosis. There was also a reuction in the incidence of postphlebographic symptoms of pain, tenderness, and erythema, but no apparent sacrifice in diagnostic accuracy

  17. Reduction of venous thrombosis complicating phlebography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettmann, M.A. (Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, MA); Salzman, E.W.; Rosenthal, D.; Clagett, P.; Davies, G.; Nebesar, R.; Rabinov, K.; Ploetz, J.; Skillman, J.

    1980-06-01

    Patients who underwent radiographic phlebography were studied to determine the frequency of postphlebographic venous thrombosis. In a group of 23 patients who had negative phlebograms performed with standard contrast agent (60% sodium methylglucamine diatrizoate), nine had positive /sup 125/I-fibrinogen leg scans. On repeat phlebography, three had confirmed deep vein thrombosis, six overall developed deep or superficial thrombosis, and three had positive scans without demonstrable thrombi. In a second group of 34 patients studied with the contrast material diluted to 45%, only three developed positive scans, one due to deep venous thrombosis and two to superficial thrombosis. There was also a reuction in the incidence of postphlebographic symptoms of pain, tenderness, and erythema, but no apparent sacrifice in diagnostic accuracy.

  18. [Thrombosis risk during pregnancy after history of cerebral venous thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourrat, O; Neau, J-P; Pouget-Abadie, J-F; Pierre, F

    2015-01-01

    Few data have been published about the prognosis of a pregnancy following an episode of venous cerebral thrombosis (CVT), and far less about preventive strategy. This is a retrospective study of a case series of 11 pregnancies in six women who had previously presented a CVT. The first pregnancies after CVT occurred on average 58 months later. Prevention with aspirin or heparin was administered in ten cases during pregnancy, and in all the cases with heparin in postpartum. No recurrence of CVT was observed. A minor pulmonary embolism was diagnosed in postpartum in one case. Prognosis of a pregnancy after a CVT seems to be favourable if a sufficient delay after CVT is respected. Although no results of controlled trials are available, prophylaxis with heparin is probably reasonable as benefit seems higher than risks and is strongly advised during the postpartum period. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  19. Superficial vein thrombosis and deep vein thrombosis – a comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Krasiński

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Although superficial vein thrombosis is commonly considered a rather minor condition, a number of studies indicate that its consequences can be much more severe. Since the introduction of Doppler ultrasonography to common diagnosis of venous diseases, the approach to threats associated with superficial vein thrombosis has changed, mainly in the context of venous thromboembolism. Superficial thrombosis in varicose veins must be differentiated from that occurring in patients without varicosities. In the former case, superficial vein thrombosis is usually caused by haemodynamic disorders (slower flow, while in the latter, it is caused by thrombophilia or inflammation, but it can also be a prodromal sign of cancer. Ultrasonography enables one to distinguish deep vein thrombosis caused by superficial vein thrombosis progression (by extension through perforator veins or the great/small saphenous vein ostium into the deep venous system from deep vein thrombosis occurring at a certain distance from the site of superficial vein thrombosis. The authors emphasise that due to the possibility of concomitant deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, our attitude to the diagnostic process, potential complications and treatment of superficial vein thrombosis should be changed.

  20. Cerebral Blood and CSF Flow Patterns in Patients Diagnosed for Cerebral Venous Thrombosis - An Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souraya ElSankari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Recent studies of the organization of the cerebral venous system in healthy subjects using phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI show its structural complexity and inter-individual variations. Our objective was to study the venous blood and CSF flows in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT. Materials and Methods: PC-MRI sequences were added to brain MRI conventional protocol in 19 patients suspected of CVT, among whom 6 patients had CVT diagnosis confirmed by MR venography. Results were compared with 18 healthy age-matched volunteers (HV. Results: In patients without CVT (NoCVT confirmed by venography, we found heterogeneous individual venous flows, and variable side dominance in paired veins and sinuses, comparable to those in healthy volunteers. In CVT patients, PC-MRI detected no venous flow in the veins and/or sinuses with thrombosis. Arterial flows were preserved. CSF aqueductal and cervical stroke volumes were increased in a patient with secondary cerebral infarction, and decreased in 4 patients with extended thrombosis in the superior sagittal and transverse sinuses. These results suggest the main role of the venous system in the regulation of the dynamic intracranial equilibrium. Conclusions: CVT produces highly individualized pattern of disturbance in venous blood drainage. Complementary to MRI venography, PC-MRI provides non-invasive data about venous blockage consequences on CSF flow disturbances.

  1. Rhino-orbitocerebral mucormycosis associated with cavernous sinus thrombosis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haber, Daniel Martiniano

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic infection caused by Mucorales fungi, and the Rhizopus is the most common one (70% of the cases. It is an acute invasive fungal disease whose form is disseminated, cutaneous, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and rhino-orbitocerebral. The latter is the most common form and its symptoms comprise of unilateral sinusitis, fever and headache. Once established in the orbit the symptoms can be chemosis, diplopia and reduced vision. The infection can spread to the brain via the orbital apex, orbital arteries or via the cribriform plate. Mucormycosis is a medical emergency and the treatment consists of a surgery to an aggressive debridement and in the use of antifungal therapy. Despite the appropriate management, the mortality rate can reach 40% of the cases. One possible intracranial complication of Mucormycosis is the Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis which is a rare and fatal infective disease. The initial symptoms of Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis are headache, retro-orbital pain, periorbital edema, proptosis, diplopia and reduced vision. Case Report: We describe the case of 43-year-old woman with medical history of diabetes mellitus and use of immunosuppressant drugs after kidney transplantation. The patient developed Acute Bacterial Sinusitis and Rhino-orbitocerebral Mucormycosis associated with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis.

  2. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Intracranial MR imaging of achondroplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Shinichi; Ootsuka, Ryouichi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Nishitani, Hiromu; Shirakawa, Norihisa; Hashimoto, Toshiaki (Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-10-01

    Intracranial MR imaging was performed in five patients with achondroplasia. All patients had narrowing of the subarachnoid space at the level of the formen magnum that was mainly due to protrusion of the posterior aspect. Three patients had compressive deformities of the brainstem and/or upper cervical spine. Among them, two patients had deformities of the pons. Relative upward displacement of the brainstem was seen in all patients. Hydrocephalus was seen in three patients. (author).

  4. Neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Sadahiko; Ogata, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Nakao, Satoshi; Mizue, Hidenari; Kobayashi, Yutaka.

    1982-01-01

    1. We have reviewed 34 cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset, 23 mature and 11 premature infants) experienced in 10-year period from 1971 to 1980, with special reference to gestational age, birth weight, type of delivery, presence or absence of asphyxia, symptoms and cause of death. 2. Regarding 9 autopsied cases and 7 cases diagnosed by CT-scan, 10 mature infants composed of 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 2 intraventricular hemorrhages, 2 subdural hematomas, 2 intracerebral and 1 subependymal hemorrhage; 6 premature infants consisted of 4 subependymal hemorrhages with ventricular rupture and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhages. Most of them presented with respiratory distress, vomiting and convulsive seizures which developed within 5 days after birth. 3. Poor outcome including death amounted 49% of mature and 63% of premature infants. Along with degree of intracranial hematoma, prematurity and pulmonary complication were felt to be important prognostic factors. 4. Introduction of CT-scan led to prompt diagnosis and treatment, thus lowering mortality rate of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages. (author)

  5. Effect of policosanol on experimental thrombosis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajal, D; Arruzazabala, M L; Más, R; Molina, V; Valdés, S

    1994-05-01

    Policosanol is a natural product, obtained from sugar cane wax (Saccharum officinarum L.) with which cholesterol-lowering effects have been demonstrated in experimental models, healthy volunteers and hypercholesterolemic patients. The effects of policosanol on experimental venous and arterial thrombosis in rats were investigated. Policosanol (25 mg/kg) significantly decreased the thrombus weight, in the venous thrombosis models, the protective effect persisting until 4 h after its oral administration. Policosanol (25 mg/kg single dose) was able to reduce rectal temperature variation induced by arterial thrombosis. Also at the same dose policosanol increased 6-keto-PGF1 alpha serum levels in rats.

  6. Thrombosis of the ileo-caval sector: puerperal thrombosis and agenesia thrombosis of the inferior vena cava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Egea, Jorge; Lara Guerrero, Isabel; Fustero Aznar, Jose Miguel; Hermoso Cuenca, Vicente; Velez Lomana, Abel

    2011-01-01

    The thrombosis of the inferior vena cava account for around the 15% of the cases of deep venous thrombosis. This is the case of a puerperal primigravida with a cesarean section labor presenting with a thrombosis initially in the right ovarian vein and then extension to the inferior vena cava. Treatment included low molecular weight heparin in anticoagulant doses; rest with elevation of the extremities and elastic bandage. After a satisfactory process evolution with partial lysis of the thrombus, the oral anticoagulation with Acenocumarol for 6 months was started. The second patient, a man aged 73 with backgrounds of an operated hepatic hydatidosis, had a thrombosis of the infrarenal inferior vena cava and agenesia of retrohepatic segment of the inferior vena cava. The patient remains with anticoagulant treatment including Acenocumarol, elastic bandage and hygienic care. As sequela he had a postphlebitic syndrome and reworsening of the edema leading to its admission in two occasions.(author)

  7. Prevention and management of the complications during embolizing intracranial aneurysm with GDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Ming; Tan Xianxi; Wang Junlu; Hu Wenhao; Fan Lianghao

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To sum up the experience of embolization of intracranial aneurysm with Guglielmi detachable coil (GDC) and to discuss how to prevent and manage the complications during the endovascular treatment. Methods: 108 patients with intracranial aneurysm were embolized with GDC. 24 accident out of 20 patients during embolization were reviewed. Results: Among the 24 accidents, there were 10 aneurysm rupture, 5 over- embolization 5 coils end protruding to parent artery, and 4 thrombosis. Once the aneurysm ruptures, neutralizing heparin and continuing embolization was administered. Among 10 cases of aneurysm ruptures, 4 were death, 1 was severe deformity, 1 was mild deformity. Thrombolysis, heparinisation and raising blood pressure were used to control over-embolization, coil protrusion, and thrombosis. Among 5 cases of over-embolization, 1 died, 4 recovered. Among 5 cases of coils end protruding, 1 was severe deformity, 1 was mild deformity. Among 4 cases of embolization, 1 died, 1 was led sensory aphasics. The accidents resulted in 5 deaths (4.6%), 4 permanent neurological deficits (3.7%). Conclusion: The correct management of the complications during the treatment, the better understanding of the aneurysm and its parent artery angio-anatomy and the improved skill of embolizing technique are helpful to reduce the accidents and increase the cure rate

  8. Peripartum Isolated Cortical Vein Thrombosis in a Mother with Postdural Puncture Headache Treated with an Epidural Blood Patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Laverse

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old woman presented with low pressure headache 3 days after delivery of her baby. An assessment of postdural puncture headache was made. This was initially treated with analgesia, caffeine, and fluids for the presumed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leak. The woman was readmitted two days after her hospital discharge with generalised seizures. A brain scan showed features of intracranial hypotension, and she was treated for CSF leak using an epidural blood patch. Her symptoms worsened and three days later, she developed a left homonymous quadrantanopia. An MRI scan confirmed a right parietal haematoma with evidence of isolated cortical vein thrombosis (ICVT.

  9. Arterial thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, R.T

    2008-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a non-inflammatory autoimmune disease that mainly affects young women. The syndrome is characterized by recurrent thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity in association with the persistent serological presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Antiphospholipid

  10. Increased rheumatoid factor and deep venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer-Olesen, Christine L; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    was incident deep venous thrombosis. There were no losses to follow-up. RESULTS: During 368381 person-years, 670 individuals developed deep venous thrombosis. A rheumatoid factor concentration ≥ vs ...BACKGROUND: The risk of deep venous thrombosis is increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We tested the hypothesis that increased concentrations of rheumatoid factor are associated with increased risk of deep venous thrombosis in individuals without autoimmune rheumatic disease...... in the general population. METHODS: We included 54628 participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study (1981-83) and the Copenhagen General Population Study (2004-12), all with a measured concentration of IgM rheumatoid factor and without autoimmune rheumatic disease or venous thromboembolism. The main outcome...

  11. Successful Thrombolysis of Aortic Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    threatening. Standard surgical treatment using cardiopulmonary bypass carries high maternal and fetal complications. Here we report a case of an antenatal female in first trimester with aortic prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT), who was successfully ...

  12. Prevention of stent thrombosis: challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reejhsinghani, Risheen; Lotfi, Amir S

    2015-01-01

    Stent thrombosis is an uncommon but serious complication which carries with it significant mortality and morbidity. This review analyzes the entity of stent thrombosis from a historical and clinical perspective, and chronicles the evolution of this condition through the various generations of stent development, from bare metal to first-generation, second-generation, and third-generation drug-eluting stents. It also delineates the specific risk factors associated with stent thrombosis and comprehensively examines the literature related to each of these risks. Finally, it highlights the preventative strategies that can be garnered from the existing data, and concludes that a multifactorial approach is necessary to combat the occurrence of stent thrombosis, with higher risk groups, such as patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, meriting further research. PMID:25657588

  13. A complicated case of deep vein thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Cerutti, Elena; Colagrande, Paola; Provera, Edoardo; Giusti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a patient with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) associated to portal vein thrombosis (PVT), complicated by hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). The pathogenesis of DVT is multifactorial; among risk factors we can list: transitory situations (surgical interventions, infectious diseases with fever, traumas), acquired conditions (neoplasms, antiphospholipid syndrome) or genetically determined situations (thrombophilia). PVT of the sovrahepatic vein...

  14. Mesenteric angina through superior mesenteric venous thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, Divya; Aijaz, Faisal; Krijgsman, Brandon

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a 67-year-old male with mesenteric venous thrombosis resulting in mesenteric angina, where early diagnosis made a favourable outcome possible through prompt anticoagulation and bowel rest. Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a relatively rare but important cause of bowel ischaemia, as a delay in diagnosis is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis through computed tomography scanning and subsequent treatment resulted in resolution of the thrombus with ...

  15. Mesenteric venous thrombosis: multidisciplinary therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Pieri

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a particular form of intestinal ischemia related to high mortality. The lack of a characteristic clinical picture often leads to a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic classification. We report the case of a young woman, using estrogenic and progestinic oral therapy, affected by a severe form of mesenteric thrombosis and complicated by segmental post ischemic stenosis of small intestine.

  16. Behçet's Disease Complicated with Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiuhua; Li, Guohua; Huang, Xinxiang; Wang, Li; Liu, Wanli; Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the clinical features of Behçet's disease (BD) complicated with thrombosis. Medical records of patients with BD at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from 1993 to 2013 were reviewed to identify thrombosis. Of the 766 patients with BD, 93 patients (16 female and 77 male) developed thrombosis. The most common thrombosis was extremity vein thrombosis (86.0%), including deep vein thrombosis (n = 78) and superficial thrombophlebitis (n = 4). The other thrombosis types associated with BD in descending frequency of order were: vena cava thrombosis (30.1%), pulmonary thromboembolism (15.1%), cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) (12.9%), intracardiac thrombosis (8.6%), Budd–Chiari syndrome (7.5%), and renal vein thrombosis (4.3%), etc. Venous thrombosis is more frequent than arterial thrombosis, and most of patients (94.6%) experienced multiple thrombosis. A male predominance of extremity vein thrombosis and positive pathergy test, and a female predominance of CVT and genital ulcers were noted. All of these patients exhibited active disease during the emergence of thrombotic events. After treating with glucocorticosteroids, immunosuppressants, and/or anticoagulants, the thrombosis resolved in 89 patients. Three patients died from aneurysm rupture, myocardial infarction and Budd–Chiari syndrome, respectively. One patient with septic shock discontinued therapy during follow-up. Thrombosis in BD patients is male predominance, mainly multiple and venous thrombosis is more common. Active disease patients are prone to thrombosis, which suggest the key role of immunosuppressive therapy for the complication. PMID:25526452

  17. Stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy: Dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlienger, M.; Lartigau, E.; Nataf, F.; Mornex, F.; Latorzeff, I.; Lisbona, A.; Mahe, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was the study of the successive steps permitting the prescription of dose in stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy, which includes radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The successive steps studied are: the choice of stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy among the therapeutic options, based on curative or palliative treatment intent, then the selection of lesions according to size/volume, pathological type and their number permitting the choice between radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, which have the same methodological basis. Clinical experience has determined the level of dose to treat the lesions and limit the irradiation of healthy adjacent tissues and organs at risk structures. The last step is the optimization of the different parameters to obtain a safe compromise between the lesion dose and healthy adjacent structures. Study of dose-volume histograms, coverage indices and 3D imaging permit the optimization of irradiation. For lesions close to or included in a critical area, the prescribed dose is planned using the inverse planing method. Implementation of the successively described steps is mandatory to insure the prescription of an optimized dose. The whole procedure is based on the delineation of the lesion and adjacent healthy tissues. There are sometimes difficulties to assess the delineation and the volume of the target, however improvement of local control rates and reduction of secondary effects are the proof that the totality of the successive procedures are progressively improved. In practice, stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy is a continually improved treatment method, which constantly benefits from improvements in the choice of indications, imaging, techniques of irradiation, planing/optimization methodology and irradiation technique and from data collected from prolonged follow-up. (authors)

  18. Cerebral sino-venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayama, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Tsunesaburo; Nakajima, Kenji

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of cerebral sino-venous thrombosis were reported. Repeated CT findings were studied and discussed on account of the treatments for those pathologic conditions. Those of studied cases are; a 22-year-old postpartum woman, a 42-year-old woman with irregular vaginal bleeding, and a 26-year-old man with severe reactive emesis after drinking alcohol. They were treated conservatively. Case 1 died in its acute stage. In the remaining ones, each had an uneventful recovery. CT scan findings of them manifested their exact clinical conditions. These findings were devided into two categories, one was direct signs expressed sino-venous occlusion, the other was indirect signs which appeared as a result of these occlusion. Direct signs cannot always get in every cases with sino-venous occlusion, but as for indirect signs, we can get various changes corresponding to the time taken CT photoes, and they are useful to decide appropriate treatments at that time. Considering suitable treatments for this disease, it is necessary to select most suitable ones according to their pathologic conditions, which may be precisely drawn with CT scans. (J.P.N.)

  19. Migraine before rupture of intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, Elena R; Gurary, Natalia M; Sakovich, Vladimir P

    2013-01-01

    Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA.......Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA....

  20. Phase contrast MRI in intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooij, P.

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are outpouchings of intracranial arteries that cause brain hemorrhage after rupture. Unruptured aneurysms can be treated but the risk of treatment may outweigh the risk of rupture. Local intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics can contribute substantially to the rupture risk estimation

  1. Acute surgical management in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zakaria, Zaitun

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a headache syndrome with progressive symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. Most commonly, it is a slow process where surveillance and medical management are the main treatment modalities. We describe herein an acute presentation with bilateral sixth nerve palsies, papilloedema and visual deterioration, where acute surgical intervention was a vision-saving operation.

  2. Computerised tomographic detection of intracranial complications of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These include cerebral, subdural and epidural abscesses, frontal bone osteomyelitis. The maxillary and ethmoidal sinuses were mostly involved and can be implicated as the sinogenic causes of intracranial infections. Sphenoidal sinus was not involved in any of the patients. Key Words: Intracranial Complications, Sinusitis, ...

  3. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-01-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma. (orig.)

  4. MRI of intracranial meningeal malignant fibrous histiocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, A.; Ochi, M.; Hayashi, K.; Hirata, K.; Hayashi, T.; Yasunaga, A.; Shibata, S.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the CT and MRI findings in a patient with primary intracranial meningeal malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH). CT delineated the anatomical relations and MRI aided in tissue characterisation. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the MRI findings in primary intracranial meningeal MFH. (orig.). With 1 fig

  5. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-11-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma.

  6. Mortality caused by intracranial bleeding in non-severe hemophilia A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomans, J I; Eckhardt, C L; Reitter-Pfoertner, S E; Holmström, M; van Gorkom, B Laros; Leebeek, F W G; Santoro, C; Haya, S; Meijer, K; Nijziel, M R; van der Bom, J G; Fijnvandraat, K

    2017-06-01

    Essentials Data on bleeding-related causes of death in non-severe hemophilia A (HA) patients are scarce. Such data may provide new insights into areas of care that can be improved. Non-severe HA patients have an increased risk of dying from intracranial bleeding. This demonstrates the need for specialized care for non-severe HA patients. Background Non-severe hemophilia (factor VIII concentration [FVIII:C] of 2-40 IU dL -1 ) is characterized by a milder bleeding phenotype than severe hemophilia A. However, some patients with non-severe hemophilia A suffer from severe bleeding complications that may result in death. Data on bleeding-related causes of death, such as fatal intracranial bleeding, in non-severe patients are scarce. Such data may provide new insights into areas of care that can be improved. Aims To describe mortality rates, risk factors and comorbidities associated with fatal intracranial bleeding in non-severe hemophilia A patients. Methods We analyzed data from the INSIGHT study, an international cohort study of all non-severe hemophilia A patients treated with FVIII concentrates during the observation period between 1980 and 2010 in 34 participating centers across Europe and Australia. Clinical data and vital status were collected from 2709 patients. We report the standardized mortality rate for patients who suffered from fatal intracranial bleeding, using a general European male population as a control population. Results Twelve per cent of the 148 deceased patients in our cohort of 2709 patients died from intracranial bleeding. The mortality rate between 1996 and 2010 for all ages was 3.5-fold higher than that in the general population (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.0-5.8). Patients who died from intracranial bleeding mostly presented with mild hemophilia without clear comorbidities. Conclusion Non-severe hemophilia A patients have an increased risk of dying from intracranial bleeding in comparison with the general population. This demonstrates the

  7. Enterprise stent in recanalizing non-acute atherosclerotic intracranial internal carotid artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Zhigang; Ji, Yong; Ding, Xuan; Zang, Yizheng; Wang, Chengwei

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the safety and effectiveness of recanalization in non-acute occlusion of intracranial internal carotid arteries using the flexible Enterprise self-expanding stent. From June 2014 to June 2016, 12 consecutive patients with non-acute occlusion of intracranial internal carotid arteries received endovascular recanalization with Enterprise stenting. All patients received medication for anti-platelet aggregation therapy before and after the operation. The perioperative complications and recanalization efficacy were evaluated with the modified Rankin scoring system and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) follow-up, respectively. Endovascular recanalization was successfully performed in 10 out of 12 patients with Enterprise stenting. Stent implantation following balloon dilatation failed in one patient because the lumen diameter was too small. Another recanalization failed because the guide wire could not pass through the occlusion. No perioperative mortality was observed. One case of acute thrombosis and one case of intraoperative carotid spasm occurred, but these were resolved with thrombolytic therapy by microcatheter exposure treatment and antispasmodic medications, respectively. DSA follow-up in seven patients revealed no re-occlusion. One stroke event occurred in the 10 patients who completed the follow-up. A meaningful improvement in the modified Rankin score during follow-up was suggested by Wilcoxon signed-rank test results. The Enterprise stent was shown to be safe and efficient in recanalizing non-acute atherosclerotic intracranial internal carotid artery occlusion. However, the long-term outcomes need to be further investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment of intracranial stenoses using the Neuroform stent system: initial experience in five cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haehnel, Stefan; Hartmann, Marius [University of Heidelberg Medical Center, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Neurology, Heidelberg (Germany); Ringleb, Peter [University of Heidelberg Medical Center, Division of Neurology, Department of Neurology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    We assessed the technical feasibility of balloon-assisted angioplasty with consecutive stenting using a flexible, self-expanding neurovascular stent for the treatment of intracranial arteriosclerotic vascular stenoses. Five consecutive patients with symptomatic drug-resistant stenoses of the intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) or the main stem of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) were treated by balloon-assisted angioplasty with consecutive stenting using the Neuroform stent system. Balloon dilatation of the stenoses and consecutive stent placement with complete coverage of the stenoses was feasible in all patients. One patient suffered acute thrombosis distally to the stented vessel segment which was successfully treated by fibrinolysis, and one patient suffered acute subarachnoid and parenchymal hemorrhage probably due to vessel perforation. In the other three patients, no complications occurred during or immediately after angioplasty. All patients were free of further ischemic events up to the 6-month follow-up. Our findings demonstrate that the Neuroform stent system can used successfully for the treatment of intracranial stenoses of the ICA and the main stem of the MCA. Although immediate angiographic results are promising, long-term angiographic and clinical follow-up is essential to demonstrate long-term outcome. (orig.)

  9. Interleukin 8 and venous thrombosis: evidence for a role of inflammation in thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aken, Benien E.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Rosendaal, Frits R.

    2002-01-01

    Elevated plasma levels of interleukin 8 (IL-8) were previously shown to be associated with recurrent venous thrombosis. To assess the risk of venous thrombosis, IL-8 plasma concentrations were measured in patients and control subjects of the Leiden Thrombophilia Study (LETS). This population based

  10. Treatment of superficial vein thrombosis to prevent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wichers, Iris M.; Di Nisio, Marcello; Büller, Harry R.; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCT) concerning the efficacy and safety of medical or surgical treatments of superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) for the prevention of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). A

  11. Treatment of symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis with Wingspan stent system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Wangchi; Li Guifu; Li Tielin; Zhu Jixiang; You Jinsong; Ma Zhaohui; Huang Yan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the safety of Gateway-Wingspan stent system in treating symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis and its effect of preventing and treating cerebral ischemic events. Methods: Interventional treatment by using Gateway-Wingspan sent system was carried out in 36 patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic arterial stenosis (a total of 38 lesions) who had failed to response the medication. Of the 32 cases, elective surgery was performed in 32 and emergent surgery in 4. Of the total 38 stenotic sites, 22 were located at the posterior cerebral blood circulation region, while 16 at the anterior circulation region. Results: The average degree of stenosis before stenting procedure was 72.6%±12.6%, the residual stenosis degree after balloon dilatation and stenting was 33.8%±15.2% and 23.6%±13.9%, respectively. The successful rate of treatment was 97.4%. Perioperative complications occurred in 4 patients, two from 32 cases who received elective surgery and other two from 4 cases who received emergent stent implantation. In cases receiving elective surgery, one suffered from perforating arterial branch occlusion and one occurred cerebral bleeding due to the rupture of middle cerebral artery caused by guide-wire. In patients receiving emergent stent implantation, acute stent thrombosis occurred in 2 cases during the interventional management (n=1) or 24 hours after stent placement (n=1). The overall complication rate was 11.1% (4/36). The 30-day composite ipsilateral stroke rate was 5.5% and the frequency of ipsilateral stroke within 30 days or ipsilateral stroke between 30 days and 12 months was 11.1% (4/36) during a mean follow-up time of 9.6 months (ranged between 1-24 months). DSA check-up was conducted in 10 cases and restenosis at the middle cerebral artery was detected in 2 cases. Conclusion: It is quite safe to use Gateway-Wingspan stent system for the treatment of symptomatic intracranial stenosis and its short-term clinical

  12. [Superficial venous thrombosis. A state of art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sándor, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    For a long time superficial thrombophlebitis has been thought to be a rather benign condition. Recently, when duplex ultrasound technique is used for the diagnosis more and more often, the disease is proved to be more dangerous than anticipated. Thrombosis propagates to the deep veins in 6-44% and pulmonary embolism was observed on the patients in 1,5-33%. We can calculate venous thromboembolic complications on every fourth patient. Diagnosis is clinical, but duplex ultrasound examination is mandatory, for estimation of the thrombus extent, for exclusion of the deep venous thrombosis and for follow up. Both legs should be checked with ultrasound, because simultaneous deep venous thrombosis can develop on the contralateral limb. Two different forms can be distinguished: superficial venous thrombosis with, or without varicose veins. In cases of spontaneous, non varicous form, especially when the process is migrating or recurrent, a careful clinical examination is necessery for exclusion of malignant diseases and thrombophilia. The treatment options are summarised on the basis of recent international consensus statements. The American and German guidelines are similar. Compression and mobilisation are cornerstones of the therapy. For a short segment thrombosis non steroidal antiinflammatory drugs are effective. For longer segments low molecular-weight heparins are preferred. Information on the effect of the novel oral anticoagulants for the therapy is lacking but they may appear to be effective in the future for this indication. When thrombus is close to the sapheno-femoral or sapheno-popliteal junction crossectomy (high ligation), or low molecular-weight heparin in therapeutic doses are indicated. The term superficial thrombophlebitis should be discouraged, because inflammation and infection is not the primary pathology. It should be called correctly superficial venous thrombosis in order to avoid the unnecessary administration of antibiotics and the misconception

  13. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhigang; Li Guoxin; Qu Yuanming; Tang Jun; Liu Zuoqin

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To setup an endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysm with detachable balloon and micro-coil. Methods: Trans-femoral artery Seldinger's catheterization was used. Balloons and free MDS, GDC micro-coils were pushed into the aneurysm or carrying arteries. Results: No mortality occurred in authors' group. Internal carotid arteries (ICA) were occluded with detachable balloons in 5 aneurysms at sinus segment of ICA and 4 traumatic pseudo-aneurysms. No complications occurred. 9 aneurysms were completely occluded with micro-coils and 2 were partly (95%) occluded. 2 patients got mild paralysis due to vasospasm or mal detaching of MDS coils. Conclusions: Balloon occlusion of ICA for treatment of aneurysm at sinus segment is safe and effective in case of having abundant collateral circulation. Coil occlusion of intracranial aneurysm is a promising method of endovascular treatment. Compared with MDS, GDC coil is safer but expensive. Free coil is not very safe theoretically, but can be used with careful consideration as it is much cheaper

  14. Management of intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Susumu; Takahashi, Jun C.

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are congenital lesions that can cause serious neurological deficits or even death. They can manifest as intracranial hemorrhage, epileptic seizure, or other symptoms such as headache or tinnitus. They are detected by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Recently there have been significant developments in the management of AVMs. In this paper, the authors represent an overview of the epidemiology of AVMs and the existing treatment strategies. AVMs are ideally excised by standard microsurgical techniques. The grading scale which was proposed by Spetzler and Martin is widely used to estimate the risk of direct surgery. Stereotactic radiosurgery such as that using a gamma knife is very useful for small lesions located in eloquent areas. Technological advances in endovascular surgery have provided new alternatives in the treatment of AVMs. Currently indications for embolization can be divided into presurgical embolization in large AVMs to occlude deep arterial feeding vessels and embolization before stereotactic radiosurgery to reduce the size of the nidus. Palliative embolization can be also applied for patients with large, inoperable AVMs who are suffering from progressive neurological deficits secondary to venous hypertension and/or arterial steal phenomenon. (author)

  15. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kapapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N=4 or multiple (N=6 doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P≤0.05. Results. (1 Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2 The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3 There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients.

  16. A case of intracranial teratoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiota, Madoka; Ando, Yukinori; Takashima, Sachio; Hori, Tomokatsu; Hiramoto, Shinsuke.

    1985-01-01

    A case of neonatal intracranial teratoma was examined on ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and tumor markers in serum, CSF and tumor tissue. This 27-day-old male infant was pointed out a head enlargement by prenatal sonography at 39 weeks' gestation. He admitted to our hospital at the age of one day after cesarean section. His birth weight was 4430 g and head circumstance 47.5 cm. On admission, physical and neurological examinations reveled big head, weak crying, twiching and sun set phenomenon. The optic fundi were normal. The CT scan at 1 day demonstrated the marked enlargement of lateral ventricles and the supratentorial large polycystic mass with calcifications at midline area. Transfontanelle sonography also delineated the polycystic mass and enlarged ventricle. Ventricular tap showed bloody CSF. Alpha-Fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen level in CSF was higher than those in serum. Postmortam tumor necropsy revealed a teratoma including mature squamous epithelium, muscle, cartilage, bone, lymphoid and nervous tissue. There were immature mesenchymal cells in some parts. The immune histochemical method showed positive staining to AFP in intestinal and respiratory epithelium, and to CEA in intestinal epithelium and immature mesenchymal cells. In summary, these characteristic findings of US, CT and tumor marker in CSF have a diagnostic value of intracranial teratoma. (author)

  17. International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis core curriculum project: core competencies in clinical thrombosis and hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLintock, C; Pabinger, I; Bauer, K A; Laffan, M; Angchaisuksiri, P; Rezende, S M; Middeldorp, S; Ross, M

    2016-01-01

    Essentials The priority of ISTH was to establish a global core curriculum in thrombosis and hemostasis. International survey to determine competencies required for clinical specialists was carried out in the field. Competency framework provides a reference point for mapping and developing regional curricula. Core curriculum informs and links to a variety of ISTH educational materials. Background The International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) identified the need for an international core curriculum on thrombosis and hemostasis for its society members and the larger thrombosis and hemostasis community. Aims The current research sought consensus on the core competencies required by medical doctors who are ready to practise as independent clinical specialists in thrombosis and hemostasis with the aim of developing a core clinical curriculum for specialists in the field. Method A draft list of competencies was developed by the Working Group and formed the basis of an online survey. ISTH members and the larger thrombosis and hemostasis community were asked to rate the importance of each competency, on a Likert scale, for clinical specialists in thrombosis and hemostasis. Results There were a total of 644 responses to the online survey with broad geographical representation. There was general agreement on what level of competency would be required for clinical specialists in thrombosis and hemostasis at the specified level of training. Conclusions Using the survey to gain consensus on the level of competency required by clinical specialists in the field of thrombosis and hemostasis enabled the development of a core clinical curriculum that has been endorsed by the ISTH Council. The curriculum will offer a framework and international reference that will be used by the society, by national and regional organizations, and for further research. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  18. Renal vascular thrombosis in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resontoc, Lourdes Paula R; Yap, Hui-Kim

    2016-06-01

    Neonatal renal vascular thrombosis is rare but has devastating sequelae. The renal vein is more commonly affected than the renal artery. Most neonates with renal vein thrombosis present with at least one of the three cardinal signs, namely, abdominal mass, macroscopic hematuria and thrombocytopenia, while unilateral renal artery thrombosis presents with transient hypertension. Contrast angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis but because of exposure to radiation and contrast agents, Doppler ultrasound scan is widely used instead. Baseline laboratory tests for platelet count, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen concentration are essential before therapy is initiated. Maternal blood is tested for lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibody. Evaluation for prothrombotic disorders is warranted when thrombosis is clinically significant, recurrent or spontaneous. Management should involve a multidisciplinary team that includes neonatologists, radiologists, pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. In addition to supportive therapy, recent guidelines recommend at least prophylactic heparin therapy in the majority of cases to prevent thrombus extension. Thrombolytic therapy is reserved for bilateral thrombosis compromising kidney function. Long-term sequelae, such as kidney atrophy, systemic hypertension and chronic kidney disease, are common, and follow-up by pediatric nephrologists is recommended for monitoring of kidney function, early detection and management of hypertension and chronic kidney disease.

  19. Update of thrombosis in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leebeek, Frank W G

    2016-04-01

    With the introduction of thalidomide and multi-agent chemotherapy in the treatment of multiple myeloma around 15years ago a strongly increased risk of venous thrombosis was observed. The occurrence of venous thrombosis in multiple myeloma is not only determined by the kind of treatment, but also by several other factors, including disease specific factors, patient-specific factors, changes in pro-and anticoagulant factors and fibrinolysis. Studies showed a prevalence of up to 25% in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Therefore these patients nowadays receive prophylaxis with aspirin, low molecular weight heparin or warfarin in order to reduce the risk of venous thrombosis. It is however still debatable which patients should receive prophylaxis and what the best kind of prophylaxis is, considering both the risk of thrombosis and the risk of bleeding. In recent years several new anti-myeloma agents have been developed and investigated in large clinical studies. The risk of thrombosis using these new drugs seems less than with thalidomide and lenalidomide-based regimens. In this article an update on prevention and management of thrombotic events in patients with multiple myeloma is given. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intracranial stenosis in cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Saima; Xu, Xin; Ikram, M Kamran; Vrooman, Henri; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Chen, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial stenosis is a common vascular lesion observed in Asian and other non-Caucasian stroke populations. However, its role in cognitive impairment and dementia has been under-studied. We, therefore, examined the association of intracranial stenosis with cognitive impairment, dementia and their subtypes in a memory clinic case-control study, where all subjects underwent detailed neuropsychological assessment and 3 T neuroimaging including three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography. Intracranial stenosis was defined as ≥50% narrowing in any of the intracranial arteries. A total of 424 subjects were recruited of whom 97 were classified as no cognitive impairment, 107 as cognitive impairment no dementia, 70 vascular cognitive impairment no dementia, 121 Alzheimer's Disease, and 30 vascular dementia. Intracranial stenosis was associated with dementia (age/gender/education - adjusted odds ratios (OR): 4.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.93-11.60) and vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (OR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.59-9.93). These associations were independent of cardiovascular risk factors and MRI markers. However, the association with Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia became attenuated in the presence of white matter hyperintensities. Intracranial stenosis is associated with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia independent of MRI markers. In Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia, this association is mediated by cerebrovascular disease. Future studies focusing on perfusion and functional markers are needed to determine the pathophysiological mechanism(s) linking intracranial stenosis and cognition so as to identify treatment strategies.

  1. Analysis of periinterventional complications of intracranial angioplasty and stenting: A single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silber, Toni; Ziemann, Ulf; Ernemann, Ulrike; Bischof, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Periinterventional complications in 7.5% of patients with intracranial artery stenting. • 2.5% of periinterventional complications were perforator strokes. • 3.8% of patients developed a hemorrhagic stroke due to reperfusion injury. • Complications could be reduced by individualized measures to prevent perforator stroke or reperfusion injury. - Abstract: Background and purpose: Treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease by angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) is limited by a high rate of periinterventional strokes. We performed a detailed analysis of these strokes at our center in order to identify strategies to reduce the risk of periinterventional complications. Methods: Case records and imaging data of 80 patients with a symptomatic 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery treated with PTAS between July 2007 and December 2013 were reviewed. All patients had a sufficient response to aspirin and clopidogrel. Periinterventional strokes were categorized as either ischemic (perforator territory, distal embolic or delayed stent thrombosis) or hemorrhagic (intraparenchymal, subarachnoid). Results: Periinterventional complications occurred in 6/80 (7.5%) patients, consisting of 2 ischemic strokes (2.5%, both perforator territory), 3 hemorrhagic strokes (3.8%, 2 intraparenchymal due to reperfusion injury, 1 subarachnoid due to vessel rupture) and one death (1.3%) unrelated to stroke. All strokes occurred within 24 h after PTAS. Conclusion: Our retrospective data analysis suggests that the risk of periinterventional stroke after PTAS of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease might be reduced by sufficient antiplatelet therapy and optimized management of patients with high risk for reperfusion injury or perforator strokes, including selection of a stenting device adapted to individual vessel morphology

  2. Analysis of periinterventional complications of intracranial angioplasty and stenting: A single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silber, Toni; Ziemann, Ulf [Center of Neurology, Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tübingen (Germany); Ernemann, Ulrike [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University of Tübingen (Germany); Bischof, Felix, E-mail: felix.bischof@uni-tuebingen.de [Center of Neurology, Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tübingen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Periinterventional complications in 7.5% of patients with intracranial artery stenting. • 2.5% of periinterventional complications were perforator strokes. • 3.8% of patients developed a hemorrhagic stroke due to reperfusion injury. • Complications could be reduced by individualized measures to prevent perforator stroke or reperfusion injury. - Abstract: Background and purpose: Treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease by angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) is limited by a high rate of periinterventional strokes. We performed a detailed analysis of these strokes at our center in order to identify strategies to reduce the risk of periinterventional complications. Methods: Case records and imaging data of 80 patients with a symptomatic 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery treated with PTAS between July 2007 and December 2013 were reviewed. All patients had a sufficient response to aspirin and clopidogrel. Periinterventional strokes were categorized as either ischemic (perforator territory, distal embolic or delayed stent thrombosis) or hemorrhagic (intraparenchymal, subarachnoid). Results: Periinterventional complications occurred in 6/80 (7.5%) patients, consisting of 2 ischemic strokes (2.5%, both perforator territory), 3 hemorrhagic strokes (3.8%, 2 intraparenchymal due to reperfusion injury, 1 subarachnoid due to vessel rupture) and one death (1.3%) unrelated to stroke. All strokes occurred within 24 h after PTAS. Conclusion: Our retrospective data analysis suggests that the risk of periinterventional stroke after PTAS of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease might be reduced by sufficient antiplatelet therapy and optimized management of patients with high risk for reperfusion injury or perforator strokes, including selection of a stenting device adapted to individual vessel morphology.

  3. Lower extremity dep vein thrombosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlmutt, L.; Fellows, K.E.; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

    1983-01-01

    Of 113 leg venograms performed in patients of all ages between 1969 and 1982, 68 were in children 16 years old or less. The patients were all studied on a tilt table (method of Rabinov and Paulin) in a head-up, 40-50 0 incline without tourniquets, supporting their weight on the unaffected leg. Among the 68 venograms, 12 (18%) were positive for deep vein thrombosis. The clinical settings for thrombosis in children were post-catheterization (two patients), post surgery (two), tumor/tumor therapy (three), drug abuse (one), and idiopathic (three). There were no long-term clinical sequelae in five patients. Pulmonary infarction occurred in three, and three patients required either long-term anticoagulation or IVC clipping. Clinical diagnosis is no more accurate for the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis in children than it is in adults. Venography is the best method for making an accurate diagnosis and directing subsequent therapy.(orig.)

  4. Straight sinus thrombosis during neurosurgical operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hiroto; Nitta, Naoki; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Perioperative straight sinus thrombosis is extremely rare. A 59-year-old female was admitted to our department because of incidentally found small anterior cerebral artery (A1) aneurysm with microbleeding. After clipping the cerebral aneurysm, she had delayed emergence from anesthesia, total aphasia, and right hemiparesis. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head showed hyperintensity in the bilateral caudate nuclei, putamina, and thalami, and computed tomography of the head showed a hyperdense straight sinus, suggesting straight sinus thrombosis. Her neurologic symptoms improved gradually, and she achieved a full clinical recovery, with radiological evidence of recanalization of the straight sinus at follow-up. The possibility of straight sinus thrombosis should be considered in postoperative patients with unexplained postoperative deficits when MRI demonstrates hyperintensity in the bilateral basal ganglia and thalami on FLAIR signal images.

  5. Thrombosis of the Abdominal Veins in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riten Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal venous thrombosis is a rare form of venous thromboembolic disease in children. While mortality rates are low, a significant proportion of affected children may suffer long-term morbidity. Additionally, given the infrequency of these thrombi, there is lack of stringent research data and evidence-based treatment guidelines. Nonetheless, pediatric hematologists and other subspecialists are likely to encounter these problems in practice. This review is therefore intended to provide a useful guide on the clinical diagnosis and management of children with these rare forms of venous thromboembolic disease. Herein, we will thus appraise the current knowledge regarding major forms of abdominal venous thrombosis in children. The discussion will focus on the epidemiology, presentation, diagnosis, management, and outcomes of (1 inferior vena cava, (2 portal, (3 mesenteric, (4 hepatic, and (5 renal vein thrombosis.

  6. A current approach to superficial vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Martin H; Fajer, Simone

    2013-02-01

    Superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) is an entity commonly encountered in practice. While the clinical diagnosis is reasonably straightforward, care must be taken to exclude concurrent thrombosis of the deep veins, and the possibility of the presence of occult systemic illness such as malignancy should be considered. Recent studies of the epidemiology of SVT demonstrate a high incidence of concurrent deep vein thrombosis emphasizing the need for surveying the deep veins using compression ultrasonography. Treatment decisions are may now be based upon the results of randomized clinical trials and should include a period of anticoagulation using fondaparinux or a low molecular weight heparin. The appropriate doses and duration of therapy are not fully established, and the cost-effectiveness of these drugs for the treatment of SVT needs further evaluation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Intracranial hemorrhage due to intracranial hypertension caused by the superior vena cava syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Abedi-Valugerdi, Golbarg; Liska, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have an intracr......We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have...... an intracranial hemorrhage secondary to a superior vena cava syndrome. The condition appears to be caused by a reversible transient rise in intracranial pressure, as a result of compression of the venous return from the brain. Treatment consisted of surgery for the aortic pseudoaneurysm, which led...... to normalization of the intracranial pressure and resorption of the intracranial hemorrhage....

  8. Stent-assisted angioplasty for intracranial atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Toshinori; Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Hamasaki, Osamu; Sakoda, Katsuaki

    2002-01-01

    We report on two patients with intracranial atherosclerosis of the carotid artery or vertebral artery treated with stent-assisted angioplasty. Both patients have severe intracranial atherosclerosis (>70%) with refractory symptoms despite optimal medical treatment. In both patients, a coronary balloon-expandable stent was successfully placed using a protective balloon technique without procedural complications. The patients were asymptomatic and neurologically intact at a mean clinical follow-up of 13 months. Follow-up angiograms did not show restenosis 3 or 4 months after procedure, respectively. Stent-assisted angioplasty for intracranial atherosclerosis in the elective patient has proven effective, with an acceptable low rate of morbidity and mortality. (orig.)

  9. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis with Nonhemorrhagic Lesions: Clinical Correlates and Prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferro, José M.; Canhão, Patrícia; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Stam, Jan; Barinagarrementeria, Fernando; Stolz, Erwin

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Brain imaging of patients with acute cerebral venous thrombosis often shows parenchymal hemorrhagic and nonhemorrhagic lesions. The clinical relevance of nonhemorrhagic lesions is poorly known. Method: In the International Study on Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus Thrombosis

  10. Very late bare-metal stent thrombosis, rare but stormy!

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ali, Mohammed

    2011-08-01

    Recurrent in-stent thrombosis is rarely reported, with catastrophic clinical consequences of either acute coronary syndrome or death. We present a case of recurrent in-stent thrombosis with its outcome and a concise literature review.

  11. Clinical features and diagnosis of venous thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsh, J.; Hull, R.D.; Raskob, G.E.

    1986-12-01

    The clinical diagnosis of venous thrombosis is inaccurate because the clinical findings are both insensitive and nonspecific. The sensitivity of clinical diagnosis is low because many potentially dangerous venous thrombi are clinically silent. The specificity of clinical diagnosis is low because the symptoms or signs of venous thrombosis all can be caused by nonthrombotic disorders. A current approach to the diagnosis of clinically suspected venous thrombosis favors the use of impedance plethysmography over Doppler ultrasonography as the main test for this disorder. This is because impedance plethysmography is precise and objective, whereas the interpretation of Doppler ultrasonography is subjective and requires considerable skill and experience to form reliable diagnoses. The use of serial impedance plethysmography has been evaluated recently in a prospective study. The rationale of repeated impedance plethysmography evaluation is based on the premise that calf vein thrombi are only clinically important when they extend into the proximal veins, at which point detection with impedance plethysmography is possible. Therefore, by performing repeated examinations with impedance plethysmography in patients with clinically suspected venous thrombosis, it is possible to identify patients with extending calf vein thrombosis who can be treated appropriately. Impedance plethysmography is performed immediately on referral; if it is positive in the absence of clinical conditions that are known to produce falsely positive results, the diagnosis of venous thrombosis is established, and the patient is treated accordingly. If the result of the initial impedance plethysmography evaluation is negative, anticoagulant therapy is withheld, and impedance plethysmography is repeated the following day, again on day 5 to 7 and on day 10 to 14. 87 references.

  12. Hypertensive response to raised intracranial pressure in infancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, A M; Whitelaw, A G

    1988-01-01

    Mean arterial pressure and intracranial pressure were measured serially in six infants with intracranial hypertension (intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg), and cerebral perfusion pressure was calculated from their difference. Overall, mean arterial pressure increased with rising intracranial pressure at a mean rate of 0.20 mm Hg/mm Hg. This caused a fall in cerebral perfusion pressure with increasing intracranial pressure at a mean rate of 0.80 mm Hg/mm Hg overall, although cerebral ...

  13. Headache following intracranial neuroendovascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Eric P; Moskowitz, Shaye I; Tepper, Stewart J; Gupta, Rishi; Novak, Eric; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Stillman, Mark J

    2012-05-01

    Predicting who will develop post-procedure headache (PPH) following intracranial endovascular procedures (IEPs) would be clinically useful and potentially could assist in reducing the excessive diagnostic testing so often obtained in these patients. Although limited safety data exist, the use of triptans or dihydroergotamine (DHE) often raise concern when used with pre/post-coiled aneurysms. We sought to determine risk factors for PPH following IEP, to evaluate the utility of diagnostic testing in patients with post-coil acute headache (HA), and to record whether triptans and DHE have been used safely in this clinical setting. We conducted a retrospective chart review of adult patients undergoing IEPs. Bivariate analyses were conducted to compare patients who did and did not develop PPH. We reviewed records pertaining to 372 patients, of whom 263 underwent intracranial coil embolizations, 21 acrylic glue embolizations, and 88 stent placements. PPH occurred in 72% of coil patients, 33% of glue patients, and 14% of stent patients. Significant risk factors for post-coil HA were female gender, any pre-coil HA history, smoking, and anxiety/depression. A pre-stent history of HA exceeding 1 year's duration, and smoking were risk factors for post-stent HA. A pre-glue history of HA exceeding 1 year was the only risk factor for post-glue HA. In the small subgroup available for study, treatment with triptans or DHE was not associated with adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Diagnostic testing was low yield. Occurrence of PPH was common after IEPs and especially so with coiling and in women, smokers, and those with anxiety/depression, and was often of longer duration than allowed by current International Classification of Headache Disorders-II criteria. The yield of diagnostic testing was low, and in a small subgroup treatment with triptans or DHE did not cause adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  14. Interventional therapy of mesenteric venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xuan; Ouyang Qiang; Xiao Xiangsheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effect of interventional therapy in treating intestinal ischemia of mesenteric venous thrombosis. Methods: Twelve cases (male 7 cases, female 5 cases; ranging from 33 to 86 years of age) of mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT) were treated with percutaneous transhepatic mesenteric venous thrombectomy and thrombolysis associated with papaverin perfusion via superior mesenteric artery. Results: Seven of the 12 cases recovered; 3 cases were undertaken laparotomy; 2 died within 30 days respectively. No severe complications occurred in all of the 12 cases. Conclusions: Interventional therapy of MVT is a safe and effective method with reduction of the mortality. (authors)

  15. Venous thrombosis during pregnancy: leg and trimester of presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginsberg, J. S.; Brill-Edwards, P.; Burrows, R. F.; Bona, R.; Prandoni, P.; Büller, H. R.; Lensing, A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to determine the relative frequencies of left and right leg venous thrombosis during pregnancy and the frequencies of venous thrombosis during the three trimesters, a cohort study of 60 consecutive patients with a first episode of venous thrombosis during pregnancy was performed.

  16. Platelets are versatile cells: New discoveries in hemostasis, thrombosis, immune responses, tumor metastasis and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohong Ruby; Zhang, Dan; Oswald, Brigitta Elaine; Carrim, Naadiya; Wang, Xiaozhong; Hou, Yan; Zhang, Qing; Lavalle, Christopher; McKeown, Thomas; Marshall, Alexandra H; Ni, Heyu

    2016-12-01

    Platelets are small anucleate blood cells generated from megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and cleared in the reticuloendothelial system. At the site of vascular injury, platelet adhesion, activation and aggregation constitute the first wave of hemostasis. Blood coagulation, which is initiated by the intrinsic or extrinsic coagulation cascades, is the second wave of hemostasis. Activated platelets can also provide negatively-charged surfaces that harbor coagulation factors and markedly potentiate cell-based thrombin generation. Recently, deposition of plasma fibronectin, and likely other plasma proteins, onto the injured vessel wall has been identified as a new "protein wave of hemostasis" that may occur even earlier than the first wave of hemostasis, platelet accumulation. Although no experimental evidence currently exists, it is conceivable that platelets may also contribute to this protein wave of hemostasis by releasing their granule fibronectin and other proteins that may facilitate fibronectin self- and non-self-assembly on the vessel wall. Thus, platelets may contribute to all three waves of hemostasis and are central players in this critical physiological process to prevent bleeding. Low platelet counts in blood caused by enhanced platelet clearance and/or impaired platelet production are usually associated with hemorrhage. Auto- and allo-immune thrombocytopenias such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia may cause life-threatening bleeding such as intracranial hemorrhage. When triggered under pathological conditions such as rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque, excessive platelet activation and aggregation may result in thrombosis and vessel occlusion. This may lead to myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke, the major causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Platelets are also involved in deep vein thrombosis and thromboembolism, another leading cause of mortality. Although fibrinogen has been

  17. Intracranial EEG Connectivity Analysis and Result Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Petr; Janeček, Jiří; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Chládek, Jan; Brázdil, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2012), s. 275-279 ISSN 2010-3638 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Connectivity * Correlation * Intracranial EEG * Signal Processing Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  18. MR angiography after coiling of intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Endovascular occlusion with detachable coils has become an alternative treatment to neurosurgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms over the last two decades. Its minimal invasiveness is the most important advantage of this treatment compared to clipping. The disadvantage of occlusion

  19. The commonly missed diagnosis of intracranial hypotension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlee N. Ruggeri-McKinley, BSN, RN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a 28 year old female who presented with a subacute onset of a severe throbbing and stabbing headache after a morning spin class 9 months ago. We confirmed the diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension cause by a cerebrospinal fluid leak. The headache finally resolved after a 55 ml blood patch. Affecting an estimated 5/100,000 patients, spontaneous intracranial hypotension is considered rare in medical literature. Many patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension are incapacitated for years and even decades. The misdiagnosis of intracranial hypotension can have serious consequences and lead to unnecessary testing and treatment. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of this diagnosis when evaluating a patient with acute head pain. Considering that physical exams are usually normal, clinicians must focus on the patient history and physical. Clues in the patient interviewing process can lead to an immediate and accurate diagnosis.

  20. Collet-Sicard syndrome: a rare but important presentation of internal jugular vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Shermyn; Lee, Kim En

    2017-01-01

    We describe a rare neurological presentation of internal jugular vein thrombosis induced by central venous catheter placement in a patient with cancer. A 71-year-old man gave a 3-week history of dysphagia and dysarthria with left-sided neck pain and headache. He was receiving chemotherapy for appendiceal adenocarcinoma. On examination, he had left 9th-12th cranial neuropathies, manifesting as voice hoarseness, decreased palatal movement, absent gag reflex, weakness of scapular elevation and left-sided tongue wasting. CT scan of neck showed the left subclavian central venous catheter tip was in the left internal jugular vein. Skull base MRI showed thrombus within the left jugular foramen extending intracranially. We diagnosed Collet-Sicard syndrome secondary to thrombosis in the sigmoid-jugular venous complex. His headache and neck pain resolved 2 days after removing the catheter and starting anticoagulation. Collet-Sicard syndrome is an unusual syndrome of lower cranial nerve palsies, often signifying disease at the skull base, including malignancy, trauma or vascular causes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma during rivaroxaban treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruschel, Leonardo Gilmone; Rego, Felipe Marques Monteiro do; Milano, Jeronimo Buzetti; Jung, Gustavo Simiano; Silva Junior, Luis Fernando; Ramina, Ricardo, E-mail: leonardoruschel@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Neurologia de Curitiba (INC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    According to our research, this is the first case described in the literature of spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma secondary to the use of Xarelto®. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematomas are rarely described in the literature. They are associated with infectious diseases of the skull, coagulation disorders, vascular malformations of the dura mater and metastasis to the skull. Long-term post-marketing monitoring and independent reports will probably detect the full spectrum of hemorrhagic complications of the use of rivaroxaban. (author)

  2. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension without Orthostatic Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Kansu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of spontaneous intracranial hypotension that presented with unilateral abducens nerve palsy, without orthostatic headache. While sixth nerve palsies improved without any intervention, subdural hematoma was detected with magnetic resonance imaging. We conclude that headache may be absent in spontaneous intracranial hypotension and spontaneous improvement of sixth nerve palsy can occur, even after the development of a subdural hematoma

  3. Mucocele and pyocele with marked intracranial extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Machida, Tohru; Iio, Masahiro

    1984-08-01

    Two cases are presented with frontal sinus pyocele and fronto-ethmoid sinus mucocele in which marked intracranial extension is shown. Their intracranial part appeared as a large biconvex mass, which showed iso or slightly low density homogeneously and had gross calcification in the posterior rim. The findings of the paranasal sinuses and the orbit in tomograms and CT scans are thought to be useful in the differential diagnosis of chronic subdural hematoma.

  4. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma during rivaroxaban treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschel, Leonardo Gilmone; Rego, Felipe Marques Monteiro do; Milano, Jerônimo Buzetti; Jung, Gustavo Simiano; Silva, Luis Fernando; Ramina, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    According to our research, this is the first case described in the literature of spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma secondary to the use of Xareltor. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematomas are rarely described in the literature. They are associated with infectious diseases of the skull, coagulation disorders, vascular malformations of the dura mater and metastasis to the skull. Long-term post-marketing monitoring and independent reports will probably detect the full spectrum of hemorrhagic complications of the use of rivaroxaban.

  5. Risk Factors for Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvis, Suzanne M.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Zuurbier, Susanna M.; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare thrombotic disorder involving the cerebral veins and dural sinuses. In contrast to more common sites of venous thromboembolism (VTE), such as the legs and lungs, CVT mainly affects young adults and children, and women are affected three times more often

  6. Small juxtacortical hemorrhages in cerebral venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coutinho, Jonathan M.; van den Berg, René; Zuurbier, Susanna M.; VanBavel, Ed; Troost, Dirk; Majoie, Charles B.; Stam, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs) are common in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). We examined whether small juxtacortical hemorrhages (JCHs) are characteristic for CVT and studied their radiological and pathological properties. We identified all patients with CVT and an ICH at baseline

  7. Venous Thromboembolic Events After Cerebral Vein Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda, Bruno; Ferro, José M.; Canhão, Patrícia; Stam, Jan; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Barinagarrementeria, Fernando; Scoditti, Umberto

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose-After cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis (CVT), there is an increased risk of further venous thromboembolic events (VTEs). Time to a second cerebral or systemic venous thrombotic event and risk factors for recurrence have not been investigated in large prospective

  8. Recent advances in haemostasis and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, Andrew K

    2009-01-01

    To review recent advances in hemostasis and thrombosis. A review of recent studies that have changed our understanding of hemostasis and thrombosis. The cascade model of coagulation divided coagulation into extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Factor VIIa/tissue factor complex of the extrinsic system is the major initiating event of hemostasis in vivo. The intrinsic pathway (the contact system) does not play a physiologic role in hemostasis. The cascade model has been replaced with a cell-based model with three overlapping phases: initiation, amplification, and propagation. Although Factors XI and XII of the intrinsic system are not involved in hemostasis, they may have a key role in abnormal hemostasis or thrombosis. The pathways of coagulation and inflammation are intertwined at numerous points. The procoagulant factors, VIIa, Xa, and thrombin can activate members of the protease-activated receptor family, which play an important role in coagulation, inflammation, and vascular hemostasis. Factor V plays a crucial role in both the procoagulant and anticoagulant systems. New insights into hemostasis provide greater understanding of the causes of both venous and arterial thrombosis.

  9. Portal vein thrombosis following laparoscopic gastric plication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikabi, S; Chang, A; Durkin, N; Ramar, S

    2017-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) following laparoscopic surgery including Roux-en-Y bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and Nissen’s fundoplication is a rare but recognised complication. Laparoscopic gastric plication in a new procedure that is popular in some parts of the world. We report a case of a patient suffering PVT as a complication of this surgery. PMID:27652795

  10. Portal vein thrombosis complicating appendicitis | Ayantunde | West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Appendicitis is still the most common acute surgical abdomen all over the world and its complications may be grave. We report an adult case of acute appendicitis complicated by Portal Vein Thrombosis (PVT) and ascending portomesenteric phlebitis treated successfully with antibiotics and anticoagulation with no residual ...

  11. Effort thrombosis: A case study and discussion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    factors such as malignant neoplasms, treatment with central venous catheters or pacemakers, or cervical ribs. 2. These patients develop secondary thrombosis, and are older, and have concurrent systemic illness. 3. The anatomical relations of the subclavian vein in the thoracic outlet are: • superior and anterior: the clavicle, ...

  12. Travel and venous thrombosis: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, S.; Schreijer, A. J. M.; Cannegieter, S. C.; Bueller, H. R.; Rosendaal, F. R.; Middeldorp, S.

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, numerous publications on the association between venous thrombosis (VT) and travel have been published. Relative and absolute risks of VT after travel, and particularly after travel by air, have been studied in case-control and observational follow-up studies, whereas the effect

  13. Circadian Variation in Coronary Stent Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoud, Karim D.; Lennon, Ryan J.; Ting, Henry H.; Rihal, Charanjit S.; Holmes, David R.

    Objectives We sought to determine the circadian, weekly, and seasonal variation of coronary stent thrombosis. Background Other adverse cardiovascular events such as acute myocardial infarction are known to have higher incidences during the early morning hours, Mondays, and winter months. Methods The

  14. Mechanical and surgical bioprosthetic valve thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Wei Yao; Lloyd, Guy; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev

    2017-12-01

    Valve thrombosis can occur in mechanical prosthetic valves and is increasingly recognised in transcatheter and surgically implanted bioprosthetic valves. The risk of thrombosis of mechanical valves is higher in the mitral position compared with aortic position and in older generation valves (ball and cage valves). There is a wide spectrum of presentation from the asymptomatic patient to those with embolic complications or cardiogenic shock. A combination of transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography is required to assess the haemodynamic effect of thrombosis (valve gradients and area), leaflet motion and thrombus size. CT or cinefluoroscopy may be useful in selected cases to assess leaflet motion or help identify the aetiology of valve obstruction where echocardiography is inconclusive. Exclusion of pannus or vegetation is important. Management of non-obstructive thrombus is primarily optimisation of anti-coagulation. Treatment of obstructive thrombus requires a decision between slow, low-dose fibrinolysis or valve surgery. Factors which need to be considered include thrombus size, New York Heart Association Class, presence of concomitant coronary artery disease or other valve dysfunction, surgical risk and contraindication to fibrinolysis. This review examines the incidence, aetiology, clinical features, imaging algorithms and management of prosthetic valve thrombosis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Portal vein thrombosis following laparoscopic gastric plication

    OpenAIRE

    Som, R; Rikabi, S; Chang, A; Durkin, N; Ramar, S

    2017-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) following laparoscopic surgery including Roux-en-Y bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and Nissen’s fundoplication is a rare but recognised complication. Laparoscopic gastric plication in a new procedure that is popular in some parts of the world. We report a case of a patient suffering PVT as a complication of this surgery.

  16. MR findings of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Myung Kwan; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Choi, Choong Gom

    1994-01-01

    To describe MR findings of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. We reviewed 11 MR images of six patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The MR images were retrospectively analyzed in terms of location and signal intensity of the thrombi, parenchymal lesions such as hemorrhage and edema, and changes in follow up study obtained in 4 patients. The thrombus in venous sinus was visualized on MRI in all six patients. The most frequently involved sites were superior sagittal sinus(n=4) and left transverse sinus(n=4). Signal intensity of the thrombus was isointense or hyperintense on both T1- and T2-weighted images with loss of normal signal void of the sinus on all sequences in all patients. Parenchymal lesion was patients in five of six cases, manifested as local hemorrhage in three and edema in three cases(one case overlapped). Local edema seen in three patients was completely resolved on follow up study of seven to 29 days intervals. It is concluded that iso- or high signal intensity with loss of signal void in venous sinus is virtually diagnostic of venous sinus thrombosis. If there are local parenchymal lesions such as hemorrhage and/or edema of unknown causes, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis should be included in differential diagnosis

  17. Portal vein thrombosis in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Köckritz, Leona; De Gottardi, Andrea; Trebicka, Jonel

    2017-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis and possible severe complications such as mesenteric ischemia are rare, but can be life-threatening. However, different aspects of clinical relevance, diagnosis and management of PVT are still areas of uncertainty...

  18. Puzzles in practice: splenic vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Brittany; Marsh, Melanie; Walden, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    This report details a 58-year-old gentleman who presented to his outpatient primary care physician's clinic several times over four weeks for ongoing epigastric pain radiating into his left flank, dry heaving, and constipation. He was presumed to have gastritis at each visit and prescribed escalating doses of proton pump inhibitors. Due to the unrelenting pain, he eventually was admitted to the hospital and diagnosed with splenic vein thrombosis after computed tomography imaging of the abdomen. Our literature search revealed that pancreatic pathology is overwhelmingly the contributing factor to splenic vein thrombosis. Our patient had prominent collateral vasculature, suggesting that his splenic vein thrombosis was chronic in nature and likely the cause of his ongoing abdominal pain. Splenic vein thrombosis is an uncommon cause of abdominal pain, but one that should be included in the treating physician's differential diagnoses when abdominal pain is ongoing despite medical therapy. Although he had no evidence of initial findings on radiography, our patient was eventually diagnosed with biopsy-proven pancreatic cancer. Our case report demonstrates how patients presenting with persistent or worsening abdominal pain despite the use of proton pump inhibitors or other acid reducing agents and potential 'red flag' findings such as decreased appetite and weight loss should be worked up for other potential sources of abdominal pathology.

  19. Superficial vein thrombosis with hemorrhagic cerebral infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-wei CONG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Cerebral superficial vein thrombosis was rare and often misdiagnosed or missed for its various etiological factors, and complicated and nonspecific clinical manifestations. This paper reported one case of superficial vein thrombosis in right fronto-parietal lobe with hemorrhagic infarction. The anatomy of superficial vein, pathophysiological points, diagnosis and treatment of superficial vein thrombosis were reviewed to help to reduce missed diagnosis or misdiagnosis. Methods and Results A 18-year-old male patient had suffered from progressive headache for 4 years and weakness of left limbs for 2 d. Head MRI showed circular space-occupying lesion in right fronto-parietal lobe. Magnetic resonance venography (MRV examination showed the front two-thirds of the superior sagittal sinus was not clear. The lesions were removed and decompressive craniectomy was conducted, showing the brain tissue was pale, partly yellow or dark red, and superficial venous engorgement. Histological observation showed pial superficial vein thrombosis and subpial encephalomalacia, and multifocal hemorrhage of cerebral cortex and local parenchymal hemorrhage. A large number of "grid cells" and vascular "cuff" phenomenan were visible in surrounding tissue, and the parenchymal blood vessel proliferation was obvious. Left hand activity of the patient was obviously limited after the operation. Conclusions Clinical diagnosis of superficial vein thrombosis with hemorrhagic infarction is difficult, and brain imaging and serological examination can provide certain help. Much attention should be paid to the multidisciplinary diagnosis and treatment to reduce misdiagnosis or missed diagnosis, and gather clinical experience. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.01.007

  20. Isolated thrombosis of the external jugular vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomina, M J; Godet, C; Bagó, J; Pellisé, F; Puig, O; Villanueva, C

    2000-08-01

    Thrombosis of the external jugular vein (EJV) is an infrequent clinical condition that has been associated with central venous catheterization, head and neck infections, intravenous drug abuse, and compression at the affected site. The authors report a case of thrombotic obstruction of the EJV in the late postoperative period after laparoscopic anterior lumbar interbody fusion. A 40-year-old morbidly obese woman with a depressive syndrome was diagnosed with L5-S1 discopathy and was submitted to laparoscopic anterior isthmic fusion. The operation lasted approximately 6 hours, during which the patient remained in a supine decubitus and Trendelenburg position. The left radial artery, peripheral veins, and right internal jugular vein were canalized. The internal jugular vein catheter was electively withdrawn 24 hours after the intervention. The postoperative period was satisfactory, and the patient was started on prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin. She sat up and began walking at 24 hours and was discharged to her home 4 days after the procedure. Eight days after discharge she returned, experiencing right cervical pain. Palpation revealed a painful induration and erythematous area under the anterior edge of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Results of otoscopy and laryngoscopy were normal. Cervical echo-Doppler disclosed an image consistent with EJV thrombosis. The most frequent causes of jugular vein thrombosis are mentioned above. A higher incidence has been described after upper abdomen and pelvic surgery; other contributing factors are age, obesity, and associated illness. There are few references in the literature to position-induced EJV thrombosis in the late postoperative period. The authors' patient presented signs and symptoms of EJV thrombosis (probably because of various factors), which was confirmed by echo-Doppler study and treated with 10 days of calcic heparin.

  1. Esophagopericardial fistula, septic shock and intracranial hemorrhage with hydrocephalus after lung transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Schuurmans

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year old woman underwent lung transplantation for non-specific interstitial pneumonia. Primary graft dysfunction was diagnosed requiring continued use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO. Within three days she developed recurring hemothoraces requiring two surgical evacuations. After ECMO removal a series of complications occurred within four months: femoral thrombosis, persisting tachycardic atrial fibrillation, pneumopericardium with an esophagopericardial fistula and purulent pericarditis, septic shock, multiorgan failure and intracerebral hemorrhage with ventricular involvement requiring external ventricular drainage. Interdisciplinary management coordinated by the intensive care specialist, transplant surgeon and pulmonologist with various interventions by the respective specialists followed by intensive physical rehabilitation allowed for discharge home on day 235 post transplant. Subsequently quality of life was considered good by the patient and family. Keywords: Lung transplantation, Esophagopericardial fistula, Intracranial hemorrhage, Complications, Treatment

  2. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi; Kang, Ji-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images.

  3. Occurrence studies of intracranial tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larjavaara, S.

    2011-07-01

    Intracranial tumours are a histopathologically heterogeneous group of tumours. This thesis focused on three types of intracranial tumours; gliomas, meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas (VS). The main objectives of the dissertation were to estimate the occurrence of intracranial tumours by different subtypes, and to assess the validity and completeness of the cancer registry data. The specific aims of the publications were to evaluate the validity of reported incidence rates of meningioma cases, to describe the trends of VS incidence in four Nordic countries, and to define the anatomic distribution of gliomas and to investigate their location in relation to mobile phone use. Completeness of meningioma registration was examined by comparing five separate sources of information, and by defining the frequencies of cases reported to the Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR). Incidence trends of VS were assessed in the four Nordic countries over a twenty-one-year period (1987 - 2007) using cancer registry data. The anatomic site of gliomas was evaluated using both crude locations in the cerebral lobes and, in more detail, a three-dimensional (3D) distribution in the brain. In addition, a study on specific locations of gliomas in relation to the typical position of mobile phones was conducted using two separate approaches: a case-case and a case-specular analysis. The thesis was based on four sets of materials. Data from the international Interphone study were used for the studies on gliomas, while the two other studies were register-based. The dataset for meningiomas included meningioma cases from the FCR and four clinical data sources in Tampere University Hospital (neurosurgical clinic, pathology database, hospital discharge register and autopsy register). The data on VS were obtained from the national cancer registries of Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The coverage of meningiomas was not comprehensive in any of the data sources. The completeness of FCR was

  4. Flow conditions in intracranial aneurysm lumen associate with inflammation and degenerative changes of the aneurysm wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebral, Juan; Ollikainen, Eliisa; Chung, Bong Jae; Mut, Fernando; Sippola, Visa; Jahromi, Behnam Rezai; Tulamo, Riikka; Hernesniemi, Juha; Niemelä, Mika; Robertson, Anne; Frösen, Juhana

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Saccular intracranial aneurysm (sIA) is a common disease that may cause devastating intracranial hemorrhage. Hemodynamics, wall remodeling, and wall inflammation have been associated with sIA rupture. We investigated how sIA hemodynamics associates with wall remodeling and inflammation of the sIA wall. Methods Tissue samples resected during sIA surgery (11 unruptured, 9 ruptured sIAs) were studied with histology and immunohistochemistry. Patient-specific computational models of hemodynamics were created from preoperative CT-angiographies. Results More stable and less complex flows were associated with thick, hyperplastic sIA walls while slower flows with more diffuse inflow were associated with degenerated and decellularized sIA walls. Wall degeneration (p=0.041) and rupture was associated with increased inflammation (CD45+, p=0.031). High wall shear stress (WSS, p=0.018), higher vorticity (VO, p=0.046), higher viscous dissipation (VD, p=0.046), and high shear rate (SR, p=0.046) associated with increased inflammation. Inflammation was also associated with lack of intact endothelium (p=0.034), and presence of organized luminal thrombosis (p=0.018), although overall organized thrombosis was associated with low minimum WSS (p=0.034) and not with the flow conditions that associated with inflammation. Conclusions Flow conditions in the sIA associate with wall remodeling. Inflammation, which is associated with degenerative wall remodeling and rupture, is associated with high flow activity including elevated WSS. Endothelial injury may be a mechanism by which flow induces inflammation in the sIA wall. Hemodynamic simulations might prove to be useful in identifying sIAs at risk of developing inflammation, a potential biomarker for rupture. PMID:27686488

  5. Study on the effect of location of intracranial arterial stenosis on the safety of stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-jie SUN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of location of intracranial arterial stenosis on the safety of intracranial stenting. Methods A total of 73 patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS were divided into intracranial internal carotid artery (IICA, N = 18, middle cerebral artery (MCA-M1 segment (MCA-M1, N = 11, intracranial vertebral artery (IVA, N = 27 and basilar artery (BA, N = 17. All of them underwent intracranial stenting. The improvement of intracranial arterial stenosis, cerebrovascular complications including perforating events, artery dissection, in-stent thrombosis, distal stent arterial embolism and cerebral hyperperfusion, and neurological complications including transient ischemic attack (TIA, ischemic stroke and intracranial hemorrhage were recorded. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS was used to evaluate the prognosis 30 d after operation. Results A total of 73 stents were implanted in 73 patients (35 Apollo balloon-expandable stents and 38 Wingspan self-expandable stents. Among them, 10 cases (10/18 were treated with Apollo stents and 8 cases (8/18 with Wingspan stents in IICA group, 5 cases (5/11 were treated with Apollo stents and 6 cases (6/11 with Wingspan stents in MCA-M1 group, 16 cases (59.26%, 16/27 were treated with Apollo stents and 11 cases (40.74%, 11/27 with Wingspan stents in IVA group, and 4 cases (4/17 were treated with Apollo stents and 13 cases (13/17 with Wingspan stents in BA group. No significant difference was seen in stent type among 4 groups (χ2 = 7.422, P = 0.201. The stenosis rate of IICA group after treatment [(10.94 ± 1.99%] was significantly improved than before treatment [(90.89 ± 7.71%; t = 69.545, P = 0.000]. The stenosis rate of MCA-M1 group after treatment [(10.37 ± 2.14%] was significantly improved than before treatment [(87.64 ± 9.46%; t = 26.000, P = 0.000]. The stenosis rate of IVA group after treatment [(11.02 ± 1.99% ] was significantly improved than before

  6. Critical cerebral perfusion pressure at high intracranial pressure measured by induced cerebrovascular and intracranial pressure reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragin, Denis E; Statom, Gloria L; Yonas, Howard; Dai, Xingping; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2014-12-01

    The lower limit of cerebral blood flow autoregulation is the critical cerebral perfusion pressure at which cerebral blood flow begins to fall. It is important that cerebral perfusion pressure be maintained above this level to ensure adequate cerebral blood flow, especially in patients with high intracranial pressure. However, the critical cerebral perfusion pressure of 50 mm Hg, obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, differs from the value of 30 mm Hg, obtained by increasing intracranial pressure, which we previously showed was due to microvascular shunt flow maintenance of a falsely high cerebral blood flow. The present study shows that the critical cerebral perfusion pressure, measured by increasing intracranial pressure to decrease cerebral perfusion pressure, is inaccurate but accurately determined by dopamine-induced dynamic intracranial pressure reactivity and cerebrovascular reactivity. Cerebral perfusion pressure was decreased either by increasing intracranial pressure or decreasing mean arterial pressure and the critical cerebral perfusion pressure by both methods compared. Cortical Doppler flux, intracranial pressure, and mean arterial pressure were monitored throughout the study. At each cerebral perfusion pressure, we measured microvascular RBC flow velocity, blood-brain barrier integrity (transcapillary dye extravasation), and tissue oxygenation (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) in the cerebral cortex of rats using in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy. University laboratory. Male Sprague-Dawley rats. At each cerebral perfusion pressure, dopamine-induced arterial pressure transients (~10 mm Hg, ~45 s duration) were used to measure induced intracranial pressure reactivity (Δ intracranial pressure/Δ mean arterial pressure) and induced cerebrovascular reactivity (Δ cerebral blood flow/Δ mean arterial pressure). At a normal cerebral perfusion pressure of 70 mm Hg, 10 mm Hg mean arterial pressure pulses had no effect on

  7. Influence of World Thrombosis Day on digital information seeking on venous thrombosis: a Google Trends study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheres, L J J; Lijfering, W M; Middeldorp, S; Cannegieter, S C

    2016-12-01

    Essentials In 2014, World Thrombosis Day (WTD) was initiated to increase global awareness of thrombosis. Google Trends can be used freely to monitor digital information seeking behavior. We used Google Trends data to assess the impact of WTD on internet searches on venous thrombosis. The WTD period was associated with more searches on thrombosis compared to control periods. Background World Thrombosis Day (WTD) was launched in 2014 and is to be held every year to increase global awareness of venous thrombosis. Measuring the impact of health awareness days is challenging; however, use of internet-based data seems promising. Methods Google Trends data were used to quantify digital searches for 'venous thrombosis' worldwide and 'trombose' in the Netherlands. The relative search volume (RSV), which is the proportion of the term of interest amongst all Google searches for a specific region and timeframe was used. Mean differences for 4 weeks surrounding WTD (period of interest) and the remaining weeks of the year (control period) were estimated with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). This was done for 2014, 2015 and 2009-2013 (control years). Results and discussion Mean differences in RSV for worldwide searches were 2.9 (95% CI, -8.2, 14.1) in 2014 and 10.5 (95% CI, 0.4, 20.5) in 2015. These figures were 15.3 (95% CI, 4.7, 25.8) and 15.9 (95% CI, 7.8, 24.1) for the Netherlands, respectively. Relatively, this corresponds to an increase in RSV of 3.9% and 13.9% for 2014 and 2015 worldwide and a 21.9% and 23.3% increase for 2014 and 2015 in the Netherlands. There was one control year with an increase in RSV in the WTD period. Conclusion In 2014 and 2015 WTD was associated with an increase in digital information seeking on venous thrombosis worldwide. This association was more pronounced in 2015 than in 2014. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  8. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis Presenting with Subracnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Eruyar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH associated with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is rarely reported. In our case, the initial CT shows with suspected lesions that SAH. After the initial diagnosis of SVT with history and neurological examination findings MRV taken and consistend with thrombus signal change. Dural sinus thrombosis with secondary venous hypertension may lead to SAH into the subarachnoid space due to the rupture of fragile, thin-walled cortical veins. Patients with non-traumatic, non-aneurysmal and non-perimesencephalic subaracnoid hemorrhage tend to have clots circumscribed along the cortical convexity, a condition referred as acute cortical SAH. CVT is a potential cause of cortical SAH. This case; SAH may be the first sign of SVT and especially SVT must do in etiologic research without the involvement of the basal sisterna in cases of SAH.

  9. The radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-04

    %. Limited literature is available on intracranial aneurysms in HIV-infected patients. Objectives: To describe the radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in HIV- positive adults. Method: In this retrospective analysis of ...

  10. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hormones, and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Keira A; Uldall, Maria; Botfield, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) results in raised intracranial pressure (ICP) leading to papilledema, visual dysfunction, and headaches. Obese females of reproductive age are predominantly affected, but the underlying pathological mechanisms behind IIH remain unknown. This review provi...

  11. Predictors of severe complications in intracranial meningioma surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Sjåvik, Kristin; Förander, Petter

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate predictors of complications after intracranial meningioma resection using a standardized reporting system for adverse events. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted in a Scandinavian population-based cohort of 979 adult operations for intracranial meningioma perfo...

  12. Intracranial arachnoid cysts treated surgically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Junji; Matsumoto, Keizo

    1982-01-01

    Craniotomy and an examination of the maximal extent of extirpation of the cystic membrane were performed under an operative microscope in a series of 30 consecutive cases of intracranial arachnoid cysts. From these clinical features and a histological examination of the membrane, the etiologies of the arachnoid cysts may be divided into three fundamental categories: arachnoid cysts due to local brain atrophy or malformation (Category I), arachnoid cysts due to a malformation of the local arachnoid membrane itself (Category II), and arachnoid cysts due to acquired etiology (Category III). The postoperative reduction rates were investigated by means of a serial CT examination over a follow-up period of from 1 month to 6.5 years (average 2 years) in 27 cases. The postoperative reduction rates of 5 cases were less than 20% (Group A), 15 cases had rates from 30 to 80% (Group B), and 7 cases had rates of more than 90% (Group C). Cases of females, large cysts, round-shaped cysts, and cases with positive mass signs and poorly communicating cysts are revealed by metrizamide CT examination seemed to have a tendency for cystic cavity to be reduced well, judging from the postoperative analysis of the clinical findings. Furthermore, from the standpoint of our hypothesis concerning the etiology of the arachnoid cysts, Group A fit in almost all cases in Category I, though a few cases of Group A who had severe secondary local brain damage were in Category II. Group C fit in Category III in almost all cases, though a few cases of Group C who had minimal local brain damage were in Category II. Cases of Group B were considered to show some changes in the local cerebrum of various degrees in the cases of Categories II and III. (J.P.N.)

  13. Circumferential and fusiform intracranial aneurysms: reconstructive endovascular treatment with self-expandable stents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubicz, Boris [Erasme University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Brussels (Belgium); Hopital Erasme, Service de Radiologie (EA 2691), Brussels (Belgium); Collignon, Laurent; Baleriaux, Danielle [Erasme University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Brussels (Belgium); Lefranc, Florence; Bruneau, Michael; Brotchi, Jacques; Witte, Olivier de [Erasme University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-06-15

    We report our experience with endovascular treatment (EVT) of circumferential and fusiform intracranial aneurysms by a reconstructive approach with self-expandable stents. A retrospective review of our prospectively maintained database identified all circumferential and fusiform aneurysms treated by a reconstructive endovascular approach over a 3-year period. Clinical charts, procedural data, and angiographic results were reviewed. From April 2004 to May 2007, 13 patients were identified, of whom 12 were asymptomatic and 1 presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Two patients with an aneurysm {<=}2 mm were treated by stent-within-stent placement without coiling (group 1). In 11 patients with a larger aneurysm, stenting with subsequent coiling was performed (group 2). In this latter approach, a balloon was temporarily inflated within the stent to ensure safe coil delivery. All patients showed an excellent clinical outcome. Asymptomatic procedural complications occurred in three patients, two with cervical internal carotid artery dissection and one with retroperitoneal hematoma. In patients of group 1, the aneurysm had completely disappeared at 6 months. In patients of group 2, aneurysm occlusion was complete in three and incomplete in eight. Follow-up angiography in 12 patients showed four with further thrombosis, six with stable results, and two with minor recanalization. Circumferential and fusiform intracranial aneurysms may be treated by a reconstructive endovascular approach with self-expandable stents. In small aneurysms, a stent-within-stent technique is effective, whereas stenting and subsequent coiling is indicated in larger aneurysms. This therapeutic protocol is associated with good clinical and anatomical results. (orig.)

  14. Deep Vein Thrombosis after Coronary Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Singh Guleria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep vein thrombosis (DVT is a rare but potentially serious complication of coronary angiography (CAG, incidence being just 0.05%. Only a few clinical cases of DVT after diagnostic transfemoral catheterization have been reported. Here, we describe the case of a 54-year-old woman who developed significant DVT after CAG without venous thromboembolism (VTE and, which was treated with anticoagulants.

  15. Brucellosis associated with deep vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolaj, Ilir; Mehmeti, Murat; Ramadani, Hamdi; Tolaj, Jasmina; Dedushi, Kreshnike; Fejza, Hajrullah

    2014-11-19

    Over the past 10 years more than 700 cases of brucellosis have been reported in Kosovo, which is heavily oriented towards agriculture and animal husbandry. Here, brucellosis is still endemic and represents an uncontrolled public health problem. Human brucellosis may present with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations; among them, vascular complications are uncommon. Hereby we describe the case of a 37-year-old male patient with brucellosis complicated by deep vein thrombosis on his left leg.

  16. Brucellosis associated with deep vein thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilir Tolaj

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 10 years more than 700 cases of brucellosis have been reported in Kosovo, which is heavily oriented towards agriculture and animal husbandry. Here, brucellosis is still endemic and represents an uncontrolled public health problem. Human brucellosis may present with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations; among them, vascular complications are uncommon. Hereby we describe the case of a 37-year-old male patient with brucellosis complicated by deep vein thrombosis on his left leg.

  17. Occipital Sinus Thrombosis: An Exceptional Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyrouti, Rahma; Mansour, Malek; Kacem, Amel; Zaouali, Jamel; Mrissa, Ridha

    2016-06-01

    Variations of the dural venous sinuses may result in inaccurate imaging interpretation or complications during surgical approaches. One variation of the dural venous sinuses reported infrequently in the literature is the occipital sinus. We report an exceptional case of occipital sinus thrombosis. A 48-year-old right-handed man with a 5-month history of hypertension and chronic renal failure presented with cephalalgia, vomiting, and blurred vision evolving over 48 hours. Neurological examination revealed papillary edema stage 1 with no others abnormalities. An initial brain computed tomography (CT) scan performed was normal. The opening pressure of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was 35 cmH2O with normal level of protein and no hypercellularity in CSF analysis. The evolution was marked by the occurrence of generalized tonic-clonic seizure. A second CT scan performed showed a hyperdensity of the occipital sinus. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography studies confirmed the diagnosis with highlighting the thrombosis of the occipital sinus in association to an ectasia of the torcular. The patient received adequate anticoagulation for 6 months in association to antiepileptic drugs with a good evolution. According to our review, such a thrombosis must be a rare condition, because our literature search has shown a lack of any report describing this condition. Herein, we review the anatomy of the occipital sinus and we illustrate the characteristics of this unusual thrombosis with multiple imaging modalities. Understanding of the cerebral venous anatomy and recognition of venous variations essentially help when dealing with a pathology, which presents along with a particular venous variation, no matter how rare this combination is. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Percutaneous management of prosthetic valve thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariram, Vuppaladadhiam

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis of a prosthetic valve is a serious complication in patients with prosthetic heart valves. Thrombolysis is the initial choice of treatment. Patients who do not respond to thrombolysis are subjected to surgery which carries a high risk. We report a case series of 5 patients with prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis who did not respond to thrombolysis and were subjected to percutaneous manipulation of the prosthetic valves successfully and improved. Five patients who were diagnosed to have prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis and failed to respond to a minimum of 36 h of thrombolysis (persistent symptoms with increased gradients, abnormal findings on fluoroscopy),were subjected to percutaneous treatment after receiving proper consent. None of them had a visible thrombus on transthoracic echocardiogram. All patients underwent transseptal puncture following which a 6F JR4 guiding catheter was passed into the left atrium. The valve leaflets were repeatedly hit gently under fluoroscopic guidance till they regained their normal mobility. Mean age was 38.8 years. Average peak and mean gradients prior to the procedure were 38 and 25 and after the procedure were 12 and 6 mm of Hg respectively. All patients had successful recovery of valve motion on fluoroscopy with normalization of gradients and complete resolution of symptoms. None of the patients had any focal neurological deficits, embolic manifestations or bleeding complications. Percutaneous manipulation of prosthetic valves in selected patients with prosthetic valve thrombosis who do not respond to thrombolytic therapy is feasible and can be used as an alternative to surgery. Copyright © 2014 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in the Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Fakeeh Khalid

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year-old boy with idiopathic steroid responsive nephritic syndrome developed bilateral sixth-nerve palsy and lethargy secondary to cerebral sinus thrombosis. Treatment with heparin, fresh frozen plasma as source of antithrombin III and vitamin K inhibitors may have prevented further sequels. However, anti-coagulation, as assessed by partial thromboplastin and prothrombin time, was difficult to achieve. Despite these problems the child made a complete neurological recovery.

  20. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa Praxedes, Marcia da; Malheiros, Noemia Reis; Machado, Dianne Melo; Carvalho, Ana Alice Vidal de; Marchiori, Edson; Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ; Santos, Alair Augusto S.M.

    1995-01-01

    A case of superior mesenteric mesenteric vein thrombosis diagnosed by computed tomography in 29 year-old man with abdominal pain, without any predisposing pathologic disorders is reported. This patient had a chronic evolution, had not resulting in mesenteric infarction. He was treated conservatively with anticoagulant therapy and recanalization of the involved vessels was demonstrated by another computed tomography. The patient is asymptomatic now. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs

  1. Deep vein thrombosis: diagnosis, treatment, and prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, W.P.; Youngswick, F.D.

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a dangerous complication that may present after elective foot surgery. Because of the frequency with which DVT occurs in the elderly patient, as well as in the podiatric surgical population, the podiatrist should be acquainted with this entity. A review of the diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and the role of podiatry in the management of DVT is discussed in this paper.

  2. Clinical and angiographic characteristics of cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas manifesting as venous infarction and/or intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Naoko; Naito, Isao; Takatama, Shin; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Iwai, Tomoyuki; Shimaguchi, Hidetoshi

    2009-01-01

    Cavernous sinus (CS) dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) rarely cause venous infarction (VI) and/or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) despite the presence of cortical venous drainage (CVD). The present study investigated the characteristics of CS DAVFs manifesting as VI/ICH. Fifty-four patients treated for CS DAVFs were retrospectively studied. Six patients presented with VI/ICH. Two of the three patients presenting with ICH had CVD only to the superficial sylvian vein (SSV) or the deep sylvian vein (DSV). Three patients presenting with VI had multiple drainages, and angiography of these patients showed a varix on the SSV, drainage into the DSV with agenesis of the second and third segment of basal vein of Rosenthal, and thrombosis of the distal petrosal vein. CS DAVF with CVD only carries higher risk of VI/ICH than multiple drainages. Many CS DAVFs presenting with VI, especially those with drainage into the petrosal vein, have multiple drainages in the early stage. Thrombosis of the inferior and superior petrosal sinuses and superior orbital vein gradually increases pressure of the CVD, and then, VI may occur. In contrast, CS DAVFs with CVD only from the beginning, common in the patients with drainage into the SSVs and DSVs, are likely to cause ICH. Angiographic risk factors causing VI/ICH are CVD only, varix formation, agenesis of the second and third segment of basal vein of Rosenthal, and thrombosis of the superior orbital vein, lateral half of the superior petrosal sinus, and distal CVD. (orig.)

  3. Clinical and angiographic characteristics of cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas manifesting as venous infarction and/or intracranial hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Naoko; Naito, Isao; Takatama, Shin; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Iwai, Tomoyuki [Geriatrics Research Institute and Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Maebashi (Japan); Shimaguchi, Hidetoshi [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Maebashi (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    Cavernous sinus (CS) dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) rarely cause venous infarction (VI) and/or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) despite the presence of cortical venous drainage (CVD). The present study investigated the characteristics of CS DAVFs manifesting as VI/ICH. Fifty-four patients treated for CS DAVFs were retrospectively studied. Six patients presented with VI/ICH. Two of the three patients presenting with ICH had CVD only to the superficial sylvian vein (SSV) or the deep sylvian vein (DSV). Three patients presenting with VI had multiple drainages, and angiography of these patients showed a varix on the SSV, drainage into the DSV with agenesis of the second and third segment of basal vein of Rosenthal, and thrombosis of the distal petrosal vein. CS DAVF with CVD only carries higher risk of VI/ICH than multiple drainages. Many CS DAVFs presenting with VI, especially those with drainage into the petrosal vein, have multiple drainages in the early stage. Thrombosis of the inferior and superior petrosal sinuses and superior orbital vein gradually increases pressure of the CVD, and then, VI may occur. In contrast, CS DAVFs with CVD only from the beginning, common in the patients with drainage into the SSVs and DSVs, are likely to cause ICH. Angiographic risk factors causing VI/ICH are CVD only, varix formation, agenesis of the second and third segment of basal vein of Rosenthal, and thrombosis of the superior orbital vein, lateral half of the superior petrosal sinus, and distal CVD. (orig.)

  4. Intracranial sewing needles in an adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanci, Atilla; Ozdemir, Halil Ibrahim; Kazanci, Burak; Kazanci, Dilek Ozturk; Er, Uygur

    2012-01-01

    A 37-year-old patient is reported with intracranial sewing needles, which were located in the right frontal lobe. Both clinical and radiological findings suggested that these needles must have been introduced in infancy before the closure of anterior fontanelle during an unsuccessful homicide. Usually intracranial foreign objects are placed due to penetrating trauma or surgical procedures. Child abuse has been known for centuries. Many types of physical traumas have been reported, especially in Western countries. In Iran, insertion of sewing needles into the brain aiming to kill the infant have been seen in a lot of cases. This situation takes part in a lot of Persian stories. We reported a 37-year-old man who had 2 intracranial sewing needles with unknown etiology.

  5. Cognitive function in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne Maria; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Forchhammer, Hysse Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the extent and nature of cognitive deficits in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) at the time of diagnosis and after 3 months of treatment. DESIGN: Prospective case-control study. SETTING: Neurological department, ophthalmological department and a terti......OBJECTIVE: To explore the extent and nature of cognitive deficits in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) at the time of diagnosis and after 3 months of treatment. DESIGN: Prospective case-control study. SETTING: Neurological department, ophthalmological department...... and a tertiary headache referral clinic at a Danish university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: 31 patients with definite IIH referred from June 2011 to February 2013 and included within 1 week of diagnostic intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement. 29 patients completed re-examination at the 3-month follow...

  6. Computed tomographic findings of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seung Sook; Kim, Young Sook; Kim, Young Chul [College of Medicine, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) was a reliable technique to evaluate the exact size and location of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and to predict it's prognosis. Fifty-nine cases of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage were evaluated and reviewed by CT scan. The following results were obtained. 1. The sex ratio of male to female was 1 to 1.4, The highest incidence was in 6th and 7th decades. 2. The most common cause of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage was hypertension (74.6%), followed by the aneurysm (13.5%), arteriovenous malformation (5.1%), occlusive vascular disease (3.4%), and blood dyscrasia (3.4%). 3. The most common location was basal ganglia and thalamic hemorrhage (37.3%), followed by lobar hemorrhage (27.1%), cerebellar hemorrhage (13.5%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (11.9%). 4. Primary intraventricular hemorrhage carried the highest mortality. 5. The larger volume of hematoma, the higher the mortality rate.

  7. Experimental study on blood flow patterns through the phantoms of the intracranial arterial aneurysms using color Doppler imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Tae Sub; Jeong, Eun Kee; Rhim, Yoon Chul; Kim, Sung Bin; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Dae In

    1994-01-01

    The occurrence, growth, thrombosis, and rupture of intracranial saccular aneurysms can be directly related to the effect of hemodynamic forces. We developed the phantom flow models and compared with the computer simulation program to analyse the flow pattern and hemodynamics that might be responsible for the intracranial arterial aneurysms. We designed the arterial phantoms of three major sites of intracranial arterial aneurysm ; 1) basilar artery tip, 2) internal carotid artery bifurcation, 3) curved area of internal carotid artery. Flow patterns in the aneurysmal portion of phantoms were evaluated with color Doppler system on the connection with automatic closed type of circulation system. Then, we compared the results with computer simulation. The hemodynamic characteristics of the phantoms were identical with those obtained by computerisation's. Three distinct zones of flow were identified by color Doppler studies on the aneurysm of the curved area of an internal carotid artery : 1) an inflow zone entering the aneurysm at the distal aspect of its orifice, 2) an outflow zone exiting the aneurysm at the proximal aspect of its orifice, 3) a central slow vortex.However, the phantoms of basilar artery tip and artery bifurcation showed a direct inflow stream at the dome of an aneurysm. Flow dynamics in the various phantoms of the aneurysms can be successfully evaluated with color Doppler imaging, and were consistent with those predicted by computer simulations

  8. Prevention and treatment of intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzen, Jan-Peter A H

    2007-12-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the pressure exerted by cranial contents on the dural envelope. It comprises the partial pressures of brain, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Normal intracranial pressure is somewhere below 10 mmHg; it may increase as a result of traumatic brain injury, stroke, neoplasm, Reye's syndrome, hepatic coma, or other pathologies. When ICP increases above 20 mmHg it may damage neurons and jeopardize cerebral perfusion. If such a condition persists, treatment is indicated. Control of ICP requires measurement, which can only be performed invasively. Standard techniques include direct ventricular manometry or measurement in the parenchyma with electronic or fiberoptic devices. Displaying the time course of pressure (high-resolution ICP tonoscopy) allows assessment of the validity of the signal and identification of specific pathological findings, such as A-, B- and C-waves. When ICP is pathologically elevated--at or above 20-25 mmHg--it needs to be lowered. A range of treatment modalities is available and should be applied with consideration of the underlying cause. When intracranial hypertension is caused by hematoma, contusion, tumor, hygroma, hydrocephalus or pneumatocephalus, surgical treatment is indicated. In the absence of a surgically treatable condition, ICP may be controlled by correcting the patient's position, temperature, ventilation or hemodynamics. If intracranial hypertension persists, drainage of CSF via external drainage is most effective. Other first-tier options include induced hypocapnea (hyperventilation; paCO2 < 35 mmHg), hyperosmolar therapy (mannitol, hypertonic saline) and induced arterial hypertension (CPP concept). When autoregulation of cerebral blood flow is compromised, hyperoncotic treatment aimed at reducing vasogenic edema and intracranial blood volume may be applied. When intracranial hypertension persists, second-tier treatments may be indicated. These include 'forced hyperventilation' (paCO2 < 25 mm

  9. Development of intracranial hypertension after surgical management of intracranial arachnoid cyst: report of three cases and review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran

    2013-11-12

    To describe three cases of delayed development of intracranial hypertension (IH) after surgical treatment of intracranial arachnoid cyst, including the pathogenesis of IH and a review of the literature.

  10. Intracranial meningiomas in the present era of modern neuroimaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Intracranial meningioma is the most common primary, intracranial, extra-axial neoplasm. It is mesenchymal in origin and arises from meningothelial cells of arachnoid villi of meninges. Objectives: To re-emphasize the regional anatomic localisation and diagnostic radiological features of intracranial ...

  11. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension – Pathophysiology Based on Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubisavljević Srdjan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the definition, idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a pathological state characterized by an increase in intracranial pressure; however, there are no obvious intracranial pathological processes. The pathophysiology of this disorder is not clear, although there are many reports related to it.

  12. Cerebral Abcess and Intracranial Empyemas in Children (Francais ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    And in both cases because of brain herniation secondary to severe raised intracranial pressure. We observed no recurrence of pus collection. Neurological sequelae was observed in 8 cases. Conclusion Intracranial subdural empyemas are most common form of intracranial suppurations seen in children in our unit.

  13. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The device...

  14. Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus with Intracranial Calcifications in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: There are numerous causes for intracranial calcification in children. We describe an unusual cause of intracranial calcifications in a child, namely, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Case Report: A 12-year-old boy presented with seizures and developmental delay. MRI of the brain revealed intracranial ...

  15. Simultaneous Intracranial and Spinal Subdural Hematoma: Two Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chung Dae; Song, Chang Joon; Lee, Jeong Eun; Choi, Seung Won [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disease. Simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma is extremely rare and only 14 such cases have been reported. We report here on two cases of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma that occurred following a fall-down head injury and intracranial surgery, and we discuss the pathogenesis of the disease.

  16. Case report: Limb-threatening femoral vein thrombosis in a healthy carpet fitter: Carpet fitter's thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothnie, Alex; Aga, Sarah; Vijayaragahavan, Santhosh; Nyamekye, Isaac

    2016-07-01

    To report a case of femoral vein thrombosis in a carpet fitter and to highlight this as an occupational hazard. Case presentation and literature review. An otherwise fit 21-year-old carpet fitter with no past medical history presented with acute thrombosis of his left common femoral, superficial femoral and great saphenous veins. Attempted catheter directed thrombolysis was unsuccessful. Due to severe pain and the threat of venous gangrene he was treated by emergency surgical thrombectomy with excision of chronic venous scarring and vein-patch repair that led to resolution of his symptoms. Deep vein thrombosis is typically associated with factors such as increasing age and prolonged periods of immobility; however, certain 'active' occupations can increase its risk. Crouched and cramped working conditions including repetitive active movement with flexed hips and knees can predispose to increased risk of venous thromboembolism. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Extensive deep vein thrombosis following prolonged gaming ('gamer's thrombosis'): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsien-Cheng Leon; Burbridge, Hayley; Wong, Conroy

    2013-10-08

    The average time spent playing video games is increasing. Prolonged immobility associated with gaming may therefore be an important risk factor for venous thromboembolism. We report a case of deep vein thrombosis associated with prolonged playing of PlayStation® games. A 31-year-old Caucasian man, an exterior painter, presented with a three-day history of left leg pain and swelling after playing PlayStation® games for almost eight hours a day for four consecutive days. Doppler ultrasound of the left leg confirmed extensive left leg deep venous thrombosis requiring thrombolysis and anticoagulation. Video gaming should be considered a risk factor for venous thromboembolism. Further studies are needed to estimate the degree of risk associated with prolonged periods of playing video games, and education for preventing venous thrombosis should be provided to gamers.

  18. Primary intracranial leiomyoma in renal transplant recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upasana Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leiomyoma, the benign tumor of smooth muscle cell origin, is commonly seen in genitourinary and gastrointestinal tracts. Primary intracranial leiomyoma, however, is extremely rare occurrence. We hereby report a case of Epstein-Barr negative primary intracranial leiomyoma in a middle-aged renal transplant recipient, which mimicked left frontal parasagittal meningioma on neuroimaging. The tumor was completely excised and diagnosis of leiomyoma was clinched on pathological analysis with immunohistochemistry. The patient improved after tumor removal, and no evidence of tumor recurrence was noted on follow-up study after 10 months postsurgically.

  19. Traumatic rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raksha Ramlakhan, BMedSc, MBBCh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial dermoid cysts are congenital tumors of ectodermal origin. Rupture of these cysts can occur spontaneously, but rupture in association with trauma is reported infrequently. The diagnosis of rupture is made by the presence of lipid (cholesterol droplets in the subarachnoid spaces and ventricles. Nonenhanced CT of the head demonstrates multiple foci of low attenuation that correspond with hyperintense signal on T1-weighted MRI. We present a case of an adult patient with rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst, precipitated by minor trauma.

  20. Intracranial osteosarcoma after radiosurgery. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanno, Naoko; Hayashi, Shinkichi; Shimura, Toshiro; Maeda, Shotaro; Teramoto, Akira

    2004-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with an intracranial osteosarcoma at the site of previous radiosurgery, manifesting as sudden onset of headache and left hemiparesis with aphasia. She had a previous history of stereotactic radiosurgery for an intracranial tumor under a diagnosis of falx meningioma. Computed tomography showed intratumoral and peritumoral hemorrhage at the right parietofrontal region. Gross total resection of the tumor with hematoma was performed. The histological diagnosis was osteosarcoma. Sarcomatous change is a rare complication of radiotherapy. This case illustrates that osteosarcoma may develop years after radiosurgery for benign brain neoplasm. (author)

  1. Animal Model of Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Sumit; Laerum, Frode; Brosstad, Frank; Kvernebo, Knut; Sakariassen, Kjell S.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an animal model of acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Methods: In part I of the study nine juvenile domestic pigs were used. Each external iliac vein was transluminally occluded with a balloon catheter. Thrombin was infused through a microcatheter in one leg according to one of the following protocols: (1) intraarterial (IA): 1250 U at 25 U/min in the common femoral artery (n= 3); (2) intravenous (IV): 5000 U in the popliteal vein at 500 U/min (n= 3), or at 100 U/min (n= 3). Saline was administered in the opposite leg. After the animals were killed, the mass of thrombus in the iliofemoral veins was measured. The pudendoepiploic (PEV), profunda femoris (PF), and popliteal veins (PV) were examined. Thrombosis in the tributaries of the superficial femoral vein (SFVt) was graded according to a three-point scale (0, +, ++). In part II of the study IV administration was further investigated in nine pigs using the following three regimens with 1000 U at 25 U/min serving as the control: (1) 1000 U at 100 U/min, (2) 250 U at 25 U/min, (3) 250 U at 6.25 U/min. Results: All animals survived. In part I median thrombus mass in the test limbs was 1.40 g as compared with 0.25 g in the controls (p= 0.01). PEV, PFV and PV were thrombosed in all limbs infused with thrombin. IV infusion was more effective in inducing thrombosis in both the parent veins (mass 1.32-1.78 g) and SVFt (++ in 4 of 6 legs), as compared with IA infusion (mass 0.0-1.16 g; SFVt ++ in 1 of 3 legs). In part II thrombus mass in axial veins ranged from 1.23 to 2.86 g, and showed no relationship with the dose of thrombin or the rate of infusion. Tributary thrombosis was less extensive with 250 U at 25 U/min than with the other regimens. Conclusion: Slow distal intravenous thrombin infusion in the hind legs of pigs combined with proximal venous occlusion induces thrombosis in the leg veins that closely resembles clinical DVT in distribution

  2. Platelet extracellular vesicles as biomarkers for arterial thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasecka, Aleksandra; Böing, Anita N; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2017-05-01

    Arterial thrombosis is a major and global cause of human death and disability. Considering the socioeconomic costs of arterial thrombosis, identification of biomarkers to predict and detect arterial thrombosis at an early stage is an important public health goal. Platelet extracellular vesicles (PEV) are a new candidate biomarker of arterial thrombosis. PEV can be measured in biorepositories, thereby offering the possibility to validate PEV in multicenter clinical trials. PEV analysis has been hitherto hampered by lack of standardized methodology, but substantial technological improvements of PEV detection techniques have been achieved recently. However, before PEV emerge from research tools to clinical applications, a number of issues should be clarified. To facilitate validation of PEV as biomarkers of thrombosis, we discuss (i) whether PEV are useful as biomarkers of thrombosis, (ii) why previous conclusions on PEV concentrations, composition and functions require re-evaluation, and (iii) which questions have to be answered before PEV become clinically useful.

  3. A superior mesenteric vein thrombosis associated with in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorais, Jessie; Jones, Kirtly; Hammoud, Ahmad; Gibson, Mark; Johnstone, Erica; Peterson, C Matthew

    2011-02-01

    To describe a case of superior mesenteric vein thrombosis associated with IVF. Case report. University teaching hospital. A 33-year-old female developed progressive abdominal pain several days after ET in her first IVF cycle. A computed tomography scan 12 days after ET showed a superior mesenteric vein thrombosis. Therapeutic anticoagulation. Resolution of the superior mesenteric vein thrombosis with therapeutic anticoagulation. Early diagnosis and treatment of a superior mesenteric vein thrombosis associated with IVF led to a favorable outcome. Endocrine alterations consequent to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for IVF place patients at risk for thromboembolic events. Thromboembolic events may occur during an IVF cycle in the absence of overt ovarian hyperstimulation, an inherited thrombophilia, or pregnancy. Early diagnosis and treatment of superior mesenteric vein thrombosis can lead to a favorable outcome. Treatment guidelines for superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in setting of IVF are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Detection of deep vein thrombosis with I-123 plasminogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smal, F.; Schonne, E.; Mahieu, P.; Verhas, M.; Schoutens, A.

    1982-01-01

    An experience with I-123 plasminogen used to investigate patients with clinically suspected deep vein thrombosis is reported. The test is efficient, not invasive and produces no discomfort on the contrary to venography. The test is not sensitive to heparine therapy since 5 thrombosis were detected in patients under heparine. Certain false positive results such as those due to Erysipelas can be foreseen by careful clinical investigation. False negative cases were due to very old thrombi or superficial thrombosis without clinical consequences

  5. Deep venous thrombosis of the upper extremity. A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitfod, Lotte; Broholm, R; Baekgaard, N

    2013-01-01

    to the condition. Malignancy and therapeutic interventions are major risk factors for the secondary deep vein thrombosis in combination with the patient's characteristics, comorbidities and prior history of deep vein thrombosis. Complications: recurrent deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and Post...... Thrombotic Syndrome (PTS) are the major complications after UEDVT. PTS is a chronic condition leading to significant functional disability and impaired quality of life. Diagnosis: compression ultrasonography is noninvasive and the most frequently used objective test with a high accuracy in experienced hands...

  6. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Nose Complicated with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Swaminath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive life threatening bacterial infection of the skin, the subcutaneous tissue, and the fascia. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis involving the nose complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis. Few cases of septic cavernous sinus thrombosis have been reported to be caused by cellulitis of the face but necrotizing fasciitis of the nose is rare. It is very important to recognize the early signs of cavernous thrombosis. Treatment for septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is controversial but early use of empirical antibiotics is imperative.

  7. Demographic profile of patients diagnosed with intracranial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Meningiomas are common brain tumours and display gender, racial and ethnic differences in their demographic profile. The demographic profile of our patients diagnosed with intracranial meningiomas is presented and compared with the literature. Objectives: To determine the age, gender, racial and ethnic ...

  8. CT and MRI of ruptured intracranial dermoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilms, G.; Demaerel, P.; Baert, A.L. (Leuven Univ. Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology); Casselman, J. (Akademisch Ziekenhuis St. Jan, Brugge (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology); Plets, C. (Leuven Univ. Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Neurosurgery); Haene, I. de (Akademisch Ziekenhuis St. Jan, Brugge (Belgium). Dept. of Neurology)

    1991-04-01

    Two patients with ruptured intracranial dermoids, examined with both CT and MRI are reported. Clinical presentation was transient cerebral ischemia in one patient and acute meningeal signs in the other. CT scan showed typical fat density of the tumor and the subarachnoid space. On MRI both the tumor and the subarachnoid fat, were strongly hyperintense on T1-weighted images. (orig.).

  9. Genetics of intracranial aneurysms and related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, F.N.G.

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IA) are dilatations of the vessel walls of cerebral arteries. Some can rupture and result in a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a severe subtype of stroke. This thesis is set out to elucidate the pathophysiology of IA from a genetic perspective. The main conclusions are: 1.

  10. CONTEMPORARY ENDOVASCULAR TREATMENT OF INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Stojanov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past twenty years we have witnessed a revolution in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Endovascular technique and materials have rapidly developed since the approval of Guglielmi detachable coils in 1995 which now allow successful treatment of most aneurysms. The development of intracranial stents and balloons for stent-assisted coiling and balloon-remodeling technique further expanded the spectrum of aneurysms treatable with endovascular technique. For these reasons, the aim of this review was to describe endovascular technique and materials which we use in our daily practice, to show benefits of endovascular treatment and to discus complications of endovascular treatment and surgical treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Endovascular treatment is more comfortable for the patient not only because it is minimally invasive but also because it does not require long hospitalization equal to that after surgical treatment. It is a fact that with further development of endovascular materials, this a procedure will have even a more significant place in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

  11. Calcification of intracranial vessels in neurocysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Bouzas, A. [ENEP Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico (Mexico); Ballesteros-Maresma, A. [Radiologia Clinica de Cuernavaca (Mexico); Casian, G.; Hernandez-Martinez, P. [Hospital Juarez de Mexico S. S. (Mexico); Martinez-Lopez, M. [Fundacion Clinica Medica Sur (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    We report calcification of intracranial vessels in neurocysticercosis. Calcification was observed in the middle cerebral arteries in two patients, and the circle of Willis in two others. The patients with middle cerebral artery calcification underwent CT with inhaled stable xenon and an area of mild hypoperfusion was observed in the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere. (orig.)

  12. Measuring elevated intracranial pressure through noninvasive methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Helena; Nissborg, Emelie; Bartek, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is an important cause of secondary brain injury, and a measurement of ICP is often of crucial value in neurosurgical and neurological patients. The gold standard for ICP monitoring is through an intraventricular catheter, but this invasive technique...

  13. Intracranial neoplasmin Ibadan, Nigeria | Olasode | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the pattern of histopathological variants of intracranial neoplasms, relative distribution of the variants in the age groups and also to determine the gender differences that exist in these tumours. Design: Case control study. Setting: Department of Pathology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

  14. MR diffusion imaging of human intracranial tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K; Gideon, P; Wagn, P

    1997-01-01

    We used MRI for in vivo measurement of brain water self-diffusion in patients with intracranial tumours. The study included 28 patients (12 with high-grade and 3 with low-grade gliomas, 7 with metastases, 5 with meningiomas and 1 with a cerebral abscess). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) wer...

  15. Deep Vein Thrombosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest NIH Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Deep Vein Thrombosis Deep Vein Thrombosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest NIH Research Past ... Symptoms The signs and symptoms of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) may be related to DVT itself or ...

  16. The Intracranial Volume Pressure Response in Increased Intracranial Pressure Patients: Clinical Significance of the Volume Pressure Indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hung-Yi; Lee, Ching-Hsin; Lee, Ching-Yi

    2016-01-01

    For patients suffering from primary brain injury, monitoring intracranial pressure alone is not enough to reflect the dynamic intracranial condition. In our previous study, a segment of the pressure-volume curve can be expressed by the parabolic regression model with single indicator "a". The aim of this study is to evaluate if the indicator "a" can reflect intracranial conditions. Patients with traumatic brain injury, spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage, and/or hydrocephalus who had external ventricular drainage from January 2009 to February 2010 were included. The successive volume pressure response values were obtained by successive drainage of cerebral spinal fluid from intracranial pressure 20-25 mm Hg to 10 mm Hg. The relationship between withdrawn cerebral spinal fluid volume and intracranial pressure was analyzed by the parabolic regression model with single parameter "a". The overall mean for indicator "a" was 0.422 ± 0.046. The mean of "a" in hydrocephalus was 0.173 ± 0.024 and in severe intracranial mass with slender ventricle, it was 0.663 ± 0.062. The two extreme intracranial conditions had a statistical significant difference (ppressure-volume curve can reflect the dynamic intracranial condition and is comparable in different situations. A significantly larger indicator "a" with increased intracranial pressure is always observed in severe intracranial mass lesions with cerebral edema. A significantly smaller indicator "a" with increased intracranial pressure is observed in hydrocephalus. Brain computed tomography should be performed early if a rapid elevation of indicator "a" is detected, as it can reveal some ongoing intracranial pathology prior to clinical deterioration. Increased intracranial pressure was frequently observed in patients with intracranial pathology. The progression can be differentiated using the pattern of the volume pressure indicator.

  17. Prediction of intracranial hypertension through noninvasive intracranial pressure waveform analysis in pediatric hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestero, Matheus Fernando Manzolli; Frigieri, Gustavo; Cabella, Brenno Caetano Troca; de Oliveira, Sergio Mascarenhas; de Oliveira, Ricardo Santos

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a noninvasive device to assess intracranial pressure wave form in children with hydrocephalus. A prospective and non-experimental descriptive-analytic study was performed. Fifty-six patients were enrolled in this study. They were divided in four groups: group A, children with clinically compensated hydrocephalus; B, surgically treated hydrocephalus; C, patients with acute intracranial hypertension due to hydrocephalus; and D, children without neurological disease (control). Data were collected through the installation of an extracranial deformation sensor, coupled to the children's scalp, which allowed registration of noninvasive intracranial pressure curves. Parameters obtained were analyzed: P2/P1 ratio, "classification P1 and P2 and P1 slope. P2/P1 index and "classification of P1 and P2" had a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 100% for predicting intracranial hypertension. "P1 slope" presented no statistical difference. This study showed a useful and noninvasive method for monitoring intracranial pressure, which was able to indicate the intracranial hypertension in children with hydrocephalus and, thus, should be further investigated for clinical applications.

  18. International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis core curriculum project: core competencies in clinical thrombosis and hemostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLintock, C.; Pabinger, I.; Bauer, K. A.; Laffan, M.; Angchaisuksiri, P.; Rezende, S. M.; Middeldorp, S.; Ross, M.

    2016-01-01

    Essentials The priority of ISTH was to establish a global core curriculum in thrombosis and hemostasis. International survey to determine competencies required for clinical specialists was carried out in the field. Competency framework provides a reference point for mapping and developing regional

  19. Association between superficial vein thrombosis and deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Barbara; Lackner, Helmut Karl; Salmhofer, Wolfgang; Kroemer, Susanne; Custovic, Jasmina; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer

    2009-07-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients with superficial vein thrombosis (SVT). A prospective study in patients with sonographically proven SVT. Outpatient department of the Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz. Patients Forty-six consecutive patients with superficial vein thrombosis were enrolled. Intervention Every patient underwent color-coded duplex sonography of both lower extremities at the beginning of the study. Important risk factors (eg, history of thromboembolic events, recent immobilization, active malignant disease, and the use of oral contraceptives) were investigated. In 24% of our patients, a concomitant, mostly asymptomatic DVT was found. In 73% of these patients, the DVT occurred in the affected leg, in 9% in the contralateral leg, and in 18% in both legs. The calf muscle veins were most commonly involved. In all patients with DVT, the SVT was located on the lower leg and the D-dimer findings were positive. Superficial vein thrombosis is not a life-threatening disease, but the risk of concomitant DVT cannot be ignored. Color-coded duplex sonography should be performed in patients with SVT to rule out DVT.

  20. Sudden infant death syndrome, childhood thrombosis, and presence of genetic risk factors for thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, TB; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Lundemose, JB

    2000-01-01

    . The vulnerability of the infant brain stem to ischemia has been suggested to be a conceivable cause of sudden infant death syndrome. This is compatible with a hypothesis that genetic risk factors for cerebral thrombosis could cause microinfarction in the brain stem during the first month of life, affecting vital...

  1. [Association between venous thrombosis and dyslipidemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Raso, Aránzazu; Ene, Gabriela; Miranda, Carolina; Vidal, Rosa; Mata, Raquel; Llamas Sillero, M Pilar

    2014-07-07

    Venous and arterial thrombosis, despite being historically considered as distinct conditions, share certain risk factors. Dyslipidemia is a clinical condition with a relatively high prevalence in the population and has been associated with an increased thrombotic risk. Lipids and lipoproteins modulate the expression and/or function of thrombotic, fibrinolytic and rheological factors. We have developed a descriptive, retrospective, comparative, cross-sectional study including a group of 313 patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE). We collected basic demographic data, cardiovascular risk factors and thrombotic complications. All patients were subjected to a lipid profile study with determination of total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (cHDL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (cLDL) and triglycerides. The multivariable analysis showed that dyslipidemia was a risk factor for VTE (odds ratio [OR] 3.87, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.72-5.56; P<.0001). Of a total of 313 patients included in the study, 31% (n=97) had a recurrent thrombotic event and 23% (n=72) developed post-thrombotic syndrome. cHDL levels below 35 mg/dl and cLDL levels higher than 180 mg/dl represented risk factors for the development of recurrent thrombosis, OR 3.12 (95% CI 1.35-7.74; P=.008) and OR 2.35 (95% CI 1.24-4.45; P=.008), respectively, and post-thrombotic syndrome, OR 3.44 (95% CI 1.43-8.83; P=.005) and OR 2.35 (95% CI 1.24-4.45; P=.008). Our study confirmed the association between dyslipidemia and VTE and showed a risk of thrombosis nearly 4 times higher in individuals with this disease. In addition, alterations in the lipid profile were also related to a higher prevalence of thrombotic complications, recurrence and post-thrombotic syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Peri-procedural complications and associated risk factors in wingspan stent-assistant angioplasty of intracranial artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhaoshuo; Li Tianxiao; Wang Ziliang; Bai Weixing; Xue Jiangyu; Zhu Liangfu; Li Li

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate the cerebrovascular complications from stenting for symptomatic intracranial stenosis and to detect the factors associated with complications. Methods: Medical records of Wingspan stenting were reviewed for 306 cases with symptomatic intracranial stenosis from July 2007 to February 2012, including transient ischemic attack, ischemic stroke, death and intracranial hemorrhage as clinical in-hospital complications. The location of lesions included middle cerebral artery level M1 (114 lesions), intracranial portion of the internal carotid artery (50 lesions), vertebral artery 4 (75 lesions), venebro-basilar artery (14 lesions), basilar artery (76 lesions). Complications were evaluated and analyzed to find out whether they were associated with patient-or stenosis-related risk factors using χ 2 test. Results: The technical success rate was 99% (303/306). Cerebrovascular complications rate was 6.9% (21/303), with 1.6% (14/303) of disabling stroke events and 0.7% (2/303) of deaths. Hemorrhagic events were consisted of procedure-related events (3 cases), hyperperfusion (3 cases), ischemic events of perforator stroke (8 cases), transient ischemic attack (3 cases), embolization (2 cases), thrombosis in stent (2 cases). Hemorrhagic events were associated with significantly higher morbidity and mortality rates (χ 2 = 2.908, P < 0.05) and occurred more frequently after treatment of middle cerebral artery stenosis than other lesions (χ 2 = 1.168, P < 0.05). Perforating branches were detected to be affected mainly in the basilar artery than other locations (χ 2 = 4.263, P < 0.05). Conclusion: The complication rates in the study are preliminary consistent with the previously published data. Hemorrhagic events are prone to occur in the treatment of middle cerebral artery stenosis, while perforating branches are affected mainly in the basilar artery. (authors)

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Deep Vein Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javier, Julian J

    2014-10-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Conventional treatment with anticoagulation therapy may undertreat the condition. Patients with VTE are at risk for recurrence with increasing time passage. Endovascular approaches exist for treating VTE, including deep vein thrombosis, but it is unclear which patients are appropriate candidates for endovascular versus medical approaches. Many new endovascular technologies are in development, and new oral anticoagulants are also on the market. Clinicians must be mindful of these new products and use them appropriately to better manage VTE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Deep vein thrombosis chemoprophylaxis in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Alan

    2013-07-01

    The practice of plastic surgery is a unique mixture of art and science, and both must be carefully balanced to provide the best possible care for patients. To do that, clinicians should be practicing evidence-based medicine. This article discusses the prevalence and risks associated with deep vein thrombosis and the reasons and options for its possible chemoprophylaxis. Until evidence-based medicine best-practice recommendations can be developed, it would be prudent for clinicians to empirically select and consistently apply a risk stratification system and prophylaxis regimen of their choice for the benefit of their patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis complicating appendicular masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echitibi, Salma S.; Bashir, Masoud O.; Ahmad, Misba U.

    2003-01-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis (MVT) is rare. Its diagnosis is usually difficult and delayed. We report two patients who developed MVT as a complication of an appendicular mass. One of them had appendectomy and developed fever 10 days postoperatively. The other was treated conservatively. An abdominal computerized tomography(CT) scan with intravenous contrast was helpful in diagnosing superior MVT in both patients, which were not suspected. Intravenous contrast should be used when performing CT of an appendicular mass. Special interest should be directed at studying the superior mesenteric vein. Early diagnosis of our patients helped to start early medical treatment with anticoagulation. (author)

  6. [Idiopathic thrombosis of the renal vein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignjatović, I; Ilić, M; Marković, N; Stamenić, T

    1995-01-01

    Renal vein thrombosis (TVR) is not a common disease especially when is not associated with renal parenchymal nephropathy. TVR has no characteristic symptoms, so it is often late recognised. The main procedures for diagnosis of TVR are: echotomography, CT and phlebography. All these procedures, although very informative, have certain limits in the clinical use. Therapy of TVR trombolytic, anticoagulant or surgical: thrombectomy or nephrectomy. In cases where the underlying parenchymal disease exists, aggresive therapeutic approach is not recommended, but in acute idiopathic TVR immediate recanalisation of the renal vein is the most effective.

  7. Doppler diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nix, L.

    1984-01-01

    The venous Doppler examination has been shown to be a sensitive test for the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis. An experienced technologist can perform the examination in about ten minutes at the bedside or in the laboratory. Because the venous Doppler examination is subjective, it requires considerable experience of the examiner to achieve maximal accuracy. Nevertheless, with sufficient practice the technologist may employ this instrument with skill and versatility to detect both obstruction and valvular incompetence in the superficial, communicating, and deep veins of the lower and upper extremities

  8. Cortical venous thrombosis – a rare complication of tuberculous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occlusion of the central veins and sinuses occurs owing to thrombus, thrombophlebitis, or tumours. Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is less frequent than arterial thrombosis, but can produce a cascade of sequelae and may be fatal. The usual predisposing factors for CVT include infections, pregnancy and puerperium, ...

  9. Portal vein thrombosis after splenectomy for beta-thalassemia major

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hawsawi, Zakaria M.; Tarawah, Ahmed M.; Hassan, Ruhul Amin A.; Haouimi, Ammar S.

    2004-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is a recognized complication after splenectomy for beta-thalassemia major due to the chronic hypercoagulable state which has been recognized to exist in childhood thalassemia and contribute to thromboembolic events. We reporting one patient with beta-thalassemia major developed portal vein thrombosis following splenectomy. (author)

  10. Lower Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis among Intensive Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT) is a common preventable health problem associated with high mortality worldwide. The factors that predispose to venous thrombosis were initially described by Virchow in 18561 and include stasis, vascular damage and hypercoagulability. The risk for DVT has been reported.

  11. Ovarian vein thrombosis | Jenayah | Pan African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnosis can be made with confidence using ultrasound, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Treatment of ovarian vein thrombosis is particularly important in the postpartum patients, with anticoagulation therapy being the current recommendation. Key words: Ovarian vein thrombosis, postpartum, ...

  12. Thrombin Avtivable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor in Venous and Arterial Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L.E. de Bruijne

    2011-01-01

    textabstractVenous and arterial thromboses are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Venous thrombosis is the result of pathological occlusive clot formation in the veins. It occurs mainly in the deep veins of the leg (deep vein thrombosis), from which parts of the clot frequently embolize to the

  13. Antenatal Deep Vein Thrombosis with an Underlying Thrombophilia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antenatal Deep Vein Thrombosis with an Underlying Thrombophilia. Emmanuel K Srofenyoh, Ali Samba, Enyonam Y Kwawukume. Abstract. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) can cause severe morbidity in the puerperium and, less commonly, during pregnancy. A woman who developed DVT as a result of thrombophilia was ...

  14. Homocysteine and venous thrombosis : studies into risk and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Huub Pieter Jan

    2006-01-01

    Homocysteine is a risk factor for venous thrombosis. Elevated concentrations can be treated with folic acid, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12. The main study (chapter 9) in this thesis is a randomized placebo-controlled trial in which patients with a first event of deep-vein thrombosis or pulmonary

  15. Are steroids useful to treat cerebral venous thrombosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canhao, Patricia; Cortesao, Ana; Cabral, Marta; Ferro, Jose M.; Stam, Jan; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Barinagarrementeria, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose-No randomized controlled trial has evaluated the efficacy of steroids in acute cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). We aimed to analyze the effect of steroids on the outcome of patients in the International Study on Cerebral Veins and Dural Sinus Thrombosis (ISCVT). Methods-ISCVT

  16. HIV Associated Deep Vein Thrombosis: Case Reports from Jos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) has been reported to be 2-10 times commoner in HIV infected patients than in the general population. We report two cases of extensive unilateral deep vein thrombosis involving the lower limb in HIV infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Doppler ultrasound in the two ...

  17. Risk factors for a first and recurrent venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flinterman, Linda Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to identify new risk factors for first and recurrent venous thrombosis of both the upper and lower extremity, and assess the incidence of recurrence and mortality after a first venous thrombosis. An overview was provided of the current literature on risk factors and

  18. Coagulation factor XI vaccination: an alternative strategy to prevent thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, C; Zhang, L; Chen, L; Deng, L; Li, R

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Coagulation Factor (F) XI is a safe target for the development of antithrombotics. We designed an antigen comprising the human FXI catalytic domain and diphtheria toxin T domain. Antigen immunization reduced plasma FXI activity by 54% and prevented thrombosis in mice. FXI vaccination can serve as an effective strategy for thrombosis prevention. Background Coagulation factor XI serves as a signal amplifier in the intrinsic coagulation pathway. Blockade of FXI by mAbs or small-molecule inhibitors inhibits thrombosis without causing severe bleeding, which is an inherent risk of currently available antithrombotic agents. Objectives To design an FXI vaccine and assess its efficacy in inhibiting FXI activity and preventing thrombosis. Methods An FXI antigen was generated by fusing the catalytic domain of human FXI to the C-terminus of the transmembrane domain of diphtheria toxin. The anti-FXI antibody response, plasma FXI activity and antithrombotic efficacy in mice immunized with the FXI antigen were examined. Results The antigen elicited a significant antibody response against mouse FXI, and reduced the plasma FXI activity by 54.0% in mice. FXI vaccination markedly reduced the levels of coagulation and inflammation in a mouse model of inferior vena cava stenosis. Significant protective effects were also observed in mouse models of venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that FXI vaccination can serve as an effective strategy for thrombosis prevention. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  19. Risk of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in Obese Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Susanna M.; Arnold, Marcel; Middeldorp, Saskia; Broeg-Morvay, Anne; Silvis, Suzanne M.; Heldner, Mirjam R.; Meisterernst, Julia; Nemeth, Banne; Meulendijks, Eva R.; Stam, Jan; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for deep vein thrombosis of the leg and pulmonary embolism. To date, however, whether obesity is associated with adult cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has not been assessed. To assess whether obesity is a risk factor for CVT. A case-control study was performed in

  20. Mesenteric venous thrombosis in Uganda: a retrospective study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but lethal form of mesenteric ischemia. Diagnosis before frank thrombosis and gangrene is a challenge. Documented experience in the East African region is scanty. This short series suggest renal dysfunction as a consequence of delayed diagnosis, intussusception as a ...

  1. CT diagnosis in idiopathic thrombosis of the vena mesenterica superior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banyoczki, G.; Goebel, N.; Antonucci, F.; Zollikofer, C.; Stuckmann, G.; Stadtspital Triemli, Zurich

    1990-01-01

    We describe three cases of idiopathic thrombosis of the superior mesenteric and portal veins, in one case with additional thrombosis of the splenic vein. All patients suffered from unspecific, slowly increasing pain. The cause of the same could be detected only via CT. After anticoagulation the patients became symptom-free. A follow-up CT showed recanalisation of the affected veins. (orig.) [de

  2. Brucellosis and thrombosis of the inferior vena cava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüegger, Kristina; Tarr, Philip; Karatolios, Konstantinos; Humburg, Jörg; Hügli, Rolf; Jeanneret, Christina

    2017-01-01

    We describe the case of a 23-year old woman with a newly diagnosed thrombosis of the inferior vena cava associated with a Brucella melitensis infection. We suggest possible mechanisms leading to brucellosis-associated venous thrombosis and review 14 previously reported cases.
.

  3. A retrospective analysis of patients treated for superficial vein thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wichers, I. M.; Haighton, M.; Büller, H. R.; Middeldorp, S.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The absolute risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) as well as extension and/or recurrence in superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) of the leg is considerable and underestimated. We retrospectively evaluated therapeutic management, thrombophilic risk factors and

  4. [Drug-eluting stent thrombosis and its pharmacological prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershukov, I V; Batyraliev, T A

    2007-01-01

    The problem of drug eluting stents (DES) safety has been actively discussed throughout 2006 because of increase of frequency of development of late stent thromboses which were noted during almost 2 years after stenting. In December 2006 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory panel acknowledged increase of development of late stent thrombosis. At the same time FDA accepted new definition of stent-thrombosis suggested by the Academic Research Consortium. According to this definition thrombosis can be definite, probable and possible. Any unexplained death before end of follow-up in a trial should be considered thrombosis related. Recalculation of thrombosis rate using this definition caused pronounced increase of this parameter in previously conducted trials. Thrombosis rate rose from 0,6 to 3,3% for bare metal stents, from 0,8 to 3,6% for sirolimus eluting stents and from 1,3 to 3,5% for paclitaxel eluting stents. Professional cardiological and angiographical societies (ACC, AHA, SCAI) responding to FDA advisory panel published their proofs and vision of the problem of stent thrombosis. In February 2007 ACC, AHA, SCAI, American College of Surgeons and Association of Dentists published scientific bulletin in which described preventive measures aimed at lowering of risk of thrombosis development. This document contains strict recommendation to continue double antithrombotic therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel for 12 months after implantation of DES or abandonment of the use of this type of stents when long term double antithrombotic therapy is not possible.

  5. Neurological Manifestations of Dural Sinus Thrombosis | Ali | Sudan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:Dural sinus thrombosis is a clinical syndrome that has a diversity of signs and symptoms that can be easily misinterpreted with other common neurological diseases such as brain infections. Objective: to study the clinical presentation of dural sinus thrombosis among Sudanese patients seen at Elshaab ...

  6. Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis: a rare complication of nephrotic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullu M

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available A two and half year-old-male child, known case of steroid responsive nephrotic syndrome presented with fever and vomiting of acute onset. He was diagnosed to have superior sagittal sinus thrombosis on a contrast computerised tomographic scan of brain. Recovery was complete without anticoagulant therapy. Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis is an extremely rare complication of nephrotic syndrome.

  7. Metastatic Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Presenting as Jugular Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prince Cheriyan Modayil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Jugular venous thrombosis is unusual and is associated with central venous catheterisation, intravenous drug abuse and head and neck sepsis. It is rarely associated with malignancy. We report a case of metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary in a forty year old female which presented with jugular venous thrombosis. The discussion includes investigation and treatment options for this condition.

  8. Ovarian vein thrombosis – a rare but important complication of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When associated with parturition, ovarian vein thrombosis usually becomes apparent within the first week after delivery,[4] with significant clinical symptoms often mimicking appendicitis.[5]. The morbidity of ovarian vein thrombosis arises from complications such as sepsis, extension of the thrombus to the inferior vena cava ...

  9. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caranci, F., E-mail: ferdinandocaranci@libero.it [Unit of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Briganti, F., E-mail: frabriga@unina.it [Unit of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Cirillo, L.; Leonardi, M. [Neuroradiology service, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Service Cardarelli Hospital Naples (Italy)

    2013-10-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5–10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3–p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3–p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2

  10. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caranci, F.; Briganti, F.; Cirillo, L.; Leonardi, M.; Muto, M.

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5–10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3–p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3–p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2

  11. Kaempferol inhibits thrombosis and platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Park, Se-Eun; Kim, Sung-Jun; Kim, Seung

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate whether kaempferol affects pro-coagulant proteinase activity, fibrin clot formation, blood clot and thrombin (or collagen/epinephrine)-stimulated platelet activation, thrombosis, and coagulation in ICR (Imprinting Control Region) mice and SD (Sprague-Dawley) rats. Kaempferol significantly inhibited the enzymatic activities of thrombin and FXa by 68 ± 1.6% and 52 ± 2.4%, respectively. Kaempferol also inhibited fibrin polymer formation in turbidity. Microscopic analysis was performed using a fluorescent conjugate. Kaempferol completely attenuated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/PKB (AKT) in thrombin-stimulated platelets and delayed aggregation time (clotting) by 34.6% in an assay of collagen/epinephrine-stimulated platelet activation. Moreover, kaempferol protected against thrombosis development in 3 animal models, including collagen/epinephrine- and thrombin-induced acute thromboembolism models and an FeCl3-induced carotid arterial thrombus model. The ex vivo anticoagulant effect of kaempferol was further confirmed in ICR mice. This study demonstrated that kaempferol may be clinically useful due to its ability to reduce or prevent thrombotic challenge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  12. A complicated case of deep vein thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Cerutti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a patient with deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE associated to portal vein thrombosis (PVT, complicated by hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP. The pathogenesis of DVT is multifactorial; among risk factors we can list: transitory situations (surgical interventions, infectious diseases with fever, traumas, acquired conditions (neoplasms, antiphospholipid syndrome or genetically determined situations (thrombophilia. PVT of the sovrahepatic veins is responsible for 5-10% of portal hypertension cases in adults and can be associated to local or systemic infections. PVT is present in 10% of patients with cirrhosis and often associated to cancers. It can also complicate a surgery abdominal intervention. HAP is defined as pneumonia that appears for the first time within 48 h of hospital admission. In Internal Medicine Departments the incidence is 7-10 cases/1.000 of hospital admissions, with an important impact in terms of both mortality and morbility. An early diagnosis, together with a correct identification of microbiologic agents in cause, allows a suitable antibiotic therapy with consequent improvement of clinical prognosis and a meaningful reduction of mortality. Main risk factors are: age, hospital and department. An important variable to be considered is the onset of pneumonia. The later is the onset of HAP (5 or more days from the admission to hospital, the more often is associated to multidrug resistant (MRD microorganisms, poorly responsive to antibiotic.

  13. MRI and CT in cerebral venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surur, Alberto; Marangoni, Alberto; Devallis, Juan P.; Galvez, Vasco; Marchegiani, Silvio; Galletti, Cayetano; Martin, Juan J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The veno-occlusive encephalic disease is a neurologic disorder of difficult clinic diagnostic almost always. This clinic situation presents a high morbi-mortality range without an early and precise diagnostic. With the use of Helical Computed Tomography (HCT) and Angio Magnetic Resonance Image (AMRI) the diagnosis has became more effective in the encephalic venous thrombosis. Methods: Fourteen patients with clinical suspicion on encephalic venous thrombosis using non-invasive techniques as HCT and AMRI were studied. Results: In all these cases we were able to arrive at the exact etiologic diagnostic using these techniques associated to the clinics findings, without needing the use of another invasive method like Angiography. Conclusion: The results were satisfactory for definitive diagnosis, without Angiography. When a patient has a high suspicion of veno-occlusive disease the neuro radiologic examination in the urgency is a very important fact and using HCT and AMRI as the first examinations techniques it is possible to obtain good results without most aggressive techniques. (author)

  14. Plasma fibronectin supports hemostasis and regulates thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiming; Reheman, Adili; Spring, Christopher M.; Kalantari, Jalil; Marshall, Alexandra H.; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Gross, Peter L.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Rand, Margaret L.; Mosher, Deane F.; Freedman, John; Ni, Heyu

    2014-01-01

    Plasma fibronectin (pFn) has long been suspected to be involved in hemostasis; however, direct evidence has been lacking. Here, we demonstrated that pFn is vital to control bleeding in fibrinogen-deficient mice and in WT mice given anticoagulants. At the site of vessel injury, pFn was rapidly deposited and initiated hemostasis, even before platelet accumulation, which is considered the first wave of hemostasis. This pFn deposition was independent of fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, β3 integrin, and platelets. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy revealed pFn integration into fibrin, which increased fibrin fiber diameter and enhanced the mechanical strength of clots, as determined by thromboelastography. Interestingly, pFn promoted platelet aggregation when linked with fibrin but inhibited this process when fibrin was absent. Therefore, pFn may gradually switch from supporting hemostasis to inhibiting thrombosis and vessel occlusion following the fibrin gradient that decreases farther from the injured endothelium. Our data indicate that pFn is a supportive factor in hemostasis, which is vital under both genetic and therapeutic conditions of coagulation deficiency. By interacting with fibrin and platelet β3 integrin, pFn plays a self-limiting regulatory role in thrombosis, suggesting pFn transfusion may be a potential therapy for bleeding disorders, particularly in association with anticoagulant therapy. PMID:25180602

  15. Gender related issues in thrombosis and hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvas, Anne-Mette; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2017-11-01

    Many aspects of hemostasis, both primary and secondary, as well as fibrinolysis display sex differences. From a clinical viewpoint, certain differential phenotypic presentations clearly arise within various disorders of thrombosis and hemostasis. Areas covered: The present mini-review summarizes selected clinical entities where sex differences are reflected in both frequency and clinical presentation of hemostasis disorders. Sex differences are discussed within the settings of cardiovascular disease, including coronary artery disease and ischemic stroke, venous thromboembolism and inherited bleeding disorders. Moreover, pregnancy and labor present particular challenges in terms of increased thromboembolic and bleeding risk, and this is also summarized. Expert commentary: Available knowledge on sex differences in risk factors and clinical presentation of disorders within thrombosis and hemostasis is increasing. However, more evidence is needed to further clarify different risk factors and treatment effect in men and women, both as regards to cardiovascular disease and venous thromboembolism. This should facilitate improved gender guided risk stratification, and prevention and treatment of these diseases. Finally, risk assessment during pregnancy remains a challenge; this applies both to thromboembolic risk assessment during normal pregnancy and special care of women with inherited bleeding disorders during labor.

  16. Two cases of jugular vein thrombosis in severely burned patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cen H

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hanghui Cen, Xiaojie HeDepartment of Burn, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University Medical College, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Here we present two cases of jugular vein thrombosis in burn patients, with diagnosis, risk factor analysis, and treatment approaches. Severely burned patients have high risk of deep vein thrombosis occurrence due to multiple surgeries. The deep vein catheter should be carefully performed. Once deep vein thrombosis is detected, a wide ultrasonography helps to find other thrombosis sites. During the acute phase, low molecular weight heparin can be used. Upon long-term anti-thrombosis treatment, combined use of herbal medicine during rehabilitation is helpful.Keywords: burn, heparin, combined treatment

  17. Increased venous thrombosis incidence in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anette Tarp; Kesmodel, U S; Juul, S

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Is venous thrombosis risk increased in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization? SUMMARY ANSWER The venous thrombosis incidence was significantly increased in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization; especially in the first trimester and in the first 6 weeks post-partum. WHAT...... IS KNOWN ALREADY In vitro fertilization without pregnancy is not associated with increased venous thrombosis incidence. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This national register-based cohort study covered the period from 1995 to 2005. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS All Danish pregnancies conceived...... by in vitro fertilization (n = 18 787) were included. Venous thrombosis incidence rates in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization were compared with venous thrombosis incidence rates in reference pregnancies, by calculating incidence rate ratios. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE In total, 48 cases were...

  18. Color-flow Doppler imaging in suspected extremity venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, W.D.; Middleton, W.D.; Lawson, T.L.; Hinson, G.W.; Puller, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Color-flow Doppler imaging (CFDI) (Quanatum, 5 and 7.5 MHz, linear array) has been performed on 23 extremities (nine positive for venous thrombosis, 14 negative) with venographic correlation. CFDI criteria evaluated were venous color-flow respiratory variation, augmentation, compressibility, valve competence, and intraluminal echogenic filling defects. Both CFDI and venography were evaluated independently and prospectively. CFDI and venography agreed in all six cases of femoral vein thrombosis and eight of nine cases of popliteal vein thrombosis. CFDI was negative in one instance of recanalized popliteal vein thrombosis. Recanalized femoral vein thrombosis was documented in three patients by CFDI when the vein was nonopacified on conventional venography. CFDI provides a rapid and accurate assessment of the femoral popliteal venous system and can distinguish an occluded from a recanalized thrombus. Initial experience with auxiliary subclavian venous thrombus has produced equally accurate results

  19. Endothelial Protein C Receptor Gene Variants and Risk of Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Georgia; Politou, Marianna; Rallidis, Loukianos; Grouzi, Elisavet; Karakitsos, Petros; Merkouri, Efrosini; Travlou, Anthi; Gialeraki, Argyri

    2016-03-01

    Endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) is a candidate mediator in the pathogenesis of thrombosis, as several data in the literature indicate that polymorphisms such as EPCR 4678G/C and 4600A/G are associated with either protective effect or increased risk of thrombosis, respectively. We investigated the prevalence of these polymorphisms in patients with thrombotic disorders as well as their impact on the risk of thrombosis, the age of first thrombotic episode, and recurrence. The prevalence of the rare EPCR alleles 4600G and 4678C was comparable in patients and controls. However, in a subset analysis, we observed that 4600G allele was more prevalent among patients who developed thrombosis at younger age (thrombosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Ultrasound in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braband, K.; Sortland, O.

    1989-01-01

    In a prospective study ultrasonography (US) was compared with venography for diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis of the leg. Using venography, thrombosis was demonstrated in 25 patients. Based on two criteria, non-compressible vein and intraluminal echoes, US showed thrombosis in 23 patients, i.e. the sensitivity was 92%. Isolated calf vein thrombosis was demonstrated in 2 out 4 patients. In 18% of the patients with negative venography, other pathological conditions were demonstrated by US, (i.e. Baker's cysts, calf vein hematomas and superficial calf vein thrombosis) which could explain the clinical condition. Venography is a somewhat costly procedure. The cost of film and non-ionic contrast medium is approximately NOK 400, while the cost of film for an US examination is about NOK 10

  1. Association of varicosities and concomitant deep venous thrombosis in patients with superficial venous thrombosis, a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baggen, Vivan J M; Chung, Kaman; Koole, Koos; Sarneel, Michelle H J; Rutten, Frans H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/189152753; Hajer, Gideon R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with superficial venous thrombosis (SVT) co-existence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) can be present. Varicosities are considered as a risk factor for both SVT and DVT separately. However, current evidence is contradictory whether varicosities are associated with an increased

  2. Risk factors for cerebral venous thrombosis and deep venous thrombosis in patients aged between 15 and 50 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Karen; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Vroomen, Patrick C A J; van der Meer, Jannes; De Keyser, Jacques; Luijckx, Gert-Jan

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) and deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism (DVT/PE) are associated with many risk factors. It is unclear why CVT occurs less often than DVT/PE. Age dependent risk factors may play a role. The aim of our study was to compare risk factors in a uniform age group of

  3. The risk of venous thrombosis in individuals with a history of superficial vein thrombosis and acquired venous thrombotic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Rachel E J; Lijfering, Willem M; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; Helmerhorst, Frans M; Rosendaal, Frits R; Cannegieter, Suzanne C

    2013-12-19

    Superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) increases the risk of venous thrombosis fourfold to sixfold. As most individuals with SVT do not develop venous thrombosis, additional risk factors may explain the risk of developing a venous thrombosis. In the Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis study, we assessed the risk of venous thrombosis in individuals with previous SVT and a mild thrombotic risk factor (smoking or overweight/obesity), a strong risk factor (surgery, hospitalization, plaster cast immobilization, or malignancy), or a reproductive factor in women (oral contraception, postmenopausal hormone therapy, or pregnancy/puerperium). Individuals with previous SVT alone had a 5.5-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.4-6.8) increased risk of venous thrombosis. This was 9.3 (95% CI, 7.2-12.1) combined with a mild thrombotic risk factor, 31.4 (95% CI, 14.6-67.5) with a strong risk factor, and 34.9 (95% CI, 19.1-63.8) in women with a reproductive risk factor. The highest separate risk estimates were found for SVT with surgery (42.5; 95% CI, 10.2-177.6), hospitalization (49.8; 95% CI, 11.9-209.2), or oral contraception (43.0; 95% CI, 15.5-119.3 in women). In conclusion, the risk of venous thrombosis is markedly increased in individuals with previous SVT who have an acquired thrombotic risk factor.

  4. Prognostic factors in childhood intracranial neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ampil, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-six cases of primary intracranial neoplasm in children (over 1 year but under 13 years of age) seen at the university medical center between 1951 and 1982 were reviewed because of concern as to the results and after-effects of applied therapy. The overall 5-year actuarial survival rate was 17 %. Several factors of possible prognostic relevance, such as patient's age, intracranial location of the tumor, application or nonapplication of therapy, single or multiple modes of therapy, and extent of surgery, were analyzed. Completeness of surgical removal of the tumor proved to be the only statistically significant factor that correlated with survival. There was only one recorded case of severe learning disability and abnormal neuropsychologic development among the 12 living patients. The influence of patient's age (and technical factors) at the time of irradiation in correlation with the child's subsequent posttreatment functional performance, as reported in the literature, is reviewed. (author)

  5. Intracranial hemorrhage of the mature newborn infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemine, Hisao

    1983-01-01

    Concerning four mature newborn infants with intracranial hemorrhage diagnosed by CT, the labour course, treatment, and prognoses were discussed. Of intracranial hemorrhage, 70.7% was small hemorrhage along the cerebellar tentorium and the falx cerebri, 12.2% subdural hemorrhage in the posterior cranial fossa, and 9.8% subdural hemorrhage in the fornex. Intraventricular or extradural hemorrhage was rarely found. The prognosis is determined by severeness of neurotic symptoms due to cerebral hypoxia. Subdural hemorrhage of the posterior cranial fossa resulted in cerebral palsy in one fifth of the cases, and in slight enlargement of the ventricle in three fifths. Subdural hematoma left porencephaly in one fourth of the patients, but the remaining recovered to normal. (Ueda, J.)

  6. The contemporary management of intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xinyi; Wong, Ka Sing; Leung, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is the most common cause of cerebral vasculopathy and an important stroke etiology worldwide, with a higher prevalence in Asian, Hispanic and African ethnicities. Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease portends a recurrent stroke risk as high as 18% at one year. The key to secondary prevention is an understanding of the underlying stroke mechanism and aggressive control of conventional cardiovascular risks. Contemporary treatment includes antiplatelet therapy, optimal glycemic and blood pressure control, statin therapy and lifestyle modifications. For patients with high-grade (70-99%) symptomatic steno-occlusion, short-term dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel followed by life-long single antiplatelet therapy may reduce the recurrent risk. Current evidence does not advocate percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting as an initial treatment. External counterpulsation, encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis and remote limb ischemic preconditioning are treatments under investigation. Future studies should aim at predicting patients prone to recurrence despite of medical therapies and testing the efficacy of emerging therapies.

  7. MR diffusion imaging of human intracranial tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K; Gideon, P; Wagn, P

    1997-01-01

    We used MRI for in vivo measurement of brain water self-diffusion in patients with intracranial tumours. The study included 28 patients (12 with high-grade and 3 with low-grade gliomas, 7 with metastases, 5 with meningiomas and 1 with a cerebral abscess). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were...... (P meningiomas did not differ significantly from those seen with high-grade gliomas or cerebral metastases...

  8. Intracranial capillary hemangioma mimicking a dissociative disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lacasse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary hemangiomas, hamartomatous proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, are rare in the central nervous system (CNS. Intracranial capillary hemangiomas presenting with reversible behavioral abnormalities and focal neurological deficits have rarely been reported. We report a case of CNS capillary hemangioma presenting with transient focal neurological deficits and behavioral abnormalities mimicking Ganser’s syndrome. Patient underwent total excision of the vascular malformation, resulting in complete resolution of his symptoms.

  9. Intracranial Volume Quantification from 3D Photography

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Liyun; Porras, Antonio R.; Ensel, Scott; Tsering, Deki; Paniagua, Beatriz; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Oh, Albert; Keating, Robert; Rogers, Gary F.; Linguraru, Marius George

    2017-01-01

    3D photography offers non-invasive, radiation-free, and anesthetic-free evaluation of craniofacial morphology. However, intracranial volume (ICV) quantification is not possible with current non-invasive imaging systems in order to evaluate brain development in children with cranial pathology. The aim of this study is to develop an automated, radiation-free framework to estimate ICV. Pairs of computed tomography (CT) images and 3D photographs were aligned using registration. We used the real I...

  10. Natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    The author examined the natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy using CT or MR imaging. Twenty patients with intracranial meningioma received radiotherapy from a high-energy linear accelerator (4-10 MV X rays) from 1980 to 1996. The total doses were 50 Gy to the tumor bed in single doses of 2 Gy in 5 weekly fractions. Meningiomas in 10 of 20 patients were reduced within 1 to 38 months after radiotherapy, the average being 11 months. The tumors were controlled for a median of 60 months after radiotherapy (range 19-126 months). Four other patients have shown no change in tumor size after radiotherapy. The tumors were controlled for a median of 70 months after radiotherapy (range 37-127 months). The other six patients have shown tumor growth within 3 to 25 months after radiotherapy, after which the tumors stopped growing for a median of 71 months (range 2-181 months). Neither tumor size nor histological type was related to response. The growth of tumors was controlled by radiotherapy for a median duration of 43 months in the meningothelial type, 52 months in the fibroblastic type, and 61 months in the transitional type. The median duration for all benign tumors was 52 months. A moderate correlation was noted between tumor response and functional outcome after radiotherapy in 9 patients with neurological deficits. The natural histories of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy were grouped into three categories. Some tumors showed no change in size over a long period. This was a characteristic response after radiotherapy that differed from that of other brain tumors. The results of this study provide important information for the follow-up of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy. (author)

  11. Computed tomography in intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Katsunuma, Hideyo; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Tomonaga, Masanori.

    1984-01-01

    In tracranial hemorrhage in leukemia was clinicopathologically studied in 62 cases of autopsy materials, with special attention paid to a morphological comparison of CT images with pathological findings. Intracranial hemorrhage was found in 32 of the 62 leukemic patients (51.6%), and in 13 of these patients (21.0%) it was responsible for death. Leukemic intracranial hemorrhage occurred more often in the acute leukemic type than in the chronic type, and even more often in younger leukemic patinents; it was pathologically characterized by multiple lesions in the white matter of the cerebral hemisphere, prone to combination with SAH or SDH. The hemorrhages could be divided into five types: (1) scattered small hemorrhagic type, (2) hematoma type, (3) fusion type (large hemorrhage composed of assembled small hemorrhages), (4) SAH type, and (5) SDH type. Among these types, the fusion type was considered to be characteristic of leukemia. CT was undertaken in 5 pathologically proven cases, with findings of the scattered small hemorrhagic type in 1, of the SDH type in 3, and of the fusion type in 1. Yet, one case with scattered small hemorrhages and two cases with SDH failed to be detected by CT. However, one case with a typical fusion hemorrhage was found to have multiple, irregular, high-density areas with surrounding edema and a mass effect as well as pathological findings. Therefore, a large-fusion hemorrhage, which is one of the most characteristic types of leukemic intracranial hemorrhage, could be demonstrated as distinctive CT images which reflected neuropathological findings. On the other hand, small parenchymal hemorrhages and relatively thin subdural hemorrhages could not be detected by CT. In conclusion, it seems that CT has value in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia. (J.P.N.)

  12. Computed tomographic findings of traumatic intracranial lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Seong Wook; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, Ki Jeoung; Yoon, Il Gyu [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-10-15

    Traumatic intracranial lesion has been one of the most frequent and serious problem in neurosurgical pathology. Computed tomography made it possible to get prompt diagnosis and surgical intervention of intracranial lesions by its safety, fastness and accuracy. Computed tomographic scan was carried out on 1309 cases at Soonchunhyang Chunan Hospital for 15 months from October 1983 to December 1984. We have reviewed the computed tomographic scans of 264 patients which showed traumatic intracranial lesion. The result were as follows: 1. Head trauma was the most frequent diagnosed disease using computed tomographic scans (57.8%) and among 264 cases the most frequent mode of injury was traffic accident (73.9%). 2. Skull fracture was accompanied in frequency of 69.7% and it was detected in CT in 38.6%: depression fracture was more easily detected in 81%. 3. Conutercoup lesion (9.5%) was usually accompanied with temporal and occipital fracture, and it appeared in lower incidence among pediatric group. 4. Intracranial lesions of all 264 cases were generalized cerebral swelling (24.6%), subdural hematoma (22.3%), epidural hematoma (20.8%), intracerebral hematoma (6.1%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (3.0%). 5. The shape of hematoma was usually biconvex (92.7%) in acute epidural hematoma and cresentic (100%) in acute subdural hematoma, but the most chronic the case became, they showed planoconvex and bicconvex shapes. 6. Extra-axial hematoma was getting decreased in density as time gone by. 7. Hematoma density was not in direct proportion to serum hemoglobin level as single factor.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of intracranial hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, H.J. (Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway))

    1989-04-01

    The signal intensity of a hematoma at Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is largely determined by the presence of paramagnetic substances derived from hemoglobin. Depending upon their structure and molecular mobility, paramagnetic substances may shorten the T1 and T2 of surrounding water protons and thus alter the MRI signal intensity and contrast. The article describes the evolution of intracranial hematomas and explains the relationship between the paramagnetic substance present and the result signal intensity at 1.5 T.

  14. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaliopy Matheos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Papilledema has long been considered a hallmark of idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a disease defined by elevated intracranial pressure with indiscernible etiology. Papilledema is often seen in the pediatric population, and as such can lead to delays in diagnosis, and often misdiagnosis. Here, we describe three children who were confirmed to have idiopathic intracranial hypertension with raised intracranial pressure by repeated lumbar puncture or intracranial pressure monitoring, normal neuroimaging and absence of papilledema. All three cases had atypical clinical presentations with visual disturbances or photophobia. The patients had a normal body mass index. This case series demonstrates that idiopathic intracranial hypertension can manifest in the absence of clinically obvious papilledema, and has, as such, the potential to cause permanent visual loss if the diagnosis is missed.

  15. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Jirásková

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Nada Jirásková, Pavel RozsívalDepartment of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Hradec Králové, Czech RepublicPurpose: To evaluate retrospectively the features, treatment, and outcome of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH in children.Methods: Nine patients, 15 years and younger, diagnosed with IIH. Inclusion criteria were papilledema, normal brain computer tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid pressure greater than 250 mm H2O, normal cerebrospinal fluid content, and a nonfocal neurologic examination except for sixth nerve palsy.Results: Of the nine patients, eight were girls. Five girls were overweight and one boy was obese. The most common presenting symptom was headache (5 patients. Diplopia or strabismus did not occur in our group. Visual field abnormalities were present in all eyes, and severe visual loss resulting in light perception vision occurred in both eyes of one patient. Eight patients were treated medically with acetazolamide alone, and one girl needed a combination of acetazolamide and corticosteroids. This girl also required optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. Resolution of papilledema and recovery of visual function occurred in all patients.Conclusions: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in prepubertal children is rather uncommon. Prompt diagnosis and management are important to prevent permanent visual loss.Keywords: idiopathic intracranial hypertension, pediatric, treatment

  16. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traver, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the some of the known results of spaceflight induced intracranial hypertension. Historical information from Gemini 5, Apollo, and the space shuttle programs indicated that some vision impairment was reported and a comparison between these historical missions and present missions is included. Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, Choroidal Folds, Hyperopic Shifts and Raised Intracranial Pressure has occurred in Astronauts During and After Long Duration Space Flight. Views illustrate the occurrence of Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, and Choroidal Folds. There are views of the Arachnoid Granulations and Venous return, and the question of spinal or venous compliance issues is discussed. The question of increased blood flow and its relation to increased Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is raised. Most observed on-orbit papilledema does not progress, and this might be a function of plateau homeostasis for the higher level of intracranial pressure. There are seven cases of astronauts experiencing in flight and post flight symptoms, which are summarized and follow-up is reviewed along with a comparison of the treatment options. The question is "is there other involvement besides vision," and other Clinical implications are raised,

  17. Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tadashi; Asao, Toyohiko; Shibata, Takeo

    1981-01-01

    Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage were diagnosed and followed up by CT scanning. By CT, hemorrhagic lesions were shown as high density areas in an acute stage and imaged as low density areas after the hemorrhage was absorbed. The time of absorption varies depending upon the site and the severity of hemorrhage. Intraventricular hemorrhage, petechial hemorrhage and subdural hematoma were absorbed rapidly in more than 70% of the exanimed cases, CT scanning 1 - 2 weeks after the onset revealed absorption of hemorrhage. However, the absorption delayed in intracerebral hematoma; CT scan taken after one month showed hemorrhagic lesions remaining in 75% of the cases. In nine cases who survived, following the absorption of the hemorrhagic lesions, cerebral atrophy was observed in 4 cases (44%), ventricular enlargement in 3 cases (33%), and complete recovery in 2 cases (22%). From these results, CT scanning for diagnosis of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage should be done before the hemorrhagic lesion is absorbed (within 7 days of the onset). Follow-up study by CT is important for observing changes and predicting prognosis of intracranial hemorrhage. (Ueda, J.)

  18. Primary brain tumor presenting as intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, Shigeru; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Miyamoto, Seiji; Kyoi, Kikuo; Utsumi, Shozaburo; Kamada, Kitaro; Inui, Shoji; Masuda, Akio.

    1989-01-01

    Ten cases of primary brain tumor presenting as intracranial hemorrhage were studied in terms of the radiological and histological findings. The cases having hemorrhage in the tumor, as established through CT or histologically, were excluded if their onsets were not sudden due to intracranial hemorrhages. The results obtained may be summarized as follows: 1) From an anatomical point of view, cerebral subcortical hemorrhages account for 80%; hemorrhages in the cerebellopontine angle, 10%, and hemorrhages in the basal ganglia, 10%. 2) Plain CT findings showed perifocal low-density areas within 24 hours after onset in all 10 cases. 3) Enhanced CT findings showed enhanced areas in 4 or 6 cases. 4) Angiographic findings revealed abnormalities besides the mass effect in 5 of the 10 cases. 4) Angiographic findings revealed abnormalities besides the mass effect in 5 of the 10 cases. 5) From a histological point of view, glioblastomas account for 30%; malignant astrocytomas, 20%; astrocytomas, 20%; malignant ependymomas, 10%; hemangioblastoma, 10%, and transitional meningiomas, 10%. In conclusion, a perifocal low-density area on CT within 24 hours after onset is the most meaningful indication of intracranial hemorrhage originating from a brain tumor. A histological 'perinuclear halo' in an astrocytoma as an artifact due to hemorrhage may often be misleading in diagnosing mixed oligo-astrocytomas. (author)

  19. Brain MRI findings of spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Kyu; Byun, Woo Mok; Cho, Jae Ho; Cho Kil Ho; Hwang, Mi Soo; Park, Bok Hwan [Yeungnam Univ. College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Yang Gu [Keimyoung Univ. College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Jin [Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    To evaluate brain MRI findings of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. A retrospective review of MRI findings was conducted on six patients with clinically proven spontaneous intracranial hypotension; no patient had a history of previous spinal puncture. Follow-up MRI was available in two patients, and to detect CSF leakage, radio-nuclide cisternography(n=3D5), myelography(n=3D1), and MR myelography(n=3D1) were performed. On contrast-enhanced T1WI, diffuse dural enhancement was seen in all cases, subdural hematoma or hygroma was seen in four cases, pituitary gland prominence in four, dural sinus dilatation in four, downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsil in two, downward displacement of the iter in one, and suprasellar and prepontine cistern effacement in two. In no patient was abnormal CSF leakage found. Although dural enhancement, as seen on MRI, is not specific, diffuse enhancement of the dura mater accompanied by subdural hematoma, hygroma, pituitary gland prominence, dural sinus dilatation, downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsil, or suprasellar and prepontine cistern effacement can strongly suggest intracranial hypotension.=20.

  20. Endovascular treatment for pediatric intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Yang, Xinjian; Wu, Zhongxue [Capital Medical University, Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing, Hebei (China)

    2009-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to report the characteristics and outcomes of pediatric patients with intracranial aneurysms. From 1998 to 2005, 25 pediatric patients (aged {<=}17 years) with intracranial aneurysm were treated at our institute. Eleven of 25 patients had subarachnoid hemorrhage. In ten patients, the aneurysm was an incidental finding. One patient presented with cranial nerves dysfunction and three with neurological deficits. The locations of the aneurysms were as follows: vertebral artery (VA; n = 9), middle cerebral artery (MCA; n = 5), posterior cerebral artery (PCA; n = 4), basilar artery (BA; n = 2), anterior communicating artery (n = 2), anterior cerebral artery (n = 2), and internal carotid artery (n = 1). Five patients were treated with selective embolization with coils. Sixteen patients were treated with parent vessel occlusion (PVO). Eight PVOs were performed with balloons and eight were performed with coils. One patient with a VA aneurysm was spontaneously thrombosed 4 days after the initial diagnostic angiogram. In three patients treated with stent alone or stent-assisted coiling, one with BA trunk aneurysm died. One aneurismal recurrence occurred and was retreated. At a mean follow-up duration of 23.5 months, 96% of patients had a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 4 or 5. Pediatric intracranial aneurysms occur more commonly in male patients and have a predilection for the VA, PCA, and MCA. PVO is an effective and safe treatment for fusiform aneurysms. Basilar trunk fusiform aneurysms were difficult to treat and were associated with a high mortality rate. (orig.)

  1. Sudden infant death syndrome, childhood thrombosis, and presence of genetic risk factors for thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T B; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Banner, Jytte

    2000-01-01

    in the child. This prompted us to investigate these genetic markers of thromboembolic disease in 121 cases of sudden infant death syndrome and in relevant controls, in the expectation of a more frequent occurrence of these markers if thrombosis is an etiological factor in sudden infant death syndrome......Sudden infant death syndrome or "cot death" has until the late eighties been a significant cause of death in children between the ages of 1 month and 1 year. Approximately two per 1000 children born alive dies of sudden infant death syndrome each year in Western Europe, North America, and Australia....... The vulnerability of the infant brain stem to ischemia has been suggested to be a conceivable cause of sudden infant death syndrome. This is compatible with a hypothesis that genetic risk factors for cerebral thrombosis could cause microinfarction in the brain stem during the first month of life, affecting vital...

  2. Catheter-directed thrombolytic therapy for thoracic deep vein thrombosis is safe and effective in selected patients with and without cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maleux, Geert; Marchal, Pieter; Heye, Sam; Vaninbroukx, Johan [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Palmers, Marleen [Sint-Trudo Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sint-Truiden (Belgium); Verhamme, Peter; Verhaeghe, Raymond [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Vascular Medicine, Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-09-15

    To assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of catheter-directed thrombolysis for thoracic central venous thrombosis in both cancer and non-cancer patients. A retrospective case series of 68 patients, including 35 with active cancer and 33 without cancer, was analysed. They all received catheter-directed thrombolysis with alteplase or urokinase for symptomatic acute major thoracic vein thrombosis. Substantial clot lysis was obtained in 62 out of 68 patients (91%), the results being 88.6 and 93.8% for cancer and non-cancer patients respectively (P = 0.68). The mean infusion time in patients with and without cancer was 2.11 and 1.84 days respectively (P = 0.3259). Procedure-related complications occurred in two cancer patients (8.6%) and in seven non-cancer patients (21%) (P = 0.18). One cancer patient developed a fatal intracranial bleeding. Additional intervention after successful lysis was performed in cancer (n = 18; 51%) as well as in non-cancer patients (n = 29; 88%). Catheter-directed thrombolysis is a feasible and highly effective interventional procedure with an acceptable safety profile in selected patients with and without cancer for the treatment of symptomatic thoracic central venous thrombosis. In most cases, additional endovascular or surgical procedures are required to restore and maintain vessel patency after successful thrombolysis. (orig.)

  3. Catheter-directed thrombolytic therapy for thoracic deep vein thrombosis is safe and effective in selected patients with and without cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleux, Geert; Marchal, Pieter; Heye, Sam; Vaninbroukx, Johan; Palmers, Marleen; Verhamme, Peter; Verhaeghe, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    To assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of catheter-directed thrombolysis for thoracic central venous thrombosis in both cancer and non-cancer patients. A retrospective case series of 68 patients, including 35 with active cancer and 33 without cancer, was analysed. They all received catheter-directed thrombolysis with alteplase or urokinase for symptomatic acute major thoracic vein thrombosis. Substantial clot lysis was obtained in 62 out of 68 patients (91%), the results being 88.6 and 93.8% for cancer and non-cancer patients respectively (P = 0.68). The mean infusion time in patients with and without cancer was 2.11 and 1.84 days respectively (P = 0.3259). Procedure-related complications occurred in two cancer patients (8.6%) and in seven non-cancer patients (21%) (P = 0.18). One cancer patient developed a fatal intracranial bleeding. Additional intervention after successful lysis was performed in cancer (n = 18; 51%) as well as in non-cancer patients (n = 29; 88%). Catheter-directed thrombolysis is a feasible and highly effective interventional procedure with an acceptable safety profile in selected patients with and without cancer for the treatment of symptomatic thoracic central venous thrombosis. In most cases, additional endovascular or surgical procedures are required to restore and maintain vessel patency after successful thrombolysis. (orig.)

  4. Intracranial Subdural Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia for Cesarean Section

    OpenAIRE

    Schweiger, Vittorio; Zanconato, Giovanni; Lonati, Gisella; Baggio, Silvia; Gottin, Leonardo; Polati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia is an infrequent occurrence in the obstetric population. Nevertheless, it is a potentially life-threatening complication. In the majority of the cases, the first clinical symptom associated with intracranial subdural bleeding is severe headache, but the clinical course may have different presentations. In this report, we describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with an acute intracranial subdural hematoma shortly after spinal anesthe...

  5. Recently Identified Factors that Regulate Hemostasis and Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddings, Julia E; Mackman, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    The blood coagulation cascade is essential for hemostasis but excessive activation can cause thrombosis. Importantly, recent studies have identified factors that contribute to thrombosis but not hemostasis. These include factor XII (FXII), tissue factor-positive microparticles (MPs) and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Recent studies have shown that FXII plays a role in thrombosis but not hemostasis. FXII is activated in vivo by a variety of negatively-charged polyphosphates, which include extracellular RNA, DNA and inorganic polyphosphate (PolyP) that are released during cell damage and infection. These findings have triggered the development of nucleic acid-binding polymers as a new class of anticoagulant drug. Other studies have analyzed the role of MPs in experimental thrombosis. MPs are small membrane vesicles released from activated or apoptotic cells. We and others have found that tissue factor-positive MPs enhance thrombosis in mouse models and are elevated in the plasma of pancreatic cancer patients. Finally, NETs have been shown to contribute to experimental venous thrombosis in mouse models and are present in human thrombi. NETs are composed of chromatin fibers that are released from neutrophils undergoing cell death. NETs can capture platelets and increase fibrin deposition. The recent advances in our understanding of the factors contributing to thrombosis in animal models provide new opportunities for the development of safer anticoagulant drugs. PMID:24573314

  6. Unsuspected lower extremity deep venous thrombosis simulating musculoskeletal pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parellada, Antoni J.; Reiter, Sean B.; Glickman, Peter L.; Kloss, Linda A. [Frankford Hospitals, DII - Diagnostic Imaging, Inc., Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Carrino, John A. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Patel, Pinecca [Frankford Hospitals, Jefferson Health System, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2006-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to highlight the critical role that MRI may play in diagnosing unsuspected lower extremity deep venous thrombosis and to stress the importance of scrutinizing MRI studies of the lower extremity showing apparently non-specific muscle edema for any evidence of intramuscular venous thrombosis. The imaging studies of four patients in whom deep venous thrombosis was unsuspected on clinical grounds, and first diagnosed on the basis of MRI findings, were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. In all four patients the initial clinical suspicion was within the scope of musculoskeletal injuries (gastrocnemius strain, n=3; ruptured Baker cyst, n=1), explaining the choice of MRI over ultrasound as the first diagnostic modality. All patients showed marked reactive edema in the surrounding soft tissues or muscles. Three patients showed MR evidence of branching rim-enhancing structures within intramuscular plexuses characteristic of venous thrombosis (gastrocnemius, n=1; sural, n=2); one patient showed a distended popliteal vein. Ultrasound was able to duplicate the MRI findings in three patients: one patient showed above-the-knee extension on ultrasound; neither of the two patients with intramuscular thrombosis demonstrated on ultrasound showed extension to the deep venous trunks. Intramuscular venous thrombosis can present as marked edema-like muscle changes on MRI, simulating primary musculoskeletal conditions. In the absence of clinical suspicion for deep venous thrombosis, only the identification of rim-enhancing branching intramuscular tubular structures will allow the correct diagnosis to be made. (orig.)

  7. The hypercoagulable profile of patients with stent thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffen, R; Godschalk, T C; van Oerle, R; Spronk, H M H; Hackeng, C M; ten Berg, J M; ten Cate, H

    2015-01-01

    Objective Coronary stent thrombosis is a devastating complication after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The mechanisms underlying stent thrombosis are multifactorial. Whether the coagulation system is involved in the pathophysiology of stent thrombosis is unclear. We hypothesised that thrombin generation, reflecting the coagulation potential, is enhanced in patients with stent thrombosis. Methods A case–control study was performed, including 63 patients with PCI: 23 cases (stent thrombosis) and 40 controls (no stent thrombosis). Thrombin generation was measured using 0, 1 and 5 pM tissue factor (TF) triggers. Active site-inhibited factor VIIa (ASIS) and recombinant thrombomodulin were added to study the contact activation system and the protein C pathway, respectively. Results Thrombin generation was significantly increased for all TF triggers in cases compared with controls. Addition of ASIS to the measurement without exogenous TF revealed significantly enhanced contact activation in cases compared with controls; mean peak height: 241 vs 183 nM. Thrombin generation was also significantly increased in cases compared with controls in the presence of exogenous TF; mean peak height: 263 vs 233 nM (5 pM TF). Addition of thrombomodulin reduced thrombin generation by 23% in cases and 31% in controls (pthrombosis. Stent thrombosis patients showed a hypercoagulable state, most likely caused by enhanced contact activation and attenuation of anticoagulation by the protein C pathway. PMID:25999588

  8. The management of mesenteric vein thrombosis: a single institution's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanar, Fatih; Ağcaoğlu, Orhan; Gök, Ali Fuat Kaan; Sarıcı, Inanç Samil; Ozçınar, Beyza; Aksakal, Nihat; Aksoy, Murat; Ozkurt, Enver; Kurtoğlu, Mehmet

    2013-05-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis occurs rarely and is responsible for approximately 5-15% of all cases of acute mesenteric ischemia. The aim of this report was to discuss the management of mesenteric vein thrombosis based on our experience with 34 patients. In the present study, 34 patients who were admitted to our emergency surgery department between January 2007 and January 2010 with a diagnosis of acute mesenteric vein thrombosis were assessed retrospectively. Patients with peritoneal signs first underwent diagnostic laparoscopy to rule out perforation or bowel gangrene. We performed a second-look laparoscopy within 72 hours of the first operation. All patients were administered 100 mg/kg of the anticoagulant enoxaparin twice daily. In the 6th and 12th months of follow up, CT angiography was performed to evaluate recanalization of the veins. CT angiography revealed superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in 25 (73%) patients, portal vein thrombosis in 24 (70%) patients, and splenic vein thrombosis in 12 (35%) patients. Eleven patients with peritoneal signs underwent diagnostic laparoscopy; eight of the patients underwent small bowel resection, anastomosis, and trocar insertion. During second-look laparoscopy, small bowel ischemia was found in two patients and re-resection was performed. Early diagnosis with CT angiography, surgical and non-surgical blood flow restoration, proper anticoagulation, and supportive intensive care are the cornerstones of successful treatment of mesenteric vein thrombosis.

  9. On the dragnosis of deep vein thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, C.-G.

    1979-01-01

    Clinical and laboratory diagnostic methods were studied in 301 consecutive patients with suspected deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Unexpectedly, phlebography (the reference method) was found to cause DVT in estimated 48 % of patients without initial DVT. Using a new type of contrast medium, however, no thrombotic complications were found. - Neither clinical examination nor plethysmography were found to give reliable results. Using a modified technique for radioisotope detection, high sensitivity to DVT was found with the 125 I-fibrinogen uptake test (within 2 days) and a newly developed 99 Tcsup(m)-plasmin test (within one hour). Since both tests showed low specificity, they are reliable as screening tests to exclude DVT, but not as independent diagnostic methods. (author)

  10. LATERAL SINUS THROMBOSIS IN OTOLOGY: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Visavanatha

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Lateral sinus thrombosis (LST is usually occurs as a complication of middle ear infection .The involvement of lateral sinus during the course of ear infection was a well known complication in preantibiotic days .The decrease in the incidence of LST is due to the introduction of broad-spectrum antibiotics, early diagnosis and surgical treatment. Now, it is a rare complication of otitis media and poses a serious threat that warrants immediate medical and surgical treatment. The classical clinical picture is often changed by previous antibiotic therapy. An awareness of this rare potentially devastating condition and its varied presentations is necessary for early diagnosis and treatment. LST can also occur after head injury.

  11. Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis following Oropharyngeal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Bostanci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal jugular vein thrombosis (IJVT is a rare condition which may lead to life-threatening complications such as sepsis and pulmonary embolism. Prolonged central venous catheterization, intravenous (IV drug use, trauma, and radiotherapy are the most frequent causes of the IJVT. IJVT that develops after the oropharyngeal infection is a quite rare situation today. In this paper, a 37-year-old woman was presented; swelling occurred on her neck after acute tonsillitis and she was diagnosed with IJVT through Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging and managed without complications. Early diagnosis and conservative treatment with broad-spectrum IV antibiotics and anticoagulant agents have a critical importance for the prevention of fatal complications.

  12. Computerized tomographic evaluation of intracranial metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bo Yong; Lee, Mi Sook; Choi, Jin Ok; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song

    1986-01-01

    In a study of intracranial metastases, 46 cases having satisfactory clinical, operative and histological proofs were analyzed by computerized tomography at Presbyterian Medical Center from May, 1982 to February, 1986. The results were as follows: 1. The male to female ratio of intracranial metastases were 67:33. The 5th decade group (34.8%) was the most prevalent age group, followed by the 6th decade (21.7%) and 7th decade (21.7%). 2. The number of lesions was found be: single -25 cases (54.3%); multiple -21 cases (45.7%). 3. The source of intracranial metastases found to be: lung 15 cases (32.6%); unknown 12 cases (26.0%); chorioca 3 cases (6.5%); liver 3 cases (6.5%); stomach 2 cases (4.3%); parotid, breast, kidney, prostate, melanoma, rectal ca, rhabdomyosarcoma, nasal ca, lymphoma, testicular ca, cervix, each 1 case (2.2%). 4. The locations of the intracranial metastases were as follows: Cerebral hemisphere 37.7% in parietal region Cerebral hemisphere 15.9% in in frontal region Cerebral hemisphere 13.4% in occipital region Cerebral hemisphere 10.5% in temporal region Cerebellar hemisphere 3.2% Cerebellopontine angle 3.2% Intraventricular 4.8% Meninges 4.8% Skull vault 6.5% 5. Peritumor edema was found to be: Grade II-17 cases (37.0%): Grade III-14 cases (30.4%); Grade I-8 cases (17.4%); Grade 0-7 cases (15.2%) in that order. 6. The chief complaints of intracranial metastases on admission, were as follows: Headache 30 cases (65.2%); Vomiting 11 cases (23.9%); deteriorated mental state 10 cases (21.7%); Hemiplegia 7 cases (15.2%); visual disturbance 6 cases (13.0%); hemiparesis 4 cases (8.7%); seizure 4 cases (8.7%); other symptoms were less frequent. 7. On pre-contrast scan, hyperdense lesions were present in 18 cases (39.1%); hypodense lesions in 15 cases (32.6%); mixed density in 8 cases (17.4%); isodensity was present in 5 cases (10.9%). On post-contrast scan, ring enhancement was seen in 19 cases (41.3%); nodular enhancement in 17 cases (37%), mixed ring

  13. Computerized tomographic evaluation of intracranial metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Yong; Lee, Mi Sook; Choi, Jin Ok; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song [Presbyterian Medical Center, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-12-15

    In a study of intracranial metastases, 46 cases having satisfactory clinical, operative and histological proofs were analyzed by computerized tomography at Presbyterian Medical Center from May, 1982 to February, 1986. The results were as follows: 1. The male to female ratio of intracranial metastases were 67:33. The 5th decade group (34.8%) was the most prevalent age group, followed by the 6th decade (21.7%) and 7th decade (21.7%). 2. The number of lesions was found be: single -25 cases (54.3%); multiple -21 cases (45.7%). 3. The source of intracranial metastases found to be: lung 15 cases (32.6%); unknown 12 cases (26.0%); chorioca 3 cases (6.5%); liver 3 cases (6.5%); stomach 2 cases (4.3%); parotid, breast, kidney, prostate, melanoma, rectal ca, rhabdomyosarcoma, nasal ca, lymphoma, testicular ca, cervix, each 1 case (2.2%). 4. The locations of the intracranial metastases were as follows: Cerebral hemisphere 37.7% in parietal region Cerebral hemisphere 15.9% in in frontal region Cerebral hemisphere 13.4% in occipital region Cerebral hemisphere 10.5% in temporal region Cerebellar hemisphere 3.2% Cerebellopontine angle 3.2% Intraventricular 4.8% Meninges 4.8% Skull vault 6.5% 5. Peritumor edema was found to be: Grade II-17 cases (37.0%): Grade III-14 cases (30.4%); Grade I-8 cases (17.4%); Grade 0-7 cases (15.2%) in that order. 6. The chief complaints of intracranial metastases on admission, were as follows: Headache 30 cases (65.2%); Vomiting 11 cases (23.9%); deteriorated mental state 10 cases (21.7%); Hemiplegia 7 cases (15.2%); visual disturbance 6 cases (13.0%); hemiparesis 4 cases (8.7%); seizure 4 cases (8.7%); other symptoms were less frequent. 7. On pre-contrast scan, hyperdense lesions were present in 18 cases (39.1%); hypodense lesions in 15 cases (32.6%); mixed density in 8 cases (17.4%); isodensity was present in 5 cases (10.9%). On post-contrast scan, ring enhancement was seen in 19 cases (41.3%); nodular enhancement in 17 cases (37%), mixed ring

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of superficial vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauersachs, R M

    2013-08-01

    Superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) is a common disease, characterized by an inflammatory-thrombotic process in a superficial vein. Typical clinical findings are pain and a warm, tender, reddish cord along the vein. Until recently, no reliable epidemiological data were available. The incidence is estimated to be higher than that of deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) (1/1000). SVT shares many risk factors with DVT, but affects twice as many women than men and frequently occurs in varicose veins. Clinically, SVT extension is commonly underestimated, and patients may have asymptomatic DVT. Therefore, ultrasound assessment and exclusion of DVT is essential. Risk factors for concomitant DVT are recent hospitalization, immobilization, autoimmune disorders, age > 75 years, prior VTE, cancer and SVT in non-varicose veins. Even though most patients with isolated SVT (without concomitant DVT or PE) are commonly treated with anticoagulation for a median of 15 days, about 8% experience symptomatic thromboembolic complications within three months. Risk factors for occurrence of complications are male gender, history of VTE, cancer, SVT in a non-varicose vein or SVT involving the sapheno-femoral junction (SFJ). As evidence supporting treatment of isolated SVT was sparse and of poor quality, the large, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled CALISTO trial was initiated assessing the effect of fondaparinux on symptomatic outcomes in isolated SVT. This study showed that, compared with placebo, 2.5 mg fondaparinux given for 45 days reduced the risk of symptomatic thromboembolic complications by 85% without increasing bleeding. Based on CALISTO and other observational studies, evidence-based recommendations can be made for the majority of SVT patients. Further studies can now be performed in higher risk patients to address unresolved issues.

  15. [Measurement of intracranial hematoma using the improved cubature formula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao; Lu, Wen

    2010-06-01

    The more accurate calculate method was investigated according to the improved formula of intracranial hematoma using segment deducing. The improved formula was deduced to calculate the intracranial hematoma using the volume formula of the solid geometry. The volume of intracranial hematoma was measured as a related accurate standards using software. The volumes of intracranial hematoma calculated by the improved formula, Tada's formula and the software were compared. The measure accuracy of the improved formula was higher than that of Tada's formula, and showed a similarity with that by using software method. The improved formula method shows a more accurate result than Tada's formula, and can be used in forensic practice.

  16. Diagnostic value of optical coherence tomography for intracranial pressure in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, M; Yri, H; Sander, B

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of space-occupying lesions or other known etiology. It primarily affects young obese females, and potentially causes permanent visual loss due to papilledema and secondary....... The diagnostic ability of OCT as a marker of increased ICP (> 25 cmH(2)O) was investigated using multiple regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. RESULTS: OCT elevation diagrams showed that in 60 % of patients newly diagnosed with IIH and in 10 % of patients with long-term IIH, 50...

  17. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension in Monozygotic Female Twins: Intracranial Pressure Dynamics and Treatment Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polemikos, Manolis; Heissler, Hans E; Hermann, Elvis J; Krauss, Joachim K

    2017-05-01

    Familial cases of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) are exceedingly rare, and its occurrence in monozygotic twins has not been reported previously. We report monozygotic female twins who developed IIH, one at age 25 years and the other at age 28 years. Continuous intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring confirmed elevated ICP as measured initially by lumbar puncture. In both cases, successful treatment with resolution of papilledema and symptoms relief was achieved after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. This report documents the first case of IIH in monozygotic twins and the associated changes in ICP dynamics. Interestingly, almost equivalent alterations in ICP dynamics were found in the 2 patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Managing Heavy Menstrual Bleeding in Women at Risk of Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivara, Andrew; James, Andra H

    2018-06-01

    Management of heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) in a woman with a history of thrombosis, or who is otherwise at high risk of thrombosis, or who takes medications for anticoagulation can present a challenge to health care providers. The goal of treating HMB is to reduce menstrual blood loss. First-line therapy is typically hormonal, and hormonal therapy can be contraindicated in women with a history of thrombosis unless they are on anticoagulation. As 70% of women on anticoagulation experience HMB, successful management of HMB may involve a modification in the anticoagulation or antiplatelet regimen, hormonal therapy tailored to the patient's situation, and/or surgical therapy.

  19. Acute Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis with a Vaginal Contraceptive Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Eilbert

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare cause of abdominal pain, which if left untreated may result in bowel infarction, peritonitis and death. The majority of patients with this illness have a recognizable, predisposing prothrombotic condition. Oral contraceptives have been identified as a predisposing factor for mesenteric venous thrombosis in reproductive-aged women. In the last fifteen years new methods of hormonal birth control have been introduced, including a transdermal patch and an intravaginal ring. In this report, we describe a case of mesenteric venous thrombosis in a young woman caused by a vaginal contraceptive ring. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(4:395-397.

  20. [Widespread mesenteric venous thrombosis and cirrhosis diagnosed with autopsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömür, İlhami; Özdemirel, Rifat Özgür; Başpınar, Bünyamin; Şam, Bülent; Anık Karayel, Ferah

    2015-09-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare disorder with a high mortality rate. Since patients remain asymptomatic, diagnosis of the disease is difficult. Diagnosis can be mainly made with either laparotomy or autopsy. Many factors are considered in the etiology of mesenteric venous thrombosis. Liver cirrhosis and chronic pyelonephritis, which we detected in the autopsy and histologic examination of our case, are considered as two of the factors. In our study, it was aimed to present a case with near-total intestinal necrosis caused by portal vein thrombosis which spread to the lineal vein, pancreatic vein and to the branches of superior mesenteric veins.

  1. Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis with a vaginal contraceptive ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilbert, Wesley; Hecht, Benjamin; Zuiderveld, Loren

    2014-07-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare cause of abdominal pain, which if left untreated may result in bowel infarction, peritonitis and death. The majority of patients with this illness have a recognizable, predisposing prothrombotic condition. Oral contraceptives have been identified as a predisposing factor for mesenteric venous thrombosis in reproductive-aged women. In the last fifteen years new methods of hormonal birth control have been introduced, including a transdermal patch and an intravaginal ring. In this report, we describe a case of mesenteric venous thrombosis in a young woman caused by a vaginal contraceptive ring.

  2. Case Study and Review: Treatment of Tricuspid Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi Zhang, David; Lozier, Jay; Chang, Richard; Sachdev, Vandana; Chen, Marcus Y.; Audibert, Jennifer L.; Horvath, Keith A.; Rosing, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) is a severe and life-threatening complication of heart valve replacement. Conventional therapy is surgical thrombectomy or valve replacement. Medical thrombolysis is another emerging option. We report the case of a 57 year old woman with a history of Ebstein anomaly who underwent successful treatment of a tricuspid prosthetic valve thrombosis with intra-atrial infusion of very low dose recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). We review the presentation, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the tricuspid PVT emphasizing a modified medical option as a safe, minimally invasive alternative to surgical intervention or conventional medical therapy for tricuspid valve thrombosis. PMID:22000268

  3. Thrombolytic therapy in prosthetic valve thrombosis during early pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.C. Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regardless of the improvements in the design of prosthetic heart valves and the use of anticoagulation, systemic embolism and valve thrombosis remains the most dreaded complications of mechanical heart valve replacement. A course of thrombolytic therapy may be considered as a first-line therapy for prosthetic heart valve thrombosis. The safety of thrombolysis in early pregnancy is not known. We describe a primigravida with mitral valve replacement status presenting with acute prosthetic valve thrombosis and treated successfully with intravenous streptokinase.

  4. A STUDY OF THE CLINICAL AND ETIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH CEREBRAL VENOUS THROMBOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aashish

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTI ON: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is an unusual cause of stroke that affects the young and is often missed or misdiagnosed . This study was undertaken to study the profile of patients who presented with CVT. METHODS: A cohort of 59 patients who presented to Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Chennai between June 2009 to September 2011 and were diagnosed to have CVT by neuro imaging were included in the study. Clinical and laboratory parameters were entered into a detailed questionnaire and patients were followed up during their stay in hospital. Data was analysed using SPSS software for Windows version SPSS 16.0. RESULTS: The mean age at diagnosis was 37 years. Headache was the most common symptom (86.4% of patients followed by vomiting (44.1% and seizures (42.4%. Papilledema was the most common sign in 37% of patients. Superior sagittal sinus was the most commonly affected. Hyperhomocysteinemia was the underlying etiological factor in 23% . 7 patients were in the pregnant and puerperal period. All patients were treated with anticoagulants. 2 patients died in hospital. CONCLUSION: CVT presents in the young, often with symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure. Response to therapy is better than with arterial stroke and there is a favourable outcome

  5. Axillary Artery Thrombosis in a Neonate In Utero: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Szvetko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a neonate of 38-week and 6-day gestation born by lower uterine cesarean section for breech presentation, where it was evident on delivery that there was significant edema of the right arm from the deltoid to the distal tips of the fingers. Doppler flow ultrasound revealed extensive arterial thromboembolus. Intravenous heparin was prescribed for three days at a dose of 27.5 U/kg/h, targeting an activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT of 60–75 seconds, followed by a course of subcutaneous enoxaparin at a dose of 1.8 mg/kg and then 2 mg/kg twice daily, titrated to a factor Xa level of 0.5–1.0 U/mL for another three days. Significant clinical improvement occurred and the child was eventually, discharged on subcutaneous enoxaparin. Magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple intracranial abnormalities. At five months increased upper limb tone, brisk reflexes, and small head circumference were noted. At one year, increased tone and increased paucity of movement on the right side persisted, and some speech delay and visual inattention were noted. Recent follow-up at 16.5 months of age demonstrated a right sided hemiplegia with increased tone and brisk reflexes. We describe the case in detail and review current knowledge regarding the management of arterial thrombosis in the neonate.

  6. Splanchnic venous thrombosis driven by a constitutively activated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Splanchnic venous thrombosis (SVT) has varied etiology with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) being the most frequent underlying prothrombotic factor. Hematological indices often remain within normal range because of portal hypertension and its sequelae, causing diagnostic ...

  7. Is there a tendency for thrombosis in gestational diabetes mellitus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suheyla Gorar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our findings indicate tendency to develop thrombosis in GDM similar to diabetes mellitus; but more comprehensive studies with larger sample size are needed to determine the relationship between GDM and hemostasis.

  8. Placental fetal vascular thrombosis lesions and maternal thrombophilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeksma, F. A.; Erwich, J. J. H. M.; Khong, T. Y.

    Aims: Following intrauterine fetal death (IUFD), the placental fetal vessels undergo regressive changes. These changes are virtually indistinguishable from lesions that are the result of fetal vascular thrombosis (FVT). This study investigated the relation between these lesions and maternal

  9. Ovarian vein thrombosis | Jenayah | Pan African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... surgery, pelvic inflammatory disease, or malignancy. Diagnosis can be made with confidence using ultrasound, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Treatment of ovarian vein thrombosis is particularly important in the postpartum patients, with anticoagulation therapy being the current recommendation.

  10. Delayed cerebral thrombosis complicating pneumococcal meningitis: an autopsy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Aronica, Eleonora; van de Beek, Diederik

    2018-01-01

    Background: Delayed cerebral thrombosis (DCT) is a devastating cerebrovascular complication in patients with excellent initial recovery of pneumococcal meningitis. The aetiology is unknown, but direct bacterial invasion, activation of coagulation or post-infectious immunoglobulin deposition has been

  11. Synergism of Selective Tumor Vascular Thrombosis and Protease Activated Prodrug

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Cheng

    2008-01-01

    ... by administration of protease-activated prodrug. The activation of coagulation cascade and tumor vascular thrombosis as well as the following activation of the thrombolytic pathways led to explosive amplification of serine protease cascades...

  12. Ovarian vein thrombosis – a rare but important complication of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This case study highlights the clinical importance of ovarian vein thrombosis in the context of pelvic surgery for benign gynaecological conditions and the role of imaging, particularly computed tomography with reformatting, in confirming the diagnosis.

  13. Plantar vein thrombosis: a rare cause of plantar foot pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal, Daniel S.; Wu, Jim S.; Brennan, Darren D.; Hochman, Mary G. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Challies, Tracy [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Plantar vein thrombosis is a rare condition, with only a handful of cases reported in the literature. The cause is unknown; however, the disease has been attributed to prior surgery, trauma, and paraneoplastic conditions. We present a case of a 32-year-old female runner with plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed on contrast-enhanced MRI and confirmed on ultrasound. The symptoms resolved with conservative treatment and evaluation revealed the presence of a prothrombin gene mutation and use of oral contraceptive pills. To our knowledge, this is the first case of plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed initially by MRI. Moreover, this case suggests that plantar vein thrombosis should be considered in patients with hypercoagulable states and plantar foot pain. (orig.)

  14. Plantar vein thrombosis: a rare cause of plantar foot pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegal, Daniel S.; Wu, Jim S.; Brennan, Darren D.; Hochman, Mary G.; Challies, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    Plantar vein thrombosis is a rare condition, with only a handful of cases reported in the literature. The cause is unknown; however, the disease has been attributed to prior surgery, trauma, and paraneoplastic conditions. We present a case of a 32-year-old female runner with plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed on contrast-enhanced MRI and confirmed on ultrasound. The symptoms resolved with conservative treatment and evaluation revealed the presence of a prothrombin gene mutation and use of oral contraceptive pills. To our knowledge, this is the first case of plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed initially by MRI. Moreover, this case suggests that plantar vein thrombosis should be considered in patients with hypercoagulable states and plantar foot pain. (orig.)

  15. Extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis : aetiology and determinants of survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, HLA; Haagsma, EB; van Uum, SHM; van Nieuwkerk, CMJ; Adang, RP; Chamuleau, RAFM; van Hattum, J; Vleggaar, FP; Hansen, BE; Rosendaal, FR; van Hoek, B

    2001-01-01

    Background-Malignancy, hypercoagulability, and conditions leading to decreased portal flow have been reported to contribute to the aetiology of extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis (EPVT). Mortality of patients with, EPVT may be associated with these concurrent medical conditions or with

  16. Extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis: aetiology and determinants of survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L.A. Janssen (Harry); B.E. Hansen (Bettina); B. van Hoek (Bart); F.R. Rosendaal (Frits); E.B. Haagsma (Els); S.H. van Uum; C.M. van Nieuwkerk; R.P.R. Adang (Rob); R.A. Chamuleau; J. van Hattum (Jan); F.P. Vleggaar (Frank); A.D. Wijnhoud (Annemarie)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Malignancy, hypercoagulability, and conditions leading to decreased portal flow have been reported to contribute to the aetiology of extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis (EPVT). Mortality of patients with EPVT may be associated with these concurrent medical

  17. Portal vein thrombosis; risk factors, clinical presentation and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogaard, Kirstine K; Astrup, Lone B; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is increasingly frequently being diagnosed, but systematic descriptions of the natural history and clinical handling of the condition are sparse. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe risk factors, clinical presentation, complications...

  18. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-02-05

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic-clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully.

  19. Heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia/Thrombosis: a clinico ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    embolism and pulmonary embolism. Thrombocytopaenia and the sequale of thrombosis are uncommon adverse effects of therapy which are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Objective: To review the clinical-pathologic features of ...

  20. Acute stent thrombosis after primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Peter; Wiberg, Sebastian; Van't Hof, Arnoud

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to determine clinical, procedural, and treatment factors associated with acute stent thrombosis (AST) in the EUROMAX (European Ambulance Acute Coronary Syndrome Angiography) trial. BACKGROUND: Bivalirudin started during transport for primary percutaneous coronary int...

  1. Splanchnic venous thrombosis driven by a constitutively activated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Introduction: Splanchnic venous thrombosis (SVT) has varied etiology with Philadelphia- negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) being the most frequent underlying prothrombotic factor. Hematological indices often remain within normal range because of portal hypertension and its sequelae, causing ...

  2. Postpartum Ovarian Vein Thrombosis: Two Cases and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos A. Akinbiyi

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion. Ovarian vein thrombosis is rare, but could present late, and difficult to diagnose, hence, should be considered as a differential diagnosis in a postpartum woman with fever and tender pelvic mass.

  3. Utility of Intracranial Pressure Monitoring for Diagnosis of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension in the Absence of Papilledema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Kelly J; Raslan, Ahmed M

    2018-03-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is characterized by headaches, visual obscurations, and papilledema, and the diagnosis involves lumbar puncture (LP) with an elevated opening pressure (OP) ≥20 cm H 2 0. When papilledema is absent, the diagnosis becomes less clear. Some physicians have argued that the absence of papilledema rules out IIH, whereas others maintain that elevated OP is sufficient for diagnosis. The authors performed a single-institution 4-year retrospective analysis of patients who underwent invasive intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring for presumed IIH. A total of 22 patients were reviewed, and 13 had classic symptoms of IIH, documented elevated OP, and absence of papilledema; 5/13 (38%) patients had proven intracranial hypertension as shown by invasive ICP monitoring, whereas 8/13 (62%) had normal ICP. With the use of current diagnostic algorithms of clinical presentation and elevated OP, over half of patients without papilledema in our series would be falsely diagnosed with IIH, which could result in unnecessary medical and surgical intervention. Thus, elevated OP as determined by LP is insufficient to diagnose IIH. On the other hand, the absence of papilledema does not rule out intracranial hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The risk of intravenous thrombolysis-induced intracranial hemorrhage in Taiwanese patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ting Chiu

    Full Text Available The presence of an intracranial aneurysm is contraindicated to recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA treatment for acute ischemic stroke. However, it is difficult to exclude asymptomatic intracranial aneurysms by using conventional, noncontrast head computed tomography (CT, which is the only neuroimaging suggested before r-tPA. Recent case reports and series have shown that administering r-tPA to patients with a pre-existing aneurysm does not increase the bleeding risk. However, Asians are known to have a relatively higher bleeding risk, and little evidence is available regarding the risk of using r-tPA on Asian patients with intracranial aneurysms.Medical records from the Shuang Ho hospital stroke registration between July 2010 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed, and 144 patients received r-tPA. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms were detected using CT, or magnetic resonance or conventional angiography after r-tPA. The primary and secondary outcomes were the difference in overall intracranial hemorrhage (ICH and symptomatic ICH after r-tPA. The differences were analyzed using Fisher's exact or Mann-Whitney U tests, and p < 0.05 was defined as the statistical significance.A total of 144 patients were reviewed, and incidental unruptured intracranial aneurysms were found in 11 of them (7.6%. No significant difference was observed in baseline demographic data between the aneurysm and nonaneurysm groups. Among patients with an unruptured aneurysm, two had giant aneurysms (7.7 and 7.4 mm, respectively. The bleeding risk was not significant different between aneurysm group (2 out of 11, 18% with nonaneurysm group (7 out of 133, 5.3% (p = 0.14. None of the patients with an unruptured aneurysm had symptomatic ICH, whereas one patient without an aneurysm exhibited symptomatic ICH.The presence of an unruptured intracranial aneurysm did not significantly increase the risk of overall and symptomatic ICH in Taiwanese patients after they

  5. Transient Euler-Lagrange/DEM simulation of stent thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stiehm Michael

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stent implantation is the treatment of choice for cardiovascular diseases. By introduction of biodegradable thick strut stents investigations of thrombosis formation is one focus of research. This study deals with a transient Euler-Lagrange/DEM approach to simulate the flow field, platelet movement and clotting. The recirculation zones prolong particle residence time. As a result, the vicinity of stent struts shown a particularly higher risk for stent thrombosis.

  6. Late in-stent thrombosis following carotid angioplasty and stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhk, Jan-Hendrik; Wellmer, Andreas; Knauth, Michael

    2006-05-23

    Acute in-stent thrombosis is a well-known complication of carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) and often due to resistance to or inadequate treatment with platelet-inhibiting agents. The authors report three cases of a delayed in-stent thrombosis after more than a week but less than 3 months after CAS. In all cases, the postprocedural antiplatelet regimen was discontinued to enable the treatment of a relevant comorbidity.

  7. Traumatic dural sinus thrombosis causing persistent headache in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhkar Bhavana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dural venous sinus thrombosis following a mild head injury is increasingly recognized. We report case of a 9-year-old male child presented with progressive headache and vomiting following a minor fall. A diagnosis of sinus venous thrombosis was suspected on nonenhancing computed tomography, and that was confirmed with magnetic resonance venography. The child was managed with intravenous fluids, anticoagulation (injection heparin followed by oral anticoagulants-tab coumarin, antiedema measures (mannitol, and antiepileptics (phenytoin with good outcome.

  8. Vena porta thrombosis in patient with inherited factor VII deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klovaite, Jolanta; Friis-Hansen, Lennart Jan; Larsen, Fin S

    2010-01-01

    with inherited FVII deficiency and chronic vena porta thrombosis. She presented at 32 weeks of gestation with spontaneously increased international normalized ratio, severe thrombocytopenia and very few unspecific symptoms. The extensive examination of the patient revealed cavernous transformation of the portal...... vein with well expressed portosystemic collaterals, heterozygosity for three common polymorphisms in FVII gene, associated with reduction in plasma FVII levels, and no other factors predisposing to thrombosis....

  9. Lateral sinus thrombosis as a complication of acute mastoiditis

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchini, C; Aimoni, C; Ceruti, S; Grasso, DL; Martini, A

    2008-01-01

    Lateral sinus thrombosis is a rare complication of middle ear diseases: in children, it is usually related to acute otitis media, but it is also found in adults with chronic otitis. It was more frequent in the pre-antibiotic era and mortality was high. The Authors present a paediatric case of lateral sinus thrombosis in which they describe the clinical approach and related literature.

  10. Adult adrenal haemorrhage: an unrecognised complication of renal vein thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loke, T.K.L. E-mail: lokekl@ha.org.hk

    2001-07-01

    There are many predisposing factors for neonatal adrenal haemorrhage but the causative factors are different in adults. Several cases of neonatal adrenal haemorrhage have been reported in association with renal vein thrombosis. This complication has not been documented in the adults. The presence of an adrenal mass in the setting of renal vein thrombosis should raise the possibility of adrenal haemorrhage even though this is extremely uncommon in adults.

  11. A Rare Complication of Acute Appendicitis: Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Koncoro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Superior mesenteric vein (SMV thrombosis caused by acute appendicitis is quite rare nowadays. These conditions occurs secondary to infection in the region drained by the portal venous system. In this case, we report a successfully treated case of SMV thrombosis and liver abscess associated with appendicitis with antibiotics and anticoagulant.Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are basic to a favorable clinical course.

  12. Massive superior mesenteric venous aneurysm with portal venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikov, Anna; Bartolotta, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    Portal venous aneurysm is a rare and sometimes dangerous vascular pathology, which can result in thrombosis or rupture. We present the computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and sonographic imaging of a 27-year-old man with superior mesenteric venous aneurysm and subsequent thrombosis following acute pancreatitis. This multimodality imaging approach can prove useful in the evaluation of these rare aneurysms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Case Study and Review: Treatment of Tricuspid Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Zhang, David; Lozier, Jay; Chang, Richard; Sachdev, Vandana; Chen, Marcus Y.; Audibert, Jennifer L.; Horvath, Keith A.; Rosing, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) is a severe and life-threatening complication of heart valve replacement. Conventional therapy is surgical thrombectomy or valve replacement. Medical thrombolysis is another emerging option. We report the case of a 57 year old woman with a history of Ebstein anomaly who underwent successful treatment of a tricuspid prosthetic valve thrombosis with intra-atrial infusion of very low dose recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). We review the presentation...

  14. Prosthetic Tricuspid Valve Thrombosis: Three Case Reports and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Yaminisharif; MohammadJavad Alemzadeh-Ansari; SeyedHossein Ahmadi

    2015-01-01

    A common complication of prosthetic heart valves is thrombosis. Although the incidence of prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) in the tricuspid position is high, there are not enough data on the management of it, in contrast to left-sided PVT. Here, we describe three cases of tricuspid PVT with three different management approaches: thrombolytic therapy; close observation with oral anticoagulants; and surgery. The first case was a woman who suffered from recurrent PVT, for which we successfully ...

  15. Upper extremity thrombosis in Behçet’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Küçük

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Behçet’s disease (BD is a systemic disease characterizedby oral aphthosis, genital ulcers, ocular lesions andalso gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, neurological andvessel involvements may develop. Venous manifestationsare more common than arterial involvement. Venousinvolvement often occurs in the veins of lower extremity.Upper extremity venous involvement is rare. In this paperwe report a case of BH presenting with upper extremitysuperficial vein thrombosis.Key words: Behçet’s disease, upper extremity, superficialvein thrombosis

  16. Gonadal vein tumor thrombosis due to renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Haghighatkhah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC had a tendency to extend into the renal vein and inferior vena cava, while extension into the gonadal vein has been rarely reported. Gonadal vein tumor thrombosis appears as an enhancing filling defect within the dilated gonadal vein anterior to the psoas muscle and shows an enhancement pattern identical to that of the original tumor. The possibility of gonadal vein thrombosis should be kept in mind when looking at an imaging study of patients with RCC

  17. Delayed thrombosis or stenosis following enterprise-assisted stent-coiling: is it safe? Midterm results of the interstate collaboration of enterprise stent coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocco, J; Fargen, Kyle M; Albuquerque, Felipe C; Bendok, Bernard R; Boulos, Alan S; Carpenter, Jeffrey S; Fiorella, David J; Hoh, Brian L; Howington, Jay U; Liebman, Kenneth M; Natarajan, Sabareesh K; Rai, Ansaar T; Rodriguez-Mercado, Rafael; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Snyder, Kenneth V; Veznedaroglu, Erol; Hopkins, L Nelson; Levy, Elad I

    2011-10-01

    Stent-assisted coiling of intracranial aneurysms with self-expanding stents has widened the applicability of neuroendovascular therapies to those aneurysms previously considered "uncoilable" because of poor morphology. The Enterprise Vascular Reconstruction Device and Delivery System (Cordis) has demonstrated promising initial short-term results. However, the rates of delayed in-stent stenosis or thrombosis are not known. To report midterm results of the Enterprise stent system. A 10-center registry was created to provide a large volume of data on the safety and efficacy of the Enterprise stent system. Pooled data were compiled for consecutive patients undergoing Enterprise stent-assisted coiling at each institution. Available follow-up data were evaluated for the incidence of in-stent stenosis, thrombosis, and aneurysm occlusion. In total, 213 patients (176 females) with 219 aneurysms were treated with the Enterprise stent. One hundred ten patients had undergone delayed angiography (≥ 30 days from stent placement, mean follow-up 174.6 days). Forty percent of patients demonstrated total occlusion with 88% having ≥ 90% aneurysm occlusion. Six percent of patients had delayed (>30 days) angiographic findings, of which 3% demonstrated significant (≥ 50%) in-stent stenosis or occlusion. Seven delayed thrombotic events occurred (3%), along with 2 additional immediate periprocedural events. All 7 delayed events were concomitant to cessation of double-antiplatelet therapy. Midterm occlusion rates are excellent, and stenosis and thrombosis rates are comparable to other available neurovascular stents. Interruption of antiplatelet therapy appears to be a factor in those developing delayed stenosis or thrombosis.

  18. Intracranial vessel wall imaging at 7.0 tesla MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kolk, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is one of the main causes of ischemic stroke. Current conventional imaging techniques assessing intracranial arterial disease in vivo only visualize the vessel wall lumen instead of the pathological vessel wall itself. Therefore, not much is known about the imaging

  19. Genus zero graph segmentation: Estimation of intracranial volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Thorup, Signe Strann; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    The intracranial volume (ICV) in children with premature fusion of one or more sutures in the calvaria is of interest due to the risk of increased intracranial pressure. Challenges for automatic estimation of ICV include holes in the skull e.g. the foramen magnum and fontanelles. In this paper, w...

  20. INTRACRANIAL NEOPLASMS IN IBADAN, NIGERIA B.J. OLASODE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-01-01

    Jan 1, 2000 ... embryogenetic classifications of intracranial neoplasms in which terms like neuroblastoma, spongioblastoma, astroblastoma and ependymoblastoma were coined to indicate neoplasms arising from these primitive cells(1). Advances in our understanding of the morphobiology of intracranial neoplasms have ...

  1. The radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-04

    Apr 4, 2014 ... has been described in young adults and affects predominantly the extracranial blood vessels.2. Intracranial aneurysms in HIV-positive adults are described infrequently. About 22 case reports of HIV-infected adult patients who presented with intracranial aneurysms could be located in the literature. Isolated ...

  2. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension with altered consciousness in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a clinical condition of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) without an obvious underlying pathological brain lesion. It is usually characterized by headache, neck pain, vomiting, visual disturbances, papilledema, cranial nerve palsy or a combination of these signs and symptoms.

  3. Mannitol-induced rebleeding from intracranial aneurysm. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenørn, J; Westergaard, L; Hansen, P H

    1983-01-01

    A case is presented in which rebleeding from an intracranial saccular aneurysm occurred a few minutes after intravenous administration of mannitol during surgery. The relationship between the reducing effect of mannitol on elevated intracranial pressure and the increased pressure gradient across...

  4. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of intracranial artery dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debette, Stéphanie; Compter, A; Labeyrie, Marc Antoine; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Metso, Tina M.; Majersik, Jennifer J.; Goeggel-Simonetti, Barbara; Engelter, Stefan T.; Pezzini, Alessandro; Bijlenga, Philippe; Southerland, Andrew M.; Naggara, Olivier; Béjot, Yannick; Cole, John W.; Ducros, Anne; Giacalone, Giacomo; Schilling, Sabrina; Reiner, Peggy; Sarikaya, Hakan; Specken-Welleweerd, Jantien; Kappelle, L. Jaap; de Borst, Gert Jan; Bonati, Leo H.; Jung, Simon; Thijs, Vincent; Martin, Juan J.; Brandt, Tobias; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kloss, Manja; Mizutani, Tohru; Minematsu, Kazuo; Meschia, James F.; Pereira, Vitor M.; Bersano, Anna; Touzé, Emmanuel; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Leys, Didier; Chabriat, Hugues; Markus, Hugh S.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Chabrier, Stéphane; Baumgartner, Ralph; Stapf, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Arnold, Marcel; Bousser, Marie Germaine

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial artery dissection is an uncommon and probably underdiagnosed cause of stroke that is defined by the occurrence of a haematoma in the wall of an intracranial artery. Patients can present with headache, ischaemic stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage, or symptoms associated with

  5. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of intracranial artery dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debette, Stephanie; Compter, Annette; Labeyrie, Marc-Antoine; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Metso, Tina M.; Majersik, Jennifer J.; Goeggel-Simonetti, Barbara; Engelter, Stefan T.; Pezzini, Alessandro; Bijlenga, Philippe; Southerland, Andrew M.; Naggara, Olivier; Bejot, Yannick; Cole, John W.; Ducros, Anne; Giacalone, Giacomo; Schilling, Sabrina; Reiner, Peggy; Sarikaya, Hakan; Welleweerd, Janna C.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; de Borst, Gert Jan; Bonati, Leo H.; Jung, Simon; Thijs, Vincent; Martin, Juan J.; Brandt, Tobias; Grand-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kloss, Manja; Mizutani, Tohru; Minematsu, Kazuo; Meschia, James F.; Pereira, Vitor M.; Bersano, Anna; Touze, Emmanuel; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Leys, Didier; Chabriat, Hugues; Markus, Hugh S.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Chabrier, Stephane; Baumgartner, Ralph; Stapf, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Arnold, Marcel; Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    Spontaneous intracranial artery dissection is an uncommon and probably underdiagnosed cause of stroke that is defined by the occurrence of a haematoma in the wall of an intracranial artery. Patients can present with headache, ischaemic stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage, or symptoms associated with

  6. Intracranial Convexity Lipoma with Massive Calcification: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eung Tae; Park, Dong Woo; Ryu, Jeong Ah; Park, Choong Ki; Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Seung Ro [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Intracranial lipoma is a rare entity, accounting for less than 0.5% of intracranial tumors, which usually develops in the callosal cisterns. We report a case of lipoma with an unusual location; in the high parietal convexity combined with massive calcification, and no underlying vascular malformation or congenital anomaly.

  7. Report on the second Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanne Emanuel

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report highlights a conference designed for patient education on elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure. The conference centered on chronic intracranial hypertension (IH including the latest research and clinical information. It was sponsored by the Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation and held at the University of Texas Medical School, Houston, on June 21–22nd, 2008.

  8. THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF INTRACRANIAL ARACHNOID CYSTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GO, KG

    Intracranial arachnoid cysts have been found in 0.3% of computed tomography (CT) scans and in 0.1% of brain autopsy specimens, more often in children than in adults. Intracranial arachnoid cysts occur prevalently in males, on the left side, and in the temporal fossa. Their occasional association

  9. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms: initial and follow-up screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, A.S.E.

    2014-01-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms may rupture, causing subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). SAH is a devastating subtype of stroke, resulting in death or severe disability in half the patients. This thesis has a focus on initial and follow-up screening for unruptured intracranial aneurysms, and consists

  10. Genetic Determinants of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms in the General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peymani, Abbas; Adams, Hieab H H; Cremers, Lotte G M; Krestin, Gabriel; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Uitterlinden, André G; van der Lugt, Aad; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M Arfan

    2015-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for intracranial aneurysms in clinical samples. In addition, SNPs have been discovered for blood pressure, one of the strongest risk factors for intracranial aneurysms. We studied the role of these genetic variants on occurrence and size of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, discovered incidentally in a general community-dwelling population. In 4890 asymptomatic participants from the Rotterdam Study, 120 intracranial aneurysms were identified on brain imaging and segmented for maximum diameter and volume. Genetic risk scores (GRS) were calculated for intracranial aneurysms (10 SNPs), systolic blood pressure (33 SNPs), and diastolic blood pressure (41 SNPs). The GRS for intracranial aneurysms was not statistically significantly associated with presence of aneurysms in this population (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.96-1.40; P=0.119), but showed a significant association with both maximum diameter (difference in log-transformed mm per SD increase of GRS, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.02-0.19; P=0.018) and volume (difference in log-transformed µL per SD increase of GRS, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.01-0.41; P=0.040) of aneurysms. GRSs for blood pressures were associated with neither presence nor size of aneurysms. Genetic variants previously identified for intracranial aneurysms in clinical studies relate to the size rather than the presence of incidentally discovered, unruptured intracranial aneurysms in the general population. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Unintended Complication of Intracranial Subdural Hematoma after Percutaneous Epidural Neuroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sung Bum; Kim, Min Ki; Kim, Kee D.; Lim, Young Jin

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous epidural neuroplasty (PEN) is a known interventional technique for the management of spinal pain. As with any procedures, PEN is associated with complications ranging from mild to more serious ones. We present a case of intracranial subdural hematoma after PEN requiring surgical evacuation. We review the relevant literature and discuss possible complications of PEN and patholophysiology of intracranial subdural hematoma after PEN.

  12. Intracranial Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in Beta-Thalassemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karki, Bivek; Xu, Yi Kai; Wu, Yuan Kui [Nan fang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tamrakar, Karuna [Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-03-15

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) represents tumor-like proliferation of hemopoietic tissue which complicates chronic hemoglobinopathy. Intracranial EMH is an extremely rare occurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a precise diagnosis. It is essential to distinguish EMH from other extradural central nervous system tumors, because treatment and prognosis are totally different. Herein, we report the imaging findings of beta-thalassemia in a 13-year-old boy complaining of weakness of left side of the body and gait disturbance; CT and MRI revealed an extradural mass in the right temporoparietal region.

  13. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is not benign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne M; Wegener, Marianne; Sander, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) primarily affects young obese females, and potentially causes visual loss and severe headache. The aim of this experiment is to examine relapse rate and long-term outcome in IIH patients. The methods involved in this experiment include a prospective...... and comprehensive neuro-ophthalmological examination, including fundus photography, Humphrey visual fields, and measurement of the retinal thickness (RT) and retinal nerve fiber layers (RNFL) by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Relapse was defined as recurrence of either: (1) papilledema or (2) symptoms...

  14. Intracranial Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in Beta-Thalassemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karki, Bivek; Xu, Yi Kai; Wu, Yuan Kui; Tamrakar, Karuna

    2012-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) represents tumor-like proliferation of hemopoietic tissue which complicates chronic hemoglobinopathy. Intracranial EMH is an extremely rare occurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a precise diagnosis. It is essential to distinguish EMH from other extradural central nervous system tumors, because treatment and prognosis are totally different. Herein, we report the imaging findings of beta-thalassemia in a 13-year-old boy complaining of weakness of left side of the body and gait disturbance; CT and MRI revealed an extradural mass in the right temporoparietal region.

  15. Benign intracranial hypertension diagnosed with bilateral papilloedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Phillips

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a case of benign intracranial hypertension (BIH diagnosed from the presence of papilloedema. This potentially sight-threatening condition particularly affects younger obese females and can be idiopathic, caused by adverse reaction to certain prescription medications or by systemic disease. Prompt treatment is essentialto avoid optic atrophy and low energy diet and exercise forms part of long-term treatment to avoid relapse. Optometrists can play a critical primary health care role in the detection of papilloedema and referring appropriately.

  16. A case of intracranial malignant fibrous histiocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Sarrami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of intracranial malignant fibrous histiocytoma which had infiltrated pons, cerebellum and basal surface of left temporal lobe without any visible mass. The patient presented with a sudden loss of consciousness and vomiting. Clinical findings, laboratory tests, imaging and examination of the cerebrospinal fluid tended to establish the diagnosis of an infectious condition than a malignancy. Without any response to the antibiotics and with a progressive deterioration of neurologic and mental condition, the patient died after 20 days. In the autopsy, histological and immunohistochemical study of the brain revealed the diagnosis of malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH.

  17. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and transverse sinus stenoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyrman, Simon; Fytagoridis, Anders; Andresen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    An 18-year-old woman was diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and bilateral transverse sinus stenoses (TSS), after presenting with papilledema and decreased visual acuity. Lumbar puncture revealed an opening pressure of >60 cm H2O. MRI showed bilateral TSS believed to be asso...... was inserted since the patient had improved with CSF diversion. MRI verified reopening of the venous sinuses after shunt placement, and the patient remains asymptomatic with no signs of relapse after 3 years of follow-up....

  18. Imaging features of unusual intracranial cystic meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, M.K.; Musluman, M.; Kilicoglu, G.; Hakan, T.; Aker, F.V.

    2007-01-01

    To describe the imaging features of unusual intracranial cystic meningiomas in infants and adults. We retrospectively reviewed the magnetic resonance and computed tomography findings for 2 female patients and 3 male patients, ranging in age from 1 to 73 years (median 41 years), with histopathologically proven cystic meningioma. Although cystic meningiomas usually appear as solid and cystic masses, they may present as a mainly multicystic lesion. The wall of a cystic part of the meningioma may include both enhancing and unenhancing areas at imaging. The cystic portion of a meningioma is hypointense on diffusion-weighted images and markedly hyperintense on corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient maps. (author)

  19. Secondary Intracranial Hypotension: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Gundogan Bozdag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypotension is a clinical condition that characterized by postural (orthostatic headache and low pressure. It apperas with cerebrospinal fluid leak which occurs spontaneous or depending on the secondary attempts. 31 years old female patient which has diagnosis of acute appendicitis and underwent appendectomy under spinal anesthesia. postoperative 5.day she admitted with a postural headache, diplopia. Patient was treated with conservative methods after diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging. We aim to asses an encountered complication after spinal anesthesia which widely applied for surgical procedures with imaging findings and literature.

  20. Intracranial extramedullary hematopoiesis in beta-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Bivek; Xu, Yi-Kai; Tamrakar, Karuna; Wu, Yuan-Kui

    2012-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) represents tumor-like proliferation of hemopoietic tissue which complicates chronic hemoglobinopathy. Intracranial EMH is an extremely rare occurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a precise diagnosis. It is essential to distinguish EMH from other extradural central nervous system tumors, because treatment and prognosis are totally different. Herein, we report the imaging findings of beta-thalassemia in a 13-year-old boy complaining of weakness of left side of the body and gait disturbance; CT and MRI revealed an extradural mass in the right temporoparietal region.

  1. Increased intracranial volume in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Katja; Karlsborg, Merete; Hansen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) are neurodegenerative diseases that can be difficult to diagnose and distinguish from each other. STUDY AIMS AND METHODS: Patients with PD and MSA and controls were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using tissue...... segmentation and outlining of regions in order to identify regional volume changes that might be useful in the diagnosis of the two diseases. RESULTS: Patients with PD had significantly larger intracranial volumes (ICVs) and significantly smaller putaminal and sustantia nigra volumes than controls. MSA...

  2. Peripherally inserted central catheters and upper extremity deep vein thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, B.; Gibbs, H.; Catchpole, I.; Hetherington, R.; Harper, J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for venous thrombosis in patients with a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). A retrospective study of all upper extremity venous duplex scans was carried out in the Vascular Medicine department from year 2000 to 2002 inclusive. A chart review of positive scans was undertaken to identify possible thrombotic risk factors. Of 317 upper extremity venous duplex scans carried out, 115, or 32%, were positive for upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. Three main risk factors were identified - presence of a central line, malignancy and administration of chemotherapy. PICC were the most common central line present. Symptomatic thrombosis occurred in 7% of PICC inserted for chemotherapy compared with 1% of PICC inserted for other reasons. Ten per cent of the patients receiving chemotherapy through a PICC developed a thrombosis. The post-thrombotic syndrome was infrequent following upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. Patients receiving chemotherapy through a PICC are at increased risk of thrombosis. There may be a role for prophylactic low-dose anticoagulation in these high-risk patients

  3. [Clinical symptoms and phlebographic findings in acute leg thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodelius, A; Lörinc, P; Nylander, G

    1970-01-08

    275 cases of venous thrombosis were compared, and a conspicuous difference between clinical and phlebographic findings was discovered. The size alone of the thrombus has no relation to the symptoms it produces. 7 factors are presented to explain this lack of correlation: 1) Thrombosis in the rigid crural fascia causes more marked clinical symptoms than in other locations. 2) The larger the venous area to which the thrombus attaches itself, the more serious the symptoms. 3) In cases of deep venous thrombosis, if the superficial veins have dilated to aid collateral flow, venous congestion, an early indication of thrombosis, will be absent. 4) Ambulant patients have more pronounced symptoms than bed patients. 5) The faster a thrombus grows, the more marked are the symptoms of thrombosis. 6) Thrombosis can often be 1st diagnosed when the thrombus blocks the blood flow between the deep and the superficial veins. 7) Severe symptoms can arise if an earlier a symptomatic thrombus suddenly blocks the femoral canal.

  4. Subclinical leaflet thrombosis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    Although clinically significant valve thrombosis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is rare, the incidence of subclinical leaflet thrombosis has been reported to be up to about 10%-15%. It is mostly found 1-3 months after procedure in any type of transcatheter heart valve. Leaflet thrombosis is detected by high-resolution CT in the form of limited valve opening/closure and hypoattenuated leaflet thickening. Transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography is capable of detecting limitations of valve motion, leaflet thickening, increased flow velocity across the valve. However, CT seems to be more sensitive than echocardiography to detect leaflet thrombosis. It can occur under dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and a thienopyridine but rarely occurs with anticoagulation with a vitamin K antagonist. A vitamin K antagonist is also helpful to resolve leaflet thrombosis. Several studies are ongoing to determine the effect of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in preventing major cardiovascular events. They will also provide useful information on whether NOACs prevent leaflet thrombosis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Deep vein thrombosis: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesieme EB

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Emeka Kesieme1, Chinenye Kesieme2, Nze Jebbin3, Eshiobo Irekpita1, Andrew Dongo11Department of Surgery, Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua, Nigeria; 2Department of Paediatrics, Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua, Nigeria; 3Department of Surgery, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port-Harcourt, NigeriaBackground: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT is the formation of blood clots (thrombi in the deep veins. It commonly affects the deep leg veins (such as the calf veins, femoral vein, or popliteal vein or the deep veins of the pelvis. It is a potentially dangerous condition that can lead to preventable morbidity and mortality.Aim: To present an update on the causes and management of DVT.Methods: A review of publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google.Results: DVT affects 0.1% of persons per year. It is predominantly a disease of the elderly and has a slight male preponderance. The approach to making a diagnosis currently involves an algorithm combining pretest probability, D-dimer testing, and compression ultrasonography. This will guide further investigations if necessary. Prophylaxis is both mechanical and pharmacological. The goals of treatment are to prevent extension of thrombi, pulmonary embolism, recurrence of thrombi, and the development of complications such as pulmonary hypertension and post-thrombotic syndrome.Conclusion: DVT is a potentially dangerous condition with a myriad of risk factors. Prophylaxis is very important and can be mechanical and pharmacological. The mainstay of treatment is anticoagulant therapy. Low-molecular-weight heparin, unfractionated heparin, and vitamin K antagonists have been the treatment of choice. Currently anticoagulants specifically targeting components of the common pathway have been recommended for prophylaxis. These include fondaparinux, a selective indirect factor Xa inhibitor and the new oral selective direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran and selective

  6. Early experience in the treatment of intra-cranial aneurysms by endovascular flow diversion: a multicentre prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James V Byrne

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Flow diversion is a new approach to the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms which uses a high density mesh stent to induce sac thrombosis. These devices have been designed for the treatment of complex shaped and large size aneurysms. So far published safety and efficacy data on this approach is sparse. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Over 8 months, standardized clinical and angiographic data were collected on 70 patients treated with a flow diverter device (SILK flow diverter (SFD in 18 centres worldwide. Treatment and early follow up details were audited centrally. SFDs were deployed alone in 57 (81% or with endosaccular coils in 10 (14% aneurysms, which included: 44 (63% saccular, 26 (37% fusiform shapes and 18 (26% small, 37 (53% large, 15 (21% giant sizes. Treatment outcome data up to 30 days were reported for all patients, with clinical (50 patients and imaging (49 patients follow up (median 119 days data available. RESULTS: Difficulties in SFD deployment were reported in 15 (21% and parent artery thrombosis in 8 (11% procedures. Procedural complications caused stroke in 1 and serious extracranial bleeding in 3 patients; 2 of whom developed fatal pneumonias. Delayed worsening of symptoms occurred in 5 patients (3 transient, 1 permanent neurological deficit, and 1 death and fatal aneurysm bleeding in 1 patient. Overall permanent morbidity rates were 2 (4% and mortality 4 (8%. Statistical analysis revealed no significant association between complications and variables related to treated aneurysm morphology or rupture status. CONCLUSION: This series is the largest reporting outcome of the new treatment approach and provides data for future study design. Procedural difficulties in SFD deployment were frequent and anti-thrombosis prophylaxis appears to reduce the resulting clinical sequelae, but at the cost of morbidity due to extracranial bleeding. Delayed morbidity appears to be a consequence of the new approach and warrants

  7. Integrated laboratory coagulation tests in hypercoagulation diagnosis and thrombosis risk assessment. Part I. The pathophysiology of thrombosis and hypercoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Lipets

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis is a fatal hemostatic disorders occurring in various conditions ranging from pregnancy and surgery to cancer, sepsis and heart attack. Despite the availability of different anticoagulants and accumulated clinical experience, proving their effectiveness, thrombosis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. This is largely due to the fact that conventional laboratory coagulation tests are not sufficiently sensitive to the hypercoagulable state, and they are difficult to use for assessing the risk of thrombosis. Specific molecular markers (D-dimers, fibrinopeptide, thrombin-antithrombin complex are more effective, but also have a large number of disadvantages. A possible solution is the use of integrated test, which simulate in vitro the majority of the physiological coagulation processes. In the first part of this paper the biochemical processes that cause the risk of thrombosis were discussed.

  8. MRI diagnosis of intracranial tuberculosis (73 cases report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Qingyong; Li Xin; He Zhihui; Cheng Chuanhu; Deng Kaijun; Deng Ming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the MRI features, classification and diagnostic value for intracranial tuberculosis. Methods MRI findings of 73 patients suffering from intracranial tuberculosis proved by pathology or clinic were analyzed respectively. Among the total 73 patients, 39 cases were tuberculosis meningitis, 12 cases simple intracranial tuberculoma, while 22 cases were tuberculoma combining with meningitis. Results: The MRI features of tuberculous meningitis are cerebral infarction, hydrocephalus, abnormal meningeal and cerebral cistern enhancement. 12 cases mature tuberculoma demon- strated typical features with high or low density on T 2 WI images and ring contrast enhancement; 22 cases non-mature tuberculoma showed focal nodular contrast enhancement with evident cerebral edema. FLAIR is more sensitive to find out focus than T 2 WI. Small lesions could be showed definitively by contrast-enhanced scan. Conclusion: MRI possess typical features in the diagnosis of intracranial tuberculosis. It plays an important role in evaluating location, range, classification of intracranial tuberculosis, and is helpful to clinical treatment. (authors)

  9. Diagnosis of ruptured intracranial aneurysm in acute stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiyama, Masataka; Nakagawa, Toshifumi

    1980-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage at an acute stage within one day from the onset to the first CT scan was classified into subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm, subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown origin and subarachnoid hemorrhage of which angiography could not be carried out, and the first CT findings, the severity, and the prognosis of these subarachnoid hemorrhage were compared and discussed. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm showed various changes according to progress in the severity with time, and intracranial hematoma, intraventricular clots and ventricular dilatation increased according to progress in the severity. Ruptured intracranial aneurysm in middle cerebral artery, anterior cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery could be found easily by CT, but that in internal carotid artery and vertabral basilar artery was difficult to be detected by CT. When cerebral angiography was carried out repeatedly for ruptured intracranial aneurysm of unknown origin, the time of performance must be consifered with attention to angiospasms or hematoma. (Tsunoda, M.)

  10. Headache patterns in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragasudha Botta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the clinical characteristics, patterns, and factors associated with headache in patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT. Methods: In this prospective cohort study, we recruited conscious CVT patients who were able to give reliable history after consent. Institutional ethics approval was obtained. The diagnosis of CVT was based on the clinical and imaging parameters. Data regarding headache characteristic, severity (visual analog scale [VAS], imaging findings and outcome was recorded. Results: Forty-seven patients (19 males and 28 females with mean age 29.7 ± 8.7 years were recruited. The mean duration of headache was 12.6 ± 26.8 days, and VAS was 79.38 ± 13.41. Headache onset was acute in 51.1%, subacute in 42.6%, thunderclap in 4.3%, and chronic in 2.1%; location was holocranial in 36.2%, frontal in 27.7% patients; description was throbbing in 44.7% and aching in 25.5% patients. Superior sagittal sinus and transverse sinus were involved in 63.8% cases each. The prothrombotic factors were anemia in 55.3%, puerperal in 38.3%, hyperhomocysteinemia in 29.8%, and polycythemia in 19.1%. Conclusion: Holocranial and bifrontal headache of increasing severity may be a marker of CVT. This may be useful in clinical judgment in identifying conscious patients with CVT.

  11. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs

  13. Imaging Diagnosis of Splanchnic Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT is a broad term that includes Budd-Chiari syndrome and occlusion of veins that constitute the portal venous system. Due to the common risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of these clinically distinct disorders, concurrent involvement of two different regions is quite common. In acute and subacute SVT, the symptoms may overlap with a variety of other abdominal emergencies while in chronic SVT, the extent of portal hypertension and its attendant complications determine the clinical course. As a result, clinical diagnosis is often difficult and is frequently reliant on imaging. Tremendous improvements in vascular imaging in recent years have ensured that this once rare entity is being increasingly detected. Treatment of acute SVT requires immediate anticoagulation. Transcatheter thrombolysis or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is used in the event of clinical deterioration. In cases with peritonitis, immediate laparotomy and bowel resection may be required for irreversible bowel ischemia. In chronic SVT, the underlying cause should be identified and treated. The imaging manifestations of the clinical syndromes resulting from SVT are comprehensively discussed here along with a brief review of the relevant clinical features and therapeutic approach.

  14. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algahtani, Hussein A; Abdu, Abduljaleel P; Shami, Abdulrahman M; Hassan, Ayman E; Madkour, Moustafa A; Al-Ghamdi, Saeed M; Malhotra, Ravi M; Al-Khathami, Ali M

    2011-10-01

    To analyze the clinical patterns, etiologies, treatment, and outcome of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) in 2 major cities of Saudi Arabia, Jeddah and Al-Baha. One hundred and eleven patients diagnosed as CVST were identified from the medical records at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Jeddah, and King Fahad Hospital, Al-Baha, Saudi Arabia, from January 1990 through November 2010. We retrospectively analyzed the data, compared it with local and international studies, and reviewed the literature. There were 92 adults and 19 children. Among adults, females predominated, while more boys were affected than girls. The mean age of onset was 29.5 years. The most common clinical presentations were headache, focal neurologic deficits, seizures, papilledema, and decreased level of consciousness. The main risk factors identified were pregnancy/ puerperium, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, oral contraceptive pills, malignancy, and infections. Multiple sinuses were affected in 51 patients (45.9%). When a single sinus was involved, the superior sagittal sinus (24.3%) was the most common. Seventy-four patients recovered completely, 23 patients recovered partially, and 10 patients died. Bad prognostic factors included incurable co-morbid conditions, late presentation, and status epilepticus. Pregnancy/puerperium was the most common etiological factor in our series. Clinical features were similar to international series. Behcet`s disease was not a major etiological factor in our series. Most patients had involvement of multiple sinuses. Prompt treatment with anticoagulation resulted in complete or partial recovery in 87.4% of patients.

  15. MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Hong Kil; Shim, Ya Seong; Kim, Seon Bok; Kim, Uk Jung; Lee, Shin Ho; Jung, Hae Kyuong; Lee, Eil Seong; Kang, Ik Won [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyeun Cha [Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    To evaluate the CT and MRI findings of neurosyphilis. We retrospectively reviewed the CT and MR imaging findings in five patients with intracranial neurosyphilis confirmed by CSF, VDRL, TPHA, and clinical follow-up. MR imaging was performed in all five cases, and CT in two. The MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis included infarction (n=3), focal inflammation (n=1) and encephalopathy (n=1). There was a total of ten infaretions : three of the basal ganglia, two each of the frontal lobe, watershed zone, and cerebellum, and one of the occipital lobe. Intaretion was most common in MCA territory (n=9; 50%), followed by the watershed zone (16.6%), posterior cerebral artery territory (16.6%), and posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory (11.1%). The size of the lesion varied from 1cm to larger than one lobe. One patient showed diffuse high signal intensity in the left temporal lobe, but on follow-up MRI, this had resolved. The most common finding of neurosyphilis, as seen on MRI and CT, was infarction in middle cerebral arterial territory.

  16. Genome screen in familial intracranial aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langefeld Carl

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals with 1st degree relatives harboring an intracranial aneurysm (IA are at an increased risk of IA, suggesting genetic variation is an important risk factor. Methods Families with multiple members having ruptured or unruptured IA were recruited and all available medical records and imaging data were reviewed to classify possible IA subjects as definite, probable or possible IA or not a case. A 6 K SNP genome screen was performed in 333 families, representing the largest linkage study of IA reported to date. A 'narrow' (n = 705 definite IA cases and 'broad' (n = 866 definite or probable IA disease definition were used in multipoint model-free linkage analysis and parametric linkage analysis, maximizing disease parameters. Ordered subset analysis (OSA was used to detect gene × smoking interaction. Results Model-free linkage analyses detected modest evidence of possible linkage (all LOD Conclusion These data suggest it is unlikely that there is a single common variant with a strong effect in the majority of the IA families. Rather, it is likely that multiple genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the susceptibility for intracranial aneurysms.

  17. Endovascular treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed I Hussain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is responsible for approximately 10% of all ischemic strokes in the United States. The risk of recurrent stroke may be as high as 35% in patient with critical stenosis greater than 70% in diameter narrowing. Recent advances in medical and endovascular therapy have placed ICAD at the forefront of clinical stroke research to optimize the best medical and endovascular approach to treat this important underlying stroke etiology. Analysis of symptomatic ICAD studies lead to the question that whether angioplasty and or stenting is a safe, suitable and efficacious therapeutic strategy in patients with critical stenoses that are deemed refractory to medical management. Most of the currently available data in support of angioplasty and or stenting in high risk patients with severe symptomatic ICAD is in the form of case series and randomized trial results of endovascular therapy versus medical treatment are awaited. This is a comprehensive review of the state of the art in the endovascular approach with angioplasty and or stenting of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

  18. Longterm surgery of posttraumatic intracranial hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babochkin D.S.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Research objective — studying of consequences of the operated traumatic intracranial hematomas in the remote period. Material. The nearest and remote results of the operated traumatic intracranial hematomas at 105 patients in terms from 6 months till 3 years are analyzed. During research the anamnesis was studied, neurologic investigation, and also research cognitive functions by means of scale MMSE, the test of drawing of hours, a scale of studying of alarm/depression HADS, learning of 5 words, scale quality of life SF-36. Results. It is established, that in the remote period the condition of the majority of patients gradually improves, at the same time, frequent enough and expressed consequences which are necessary for analyzing with the purpose of optimization of outcomes and the forecast at the given disease are observed. The special attention should be given again developing complications to which it is possible to carry epileptic seizures and behavioral-memorable infringements. Conclusion. Studying of the remote consequences of this heavy kind of craniocereberal trauma allows to optimize results of treatment and to provide complex medical, labor, social and family adaptation

  19. Accuracy of brain imaging in the diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maralani, P.J. [Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Hassanlou, M. [Department of Ophthalmology, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Torres, C.; Chakraborty, S.; Kingstone, M. [Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Patel, V.; Zackon, D. [Department of Ophthalmology, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Bussiere, M., E-mail: mbussiere@toh.on.ca [Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-15

    Aim: To investigate the accuracy of individual and combinations of signs on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance venography (MRV) in the diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Materials and methods: This study was approved by the institutional research ethics board without informed consent. Forty-three patients and 43 control subjects were retrospectively identified. Each patient and control had undergone brain MRI and MRV. Images were anonymized and reviewed by three neuroradiologists, blinded to clinical data, for the presence or absence of findings associated with IIH. The severity of stenosis in each transverse sinus was graded and summed to generate a combined stenosis score (CSS). The sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios (LR) were calculated for individual and combinations of signs. Results: Partially empty sella (specificity 95.3%, p < 0.0001), flattening of the posterior globes (specificity 100%, p < 0.0001), and CSS <4 (specificity 100%, p < 0.0001) were highly specific for IIH. The presence of one sign, or any combination, significantly increased the odds of a diagnosis of IIH (LR+ 18.5 to 46, p < 0.0001). Their absence, however, did not rule out IIH. Conclusions: Brain MRI with venography significantly increased the diagnostic certainty for IIH if there was no evidence of a mass, hydrocephalus, or sinus thrombosis and one of the following signs was present: flattening of the posterior globes, partially empty sella, CSS <4. However, absence of these signs did not exclude a diagnosis of IIH.

  20. Diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of deep vein thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerstedt, C.

    1992-01-01

    51 out-patients presenting with calf-vein thrombosis were randomized to treatment with heparin for five days or heparin with subsequent warfarin for three months. Among 23 patients in the warfarin-group no recurrence occurred, whereas 8 of the 28 patients (29%) in the non-warfarin group had recurrent thrombo-embolism during the first 90 days. It is concluded that patients with symptomatic calf-vein thrombi should be treated with both heparin and oral anticoagulation. In a prospective study of X-ray contrast media, post-phlebographic reactions occurred in 7 of 19 patients (37%) investigated with a high-osmolality contrast medium metrizoate whereas no such reaction occurred among 24 patients investigated with a low-osmolality contrast medium iohexol. Thus, low-osmolatily contrast media should preferably be used at phlebography. 396 out-patients with suspected venous thrombosis were investigated with the 99m Tc-plasmin test, physical examination and phlebography. The plasmin test has a high sensitivity (95%) but a low specificity (47%), and was frequently abnormal when clinical signs of inflammation were present. Clinical signs could not accurately predict if thrombosis was present, although subpopulations of patients with high or low probability of venous thrombosis could be identified. 112 patients with suspected DVT were investigated with thermography. Both sensitivity and specificity were low (77% and 66% respectively) and thermography therefore seems not to be useful in the diagnosis of symptomatic venous thrombosis. Long-term sequelae after a first episode of venous thrombosis are mostly mild as long as 6 years after the diagnosis. Venous function correlated to the extension of the thrombus but no to subjective symptoms. Clinical signs at diagnosis could not predict the late outcome. During the six years of follow-up, 28% of the patients had recurrent thrombosis. (158 refs.) (au)

  1. Stent-assisted recanalization of atherosclerotic intracranial stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo Mee Lim; Dae Chul Suh

    2006-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is a major cause of ischemic stroke, and depending on the studied population, it accounts for 8%-15% of all strokes that are due to cerebral atherosclerosis. The prognosis of patients with symptomatic intracranial stenoses seems to depend on the location and extent of intracranial atherosclerosis. Currently, the primary treatment in intracranial atherosclerosis is the control of vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking. Secondary prevention with antiplatelet therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of subsequent vascular events in patients who have suffered a recent ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Unfortunately, a significant number of patients with intracranial atherosclerosis continue to suffer from repeated strokes or TIA despite maximal medical treatment. Although endovascular revascularization for symptomatic intracranial stenoses remains at the investigational stage and much of the pertinent information is anecdotal, intracranial angioplasty and stenting are being increasingly performed to treat stenotic lesions. This article reviews basic principles involved in the patient selection, premedication, angio-interventional procedures, angiographic and clinical results, periprocedural complication, patients aftercare. (authors)

  2. Intracranial hypertension prediction using extremely randomized decision trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzo, Fabien; Hamilton, Robert; Asgari, Shadnaz; Kim, Sunghan; Hu, Xiao

    2012-10-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) elevation (intracranial hypertension, IH) in neurocritical care is typically treated in a reactive fashion; it is only delivered after bedside clinicians notice prolonged ICP elevation. A proactive solution is desirable to improve the treatment of intracranial hypertension. Several studies have shown that the waveform morphology of the intracranial pressure pulse holds predictors about future intracranial hypertension and could therefore be used to alert the bedside clinician of a likely occurrence of the elevation in the immediate future. In this paper, a computational framework is proposed to predict prolonged intracranial hypertension based on morphological waveform features computed from the ICP. A key contribution of this work is to exploit an ensemble classifier method based on extremely randomized decision trees (Extra-Trees). Experiments on a representative set of 30 patients admitted for various intracranial pressure related conditions demonstrate the effectiveness of the predicting framework on ICP pulses acquired under clinical conditions and the superior results of the proposed approach in comparison to linear and AdaBoost classifiers. Copyright © 2011 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pediatric cerebral sinovenous thrombosis following cranial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Dmitriy; Uohara, Michael Y; Ichord, Rebecca; Ali, Zarina; Jastrzab, Laura; Lang, Shih-Shan; Billinghurst, Lori

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) is an important, though less common subtype of pediatric stroke. It has been linked to several risk factors, including cranial procedures, with few studies highlighting this relationship. The aim of this study was to characterize the diagnosis and treatment of CSVT after cranial surgery. An institutional pediatric stroke research database was used to identify all CSVT cases diagnosed within 30 days of cranial surgery from November 2004 to December 2014. Thirteen subjects were retrospectively analyzed for clinical presentation, surgical details, radiographic characteristics, laboratory study results, treatment, and outcome. Diagnostic testing and treatment adhered to a consensus-based institutional stroke protocol. Cranial vault reconstruction, subdural empyema evacuation, and tumor resection were each observed in three subjects. Eleven (85%) subjects had sinus exposure during surgery, and eight (73%) developed thrombus in a sinus within or adjacent to the operative field. Two (15%) had documented iatrogenic sinus injury. On post-operative testing, ten (77%) subjects had prothrombotic abnormalities. Seven (54%) were treated with anti-coagulation therapy (ACT) starting on a median of post-operative day (POD) 3 (IQR 1-3) for a median of 2.9 months (IQR 2.4-5.4). Median time to imaging evidence of partial or complete recanalization was 2.4 months (IQR 0.7-5.1). No symptomatic hemorrhagic complications were encountered. Pediatric CSVT may be encountered after cranial surgery, and decisions related to anti-coagulation are challenging. The risk of CSVT should be considered in pre-surgical planning and post-operative evaluation of cases with known risk factors. In our study, judicious use of ACT was safe in the post-operative period.

  4. Timing of vitamin K antagonist re-initiation following intracranial hemorrhage in mechanical heart valves: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKherayf, Fahad; Xu, Yan; Gandara, Esteban; Westwick, Harrison; Moldovan, Ioana Doina; Wells, Philip S

    2016-08-01

    While evidence supports resumption of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among mechanical heart valve (MHV) patients presenting with anticoagulant-associated intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), ideal timing of resumption is uncertain. To determine the optimal timing of VKA re-initiation and its associated clinical outcomes. We performed a systematic review and a meta-analysis of studies published from January 1950 to August 2015. We extracted data on the location of initial ICH, use of cranial surgery, presence of atrial fibrillation, MHV type and position, number of MHVs, and timing of VKA resumption. Outcomes including valve thrombosis, thromboembolic events or ICH recurrence were recorded. Meta-regression analysis was conducting with controlling for covariates. We calculated absolute risks, and assessed the effect of anticoagulant resumption timing on ICH recurrence. 23 case-series and case-reports were identified. Overall ICH recurrence was 13% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7%-25%), while valve thrombosis and ischemic strokes occurred at 7% (95% CI, 3%-17%) and 12% (95% CI, 5%-23%) respectively. A trend towards lower ICH recurrence was observed with delayed VKA resumption (slope estimate -0.2154, p=0.10). Recurrence rate ranged from 50% with VKA resumption at 3days to 0% with resumption at 16days. Among patients with MHV, there is inadequate data to suggest an optimal timing of VKA re-initiation following an ICH, though delayed restart appears to be protective against recurrence but is associated with higher risk of thrombosis. Our analysis suggests 4-7days might be an ideal time with least risk of thrombosis or ICH recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thrombosis and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome during acute Q fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Matthieu; Bardin, Nathalie; Bessis, Simon; Nouiakh, Nadia; Douliery, Charlaine; Edouard, Sophie; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Bosseray, Annick; Epaulard, Olivier; Branger, Stéphanie; Chaudier, Bernard; Blanc-Laserre, Karine; Ferreira-Maldent, Nicole; Demonchy, Elisa; Roblot, France; Reynes, Jacques; Djossou, Felix; Protopopescu, Camelia; Carrieri, Patrizia; Camoin-Jau, Laurence; Mege, Jean-Louis; Raoult, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Q fever is a neglected and potentially fatal disease. During acute Q fever, antiphospholipid antibodies are very prevalent and have been associated with fever, thrombocytopenia, acquired heart valve disease, and progression to chronic endocarditis. However, thrombosis, the main clinical criterion of the 2006 updated classification of the antiphospholipid syndrome, has not been assessed in this context. To test whether thrombosis is associated with antiphospholipid antibodies and whether the criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome can be met in patients with acute Q fever, we conducted a cross-sectional study at the French National Referral Center for Q fever. Patients included were diagnosed with acute Q fever in our Center between January 2007 and December 2015. Each patient's history and clinical characteristics were recorded with a standardized questionnaire. Predictive factors associated with thrombosis were assessed using a rare events logistic regression model. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (IgG aCL) assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were tested on the Q fever diagnostic serum. A dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and thrombosis was tested using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Of the 664 patients identified for inclusion in the study, 313 (47.1%) had positive IgG aCL and 13 (1.9%) were diagnosed with thrombosis. Three patients fulfilled the antiphospholipid syndrome criteria. After multiple adjustments, only positive IgG aCL (relative risk, 14.46 [1.85–113.14], P = .011) were independently associated with thrombosis. ROC analysis identified a dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and occurrence of thrombosis (area under curve, 0.83, 95%CI [0.73–0.93], P antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and acquired valvular heart disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies should be systematically assessed in acute Q fever patients. Hydroxychloroquine

  6. Intracranial structural alteration predicts treatment outcome in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hanna; Lee, Mi Ji; Choi, Hyun Ah; Cha, Jihoon; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2018-02-01

    Background Intracranial structural dislocation in spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) can be measured by various intracranial angles and distances. We aimed to identify the clinical significance of structural dislocation in relation to treatment outcome in patients with SIH. Methods In this retrospective analysis, we identified patients with SIH who received an epidural blood patch (EBP) at Samsung Medical Center from January 2005 to March 2015. Structural dislocation in pretreatment MRIs of SIH patients was assessed by measuring tonsillar herniation, mamillopontine distance, the angle between the vein of Galen and straight sinus (vG/SS angle), the pontomesencephalic angle, and the lateral ventricular angle. After the first EBP, poor response was defined as the persistence of symptoms that prompted a repeat EBP. Results Out of the 95 patients included, 31 (32.6%) showed poor response. Among the radiological markers of structural dislocation, the vG/SS angle was associated with poor response (49.82 ± 16.40° vs 66.58 ± 26.08°, p = 0.002). Among clinical variables, premorbid migraine ( p = 0.036) was related to poor response. In multivariate analysis, reduced vG/SS angle was independently associated with poor response (OR 1.04 [95% CI 1.01 - 1.07] per 1° decrease, p = 0.006). In 23 patients who underwent MRI after successful treatment, the vG/SS angle significantly increased after the EBP ( p < 0.001, by paired t-test), while two patients with aggravation or recurrence showed a further reduction of their vG/SS angles. Conclusions Intracranial structural dislocation, measured by the vG/SS angle, is associated with poor response to the first EBP in patients with SIH. Successful treatment can reverse the structural dislocation.

  7. Chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Different manifestations of the same disorder of intracranial pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, J Nicholas P; Pickard, John D; Lever, Andrew M L

    2017-08-01

    Though not discussed in the medical literature or considered in clinical practice, there are similarities between chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) which ought to encourage exploration of a link between them. The cardinal symptoms of each - fatigue and headache - are common in the other and their multiple other symptoms are frequently seen in both. The single discriminating factor is raised intracranial pressure, evidenced in IIH usually by the sign of papilloedema, regarded as responsible for the visual symptoms which can lead to blindness. Some patients with IIH, however, do not have papilloedema and these patients may be clinically indistinguishable from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Yet IIH is rare, IIH without papilloedema (IIHWOP) seems rarer still, while chronic fatigue syndrome is common. So are the clinical parallels spurious or is there a way to reconcile these conflicting observations? We suggest that it is a quirk of clinical measurement that has created this discrepancy. Specifically, that the criteria put in place to define IIH have led to a failure to appreciate the existence, clinical significance or numerical importance of patients with lower level disturbances of intracranial pressure. We argue that this has led to a grossly implausible distortion of the epidemiology of IIH such that the milder form of the illness (IIHWOP) is seen as less common than the more severe and that this would be resolved by recognising a connection with chronic fatigue syndrome. We hypothesise, therefore, that IIH, IIHWOP, lesser forms of IIH and an undetermined proportion of chronic fatigue cases are all manifestations of the same disorder of intracranial pressure across a spectrum of disease severity, in which this subset of chronic fatigue syndrome would represent the most common and least severe and IIH the least common and most extreme. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Topographic Surgical Anatomy of the Parasylvian Anterior Temporal Artery for Intracranial-Intracranial Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Griswold, Dylan; Tabani, Halima; Lawton, Michael T; Mokhtari, Pooneh; Payman, Andre; Benet, Arnau

    2016-09-01

    The anterior temporal artery (ATA) is an appealing donor artery for intracranial-intracranial bypass procedures. However, its identification may be difficult. Current literature lacks useful landmarks to help identify the ATA at the surface of the sylvian fissure. The objective of this study was to define the topographic anatomy of the cortical segment of the ATA relative to constant landmarks exposed during the pterional approach. The temporopolar artery (TPA), ATA, and middle temporal artery (MTA) were examined in 16 cadaveric specimens. The topographic anatomy and key landmarks of the arteries at the sylvian fissure were recorded. The distance between the point of emergence from the sylvian fissure to the lesser sphenoid wing and anterior tip of the temporal lobe was measured. The features of the inferior frontal gyrus relative to each of the arteries at the sylvian fissure were also recorded. The average distances from the lesser sphenoid wing to the TPA, ATA, and MTA were 3.7 mm, 21.2 mm, and 37 mm. The mean distances from the temporal pole were TPA, 14.7 mm; ATA, 32.0 mm; and MTA, 45.4 mm. The differences between the average distances were statistically significant (P < 0.0001). The ATA most frequently faced pars triangularis, whereas the TPA always faced pars orbitalis. The MTA was always found posterior to the junction of pars triangularis and pars opercularis. This article provides topographic evidence for efficient identification of the ATA in the parasylvian space. The key relationship and landmarks identified in this study may increase efficiency and safety when harvesting the ATA for intracranial-intracranial bypass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Improved Pig Model to Evaluate Heart Valve Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payanam Ramachandra, Umashankar; Shenoy, Sachin J; Arumugham, Sabareeswaran

    2016-09-01

    Although the sheep is the most acceptable animal model for heart valve evaluation, it has severe limitations for detecting heart valve thrombosis during preclinical studies. While the pig offers an alternative model and is better for detecting prosthetic valve thrombogenicity, it is not often used because of inadvertent valve thrombosis or bleeding complications. The study aim was to develop an improved pig model which can be used reliably to evaluate mechanical heart valve thrombogenicity. Mechanical heart valves were implanted in the mitral position of indigenous pigs administered aspirin-clopidogrel, and compared with similar valves implanted in control pigs to which no antiplatelet therapy had been administered. The pigs were observed for six months to study their overall survivability, inadvertent bleeding/valve thrombosis and pannus formation. The efficacy of aspirinclopidogrel on platelet aggregation and blood coagulation was also recorded and compared between test and control animals. In comparison to controls, pigs receiving anti-platelet therapy showed an overall better survivability, an absence of inadvertent valve thrombosis/ bleeding, and less obstructive pannus formation. Previously unreported inhibitory effects of aspirin-clopidogrel on the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation were also observed in the pig model. Notably, with aspirin-clopidogrel therapy inadvertent thrombus formation or bleeding can be prevented. The newly developed pig model can be successfully used to evaluate heart valve thrombosis following chronic orthotopic valve implantation. The model may also be utilized to evaluate other bloodcontacting implantable devices.

  10. Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Paul J

    2011-08-01

    Allograft thrombosis is a devastating early complication of renal transplantation that ultimately leads to allograft loss. We report here on our experience of nine cases of immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis at a single centre between January 1990 and June 2009. The mean age was 42.9 years at time of transplant. For seven patients, the allograft thrombosis was their first kidney transplant and seven of the nine cases had a deceased donor transplant. The initial transplants functioned for a mean of 1.67 days and the patients received a second allograft at a mean of 3.1 days after graft failure. All of the re-transplants worked immediately. Four allografts failed after a mean of 52.5 months (2-155 months). Two of these died with a functioning allograft, one failed owing to chronic allograft nephropathy and one owing to persistent acute cellular rejection. The remaining five patients still have a functioning allograft after a mean of 101.8 months (7-187 months). One year allograft and patient survival after re-transplantation were 87.5% and 100% respectively (after 5 years, both were 57%). Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis can be a success. It may be considered in selected cases after allograft thrombosis.

  11. Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Paul J

    2012-02-01

    Allograft thrombosis is a devastating early complication of renal transplantation that ultimately leads to allograft loss. We report here on our experience of nine cases of immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis at a single centre between January 1990 and June 2009. The mean age was 42.9 years at time of transplant. For seven patients, the allograft thrombosis was their first kidney transplant and seven of the nine cases had a deceased donor transplant. The initial transplants functioned for a mean of 1.67 days and the patients received a second allograft at a mean of 3.1 days after graft failure. All of the re-transplants worked immediately. Four allografts failed after a mean of 52.5 months (2-155 months). Two of these died with a functioning allograft, one failed owing to chronic allograft nephropathy and one owing to persistent acute cellular rejection. The remaining five patients still have a functioning allograft after a mean of 101.8 months (7-187 months). One year allograft and patient survival after re-transplantation were 87.5% and 100% respectively (after 5 years, both were 57%). Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis can be a success. It may be considered in selected cases after allograft thrombosis.

  12. SPLANCHNIC VEIN THROMBOSIS IN THE MEDITERRANEAN AREA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaa El-Karaksy

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal venous thrombosis may present as splanchnic venous thrombosis (SVT (occlusion of portal, splenic, superior or inferior mesenteric veins or Budd- Chiari Syndrome (BCS (thrombosis of inferior vena cava and/or hepatic veins. The aim of this review is to report the scanty data available for splanchnic vein thrombosis in the South Mediterranean area. In one Egyptian study, the possible circumstantial risk factors for portal vein thrombosis were found in 30% of cases:  19% neonatal sepsis, 8.7% umbilical catheterization, 6% severe gastroenteritis and dehydration. Another Egyptian study concluded that hereditary thrombophilia was common in children with PVT (62.5%, the commonest being factor V Leiden mutation (FVL (30%. Concurrence of more than one hereditary thrombophilia was not uncommon (12.5%. The first international publication on hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD in Egypt was in 1965 in children who rapidly develop abdominal distention with ascites and hepatomegaly. This disease was more frequent in malnourished children coming from rural areas; infusions given at home may contain noxious substances that were hepatotoxic and Infections might play a role. VOD of childhood is rarely seen nowadays. Data from South Mediterranean area are deficient and this may be attributable to reporting in local medical journals that are difficult to access. Medical societies concerned with this topic could help distribute this information.

  13. CAUSES OF ADULT SPLANCHNIC VEIN THROMBOSIS IN THE MEDITERRANEAN AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio De Stefano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The term splanchnic vein thrombosis encompasses Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS, extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO, and mesenteric vein thrombosis. Risk factors can be local or systemic. A local precipitating factor is rare in BCS, while it is common in  patients with portal vein thrombosis. Chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN are the leading systemic cause of splanchnic vein thrombosis, and are diagnosed in half BCS patients and one-third of EHPVO patients; the molecular marker JAK2 V617F is detectable in a large majority of patients with overt MPN and up to 40% of patients without overt MPN. Inherited thrombophilia is present in at least one-third of patients, and the factor V Leiden or the prothrombin G20210A mutations are the most common mutations found in BCS or EHPVO patients, respectively. Multiple factors are present in approximately one-third of patients with BCS and two- thirds of patients with portal vein thrombosis. In a few patient series from the Southern Mediterranean area the high prevalence of MPN and thrombophilia as underlying cause of BCS is confirmed, although the data should be considered preliminary. Peculiar risk factors present in the area are Behcet’s disease and hydatidosis; moreover, the presence of membraneous webs, typically found in Asian patients, can be found in a significant portion of cases.

  14. CAUSES OF ADULT SPLANCHNIC VEIN THROMBOSIS IN THE MEDITERRANEAN AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Betti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    The term splanchnic vein thrombosis encompasses Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS, extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO, and mesenteric vein thrombosis.

    Risk factors can be local or systemic. A local precipitating factor is rare in BCS, while it is common in  patients with portal vein thrombosis. Chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN are the leading systemic cause of splanchnic vein thrombosis, and are diagnosed in half BCS patients and one-third of EHPVO patients; the molecular marker JAK2 V617F is detectable in a large majority of patients with overt MPN and up to 40% of patients without overt MPN. Inherited thrombophilia is present in at least one-third of patients, and the factor V Leiden or the prothrombin G20210A mutations are the most common mutations found in BCS or EHPVO patients, respectively. Multiple factors are present in approximately one-third of patients with BCS and two- thirds of patients with portal vein thrombosis.

    In a few patient series from the Southern Mediterranean area the high prevalence of MPN and thrombophilia as underlying cause of BCS is confirmed, although the data should be considered preliminary. Peculiar risk factors present in the area are Behcet’s disease and hydatidosis; moreover, the presence of membraneous webs, typically found in Asian patients, can be found in a significant portion of cases.

  15. Uncontrolled seizures resulting from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis complicating neurobrucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Faraji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare form of stroke caused by thrombosis in venous sinuses of the brain. In this study, we reported on a patient with venous sinus thrombosis and brucellosis who presented with uncontrolled seizure despite being treated with anti-epileptic drugs at high doses. The case was a 33-year-old woman with a history of controlled complex partial seizure who presented with headache, asthenia, and uncontrolled seizure for one month. She was febrile and a brain CT scan indicated hemorrhagic focus in the left posterior parietal and the temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography also proved venous sinus thrombosis in the left transverse sinus. Besides [In addition], a laboratory assessment confirmed brucellosis. Following the treatment with anti-coagulant, anti-brucellosis, and anti-epileptic agents, the patient was discharged in good condition with medical orders. Clinical suspicion and accurate evaluation of a patient′s history is the most important clue in diagnosis and treatment of brucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, especially in uncontrolled seizure in patients who had previously been under control.

  16. Patterns in the management of superficial vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karathanos, Christos; Spanos, Konstantinos; Lachanas, Vasileios; Athanasoulas, Athanasios; Giannoukas, Athanasios D

    2017-04-01

    Objective To highlight current practice patterns in management of superficial vein thrombosis. Methods An electronic survey was conducted using the mailing lists of the Mediterranean League of Angiology and Vascular Surgery and European Venous Forum regarding superficial vein thrombosis diagnosis, investigation, and treatment. Results The response rate was 41% (175/430) and the majority of the participants were vascular surgeons practicing in a hospital. More experienced physicians considered superficial vein thrombosis as a medical issue of moderate seriousness and performed duplex ultrasound for confirmation of diagnosis. Elastic stockings were recommended by 87% of the physicians, while 57% prescribed nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Eighty six percent advised anticoagulation, although a large disparity was shown regarding regime, dose, and duration. Thrombophilia test was regularly suggested by 19% of the physicians. Ligation of the saphenofemoral junction was the treatment of choice by those who suggested intervention in the acute phase of superficial vein thrombosis. Conclusions A great disparity exists in the management of superficial vein thrombosis. Current guidelines have not been adopted by physicians; more focused training is needed for those involved in the management of venous diseases.

  17. Intracranial subdural hematoma coexisting with improvement in spontaneous intracranial hypotension after an epidural blood patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsi Chang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A 36-year-old male had spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH presenting with refractory headache for 4 months. Multiple epidural blood patches (EBPs yielded relief of symptoms, but the course was complicated, with asymptomatic intracranial subdural hematoma (SDH. Except for SDH, other radiological diagnostic signs of SIH were resolved and the patient’s headaches improved after EBP. Owing to a mass effect and persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage, surgical repair of the spinal leakage was performed, but no cranial procedures were carried out. Postoperatively, the SDH completely resolved, but there was still CSF leakage at the level where surgery was performed. The patient has remained free of headache or other events for 3 years. It was reduction rather than elimination of the spinal CSF leak that yielded remission of SIH. In summary, intracranial SDH can be a complication of inadequately treated SIH (i.e. persistent minor CSF leakage. Management of SDH should focus on correction of the underlying SIH rather than craniotomy for hematoma evacuation.

  18. Intracranial subdural hematoma coexisting with improvement in spontaneous intracranial hypotension after an epidural blood patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Hsi; Wu, Jau-Ching; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Chen, Hung-Chieh; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Hseu, Shu-Shya; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Cheng, Henrich; Ko, Chin-Chu

    2012-11-01

    A 36-year-old male had spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) presenting with refractory headache for 4 months. Multiple epidural blood patches (EBPs) yielded relief of symptoms, but the course was complicated, with asymptomatic intracranial subdural hematoma (SDH). Except for SDH, other radiological diagnostic signs of SIH were resolved and the patient's headaches improved after EBP. Owing to a mass effect and persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, surgical repair of the spinal leakage was performed, but no cranial procedures were carried out. Postoperatively, the SDH completely resolved, but there was still CSF leakage at the level where surgery was performed. The patient has remained free of headache or other events for 3 years. It was reduction rather than elimination of the spinal CSF leak that yielded remission of SIH. In summary, intracranial SDH can be a complication of inadequately treated SIH (i.e. persistent minor CSF leakage). Management of SDH should focus on correction of the underlying SIH rather than craniotomy for hematoma evacuation. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Management of raised intracranial pressure and hyperosmolar therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropper, Allan H

    2014-06-01

    The management of raised intracranial pressure is undergoing rapid change. The choice of medical treatments to reduce intracranial pressure varies between institutions and regions of the world. The mainstay of therapy, however, continues to be the infusion of a hyperosmolar solution to achieve an osmotic gradient to force the exit of water from the brain. This review introduces the basic concepts of raised intracranial pressure, summarises several recent studies that have challenged dogma in the field, and provides practical advice on hyperosmolar treatment, based on personal experience and a critical reading of the literature.

  20. Natriuretic pro-peptides in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Maren Cecilie Kloppenbor; Gøtze, Jens Peter; Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder of unknown pathogenesis. Natriuretic peptides may be involved in intracranial pressure regulation, but cerebrospinal fluid (CNS) and plasma concentrations in this disorder are unknown. We evaluated venous and intrathecal concentrations of ANP, BNP...... and CNP precursor peptides in 40 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension and in 20 controls. Natriuretic pro-peptides were quantitated using processing-independent assays. In CSF, no differences in peptide concentrations between patients and controls were found (proANP: 239 + or - 23 vs 231...

  1. A Case Of Ollier′s Disease With Intracranial Enchondroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharthan Neeraj

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of multiple enchondromas is known as Ollier′s disease. Enchondromas are benign tumours of hyaline cartilage arising within the medullary cavity of tubular bones. We are reporting the case of a 16 year old girl with Ollier′s disease who presented with seizures and brainstem compression. A MRI scan of brain showed an intracranial space-occupying lesion in the region of clivus. The intracranial tumour was surgically removed and the histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of enchondroma. Intracranial enchondroma is an extremely rare situation and reported for the first time from south India.

  2. [Measurement of intracranial hematoma volume by personal computer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Wanping; Tan, Lihua; Zhai, Ning; Zhou, Shunke; Wang, Rui; Xue, Gongshi; Xiao, An

    2011-01-01

    To explore the method for intracranial hematoma volume measurement by the personal computer. Forty cases of various intracranial hematomas were measured by the computer tomography with quantitative software and personal computer with Photoshop CS3 software, respectively. the data from the 2 methods were analyzed and compared. There was no difference between the data from the computer tomography and the personal computer (P>0.05). The personal computer with Photoshop CS3 software can measure the volume of various intracranial hematomas precisely, rapidly and simply. It should be recommended in the clinical medicolegal identification.

  3. Low incidence of pulmonary embolism associated with upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Mark M; Albuquerque, Francisco; Pfeifer, Justin D

    2012-10-01

    deep venous thrombosis, and its extent. Six patients (2%) suffered PE in association with their UEDVT diagnosis. There was no PE-related mortality. However, among anticoagulated UEDVT patients, there were four patients who suffered intracranial hemorrhage resulting in three deaths, and an additional three patients who required rehospitalization for upper gastrointestinal (n = 2) or stomal (n = 1) hemorrhage. Anticoagulation therapy is inconsistently used to treat UEDVT and most often used for patients with multiple vein segments involved and with sonographically acute UEDVT components. However, regardless of the decision to anticoagulate, the incidence of PE attributable to UEDVT is small (2%), regardless of treatment with anticoagulation. Given the observed mortality associated with anticoagulation in this fragile patient cohort, the risk-benefit analysis for anticoagulation does not favor routine anticoagulation among these patients. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Clinical analysis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and its combined treatment of anticoagulation and endovascular thrombolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun JIANG

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical and imaging manifestations of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST, and the clinical effect of combined treatment of anticoagulation and endovascular thrombolysis. Methods and Results The clinical manifestations of 22 CVST patients were highly variable. Headache (90.91%, 20/22 was the most frequent symptom, and conscious disturbance, seizure and focal neurological deficits were commonly present. Plasma D-dimer level was elevated in 12 patients (54.55%. Lumbar puncture was performed in 14 patients, in whom intracranial hypertension was present in 9 patients (9/14 with no characteristic changes in routine and biochemical examination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Brain CT/MRI and CTV/MRV showed direct signs of CVST in all 22 patients, involving superior sagittal sinus, transverse sinus, sigmoid sinus, straight sinus and cortex veins, parenchymal lesions (infarction, hemorrhage and white matter abnormalities in 13 patients (59.09%, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in 2 patients (9.10% and subdural hematoma in one patient (4.55%. The involved cerebral sinuses revealed by DSA were superior sagittal sinus in 13 patients (59.09% , transverse sinus in 17 patients (77.27%, sigmoid sinus in 14 patients (63.64%, inferior sagittal sinus in 2 patients (9.10%, straight sinus in 4 patients (18.18%, vein of Galen in one patient (4.55% and jugular vein in one patient (4.55%. Two thrombosed sinuses were found in 9 patients (40.91% and 3 or more thrombosed sinuses in 8 patients (36.36% . As no clinical improvements and progressive exacerbation were observed several days after heparin sodium intravenous drip or lower molecular weight heparin (LMWH hypodermic injection with oral warfarin anticoagulant therapy, urokinase thrombolysis in venous sinus or artery was applied in 21 patients (95.45%. After (25.70 ± 12.18 d treatment with anticoagulation, the modified Rankin Scale (mRS score of 13 patients (59.09% reached 0-1, 4 patients

  5. Analysis of thrombosis and bleeding complications in patients with polycythemia vera: a Turkish retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilova, A M; Yavuzer, S; Yavuzer, H; Cengiz, M; Toprak, I D; Hanedar, E; Ar, M C; Baslar, Z

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study are to determine the incidence and risk factors of thrombosis and bleeding in polycythemia vera (PV) patients and to research the effects of these risk factors on survival. The medical records of 155 PV patients were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into groups according to whether or not thrombosis had developed in follow-up, and according to whether or not bleeding had occurred during follow-up. The mean age at diagnosis was 53 years, and the mean follow-up period was 66 months. The percentage of cases in which thrombosis events had occurred before diagnosis and during follow-up were 26 and 28 %, respectively. Comparisons of disease duration and average thrombosis risk score between groups with or without thrombosis drew statistically significant results. A patient's history of thrombosis and thrombocytosis at first visit was found to have a significant effect on thrombosis recurrence. The major bleeding rate was 8 %. Post-PV myelofibrosis was an independent risk factor for bleeding. The major cause of death among the patients in this study was primary thrombosis. The most important causes of mortality among PV patients are thrombosis, and the most prominent risk factors for thrombosis development are disease duration and high thrombosis risk scores. Thrombocytosis in patients with a history of thrombosis may cause thrombosis recurrence during the follow-up period.

  6. Computed tomographic findings of intracranial acute leukemia

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    Park, Dong Woo; Ryu, Weon Don; Kim, Jong Sung; Koh, Byung Hee; Jeon, Seok Chol; Lee, Seung Ro; Hahm, Chang Kok [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    Computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities in the brain were retrospectively analyzed in 16 of 103 patients with acute leukemia confirmed by CSF cytology or combined surgery at Hanyang University Hospital, from August 1980 to August 1989. The results were as follows : 1. With FAB classification, the most frequent pathologic type was L1 : 8 cases (50%) 2. The range of age distribution showed typical pattern that ALL occurred below the 15 years old, and AML, over 15 years old. 3. Abnormal CT findings were ; Meningitis(2 cases), Mass(3), Thrombosis(1), Infarction(2), Edema(1), Hemorrhage(7), Hydrocephalus(2), Atrophy(2). 4. Most of infracranial hemorrhage were seen in M{sub 2} and M{sub 3} type.

  7. Woman with Sickle Cell Disease with Current Sigmoid Sinus Thrombosis and History of Inadequate Warfarin Use during a Past Thrombotic Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuman Çelikbilek

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a 20-year-old woman with sickle cell disease (SCD who presented with a severe pulsating headache, nausea, and vomiting. Her history was significant for a past thrombotic event during which she had not used anticoagulation therapy as prescribed. Her mental status was mildly confused. On funduscopic examination, papilledema and retinal hemorrhages were found. Results of a computed tomogram were normal. A lumbar puncture demonstrated increased intracranial pressure (60 cm H2O. Magnetic resonance venography demonstrated a right sigmoid sinus thrombosis. Although SCD has been reported as a cause of thrombotic dural venous sinus events, this case increases the knowledge about neurological complications of SCD. The patient was treated with low molecular weight heparin, blood transfusions, acetazolamide, and methylprednisolone, and her symptoms and signs resolved.

  8. Bedside Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Assessment in the Identification of Increased Intracranial Pressure in Suspected Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazuzta, Jose E; Brown, Martha E; Akhtar, Javed

    2016-01-01

    We determined whether the bedside assessment of the optic nerve sheath diameter could identify elevated intracranial pressure in individuals with suspected idiopathic intracranial hypertension. This was a single-center, prospective, rater-blinded study performed in a freestanding pediatric teaching hospital. Patients aged 12 to 18 years scheduled for an elective lumbar puncture with the suspicion of idiopathic intracranial hypertension were eligible to participate. Optic nerve sheath diameter was measured via ultrasonography before performing a sedated lumbar puncture for measuring cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure. Abnormal measurements were predefined as optic nerve sheath diameter ≥4.5 mm and a cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure greater than 20 cmH2O. Thirteen patients participated in the study, 10 of whom had elevated intracranial pressure. Optic nerve sheath diameter was able to predict or rule out elevated intracranial pressure in all patients. Noninvasive assessment of the optic nerve sheath diameter could help to identify patients with elevated intracranial pressure when idiopathic intracranial hypertension is suspected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Computer tomography of intracranial tumours and hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tans, J.T.J.

    1978-01-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of intracranial tumors and hematomas was investigated in a retrospective study comprising 220 patients. All C.T.scans are reviewed and described in detail. To assess the diagnostic accuracy, the original interpretation of the C.T.scans was compared with that of conventional neuroradiological and neurophysiological examinations. The aspect on C.T. of the various types of tumors and hematomas proved to vary widely and specific features were seldom seen. This holds particularly for the malignant tumors. Benign tumors such as meningeomas, adenomas and neurilemmomas showed a rather easily identifiable and almost identical picture of the C.T.scan, and diagnosis had to be based mainly on differences in localization. The hematomas, with the exception of the older intracerebral ones, showed the most characteristic C.T.abnormalities. (Auth.)

  10. Intracranial developmental venous anomaly: is it asymptomatic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, A Bolívar; de Asís Bravo Rodríguez, F; Bravo Rey, I; Romero, E Roldán

    2018-03-16

    Intracranial developmental venous anomalies are the most common vascular malformation. In the immense majority of cases, these anomalies are asymptomatic and discovered incidentally, and they are considered benign. Very exceptionally, however, they can cause neurological symptoms. In this article, we present three cases of patients with developmental venous anomalies that presented with different symptoms owing to complications derived from altered venous drainage. These anomalies were located in the left insula, right temporal lobe, and cerebellum. The exceptionality of the cases presented as well as of the images associated, which show the mechanism through which the symptoms developed, lies in the low incidence of symptomatic developmental venous anomalies reported in the literature. Copyright © 2018 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Intracranial Aspergillosis in an Immunocompetent Young Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Prasan Kumar; Mavidi, Sunil Kumar; Wig, Naveet; Garg, Ajay; Nalwa, Aasma; Sharma, M C

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial aspergillosis (ICA) is very rare in the immunocompetent individuals, usually misdiagnosed as a tumor or an abscess. A high index of clinical suspicion is required in patients who present with focal neurological deficits, headache, or seizures. We report the case of a 25-year-old immunocompetent female, who presented with a 15-month history of headache, seizures, left-sided proptosis and ophthalmoplegia, and right hemiparesis. Recovery from the symptoms and decrease in the lesion size seen on the radiological assessment were achieved through two decompressive craniotomies followed by prolonged combined systemic antifungal therapies. Although the initial neuroimaging suggested a mitotic pathology, the surgical sample confirmed ICA. Now the patient is on single antifungal therapy (Tab. voriconazole, 200 mg twice daily) and doing her daily activities, but with a reduced intelligent quotient. We report a challenging case of ICA where multiple courses of combined antifungal therapies and repeat surgeries paved the way for a good prognosis.

  12. Endovascular treatment of very small intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iskandar, A; Nepper-Rasmussen, J

    2011-01-01

    to large aneurysms (> 3 mm). However the data also suggest that endovascular treatment of very small aneurysms might be associated with an increased risk of procedural ruptures and mortality. At nine-month follow-up results indicate significantly less compaction in the very small aneurysms....... endovascular treatment was attempted in 956 consecutive intracranial aneurysms. Of 956 aneurysms, 111 aneurysms were very small aneurysms with a maximal diameter of 3 mm or less. We conducted a retrospective analysis of angiographic and clinical outcome following coiling of very small aneurysms...... aneurysms and less than 90% aneurysm occlusion in six aneurysms. Complications occurred in the treatment of 15 aneurysms, including eight procedural ruptures, six thromboembolic events and one case of early hemorrhage. Compared with larger aneurysms, treatment of very small aneurysms was associated...

  13. MRI of intracranial germ cell tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumida, M.; Uozumi, T.; Kiya, K.; Mukada, K.; Arita, K.; Kurisu, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Onda, J.; Satoh, H.; Ikawa, F.; Migita, K.

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed MRI findings in proven intracranial germ cell tumours in 22 cases, 12 of whom received Gd-DTPA. On T1-weighted images, the signal intensity of the tumour parenchyma was moderately low in 19 cases and isointense in 3; on T2-weighted images, it was high in all cases. Regions of different intensity thought to be cysts were found in 17 (77 %): 7 of 12 patients with germinoma (58 %) and in all other cases. Of the 13 patients with pineal lesions T1-weighted sagittal images showed the aqueduct to be obstructed in 5, stenotic in 7 and normal in 1. Strong contrast enhancement was observed in all 12 cases. Of the 14 patients with suprasellar lesions, 5 were found to have an intrasellar extension, and in 3 of these, the normal pituitary gland, which could be distinguished from the tumour, was displaced anteriorly. Ten patients (45 %) had multiple lesions. (orig.)

  14. Effect of radiation therapy against intracranial hemangiopericytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Shozaburo; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Hamada, Jun-ichiro; Yoshioka, Susumu; Kochi, Masato; Ushio, Yukitaka; Nakahara, Tadashi; Kishida, Katsuaki.

    1992-01-01

    Seven cases of intracranial hemangiopericytoma were studied retrospectively to investigate the efficacy of radiation therapy. Tumor response evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging was obvious after 20-30 Gy irradiation. The total reduction rate was 80-90% and continued as long as 5-7 months after treatment. In five patients receiving radiation therapy before radical removal, the tumors were easily removed without massive hemorrhage. Histological inspection of specimens after irradiation showed a significant disappearance of tumor cells. Pyknosis frequently occurred in endothelial cells, and proliferating vessels with hyalinoid degeneration were also seen. Reticulin fibers between tumor cells were fewer, split, or absent. Preoperative radiation therapy is useful in the treatment of hemangiopericytoma involving considerable surgical risk. Postoperative radiation therapy should be given even if removal is complete. (author)

  15. Intracranial calcification on paediatric computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, B.; Cavanagh, N.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of the computed tomograms of 18000 children examined consecutively form the basis of an assessment of the diagnostic significance of intracranial calcification. The low incidence of physiological calcification in the pineal and choroid of about 2% up to the age of 8 years, but increasing 5-fold by the age of 15 years, is confirmed. Pathological calcification occurred in 1.6%, the commonest causes being neoplasms (43%), neuroectodermal syndromes (20%) and infections (12%). Diffuse basal ganglia calcification (15%) bore little relation to the diverse clinical symptomatology, and routine bio-chemical studies showed a disorder of metabolism to be present in only 6 cases. Calcification has not been previously noted in acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalitis, Pertussis or Cocksackie encephalitis, infantile neuraxonal dystrophy, Marinesco-Sjoegren syndrome or in the basal ganglia in neurofibromatosis. (orig.)

  16. Converging intracranial markers of conscious access.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Gaillard

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We compared conscious and nonconscious processing of briefly flashed words using a visual masking procedure while recording intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG in ten patients. Nonconscious processing of masked words was observed in multiple cortical areas, mostly within an early time window (<300 ms, accompanied by induced gamma-band activity, but without coherent long-distance neural activity, suggesting a quickly dissipating feedforward wave. In contrast, conscious processing of unmasked words was characterized by the convergence of four distinct neurophysiological markers: sustained voltage changes, particularly in prefrontal cortex, large increases in spectral power in the gamma band, increases in long-distance phase synchrony in the beta range, and increases in long-range Granger causality. We argue that all of those measures provide distinct windows into the same distributed state of conscious processing. These results have a direct impact on current theoretical discussions concerning the neural correlates of conscious access.

  17. Imaging features of intracranial solitary fibrous tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Shuilian; Man Yuping; Ma Longbai; Liu Ying; Wei Qiang; Zhu Youkai

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the imaging features of intracranial solitary fibrous tumors (ISFT). Methods: Ten patients with ISFT proven histopathologically were collected. Four cases had CT data and all cases had MR data. The imaging features and pathological results were retrospectively analyzed. Results: All cases were misdiagnosed as meningioma at pre-operation. All lesions arose from intracranial meninges including 5 lesions above the tentorium, 4 lesions beneath the tentorium and 1 lesion growing around the tentorium. The margins of all the masses were well defined, and 8 lesions presented multilobular shape. CT demonstrated hyerattenuated masses in all 4 lesions, smooth erosion of the basicranial skull in 1 lesion, and punctiform calcification of the capsule in 1 lesion. T 1 WI showed most lesions with isointense or slight hyperintense signals including homogeneous in 4 lesions and heterogeneous in 6 lesions. T 2 WI demonstrated isointense or slight hyperintense in 2 lesions, mixed hypointense and hyperintense signals in 4, cystic portion in 2, and two distinct portion of hyperintense and hypointense signal, so called 'yin-yang' pattern, in 2. Strong enhanced was found in all lesions, especially in 8 lesion with heterogeneous with the low T 2 signal. 'Dural tail' was found in 4 lesions. Conclusions: ISFI has some specific CT and MR features including heterogeneous signal intensity on T 2 WI, strong enhancement of areas with low T 2 signal intensity, slight or no 'dural tail', without skull thickening, and the typical 'yin-yang' pattern. (authors)

  18. Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Durham, T.; Otto, C.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2006 there have been 6 reported cases of altered visual acuity and intracranial pressure (ICP) in long duration astronauts. In order to document this risk and develop an integrated approach to its mitigation, the NASA Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) and Human Research Program (HRP) have chosen to use the Human System Risk Board (HSRB) and the risk management analysis tool (RMAT). The HSRB is the venue in which the stakeholders and customers discuss and vet the evidence and the RMAT is the tool that facilitates documentation and comparison of the evidence across mission profiles as well as identification of risk factors, and documentation of mitigation strategies. This process allows for information to be brought forward and dispositioned so that it may be properly incorporated into the RMAT and contribute to the design of the research and mitigation plans. The evidence thus far has resulted in the identification of a visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) project team, updating of both short and long duration medical requirements designed to assess visual acuity, and a research plan to characterize this issue further. In order to understand this issue more completely, a plan to develop an Accelerated Research Collaboration (ARC) has been approved by the HSRB. The ARC is a novel research model pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. It is a patient centered research model that brings together researchers and clinicians, under the guidance of a scientific advisory panel, to collaborate and produce results much quickly than accomplished through traditional research models. The data and evidence from the updated medical requirements and the VIIP ARC will be reviewed at the HSRB on a regular basis. Each review package presented to the HSRB will include an assessment and recommendation with respect to continuation of research, countermeasure development, occupational surveillance modalities, selection criteria, etc. This process will determine the

  19. Structured Reporting in Neuroradiology: Intracranial Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bink, Andrea; Benner, Jan; Reinhardt, Julia; De Vere-Tyndall, Anthony; Stieltjes, Bram; Hainc, Nicolin; Stippich, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the clinical feasibility, diagnostic yield, advantages, and disadvantages of structured reporting for routine MRI-reading in patients with primary diagnosis of intracranial tumors as compared to traditional neuroradiological free text reporting. A structured MRI reporting template was developed covering pathological, anatomical, and functional aspects in an itemized fashion. Retrospectively, 60 consecutive patients with first diagnosis of an intracranial tumor were selected from the radiology information system/PACS system. Structured reporting was performed by a senior neuroradiologist, blinded to clinical and radiological data. Reporting times were measured per patient. The diagnostic content was compared to free text reporting which was independently performed on the same MRI exams by two other neuroradiologists. The comparisons were categorized per item as: "congruent," "partially congruent," "incongruent," or "not mentioned in free-style report." Tumor-related items: congruent findings were found for all items (17/17) with congruence rates ranging between 98 and 39% per item. Four items achieved congruence rates ≥90%, 5 items >80%, and 9 items ≥70%. Partially congruent findings were found for all items in up to 50% per item. Incongruent findings were present in 7/17 items in up to 5% per item. Free text reports did not mention 12 of 17 items (range 7-43% per item). Non-tumor-related items, including brain atrophy, microangiopathy, vascular pathologies, and various extracranial pathologies, which were not mentioned in free-text reports between 18 and 85% per item. Mean reporting time for structured reporting was 7:49 min (3:12-17:06 min). First results showed that expert structured reporting ensured reliable detection of all relevant brain pathologies along with reproducible documentation of all predefined diagnostic items, which was not always the case for free text reporting. A mean reporting time of 8

  20. Intracranial pressure changes during mouse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazen, Mehran; Alazmani, Ali; Rafferty, Katherine; Liu, Zi-Jun; Gustafson, Jennifer; Cunningham, Michael L; Fagan, Michael J; Herring, Susan W

    2016-01-04

    During early stages of postnatal development, pressure from the growing brain as well as cerebrospinal fluid, i.e. intracranial pressure (ICP), load the calvarial bones. It is likely that such loading contributes to the peripheral bone formation at the sutural edges of calvarial bones, especially shortly after birth when the brain is growing rapidly. The aim of this study was to quantify ICP during mouse development. A custom pressure monitoring system was developed and calibrated. It was then used to measure ICP in a total of seventy three wild type mice at postnatal (P) day 3, 10, 20, 31 and 70. Retrospectively, the sample in each age group with the closest ICP to the average value was scanned using micro-computed tomography to estimate cranial growth. ICP increased from 1.33±0.87mmHg at P3 to 1.92±0.78mmHg at P10 and 3.60±1.08mmHg at P20. In older animals, ICP plateaued at about 4mmHg. There were statistically significant differences between the ICP at the P3 vs. P20, and P10 vs. P20. In the samples that were scanned, intracranial volume and skull length followed a similar pattern of increase up to P20 and then plateaued at older ages. These data are consistent with the possibility of ICP being a contributing factor to bone formation at the sutures during early stages of development. The data can be further used for development and validation of computational models of skull growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.